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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh acid rain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

NH Acid Rain Control Act (New Hampshire)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Act is implemented under New Hampshire's acid deposition control program established under the Rules to Control Air Pollution in Chapter Env-A 400. The goal of the Act is to reduce emissions...

2

Chlorophyll and acid rain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chlorophyll and acid rain Chlorophyll and acid rain Name: beachbum Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: A while ago I read an article that stated that after a plant received acid rain, there seemed to be less of chlorophyll a and b in the plant. I was wondering where does the chlorophyll go and what is the actual process (cell structure affected?). Replies: I think that less chlorophyll being present would be more likely a result of less being produced. Plant cell constantly turn over cell material, it will also constantly produce more. So if one compares a plant not exposed to acid rain (presumably producing a normal amount of chlorophyll and the exposed plant then one sees that the exposed plant has less chlorophyll than the unexposed plant. I do not think I can answer the rest of your question.

3

(Acid rain workshop)  

SciTech Connect

The traveler presented a paper entitled Susceptibility of Asian Ecosystems to Soil-Mediated Acid Rain Damage'' at the Second Workshop on Acid Rain in Asia. The workshop was organized by the Asian Institute of Technology (Bangkok, Thailand), Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne, Illinois), and Resource Management Associates (Madison, Wisconsin) and was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the United Nations Environment Program, the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, and the World Bank. Papers presented on the first day discussed how the experience gained with acid rain in North America and Europe might be applied to the Asian situation. Papers describing energy use projections, sulfur emissions, and effects of acid rain in several Asian countries were presented on the second day. The remaining time was allotted to discussion, planning, and writing plans for a future research program.

Turner, R.S.

1990-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

4

Controlling acid rain : policy issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The policy and regulatory ramifications of U.S. acid rain control programs are examined; particularly, the alternative of a receptor-oriented strategy as constrasted to emission-oriented proposals (e.g., the Mitchell bill) ...

Fay, James A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Controlling acid rain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn the northeastern USA are caused by the large scale combustion of fossil fuels within this region. Average precipitation acidity is pH 4.2, but spatial and temporal ...

Fay, James A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

The Hunter Region (Australia) Acid Rain Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field measurements for the Hunter Region Acid Rain Project were conducted as a major co-operative effort by the New South Wales State Pollution Control Commission, the Electricity Commission of New South Wales, and the University of Newcastle in ...

Howard A. Bridgman; Robert Rothwell; Christopher Pang Way; Peng-Hing Tio

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

A ACID RAIN Audrey Gibson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acid and nitric acid. Sunlight increases the rate of most of these reactions. Electric utility plants;Gas Natural Sources Concentration Carbon dioxide CO2 Decomposition 355 ppm Nitric oxide NO Electric, 2010 #12;Gas Non-Natural Sources Concentration Nitric oxide NO Internal Combustion (cars) 0.2 ppm

Toohey, Darin W.

8

A Study of the Mechanisms of Acid Rain Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Samples of rain, snow, cloud water, aerosols and soil were collected in Colorado to study the mechanisms of acid rain formation. Chemical compositions of various types of samples were analyzed to investigate the stepwise incorporation of ...

Farn Parungo; Clarence Nagamoto; Robin Maddl

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

The greenhouse effect and acid rain  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane, sulfur dioxide, nitrous oxides and chlorofluorocarbons is increasing in the earth's atmosphere. Increased concentrations of these trace gases could lead to global warming, increased acid rain and increased UV radiation on the earth's surface; however, the actual impacts are still uncertain and are also the subject of great debate. Application of clean'' energy sources such as geothermal are obviously desirable for decreasing these effects and improving our overall general environment. This paper briefly summarizes the global environment concerns, providing a backdrop for the following papers which describe the geothermal role in future environmental considerations. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Traeger, R.K.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

The greenhouse effect and acid rain  

SciTech Connect

The concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane, sulfur dioxide, nitrous oxides and chlorofluorocarbons is increasing in the earth's atmosphere. Increased concentrations of these trace gases could lead to global warming, increased acid rain and increased UV radiation on the earth's surface; however, the actual impacts are still uncertain and are also the subject of great debate. Application of clean'' energy sources such as geothermal are obviously desirable for decreasing these effects and improving our overall general environment. This paper briefly summarizes the global environment concerns, providing a backdrop for the following papers which describe the geothermal role in future environmental considerations. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Traeger, R.K.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Acid rain: discerning the change in waters and woodlands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research being done to establish the effects of acid rain on the earth's waters and woods is presented. It is pointed out that definitive answers cannot be possible because of the lack of scientifically credible, consistent, long-term data on trends. Various specific programs now under way to collect adequate data are highlighted. Researchers are not yet able to predict an area's susceptibility to acidic rain damage, but are more confident that acid rain is only a minimal threat to the earth's water and soil ecosystems. 13 figures.

Lihach, N.; Brocksen, R.; Goldstein, R.; Huckabee, J.; Kawaratani, R.; Mattice, J.; Murarka, I.; Perhac, R.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

An Overview of Acid Rain Monitoring Activities in North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The various forms of acidic components that may be deposited from the atmosphere are reviewed. These components are classified into three categories: wet deposition (rain and snow), dry deposition (particles and gases), and special events (dews, ...

Joe Wisniewski; John D. Kinsman

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Allowance trading activity and state regulatory rulings : evidence from the U.S. Acid Rain Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Acid Rain Program is one of the first, and by far the most extensive, applications of a market based approach to pollution control. From the beginning, there has been concern whether utilities would participate ...

Bailey, Elizabeth M.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Allowance trading activity and state regulatory rulings : evidence from the U.S. Acid Rain Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Acid Rain Program is one of the first, and by far the most extensive, applications of a market based approach to pollution control. From the beginning, there has been concern whether utilities would participate ...

Bailey, Elizabeth M.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Macroeconomic impacts of clean coal technologies and acid rain legislation: A comparative analysis  

SciTech Connect

In 1987, the National Association of Manufacturers published a study documenting the negative macroeconomic impacts that could occur if proposed acid rain legislation were passed (NAM 1987). These negative impacts would result from the substantially higher electricity rates that would be needed to finance conventional pollution-control retrofits. The US Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (DOE/FE) wanted to evaluate the macroeconomic impacts of nonregulatory approaches to reduce the emissions of acid rain precursors. DOE/FE therefore directed Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to determine the potential for clean coal technologies (CCTs) to satisfy future electric load growth and achieve greater long-term reductions in emissions at a lower cost than could be achieved through a legislative mandate. This study documents the macroeconomic impacts of CCT deployment without acid rain legislation and compares these results with the corresponding impacts of using conventional technologies and meeting mandatory emission reductions. The Argonne Utility Simulation (ARGUS) model was used to determine the least-cost solution and incremental levelized system costs* over the period 1995-2030 for three scenarios: (1) a baseline scenario, in which no acid rain controls are mandated and no CCTs are deployed; (2) an acid rain (AR) scenario, in which legislation (S. 1894, 100th Congress) is mandated but no CCTs are deployed; and (3) a CCT scenario, in which maximum CCT deployment (specifically, integrated gasification combined-cycle or IGCC technology in repowering and new or greenfield'' applications) occurs but no acid rain legislation is mandated. The Data Resources Inc. (DRI) annual macroeconomic model (which was extended from 2010 to 2030) was used to compute the macroeconomic impacts of the AR and CCT scenarios. 2 refs., 28 figs.

Edwards, B.K.; South, D.W.; Veselka, T.D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.); Gault, N.J. (DRI/McGraw-Hill Energy Service, Lexington, MA (USA))

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Electric Utility Phase I Acid Rain Compliance Strategies for the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Acid Rain Program is divided into two time periods; Phase I, from 1995 through 1999, and Phase II, starting in 2000. Phase I mostly affects power plants that are the largest sources of SO2 and NOx . Phase II affects virtually all electric power producers, including utilities and nonutilities. This report is a study of the effects of compliance with Phase I regulations on the costs and operations of electric utilities, but does not address any Phase II impacts.

Information Center

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Voluntary compliance with market-based environment poliy [sic] : evidence from the U.S. acid rain program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. acid rain program, Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, is a pioneering experience in environmental regulation by setting a market for electric utility emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and by including ...

Montero, Juan Pablo

18

The U.S. Acid rain program: Key insights from the design, operation, and assessment of a Cap-and-Trade program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors' 15 years of experience with the Acid Rain Program suggests that for regional or larger-scale air pollution problems, such as acid rain and pollution transport, a well-designed cap-and-trade program can be cost-effective, flexible, and easy to implement with clear benefits that can be sustained into the future. (author)

Napolitano, Sam; Schreifels, Jeremy; Stevens, Gabrielle; Witt, Maggie; LaCount, Melanie; Forte, Reynaldo; Smith, Kenon

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

19

ARM - Instrument - rain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govInstrumentsrain govInstrumentsrain Documentation RAIN : Handbook RAIN : Instrument Mentor Monthly Summary (IMMS) reports RAIN : Data Quality Assessment (DQA) reports ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Instrument : Rain Gauge (RAIN) Beneficiary of Recovery Act funding. Instrument Categories Surface Meteorology General Overview The tipping bucket rain gauge was located next to the disdrometer. It was replaced with a weighing bucket rain gauge in FY2010. Please contact the instrument mentor, if you have any questions. Output Datastreams rain : Rain gauge Primary Measurements The following measurements are those considered scientifically relevant. Precipitation Locations Eastern North Atlantic

20

Chemical alteration of limestone and marble samples exposed to acid rain and weathering in the eastern United States, 1984--1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a long-term program that began in 1984, limestone and marble briquettes have been exposed to both anthropogenic acid deposition and natural weathering of four field sites in the eastern United States. Similar tests began at an Ohio site in 1986. Effects of exposure on the briquettes and other materials at the sites are evaluated periodically by several federal agencies cooperating in the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). A primary contribution of Argonne National Laboratory to the NAPAP has been chemical analysis to determine changes in the samples caused by exposure to the environment. Wet chemical analysis was used to detect sulfates, nitrates, fluorides, chlorides, and a series of metal cations in sequential layers of stone removed from the briquettes after field exposure. Results from the first four years of the program indicate that rinsing by rain keeps skyward-facing stone relatively clean of reaction products, especially sulfate, the most abundant product. On groundward-facing samples, sulfate concentrations increased linearly with exposure time, and values were proportional to atmospheric SO{sub 2} concentrations at the site. Sulfate concentrations in groundward samples were much higher in limestone than in marble, because of the greater porosity of the limestone. A steep sulfate gradient was seen in both sample types from the surface to the interior. On skyward surfaces, material losses per rain event due to complete dissolution of accumulated sulfates were approximately equal to concentrations measured in runoff. Preexposed limestone samples had sulfate accumulations deep in their interiors, while fresh, unexposed limestone did not. No substantial changes in cation accumulations wee detected in either limestone or marble.

Reimann, K.J.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh acid rain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

ARM - Datastreams - rain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamsrain Datastreamsrain Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1025264 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : RAIN Rain gauge Active Dates 2006.03.01 - 2014.01.09 Measurement Categories Atmospheric State Originating Instrument Rain Gauge (RAIN) Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Altitude above mean sea level m alt Base time in Epoch seconds since 1970-1-1 0:00:00 0:00 base_time Record with error unitless error_latch ( time ) Frequency average, sensor 1 Hz frequency1 ( time ) Frequency average, sensor 2 Hz frequency2 ( time )

22

Rain sampling device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

1991-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

23

In Search of the Rain Forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: In Search of the Rain Forest By Candace Slater (Candace Slater (Ed. ). In Search of the Rain Forest. Durham:

Hamilton-Smith, Elery

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Singin' in the Rain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Singin' in Singin' in the Rain News Featured Articles 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 11.25.13 Singin' in the Rain Ultra water-repellent material developed at Brookhaven Lab may lead to many warming applications. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Brookhaven Lab physicist Antonio Checco. Photo courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory When it comes to designing extremely water-repellent surfaces, shape and size matter. That's the finding of a group of scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory, who investigated the

25

Optical Rain Gauge and Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge Comparisons  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rain Gauge and Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge Comparisons Rain Gauge and Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge Comparisons at the ARM Climate Research Facility TWP Sites Michael T. Ritsche 1 , Donna J. Holdridge 1 , Amanda Deieso 2 , Amy Kanta 2 , and Jenni Prell 2 1 Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 2 Department of Geography, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 1. Introduction Measurement of rainfall and precipitation is a difficult task even in the best of circumstances. Different types of gauges are used depending on the type of precipitation expected (solid or liquid) and the rate at which it falls. The ARM Program uses two types of precipitation sensors in its surface meteorological systems: the optical rain gauge (ORG) and the tipping bucket rain gauge (TBRG). The ORG was originally

26

Biases of Rain Retrieval Algorithms for Spaceborne Radar Caused by Nonuniformity of Rain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The biases of various rain retrieval algorithms for a spaceborne rain radar due to nonuniformity of rain are studied using simple models and an actual time sequence of rainfall rate. A conventional rain retrieval algorithm in which measured radar ...

Kenji Nakamura

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

A numerical and experimental study of in-situ NO formation in laminar NH3-seeded syngas diffusion flames.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Oxides of nitrogen formed during combustion are significant threats to our environment. They result in the formation of “acid rain”, smog, and depletion of… (more)

Li, Miao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

A numerical and experimental study of in-situ NO formation in laminar NH3-seeded syngas diffusion flames.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Oxides of nitrogen formed during combustion are significant threats to our environment. They result in the formation of "acid rain", smog, and depletion of the… (more)

Li, Miao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

A Probability Distribution Model for Rain Rate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A systematic approach is suggested for modeling the probability distribution of rain rate. Rain rate, conditional on rain and averaged over a region, is modeled as a temporally homogeneous diffusion process with appropriate boundary conditions. ...

Benjamin Kedem; Harry Pavlopoulos; Xiaodong Guan; David A. Short

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Warm Rain Study in Hawaii—Rain Initiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than 300 hours of aircraft flights were conducted in Hawaii from 1977 to 1979 to study precipitation mechanisms in warm rain. Airborne instruments were used to measure drop size distributions over the size range from cloud droplets to ...

Tsutomu Takahashi

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Category:Concord, NH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Go Back to PV Economics By Location Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Concord, NH" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 74 KB SVHospital Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVHospital Concord NH ... 75 KB SVLargeHotel Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVLargeHotel Concord N... 74 KB SVLargeOffice Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVLargeOffice Concord ... 76 KB SVMediumOffice Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVMediumOffice Concord... 74 KB SVMidriseApartment Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVMidriseApartment Con... 71 KB SVOutPatient Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVOutPatient Concord N... 72 KB SVPrimarySchool Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png

32

Estimating Rain Rates from Tipping-Bucket Rain Gauge Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the cubic spline–based operational system for the generation of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 1-min rain-rate product 2A-56 from tipping-bucket (TB) gauge measurements. A simulated TB gauge from a Joss–...

Jianxin Wang; Brad L. Fisher; David B. Wolff

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

A Piezoelectrical Rain Gauge for Application on Buoys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rain gauge systems are required to measure rainfall data on buoys at oceanic sites that are not suited for conventional rain sensors. A piezoelectrical rain gauge has been developed for use on buoys, to provide rain measurements just above the ...

Jörg Förster; Giselher Gust; Siegfried Stolte

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Interactions between Rain and Wind Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of rain on surface waves have been investigated in a circulating wind-wave tank. Surface displacement and slope spectra under different wind velocities were measured near the upwind and downwind edges of a region with simulated rains. ...

Ying-Keung Poon; Shih Tang; Jin Wu

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Rain Rate Estimates from Differential Polarization Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an analysis of the accuracy of rain rate estimates from data observed with a radar that has alternating horizontal and vertical polarization. Theoretical accuracies of rain rates from the reflectivity, the differential ...

M. Sachidananda; D. S. Zrni?

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

NEWTON: Why Does It Rain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Why Does It Rain? Why Does It Rain? Name: Drama Status: student Grade: K-3 Location: FL Country: USA Date: Fall 2011 Question: Why does it rain? Replies: Drama, When water is heated it evaporates into the air. You cannot see the water in the air, but sometimes you can feel it (especially when it is hot outside). Have you ever noticed that on some warm days it is really humid (sticky and sweaty) and other warm days it feels dry? You might have also noticed that in the morning, when the air is cool, you might find dew or mist on the leaves and grass. This occurs because cold air cannot hold much of moisture. There is a limit to the amount of water that air can hold. This limit is known as the saturation limit (or dew point). When the air is completely saturated and cannot hold any more water, then it comes down as rain (and leaves all that heat in the air).

37

NH NH NH NH  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Grand Station Foyer Continental Breakfast - Grand Station iii PoSt-CoMbuStion MeMbrane-baS Moderator - Jos Figueroa, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Techno tueSday,...

38

Updated 6/10 Volunteer NH!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plant a garden 5 Hitchcock Hall Durham, NH 03824 Marianne Fortescue, Coordinator 603-862-2197 marianne.fortescue

Pohl, Karsten

39

Advanced Rain/No-Rain Classification Methods for Microwave Radiometer Observations over Land  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seto et al. developed rain/no-rain classification (RNC) methods over land for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI). In this study, the methods are modified for application to other microwave radiometers. The ...

Shinta Seto; Takuji Kubota; Nobuhiro Takahashi; Toshio Iguchi; Taikan Oki

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Evidence for an Oscillatory Rain Rate in a Midwestern Winter Rain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rain rate during light precipitation in winter was measured with high temporal resolution optical systems at a site in Illinois. In addition to quasi-periodic variations, a clearly sinusoidal oscillation in rain rate was found imbedded in the ...

R. B. Fritz; R. J. Hill; J. T. Priestley; W. P. Schoenfeld

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh acid rain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The Relation between the Area-Average Rain Rate and the Rain Cell Size Distribution Parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review of the literature on the rain cell diameter distribution (RCDD) is first presented. It shows that RCDD, for a given rain-rate threshold ?, is accurately described by an exponential distribution with an exponential parameter ? weakly ...

Henri Sauvageot; Frédéric Mesnard; Ricardo S. Tenório

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Characteristics of Rain Integral Parameters during Tropical Convective, Transition, and Stratiform Rain at Gadanki and Its Application in Rain Retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present study the characteristics of rain integral parameters during tropical convective (C), transition (T), and stratiform (S) types of rain are studied with the help of Joss–Waldvogel disdrometer (JWD), L-band, and very-high-frequency ...

Sanjay Sharma; Mahen Konwar; Diganta Kumar Sarma; M. C. R. Kalapureddy; A. R. Jain

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Sources of Data on Freezing Rain and Resulting Damages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Freezing rain produces major damages each year in the United States, and various affected groups continue to seek data on the incidence and losses produced by freezing rain. The various kinds of data available about freezing rain and related ...

Stanley A. Changnon; Tamara G. Creech

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Urban Modification of Freezing-Rain Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new national database for freezing-rain occurrences during the 1945–2000 period provided an opportunity for a study of the potential urban effects on freezing-rain events. Numerous past studies of snowfall events in urban areas have defined ...

Stanley A. Changnon

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

SAR Imagery: Rain Forests, South America  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Images of Rain Forests in South America Images of Rain Forests in South America The ORNL DAAC now offers a CD-ROM volume containing Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery of the rain forest region of South America, including the Amazon Basin. The images were collected during 1995-1996 as part of an international project led by the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) to map the world's rain forest regions to high resolution by means of SAR. The 4-disc volume--entitled "JERS-1 SAR Global Rain Forest Mapping Project: Vol. AM-1, South America"--is made available under the auspices of the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). These CDs can be ordered through the ORNL DAAC at http://daac.ornl.gov/prepaks.shtml (look for the "LBA" listings).

46

Formalism for Comparing Rain Estimation Designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Space-time averages of rain rates are needed in several applications. Nevertheless, they are difficult to estimate because the methods invariably leave gaps in the measurements in space or time. A formalism is developed which makes use of the ...

Gerald R. North; Shoichiro Nakamoto

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Freezing Rain: An Observational and Theoretical Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from a Doppler radar, an instrumented aircraft, and several rawinsonde observations during freezing rain and ice pellet events have been analyzed for this study. From these data, 34 soundings were obtained that characterized the vertical ...

Ryan J. Zerr

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Temporal Sampling Requirements for Automatic Rain Gauges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Automatic rain gauges are needed to obtain rainfall statistics from remote locations and platforms. Many of these platforms cannot be serviced regularly, thus requiring unattended operations for many months. At such locations there is often a ...

Jeffrey A. Nystuen

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- R Brew Co - NH 01  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R Brew Co - NH 01 R Brew Co - NH 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: R. BREW CO. (NH.01 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Concord , New Hampshire NH.01-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 NH.01-2 Site Operations: Conducted vacuum furnace tests using uranium and copper billets. NH.01-1 NH.01-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote NH.01-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium NH.01-1 NH.01-3 Radiological Survey(s): Yes - radiological monitoring during operations NH.01-3 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to R. BREW CO. NH.01-1 - Memorandum/Checklist; Landis to File; Subject: R. Brew

50

RADIOACTIVITY IN RAIN WATER IN BANGKOK  

SciTech Connect

In order to check the effect of nuclear explosions on the atmosphere over Bangkok, rain water was evaporated and the radioactivity of the residue obtained was counted by a G. M. counter. The result shows that the radioactivity in the rain water began to rise from the normal level since 26 September 1961, reached the maximum on 10 November 1961, and then slowly declined. Because the level of radiation remained above that of the Maximum Permissible Concentration (MPC) for only a short time, it did not constitute a health hazard. Analysis of the residue of rain water indicates that the increase in radiation is caused by the fall-out from the Russian tests of nuclear weapons in the air from September to October 1961. (auth)

Sundara-vicharana, Y.; Bhodigen, S.; Hayodom, V.

1961-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Rain initiation time in turbulent warm clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a mean-field model that describes droplet growth due to condensation and collisions and droplet loss due to fallout. The model allows for an effective numerical simulation. We study how the rain initiation time depends on different parameters. We also present a simple model that allows one to estimate the rain initiation time for turbulent clouds with an inhomogeneous concentration of cloud condensation nuclei. In particular, we show that over-seeding even a part of a cloud by small hygroscopic nuclei one can substantially delay the onset of precipitation.

Falkovich, G; Vucelja, M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Rain initiation time in turbulent warm clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a mean-field model that describes droplet growth due to condensation and collisions and droplet loss due to fallout. The model allows for an effective numerical simulation. We study how the rain initiation time depends on different parameters. We also present a simple model that allows one to estimate the rain initiation time for turbulent clouds with an inhomogeneous concentration of cloud condensation nuclei. In particular, we show that over-seeding even a part of a cloud by small hygroscopic nuclei one can substantially delay the onset of precipitation.

G. Falkovich; M. G. Stepanov; M. Vucelja

2004-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

53

The Rain Profiling Algorithm Applied to Polarimetric Weather Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The algorithm developed in this paper for ground-based polarimetric radars is derived from those used for the spaceborne rain radar of TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission)—the so-called rain profiling algorithms. The characteristic of ...

Jacques Testud; Erwan Le Bouar; Estelle Obligis; Mustapha Ali-Mehenni

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Principal Modes of Variation of Rain-Rate Probability Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radar or satellite observations of an area generate sequences of rain-rate maps. From a gridded map a histogram of rain rates can be obtained representing the relative areas occupied by rain rates of various strengths. The histograms vary with ...

Thomas L. Bell; R. Suhasini

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

ARMAR: An Airborne Rain-Mapping Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new airborne rain-mapping radar (ARMAR) has been developed by NASA and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for operation on the NASA Ames DC-8 aircraft. The radar operates at 13.8 GHz, the frequency to be used by the radar on the Tropical Rainfall ...

S. L. Durden; E. Im; F. K. Li; W. Ricketts; A. Tanner; W. Wilson

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Estimation of Mean Rain Rate through Censoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mixed lognormal distribution is fit to rain-rate data to estimate the space–time average. To mitigate problems associated with biased data, data below a minimum and above a maximum threshold are treated as if they are at the respective ...

Donald Martin

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Determination of Oceanic Rain Rate and Rain Cell Structure from Altimeter Waveform Data. Part I: Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The predominant effect of rain on altimeter data is through the attenuation it causes of radar pulses propagating through it. Both the ERS-1 and TOPEX/Poseidon have recorded sharp decreases in the observed backscatter ?0, which have been ...

Graham D. Quartly

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

A Probabilistic View on the Rain Drop Size Distribution Modeling: a Physical Interpretation of Rain Microphysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Rain Drop Size Distribution (RDSD) is defined as the relative frequency of raindrops per given diameter in a volume. This paper describes a mathematically-consistent modeling of the RDSD drawing on probability theory. It is shown that this ...

Francisco J. Tapiador; Ziad S. Haddad; Joe Turk

59

NH House Committee_April27 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury Control Mercury Control Technology R&D Program for Coal-Fired Boilers Working Session of the New Hampshire House Science, Technology, & Energy Committee April 26, 2005 Concord, New Hampshire Thomas J. Feeley, III thomas.feeley@netl.doe.gov National Energy Technology Laboratory NH House Committee_April 2005 Mercury Control Technology Field Testing Program Performance/Cost Objectives * Have technologies ready for commercial demonstration by 2007 for all coals * Reduce "uncontrolled" Hg emissions by 50-70% * Reduce cost by 25-50% compared to baseline cost estimates Baseline Costs: $50,000 - $70,000 / lb Hg Removed 2000 Year Cost NH House Committee_April 2005 Stages of Mercury Control Technology Development DOE RD&D Model Lab/Bench/Pilot-Scale Testing Field Testing

60

Evaluation and performance prediction of cooling tower rain zones.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cooling tower rain zone performance characteristics such as the loss coefficient and the Merkel number are evaluated and simulated. To this end the influence of… (more)

Pierce, Darren John

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh acid rain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Microsoft PowerPoint - 16.0855_Raines Draft Rev 4 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0855Raines Draft Rev 4 Microsoft PowerPoint - 16.0855Raines Draft Rev 4 Microsoft PowerPoint - 16.0855Raines Draft Rev 4 More Documents & Publications Earned Value (EV) Analysis...

62

Comparison of Rain Rates over the Ocean Derived from TRMM Microwave Imager and Precipitation Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface rain rates over the ocean derived from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) and precipitation radar (PR) are compared and systematic differences between TMI-derived rain rates and PR-derived rain rates are ...

Junji Ikai; Kenji Nakamura

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

acid  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Acid/Pueblo Canyon, New Mexico, Site is Acid/Pueblo Canyon, New Mexico, Site is located near the town of Los Alamos, New Mexico, approximately 25 miles northwest of Santa Fe and 60 miles north-northeast of Albuquerque. The site is accessible from Canyon Road, which runs just south of the former waste treatment plant. The plant was situated on a mesa that forms the south rim of Acid Canyon. Acid Canyon is a small tributary near the head

64

Rain Attenuation Prediction Model for Lagos at Millimeter Wave Bands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rain Attenuation Prediction Model for Lagos at Millimeter Wave bands” is the subject of this work. Lagos (geog. Lat. 6.350N and Long. 3.20E), is a coastal station in the rain forest area in the South-Western Nigeria with an altitude of 380 ...

Abayomi Isiaka Yussuff; Nor Hisham Haji Khamis

65

Front Doors, Back Doors, and Trapdoors to Acid Rain Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Fossil-Fuel-Fired Steam Generators, 40 C.F.R. § 60.43a (for Fossil-Fuel-Fired Steam Generators, 40 C.F.R. § 60.43 (

Manor, C. Robert

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Incentive mechanisms as a strategic option for acid rain compliance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 (P.L. 101--549) establishes the use of flexible emission compliance strategies for electric utilities to reduce the emissions of add precursors (SO{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}). To control SO{sub 2} emissions, tradeable emission allowances will be used; NO{sub 2} emissions will be controlled by an emission standard, but a utility is permitted to average NO{sub 2} emissions systemwide to meet the standard. Both of these policies promote flexibility and cost savings for the utility while achieving the prescribed emission reduction goals of P.L. 101--549. The use of SO{sub 2} emission allowances has two notable benefits: A utility has the choice of a wide range of compliance methods allowing it to minimize compliance costs and second; the use of transferable emission allowances promote technological innovation with respect to emissions reduction/control. This report discusses the use of regulatory incentives towards the achievement of a Title IV goal of cost reduction of SO{sub 2} emissions.

South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A.; McDermott, K.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

67

Incentive mechanisms as a strategic option for acid rain compliance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 (P.L. 101--549) establishes the use of flexible emission compliance strategies for electric utilities to reduce the emissions of add precursors (SO[sub 2], NO[sub 2]). To control SO[sub 2] emissions, tradeable emission allowances will be used; NO[sub 2] emissions will be controlled by an emission standard, but a utility is permitted to average NO[sub 2] emissions systemwide to meet the standard. Both of these policies promote flexibility and cost savings for the utility while achieving the prescribed emission reduction goals of P.L. 101--549. The use of SO[sub 2] emission allowances has two notable benefits: A utility has the choice of a wide range of compliance methods allowing it to minimize compliance costs and second; the use of transferable emission allowances promote technological innovation with respect to emissions reduction/control. This report discusses the use of regulatory incentives towards the achievement of a Title IV goal of cost reduction of SO[sub 2] emissions.

South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A.; McDermott, K.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

On nuclear scars, renewables, and an acid rain model  

SciTech Connect

The author argues that the extreme precautions observed at a nuclear power plant and throughout the nuclear industry create an interesting conflict in imagery. First, the safety measures far exceed the normal acceptable lengths taken to protect workers and the public at large in any other circumstance. Second, those very extremes in precaution contribute to public fear. Naturally, anti-nuclear radicals use this to great advantage by constantly trying to force more extreme measures on the industry. According to the author it happens even though some of these groups seem to realize that fighting the most environmentally benign source of power makes no sense.

Rittenhouse, R.C

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

,"Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","172014" ,"Next...

70

acid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acid/Pueblo Canyon, New Mexico, Site. Acid/Pueblo Canyon, New Mexico, Site. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Site Description and History The Acid/Pueblo Canyon, New Mexico, Site is located near the town of Los Alamos, New Mexico, approximately 25 miles northwest of Santa Fe and 60 miles north-northeast of Albuquerque. The site is accessible from Canyon Road, which runs just south

71

NH Clean Power Act (New Hampshire) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NH Clean Power Act (New Hampshire) NH Clean Power Act (New Hampshire) NH Clean Power Act (New Hampshire) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NH Department of Environmental Services The Act calls for annual reductions of multiple pollutants, including SO2, Nox, CO2, and mercury. The Act calls for an 87% reduction in SO2 emissions and a 70% reduction in Nox emissions from 1999 levels. CO2 emissions are to be reduced to 1990 levels by the end of 2006. Act is implemented under NH Rules Env-A 2900. This act applies specifically to three existing fossil

72

ARM - Field Campaign - Rain Microphysics Study with Disdrometer and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsRain Microphysics Study with Disdrometer and Polarization govCampaignsRain Microphysics Study with Disdrometer and Polarization Radar Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Rain Microphysics Study with Disdrometer and Polarization Radar 2005.04.28 - 2005.06.30 Lead Scientist : Guifu Zhang For data sets, see below. Description Understanding rain microphysics is important for accurate rainfall rate estimation and for improving parameterization in numerical weather prediction (NWP). The NCAR video disdrometer was installed at the ARM site at the Kessler farm. The disdrometer was also put side-by-side with the NSSL disdrometer for comparison/calibration and to study sampling effects. The disdrometer observations were used to verify KOUN polarimeteric radar

73

The Effects of Rain on Topex Radar Altimeter Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rain has long been categorized as a contaminant of altimeter data, but little has been done previously to ascertain the magnitude and frequency of its effect or its geographical distribution. Proceeding from recent analysis of ERS-1 data, and the ...

G. D. Quartly; T. H. Guymer; M. A. Srokosz

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Solar Decathlon: Rain and Shine | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Decathlon: Rain and Shine Solar Decathlon: Rain and Shine Solar Decathlon: Rain and Shine October 20, 2009 - 7:00am Addthis Drew Bittner Web Manager, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Friday marked the end of the Solar Decathlon competition. Team Germany won (for the second time) in a very competitive field, in a ceremony marked by gray skies, cold temperatures and rain. For all the bad weather, however, the mood in DC was very upbeat. This was the fourth Solar Decathlon, an event that has seen great strides since its launch in 2002. The mission of the event is to promote solar energy and energy efficiency in buildings, through innovative engineering and scholarly dedication. I would venture to say that this year might mark the event's greatest success, with TWO teams from Canada, as well as returning

75

Solar Decathlon: Rain and Shine | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Decathlon: Rain and Shine Solar Decathlon: Rain and Shine Solar Decathlon: Rain and Shine October 20, 2009 - 7:00am Addthis Drew Bittner Web Manager, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Friday marked the end of the Solar Decathlon competition. Team Germany won (for the second time) in a very competitive field, in a ceremony marked by gray skies, cold temperatures and rain. For all the bad weather, however, the mood in DC was very upbeat. This was the fourth Solar Decathlon, an event that has seen great strides since its launch in 2002. The mission of the event is to promote solar energy and energy efficiency in buildings, through innovative engineering and scholarly dedication. I would venture to say that this year might mark the event's greatest success, with TWO teams from Canada, as well as returning

76

Freezing Rain Simulations for Fixed, Unheated Conductor Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present paper reports on extensive experiments performed on short, fixed, unheated conductor samples in an outdoor freezing rain simulator. Their purpose is to relate the weight of ice (or, alternatively, the equivalent radial ice thickness) ...

M. L. Lu; N. Popplewell; A. H. Shah

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

ATLAS Self-Siphoning Rain Gauge Error Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes sampling and error characteristics of self-siphoning rain gauges used on moored buoys designed and assembled at NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) for deployment in the tropical Pacific and Atlantic Oceans ...

Yolande L. Serra; Patrick A'Hearn; H. Paul Freitag; Michael J. McPhaden

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

A Rain-Rate Retrieval Algorithm for Attenuated Radar Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dynamic regularization scheme for rain-rate retrievals from attenuated radar measurements is presented. Most regularization techniques, including the optimal estimation method, use the state-space parameters to regularize the problem, which ...

Prabhat K. Koner; Alessandro Battaglia; Clemens Simmer

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Comparison of Dual-Polarization Radar Estimators of Rain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several polarimetric radar estimators of rain rate R and rainwater content M are examined. The accuracy of the estimators is analyzed using a gamma drop size distribution (DSD) simulation and a radar wavelength of 11 cm. The estimators that use ...

A. V. Ryzhkov; D. S. Zrni?

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Rain in Shallow Cumulus Over the Ocean: The RICO Campaign  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shallow, maritime cumuli are ubiquitous over much of the tropical oceans, and characterizing their properties is important to understanding weather and climate. The Rain in Cumulus over the Ocean (RICO) field campaign, which took place during ...

Robert M. Rauber; Harry T. Ochs III; L. Di Girolamo; S. Göke; E. Snodgrass; Bjorn Stevens; Charles Knight; J. B. Jensen; D. H. Lenschow; R. A. Rilling; D. C. Rogers; J. L. Stith; B. A. Albrecht; P. Zuidema; A. M. Blyth; C. W. Fairall; W. A. Brewer; S. Tucker; S. G. Lasher-Trapp; O. L. Mayol-Bracero; G. Vali; B. Geerts; J. R. Anderson; B. A. Baker; R. P. Lawson; A. R. Bandy; D. C. Thornton; E. Burnet; J-L. Brenguier; L. Gomes; P. R. A. Brown; P. Chuang; W. R. Cotton; H. Gerber; B. G. Heikes; J. G. Hudson; P. Kollias; S. K. Krueger; L. Nuijens; D. W. O'Sullivan; A. P. Siebesma; C. H. Twohy

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh acid rain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The Effects of Rain on ERS-1 Radar Altimeter Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation into a potentially important, but little-studied effect on altimeter data—rain contamination—has been carried out using ERS-1. The method involves identifying large changes in the radar backscatter coefficient and relating these ...

Trevor H. Guymer; Graham D. Quartly; Meric A. Srokosz

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

A Climate Transect through Tropical Montane Rain Forest in Hawaii  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two years of climate data from a transect of three surface meteorological stations on the windward slopes of Mauna Loa, Hawaii, are analyzed. The stations constitute a transect between 700 and 1640 m through the wet, montane rain forest zone ...

James O. Juvik; Dennis Nullet

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

The Development of Drop Size Distributions in Light Rain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model of rain development based on the quasi-stochastic coalescence equation and including the sedimentation of drops has been used to study the formation of drop size distributions in conditions of weak updraft. Comparisons with “box model” ...

I. Zawadzki; E. Monteiro; F. Fabry

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Relative Performance of Automatic Rain Gauges under Different Rainfall Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Six different types of automatic rain gauges, including tipping bucket, weighing, capacitance, optical, disdrometer, and acoustical sensors, were deployed for 17 months (September 1993–January 1995) at the NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and ...

Jeffrey A. Nystuen

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Variability of Space–Time Mean Rain Rate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mixed lognormal distribution is fit to rain-rate data for the purpose of estimating the space–time mean. Using Fisher information, the large sample variance is obtained for grouped and ungrouped data estimates. The asymptotic variance results ...

B. Kedem; R. Pfeiffer; D. A. Short

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Estimating Rainfall in the Tropics Using the Fractional Time Raining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relationship between the fractional time raining and tropical rainfall amount is investigated using raingage data and a point process model of tropical rainfall. Both the strength and the nature of the relationship are dependent upon the ...

Mark L. Morrissey; Witold F. Krajewski; Michael J. McPhaden

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Estimating the Uncertainty in Passive-Microwave Rain Retrievals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current passive-microwave rain-retrieval methods are largely based on databases built offline using cloud models. Since the vertical distribution of hydrometeors within the cloud has a large impact on upwelling brightness temperatures, a forward ...

Dorothée Coppens; Ziad S. Haddad; Eastwood Im

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Test of the Specific Differential Propagation Phase Shift (KDP) Technique for Rain-Rate Estimation with a Ku-Band Rain Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The variation in drop size distribution (DSD) and the attenuation at higher frequencies are the two major impairments for quantitative rain-rate estimation. The sensitivity of rain-rate estimators (such as reflectivity factor Z, differential ...

K. Isiah Timothy; Toshio Iguchi; Yuji Ohsaki; Hiroaki Horie; Hiroshi Hanado; Hiroshi Kumagai

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Understanding the Importance of Microphysics and Macrophysics for Warm Rain in Marine Low Clouds. Part II: Heuristic Models of Rain Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two simple heuristic model formulations for warm rain formation are introduced and their behavior explored. The first, which is primarily aimed at representing warm rain formation in shallow convective clouds, is a continuous collection model ...

Robert Wood; Terence L. Kubar; Dennis L. Hartmann

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Relation between hydrogen isotopic ratios of bone collagen and rain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydrogen isotopic value ([delta]D) of deer bone collagen is related to both [delta]D of rain during the growing season and growing season relative humidity (RH). With correction for the effects of RH, bone [delta]D is related to growing season rain [delta]D in a simple manner with a slope of 1.0. This indicates that, with RH correction, there are no additional sources of bias in the [delta]D of bone due to unaccounted for biologic or climatic effects. Due to a low sensitivity of bone [delta]D to RH effects, both yearly and growing season rain [delta]D can be estimated with considerable accuracy (R = 0.97 and R = 0.96) from bone collagen [delta]D and [delta][sup 15]N. Here, [delta][sup 15]N is used to correct bone [delta]D for the effects of RH. From these estimates of rain [delta]D, it may then be possible to evaluate temperature since the [delta]D of rain primarily reflects local temperature. Therefore, the measurement of bone collagen [delta]D has good potential for evaluating paleoclimates.

Cormie, A.B.; Schwarcz, H.P. (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)); Gray, J. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

New biology of red rain extremophiles prove cometary panspermia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports the extraordinary biology of the microorganisms from the mysterious red rain of Kerala, India. These chemosynthetic organisms grow optimally at an extreme high temperature of 300 degrees C in hydrothermal conditions and can metabolize inorganic and organic compounds including hydrocarbons. Stages found in their life cycle show reproduction by a special multiple fission process and the red cells found in the red rain are identified as the resting spores of these microbes. While these extreme hyperthermophiles contain proteins, our study shows the absence of DNA in these organisms, indicating a new primitive domain of life with alternate thermostable genetics. This new biology proves our earlier hypothesis that these microbes are of extraterrestrial origin and also supports our earlier argument that the mysterious red rain of Kerala is due to the cometary delivery of the red spores into the stratosphere above Kerala.

Godfrey Louis; A. Santhosh Kumar

2003-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

92

Public Service Co of NH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NH NH (Redirected from PSNH) Jump to: navigation, search Name Public Service Co of NH Place New Hampshire Service Territory New Hampshire Website www.psnh.com Green Button Landing Page www.psnh.com/SaveEnergyMo Green Button Reference Page www.psnh.com/SaveEnergyMo Green Button Implemented Yes Utility Id 15472 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO NE Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections

93

On a New Approach for Instantaneous Rain Area Delineation in the Midlatitudes Using GOES Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using satellite and weather radar data, a simple clustering analysis has been used in order to differentiate between raining and nonraining clouds. Based on these results, a scheme is proposed for instantaneous rain area delineation in the ...

A. A. Tsonis; G. A. Isaac

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Quantitative Measurements of Path-Integrated Rain Rate by an Airborne Microwave Radiometer over the Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data on the airborne microwave radiometer, which is one of the sensors of the airborne microwave rain-scatterometer/radiometer (AMRS) system, are analyzed to infer path-integrated rain rate measured from topside. The equation of radiative ...

Masaharu Fujita; Ken'ichi Okamoto; Harunobu Masuko; Takeyuki Ojima; Nobuyoshi Fugono

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Possible Misidentification of Rain Type by TRMM PR over Tibetan Plateau  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rain-type statistics derived from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) standard product show that some 70% of raining pixels in the central Tibetan Plateau summer are stratiform—a clear contradiction to the common ...

Yunfei Fu; Guosheng Liu

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Sensitivity of the Estimated Monthly Convective Rain Fraction to the Choice of Z–R Relation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the sensitivity of the estimated monthly convective rain fraction—that is, the percentage of the areal rain accumulation contributed by precipitation identified as convective—to variations of the Z–R parameters used in ...

Matthias Steiner; Robert A. Houze Jr.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Satellite Passive Microwave Rain Rate Measurement over Croplands during Spring, Summer and Fall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rain rate algorithms for spring, summer and fall that have been developed from comparisons between the brightness temperatures measured by the Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) and rain rates derived from operational WSR-...

Roy W. Spencer

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Comparisons of Instantaneous TRMM Ground Validation and Satellite Rain-Rate Estimates at Different Spatial Scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study provides a comprehensive intercomparison of instantaneous rain rates observed by the two rain sensors aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite with ground data from two regional sites established for long-term ...

David B. Wolff; Brad L. Fisher

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Comparison of Simulated Rain Rates from Disdrometer Data Employing Polarimetric Radar Algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disdrometer data collected during three spring days, with moderate to heavy rain in the Norman, Oklahoma region are used with various polarimetric radar algorithms to simulate rain rates. It is assumed that available measurables are 1) ...

N. Balakrishnan; Dúsan S. Zrni?; Julius Goldhirsh; John Rowland

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Incorporating Satellite Observations of “No Rain” in an Australian Daily Rainfall Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geostationary satellite observations can be used to distinguish potential rain-bearing clouds from nonraining areas, thereby providing surrogate observations of “no rain” over large areas. The advantages of including such observations are the ...

Elizabeth E. Ebert; Gary T. Weymouth

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh acid rain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Computer-Controlled Automated Rain Sampler (CCARS) for Rainfall Measurement and Sequential Sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Computer-Controlled Automated Rain Sampler (CCARS) is a combination rain gage and sequential sampler for precipitation chemistry measurements. The primary objectives of the design are low cost, versatility of operational mode, and remote ...

Stan D. Tomich; M. Terry Dana

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Estimation of Rain and Hail Rates in Mixed-Phase Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation comprising rain and hail is studied. Specifically, techniques to identify and quantify such precipitation in terms of rain and hail fall rates using dual polarized radar data, are presented. Included for consideration are ZH, the ...

N. Balakrishnan; D. S. Zrni?

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Observations of Precipitation Size and Fall Speed Characteristics within Coexisting Rain and Wet Snow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ground-based measurements of particle size and fall speed distributions using a Particle Size and Velocity (PARSIVEL) disdrometer are compared among samples obtained in mixed precipitation (rain and wet snow) and rain in the Oregon Cascade ...

Sandra E. Yuter; David E. Kingsmill; Louisa B. Nance; Martin Löffler-Mang

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Optimal Thresholds for the Estimation of Area Rain-Rate Moments by the Threshold Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimization of the threshold method, achieved by determination of the threshold that maximizes the correlation between an area-average rain-rate moment and the area coverage of rain rates exceeding the threshold, is demonstrated empirically and ...

David A. Short; Kunio Shimizu; Benjamin Kedem

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

A Synoptic Overview of a Heavy Rain Event in Southern China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The meteorological events surrounding the heavy rains of 23–25 June 1983 in the Yangtze River Valley of China are investigated. The rains developed along a persistent quasi-stationary frontal boundary that separated warm, moist tropical air from ...

Kai-Yu Ma; Lance F. Bosart

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

The Supercooled Warm Rain Process and the Specification of Freezing Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 30% of freezing precipitation cases are observed to occur in a subfreezing atmosphere (contrary to the classical melting ice model). We explain these cases with the concept of the “supercolled warm rain process” (SWRP): the warm rain ...

George J. Huffman; Gene Alfred Norman Jr.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Rain Gauge and Disdrometer Measurements during the Keys Area Microphysics Project (KAMP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four impact disdrometers and 27 tipping bucket rain gauges were operated at 11 different sites during August and September 2001, as part of the Keys Area Microphysics Project. The rain gauge and disdrometer network was designed to study the range ...

Ali Tokay; David B. Wolff; Katherine R. Wolff; Paul Bashor

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Forcing Versus Feedback: Epidemic Malaria and Monsoon Rains in Northwest India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forcing Versus Feedback: Epidemic Malaria and Monsoon Rains in Northwest India Karina Laneri1 the monsoonal rains. Consideration of a more complex model with clinical immunity demonstrates the robustness Feedback: Epidemic Malaria and Monsoon Rains in Northwest India. PLoS Comput Biol 6(9): e1000898. doi:10

Pascual, Mercedes

109

A Rain Gauge for the Measurement of Finescale Temporal Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A rain gauge is described that quantizes rainwater collected by a funnel into equal-sized drops. Using a funnel of 150-mm diameter, the quantization corresponds to 1/160 mm of rainfall, enabling the measurement of low rainfall rates and the ...

C. David Stow; Stuart G. Bradley; Keith E. Farrington; Kim N. Dirks; Warren R. Gray

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Apparatus for the Simulation of Rain in the Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulated rains are produced by directing a jet of water toward the periphery of an automobile tire that rotates opposite to the flow of water. The air and mechanical turbulence created by the rotating tire surface break the jet up into a spray ...

David R. Derenzo; Bernard Vonnegut

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Is Virga Rain That Evaporates before Reaching the Ground?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The visual phenomenon called virga, a sudden change in the brightness of a precipitation shaft below a cloud, is commonly attributed to evaporation of raindrops. It is said to be rain that does not reach the ground. The optical thickness of an ...

Alistair B. Fraser; Craig F. Bohren

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Polarimetric Attenuation Correction in Heavy Rain at C Band  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of C-band polarimetric radar to account for strong attenuation/differential attenuation is demonstrated in two cases of heavy rain that occurred in the Chicago, Illinois, metropolitan area on 5 August 2008 and in central Oklahoma on ...

Ji-Young Gu; A. Ryzhkov; P. Zhang; P. Neilley; M. Knight; B. Wolf; Dong-In Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

The Impacts of Different Satellite Data on Rain Estimation Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rain estimates for the Great Plains States were made for a one-month period, August 1979, using different combinations of satellite and other data. The data tested were as follows: 1) two satellite images per day without any other data, 2) four ...

Donald P. Wylie; Denise Laitsch

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

The Effect of Rain in Calming the Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of rain in damping surface waves appears to be significant in the estimation of wind speed from the backscatter of radar signal from the sea surface. The radar backscatter depends on the small-scale roughness of the sea surface. This ...

M. N. Tsimplis

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Drop shapes and fall speeds in rain: two contrasting examples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two rain events are analyzed using two collocated 2D-video disdrometers (2DVD) and a C band polarimetric radar at 15 km distance. Both events had moderate-to-intense rainfall rates, but the second event had an embedded convective line. For the ...

M. Thurai; V. N. Bringi; W. A. Petersen; P. N. Gatlin

116

Probing Hurricanes with Stable Isotopes of Rain and Water Vapor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rain and water vapor were collected during flights in Hurricanes Olivia (1994), Opal (1995), Marilyn (1995), and Hortense (1995) and analyzed for their stable isotopic concentrations, or ratios, H218O:H2O and HDO:H2O. The spatial patterns and ...

Stanley Gedzelman; James Lawrence; John Gamache; Michael Black; Edward Hindman; Robert Black; Jason Dunion; Hugh Willoughby; Xiaoping Zhang

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Computing a Probability Distribution for the Start of the Rains from a Markov Chain Model for Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The start of the rains is defined to be the first day, or two-day rain spell, in which greater than a specified total amount of rain occurs. A method of calculating the probability distribution of the start of the rains from a Markov chain model ...

R. D. Stern

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Public Service Co of NH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Public Service Co of NH Name Public Service Co of NH Place New Hampshire Service Territory New Hampshire Website www.psnh.com Green Button Landing Page www.psnh.com/SaveEnergyMo Green Button Reference Page www.psnh.com/SaveEnergyMo Green Button Implemented Yes Utility Id 15472 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO NE Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now!

119

Characterization of the selective reduction of NO by NH/sub 3/  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The selective reduction of NO by NH/sub 3/ addition has been studied in a lean-burning oil-fired laboratory combustion tunnel as a function of equivalence ratio, NH/sub 3/ injection temperature, concentration of NH/sub 3/ added, and the source of NO. Ammonia breakthrough was found to depend strongly on the NH/sub 3/ addition temperature. The total concentration of nitrogen containing species other N/sub 2/, NO, and NH/sub 3/ was measured with a variety of techniques and was found to be less than 5 ppM over the range of conditions studied.

Lucas, D.; Brown, N.J.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Results of Seeding for Dynamic Effects on Rain-Cell Properties in FACE-2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume scan radar studies incorporating the use of an elaborate method of defining and tracking convective rain cells through their lifetime have been used to

Abraham Gagin; Daniel Rosenfeld; William L. Woodley; Raul E. Lopez

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh acid rain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Revealing the Winds Under the Rain. Part I. Passive Microwave Rain Retrievals Using a New, Observations-Based, Parameterization of Sub-Satellite Rain Variability and Intensity: Algorithm Description.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scatterometer ocean surface winds have been providing very valuable information to researchers and operational weather forecasters for over ten years. However, the scatterometer wind retrievals are compromised when rain is present. Merely flagging ...

S. M. Hristova-Veleva; P. S. Callahan; R. S. Dunbar; B. W. Stiles; S. H. Yueh; J. N. Huddleston; S. V. Hsiao; G. Neumann; M. H. Freilich; B. A. Vanhoff; R. W. Gaston; E. Rodriguez; D. E. Weissman

122

Flux Measurements of Pulsating Rain with a Disdrometer and Doppler Radar during Phase II of the Joint Tropical Rain Experiment in Malaysia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the Joint Tropical Rain Experiment of the Malaysian Meteorological Service and the University of Toronto, pulsating raindrop ensembles, hereafter pulses, were observed in and around Penang Island. Using a Doppler radar on 25 October 1990, ...

Greg M. McFarquhar; Roland List; David R. Hudak; Robert P. Nissen; J. S. Dobbie; N. P. Tung; T. S. Kang

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Temporal and Spatial Variations of Freezing Rain in the Contiguous United States: 1948–2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new freezing-rain-days database was used to define the spatial and temporal distributions of freezing-rain days across the contiguous United States. The database contained 988 stations, spanning the period 1948–2000. Areas averaging one or more ...

Stanley A. Changnon; Thomas R. Karl

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Processes Influencing Rain-Field Growth and Decay after Tropical Cyclone Landfall in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study measured rain-field sizes for tropical cyclones (TCs) after U.S. landfall and related changes in size to the diurnal cycle and extratropical transition (ET). For 45 TC landfalls, the spatial properties of the rain fields were calculated ...

Corene J. Matyas

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Properties of the Threshold Method on a Radar Rain Cluster Basis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The average rain rate R is estimated with radar data at the radar beam height by measuring the fractional area F(?) of pixels above a preset rain-rate threshold ?. This work applies the “threshold method” to smaller areas. The threshold method ...

L. Li; S. Sénési

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Stratiform Rain in the Tropics as Seen by the TRMM Precipitation Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Across the Tropics (20°N–20°S), the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR) indicates that for reflectivities ?17 dBZ, stratiform precipitation accounts for 73% of the area covered by rain and 40% of the total rain ...

Courtney Schumacher; Robert A. Houze Jr.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Heavy Rain Events over the South-Facing Slopes of Hawaii: Attendant Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heavy rain events (>100 mm day?1) over the southeast flank of Mauna Loa volcano on the island of Hawaii are examined using surface, rawinsonde, rain gauge, and satellite data. The events occur in the presence of four types of synoptic-scale ...

Kevin Kodama; Gary M. Barnes

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Correcting Active Scatterometer Data for the Effects of Rain Using Passive Radiometer Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model for the effects of rain on scatterometer data is proposed. Data from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR) and the SeaWinds scatterometer, both on the Midori-II satellite, are used. The model includes three basic rain effects: ...

K. A. Hilburn; F. J. Wentz; D. K. Smith; P. D. Ashcroft

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Assessing the Relative Performance of Microwave-Based Satellite Rain-Rate Retrievals Using TRMM Ground Validation Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spaceborne microwave sensors provide critical rain information used in several global multisatellite rain products, which in turn are used for a variety of important studies, including landslide forecasting, flash flood warning, data assimilation,...

David B. Wolff; Brad L. Fisher

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Non-Rayleigh Scattering Effect in Rain Observations by an X- and Ka-band Dual-Wavelength Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of non-Rayleigh scattering appearing in a rain observation experiment using a dual-wavelength rain radar, is investigated. The non-Rayleigh scattering effect causes a small difference between the effective radar reflectivity factor and ...

Kenji Nakamura; Hideyuki Inomata

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Page 1 of 7 2013 NH 4-H HORSE QUIZ BOWL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at http://extension.unh.edu/4H/NH4-HHorseProject.htm or by sending an Excel document to Rhiannon.Beauregard

New Hampshire, University of

132

Experimental 4D-Var Assimilation of SYNOP Rain Gauge Data at ECMWF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four-dimensional variational data assimilation (4D-Var) experiments with 6-hourly rain gauge accumulations observed at synoptic stations (SYNOP) around the globe have been run over several months, both at high resolution in an ECMWF operations-...

Philippe Lopez

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Australian Heavy-Rain Days and Associated East Coast Cyclones: 1958–92  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present a comprehensive climatology of heavy rain and east coast cyclones from January 1958 to September 1992. A total of 80 cyclones, including nondeveloping systems, were objectively identified from daily rainfall and surface wind ...

Linda C. Hopkins; Greg J. Holland

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Rain Enhancement and Fog Elimination by Seeding with Charged Droplets. Part I: Theory and Numerical Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method of droplet collision acceleration, with the purpose of rain enhancement and fog elimination, is proposed. According to the method, some fraction of the droplets is taken from clouds (or fog) themselves, charged, and then injected ...

A. Khain; V. Arkhipov; M. Pinsky; Y. Feldman; Ya Ryabov

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Analysis of Short Space–Time-Scale Variability of Oceanic Rain Using TOPEX/Jason  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information on the spatial and temporal variability of rain rate is important not only for meteorology and hydrology but also for the design of remote sensing and in situ measuring or of millimeter wave communication systems. The Ocean Topography ...

J. Tournadre; S. Bhandari

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Drop Shapes, Model Comparisons, and Calculations of Polarimetric Radar Parameters in Rain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Drop shapes derived from a previously conducted artificial rain experiment using a two-dimensional video disdrometer (2DVD) are presented. The experiment involved drops falling over a distance of 80 m to achieve their terminal velocities as well ...

M. Thurai; G. J. Huang; V. N. Bringi; W. L. Randeu; M. Schönhuber

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

On the Shape–Slope Relation of Drop Size Distributions in Convective Rain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relation between the slope and shape parameters of the raindrop size distribution parameterized by a gamma distribution is examined. The comparison of results of a simple rain shaft model with an empirical relation based on disdrometer ...

Axel Seifert

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Infrared and Visible Satellite Rain Estimation. Part II: A Cloud Definition Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the relationships between satellite infrared clouds and rainfall, and infrared-threshold visible clouds and rainfall. Clouds are defined by the outline of the 253 K isotherm. Cloud infrared area was highly correlated with rain ...

Andrew J. Negri; Robert F. Adler

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

A Physically Based, Nondimensional Parameter for Discriminating between Locations of Freezing Rain and Ice Pellets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nondimensional parameter is presented that can he used to help distinguish between conditions favorable for the occurrence of freezing rain and ice pellets. The parameter was derived from the well-established condition that most incidents of ...

Robert R. Czys; Robert W. Scott; K. C. Tang; Ronald W. Przybylinski; Michael E. Sabones

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Intercomparison of Rain Gauge, Radar, and Satellite-Based Precipitation Estimates with Emphasis on Hydrologic Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study compares mean areal precipitation (MAP) estimates derived from three sources: an operational rain gauge network (MAPG), a radar/gauge multisensor product (MAPX), and the Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using ...

Koray K. Yilmaz; Terri S. Hogue; Kuo-lin Hsu; Soroosh Sorooshian; Hoshin V. Gupta; Thorsten Wagener

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh acid rain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Uncertainties in Oceanic Radar Rain Maps at Kwajalein and Implications for Satellite Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Kwajalein, Marshall Islands, Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) ground validation radar has provided a multiyear three-dimensional radar dataset at an oceanic site. Extensive rain gauge networks are not feasible over the ocean and, ...

Robert A. Houze Jr; Stacy Brodzik; Courtney Schumacher; Sandra E. Yuter; Christopher R. Williams

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Climatologically Tuned Reflectivity-Rain Rate Relations and Links to Area-Time Integrals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relations between either the point- or beam-averaged effective reflectivity, Ze, and surface rain rate, R, are determined by a probability matching method similar to that of Calheiros and Zawadzki, and Rosenfeld. The cumulative density functions (...

David Atlas; Daniel Rosenfeld; David B. Wolff

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

A Remote-Sensing View of a Freezing-Rain Storm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A destructive freezing-rain storm on 15 February 1990 was observed intensively with advanced ground-based remote sensors and conventional instruments by the Lake Ontario Winter Storms (LOWS) project in upstate New York. A deep layer of warm, ...

Brooks E. Martner; Jack B. Snider; Robert J. Zamora; Gregory P. Byrd; Thomas A. Niziol; Paul I. Joe

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Analyses of 1-min Rain Rates Extracted from Weighing Raingage Recordings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for extracting 1-min rain rates from original weighing raingage recordings is described. The method allows the retrieval of rates for long periods at approximately 300 United States weather stations. The process combines magnification of ...

Paul Tattelman; Richard W. Knight

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Monsoon variation and vegetative drought patterns in the Luni Basin in the rain-shadow zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Drought has a significant impact on agricultural, ecological and socio-economic spheres. Poor and delayed monsoon, high temperature and insufficient water resources lead to recurrent drought in the Luni River basin located in the rain-shadow zone of ...

C. Bhuiyan; F. N. Kogan

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Intercalibrated Passive Microwave Rain Products from the Unified Microwave Ocean Retrieval Algorithm (UMORA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Unified Microwave Ocean Retrieval Algorithm (UMORA) simultaneously retrieves sea surface temperature, surface wind speed, columnar water vapor, columnar cloud water, and surface rain rate from a variety of passive microwave radiometers ...

K. A. Hilburn; F. J. Wentz

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Regional and Local Influences on Freezing Drizzle, Freezing Rain,and Ice Pellet Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regional and local influences on frequency and type of freezing precipitation (freezing drizzle, freezing rain, and ice pellets) are investigated via in-depth climatologies of six continental United States (CONUS) sounding sites. For each site, ...

Ben C. Bernstein

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Influence of Rain-Rate Initialization, Cloud Microphysics, and Cloud Torques on Hurricane Intensity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the impact of rain-rate initialization (RINIT), microphysical modifications, and cloud torques (in the context of angular momentum) on hurricane intensity forecasts using a mesoscale model [the Advanced Research Weather ...

S. Pattnaik; C. Inglish; T. N. Krishnamurti

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

The Role of Giant and Ultragiant Aerosol Particles in Warm Rain Initiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Giant and ultragiant aerosol particles can play an important role in warm rain initiation. Recent aerosol measurements have established that particles as large as 100 ?m are a regular part of the atmospheric aerosol. When ingested in growing ...

David B. Johnson

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Model Rain and Clouds over Oceans: Comparison with SSM/I Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparison of global model cloud and rain parameterization output with satellite observed radiances was carried out. Hydrometeor profiles from ECMWF operational short-range forecasts were combined with a microwave radiative transfer model to ...

Frédéric Chevallier; Peter Bauer

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

An Investigation of the Consistency of TAO–TRITON Buoy-Mounted Capacitance Rain Gauges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The common use of remotely located, buoy-mounted capacitance rain gauges in the tropical oceans for satellite rainfall verification studies provides motivation for an in situ gauge bias assessment. A comparison of the biases in rainfall catchment ...

Mark L. Morrissey; Howard J. Diamond; Michael J. McPhaden; H. Paul Freitag; J. Scott Greene

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

The Second-Moment Climatology of the GATE Rain Rate Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first part of this paper presents the description of the GARP (Global Atmospheric Research Program) Atlantic Tropical Experiment 1 rain-rate data and its two-dimensional spectral and correlation characteristics, which have made it possible to ...

Ilya Polyak; Gerald North

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Satellite and Numerical Model Investigation of Two Heavy Rain Events over the Central Mediterranean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two heavy rain events over the Central Mediterranean basin, which are markedly different by genesis, dimensions, duration, and intensity, are analyzed. Given the relative low frequency of this type of severe storms in the area, a synoptic analysis ...

Sante Laviola; Agata Moscatello; Mario Marcello Miglietta; Elsa Cattani; Vincenzo Levizzani

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Rain Shedding and Rainwater Runoff Tests on Cast Iron Vented Manhole Covers for Con Edison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents work EPRIsolutions performed for Con Edison that compares water penetration characteristics of two types of vented manhole covers with a solid cover and a manhole with no cover under typical and very heavy rain conditions.

2007-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

155

Probabilistic Parameterizations of Visibility Using Observations of Rain Precipitation Rate, Relative Humidity, and Visibility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyzes the occurrence of the visibility (Vis) versus precipitation rates (PR) for rain and versus relative humidity (RH) from surface observations that were collected during the Fog Remote Sensing and Modeling (FRAM) field project, ...

I. Gultepe; J. A. Milbrandt

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

General Probability-matched Relations between Radar Reflectivity and Rain Rate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method of deriving the relation between radar-observed reflectivities Ze and gauge-measured rain intensity, R is presented. It is based on matching the probabilities of the two variables. The observed reflectivity is often very different from ...

Daniel Rosenfeld; David B. Wolff; David Atlas

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Bayesian Retrieval of Complete Posterior PDFs of Oceanic Rain Rate from Microwave Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new Bayesian algorithm for retrieving surface rain rate from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) over the ocean is presented, along with validations against estimates from the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR). The ...

J. Christine Chiu; Grant W. Petty

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Improving Estimates of Heavy and Extreme Precipitation Using Daily Records from European Rain Gauges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The long-term variability in heavy precipitation characteristics over Europe for the period 1950–2000 is analyzed using high-quality daily records of rain gauge measurements from the European Climate Assessment (ECA) dataset. To improve the ...

Olga Zolina; Clemens Simmer; Konstantin Belyaev; Alice Kapala; Sergey Gulev

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Rain Attenuation of Radar Echoes Considering Finite-Range Resolution and Using Drop Size Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The classical rain attenuation correction scheme of Hitschfeld and Bordan (HIBO) and the newer iterative approach by Hildebrand (HL) are reconsidered. Although the motivation for the HL algorithm was an extension into ranges, where HIBO tends to ...

Gerhard Peters; Bernd Fischer; Marco Clemens

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Real-Time Correction of Spatially Nonuniform Bias in Radar Rainfall Data Using Rain Gauge Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A procedure for real-time correction of spatially nonuniform bias in radar rainfall data using rain gauge measurements is described. Developed to complement the existing gauge-based bias correction procedures used in the National Weather Service (...

Dong-Jun Seo; J. P. Breidenbach

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh acid rain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Evaluating Light Rain Drop Size Estimates from Multi-Wavelength Micropulse Lidar Network Profiling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate multi-wavelength retrievals of median equivolumetric drop diameter, D0, suitable for drizzle and light rain, through collocated 355/527 nm Micro Pulse Lidar NETwork (MPLNET) observations collected during precipitation occurring 9 ...

Simone Lolli; Ellsworth J. Welton; James. R. Campbell

162

How Does Rain Affect Surface Pressure in a One-Dimensional Framework?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process of hydrostatic adjustment in a vertical column is discussed in the context of rain formation and sedimentation. The authors assume an event of instantaneous condensation in a midatmospheric layer that removes mass from the gas phase ...

Thomas Spengler; Joseph Egger; Stephen T. Garner

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Rain-Related Impacts on Selected Transportation Activities and Utility Services in the Chicago Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An intensive meteorological study of summer precipitation in the Chicago area during 1976–78 furnished detailed data needed to perform a study of the impacts of rain on selected transportation-related activities and on certain utility services. ...

Jan Bertness

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

A Climatology of Freezing Rain in the Great Lakes Region of North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 15-yr climatology of freezing rain surrounding the Great Lakes region of North America has been constructed using data from rawinsondes, surface stations, and gridded reanalyses from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction. This ...

John Cortinas Jr.

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

High-Resolution Imaging of Rain Systems with the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) has been developed and flown in the NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft for imaging various atmospheric and surface processes, primarily the internal structure of rain clouds. The AMPR is a ...

Roy W. Spencer; Robbie E. Hood; Frank J. Lafontaine; Eric A. Smith; Robert Platt; Joe Galliano; Vanessa L. Griffin; Elena Lobl

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Can a Descending Rain Curtain in a Supercell Instigate Tornadogenesis Barotropically?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates whether the descending rain curtain associated with the hook echo of a supercell can instigate a tornado through a purely barotropic mechanism. A simple numerical model of a mesocyclone is constructed in order to rule out ...

Robert Davies-Jones

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

A Numerical Study of the Warm Rain Process in Orographic Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique for numerical simulation of a stationary, two-dimensional laminar flow process is described. Based on this technique, a model for warm rain microphysics in an orographic cloud was developed. The model includes condensation, ...

Naihui Song; John Marwitz

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Intrinsic Ambiguities in the Retrieval of Rain Rates from Radar Returns at Attenuating Wavelengths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is well known that there are significant deterministic ambiguities inherent in trying to determine the particular rain-rate profile that produced some given sequence of air- or spaceborne radar echo powers at a single attenuating frequency. ...

Ziad S. Haddad; Eastwood Im; Stephen L. Durden

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Convective Rain Rates and their Evolution during Storms in a Semiarid Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rain rates and their evolution during summertime convective storms were analyzed for the semiarid climate of the northern High Plains. Radar data from a total of 750 radar echo clusters from the 1980 and 1981 summer cloud seeding operations of ...

AndréA. Doneaud; Stefano Ionescu-Niscov; James R. Miller Jr.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

The Role of Visible Data in Improving Satellite Rain-Rate Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from the first Algorithm Intercomparison Project(AIP/1) collected over Japan and surrounding waters in June, July, and August 1989 are used in this study to assess the importance of visible data in satellite rain estimation techniques. The ...

Patrick W. S. King; William D. Hogg; Philip A. Arkin

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Use of Numerical Forecasts for Improving TMI Rain Retrievals over the Mountainous Area in Korea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topographical influences on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) rain retrievals over the terrain area of the Korean peninsula were examined using a training dataset constructed from numerical mesoscale model ...

Eun-Han Kwon; Byung-Ju Sohn; Dong-Eon Chang; Myoung-Hwan Ahn; Song Yang

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Rain Retrieval from TMI Brightness Temperature Measurements Using a TRMM PR–Based Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study focuses on improving the retrieval of rain from measured microwave brightness temperatures and the capability of the retrieved field to represent the mesoscale structure of a small intense hurricane. For this study, a database is ...

Nicolas Viltard; Corinne Burlaud; Christian D. Kummerow

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

An Examination of Radar and Rain Gauge–Derived Mean Areal Precipitation over Georgia Watersheds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compared to conventional rain gauge networks, the Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler provides precipitation estimates at enhanced spatial and temporal resolution that River Forecast Centers can use to improve streamflow forecasts. This study ...

Keith M. Stellman; Henry E. Fuelberg; Reggina Garza; Mary Mullusky

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Doppler Polarimetric Radar Measurements of the Gamma Drop Size Distribution of Rain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conversion of radar reflections into rain intensities is dependent upon assumptions regarding the drop size distribution. The gamma drop size distribution contains three unknown parameters; the number of parameters that can be obtained ...

H. W. J. Russchenberg

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Nimbus-7 37 GHz Radiances Correlated with Radar Rain Rates over the Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a comparison between 37 GHz brightness temperatures from the Nimbus 7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer and rain rates derived from the WSR-57 radars at Galveston, Texas and Apalachicola, Florida, it was found that the brightness ...

Roy W. Spencer; Barry B. Hinton; William S. Olson

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Correction of Polarimetric Radar Reflectivity Measurements and Rainfall Estimates for Apparent Vertical Profile in Stratiform Rain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for correcting the vertical profile of reflectivity measurements and rainfall estimates (VPR) in plan position indicator (PPI) scans of polarimetric weather radars in the melting layer and the snow layer during stratiform rain is ...

John Kalogiros; Marios N. Anagnostou; Emmanouil N. Anagnostou; Mario Montopoli; Errico Picciotti; Frank S. Marzano

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Climatological Characterization of Three-Dimensional Storm Structure from Operational Radar and Rain Gauge Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three algorithms extract information on precipitation type, structure, and amount from operational radar and rain gauge data. Tests on one month of data from one site show that the algorithms perform accurately and provide products that ...

Matthias Steiner; Robert A. Houze Jr.; Sandra E. Yuter

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Data Transformation and Uncertainty in Geostatistical Combination of Radar and Rain Gauges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geostatistics provides a popular framework for deriving high-resolution quantitative precipitation estimates (QPE) by combining radar and rain gauge data. However, the skewed and heteroscedastic nature of precipitation is in contradiction to ...

Rebekka Erdin; Christoph Frei; Hans R. Künsch

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

An Automated Synoptic Typing Procedure to Predict Freezing Rain: An Application to Ottawa, Ontario, Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Freezing rain is a major weather hazard that can compromise human safety, significantly disrupt transportation, and damage and disrupt built infrastructure such as telecommunication towers and electrical transmission and distribution lines. In ...

Chad Shouquan Cheng; Heather Auld; Guilong Li; Joan Klaassen; Bryan Tugwood; Qian Li

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Synoptic-Scale Analysis of Freezing Rain Events in Montreal, Quebec, Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Freezing rain is a major environmental hazard that is especially common along the St. Lawrence River valley (SLRV) in southern Quebec, Canada. For large cities such as Montreal, severe events can have a devastating effect on people, property, and ...

Gina M. Ressler; Shawn M. Milrad; Eyad H. Atallah; John R. Gyakum

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh acid rain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Satellite Cloud Classification and Rain-Rate Estimation Using Multispectral Radiances and Measures of Spatial Texture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Twelve months of Southern Hemisphere (maritime) midlatitudes Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer local area coverage data at full radiometric and spatial resolution have been collocated with rain-rate data from three Doppler weather radars.

Michael J. Uddstrom; Warren R. Gray

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Sensitivity of WSR-88D Rainfall Estimates to the Rain-Rate Threshold and Rain Gauge Adjustment: A Flash Flood Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A strong thunderstorm produced a flash flood on the evening of 12 July 1996 in Buffalo Creek, Colorado, that caused two deaths and significant property damage. Most of the rain fell in a 1-h time period from 2000 to 2100 MDT. The performance of ...

Richard A. Fulton

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

CHARACTERIZATION STUDIES OF THE SELECTIVE REDUCTION OF NO by NH3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Maloney, K.L. , "NOx Reduction with Ammonia: Laboratoryand Hashizawa, K. , "Reduction of NOx in Combustion ExhaustSelective Noncatalytic Reduction of NOx with NH3," EPRI NOx

Brown, N.J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Acid Rain Science and Politics in Japan: A History of Knowledge and Action Toward Sustainability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Action Toward Sustainability By Kenneth E. Wilkeningand Action Toward Sustainability . Cambridge, MA: MIT Press,three pollution-related sustainability crises since the end

Javed, M. Tayyeb

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

An Acid Rain Study in the Washington, D.C. Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field study in the Washington, D.C. area explored the impact of urban emissions and mesoscale meteorology on precipitation chemistry. The study was a follow-up to an earlier, considerably more industrialized, study in the Philadelphia area; ...

A. A. N. Patrinos; M. J. Leach; R. M. Brown; R. L. Tanner; F. S. Binkowski

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

1996 update on compliance and emissions trading under the U.S. acid rain program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

November 1997This paper reports on the second year of compliance with the sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions-reduction and -trading provisions of the Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). The material is intended ...

Ellerman, A. Denny

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

A Mathematical Model for the Analysis of Acid Deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the use of a regional-scale air quality model as a diagnostic tool for analyzing problems associated with acid rain. The model, which is hybrid in nature, consists of a puff module and a grid module. The puff module computes ...

Mei-Kao Liu; Douglas A. Stewart; Donald Henderson

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Photo of the Week: Rain or Shine, Preparing for the 2013 Hurricane Season |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rain or Shine, Preparing for the 2013 Hurricane Rain or Shine, Preparing for the 2013 Hurricane Season Photo of the Week: Rain or Shine, Preparing for the 2013 Hurricane Season May 15, 2013 - 1:16pm Addthis President Barack Obama listens to Acting Energy Secretary Daniel B. Poneman during a meeting with electric utility CEOs and trade association representatives at the Department of Energy in Washington, D.C., May 8, 2013. The group met to discuss lessons learned during the response to Hurricane Sandy, as well as the ongoing preparations for 2013 hurricane season, which begins June 1. | Official White House Photo by Pete Souza. President Barack Obama listens to Acting Energy Secretary Daniel B. Poneman during a meeting with electric utility CEOs and trade association representatives at the Department of Energy in Washington, D.C., May 8,

189

Watch Out for the Snakes! 21 Biologists and one Physicist in a Rain Forest  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Watch Out for the Snakes! 21 Biologists and one Physicist in a Rain Forest Watch Out for the Snakes! 21 Biologists and one Physicist in a Rain Forest in Nicaragua Speaker(s): Donald Grether Date: June 29, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Don, his wife Becky, and their granddaughter Briana recently returned from spending almost three weeks at a field station in a rain forest in Nicaragua, along with UCLA faculty members, graduate students, and undergraduates. Our location was way off the beaten track, even for "eco-tourists", and could only be reached by a three-hour boat trip on Rio San Juan. No hot water or space heating or cooling, running water most but not all of the time, no electricity in our rooms, no windows, and no Internet. Sort of like a near-zero energy building. Don's presentation will include photos that give some sense of why we went, what it took to

190

APRIL 2006 F A LKOVICH ET AL. 591 Rain Initiation Time in Turbulent Warm Clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A mean field model is presented that describes droplet growth resulting from condensation and collisions and droplet loss resulting from fallout. The model allows for an effective numerical simulation. The numerical scheme that is conservative in water mass and keeps accurate count of the number of droplets is applied, and the way in which the rain initiation time depends on different parameters is studied. In particular, it is shown that the rain initiation time depends nonmonotonically (has a minimum) on the number of cloud condensation nuclei. Also presented is a simple model that allows one to estimate the rain initiation time for turbulent clouds with an inhomogeneous concentration of cloud condensation nuclei. It is argued that by overseeding even a part of a cloud by small hygroscopic nuclei one can substantially delay the onset of precipitation. 1.

Gregory Falkovich; Mikhail; G. Stepanov

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

An Approach to Estimate the Areal Rain-Rate Distribution from Spaceborne Radar by the Use of Multiple Thresholds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimates of rain rate derived from a spaceborne weather radar will be most reliable over an intermediate range of values. At light or heavy rain rates, where the signal-to-noise ratios are degraded either by small values of the backscattered ...

R. Meneghini; J. A. Jones

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Frequency of Heavy Rainstorms on Areas from 10 to 10 000 km2, Defined Using Dense Rain Gauge Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operation in Illinois of eight dense rain gauge networks of varying sizes, with each operating for 5–22 yr, provided data used to assess the temporal frequency of very heavy rain events on small- to moderate-sized areas. Initial testing reveals ...

Stanley A. Changnon

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Validation of the Rain Profiling Algorithm “ZPHI” from the C-Band Polarimetric Weather Radar in Darwin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extensive application of a rain profiling algorithm (ZPHI) employing a C-band polarimetric radar (the C-POL radar of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre in Darwin) is presented. ZPHI belongs to the class of rain profiling ...

Erwan Le Bouar; Jacques Testud; Tom D. Keenan

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Thermal Durability of Cu-CHA NH3-SCR Catalysts for Diesel NOx Reduction  

SciTech Connect

Multiple catalytic functions (NOx conversion, NO and NH3 oxidation, NH3 storage) of a commercial Cu-zeolite urea/NH3-SCR catalyst were assessed in a laboratory fixed-bed flow reactor system after differing degrees of hydrothermal aging. Catalysts were characterized by using x-ray diffraction (XRD), 27Al solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) / energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy to develop an understanding of the degradation mechanisms during catalyst aging. The catalytic reaction measurements of laboratory-aged catalysts were performed, which allows us to obtain a universal curve for predicting the degree of catalyst performance deterioration as a function of time at each aging temperature. Results show that as the aging temperature becomes higher, the zeolite structure collapses in a shorter period of time after an induction period. The decrease in SCR performance was explained by zeolite structure destruction and/or Cu agglomeration, as detected by XRD/27Al NMR and by TEM/EDX, respectively. Destruction of the zeolite structure and agglomeration of the active phase also results in a decrease in the NO/NH3 oxidation activity and the NH3 storage capacity of the catalyst. Selected laboratory aging conditions (16 h at 800oC) compare well with a 135,000 mile vehicle-aged catalyst for both performance and characterization criteria.

Schmieg, Steven J.; Oh, Se H.; Kim, Chang H.; Brown, David B.; Lee, Jong H.; Peden, Charles HF; Kim, Do Heui

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

195

A Comparison of NEXRAD WSR-88D Radar Estimates of Rain Accumulation with Gauge Measurements for High- and Low-Reflectivity Horizontal Gradient Precipitation Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radar-estimated rainfall amounts from the NEXRAD Weather Surveillance Radar precipitation accumulation algorithm were compared with measurements from numerous rain gauges (1639 radar versus gauge comparisons). Storm total rain accumulations from ...

Gerard E. Klazura; Jessica M. Thomale; D. Scott Kelly; Paul Jendrowski

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Photolysis of solid NH{sub 3} and NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O mixtures at 193 nm  

SciTech Connect

We have studied UV photolysis of solid ammonia and ammonia-dihydrate samples at 40 K, using infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and microgravimetry. We have shown that in the pure NH{sub 3} sample, the main species ejected are NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}, where the hydrogen and nitrogen increase with laser fluence. This increase in N{sub 2} ejection with laser fluence explains the increase in mass loss rate detected by a microbalance. In contrast, for the ammonia-water mixture, we see very weak signals of H{sub 2} and N{sub 2} in the mass spectrometer, consistent with the very small mass loss during the experiment and with a <5% decrease in the NH{sub 3} infrared absorption bands spectroscopy after a fluence of {approx}3 x 10{sup 19} photons/cm{sup 2}. The results imply that ammonia-ice mixtures in the outer solar system are relatively stable under solar irradiation.

Loeffler, M. J. [Astrochemistry Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 691, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Laboratory for Atomic and Surface Physics, Engineering Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Baragiola, R. A. [Laboratory for Atomic and Surface Physics, Engineering Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

197

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy March 19, 2010 - 4:17pm Addthis New Hampshire has a plan to lower expenses and create jobs, all while conserving energy. In all, the state has received $17.3 million in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) funding. Of that, $9.6 million has been sent to the New Hampshire Office of Energy and Planning (NHOEP) to launch several energy saving projects. NHOEP established a subgrant program to award $6.6 million of the EECBG grant funding to local municipalities and counties. New Hampshire municipalities and counties submitted over 270 applications, totaling over $21 million in grant requests. "Substantial energy efficiency improvements will be made throughout the

198

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy March 19, 2010 - 4:17pm Addthis New Hampshire has a plan to lower expenses and create jobs, all while conserving energy. In all, the state has received $17.3 million in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) funding. Of that, $9.6 million has been sent to the New Hampshire Office of Energy and Planning (NHOEP) to launch several energy saving projects. NHOEP established a subgrant program to award $6.6 million of the EECBG grant funding to local municipalities and counties. New Hampshire municipalities and counties submitted over 270 applications, totaling over $21 million in grant requests. "Substantial energy efficiency improvements will be made throughout the

199

Torrential Rains on the Spanish Mediterranean Coast: Modeling the Effects of the Sea Surface Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Torrential rains are a frequent meteorological risk in the Mediterranean Basin, and the work reported here is part of a long-term study that includes the analysis of the synoptic conditions involved in their genesis. This paper studies the role ...

Francisco Pastor; MarÍa J. Estrela; David Peñarrocha; Millán M. Millán

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Dynamics and Prediction of a Mesoscale Extreme Rain Event in the Baiu Front over Kyushu, Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-resolution version of the limited-area primitive equations model of the Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre is used to investigate the dynamics and prediction of the mesoscale, extreme rain event of 1 August 1993 over Kyushu. The model ...

Noel E. Davidson; Kazuo Kurihara; Teruyuki Kato; Graham Mills; Kamal Puri

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh acid rain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The Heavy Rain Event of 29 October 2000 in Hana, Maui  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 29 October 2000, the Hana region of Maui received 700 mm of rain in 7 h. Radar analyses revealed that the storm consisted of seven cells that were initiated along the southeast slope of Haleakala volcano. One of these cells survived for nearly ...

Ryan E. Lyman; Thomas A. Schroeder; Gary M. Barnes

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Measurements of the Transmission Loss of a Radome at Different Rain Intensities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results on the transmission loss of a dry and a wet C-band weather radar radome at different rain intensities are presented. Two methods were used in the study, both carried out under laboratory conditions. In the first method, the complex ...

Mikko Kurri; Asko Huuskonen

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Organization and Environmental Properties of Extreme-Rain-Producing Mesoscale Convective Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the radar-indicated structures and other features of extreme rain events in the United States over a 3-yr period. A rainfall event is defined as “extreme” when the 24-h precipitation total at one or more stations surpasses the ...

Russ S. Schumacher; Richard H. Johnson

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Comparison of Bulk and Bin Warm-Rain Microphysics Models Using a Kinematic Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the development and testing of a bulk warm-rain microphysics model that is capable of addressing the impact of atmospheric aerosols on ice-free clouds. Similarly to previous two-moment bulk schemes, this model predicts the ...

Hugh Morrison; Wojciech W. Grabowski

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Polarimetric Estimates of a 1-Month Accumulation of Light Rain with a 3-cm Wavelength Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors evaluate rainfall estimates from the new polarimetric X-band radar at Bonn, Germany, for a period between mid-November and the end of December 2009 by comparison with rain gauges. The emphasis is on slightly more than 1-month ...

L. Borowska; D. Zrni?; A. Ryzhkov; P. Zhang; C. Simmer

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Long-Lasting Trade-Wind Rain Showers in a Three-Dimensional Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional warm rain model that included microphysics was used to study the reasons for ease of rainfall in Hawaiian clouds and the long-lasting rainfall from certain rainbands. It was found that drop recirculation occurs within these ...

Tsutomu Takahashi

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Local and Synoptic Environments Associated with Freezing Rain in the Contiguous United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Local and synoptic conditions associated with freezing-rain events in the continental United States, as well as the temporal and spatial variability of these conditions, have been documented for the period 1976–90. It had been postulated that the ...

Chris C. Robbins; John V. Cortinas Jr.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

The Ground-Truth Problem for Satellite Estimates of Rain Rate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper a scheme is proposed to use a point raingage to compare contemporaneous measurements of rain rate from a single-field-of-view estimate based on a satellite remote sensor such as a microwave radiometer. Even in the ideal case the ...

Gerald R. North; Juan B. Valdés; Eunho Ha; Samuel S. P. Shen

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Measurements of 7Be and 210Pb in Rain, Snow, and Hail  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of the levels of 7Be and 210Pb are reported for rain, snow, and hail samples taken at Argonne, Illinois, and Socorro, New Mexico. These natural radioisotopes are indicators of the sources of the aerosols contributing materials to the ...

Jeffrey S. Gaffney; Kent A. Orlandini; Nancy A. Marley; Carl J. Popp

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Climatology of Heavy Rain Events in the United States from Hourly Precipitation Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flash flooding is frequently associated with heavy precipitation (defined here as ?1 in. h?1) occurring over a short period of time. To begin a study of flash flood–producing rain events, the Hourly Precipitation Dataset (HPD) is used to develop ...

Harold E. Brooks; David J. Stensrud

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Heavy Rains and Flooding in Montana: A Case for Operational Use of Symmetric Instability Diagnosis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A strongly developing cyclone east of the Rockies moved northward along the Montana/North Dakota border between 24–26 September 1986 and deposited over 1 in. of rain throughout much of eastern Montana. Included in this area of precipitation was ...

Glenn R. Lussky

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Study of a Heavy Rain Vortex Formed over the Eastern Flank of the Tibetan Plateau  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case of the heavy rain vortex which occurred during the period 14–15 July 1979 is studied using a limited-area mesoscale numerical model. This is a representative example of a group of warm southwest vortices that often form over the eastern ...

Bin Wang; Isidoro Orlanski

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Soil Thermal and Ecological Impacts of Rain on Snow Events in the Circumpolar Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rain on snow (ROS) events are rare in most parts of the circumpolar Arctic, but have been shown to have great impact on soil surface temperatures and serve as triggers for avalanches in the midlatitudes, and they have been implicated in ...

Kevin J. Rennert; Gerard Roe; Jaakko Putkonen; Cecilia M. Bitz

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

The combined effect of rain and wind on airwater gas exchange: A feasibility study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rights reserved. 1. Introduction Air­water gas exchange is an important process on local, regional, and cycling of biogeochemically important trace gases. Gas exchange for slightly soluble gases is thought of the reduction. In order to examine the systematic effects of rain and wind on gas exchange in the natural

Ho, David

215

Synoptic and Mesoscale Structure of a Severe Freezing Rain Event: The St. Valentine's Day Ice Storm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A severe freezing rainstorm produced as much as 4.5 cm of freezing rain during an 18-h period at Champaign, Illinois, on 14–15 February 1990, resulting in over $12 million in damage, week-long power outages, and a federal disaster declaration. ...

Robert M. Rauber; Mohan K. Ramamurthy; Ali Tokay

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Analysis of Video Disdrometer and Polarimetric Radar Data to Characterize Rain Microphysics in Oklahoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, data from three 2-dimensional video disdrometers (2DVDs) and an S-band polarimetric radar are used to characterize rain microphysics in Oklahoma. Sampling errors from the 2DVD measurements are quantified through side-by-side ...

Qing Cao; Guifu Zhang; Edward Brandes; Terry Schuur; Alexander Ryzhkov; Kyoko Ikeda

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Proposal for a Spaceborne Dual-Beam Rain Radar with Doppler Capability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential characteristics and performances of a spaceborne dual-beam radar (or stereo radar) operating at 24 GHz, and devoted primarily to the retrieval of rain-rate structure by using the stereo-radar analysis, were presented in a previous ...

Paul Amayenc; Jacques Testud; Mongi Marzoug

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Synthesis and Characterization of Th2N2(NH) Isomorphous to Th2N3  

SciTech Connect

Using a new, low-temperature, fluoride-based process, thorium nitride imide of the chemical formula Th{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) was synthesized from thorium dioxide via an ammonium thorium fluoride intermediate. The resulting product phase was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and was found to be crystallographically similar to Th{sub 2}N{sub 3}. Its unit cell was hexagonal with a space group of P3m{bar 1} and lattice parameters of a = b = 3.886(1) and c = 6.185(2) {angstrom}. The presence of -NH in the nitride phase was verified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Total energy calculations performed using all-electron scalar relativistic density functional theory (DFT) showed that the hydrogen atom in the Th{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) prefers to bond with nitrogen atoms occupying 1a Wyckoff positions of the unit cell. Lattice fringe disruptions observed in nanoparticle areas of the nitride species by high-resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM) images also displayed some evidence for the presence of -NH group. As ThO{sub 2} was identified as an impurity, possible reaction mechanisms involving its formation are discussed.

Silva, G W Chinthaka M [ORNL; Yeamans, Charles B. [University of California, Berkeley; Hunn, John D [ORNL; Sattelberger, Alfred P [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Czerwinski, Ken R. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Weck, Dr. Phil F [University of Nevada, Las Vegas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Page 1 of 16 2013 NH 4-H Horse Quiz Bowl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM Location: Belmont Middle School, 38 School Street, Belmont NH 03220 Deadline Quiz Bowl is an event where youth demonstrate their knowledge of equine science in a contest similar to high school quiz bowls. Teams of four race to hit their buzzers and answer equine-related questions

New Hampshire, University of

220

Further Experiments on the Effect of Tropical Atlantic Heating Anomalies upon GCM Rain Forecasts over the Americas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of real-data experiments is performed with a general circulation model to study the sensitivity of extended range rain forecasts over the Americas to the structure and magnitude of tropical beating anomalies. The emphasis is upon heat ...

Julio Buchmann; Lawrence E. Buja; Jan Paegle; Robert E. Dickinson

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh acid rain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Correction of the High-Latitude Rain Day Anomaly in the NCEP–NCAR Reanalysis for Land Surface Hydrological Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spurious wavelike pattern in the monthly rain day statistics exists within the National Centers for Environmental Prediction–National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP–NCAR) reanalysis precipitation product. The anomaly, which is an ...

Justin Sheffield; Alan D. Ziegler; Eric F. Wood; Yangbo Chen

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Correction of Drop Shape-Induced Errors on Rain Rates Derived from Radar-Measured Doppler Spectra at Vertical Incidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The shape of larger raindrops shows a deviation from spheres. This leads to a radar backscatter cross section different from the Rayleigh cross section. The drop shape-induced error for deducing rain rates is calculated. The resulting correction ...

Dirk Klugmann; Carolin Richter

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

A Robust Error-Based Rain Estimation Method for Polarimetric Radar. Part I: Development of a Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The algorithms used to estimate rainfall from polarimetric radar variables show significant variance in error characteristics over the range of naturally occurring rain rates. As a consequence, to improve rainfall estimation accuracy using ...

Acacia S. Pepler; Peter T. May; Merhala Thurai

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Diagnosis of the Warm Rain Process in Cloud-Resolving Models Using Joint CloudSat and MODIS Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the warm rain formation process in global and regional cloud-resolving models. Methodologies developed to analyze CloudSat and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite observations are employed to ...

Kentaroh Suzuki; Graeme L. Stephens; Susan C. van den Heever; Takashi Y. Nakajima

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

On the Differences in Storm Rainfall from Hurricanes Isidore and Lili. Part I: Satellite Observations and Rain Potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been well known for years that the heavy rain and flooding of tropical cyclones over land bear a weak relationship to the maximum wind intensity. The rainfall accumulation history and rainfall potential history of two North Atlantic ...

Haiyan Jiang; Jeffrey B. Halverson; Joanne Simpson

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Analysis of 2002 and 2003 Warm-Season Precipitation from the North American Monsoon Experiment Event Rain Gauge Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analyses of rainfall characteristics and their linkage to physiographic features are made from the North American monsoon experiment (NAME) Event Rain Gauge Network (NERN) in northwest Mexico. The findings are based on the network configuration ...

David J. Gochis; Alejandro Jimenez; Christopher J. Watts; Jaime Garatuza-Payan; W. James Shuttleworth

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

APHRODITE: Constructing a Long-Term Daily Gridded Precipitation Dataset for Asia Based on a Dense Network of Rain Gauges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A daily gridded precipitation dataset covering a period of more than 57 yr was created by collecting and analyzing rain gauge observation data across Asia through the activities of the Asian Precipitation—Highly Resolved Observational Data Integration ...

Akiyo Yatagai; Kenji Kamiguchi; Osamu Arakawa; Atsushi Hamada; Natsuko Yasutomi; Akio Kitoh

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Intercomparison of Single-Frequency Methods for Retrieving a Vertical Rain Profile from Airborne or Spaceborne Radar Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper briefly reviews several single-frequency rain profiling methods for an airborne or spaceborne radar. The authors describe the different methods from a unified point of view starting from the basic differential equation. This ...

Toshio Iguchi; Robert Meneghini

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

A Comparison of Gamma and Lognormal Distributions for Characterizing Satellite Rain Rates from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the spatial characteristics of nonzero rain rates to develop a probability density function (PDF) model of precipitation using rainfall data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. The minimum ?2 ...

Hye-Kyung Cho; Kenneth P. Bowman; Gerald R. North

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

The Improved AMSU Rain-Rate Algorithm and Its Evaluation for a Cool Season Event in the Western United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rain-rate retrievals from passive microwave sensors are useful for a number of applications related to weather forecasting. For example, in the United States, such estimates are useful for offshore rainfall systems approaching land and in regions ...

Shuang Qiu; Paul Pellegrino; Ralph Ferraro; Limin Zhao

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Application of an Apple-II Computer in Real-Time Data Processing of Microwave Radiation Attenuation by Rain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using an Apple-II microcomputer, real-time data acquisition, processing, staring and display of 12 GHz microwave radiation attenuation by rain have been implemented. The computer-radiometer interface consists of an address decoder, two three-...

Song Qian

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

An Observational Study of the Relationship between Excessively Strong Short Rains in Coastal East Africa and Indian Ocean SST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Composites of SST, wind, rainfall, and humidity have been constructed for years of high rainfall during September, October, and November (SON) in equatorial and southern-central East Africa. These show that extreme East African short rains are ...

Emily Black; Julia Slingo; Kenneth R. Sperber

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Relationships between Radar Properties at High Elevations and Surface Rain Rate: Potential Use for Spaceborne Rainfall Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ground-based radar data have been used to investigate the relationship between reflectivity at high elevations and surface rain rates. Such relations are useful for rainfall measurements by spaceborne radars at attenuating wavelength such as the ...

Eyal Amitai

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Characteristics of the Vertical Profiles of Dual-Frequency, Dual-Polarization Radar Data in Stratiform Rain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne dual-wavelength and dual-polarization radar data are analyzed for measurements taken in stratiform rain in the western Pacific during September 1990. The focus of the paper is on the vertical profiles of the linear depolarization ratio, ...

R. Meneghini; H. Kumagai

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Characteristic Features of Warm-Type Rain Producing Heavy Rainfall over the Korean Peninsula Inferred from TRMM Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In contrast to the view that deep convection causes heavy rainfall, Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) measurements demonstrate that heavy rainfall (ranging from moderate to extreme rain rate) over the Korean peninsula is associated more ...

B. J. Sohn; Geun-Hyeok Ryu; Hwan-Jin Song; Mi-Lim Ou

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Numerical Simulation of a Rain Shower Affected by Waste Energy Released from a Cooling Tower Complex in a Calm Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An axisymmetric cloud model is used to investigate the evolution of convective cells and associated rain showers that develop due to the sensible and latent heat released into a calm atmosphere from an industrial cooling complex. The simulated ...

S. Guan; G. W. Reuter

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

CPOL Radar-Derived Drop Size Distribution Statistics of Stratiform and Convective Rain for Two Regimes in Darwin, Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This note builds on prior technique development related to the classification of rain types utilizing C-band polarimetric (CPOL) radar measurements. While the prior work was preliminary and limited in scope, the authors elaborate here on the ...

M. Thurai; V. N. Bringi; P. T. May

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

An Analysis of Freezing Rain, Freezing Drizzle, and Ice Pellets across the United States and Canada: 1976–90  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive analysis of freezing rain, freezing drizzle, and ice pellets was conducted using data from surface observations across the United States and Canada. This study complements other studies of freezing precipitation in the United ...

John V. Cortinas Jr.Ben C. Bernstein; Christopher C. Robbins; J. Walter Strapp

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Characteristic features of warm-type rain producing heavy rainfall over the Korean peninsula inferred from TRMM measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In contrast to the view that deep convection causes the heavy rainfall, Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) measurements demonstrate that heavy rainfall (ranging from moderate to extreme rain rate) over the Korean peninsula is associated ...

B.J. Sohn; Geun-Hyeok Ryu; Hwan-Jin Song; Mi-Lim Ou

240

Rain water transport and storage in a model sandy soil with hydrogel particle additives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study rain water infiltration and drainage in a dry model sandy soil with superabsorbent hydrogel particle additives by measuring the mass of retained water for non-ponding rainfall using a self-built 3D laboratory set-up. In the pure model sandy soil, the retained water curve measurements indicate that instead of a stable horizontal wetting front that grows downward uniformly, a narrow fingered flow forms under the top layer of water-saturated soil. This rain water channelization phenomenon not only further reduces the available rain water in the plant root zone, but also affects the efficiency of soil additives, such as superabsorbent hydrogel particles. Our studies show that the shape of the retained water curve for a soil packing with hydrogel particle additives strongly depends on the location and the concentration of the hydrogel particles in the model sandy soil. By carefully choosing the particle size and distribution methods, we may use the swollen hydrogel particles to modify the soil pore structure, to clog or extend the water channels in sandy soils, or to build water reservoirs in the plant root zone.

Y. Wei; D. J. Durian

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh acid rain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Page 1 of 16 2014 NH 4-H Horse Quiz Bowl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their knowledge of equine science in a contest similar to high school quiz bowls. Teams of four race to hitPage 1 of 16 2014 NH 4-H Horse Quiz Bowl Date: Saturday January 25, 2014 Time: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM the day of the contest. The New Hampshire 4-H Quiz Bowl is an event where youth demonstrate

New Hampshire, University of

242

Theoretical Investigations on the Formation and Dehydrogenation Reaction Pathways of H(NH2BH2)nH (n=1-4) Oligomers: Importance of Dihydrogen Interactions (DHI)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The H(NH2BH2)nH oligomers are possible products from dehydrogenation of ammonia borane (NH3BH3) and ammonium borohydride (NH4BH4), which belong to a class of boron-nitrogen-hydrogen (BNHx) compounds that are promising materials for chemical hydrogen storage. Understanding the kinetics and reaction pathways of formation of these oligomers and their further dehydrogenation is essential for developing BNHx-based hydrogen storage materials. We have performed computational modeling using density functional theory (DFT), ab initio wavefunction theory, and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations on the energetics and formation pathways for the H(NH2BH2)nH (n=1-4) oligomers, polyaminoborane (PAB), from NH3BH3 monomers and the subsequent dehydrogenation steps to form polyiminoborane (PIB). Through transition state searches and evaluation of the intrinsic reaction coordinates, we have investigated the B-N bond cleavage, the reactions of NH3BH3 molecule with intermediates, dihydrogen release through intra- and intermolecular hydrogen transfer, dehydrocoupling/cyclization of the oligomers, and the dimerization of NH3BH3 molecules. We discovered the formation mechanism of H(NH2BH2)n+1H oligomers through reactions of the H(NH2BH2)nH oligomers first with BH3 followed by reactions with NH3 and the release of H2, where the BH3 and NH3 intermediates are formed through dissociation of NH3BH3. We also found that the dimerization of the NH3BH3 molecules to form c-(NH2BH2)2 is slightly exothermic, with an unexpected transition state that leads to the simultaneous release of two H2 molecules. The dehydrogenations of the oligomers are also exothermic, typically by less than 10 kcal/(mol of H2), with the largest exothermicity for n=3. The transition state search shows that the one-step direct dehydrocoupling cyclization of the oligomers is not a favored pathway because of high activation barriers. The dihydrogen bonding, in which protic (HN) hydrogens interact with hydridic (HB) hydrogens, plays a vital role in stabilizing different structures of the reactants, transition states, and products. The dihydrogen interaction (DHI) within the -BH2(?2-H2) moiety accounts for both the formation mechanisms of the oligomers and for the dehydrogenation of ammonia borane. Support was provided from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences Division and from the U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Li, Jun; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Hu, Han-Shi; Schenter, Gregory K.; Autrey, Thomas; Gutowski, Maciej S.

2010-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

243

A WATER MASER AND NH{sub 3} SURVEY OF GLIMPSE EXTENDED GREEN OBJECTS  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of a Nobeyama 45 m H{sub 2}O maser and NH{sub 3} survey of all 94 northern GLIMPSE extended green objects (EGOs), a sample of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) identified based on their extended 4.5 {mu}m emission. We observed the NH{sub 3}(1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) inversion lines, and detected emission toward 97%, 63%, and 46% of our sample, respectively (median rms {approx} 50 mK). The H{sub 2}O maser detection rate is 68% (median rms {approx} 0.11 Jy). The derived H{sub 2}O maser and clump-scale gas properties are consistent with the identification of EGOs as young MYSOs. To explore the degree of variation among EGOs, we analyze subsamples defined based on mid-infrared (MIR) properties or maser associations. H{sub 2}O masers and warm dense gas, as indicated by emission in the higher-excitation NH{sub 3} transitions, are most frequently detected toward EGOs also associated with both Class I and II CH{sub 3}OH masers. Ninety-five percent (81%) of such EGOs are detected in H{sub 2}O (NH{sub 3}(3,3)), compared to only 33% (7%) of EGOs without either CH{sub 3}OH maser type. As populations, EGOs associated with Class I and/or II CH{sub 3}OH masers have significantly higher NH{sub 3} line widths, column densities, and kinetic temperatures than EGOs undetected in CH{sub 3}OH maser surveys. However, we find no evidence for statistically significant differences in H{sub 2}O maser properties (such as maser luminosity) among any EGO subsamples. Combining our data with the 1.1 mm continuum Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey, we find no correlation between isotropic H{sub 2}O maser luminosity and clump number density. H{sub 2}O maser luminosity is weakly correlated with clump (gas) temperature and clump mass.

Cyganowski, C. J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Koda, J.; Towers, S.; Meyer, J. Donovan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Rosolowsky, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Okanagan, Kelowna BC V1V 1V7 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Okanagan, Kelowna BC V1V 1V7 (Canada); Egusa, F. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)] [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Momose, R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Robitaille, T. P., E-mail: ccyganowski@cfa.harvard.edu [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg (Germany)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

244

High-throughput and in situ EDXRD investigation on the formation of two new metal aminoethylphosphonates - Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 2}) and Ca(OH)(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3}){center_dot}2H{sub 2}O  

SciTech Connect

The system Ca{sup 2+}/2-aminoethylphosphonic acid/H{sub 2}O/NaOH was systematically investigated using high-throughput methods. The experiments led to one new compound Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2} H{sub 4}NH{sub 2}) (1) and the crystal structure was determined using in house X-ray powder diffraction data (monoclinic, P2{sub 1}/c, a=9.7753(3), b=6.4931(2), c=8.4473(2) A, {beta}=106.46(2) Degree-Sign , V=514.20(2) A{sup 3}, Z=4). The formation of 1 was investigated by in situ energy dispersive X-ray diffraction measurements (EDXRD) at beamline F3 at HASYLAB (light source DORIS III), DESY, Hamburg. An intermediate, Ca(OH)(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3}){center_dot}2H{sub 2}O (2), was observed and could be isolated from the reaction mixture at ambient temperatures by quenching the reaction. The crystal structure of 2 was determined from XRPD data using synchrotron radiation (monoclinic, P2{sub 1}/m, a=11.2193(7), b=7.1488(3), c=5.0635(2) A, {beta}=100.13(4) Degree-Sign , V=399.78(3) A{sup 3}, Z=2). - Graphical abstarct: The detailed in situ energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) investigation on the formation of the new inorganic-organic hybrid compound Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 2}) leads to the discovery of a new crystalline intermediate phase. Both crystal structures were elucidated using X-ray powder diffraction data. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-throughput investigation led to new metal aminoethylphosphonate Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 2}). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 2}) was followed by in situ EDXRD measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystalline intermediate Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3})(OH){center_dot}2H{sub 2}O was discovered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isolation of Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3})(OH){center_dot}2H{sub 2}O was accomplished by quenching experiments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structures were determined using X-ray powder diffraction data.

Schmidt, Corinna; Feyand, Mark [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Max-Eyth Strasse 2, D 24118 Kiel (Germany); Rothkirch, Andre [HASYLAB, DESY Hamburg, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Stock, Norbert, E-mail: stock@ac.uni-kiel.de [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Max-Eyth Strasse 2, D 24118 Kiel (Germany)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

[(CH3)4N][(C5H5NH)0.8((CH3)3NH)0.2]U2Si9O23F4 (USH-8): An Organically Templated Open-Framework Uranium Silicate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Framework Uranium Silicate Xiqu Wang, Jin Huang, and Allan J. Jacobson* Department of Chemistry, Uni pyramids we obtained also a number of open-framework uranium silicates.18,19 These new compounds were-framework uranium fluorosilicate [(CH3)4N][(C5H5NH)0.8((CH3)3NH)0.2]U2Si9O23F4 (USH- 8) that has been synthesized

Wang, Xiqu

246

Ammonia as a hydrogen energy-storage medium. [LH/sub 2/, MeOH, and NH/sub 3/  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Liquid Hydrogen (LH/sub 2/), Methanol (MeOH), and Ammonia (NH/sub 3/) are compared as hydrogen energy-storage media on the basis of reforming the MeOH to produce H/sub 2/ and dissociating (cracking) the NH/sub 3/ to release H/sub 2/. The factors important in this storage concept are briefly discussed. Results of the comparison show that, in terms of energy input for media manufacture from natural gas, hydrogen energy content of the medium, and energy cost ($/10/sup 6/ Btu), NH/sub 3/ has a wide advantage and comes the closest to matching gasoline. The tasks required in developing a safe and practicial hydrogen energy-storage system based on the storage and cracking of NH/sub 3/ are listed. Results of the technical and economic evaluation of this concept will provide the basis for continued development.

Strickland, G

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Phosphorylated Mesoporous Carbon as a Solid Acid Catalyst  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mesoporous carbon catalyst supports are attractive due to their wide chemical stability while potentially increasing masstransport through and providing a path for larger molecules to access catalytic sites. Herein we report the synthesis of a 10 phosphorylated mesoporous carbon solid-acid catalyst characterized by NH3-TPD and isopropanol dehydration.

Dai, Sheng [ORNL; Mayes, Richard T [ORNL; Fulvio, Pasquale F [ORNL; Ma, Zhen [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Metallicity of InN and GaN surfaces exposed to NH{sub 3}.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A systematic study of energies and structures of InN and GaN (0001) surfaces exposed to NH{sub 3} and its decomposition products was performed with first-principles methods. A phenomenological model including electron counting contributions is developed based on calculated DFT energies and is used to identify low-energy structures. These predictions are checked with additional DFT calculations. The equilibrium phase diagrams are found to contain structures that violate the electron counting rule. Densities of states for these structures indicate n-type conductivity, consistent with available experimental results.

Walkosz, W.; Zapol, P.; Stephenson, G. B. (Materials Science Division)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Rain-Induced Increase in Background Radiation Detected by Radiation Portal Monitors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A complete understanding of both the steady state and transient background measured by Radiation Portal Monitors (RPMs) is essential to predictable system performance, as well as maximization of detection sensitivity. To facilitate this understanding, a test bed for the study of natural background in RPMs has been established at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This work was performed in support of the Second Line of Defense Program's mission to detect the illicit movement of nuclear material. In the present work, transient increases in gamma ray counting rates in RPMs due to rain are investigated. The increase in background activity associated with rain, which has been well documented in the field of environmental radioactivity, originates from the atmospheric deposition of two radioactive daughters of radon-222, namely lead-214 and bismuth-214 (henceforth {sup 222}Rn, {sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Bi). In this study, rainfall rates recorded by a co-located weather station are compared with RPM count rates and High Purity Germanium spectra. The data verifies these radionuclides are responsible for the dominant transient natural background fluctuations in RPMs. Effects on system performance and potential mitigation strategies are discussed.

Hausladen, Paul [ORNL; Blessinger, Christopher S [ORNL; Guzzardo, Tyler [ORNL; Livesay, Jake [ORNL

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Core hole drilling and the ''rain current'' phenomenon at Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

Two core holes have been completed on the flanks of Newberry Volcano, Oregon. Core hole Geo N-1 has a heat flow of 180 mW m/sup -2/, reflecting subsurface temperatures, sufficient for commerical exploitation of geothermally generated electricity. GEO N-3, which has a heat flow of 86 mW m/sup -2/, is less encouraging. We emphasize the ''rain curtain'' effect with the hope that a detailed discussion of this phenomenon at two distinct localities will lead to a better understanding of the physical processes in operation. Cole hole GEO N-1 was cored to a depth of 1387 m at a site located 9.3 km south of the center of the volcano. Core hole GEO N-3 was cored to a depth of 1220 m at a site located 12.6 km north of the center of the volcano. Both core holes penetrated interbedded pyroclastic lava flows and lithic tuffs ranging in composition from basalt to rhyolite, basaltic andesite being the most common rock type. Potassium-argon age dates range up to 2 Ma. Caving and sloughing were encountered in both core holes at depths near the regional water table. Both core holes penetrate three distinct thermal regimes. The uppermost regime is isothemal at mean air temperature down to about 900-1000 m (the rain curtain).

Swanberg, C.A.; Walkey, W.C.; Combs, J.

1988-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

251

Using biodiversity methods to assess the impacts of oil and gas development in tropical rain forests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil and gas development in tropical rain forests has attracted international attention because of the potentially adverse effects on the forest ecosystems. Biodiversity is a topic of particular concern, but is difficult to assess for small areas of disturbance. In July 1992 we used light traps to compare insect diversity at canopy and ground level as a means of detecting the impacts of an exploratory well site and related facilities within mature Amazonian rain forest in the Oriente Province of Ecuador. Replicate samples were collected at the well site, in a nearby area of agricultural development, and in a reference site within mature forest. Species richness was determined, and diversity indices were calculated for each set of samples. Results indicated that changes in diversity could be detected in the canopy and at ground level at the well site, but that the reduction in diversity was small. Biological diversity was substantially reduced in the area of agricultural development. Limitations and possible applications of this approach are discussed.

Reagan, D.P.; Silva del Poso, X. [Woodward-Clyde Consultants, Denver, CO (United States)]|[Sociedad Entomologica Ecuatoriana, Quito (Ecuador)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Overview of the oxidation and scavenging characteristics of April rains (OSCAR) experiment  

SciTech Connect

The OSCAR (Oxidation and Scavenging Characteristics of April Rains) field experiment was conducted in April, 1981, as part of the MAP3S/RAINE program. The OSCAR study was designed to provide detailed characterizations of the physicochemical and dynamical features of selected cyclonic storm systems as they traversed the eastern U.S. Major experiment components included sequential precipitation chemistry measurements, aircraft measurements both in cloud and in clear air in storm inflow regions, surface-level air chemistry measurements, and supporting meteorological measurements. The precipitation chemisty network consisted of an intermediate-density network with 37 sampling sites covering the region from southern Ontario to Tennessee and from Illinois to New Hampshire, and a high-density network with 47 sampling sites located in a 100 by 100 km area in northeast Indiana. A total of four storm events were studied during the experiment. The report describes the design and operational aspects for the high-density and intermediate-density components of the experiment, and the composition of the integrated OSCAR data set which has been developed. A synoptic meteorological description of the four storm events studied during OSCAR is also provided. 17 references, 13 figures, 8 tables.

Easter, R.C.; Dana, M.T.; Thorp, J.M.; Busness, K.M.; Hales, J.M.; Raynor, G.S.; Benkovitz, C.M.; Tanner, R.L.; Shannon, J.D.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Quasielastic neutron scattering of -NH3 and -BH3 rotational dynamics in orthorhombic ammonia borane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutrons scattering techniques are ideally suited to directly probe H in materials due to the large incoherent scattering cross-section of hydrogen atom, and have been invaluable in providing direct insight into the local fluctuations and large amplitude motions in AB. Dihydrogen bonding may have a significant affect on materials to be used to store hydrogen for fuel-cell powered applications. We have noticed a trend of low temperature release of H2 in materials composed of hydridic and protonic hydrogen. This phenomenon has caught our attention and motivated our interest to gain more insight into dihydrogen bonding interactions in AB. We present results from a thorough Quasielastic Neutron Scattering (QENS) investigation of diffusive hydrogen motion in NH311BH3 and ND311BH3 to obtain (1) a direct measure of the rotational energy barriers the protonated species and (2) a confirmation of the 3-site jump model for rotational motion. The amplitude of the energy barrier of rotation of BH3 and NH3 determined by QENS are compared to those determined for BD3 and ND3 determined by 2H NMR studies.

Hess, Nancy J.; Hartman, Michael R.; Brown, Craig; Mamontov, Eugene; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Heldebrant, David J.; Daemen, Luke L.; Autrey, Thomas

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

254

Herschel / HIFI observations of CO, H2O and NH3 in Mon R2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context. Mon R2 is the only ultracompact HII region (UCHII) where the associated photon-dominated region (PDR) can be resolved with Herschel. Due to its brightness and proximity, it is the best source to investigate the chemistry and physics of highly UV-irradiated PDRs. Aims. Our goal is to estimate the abundance of H2O and NH3 in this region and investigate their origin. Methods. We present new observations obtained with HIFI and the IRAM-30m telescope. Using a large velocity gradient approach, we model the line intensities and derive an average abundance of H2O and NH3 across the region. Finally, we model the line profiles with a non-local radiative transfer model and compare these results with the abundance predicted by the Meudon PDR code. Results. The variations of the line profiles and intensities indicate complex geometrical and kinematical patterns. The H2O lines present a strong absorption at the ambient velocity and emission in high velocity wings towards the HII region. The spatial distribution of...

Pilleri, P; Cernicharo, J; Ossenkopf, V; Berné, O; Gerin, M; Pety, J; Goicoechea, J R; Rizzo, J R; Montillaud, J; González-García, M; Joblin, C; Bourlot, J Le; Petit, F Le; Kramer, C

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Growth kinetics and micromorphology of NH{sub 4}Cl:Mn{sup 2+} crystals formed in the NH{sub 4}Cl-MnCl{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-CONH{sub 3} system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth kinetics and elementary growth processes on the surface of NH{sub 4}Cl:Mn{sup 2+} heterogeneous crystals formed in the NH{sub 4}Cl-MnCl{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-CONH{sub 3} system are experimentally studied. It is found that a change in the composition of complexes in an NH{sub 4}Cl crystal from Mn(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl{sub 4} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O to MnCl{sub 2} {center_dot} 2CONH{sub 3} leads to the occurrence of a local maximum in the kinetic curve and a change in the shape of dislocation growth centers from flat to conical. The growth kinetics of {l_brace}100{r_brace} faces of heterogeneous NH{sub 4}Cl:Mn{sup 2+} crystals is described within the Bliznakov model using the Fowler-Guggenheim adsorption isotherm, which takes into account the lateral interaction of adsorbed particles.

Pyankova, L. A., E-mail: lyuba_pyan@mail.ru; Punin, Yu. O.; Bocharov, S. N.; Shtukenberg, A. G. [Petersburg State University (Russian Federation)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Theoretical Analysis and Meteorological Interpretation of the Role of Raindrop Shape on Microwave Attenuation and Propagation Phase Shifts: Implication for the Radar Measurement of Rain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In rain radars can measure various powers of the drop diameter averaged over the drop size distribution. These averages can then be used to infer rain water content (W) or the rainfall rate in still air (R0). Besides being sensitive to drop sizes ...

A. R. Jameson

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Alternate processing flowsheets for treating NCAW waste slurry with formic acid  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High-level waste stored at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site will be pretreated and fed to the Hanford Waste Virtrification Plant (HWVP). The reference flowsheet used to develop the pretreatment process calls for formic acid. However, the potential for generating H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} during treatment of high-level waste (HLW) with HCOOH was identified at Pacific Northwest Laboratory by Wiemers. Work performed at PNL during FY 1991, FY 1992, and FY 1993 further documented the generation of H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} in neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) slurries treated with HCOOH. Studies at the University of Georgia under contract with Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) and PNL have verified the catalytic role of noble metals in the generation of H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}. Both laboratory-scale and pilot-scale studies at SRTC have documented the H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} generation phenomena. Since H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} may create hazardous conditions in a waste slurry treatment plant, it is important to reduce the H{sub 2} generation rate and the amount of NH{sub 3} to the lowest levels.

Smith, H.D.; Merz, M.D.; Wiemers, K.D.; Bell, R.D.; Williford, R.E.; Larson, D.E.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Correction of Radar Reflectivity and Differential Reflectivity for Rain Attenuation at X Band. Part I: Theoretical and Empirical Basis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this two-part paper, a correction for rain attenuation of radar reflectivity (ZH) and differential reflectivity (ZDR) at the X-band wavelength is presented. The correction algorithm that is used is based on the self-consistent method with ...

S-G. Park; V. N. Bringi; V. Chandrasekar; M. Maki; K. Iwanami

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

The Relation of Radar to Cloud Area-Time Integrals and Implications for Rain Measurements from Space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work we determine the relationships between satellite-based and radar-measured area-time integrals (ATI) for convective storms and show how both depend upon the climatological conditional mean rain rate Rc, and the ratio of the measured ...

David Atlas; Thomas L. Bell

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

The Influence of Entrainment and Mixing on the Initial Formation of Rain in a Warm Cumulus Cloud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to address the problem of the production of rain in warm cumulus clouds that has been observed to occur within about 20 min. A hybrid model approach is used where a microphysical parcel model is run along ...

William A. Cooper; Sonia G. Lasher-Trapp; Alan M. Blyth

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh acid rain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Tests of Rain Profiling Algorithms for a Spaceborne Radar Using Raincell Models and Real Data Precipitation Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares the performances of several algorithms for profiling the rain rate from a spaceborne radar. Three techniques are considered: single frequency (or SF) at 13.8, or 24 GHz; dual frequency (or DF) at 13.8 and 24 GHz; and dual beam ...

Jacques Testud; Paul Amayenc; Xiankang Dou; Taoufix Tani

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

The Use of Partial Cloudiness in a Warm-Rain Parameterization: A Subgrid-Scale Precipitation Scheme  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is proposed on how to handle the effects of partial cloudiness in a warm-rain microphysical scheme and how to generate subgrid-scale precipitation. The method is simple and concerns essentially two ideas: the use of the vertical ...

Peter Bechtold; Jean Pierre Pinty; Patrick Mascart

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Rain versus Snow in the Sierra Nevada, California: Comparing Doppler Profiling Radar and Surface Observations of Melting Level  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The maritime mountain ranges of western North America span a wide range of elevations and are extremely sensitive to flooding from warm winter storms, primarily because rain falls at higher elevations and over a much greater fraction of a basin’s ...

Jessica D. Lundquist; Paul J. Neiman; Brooks Martner; Allen B. White; Daniel J. Gottas; F. Martin Ralph

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

CAMS–OPI: A Global Satellite–Rain Gauge Merged Product for Real-Time Precipitation Monitoring Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method has been developed to produce real-time rain gauge–satellite merged analyses of global monthly precipitation. A dataset of these analyses spans the period from January 1979 to the present, which is sufficiently long to allow the ...

John E. Janowiak; Pingping Xie

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Microsoft PowerPoint - 16.0855_Raines Draft Rev 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Update Management Update Project Management Update Bob Raines Director, Project Management Systems and Assessments * Everybody's Favorite Subject Cost Estimating * Cost Estimating * EVMS * Metrics * Take Aways Agenda 2 Agenda * Ahead of Schedule On Budget - S-2's Stretch Goal 177 Projects $92B TPC - 177 Projects, $92B TPC * Front End Planning - User Acceptance Testing - Comprehensive Training - System Documentation - Capacity/Throughput Testing Capacity/Throughput Testing - Communications via ESC * Thank You For Your Support! * Ensure New Contracts Include PARS II Requirement PARS II Everyone's Favorite Subject 3 PARS II : Everyone s Favorite Subject * DOE is Taking Advantage of PARS II Taking Advantage of PARS II Taking Advantage of PARS II Taking Advantage of PARS II - SC is Using PARS II For an IT Project

266

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-079 Disdrometer and Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disdrometer and Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge Handbook MJ Bartholomew December 2009 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. The views and

267

Managing nontechnical risks associated with seismic operations in the tropical rain forests of Ecuador  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Companies operating in sensitive areas are being challenged to address the environmental and social issues while preserving these areas for future generations. This increased international attention on environmental and sociocultural issues has led Amoco to focus efforts on developing new ideas and strategies to facilitate environmental and cultural management. In Ecuador, the major oil producing region is the Ecuadorian portion of the Amazon Basin, referred to locally as the Oriente. Amoco Ecuador BV recently completed a seismic acquisition program in the Oriente with minimum impact to the environment and the communities within the project area. The goal of this article is to describe Amoco`s experience in managing environmental, social, and public perception issues associated with seismic operations in the rain forests of Ecuador.

Barker, G.; Smith, G.R.; Vacas, F.J. [Amoco Corp., Houston, TX (United States); Swingholm, E.K.; Yuill, R.M.; Aleman, M.A.

1997-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

268

Verification of Allowable Stresses In ASME Section III Subsection NH For Grade 91 Steel & Alloy 800H  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The database for the creep-rupture of 9Cr-1Mo-V (Grade 91) steel was collected and reviewed to determine if it met the needs for recommending time-dependent strength values, S{sub t}, for coverage in ASME Section III Subsection NH (ASME III-NH) to 650 C (1200 F) and 600,000 hours. The accumulated database included over 300 tests for 1% total strain, nearly 400 tests for tertiary creep, and nearly 1700 tests to rupture. Procedures for analyzing creep and rupture data for ASME III-NH were reviewed and compared to the procedures used to develop the current allowable stress values for Gr 91 for ASME II-D. The criteria in ASME III-NH for estimating S{sub t} included the average strength for 1% total strain for times to 600,000 hours, 80% of the minimum strength for tertiary creep for times to 600,000 hours, and 67% of the minimum rupture strength values for times to 600,000 hours. Time-temperature-stress parametric formulations were selected to correlate the data and make predictions of the long-time strength. It was found that the stress corresponding to 1% total strain and the initiation of tertiary creep were not the controlling criteria over the temperature-time range of concern. It was found that small adjustments to the current values in III-NH could be introduced but that the existing values were conservative and could be retained. The existing database was found to be adequate to extend the coverage to 600,000 hours for temperatures below 650 C (1200 F).

R. W. Swindeman; M. J. Swindeman; B. W. Roberts; B. E. Thurgood; D. L. Marriott

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

269

Effect of sulfated CaO on NO reduction by NH{sub 3} in the presence of excess oxygen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of sulfated CaO on NO reduction by NH{sub 3} in the presence of excess oxygen was investigated to evaluate the potential of simultaneous SO{sub 2} and NO removal at the temperature range of 700-850{sup o}C. The physical and chemical properties of the CaO sulfation products were analyzed to investigate the NO reduction mechanism. Experimental results showed that sulfated CaO had a catalytic effect on NO reduction by NH{sub 3} in the presence of excess O{sub 2} after the sulfation reaction entered the transition control stage. With the increase of CaO sulfation extent in this stage, the activity for NO reduction first increased and then decreased, and the selectivity of NH{sub 3} for NO reduction to N{sub 2} increased. The byproduct (NO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O) formation during NO reduction experiments was negligible. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis showed that neither CaSO{sub 3} nor CaS was detected, indicating that the catalytic activity of NO reduction by NH{sub 3} in the presence of excess O{sub 2} over sulfated CaO was originated from the CaSO{sub 4} product. These results revealed that simultaneous SO{sub 2} and NOx control by injecting NH{sub 3} into the dry flue gas desulfurization process for NO reduction might be achieved. 38 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Tianjin Li; Yuqun Zhuo; Yufeng Zhao; Changhe Chen; Xuchang Xu [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Relationship between acid content of particulates and rainfall in Bangkok  

SciTech Connect

Rainfall at nine stations in Bangkok, Thailand, varied from pH 5.57 to 6.32, low values compared with cities in North America and Europe. Particulate acid content ranged from 5.38 to 10.15 micrograms per cu meter. Analysis for several ions showed that the concentration of sulfate was the controlling factor in acidity of rain. pH was reduced by 1 unit for each 9.09 micrograms per cu meter acid content of particulates according to a relationship derived in the study: pH = 6.87 - 0.11 (acidity of particulates in micrograms per cu meter). 13 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

Khan, S.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Two Dimensional Polyamides Prepared From Unsaturated Carboxylic Acids And Amines.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A polyamide and a process for preparing the polyamide are disclosed. The process comprises reacting in a reaction mixture a monomer selected from unsaturated carboxylic acids, esters of unsaturated carboxylic acids, anhydrides of unsaturated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof, and a first amine to form an intermediate reaction product in the reaction mixture, wherein the first amine is selected from RR.sub.1 NH, RNH.sub.2, RR.sub.1 NH.sub.2.sup.+, RNH.sub.3.sup.+ and mixtures thereof, wherein R and R.sub.1 can be the same or different and each contain between about 1 and 50 carbon atoms and are optionally substituted with heteroatoms oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus and combinations thereof, and reacting the intermediate reaction product and a second amine to form a polyamide, wherein the second amine is selected from R.sub.2 R.sub.3 NH, R.sub.2 NH.sub.2, R.sub.2 R.sub.3 NH.sub.2.sup.+, R.sub.2 NH.sub.3.sup.+ and mixtures thereof wherein R.sub.2 and R.sub.3 can be the same or different and each contain between about 1 and 50 carbon atoms and are optionally substituted with heteroatoms oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus and combinations thereof, wherein multiple of the R, R.sub.1, R.sub.2, and R.sub.3 are in vertically aligned spaced relationship along a backbone formed by the polyamide. In one version of the invention, the monomer is selected from maleic anhydride, maleic acid esters, and mixtures thereof. In another version of the invention, the first amine is an alkylamine, such as tetradecylamine, and the second amine is a polyalkylene polyamine, such as pentaethylenehexamine. In yet another version of the invention, the first amine and the second amine are olefinic or acetylenic amines, such as the reaction products of an alkyldiamine and an acetylenic carboxylic acid. The first amine and the second amine may be the same or different depending on the desired polyamide polymer structure.

McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Huang, Zhi Heng (East Lansing, MI); Wright, Stacy C. (Lansing, MI); Danzig, Morris (Northbrook, IL); Taylor, Andrew C. (Ann Arbor, MI)

2002-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

272

Plasma-sprayed semiconductor electrodes: Photoelectrochemical characterization and NH sub 3 photoproduction by substoichiometric tungsten oxides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two substoichiometric tungsten oxide coatings have been obtained by plasma spray of WO{sub 3} powder on Ti substrates. The films are 40 {plus minus} 20 {mu}m thick and are yellow (WO{sub 2.99}) or dark blue (WO{sub 2.97}). WO{sub 2.99} coatings show a highly textured surface with a specific area 27.9 times the geometrical one. X-ray diffraction pattern reveals that their structure is a mixture of monoclinic and triclinic phases. The yellow films have been characterized photoelectrochemically in regenerative cells by using O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O redox at pH 2.0. Under anodic polarization of 1.5 V (SCE) their quantum yield is between 10% and 20% in the wavelength range comprised between 270 and 430 nm with an indirect bandgap of 2.55 eV and a flatband potential of {minus}0.1 V. WO{sub 2.99} films have been tested for NH{sub 3} photoproduction.

Ladouceur, M.; Dodelet, J.P. (INRS-Energie, Varennes, Quebec (Canada)); Tourillon, G. (Universite Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)); Parent, L.; Dallaire, S. (IGM, Boucherville, Quebec (Canada))

1990-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

Relationships between Rain Characteristics and Environment. Part I: TRMM Precipitation Features and the Large-Scale Environment over the Tropical Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differences in the characteristics of rain systems in the eastern Pacific (EP) intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) and the western Pacific (WP) warm pool are quantitatively examined in relation to the large-scale environment. This study mainly ...

Chie Yokoyama; Yukari N. Takayabu

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Distant Effects of a Recurving Tropical Cyclone on Rainfall in a Midlatitude Convective System: A High-Impact Predecessor Rain Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent research has identified predecessor rain events (PREs), which are mesoscale regions of heavy rainfall that occur 1000 km poleward and downshear of recurving tropical cyclones (TCs). PREs typically occur 24–36 h prior to the arrival of the ...

Russ S. Schumacher; Thomas J. Galarneau Jr.; Lance F. Bosart

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Difficulties with Correcting Radar Rainfall Estimates Based on Rain Gauge Data: A Case Study of Severe Weather in Montana on 16–17 June 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal source of information for operational flash flood monitoring and warning issuance is weather radar–based quantitative estimates of precipitation. Rain gauges are considered truth for the purposes of validating and calibrating real-...

Steven V. Vasiloff; Kenneth W. Howard; Jian Zhang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

The Challenge of Forecasting Heavy Rain and Flooding throughout the Eastern Region of the National Weather Service. Part I: Characteristics and Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heavy rain and flooding are of particular concern to forecasters throughout the eastern and southeastern United States. In this paper, the unique combination of synoptic-scale and mesoscale weather conditions and topographic factors that ...

Kenneth D. Lapenta; Barbara J. McNaught; Steven J. Capriola; Louis A. Giordano; Charles D. Little; Stephen D. Hrebenach; Gary M. Carter; Mario D. Valverde; Derek S. Frey

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Satellite Data Assimilation in Numerical Weather Prediction Models. Part II: Uses of Rain-Affected Radiances from Microwave Observations for Hurricane Vortex Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hybrid variational scheme (HVAR) is developed to produce the vortex analysis associated with tropical storms. This scheme allows for direct assimilation of rain-affected radiances from satellite microwave instruments. In the HVAR, the ...

Fuzhong Weng; Tong Zhu; Banghua Yan

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Synoptic-Scale Environments of Predecessor Rain Events Occurring East of the Rocky Mountains in Association with Atlantic Basin Tropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The synoptic-scale environments of predecessor rain events (PREs) occurring to the east of the Rocky Mountains in association with Atlantic basin tropical cyclones (TCs) are examined. PREs that occurred during 1988–2010 are subjectively classified ...

Benjamin J. Moore; Lance F. Bosart; Daniel Keyser; Michael L. Jurewicz

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

An Analysis of Errors in Drop Size Distribution Retrievals and Rain Bulk Parameters with a UHF Wind Profiling Radar and a Two-Dimensional Video Disdrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertically pointed wind profiling radars can be used to obtain measurements of the underlying drop size distribution (DSD) for a rain event by means of the Doppler velocity spectrum. Precipitation parameters such as rainfall rate, radar ...

Laura Kanofsky; Phillip Chilson

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Evaluation of a Satellite Multispectral VIS–IR Daytime Statistical Rain-Rate Classifier and Comparison with Passive Microwave Rainfall Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A daytime surface rain-rate classifier, based on artificial neural networks (ANNs), is proposed for the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) on board the Meteosat-8 geostationary satellite. It is developed over the British Isles ...

Davide Capacci; Federico Porcù

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh acid rain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Global Precipitation Estimates Based on a Technique for Combining Satellite-Based Estimates, Rain Gauge Analysis, and NWP Model Precipitation Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The “satellite-gauge-model” (SGM) technique is described for combining precipitation estimates from microwave satellite data, infrared satellite data, rain gauge analyses, and numerical weather prediction models into improved estimates of global ...

George J. Huffman; Robert F. Adler; Bruno Rudolf; Udo Schneider; Peter R. Keehn

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

A Space-Filling Algorithm to Extrapolate Narrow-Swath Instantaneous TRMM Microwave Rain-Rate Estimates Using Thermal IR Imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A space-filling algorithm (SFA) based on 2D spectral estimation techniques was developed to extrapolate the spatial domain of the narrow-swath near-instantaneous rain-rate estimates from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation ...

Ana P. Barros; Kun Tao

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

The Area-Time-Integral Technique to Estimate Convective Rain Volumes over Areas Applied to Satellite Data—A Preliminary Investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Early work attempting to apply GOES rapid scan satellite data to a recently developed simple radar technique used to estimate convective rain volumes over areas in a semiarid environment (the northern Great Plains) is described.

AndréA. Doneaud; James R. Miller Jr.; L. Ronald Johnson; Thomas H. Vonder Haar; Patrick Laybe

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

The Numerical Simulation of Clouds, Rains and Airflow over the Vosges and Black Forest Mountains: A Meso-? Model with Parameterized Microphysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional meso-? model with parameterized microphysics is presented. The model is capable of simulating orographically forced clouds, rain, and airflow. Tests using a two-dimensional version confirm the ability of the model to replicate ...

Everett C. Nickerson; Evelyne Richard; Robert Rosset; David R. Smith

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Validation and Development of Melting Layer Models Using Constraints by Active/Passive Microwave Observations of Rain and the Wind-Roughened Ocean Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A physically based method is developed to estimate the microphysical structure of the melting layer in stratiform rain using airborne observations by a dual-frequency radar and a 10.7-GHz radiometer. The method employs a nonlinear optimal ...

Shannon T. Brown; Christopher S. Ruf

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The Challenge of Forecasting Heavy Rain and Flooding throughout the Eastern Region of the National Weather Service. Part II: Forecast Techniques and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the years, as the recognition and understanding of the structure and climatic frequency of heavy-rain events has expanded, there has been a corresponding improvement in the available forecast guidance on both the national and local level. ...

Harold H. Opitz; Solomon G. Summer; David A. Wert; Warren R. Snyder; Richard J. Kane; Raymond H. Brady; Paul M. Stokols; Stephan C. Kuhl; Gary M. Carter

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Spatial and Microphysical Characteristics of Low-Ceiling, Temperature-Inverted Clouds in Warm Overrunning and Freezing-Rain Conditions: A Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In-flight microphysical measurements in classical freezing-rain conditions were used to study the vertical and horizontal characteristics of the precipitation and associated low-ceiling, stratiform clouds, which are usually present as overcast in ...

Richard K. Jeck

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Dynamics of coronal rain and descending plasma blobs in solar prominences: I. Fully ionised case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations of active regions and limb prominences often show cold, dense blobs descending with an acceleration smaller than that of free fall. The dynamics of these condensations falling in the solar corona is investigated in this paper using a simple fully ionised plasma model. We find that the presence of a heavy condensation gives rise to a dynamical rearrangement of the coronal pressure that results in the formation of a large pressure gradient that opposes gravity. Eventually this pressure gradient becomes so large that the blob acceleration vanishes or even points upwards. Then, the blob descent is characterised by an initial acceleration phase followed by an essentially constant velocity phase. These two stages can be identified in published time-distance diagrams of coronal rain events. Both the duration of the first stage and the velocity attained by the blob increase for larger values of the ratio of blob to coronal density, for larger blob mass, and for smaller coronal temperature. Dense blobs ar...

Oliver, R; Terradas, J; Zaqarashvili, T V; Khodachenko, M L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Current and Future Carbon Budgets of Tropical Rain Forest: A Cross Scale Analysis. Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to make a first assessment of the major carbon stocks and fluxes and their climatic determinants in a lowland neotropical rain forest, the La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. Our research design was based on the concurrent use of several of the best available approaches, so that data could be cross-validated. A major focus of our effort was to combine meteorological studies of whole-forest carbon exchange (eddy flux), with parallel independent measurements of key components of the forest carbon budget. The eddy flux system operated from February 1998 to February 2001. To obtain field data that could be scaled up to the landscape level, we monitored carbon stocks, net primary productivity components including tree growth and mortality, litterfall, woody debris production, root biomass, and soil respiration in a series of replicated plots stratified across the major environmental gradients of the forest. A second major focus of this project was on the stocks and changes of carbon in the soil. We used isotope studies and intensive monitoring to investigate soil organic stocks and the climate-driven variation of soil respiration down the soil profile, in a set of six 4m deep soil shafts stratified across the landscape. We measured short term tree growth, climate responses of sap flow, and phenology in a suite of ten canopy trees to develop individual models of tree growth to daytime weather variables.

Oberbauer, S. F.

2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

290

Capacitive deionization of NH{sub 4}CIO{sub 4} solutions with carbon aerogel electrodes. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process for capacitive deionization of water with a stack of carbon aerogel electrodes was developed. Unlike ion exchange, one of the more conventional deionization processes, no chemicals are required for regeneration of the system; electricity is used instead. An aqueous solution of NH{sub 4}ClO{sub 4} is pumped through the electrochemical cell. After polarization, NH{sub 4}{sup +} and ClO{sub 4}{sup -} ions are removed from the water by the imposed electric field and trapped in the extensive cathodic and anodic double layers. Thsi process produces one stream of purified water and a second stream of concentrate. Effects of cell voltage, salt concentration, and cycling on electrosorption capacity were studied and results reported.

Farmer, J.C.; Fix, D.V.; Mack, G.V.; Pekala, R.W.; Poco, J.F.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

A reaction mechanism for titanium nitride CVD from TiCl{sub 4} and NH{sub 3}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A gas-phase and surface reaction mechanism for the CVD of TiN from TiCl{sub 4} and NH{sub 3} is proposed. The only gas-phase process is complex formation, which can compete with deposition. The surface mechanism postulates the stepwise elimination of Cl and H atoms from TiCl{sub 4} and NH{sub 3}, respectively, to form solid TiN and gaseous HCl. The mechanism also accounts for the change in oxidation state of Ti by allowing for liberation of N{sub 2}. Provided that the surface composition is at steady state, the stoichiometry of the overall reaction is reproduced exactly. In addition, the global kinetic law predicted by the mechanism is successfully fit to new deposition data from a rotating disk reactor and is shown to be consistent with literature results.

Larson, R.S.; Allendorf, M.D.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

UNH Cooperative Extension is an equal opportunity educator and employer, UNH, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture and NH counties cooperating.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-up of what you did to Rhiannon Beauregard, 4-H State Program Coordinator. Signature of Applicant Date: Rhiannon Beauregard, 4-H State Program Coordinator Moiles House, 180 Main Street, Durham, NH 03824 Rhiannon.beauregard

New Hampshire, University of

293

DENSE GAS TRACERS IN PERSEUS: RELATING THE N{sub 2}H{sup +}, NH{sub 3}, AND DUST CONTINUUM PROPERTIES OF PRE- AND PROTOSTELLAR CORES  

SciTech Connect

We investigate 35 prestellar cores and 36 protostellar cores in the Perseus molecular cloud. We find a very tight correlation between the physical parameters describing the N{sub 2}H{sup +} and NH{sub 3} gas. Both the velocity centroids and the line widths of N{sub 2}H{sup +} and NH{sub 3} correlate much better than either species correlates with CO, as expected if the nitrogen-bearing species are probing primarily the dense core gas where the CO has been depleted. We also find a tight correlation in the inferred abundance ratio between N{sub 2}H{sup +} and para-NH{sub 3} across all cores, with N(p-NH{sub 3})/N(N{sub 2}H{sup +}) = 22 +- 10. We find a mild correlation between NH{sub 3} (and N{sub 2}H{sup +}) column density and the (sub)millimeter dust continuum derived H{sub 2} column density for prestellar cores, N(p-NH{sub 3})/N(H{sub 2}) {approx}10{sup -8}, but do not find a fixed ratio for protostellar cores. The observations suggest that in the Perseus molecular cloud the formation and destruction mechanisms for the two nitrogen-bearing species are similar, regardless of the physical conditions in the dense core gas. While the equivalence of N{sub 2}H{sup +} and NH{sub 3} as powerful tracers of dense gas is validated, the lack of correspondence between these species and the (sub)millimeter dust continuum observations for protostellar cores is disconcerting and presently unexplained.

Johnstone, Doug; Kirk, Helen [National Research Council Canada, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Rosolowsky, Erik [University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna, BC V1V 1V7 (Canada); Tafalla, Mario, E-mail: doug.johnstone@nrc-cnrc.gc.c [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional (IGN), Alfonso XII 3, E-28014 Madrid (Spain)

2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

294

A Class of Single- and Dual-Frequency Algorithms for Rain-Rate Profiling from a Spaceborne Radar. Pad I: Principle and Tests from Numerical Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A class of single- and dual-frequency algorithms that can be used to infer rain-rate profile from a downward-looking spaceborne radar operating at attenuating frequencies is presented. These algorithms rely on use of power-law relations between ...

Mongi Marzoug; Paul Amayenc

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Initiation and Organizational Modes of an Extreme-Rain-Producing Mesoscale Convective System along a Mei-Yu Front in East China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The initiation and organization of a quasi-linear extreme-rain-producing mesoscale convective system (MCS) along a Meiyu front in East China during the midnight-to-morning hours of 8 July 2007 are studied using high-resolution surface observations ...

Yali Luo; Yu Gong; Da-Lin Zhang

296

A Class of Single- and Dual-Frequency Algorithms for Rain-Rate Profiling from a Spaceborne Radar. Part II: Tests from Airborne Radar Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I, four single-frequency (SF) algorithms and a dual-frequency (DF) algorithm for range profiling of the rain rate from a spaceborne radar were described and tested from numerical simulations. In Part II, performances of these algorithms ...

Paul Amayenc; Jean Philippe Diguet; Mongi Marzoug; Taoufik Tani

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Superposition of the Neyman–Scott Rectangular Pulses Model and the Poisson White Noise Model for the Representation of Tropical Rain Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A point process model for tropical rain rates is developed through the derivation of the third moment expression for a combined point process model. The model is a superposition of a Neyman–Scott rectangular pulse model and a Poisson white noise ...

Mark L. Morrissey

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program Report to Congress: An Integrated Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Under Title IX of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, Congress reauthorized the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) to continue coordinating acid rain research and monitoring, as it had done during the previous decade, and to provide Congress with periodic reports. In particular, Congress asked NAPAP to assess all available data and information to answer two questions: (1) What are the costs, benefits, and effectiveness of Title IV? This question addresses the costs and economic impacts of complying with the Acid Rain Program as well as benefit analyses associated with the various human health and welfare effects, including reduced visibility, damages to materials and cultural resources, and effects on ecosystems. (2) What reductions in deposition rates are needed to prevent adverse ecological effects? This complex questions addresses ecological systems and the deposition levels at which they experience harmful effects. The results of the assessment of the effects of Title IV and of the relationship between acid deposition rates and ecological effects were to be reported to Congress quadrennially, beginning with the 1996 report to Congress. The objective of this Report is to address the two main questions posed by Congress and fully communicate the results of the assessment to decision-makers. Given the primary audience, most of this report is not written as a technical document, although information supporting the conclusions is provided along with references.

Uhart, M.; et al.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

NOIlVUlSININdV NOIlVWdOdNI AOd3N3 ACTO3NH  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NOIlVUlSININdV NOIlVWdOdNI AOd3N3 NOIlVUlSININdV NOIlVWdOdNI AOd3N3 ACTO3NH 0661 This publication may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. Purchasing in formation for this or other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be obtained from the Government Printing Office or ElA's National Energy Information Center. Questions on energy statistics should be directed to the Center by mail, telephone, or telecommunications device for the hearing impaired. Addresses, telephone numbers, and hours are as follows: National Energy Information Center Energy Information Administration Forrestal Building, Room 1F-048 Washington, DC 20585 (202) 586-8800 Telecommunications Device for the Hearing Impaired Only: (202) 586-1181 8 a.m. - 5 p.m., eastern time, M-F

300

A model of the gas-phase chemistry of boron nitride CVC from BCl{sub 3} and NH{sub 3}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The kinetics of gas-phase reactions occurring during the CVD of boron nitride (BN) from BCl{sub 3} and NH{sub 3} are investigated using an elementary reaction mechanism whose rate constants were obtained from theoretical predictions and literature sources. Plug-flow calculations using this mechanism predict that unimolecular decomposition of BCl{sub 3} is not significant under typical CVD conditions, but that some NH{sub 3} decomposition may occur, especially for deposition occurring at atmospheric pressure. Reaction of BCl{sub 3} with NH{sub 3} is rapid under CVD conditions and yields species containing both boron and nitrogen. One of these compounds, Cl{sub 2}BNH{sub 2}, is predicted to be a key gas-phase precursor to BN.

Allendorf, M.D.; Melius, C.F.; Osterheld, T.H.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh acid rain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

FLUORESCENCE EXCITATION MODELS OF AMMONIA AND AMIDOGEN RADICAL (NH{sub 2}) IN COMETS: APPLICATION TO COMET C/2004 Q2 (MACHHOLZ)  

SciTech Connect

Ammonia is a major reservoir of nitrogen atoms in cometary materials. However, detections of ammonia in comets are rare, with several achieved at radio wavelengths. A few more detections were obtained through near-infrared observations (around the 3 {mu}m wavelength region), but moderate relative velocity shifts are required to separate emission lines of cometary ammonia from telluric absorption lines in the 3 {mu}m wavelength region. On the other hand, the amidogen radical (NH{sub 2}-a photodissociation product of ammonia in the coma) also shows rovibrational emission lines in the 3 {mu}m wavelength region. Thus, gas production rates for ammonia can be determined from the rovibrational emission lines of ammonia (directly) and amidogen radical (indirectly) simultaneously in the near-infrared. In this article, we present new fluorescence excitation models for cometary ammonia and amidogen radical in the near-infrared, and we apply these models to the near-infrared high-dispersion spectra of comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) to determine the mixing ratio of ammonia to water in the comet. Based on direct detection of NH{sub 3} lines, the mixing ratio of NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O is 0.46% {+-} 0.03% in C/2004 Q2 (Machholz), in agreement with other results. The mixing ratio of ammonia determined from the NH{sub 2} observations (0.31%-0.79%) is consistent but has relatively larger error, owing to uncertainty in the photodissociation rates of ammonia. At the present level of accuracy, we confirm that NH{sub 3} could be the sole parent of NH{sub 2} in this comet.

Kawakita, Hideyo [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Mumma, Michael J., E-mail: kawakthd@cc.kyoto-su.ac.jp [Solar System Exploration Division, Mailstop 690.3, NASA Godard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Short-term recovery of NH4-15N applied to a temperate forest inceptisol and ultisol in east Tennessee USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The short-term fate and retention of ammonium (NH4)-{sup 15}nitrogen (N) applied to two types of forest soils in east Tennessee was investigated. Four ridgetop forests, predominantly oak (Quercus spp.), were studied. Five applications of NH{sub 4}-{sup 15}N tracer were made to the forest floor at 2- to 4-week intervals over a 14-week period in 2004. Nitrogen-15 recovery in the forest floor, fine roots (100 weeks) indicated the forest floor is an effective filter for atmospheric N inputs.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Brice, Deanne Jane [ORNL; Todd Jr, Donald E [ORNL

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Comparison of Drop Size Distribution Parameter (D0) and Rain Rate from S-Band Dual-Polarized Ground Radar, TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR), and Combined PR–TMI: Two Events from Kwajalein Atoll  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The estimation of the drop size distribution parameter [median volume diameter (D0)] and rain rate (R) from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) as well as from combined PR–TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) algorithms ...

V. N. Bringi; Gwo-Jong Huang; S. Joseph Munchak; Christian D. Kummerow; David A. Marks; David B. Wolff

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

The south central Texas heavy rain event of October 1998: an MM5 simulation and diagnosis of convective initiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the weekend of 17-18 October 1998, extremely heavy rainfall over south central Texas resulted in widespread flash flooding and numerous river floods. Southern Hays County received 760 mm of rainfall, and an area of 18,000 km² recorded over 250 mm. The convection began in a weakly forced environment well ahead of a cold front that was forecast to trigger the storms. The Penn State University/NCAR Mesoscale Model version 5 (MM5) was used to diagnose the extent and magnitude of upward motion, the convective potential of the environment, and the causes of the upward motion that contributed to the convective initiation. A rainfall analysis constructed from all available observations and radar estimates was used for a quantitative comparision with the MM5-simulated rainfall. The MM5's success in simulating many aspects of the rainfall suggested that the atmospheric processes that brought about this heavy rain event were also present in the model simulation. Using a 48-km model grid, upward motion was found to be more than sufficient to cause deep convection in the conditionally unstable atmosphere of south Texas. The cause of the upward motion was attributed to differential warm advection focused by a low-level jet centered over the region where convection began.

Scott, Richard Kevin

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

NETL: News Release - DOE Selects Five NOx-Control Projects to Combat Acid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 5, 2004 November 5, 2004 DOE Selects Five NOx-Control Projects to Combat Acid Rain and Smog Industry Partners to Focus on Reducing Emissions While Cutting Energy Costs PITTSBURGH, PA - Continuing efforts to cut acid rain and smog-producing nitrogen oxides (NOx) have prompted the U.S. Department of Energy to partner with industry experts to develop advanced NOx-control technologies. With the selection of five new NOx-control projects, the Energy Department continues as a leader in developing advanced technologies to achieve environmental compliance for the nation's fleet of coal-fired power plants. Although today's NOx-control workhorses, such as low-NOx burners and selective catalytic reduction (SCR), have been successfully deployed to address existing regulations, proposed regulations will require deeper cuts in NOx emissions, at a greater number of generating facilities. Many of the smaller affected plants will not be able to cost-effectively use today's technologies; these are the focus of the advanced technologies selected in this announcement.

306

Pingin' in the rain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential Internet connections are susceptible to weather-caused outages: Lightning and wind cause local power failures, direct lightning strikes destroy equipment, and water in the atmosphere degrades satellite links. Outages caused by severe events ... Keywords: ThunderPing, outage, ping, weather

Aaron Schulman; Neil Spring

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Minisodar Measurements of Rain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of raindrop fall velocity spectra have been made with a minisodar. Amplitude calibration of the system enables the calculation of drop size parameters such as number density, water density, and surface area using methods similar to ...

R. L. Coulter; T. J. Martin; T. M. Weckwerth

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Regulatory Safety Issues in the Structural Design Criteria of ASME Section III Subsection NH and for Very High Temperatures for VHTR & GEN IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this task is to identify issues relevant to ASME Section III, Subsection NH [1], and related Code Cases that must be resolved for licensing purposes for VHTGRs (Very High Temperature Gas Reactor concepts such as those of PBMR, Areva, and GA); and to identify the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code to cover the unresolved safety issues. Subsection NH was originally developed to provide structural design criteria and limits for elevated-temperature design of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems and some gas-cooled systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its Advisory Committee for Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) reviewed the design limits and procedures in the process of reviewing the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) for a construction permit in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and identified issues that needed resolution. In the years since then, the NRC and various contractors have evaluated the applicability of the ASME Code and Code Cases to high-temperature reactor designs such as the VHTGRs, and identified issues that need to be resolved to provide a regulatory basis for licensing. This Report describes: (1) NRC and ACRS safety concerns raised during the licensing process of CRBR , (2) how some of these issues are addressed by the current Subsection NH of the ASME Code; and (3) the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code and Code Cases to cover unresolved regulatory issues for very high temperature service.

William J. O’Donnell; Donald S. Griffin

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

309

Effects of gaseous NH{sub 3} and SO{sub 2} on the concentration profiles of PCDD/F in flyash under post-combustion zone conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Influence of NH{sub 3} and SO{sub 2} on 2378-PCDD/F in flyash and flue gases was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NH{sub 3} decreased the concentration of PCDD and PCDF by 34-75% in the flyash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NH{sub 3} decreased the concentration of PCDD and PCDF by 21-40% from the flue gases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SO{sub 2} led to 99% PCDD and 93% PCDF reductions in the flyash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SO{sub 2} led to 89% PCDD and 76% PCDF reductions in the flue gases. - Abstract: The influence of gaseous ammonia and sulphur dioxide on the formation of 2378-substituted PCDD/F on a reference flyash from a municipal waste incinerator has been investigated using a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor. The reference flyash samples (BCR-490) was reacted under a simulated flue gas stream at temperatures of 225 and 375 Degree-Sign C for 96 h. The experiments were carried out in two series: first with simulated flue gas alone, and then with injection of NH{sub 3} or SO{sub 2} gas into the flue gas just before the reactor inlet. It was found that the injection of gaseous ammonia into the flue gas could decrease the concentration of both PCDD and PCDF by 34-75% from the solid phase and by 21-40% from the gas phase. Converting the results to I-TEQ values, it could reduce the total I-TEQ values of PCDD and PCDF in the sum of the flyash and exhaust flue gas by 42-75% and 24-57% respectively. The application of SO{sub 2} led to 99% and 93% reductions in the PCDD and PCDF average congener concentrations, respectively in the solid phase. In the gas phase, the total reductions were 89% and 76% for PCDD and PCDF, respectively. Moreover, addition of SO{sub 2} reduced the total I-TEQ value of PCDD and PCDF in the flyash and exhaust flue gas together by 60-86% and 72-82% respectively. Sulphur dioxide was more effective than ammonia in suppressing PCDD/F formation in flyash under the conditions investigated.

Hajizadeh, Yaghoub; Onwudili, Jude A. [Energy Research Institute, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Williams, Paul T., E-mail: p.t.williams@leeds.ac.uk [Energy Research Institute, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Decomposition of NH3BH3 at sub-ambient pressures: A combined thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis-mass spectrometry study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report a systematic study of the isothermal decomposition of ammonia borane, NH3BH3, at 363 K as a function of argon pressure ranging between 50 and 1040 mbar using thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis coupled with mass analysis of the volatile species. During thermal aging at 363 K, evolution of hydrogen, aminoborane and borazine is monitored, with the relative mass loss strongly depending on the pressure in the reaction chamber. Furthermore, the induction period required for hydrogen release at 363 K decreases with decreasing pressure.

Palumbo, Oriele; Paolone, Annalisa; Rispoli, Pasquale; Cantelli, Rosario; Autrey, Thomas

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Partitioning of solutes between liquid water and steam in the system {l_brace}Na-NH{sub 4}-NH{sub 3}-H-Cl{r_brace} to 350{degree}C  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurements have been made of the partitioning of solutes between liquid and vapor phases for hydrochloric acid and chloride salts found in both power plant steam cycles and in natural geothermal systems. Static sampling of equilibrium liquid and vapor phases extended from 350 C to the lowest temperatures for which reliable analytical determinations of vapor-phase solute concentrations could be made. Equilibrium constants for the partitioning of the various solutes were calculated from the measured equilibrium compositions, and represented as functions of temperature and solvent density over the full temperature range investigated. These equilibrium constants can be used to calculate equilibrium compositions of coexisting liquid and vapor phases under conditions ranging from steam production from saline geothermal brines to early-condensate formation in all-volatile treatment steam cycles.

Simonson, J.M.; Palmer, D.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical and Analytical Sciences Div.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

Quantum wells on 3C-SiC/NH-SiC heterojunctions. Calculation of spontaneous polarization and electric field strength in experiments  

SciTech Connect

The results of experiments with quantum wells on 3C-SiC/4H-SiC and 3C-SiC/6H-SiC heterojunctions obtained by various methods are reconsidered. Spontaneous polarizations, field strengths, and energies of local levels in quantum wells on 3C-SiC/NH-SiC heterojunctions were calculated within a unified model. The values obtained are in agreement with the results of all considered experiments. Heterojunction types are determined. Approximations for valence band offsets on heterojunctions between silicon carbide polytypes and the expression for calculating local levels in quantum wells on the 3C-SiC/NH-SiC heterojunction are presented. The spontaneous polarizations and field strengths induced by spontaneous polarization on 3C-SiC/4H-SiC and 3C-SiC/6H-SiC heterojunctions were calculated as 0.71 and 0.47 C/m{sup 2} and 0.825 and 0.55 MV/cm, respectively.

Sbruev, I. S.; Sbruev, S. B., E-mail: science@yandex.ru [Moscow Aviation Institute (Russian Federation)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

HfO2 Gate Dielectric on (NH4)2S Passivated (100) GaAs Grown by Atomic Layer Deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interface between hafnium oxide grown by atomic layer deposition and (100) GaAs treated with HCl cleaning and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S passivation has been characterized. Synchrotron radiation photoemission core level spectra indicated successful removal of the native oxides and formation of passivating sulfides on the GaAs surface. Layer-by-layer removal of the hafnia film revealed a small amount of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} formed at the interface during the dielectric deposition. Traces of arsenic and sulfur out-diffusion into the hafnia film were observed after a 450 C post-deposition anneal, and may be the origins for the electrically active defects. Transmission electron microscopy cross section images showed thicker HfO{sub 2} films for a given precursor exposure on S-treated GaAs versus the non-treated sample. In addition, the valence-band and the conduction-band offsets at the HfO{sub 2}/GaAs interface were deduced to be 3.18 eV and a range of 0.87-0.97 eV, respectively. It appears that HCl+(NH{sub 4})2{sub S} treatments provide a superior chemical passivation for GaAs and initial surface for ALD deposition.

Chen, P.T.; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.; Sun, Y.; /SLAC, SSRL; Kim, E.; McIntyre, P.C.; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.; Tsai, W.; Garner, M.; /Intel, Santa Clara; Pianetta, P.; /SLAC, SSRL; Nishi, Y.; /Stanford U., Elect. Eng. Dept.; Chui, C.O.; /UCLA

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

314

AFFECTS OF MECHANICAL MILLING AND METAL OXIDE ADDITIVES ON SORPTION KINETICS OF 1:1 LiNH2/MgH2 MIXTURE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The destabilized complex hydride system composed of LiNH{sub 2}:MgH{sub 2} (1:1 molar ratio) is one of the leading candidates of hydrogen storage with a reversible hydrogen storage capacity of 8.1 wt%. A low sorption enthalpy of {approx}32 kJ/mole H{sub 2} was first predicted by Alapati et al. utilizing first principle density function theory (DFT) calculations and has been subsequently confirmed empirically by Lu et al. through differential thermal analysis (DTA). This enthalpy suggests that favorable sorption kinetics should be obtainable at temperatures in the range of 160 C to 200 C. Preliminary experiments reported in the literature indicate that sorption kinetics are substantially lower than expected in this temperature range despite favorable thermodynamics. Systematic isothermal and isobaric sorption experiments were performed using a Sievert's apparatus to form a baseline data set by which to compare kinetic results over the pressure and temperature range anticipated for use of this material as a hydrogen storage media. Various material preparation methods and compositional modifications were performed in attempts to increase the kinetics while lowering the sorption temperatures. This paper outlines the results of these systematic tests and describes a number of beneficial additions which influence kinetics as well as NH{sub 3} formation.

Erdy, C.; Anton, D.; Gray, J.

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

315

Estimating the Accuracy of Polarimetric Radar–Based Retrievals of Drop-Size Distribution Parameters and Rain Rate: An Application of Error Variance Separation Using Radar-Derived Spatial Correlations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy of retrieving the two drop size distribution (DSD) parameters, median volume diameter (D0), and normalized intercept parameter (NW), as well as rain rate (R), from polarimetric C-band radar data obtained during a cool-season, long-...

M. Thurai; V. N. Bringi; L. D. Carey; P. Gatlin; E. Schultz; W. A. Petersen

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Improved Coupled Z?R and k?R Relations and the Resulting Ambiguities in the Determination of the Vertical Distribution of Rain from the Radar Backscatter and the Integrated Attenuation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several algorithms to calculate a rain-rate profile from a single-frequency air- or spaceborne radar backscatter profile and a given path-integrated attenuation have been proposed. The accuracy of any such algorithm is limited by the ambiguities ...

Z. S. Haddad; A. R. Jameson; E. Im; S. L. Durden

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Acrylic Acid from 3-Hydroxypropionic Acid - Energy Innovation ...  

Technology Marketing Summary. 3-hydroxypropionic acid is readily converted to acrylic acid by conversion to the acid salt followed by treatment with a solid oxide ...

318

PRODUCTION OF TRIFLUOROACETIC ACID  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for the production of improved yields of trifluoroacetic acid. The compound is prepared by oxidizing m-aminobenzotrifluoride with an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal permanganate at a temperature in the range of 80 deg C to 100 deg C while dissolved ln a mixture of water with glacial acetic acid and/or trifluoroacetic acid. Preferably a mixture of water and trifluoroacetic acid ls used as the solvent.

Haworth, W.N.; Stacey, M.

1949-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

319

High external quantum efficiency and fill-factor InGaN/GaN heterojunction solar cells grown by NH{sub 3}-based molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

High external quantum efficiency (EQE) p-i-n heterojunction solar cells grown by NH{sub 3}-based molecular beam epitaxy are presented. EQE values including optical losses are greater than 50% with fill-factors over 72% when illuminated with a 1 sun AM0 spectrum. Optical absorption measurements in conjunction with EQE measurements indicate an internal quantum efficiency greater than 90% for the InGaN absorbing layer. By adjusting the thickness of the top p-type GaN window contact layer, it is shown that the short-wavelength (<365 nm) quantum efficiency is limited by the minority carrier diffusion length in highly Mg-doped p-GaN.

Lang, J. R.; Hurni, C. A.; Cruz, S. C.; Matioli, E.; Speck, J. S. [Department of Materials, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Neufeld, C. J.; Mishra, U. K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

320

QM/MM Lineshape Simulation of the Hydrogen-bonded Uracil NH Stretching Vibration of the Adenine:Uracil Base Pair in CDCl$_3$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A hybrid Car-Parrinello QM/MM molecular dynamics simulation has been carried out for the Watson-Crick base pair of 9-ethyl-8-phenyladenine and 1-cyclohexyluracil in deuterochloroform solution at room temperature. The resulting trajectory is analyzed putting emphasis on the N-H$...$N Hydrogen bond geometry. Using an empirical correlation between the $\\NN$-distance and the fundamental NH-stretching frequency, the time-dependence of this energy gap along the trajectory is obtained. From the gap-correlation function we determine the infrared absorption spectrum using lineshape theory in combination with a multimode oscillator model. The obtained average transition frequency and the width of the spectrum is in reasonable agreement with recent experimental data.

Yan, Yun-an; Kühn, Oliver

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh acid rain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Nucleic acid detection compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor I. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James L. (Madison, WI)

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

322

Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide with ammonia using Cu-ZSM-5 and Va-based honeycomb monolith catalysts: effect of H2 pretreatment, NH3-to-NO ratio, O2, and space velocity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, the steady-state performance of zeolite-based (Cu-ZSM-5) and vanadium-based honeycomb monolith catalysts was investigated in the selective catalytic reduction process (SCR) for NO removal using NH3. The aim was to delineate the effect of various parameters including pretreatment of the catalyst sample with H2, NH3-to-NO ratio, inlet oxygen concentration, and space velocity. The concentrations of the species (e.g. NO, NH3, and others) were determined using a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. The temperature was varied from ambient (25 C) to 500 C. The investigation showed that all of the above parameters (except pre-treatment with H2) significantly affected the peak NO reduction, the temperature at which peak NO reduction occurred, and residual ammonia left at higher temperatures (also known as 'NH3 slip'). Depending upon the particular values of the parameters, a peak NO reduction of around 90% was obtained for both the catalysts. However, an accompanied generation of N2O and NO2 species was observed as well, being much higher for the vanadium-based catalyst than for the Cu-ZSM-5 catalyst. For both catalysts, the peak NO reduction decreased with an increase in space velocity, and did not change significantly with an increase in oxygen concentration. The temperatures at which peak NO reduction and complete NH3 removal occurred increased with an increase in space velocity but decreased with an increase in oxygen concentration. The presence of more ammonia at the inlet (i.e. higher NH3-to-NO ratio) improved the peak NO reduction but simultaneously resulted in an increase in residual ammonia. Pretreatment of the catalyst sample with H2 (performed only for the Cu-ZSM-5 catalyst) did not produce any perceivable difference in any of the results for the conditions of these experiments.

Gupta, Saurabh

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Process for the preparation of lactic acid and glyceric acid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hexose and pentose monosaccharides are degraded to lactic acid and glyceric acid in an aqueous solution in the presence of an excess of a strongly anionic exchange resin, such as AMBERLITE IRN78 and AMBERLITE IRA400. The glyceric acid and lactic acid can be separated from the aqueous solution. Lactic acid and glyceric acid are staple articles of commerce.

Jackson, James E [Haslett, MI; Miller, Dennis J [Okemos, MI; Marincean, Simona [Dewitt, MI

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

324

GAS-PHASE SYNTHESIS OF PRECURSORS OF INTERSTELLAR GLYCINE: A COMPUTATIONAL STUDY OF THE REACTIONS OF ACETIC ACID WITH HYDROXYLAMINE AND ITS IONIZED AND PROTONATED DERIVATIVES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computational study of the reactions of hydroxylamine and its ionized and protonated derivatives with acetic acid is provided. The reaction of neutral hydroxylamine with acetic acid, despite being clearly exothermic, involves a very large energy barrier. The reaction of ionized hydroxylamine with acetic acid is also clearly exothermic, but again a significant energy barrier is found (around 24 kcal mol{sup -1} at the CCSD(T) level). The reaction of the most stable protonated isomer of hydroxylamine, NH{sub 3}OH{sup +}, with acetic acid also involves a high barrier (more than 27 kcal mol{sup -1} at the CCSD(T) level). Only the higher energy isomer, NH{sub 2}OH{sup +}{sub 2}, leads to a sensibly lower energy barrier (about 2.3 kcal mol{sup -1} at the CCSD(T) level). Nevertheless, an estimate of the reaction coefficient at low temperatures such as those reigning in the interstellar medium gives very low values. Therefore, it seems that precursors of interstellar glycine could not be efficiently produced from the reactions of hydroxylamine-derived ions with acetic acid.

Barrientos, Carmen; Redondo, Pilar; Largo, Laura; Rayon, Victor M.; Largo, Antonio, E-mail: alargo@qf.uva.es [Departamento de Quimica Fisica y Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, 47005 Valladolid (Spain)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Destruction of acid gas emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method of destroying NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} in a combustion gas is disclosed. The method includes generating active species by treating stable molecules in a high temperature plasma. Ammonia, methane, steam, hydrogen, nitrogen or a combustion of these gases can be selected as the stable molecules. The gases are subjected to plasma conditions sufficient to create free radicals, ions or excited atoms such as N, NH, NH{sub 2}, OH, CH and/or CH{sub 2}. These active species are injected into a combustion gas at a location of sufficiently high temperature to maintain the species in active state and permit them to react with NO{sub x} and SO{sub x}. Typically the injection is made into the immediate post-combustion gases at temperatures of 475--950{degrees}C. 1 fig.

Mathur, M.P.; Fu, Yuan C.; Ekmann, J.M.; Boyle, J.M.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

326

LOW-TEMPERATURE ION TRAP STUDIES OF N{sup +}({sup 3} P{sub ja} ) + H{sub 2}(j) {yields} NH{sup +} + H  

SciTech Connect

Using a low-temperature 22-pole ion trap apparatus, detailed measurements for the title reaction have been performed between 10 K and 100 K in order to get some state specific information about this fundamental hydrogen abstraction process. The relative population of the two lowest H{sub 2} rotational states, j = 0 and 1, has been varied systematically. NH{sup +} formation is nearly thermo-neutral; however, to date, the energetics are not known with the accuracy required for low-temperature astrochemistry. Additional complications arise from the fact that, so far, there is no reliable theoretical or experimental information on how the reactivity of the N{sup +} ion depends on its fine-structure (FS) state {sup 3} P{sub ja} . Since in the present trapping experiment, thermalization of the initially hot FS population competes with hydrogen abstraction, the evaluation of the decay of N{sup +} ions over long storage times and at various He and H{sub 2} gas densities provides information on these processes. First assuming strict adiabatic behavior, a set of state specific rate coefficients is derived from the measured thermal rate coefficients. In addition, by recording the disappearance of the N{sup +} ions over several orders of magnitude, information on nonadiabatic transitions is extracted including FS-changing collisions.

Zymak, I.; Hejduk, M.; Mulin, D.; Plasil, R.; Glosik, J.; Gerlich, D. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Imaging ion-molecule reactions: Charge transfer and C-N bond formation in the C{sup +}+ NH{sub 3} system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The velocity mapping ion imaging method is applied to the ion-molecule reactions occurring between C{sup +} and NH{sub 3}. The velocity space images are collected over the relative collision energy range from 1.5 to 3.3 eV, allowing both product kinetic energy distributions and angular distributions to be obtained from the data. The charge transfer process appears to be direct, dominated by long-range electron transfer that results in minimal deflection of the products. The product kinetic energy distributions are consistent with a process dominated by energy resonance. The kinetic energy distributions for C-N bond formation appear to scale with the total available energy, providing strong evidence that energy in the [CNH{sub 3}]{sup +} precursor to products is distributed statistically. The angular distributions for C-N bond formation show pronounced forward-backward symmetry, as expected for a complex that resembles a prolate symmetric top decaying along its symmetry axis.

Pei, Linsen; Farrar, James M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

2012-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

328

Detailed modeling and laser-induced fluorescence imaging of nitric oxide in a NH(i)-seeded non-premixed methane/air flame  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we study the formation of NO in laminar, nitrogen diluted methane diffusion flames that are seeded with ammonia in the fuel stream. We have performed numerical simulations with detailed chemistry as well as laser-induced fluorescence imaging measurements for a range of ammonia injection rates. For comparison with the experimental data, synthetic LIF images are calculated based on the numerical data accounting for temperature and fluorescence quenching effects. We demonstrate good agreement between measurements and computations. The LIF corrections inferred from the simulation are then used to calculate absolute NO mole fractions from the measured signal.The NO formation in both doped and undoped flames occurs in the flame sheet. In the undoped flame, four different mechanisms including thermal and prompt NO appear to contribute to NO formation. As the NH3 seeding level increases, fuel-NO becomes the dominant mechanism and N2 shifts from being a net reactant to being a net product. Nitric oxide in the undoped flame as well as in the core region of the doped flames are underpredicted by the model; we attribute this mainly to inaccuracies in the NO recycling chemistry on the fuel-rich side of the flame sheet.

Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Bessler, Wolfgang G.; Schulz, Christof; Glarborg, Peter; Jensen, Anker D.

2001-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

329

Make Checks Payable to the 4-H Foundation of New Hampshire. For more information contact Rhiannon Beauregard at Rhiannon.Beauergard@unh.edu or (603) 862-2188. All of this information can be found at the NH 4-H State Horse Show Website  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beauregard at Rhiannon.Beauergard@unh.edu or (603) 862-2188. All of this information can be found at the NH 4 Foundation of New Hampshire. For more information contact Rhiannon Beauregard at Rhiannon Exposition. Please notify Rhiannon Beauregard, NH 4-H Animal and Agricultural Science Education Coordinator

New Hampshire, University of

330

Synthesis of acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid ...  

A process of preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinc acid comprising: a) dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and hexamethylenetetramine in a ...

331

Recovery of Phosphoric Acid in Waste Acid Mixtures Discharged ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 2003 ... In order to separate impurity acids from the phosphoric acid, trioctyl phosphate ( TOP) is used as an extractant. TOP can extract acetic and nitric ...

332

NH_50m_Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UnitedStatesWindHighResolutionNewHampshireWindHighResolution.zip> Description: Abstract: Annual average wind resource potential for the state of New...

333

Nucleic Acid Softwars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nucleic Acid Software Nucleic Acid Software FR3D, a software for finding local and composite recurrent structural motifs in RNA 3D structures. Sarver, M., Zirbel, C.L., Stombaugh, J., Mokdad, A. and Leontis, N.B. (2008) FR3D: finding local and composite recurrent structural motifs in RNA 3D structures. J Math Biol, 56, 215-252. RNAView, a program for quickly generating a display of RNA/DNA secondary structures with tertiary interactions. Yang, H., Jossinet, F., Leontis, N., Chen, L., Westbrook, J., Berman, H.M. and Westhof, E. (2003) Tools for the automatic identification and classification of RNA base pairs. Nucleic Acids Res, 31, 3450-3460. RNAMLview, a program to display and/or edit RNAView 2-dimensional diagrams. 3DNA, a software package for the analysis, rebuilding and visualization of three-dimensional nucleic acid structures.

334

Reactivity of Acid Generators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactivity of Acid Generators for Chemically Amplified Resists with Reactivity of Acid Generators for Chemically Amplified Resists with Low-Energy Electrons Atsuro Nakano, Takahiro Kozawa, Seiichi Tagawa, Tomasz Szreder, James F. Wishart, Toshiyuki Kai and Tsutomu Shimokawa Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., 45, L197-L200 (2006). [Find paper at the Japanese Journal of Applied Physics] Abstract: In chemically amplified resists for ionizing radiations such as electron beams and extreme ultraviolet (EUV), low-energy electrons play an important role in the pattern formation processes. The reactivity of acid generators with low-energy electrons was evaluated using solvated electrons in tetrahydrofuran, which were generated by a pulsed electron beam. The rate constants of acid generators with the solvated electrons ranged from 0.6 to 1.9 x 1011 M-1s-1

335

Optical high acidity sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for determining acid concentrations in solutions having acid concentrations of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar is disclosed. The apparatus includes a chamber for interrogation of the sample solution, a fiber optic light source for passing light transversely through the chamber, a fiber optic collector for receiving the collimated light after transmission through the chamber, a coating of an acid resistant polymeric composition upon at least one fiber end or lens, the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution within the chamber and having a detectable response to acid concentrations within the range of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar, a measurer for the response of the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution, and a comparer of the measured response to predetermined standards whereby the acid molarity of the sample solution within the chamber can be determined. Preferably, a first lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic light source, the first lens adapted to collimate light from the fiber optic light source, and a second lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic collector for focusing the collimated light after transmission through the chamber. 10 figs.

Jorgensen, B.S.; Nekimken, H.L.; Carey, W.P.; O`Rourke, P.E.

1997-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

336

Optical high acidity sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for determining acid concentrations in solutions having acid concentrations of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar is disclosed. The apparatus includes a chamber for interrogation of the sample solution, a fiber optic light source for passing light transversely through the chamber, a fiber optic collector for receiving the collimated light after transmission through the chamber, a coating of an acid resistant polymeric composition upon at least one fiber end or lens, the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution within the chamber and having a detectable response to acid concentrations within the range of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar, a measurer for the response of the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution, and, a comparer of the measured response to predetermined standards whereby the acid molarity of the sample solution within the chamber can be determined. Preferably, a first lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic light source, the first lens adapted to collimate light from the fiber optic light source, and a second lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic collector for focusing the collimated light after transmission through the chamber.

Jorgensen, Betty S. (Jemez Springs, NM); Nekimken, Howard L. (Los Alamos, NM); Carey, W. Patrick (Lynnwood, WA); O' Rourke, Patrick E. (Martinez, GA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Nucleic Acid Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nucleic Acid Tools Nucleic Acid Tools RNA 3D Motif Atlas, a representative collection of RNA 3D internal and hairpin loop motifs. Petrov, A.I., Zirbel, C.L., Leontis, N.B. (2013) Automated classification of RNA 3D motifs and the RNA 3D motif atlas. RNA. Non-redundant List of RNA-containing 3D structures. Leontis, N.B., & Zirbel, C.L. (2012) In Leontis, N. B., Westhof. E. (ed.), RNA 3D structure analysis and prediction. Springer Berlin Heidelberg Vol. 27, pp. 281-298. RNA Base Triple Atlas, a collection of motifs consisting of two RNA basepairs. Abu Almakarem, A.S., Petrov, A.I., Stombaugh, J., Zirbel, C.L. and Leontis, N.B. (2012) Comprehensive survey and geometric classification of base triples in RNA structures. Nucleic Acids Res, 40, 1407-1423. R3D Align, an application for detailed nucleotide to nucleotide

338

Synthesis and characterization of sulfonated single-walled carbon nanotubes and their performance as solid acid catalyst  

SciTech Connect

Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were treated with sulfuric acid at 300 deg. C to synthesize sulfonated SWCNTs (s-SWCNTs), which were characterized by electron microscopy, infrared, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and thermo analysis. Compared with activated carbon, more sulfonic acid groups can be introduced onto the surfaces of SWCNTs. The high degree ({approx}20 wt%) of surface sulfonation led to hydrophilic sidewalls that allows the SWCNTs to be uniformly dispersed in water and organic solvents. The high surface acidity of s-SWCNTs was demonstrated by NH{sub 3} temperature-programmed desorption technique and tested by an acetic acid esterification reaction catalyzed by s-SWCNTs. The results show that the water-dispersive s-SWCNTs are an excellent solid acid catalyst and demonstrate the potential of SWCNTs in catalysis applications. - Graphical abstract: Sulfonated SWCNTs with 20 wt% -SO{sub 2}OH groups were prepared by a high-temperature H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} process, which transformed the hydrophobic surface of pristine SWCNTs to a hydrophilic surface and provided an excellent performance as solid acid catalyst.

Yu Hao [School of Chemical and Energy Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China)], E-mail: yuhao@scut.edu.cn; Jin Yuguang; Li Zhili [School of Chemical and Energy Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Peng Feng [School of Chemical and Energy Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China)], E-mail: cefpeng@scut.edu.cn; Wang Hongjuan [School of Chemical and Energy Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Transition metal ion-assisted photochemical generation of alkyl halides and hydrocarbons from carboxylic acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Near-UV photolysis of aqueous solutions of propionic acid and aqueous Fe3+ in the absence of oxygen generates a mixture of hydrocarbons (ethane, ethylene and butane), carbon dioxide, and Fe2+. The reaction becomes mildly catalytic (about five turnovers) in the presence of oxygen which converts a portion of alkyl radicals to oxidizing intermediates that reoxidize Fe2+. The photochemistry in the presence of halide ions (X? = Cl?, Br?) generates ethyl halides via halogen atom abstraction from FeXn3?n by ethyl radicals. Near-quantitative yields of C2H5X are obtained at ?0.05 M X?. Competition experiments with Co(NH3)5Br2+ provided kinetic data for the reaction of ethyl radicals with FeCl2+ (k = (4.0 ± 0.5) × 106 M?1 s?1) and with FeBr2+ (k = (3.0 ± 0.5) × 107 M?1 s?1). Photochemical decarboxylation of propionic acid in the presence of Cu2+ generates ethylene and Cu+. Longer-chain acids also yield alpha olefins as exclusive products. These reactions become catalytic under constant purge with oxygen which plays a dual role. It reoxidizes Cu+ to Cu2+, and removes gaseous olefins to prevent accumulation of Cu+(olefin) complexes and depletion of Cu2+. The results underscore the profound effect that the choice of metal ions, the medium, and reaction conditions exert on the photochemistry of carboxylic acids.

Carraher, Jack; Pestovsky, Oleg; Bakac, Andreja

2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

340

Synthesis of acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinc acid comprising: a) dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and hexamethylenetetramine in a solvent selected from the group consisting of water, ethyl acetate, chloroform, acetone, ethanol, tetrahydrofuran and acetonitrile, to form a quaternary ammonium salt of the lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate; and b) hydrolyzing the quaternary ammonium salt with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid.

Moens, Luc (Lakewood, CO)

2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Effect of CH4 and O2 variations on rates of CH4 oxidation and stable isotope fractionation in tropical rain forest soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methane-oxidizing bacteria are the primary sink for CH{sub 4} in reduced soils, and account for as much as 90 percent of all CH{sub 4} produced. Methanotrophic bacteria strongly discriminate against the heavy isotopes of carbon, resulting in CH{sub 4} emissions that are significantly more enriched in {sup 13}C than the original source material. Previous studies have used an isotope mass balance approach to quantify CH{sub 4} sources and sinks in the field, based on the assumption that the fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation is a constant. This study quantifies the effect of systematic variations in CH{sub 4} and O{sub 2} concentrations on rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation and stable isotope fractionation in tropical rain forest soils. Soils were collected from the 0-15 cm depth, and incubated with varying concentrations of CH{sub 4} (100 ppmv, 500 ppmv, 1000 ppmv, and 5000 ppmv) or O{sub 2} (3 percent, 5 percent, 10 percent, and 21 percent). The isotope fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation was calculated for each incubation using a Rayleigh fractionation model. Rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation varied significantly between CH{sub 4} treatments, with the 100 ppmv CH{sub 4} treatment showing the lowest rate of CH{sub 4} uptake, and the other 3 treatments showing similar rates of CH{sub 4} uptake. Rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation did not vary significantly between the different O{sub 2} treatments. The fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation varied significantly between the different CH{sub 4} treatments, with the 5000 ppmv CH{sub 4} treatment showing the largest {sup 13}C-enrichment of residual CH{sub 4}. In treatments where CH{sub 4} concentration was not rate-limiting (> 500 ppmv CH{sub 4}), the fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation was negatively correlated with CH{sub 4} oxidation rate (P activity or CH{sub 4} pool size.

Teh, Yit Arn; Conrad, Mark; Silver, Whendee L.; Carlson, Charlotte M.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Lake-Effect Rain Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seven years of autumnal (September–November) precipitation data are examined to determine the characteristics of lake-effect precipitation downwind of Lake Erie. Atmospheric conditions for each lake-effect event are compiled and the mean ...

Todd J. Miner; J. M. Fritsch

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

How Often Does It Rain?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daily precipitation data from worldwide stations and gridded analyses and from 18 coupled global climate models are used to evaluate the models' performance in simulating the precipitation frequency, intensity, and the number of rainy days ...

Ying Sun; Susan Solomon; Aiguo Dai; Robert W. Portmann

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Acid Placement in Acid Jetting Treatments in Long Horizontal Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the Middle East, extended reach horizontal wells (on the order of 25,000 feet of horizontal displacement) are commonly acid stimulated by jetting acid out of drill pipe. The acid is jetted onto the face of the openhole wellbore as the drill pipe is withdrawn from the well. The jetting action helps to remove the drilling fluid filter cake and promote the acid to penetrate into the formation and form wormholes to stimulate the well. However, with very long sections of wellbore open to flow, the acid placement and subsequent wormhole distribution and penetration depths are uncertain. This study has modeled the acid jetting process using a comprehensive model of acid placement and wormhole propagation in a horizontal well. It is presumed that the acid jetting tool removes the drilling mud filter cake, so that no filter cake exists between the end of the drill pipe and the toe of the well. Correspondingly, the model also assumes that there is an intact, low-permeability filter cake on the borehole wall between the end of the drill pipe and the heel of the well. The drill pipe is modeled as being withdrawn from the well during the acid jetting treatment, as is done in practice. The acidizing simulator predicts the distribution of acid and the depths of wormholes formed as functions of time and position during the acid jetting treatment. The model shows that the acid jetting process as typically applied in these wells preferentially stimulates the toe region of the horizontal well. Comparisons of the simulation predictions with published data for acid jetting treatments in such wells showed good general agreement. Based on the simulation study, this study presents recommendations for improved acid jetting treatment procedures to improve the distribution of acid injected into the formation.

Sasongko, Hari

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Acidity and catalytic activity of zeolite catalysts bound with silica and alumina  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zeolites ZSM-5 (SiO2/Al2O3=30~280) and Y(SiO2/Al2O3=5.2~80) are bound with silica gel (Ludox HS-40 and Ludox AS-40) and alumina (?- Al2O3 and boehmite) by different binding methods, namely, gel-mixing, powder-mixing and powder-wet-mixing methods. The acidities of the bound catalysts and the zeolite powder are determined by NH3-TPD and FTIR. The textures of these catalysts are analyzed on a BET machine with nitrogen as a probe molecule. The micropore surface area and micropore volume are determined by t-plot method. Micropore volume distribution is determined by Horvath-Kawazoe approach with a cylindrical pore model. Mesopore volume distribution is determined by BJH method from the nitrogen desorption isotherm. Silica from the binder may react with extra-framework alumina in zeolites to form a new protonic acid. SiO2-bound catalysts have less strong acidity, Bronsted acidity and Lewis acidity than the zeolite powder. Also, the strength of strong acid sites of the zeolites is reduced when silica is embedded. Micropore surface area and micropore volume are reduced by about 19% and 18%, respectively, indicating some micropores of ZSM-5 are blocked on binding with silica. SiO2-bound ZSM-5 catalysts have less catalytic activity for butane transformation (cracking and disproportionation) and ethylene oligomerization than ZSM-5 powder. When alumina is used as a binder, both the total acid sites and Lewis acid sites are increased. Micropore surface area and micropore volume of ZSM-5 powder are reduced by 26% and 23%, respectively, indicating some micropores of ZSM-5 are blocked by the alumina binder. Alumina-bound catalysts showed a lower activity for butane transformation and ethylene oligomerization than ZSM-5 powder. Alkaline metals content in the binder is a crucial factor that influences the acidity of a bound catalyst. The metal cations neutralize more selectively Bronsted acid sites than Lewis acid sites. Alkaline metal cations in the binder and micropore blockage cause the bound catalysts to have a lower catalytic activity than the zeolite powder.

Wu, Xianchun

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Lubrication with boric acid additives  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Self-lubricating resin compositions including a boric acid additive and a synthetic polymer including those thermoset materials.

Erdemir, Ali (Naperville, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Kinetics and mechanism of the reduction of hydroxylamine-O-sulfonic acid by the hexaaquochromium(II) ion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The title reaction takes place with a 2:1 (Cr{sup 2+}):(HSA) stoichiometry (HSA = hydroxylamine-O-sulfonic acid) and yields CrNH{sub 3}{sup 3+}, Cr{sup 3+}, and CrSO{sub 4}{sup +} as the main products. The kinetics conform to the rate law {minus}d(HSA)/dt = {minus}d(Cr{sup 2+})/2(dt) = k{sub obs}(Cr{sup 2+})(HSA), where k{sub obs} = kK{sub a}/(K{sub a} + (H{sup +)}). At 25{degree}C and 1.0 M ionic strength (CHlO{sub 4} + LiClO{sub 4}) the parameter k has the value of 20.5 {plus minus} 0.3 M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} when K{sub a} is set at the value (6.8 {plus minus} 0.8) {times} 10{sup {minus}2} M, as determined by pH titration. In the proposed mechanism, Cr{sup 2+} attacks at the nitrogen end of the anion, NH{sub 2}OSO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, to form CrNH{sub 3}{sup 3+} and SO{sub 4}{sup {center dot}{minus}}. The sulfate radical anion then oxidizes rapidly the second mole of Cr{sup 2+} to yield Cr{sup 3+} and some CrSO{sub 4}{sup +}. In solutions containing Br{sup {minus}}, SO{sub 4}{sup {center dot}{minus}} oxidizes it to Br{sub 2}{sup {center dot}{minus}}. The latter reacts with Cr{sup 2+} to yield CrBr{sup 2+}. 19 refs., 2 figs.

Bakac, A.; Simunic, J.L.; Espenson, J.H. (Iowa State Univ., Ames (USA))

1990-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

348

Effect of CH4 and O2 variations on rates of CH4 oxidation and stable isotope fractionation in tropical rain forest soils  

SciTech Connect

Methane-oxidizing bacteria are the primary sink for CH{sub 4} in reduced soils, and account for as much as 90 percent of all CH{sub 4} produced. Methanotrophic bacteria strongly discriminate against the heavy isotopes of carbon, resulting in CH{sub 4} emissions that are significantly more enriched in {sup 13}C than the original source material. Previous studies have used an isotope mass balance approach to quantify CH{sub 4} sources and sinks in the field, based on the assumption that the fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation is a constant. This study quantifies the effect of systematic variations in CH{sub 4} and O{sub 2} concentrations on rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation and stable isotope fractionation in tropical rain forest soils. Soils were collected from the 0-15 cm depth, and incubated with varying concentrations of CH{sub 4} (100 ppmv, 500 ppmv, 1000 ppmv, and 5000 ppmv) or O{sub 2} (3 percent, 5 percent, 10 percent, and 21 percent). The isotope fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation was calculated for each incubation using a Rayleigh fractionation model. Rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation varied significantly between CH{sub 4} treatments, with the 100 ppmv CH{sub 4} treatment showing the lowest rate of CH{sub 4} uptake, and the other 3 treatments showing similar rates of CH{sub 4} uptake. Rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation did not vary significantly between the different O{sub 2} treatments. The fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation varied significantly between the different CH{sub 4} treatments, with the 5000 ppmv CH{sub 4} treatment showing the largest {sup 13}C-enrichment of residual CH{sub 4}. In treatments where CH{sub 4} concentration was not rate-limiting (> 500 ppmv CH{sub 4}), the fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation was negatively correlated with CH{sub 4} oxidation rate (P < 0.003, r{sup 2} = 0.86). A multiple regression model that included initial CH{sub 4} concentration and CH{sub 4} oxidation rate as independent variables accounted for 94 percent of the variability in the isotope fractionation data, suggesting that both factors are important in determining the extent of isotopic fractionation (P < 0.002, r{sup 2} = 0.94). The fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation did not vary significantly between the different O{sub 2} treatments. These results challenge the assumption that the isotope fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation remains constant, regardless of metabolic activity or CH{sub 4} pool size.

Teh, Yit Arn; Conrad, Mark; Silver, Whendee L.; Carlson, Charlotte M.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Non-Lead/Acid Battery Recyclers:  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in H2O solution such as Citric Acid, Acetic Acid, Acetates or ... MnO2 is soluble in sulfuric acid only at ... cells were treated by alkali followed by acids. ...

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

350

Bulk gold catalyzed oxidation reactions of amines and isocyanides and iron porphyrin catalyzed N-H and O-H bond insertion/cyclization reactions of diamines and aminoalcohols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work involves two projects. The first project entails the study of bulk gold as a catalyst in oxidation reactions of isocyanides and amines. The main goal of this project was to study the activation and reactions of molecules at metal surfaces in order to assess how organometallic principles for homogeneous processes apply to heterogeneous catalysis. Since previous work had used oxygen as an oxidant in bulk gold catalyzed reactions, the generality of gold catalysis with other oxidants was examined. Amine N-oxides were chosen for study, due to their properties and use in the oxidation of carbonyl ligands in organometallic complexes. When amine N-oxides were used as an oxidant in the reaction of isocyanides with amines, the system was able to produce ureas from a variety of isocyanides, amines, and amine N-oxides. In addition, the rate was found to generally increase as the amine N-oxide concentration increased, and decrease with increased concentrations of the amine. Mechanistic studies revealed that the reaction likely involves transfer of an oxygen atom from the amine N-oxide to the adsorbed isocyanide to generate an isocyanate intermediate. Subsequent nucleophilic attack by the amine yields the urea. This is in contrast to the bulk gold-catalyzed reaction mechanism of isocyanides with amines and oxygen. Formation of urea in this case was proposed to proceed through a diaminocarbene intermediate. Moreover, formation of the proposed isocyanate intermediate is consistent with the reactions of metal carbonyl ligands, which are isoelectronic to isocyanides. Nucleophilic attack at coordinated CO by amine N-oxides produces CO{sub 2} and is analogous to the production of an isocyanate in this gold system. When the bulk gold-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenation of amines was examined with amine N-oxides, the same products were afforded as when O{sub 2} was used as the oxidant. When the two types of oxidants were directly compared using the same reaction system and conditions, it was found that the oxidative dehydrogenation of dibenzylamine to Nbenzylidenebenzylamine, with N-methylmorpholine N-oxide (NMMO), was nearly quantitative (96%) within 24 h. However, the reaction with oxygen was much slower, with only a 52% yield of imine product over the same time period. Moreover, the rate of reaction was found to be influenced by the nature of the amine N-oxide. For example, the use of the weakly basic pyridine N-oxide (PyNO) led to an imine yield of only 6% after 24 h. A comparison of amine N-oxide and O2 was also examined in the oxidation of PhCH{sub 2}OH to PhCHO catalyzed by bulk gold. In this reaction, a 52% yield of the aldehyde was achieved when NMMO was used, while only a 7% product yield was afforded when O{sub 2} was the oxidant after 48 h. The bulk gold-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclic amines generates amidines, which upon treatment with Aerosil and water were found to undergo hydrolysis to produce lactams. Moreover, 5-, 6-, and 7-membered lactams could be prepared through a one-pot reaction of cyclic amines by treatment with oxygen, water, bulk gold, and Aerosil. This method is much more atom economical than industrial processes, does not require corrosive acids, and does not generate undesired byproducts. Additionally, the gold and Aerosil catalysts can be readily separated from the reaction mixture. The second project involved studying iron(III) tetraphenylporphyrin chloride, Fe(TPP)Cl, as a homogeneous catalyst for the generation of carbenes from diazo reagents and their reaction with heteroatom compounds. Fe(TPP)Cl, efficiently catalyzed the insertion of carbenes derived from methyl 2-phenyldiazoacetates into O-H bonds of aliphatic and aromatic alcohols. Fe(TPP)Cl was also found to be an effective catalyst for tandem N-H and O-H insertion/cyclization reactions when 1,2-diamines and 1,2-alcoholamines were treated with diazo reagents. This approach provides a one-pot process for synthesizing piperazinones and morpholinones and related analogues such as quinoxalinones and benzoxazin-2-ones.

Klobukowski, Erik

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

351

Evidence of acid-base interactions between amines and model indoor surfaces  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evidence of acid-base interactions between amines and model indoor surfaces Evidence of acid-base interactions between amines and model indoor surfaces by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy Title Evidence of acid-base interactions between amines and model indoor surfaces by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-63480 Year of Publication 2007 Authors Destaillats, Hugo, Brett C. Singer, and Lara A. Gundel Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 41 Start Page Chapter Pagination 3177-3181 ISBN Number 1352-2310 Keywords acid-base, cellulose, gypsum, nicotine, pyridine, sorption, surface materials Abstract Molecular associations of pyridine with cellulose and gypsum, surrogates for common indoor surface materials, were studied using an attenuated total reflection (ATR)-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometric method. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the molecular interactions of amines with well-characterized materials that affect their partitioning between indoor air and surfaces. The experimental results suggest the presence of at least two sorptive states for volatile and semivolatile amines, attributed to the chemisorbed species and to a more labile surface state (i.e., physisorbed pyridine). Both exhibited spectroscopic signatures corresponding to aromatic C-H stretching modes (2950-3100 cm-1) in the studied spectral region. Chemisorbed pyridine could be identified by the presence of additional IR signals in the N-H and O-H stretching region of the spectrum (2900-3600 cm-1). During desorption under a stream of N2, surface enrichment in the chemisorbed species was evidenced by a slower reduction of the absorbance of the broad band at 2900-3600 cm-1 in relation to the total pyridine absorbance change. This spectroscopic evidence for acid-base interactions between amines and surfaces is consistent with the desorption behavior observed in previous work for nicotine from model surfaces.

352

Fatty Acid Methods and Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... mixtures are analyzed by either gas chromatography with ... for fatty acids, including various oils and biodiesel ... Material 3276 Carrot Extract in Oil," Anal ...

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

353

Acidic gas capture by diamines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compositions and methods related to the removal of acidic gas. In particular, the present disclosure relates to a composition and method for the removal of acidic gas from a gas mixture using a solvent comprising a diamine (e.g., piperazine) and carbon dioxide. One example of a method may involve a method for removing acidic gas comprising contacting a gas mixture having an acidic gas with a solvent, wherein the solvent comprises piperazine in an amount of from about 4 to about 20 moles/kg of water, and carbon dioxide in an amount of from about 0.3 to about 0.9 moles per mole of piperazine.

Rochelle, Gary (Austin, TX); Hilliard, Marcus (Missouri City, TX)

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

354

Volatility of Aqueous Acetic Acid, Formic Acid, and Sodium Acetate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quality of water and steam is central to ensuring power plant component availability and reliability. A key part of developing operating cycle chemistry guidelines is an understanding of the impurity distribution between water and steam. This report examines the volatility of some of the principal cycle organic corrodents: acetic acid, formic acid, and sodium acetate.

2000-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

355

Carbonic Acid Retreatment of Biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project sought to address six objectives, outlined below. The objectives were met through the completion of ten tasks. (1) Solidify the theoretical understanding of the binary CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O system at reaction temperatures and pressures. The thermodynamics of pH prediction have been improved to include a more rigorous treatment of non-ideal gas phases. However it was found that experimental attempts to confirm theoretical pH predictions were still off by a factor of about 1.8 pH units. Arrhenius experiments were carried out and the activation energy for carbonic acid appears to be substantially similar to sulfuric acid. Titration experiments have not yet confirmed or quantified the buffering or acid suppression effects of carbonic acid on biomass. (2) Modify the carbonic acid pretreatment severity function to include the effect of endogenous acid formation and carbonate buffering, if necessary. It was found that the existing severity functions serve adequately to account for endogenous acid production and carbonate effects. (3) Quantify the production of soluble carbohydrates at different reaction conditions and severity. Results show that carbonic acid has little effect on increasing soluble carbohydrate concentrations for pretreated aspen wood, compared to pretreatment with water alone. This appears to be connected to the release of endogenous acids by the substrate. A less acidic substrate such as corn stover would derive benefit from the use of carbonic acid. (4) Quantify the production of microbial inhibitors at selected reaction conditions and severity. It was found that the release of inhibitors was correlated to reaction severity and that carbonic acid did not appear to increase or decrease inhibition compared to pretreatment with water alone. (5) Assess the reactivity to enzymatic hydrolysis of material pretreated at selected reaction conditions and severity. Enzymatic hydrolysis rates increased with severity, but no advantage was detected for the use of carbonic acid compared to water alone. (6) Determine optimal conditions for carbonic acid pretreatment of aspen wood. Optimal severities appeared to be in the mid range tested. ASPEN-Plus modeling and economic analysis of the process indicate that the process could be cost competitive with sulfuric acid if the concentration of solids in the pretreatment is maintained very high ({approx}50%). Lower solids concentrations result in larger reactors that become expensive to construct for high pressure applications.

Baylor university

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Carbonic Acid Pretreatment of Biomass  

SciTech Connect

This project sought to address six objectives, outlined below. The objectives were met through the completion of ten tasks. 1) Solidify the theoretical understanding of the binary CO2/H2O system at reaction temperatures and pressures. The thermodynamics of pH prediction have been improved to include a more rigorous treatment of non-ideal gas phases. However it was found that experimental attempts to confirm theoretical pH predictions were still off by a factor of about 1.8 pH units. Arrhenius experiments were carried out and the activation energy for carbonic acid appears to be substantially similar to sulfuric acid. Titration experiments have not yet confirmed or quantified the buffering or acid suppression effects of carbonic acid on biomass. 2) Modify the carbonic acid pretreatment severity function to include the effect of endogenous acid formation and carbonate buffering, if necessary. It was found that the existing severity functions serve adequately to account for endogenous acid production and carbonate effects. 3) Quantify the production of soluble carbohydrates at different reaction conditions and severity. Results show that carbonic acid has little effect on increasing soluble carbohydrate concentrations for pretreated aspen wood, compared to pretreatment with water alone. This appears to be connected to the release of endogenous acids by the substrate. A less acidic substrate such as corn stover would derive benefit from the use of carbonic acid. 4) Quantify the production of microbial inhibitors at selected reaction conditions and severity. It was found that the release of inhibitors was correlated to reaction severity and that carbonic acid did not appear to increase or decrease inhibition compared to pretreatment with water alone. 5) Assess the reactivity to enzymatic hydrolysis of material pretreated at selected reaction conditions and severity. Enzymatic hydrolysis rates increased with severity, but no advantage was detected for the use of carbonic acid compared to water alone. 6) Determine optimal conditions for carbonic acid pretreatment of aspen wood. Optimal severities appeared to be in the mid range tested. ASPEN-Plus modeling and economic analysis of the process indicate that the process could be cost competitive with sulfuric acid if the concentration of solids in the pretreatment is maintained very high (~50%). Lower solids concentrations result in larger reactors that become expensive to construct for high pressure applications.

G. Peter van Walsum; Kemantha Jayawardhana; Damon Yourchisin; Robert McWilliams; Vanessa Castleberry

2003-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

357

Photochemical Studies on Xanthurenic Acid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photochemical Studies on Xanthurenic Acid Photochemical Studies on Xanthurenic Acid J. E. Roberts, J. F. Wishart, L. Martinez, C. F. Chignell Photochem.Photobiol. 72, 467-471 (2000) Abstract: The tryptophan metabolite xanthurenic acid has been isolated from aged human cataractous lenses. The photophysical properties of xanthurenic acid were examined to determine if it is a potential chromophore for age-related cataractogenesis. We found that xanthurenic acid produces singlet oxygen (F*= 0.17; CD3OD) with the same efficiency as the lenticular chromophore N-formyl kynurenine and quenches singlet oxygen at a rate similar to other tryptophan metabolites (2.1 x 107 M-1 s-1; CD3OD) found in the eye. As the mechanisms of induction of cataracts may also involve redox reactions, the interactions of hydrated electrons (e-aq), the azide radical

358

Hydrogen storage in a combined M.sub.xAlH.sub.6/M'.sub.y(NH.sub.2).sub.z system and methods of making and using the same  

SciTech Connect

As a promising clean fuel for vehicles, hydrogen can be used for propulsion, either directly or in fuel cells. Hydrogen storage compositions having high storage capacity, good dehydrogenation kinetics, and hydrogen release and uptake reactions which are reversible are disclosed and described. Generally a hydrogen storage composition of a metal aluminum hexahydride and a metal amide can be used. A combined system (Li.sub.3AIH.sub.6/3LiNH.sub.2) with a very high inherent hydrogen capacity (7.3 wt %) can be carried out at moderate temperatures, and with approximately 95% of that inherent hydrogen storage capacity (7.0%) is reversible over repeated cycling of release and uptake.

Lu, Jun (Salt Lake City, UT); Fang, Zhigang Zak (Salt Lake City, UT); Sohn, Hong Yong (Salt Lake City, UT)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

359

Hydrogen storage in a combined M.sub.xAlH.sub.6/M'.sub.y(NH.sub.2).sub.z system and methods of making and using the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

As a promising clean fuel for vehicles, hydrogen can be used for propulsion, either directly or in fuel cells. Hydrogen storage compositions having high storage capacity, good dehydrogenation kinetics, and hydrogen release and uptake reactions which are reversible are disclosed and described. Generally a hydrogen storage composition of a metal aluminum hexahydride and a metal amide can be used. A combined system (Li.sub.3AIH.sub.6/3LiNH.sub.2) with a very high inherent hydrogen capacity (7.3 wt %) can be carried out at moderate temperatures, and with approximately 95% of that inherent hydrogen storage capacity (7.0%) is reversible over repeated cycling of release and uptake.

Lu, Jun (Salt Lake City, UT); Fang, Zhigang Zak (Salt Lake City, UT); Sohn, Hong Yong (Salt Lake City, UT)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

360

Mechanochemical transformation of mixtures of Ca(OH){sub 2} and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4} or P{sub 2}O{sub 5}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed comparative study of the mechanochemical transformation of two mixtures: Ca(OH){sub 2}-(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4} and Ca(OH){sub 2}-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, milled in a mortar dry grinder for different periods of time was carried out. The phase transformations obtained at each milling stage were studied by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis. The transformations taking place during the first periods of milling are very different for both mixtures. However, prolonged milling, over nearly the same period, causes amorphization of both mixtures. DSC analysis of the milled powders showed the temperature of crystallization of hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP). Calcinations of all the different milled powders at 800 deg. C for 2 h, results in the formation of hydroxyapatite and {beta}-TCP.

Gonzalez, G. [Laboratorio de Materiales, Centro Tecnologico, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas. Aptdo. 21827 Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela)]. E-mail: gemagonz@ivic.ve; Sagarzazu, A. [Laboratorio de Materiales, Centro Tecnologico, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas. Aptdo. 21827 Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Villalba, R. [Laboratorio de Materiales, Centro Tecnologico, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas. Aptdo. 21827 Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela)

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh acid rain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

SiO{sub 2} nanospheres with tailorable interiors by directly controlling Zn{sup 2+} and NH{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O species in an emulsion process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SiO{sub 2} nanospheres with tailorable interiors were synthesized by a facile one-spot microemulsion process using TEOS as silica source, wherein cyclohexane including triton X-100 and n-octanol as oil phase and Zn{sup 2+} or NH{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O aqueous solution as dispersive phase, respectively. The products were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray Powder Diffraction. It was suggested that the as-synthesized silica nanospheres possessed grape-stone-like porous or single hollow interior, and also found that the ammonia dosage and aging time played key roles in controlling the size and structure of silica nanospheres. Furthermore, the comparative results confirmed that in-situ zinc species [ZnO/Zn(OH){sub 2}] acted as the temporary templates to construct grape-stone-like interior, and a simultaneously competing etching process occurred owing to the soluble Zn(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup 2+} complex formation while the additional excessive ammonia was introduced. With the aging time being extended, the in-situ nanocrystals tended to grow into bigger ones by Ostwald Ripening, producing single hollow interior. - Graphical Abstract: Formation process of SiO{sub 2} nanospheres with porous and single hollow interior. Highlights: > ZnO/Zn(OH){sub 2} nanocrystals as the temporary templates shape the interior structures of SiO{sub 2} nanospheres. > Fabrication of porous and single hollow interiors needs no additional processes such as roasting or dissolving. > Tailorable interiors can be easily obtained through adjusting the aging time of temporary templates.

Liao Yuchao [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wu Xiaofeng [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wang Zhen [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen Yunfa, E-mail: yfchen@home.ipe.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

Catalytic Hydrogenation of Glutamic Acid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technology to convert biomass to chemical building blocks provides an opportunity to displace fossil fuels and increase the economic viability of bio-refineries. Coupling fermentation capability with aqueous phase catalysis provides novel routes to monomers and chemicals, including those not accessible from petrochemical routes. Glutamic acid provides a platform to numerous compounds through thermochemical approaches including, hydrogentation, cyclyization, decarboxylation and deamination. Hydrogenation of amino acids also provides access into chiral compounds with high enantio-purity. This paper details aqueous phase hydrogenation reactions we have developed that lead to valuable chemical intermediates from glutamic acid.

Holladay, John E.; Werpy, Todd A.; Muzatko, Danielle S.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

PRODUCTION OF TRIFLUOROACETIC ACID COMPOUNDS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for the preparation of trifluoroacetic acid. Acetone vapor diluted wlth nitrogen and fluorine also diluted with nltrogen are fed separately at a temperature of about 210 deg C into a reaction vessel containing a catalyst mass selected from-the group consisting of silver and gold. The temperature in the reaction vessel is maintained in the range of 200 deg to 250 deg C. The reaction product, trifluoroacetyl fluoride, is absorbed in aqueous alkali solution. Trifluoroacetic acid is recovered from the solution by acidification wlth an acid such as sulfuric followed by steam distillation.

Haworth, W.N.; Stacey, M.

1949-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

364

Addendum to Guarantee Testing Results from the Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project: Additiona NH3, NOx, and CO Testing Results  

SciTech Connect

On March 28-30 and May 1-4, 2007, CONSOL Energy Inc. Research & Development (CONSOL R&D) performed flue gas sampling at AES Greenidge to verify the performance of the multi-pollutant control system recently installed by Babcock Power Environmental Inc. (BPEI) on the 107-MW Unit 4 (Boiler 6). The multi-pollutant control system includes combustion modifications and a hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR)/in-duct selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, followed by a Turbosorp{reg_sign} circulating fluidized bed dry scrubber system and baghouse to reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HCl, HF, and particulate matter. Mercury removal is provided via the co-benefits afforded by the in-duct SCR, dry scrubber, and baghouse and by injection of activated carbon upstream of the scrubber, as required. The testing in March and May demonstrated that the multi-pollutant control system attained its performance targets for NO{sub x} emissions, SO{sub 2} removal efficiency, acid gas (SO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF) removal efficiency, and mercury removal efficiency. However, the ammonia slip measured between the SCR outlet and air heater inlet was consistently greater than the guarantee of 2 ppmvd {at} 3% O{sub 2}. As a result, additional testing was performed on May 30-June 1 and on June 20-21, 2007, in conjunction with tuning of the hybrid NO{sub x} control system by BPEI, in an effort to achieve the performance target for ammonia slip. This additional testing occurred after the installation of a large particle ash (LPA) screen and removal system just above the SCR reactor and a fresh SCR catalyst layer in mid-May. This report describes the results of the additional tests. During the May 30-June 1 sampling period, CONSOL R&D and Clean Air Engineering (CAE) each measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the air heater inlet, downstream of the in-duct SCR reactor. In addition, CONSOL R&D measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the economizer outlet, upstream of the SCR reactor, and CAE measured flue gas NO{sub x} and CO concentrations at the sampling grids located at the inlet and outlet of the SCR reactor. During the June 20-21 sampling period, CONSOL R&D measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the air heater inlet. All ammonia measurements were performed using a modified version of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Conditional Test Method (CTM) 027. The NO{sub x} and CO measurements were performed using U.S. EPA Methods 7E and 10, respectively.

Daniel P. Connell; James E. Locke

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Metabolism of Thioctic Acid in Algae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

METABOLISM OF THlOCTlC ACID IN ALGAE TWO-WEEK LOAN COPY ThisMETABOLISM OF THIOCTIC ACID IN ALGAE Hans Grisebach, R. , C.METABOLISM OF THIOCTIC ACID IN ALGAE Hans Grisebach, R. C.

Grisebach, Hans; Fuller, R.C.; Calvin, M.

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Nucleic acid arrays and methods of synthesis  

SciTech Connect

The present invention generally relates to high density nucleic acid arrays and methods of synthesizing nucleic acid sequences on a solid surface. Specifically, the present invention contemplates the use of stabilized nucleic acid primer sequences immobilized on solid surfaces, and circular nucleic acid sequence templates combined with the use of isothermal rolling circle amplification to thereby increase nucleic acid sequence concentrations in a sample or on an array of nucleic acid sequences.

Sabanayagam, Chandran R. (Allston, MA); Sano, Takeshi (Needham, MA); Misasi, John (Syracuse, NY); Hatch, Anson (Seattle, WA); Cantor, Charles (Del Mar, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Seasonalepisodic control of acid deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report contains the climatological, technical and economic factors for episodic and seasonal control of emissions in existing power plants. Analyzing a large data set of acid deposition for the years 1982-85, we find ...

Fay, James A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Polybenzimidazole: Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Polybenzimidazole: Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cells Speaker(s): Dave Sopchak Date: May 1, 2013 - 3:00pm - 4:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Max Wei The PBI...

369

Well development with acid wool  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a unique method to prevent the lost circulation of drilling fluids in fractured bedrock aquifers. The method utilizes acid wool to bridge fractures and prevent the migration of these fluids in to the reservoir. This wool material collects the mud on its surface and allows it to be removed during development. The wool is produced from melted silic-carbonate rock and is dissolved using hydrochloric acid. The timing and methodology of installation is provided.

Hanna, T.M. (Hydrologic Consultants Inc., Lakewood, CO (USA)); Rothauge, F. (Quality Drilling Fluids Engineering Inc., Longmont, CO (USA))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Acidic Ion Exchange Membrane - Energy Innovation Portal  

Technology Marketing Summary In this invention we report the synthesis of a copolymer of vinyl phosphonic acid (VPA) and vinyl zirconium phosphorous (VZP) acid has ...

371

Conversion of sugarcane bagasse to carboxylic acids under thermophilic conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the inevitable depletion of the petroleum supply and increasing energy demands in the world, interest has been growing in bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass (e.g., sugarcane bagasse). Lignocellulosic biomass is an abundant, inexpensive, and renewable resource. Most of current conversion technologies require expensive enzymes and sterility. In contrast, the patented MixAlco process requires no enzymes or sterility, making it attractive to convert lignocellulosic biomass to transportation fuels and valuable chemicals. This study focuses on pretreatment and thermophilic fermentation in the MixAlco process. Ammonium bicarbonate (NH4HCO3) was discovered to be a better pH buffer than previously widely used calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in anaerobic fermentations under thermophilic conditions (55°C). The desired pH should be controlled within 6.5 to 7.5. Over 85% acetate content in the product was found in paper fermentations and bagasse fermentations. Hot-lime-water-treated bagasse countercurrent fermentations buffered by ammonium bicarbonate achieved 50–60% higher total product concentrations than those using calcium carbonate. It was nearly double in paper batch fermentations if the pH was controlled around 7.0. Ammonium bicarbonate is a “weak” methane inhibitor, so a strong methane inhibitor (e.g., iodoform) is still required in ammonium bicarbonate buffered fermentations. Residual calcium salts did not show significant effects on ammonium bicarbonate buffered fermentations. Lake inocula from the Great Salt Lake, Utah, proved to be feasible in ammonium bicarbonate buffered fermentations. Under mesophilic conditions (40°C), the inoculum from the Great Salt Lake increased the total product concentration about 30%, compared to the marine inoculum. No significant fermentation performance difference, however, was found under thermophilic conditions. The Continuum Particle Distribution Model (CPDM) is a powerful tool to predict product concentrations and conversions for long-term countercurrent fermentations, based on batch fermentation data. The experimental acid concentrations and conversions agree well with the CPDM predictions (average absolute error < 15%). Aqueous ammonia treatment proved feasible for bagasse. Air-lime-treated bagasse had the highest acid concentration among the three treated bagasse. Air-lime treatment coupled with ammonium bicarbonate buffered fermentations is preferred for a “crop-tofuel” process. Aqueous ammonia treatment combined with ammonium bicarbonate buffered fermentations is a viable modification of the MixAlco process, if “ammonia recycle” is deployed.

Fu, Zhihong

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Ultra-Deep Strong Acidizing and Sour Gas Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two acidizing environments that were studied included 10% acetic acid and a mixture of 10% acetic acid and 10% hydrochloric acid with 15 psia hydrogen ...

373

Acid sorption regeneration process using carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carboxylic acids are sorbed from aqueous feedstocks onto a solid adsorbent in the presence of carbon dioxide under pressure. The acids are freed from the sorbent phase by a suitable regeneration method, one of which is treating them with an organic alkylamine solution thus forming an alkylamine-carboxylic acid complex which thermally decomposes to the desired carboxylic acid and the alkylamine.

King, C. Judson (Kensington, CA); Husson, Scott M. (Anderson, SC)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Method for production of petroselinic acid and OMEGA12 hexadecanoic acid in transgenic plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a process for producing lipids containing the fatty acid petroselinic acid in plants. The production of petroselinic acid is accomplished by genetically transforming plants which do not normally accumulate petroselinic acid with a gene for a .omega.12 desaturase from another species which does normally accumulate petroselinic acid.

Ohlrogge, John B. (Okemos, MI); Cahoon, Edgar B. (Lansing, MI); Shanklin, John (Upton, NY); Somerville, Christopher R. (Okemos, MI)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Method for production of petroselinic acid and OMEGA12 hexadecanoic acid in transgenic plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a process for producing lipids containing the fatty acid, petroselinic acid, in plants. The production of petroselinic acid is accomplished by genetically transforming plants which do not normally accumulate petroselinic acid with a gene for a {omega}12 desaturase from another species which does normally accumulate petroselinic acid. 19 figs.

Ohlrogge, J.B.; Cahoon, E.B.; Shanklin, J.; Somerville, C.R.

1995-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

376

Export.gov - NH Our Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Identify potential partners. Market your firm directly to local companies. Partner Search Identify potential partners and get detailed company reports. Determine the...

377

Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Exports to Canada  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

56,879 39,438 26,767 18,297 19,826 47,451 1998-2012 Pipeline Prices 7.52 9.72 5.04 5.48 5.45 4.08 1998...

378

Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Exports to Canada  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Pipeline Volumes 0 64 0 0 336 199 2007-2012 Pipeline Prices -- 7.61 -- -- 7.54 2.62 2007-2012...

379

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Volume 3Chapter 3 Syntheses of Conjugated Linoleic Acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Volume 3 Chapter 3 Syntheses of Conjugated Linoleic Acids Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press   Downloadable pdf...

380

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Volume 3 Chapter 9 Conjugated Linoleic Acid in Hypertension  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Volume 3 Chapter 9 Conjugated Linoleic Acid in Hypertension Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press   Downloadable pdf...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh acid rain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Volume 3Chapter 1 Conjugated Linoleic Acid Synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Volume 3 Chapter 1 Conjugated Linoleic Acid Synthesis Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press   Downloadable pdf...

382

acid  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

cut into the Pajarito Plateau in north- central New Mexico. From 1943 to 1964, during nuclear weapons research activities at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL, then...

383

Why Sequence Algae from Acidic Waters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequence Algae from Acidic Waters? Strains of green algae from isolated acidic waters are being sequenced to understand how they adapt to variable levels of carbon dioxide, as well...

384

Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and thence quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal. 1 fig.

Greenhalgh, W.O.

1987-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

385

trans Fatty Acid Content Laboratory Proficiency Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing service for trans fatty acid content. Samples include non-hydrogenated Soybean Oil and hydrogenated Soybean Oil. trans Fatty Acid Content Laboratory Proficiency Program Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP) aocs applicants certifie

386

Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and then quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal.

Greenhalgh, Wilbur O. (Richland, WA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Fuel cell electrolyte membrane with acidic polymer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrolyte membrane is formed by an acidic polymer and a low-volatility acid that is fluorinated, substantially free of basic groups, and is either oligomeric or non-polymeric.

Hamrock, Steven J. (Stillwater, MN); Larson, James M. (Saint Paul, MN); Pham, Phat T. (Little Canada, MN); Frey, Matthew H. (Cottage Grove, MN); Haugen, Gregory M. (Edina, MN); Lamanna, William M. (Stillwater, MN)

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

388

Recovery of boric acid from ion exchangers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The recovery of boric acid from an anion exchange resin is improved by eluting the boric acid with an aqueous solution of ammonium bicarbonate. The boric acid can be readily purified and concentrated by distilling off the water and ammonium bicarbonate. This process is especially useful for the recovery of boric acid containing a high percentage of .sup.10 B which may be found in some nuclear reactor coolant solutions.

Pollock, Charles W. (Richland, WA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Conversion of Levulinic Acid to Methyl Tetrahydrofuran ...  

Search PNNL. PNNL Home; About; Research; Publications; Jobs; News; Contacts; Conversion of Levulinic Acid to Methyl Tetrahydrofuran. Battelle ...

390

Production of high molecular weight polylactic acid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A degradable high molecular weight poly(lactic acid) is described. The poly(lactic acid) has a terminal end group of one of carboxyl or hydroxyl groups with low molecular weight poly(lactic acid) units coupled with linking agents of di-isocyanates, bis-epoxides, bis-oxazolines and bis-ortho esters. The resulting high molecular weight poly(lactic acid) can be used for applications taking advantage of the improved physical properties.

Bonsignore, P.V.

1995-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

391

Production of high molecular weight polylactic acid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A degradable high molecular weight poly(lactic acid). A poly(lactic acid) has a terminal end group of one of carboxyl or hydroxyl groups with low molecular weight poly(lactic acid) units coupled with linking agents of di-isocyanates, bis-epoxides, bis-oxazolines and bis-ortho esters. The resulting high molecular weight poly(lactic acid) can be used for applications taking advantage of the improved physical properties.

Bonsignore, Patrick V. (Joilet, IL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

NITRIC ACID RECPVERY FROM WASTE COLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The recovery of nitric acid from aqueous nitrate solutions containing fission products as impurities is described. It is desirable to subject such solutions to concentration by evaporation since nitric acid is regenerated thereby. A difficulty, however, is that the highly radioactive fission product ruthenium is volatilized together with the nitric acid. It has been found that by adding nitrous acids ruthenium volatilization is suppressed and reduced to a negligible degree so that the distillate obtained is practically free of rutheniuim.

Wilson, A.S.

1959-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

393

NITRIC ACID RECOVERY FROM WASTE SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The recovery of nitric acid from aqueous nitrate solutions containing fission products as impurities is described. It is desirable to subject such solutions to concentration by evaporation since nitric acid is regenerated thereby. A difficulty, however, is that the highly radioactive fission product ruthenium is volatilized together with the nitric acid. It has been found that by adding nitrous acid, ruthenium volatilization is suppressed and reduced to a negligible degree so that the distillate obtained is practically free of ruthenium.

Wilson, A.S.

1959-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

394

Conversion of Levulinic Acid to Methyl Tetrahydrofuran ...  

Biomass and Biofuels Conversion of Levulinic Acid to Methyl Tetrahydrofuran Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Contact PNNL About This Technology ...

395

Synthesis of an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid comprising. The process involves dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and an alkali metal diformylamide in an organic solvent selected from the group consisting of acetonitrile, methanol, tetrahydrofuran, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran and methylformate or mixtures to form a suspension of an alkyl 5-(N,N-diformylamino) levulinate ester; and hydrolyzing the alkyl 5-(N,N-diformylamino) levulinate with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-amino levulinic acid.

Moens, L.

1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

396

Hydrogenation using hydrides and acid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a very rapid, non-catalytic process for hydrogenating unsaturated organic compounds that can be carried out at temperatures generally lower than previously utilized. In this process organic compounds which contain at least one reducible functional group are hydrogenated non-catalytically by reacting them with a hydride complex and a strong acid. The reducible functional group may be, for example, C=C, C-OH, C-O-C, or a strained cyclic structure. If the reactants are not mutually soluble, they are dissolved in an appropriate inert solvent. 3 tabs.

Bullock, R.M.

1989-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

397

(Acidic deposition and the environment)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The travelers presented several papers at the Fourth International Conference on Acidic Deposition. These covered the following topics: atmospheric chemistry and deposition of airborne nitrogen compounds, soil solution chemistry in high-elevation spruce forests, and forest throughfall measurements for estimating total sulfur deposition to ecosystems. In addition, S. E. Lindberg was invited to organize and chair a conference session on Throughfall and Stemflow Experiments, and to present an invited lecture on Atmospheric Deposition and Canopy Interactions of Metals and Nitrogen in Forest Ecosystems: The Influence of Global Change'' at the 110th Anniversary Celebration of the Free University of Amsterdam.

Garten, C.T.; Lindberg, S.E.; Van Miegroet, H.

1990-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

398

Development of an Amino Acid (in Solution) Standard ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of an Amino Acid (in Solution) Standard Reference Material. Summary: Amino acids are the sequential components ...

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

399

LITERATURE REVIEW OF BORIC ACID SOLUBILITY DATA  

SciTech Connect

A new solvent system is being evaluated for use in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) and in the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The new system replaces the current dilute nitric acid strip solution with 0.01 M boric acid. This literature study is performed to determine if there is a potential for boric acid to crystallize in the lines with emphasis on the transfer lines to the Defense Waste Processing Facility. This report focuses on the aqueous phase chemistry of boric acid under conditions relevant to MCU and SWPF. Operating and transfer conditions examined for the purpose of this review include temperatures between 13 C (McLeskey, 2008) and 45 C (Fondeur, 2007) and concentrations from 0 to 3M in nitric acid as well as exposure of small amounts of entrained boric acid in the organic phase to the sodium hydroxide caustic wash stream. Experiments were also conducted to observe any chemical reactions and off-gas generation that could occur when 0.01 M boric acid solution mixes with 3 M nitric acid solution and vice versa. Based on the low concentration (0.01M) of boric acid in the MCU/SWPF strip acid and the moderate operating temperatures (13 C to 45 C), it is unlikely that crystallization of boric acid will occur in the acid strip solution under process or transfer conditions. Mixing experiments of boric and nitric acid show no measurable gas generation (< 1 cc of gas per liter of solution) under similar process conditions.

Crapse, K.; Kyser, E.

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

400

Numerical Modeling of Orographically Forced Postfrontal Rain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nonhydrostatic mesoscale model is used to simulate the dynamics and microphysics of postfrontal flow in the mountainous region of southeastern Australia. The aim of the paper is to determine if it is possible to use 2D models to simulate the ...

Deborah J. Abbs; Jørgen B. Jensen

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh acid rain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A Survey of Radar Rain Measurement Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several methods used to estimate rainfall rate R are surveyed. The distribution N(D) of drop sizes is of central importance in determining the reflectivity factor Z, attenuation rate K, and R. With single-parameter measurement techniques either ...

Richard J. Doviak

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Jack Rains | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EARLY CHILDHOOD I was born 7-7-36, and I was one of eight children, and we were living at Norris Lake at Demre community when they started building TVA. Then my dad had...

403

Observation and Analysis of Midwestern Rain Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A prototype meteorological station has been established in Iowa City for the measurement of surface meteorological parameters with accuracy and resolution sufficient to allow for modern dimensional and scaling analyses. The sensor characteristics ...

K. P. Georgakakos; A. A. Carsteanu; P. L. Sturdevant; J. A. Cramer

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Acoustic Radar Studies of Rain Microphysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Raindrop size distributions are obtained from the Doppler frequency spectrum of an acoustic radar. Number concentrations of 12 drop diameters with a minimum diameter 0.14 cm are obtained and averaged over 3–15 min at 20-m range gates from 20 to ...

S. G. Bradley

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

In Search of the Rain Forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil extraction in Ecuador, the appropriation and industrialization of herbal medicine in the forests of Belize, a critical history

Hamilton-Smith, Elery

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Robert B. Raines | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

407

Rain scavenging studies. Progress report No. 11  

SciTech Connect

The modeling of convective storm scavenging processes is going forward on two distinct fronts. The first of these relates to the microphysical processes, particularly to the study of their response to micro-dynamical components of the convective circulation. It is found that the droplet size spectra generated are responsive to variations of vertical velocity due to turbulence within the cloud and to humidity variations due to entrainment processes. Both sets of variations give responses that differ for different amplitudes and frequencies, i.e., rapid, small-amplitude eddies appear to enhance small-droplet development, whereas slow, large-amplitude oscillations tend to enhance large-droplet development. An allied study of the assumptions used in the microphysical equations is also being made. The second modeling effort is addressed to the problem of three-dimensional representation of convective dynamics. Equations are presented, and some of the problems under attack are discussed. (auth)

Dingle, A.N.

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Self-assembling multimeric nucleic acid constructs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is directed to constructs and compositions containing multimeric forms of nucleic acid. Multimeric nucleic acids comprise single-stranded nucleic acids attached via biotin to streptavidin and bound with a functional group. These constructs can be utilized in vivo to treat or identify diseased tissue or cells. Repeated administrations of multimeric nucleic acid compositions produce a rapid and specific amplification of nucleic acid constructs and their attached functional groups. For treatment purposes, functional groups may be toxins, radioisotopes, genes or enzymes. Diagnostically, labeled multimeric constructs may be used to identify specific targets in vivo or in vitro. Multimeric nucleic acids may also be used in nanotechnology and to create self-assembling polymeric aggregates such as membranes of defined porosity, microcircuits and many other products. 5 figs.

Cantor, C.R.; Niemeyer, C.M.; Smith, C.L.; Sano, Takeshi; Hnatowich, D.J.; Rusckowski, M.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Self-assembling multimeric nucleic acid constructs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is directed to constructs and compositions containing multimeric forms of nucleic acid. Multimeric nucleic acids comprise single-stranded nucleic acids attached via biotin to streptavidin and bound with a functional group. These constructs can be utilized in vivo to treat or identify diseased tissue or cells. Repeated administrations of multimeric nucleic acid compositions produce a rapid and specific amplification of nucleic acid constructs and their attached functional groups. For treatment purposes, functional groups may be toxins, radioisotopes, genes or enzymes. Diagnostically, labeled multimeric constructs may be used to identify specific targets in vivo or in vitro. Multimeric nucleic acids may also be used in nanotechnology and to create self-assembling polymeric aggregates such as membranes of defined porosity, microcircuits and many other products.

Cantor, Charles R. (Boston, MA); Niemeyer, Christof M. (Bremen, DE); Smith, Cassandra L. (Boston, MA); Sano, Takeshi (Boston, MA); Hnatowich, Donald J. (Brookline, MA); Rusckowski, Mary (Southborough, MA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Self-assembling multimeric nucleic acid constructs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is directed to constructs and compositions containing multimeric forms of nucleic acid. Multimeric nucleic acids comprise single-stranded nucleic acids attached via biotin to streptavidin and bound with a functional group. These constructs can be utilized in vivo to treat or identify diseased tissue or cells. Repeated administrations of multimeric nucleic acid compositions produce a rapid and specific amplification of nucleic acid constructs and their attached functional groups. For treatment purposes, functional groups may be toxins, radioisotopes, genes or enzymes. Diagnostically, labeled multimeric constructs may be used to identify specific targets in vivo or in vitro. Multimeric nucleic acids may also be used in nanotechnology and to create self-assembling polymeric aggregates such as membranes of defined porosity, microcircuits and many other products.

Cantor, Charles R. (Boston, MA); Niemeyer, Christof M. (Bremen, DE); Smith, Cassandra L. (Boston, MA); Sano, Takeshi (Boston, MA); Hnatowich, Donald J. (Brookline, MA); Rusckowski, Mary (Southborough, MA)

1999-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

411

Nucleic Acid Standards - Program List  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

List of Programs and References List of Programs and References CEHS M. A. El Hassan & C. R. Calladine (1995). ``The Assessment of the Geometry of Dinucleotide Steps in Double-Helical DNA: A New Local Calculation Scheme.'' J. Mol. Biol. 251, 648-664. X. J. Lu, M. A. El Hassan & C. A. Hunter (1997). ``Structure and Conformation of Helical Nucleic Acids: Analysis Program (SCHNAaP).''J. Mol. Biol. 273, 668-680. CompDNA (Please refer to Dr. Andrey A. Gorin: agor@sbnmr1.ski.mskcc.org OR Dr. Victor B. Zhurkin: zhurkin@lmmb.nci.nih.gov) A. A. Gorin, V. B. Zhurkin & W. K. Olson (1995). ``B-DNA Twisting Correlates with Base-pair Morphology.'' J. Mol. Biol. 247, 34-48. K. M. Kosikov, A. A. Gorin, V. B. Zhurkin & W. K. Olson (1999). ``DNA Stretching and Compression: Large-scale Simulations of Double Helical

412

Nucleic Acid Standards - Refinement Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Refinement Parameters Refinement Parameters The DNA/RNA topology and parameter files for X-PLOR are shown below. These were tested with DNA structures and with protein-DNA complexes. X-PLOR topology file X-PLOR parameter files: X-PLOR parameter file For the refinement of high resolution structures (< 1.7 Angstroms) the parameter file with distinct bond distances and bond angles for both C2'-endo and C3'-endo conformations should be considered: X-PLOR parameter file for high resolution structures "New Parameters for the Refinement of Nucleic Acid Containing Structures." Gary Parkinson, Jaroslav Vojtechovsky, Lester Clowney, Axel Brunger*, and Helen M. Berman. (1996) Acta Cryst. D 52, 57-64 Rutgers University, Department of Chemistry, Piscataway, NJ 08855-0939; *The Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Departments of Molecular and

413

A Direct, Biomass-Based Synthesis of Benzoic Acid: Formic Acid-Mediated Deoxygenation of the Glucose-Derived Materials Quinic Acid and Shikimic Acid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Direct, Biomass-Based Synthesis of Benzoic Acid: Formic200X An alternative biomass-based route to aromatics isaromatic compounds from biomass resources could provide a

Arceo, Elena

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Biorenewable Process to Acrylic Acid - PNNL: Available ...  

Acrylic acid is commonly used in the production of consumer products. Highly notable is its use in producing super absorbent polymers, the component ...

415

Available Technologies: Enhancing Fatty Acid Production by ...  

Synthetic biology has opened the door to fatty acid production from simple carbon sources through engineering microbes such as E. coil or yeast.

416

Analysis of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: A forecast of the electric utility industry response to Title IV, Acid Deposition Control  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 incorporate, for the first time, provisions aimed specifically at the control of acid rain. These provisions restrict emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) from electric power generating stations. The restrictions on SO{sub 2} take the form of an overall cap on the aggregate emissions from major generating plants, allowing substantial flexibility in the industry`s response to those restrictions. This report discusses one response scenario through the year 2030 that was examined through a simulation of the utility industry based on assumptions consistent with characterizations used in the National Energy Strategy reference case. It also makes projections of emissions that would result from the use of existing and new capacity and of the associated additional costs of meeting demand subject to the emission limitations imposed by the Clean Air Act. Fuel-use effects, including coal-market shifts, consistent with the response scenario are also described. These results, while dependent on specific assumptions for this scenario, provide insight into the general character of the likely utility industry response to Title IV.

Molburg, J.C.; Fox, J.A.; Pandola, G.; Cilek, C.M.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Analysis of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: A forecast of the electric utility industry response to Title IV, Acid Deposition Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 incorporate, for the first time, provisions aimed specifically at the control of acid rain. These provisions restrict emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and oxides of nitrogen (NO[sub x]) from electric power generating stations. The restrictions on SO[sub 2] take the form of an overall cap on the aggregate emissions from major generating plants, allowing substantial flexibility in the industry's response to those restrictions. This report discusses one response scenario through the year 2030 that was examined through a simulation of the utility industry based on assumptions consistent with characterizations used in the National Energy Strategy reference case. It also makes projections of emissions that would result from the use of existing and new capacity and of the associated additional costs of meeting demand subject to the emission limitations imposed by the Clean Air Act. Fuel-use effects, including coal-market shifts, consistent with the response scenario are also described. These results, while dependent on specific assumptions for this scenario, provide insight into the general character of the likely utility industry response to Title IV.

Molburg, J.C.; Fox, J.A.; Pandola, G.; Cilek, C.M.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2Chapter 15 Metabolism of Conjugated Linoleic Acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2 Chapter 15 Metabolism of Conjugated Linoleic Acids Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry 305CB38A5497B8636973A9A3E5756142 AOCS Press ...

419

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2Chapter 18 Conjugated Linoleic Acid in Experimental Atherosclerosis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2 Chapter 18 Conjugated Linoleic Acid in Experimental Atherosclerosis Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AA212B9659CFD264953B73B80A39B367 AOCS

420

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2Chapter 8 Conjugated Linoleic Acid in Food  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2 Chapter 8 Conjugated Linoleic Acid in Food Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Downloadable pdf of Chapter 8 Conjugated Lino

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh acid rain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Geochemistry of Hydrofluoric Acid in Kaolinitic Soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document explores the geochemical reactions likely to occur when hydrofluoric acid is spilled on Savannah River Site (SRS) soil. In particular, we evaluate the potential of environmental damage from a one-time release of concentrated hydrofluoric acid into a trench. According to interviews with personnel involved, sometime between 1955 and 1960 drums of 50-60 per cent hydrofluoric acid were disposed in a trench in the Central Shops area. The method of disposal suggests that most of the acid would have been released at the time of burial. No evidence of drum disposal or acidic pH values was found. Therefore, the Soil and Groundwater Closure Projects group requested that we evaluate potential risk by examining the major geochemical interactions expected between hydrofluoric acid and soil. The geochemical calculations in this report were done with The Geochemist's Workbench (Registered). This program uses an extended Debye-Huckel method for calculating activity coefficients. The conclusions of this report are accurate, but some of the intermediate steps may have higher uncertainty. Hydrofluoric acid disposed in a trench in the area would have reacted with soil kaolinite to neutralize the pH to a value of about 4.2. Based on conservative assumptions, this would have occurred within the top 500 cm of soil. This analysis considers only the reaction of the acid with kaolinite. Other processes such as dilution, dispersion, and clogging of permeability would contribute to neutralization of the acid within a shorter distance. When the acid solution reached the water table, dilution would have driven the solution to saturation with gibbsite. A resulting layer enriched in aluminum may be the only remnant of the acid disposal identifiable today. However, any such layer would be difficult to identify because of the normally high aluminum concentrations in the soil. Subtle textural evidence of shallow soil dissolution may be present, but 40 years of rainfall infiltration may well have erased such evidence.

DENHAM, MILES

2004-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

422

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 16 Ruminal Metabolism of Fatty Acids: Modulation of Polyunsaturated, Conjugated, and trans Fatty Acids in Meat and Milk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 16 Ruminal Metabolism of Fatty Acids: Modulation of Polyunsaturated, Conjugated, and trans Fatty Acids in Meat and Milk Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrit

423

Electrostatic precipitation of condensed acid mist  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project addresses the acid mist that is formed by condensation of sulfuric acid vapor in flue gas from coal-fired utility boilers. An acid mist can be formed whenever the flue gas temperature approaches the prevailing acid dew point. This commonly occurs when the gas is subjected to rapid adiabatic cooling in a wet scrubber system for flue gas desulfurization. Acid mists can also sometimes result from unexpected temperature excursions caused by air inleakage, load cycling, and start-up operations. A wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) is the best control option for acid mist. The mist would blind a fabric filter and attack glass fiber fabrics. A wet ESP is required because the acid would quickly corrode the plates in a conventional dry ESP. The wet ESP also offers the advantages of no rapping reentrainment and no sensitivity to fly ash resistivity. Therefore, this program has been structured around the use of a compact, wet ESP to control acid mist emissions. 7 refs.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Hydriodic acid-anode-depolarized hydrogen generator  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen is recovered from aqueous hydriodic acid in the presence of sulfuric acid, in an electrolysis cell having an anode and cathode compartment separated by a hydrogen ion permeable membrane, by electrochemically liberating iodine in the anode compartment by anodization of iodide anions, and electrochemically generating hydrogen in the cathode compartment from hydrogen cations that migrate across the membrane.

Maskalick, N.J.

1984-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

425

Biomass burning sources of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and non-methane hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

Biomass burning is an important source of many key tropospheric species, including aerosols, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub {times}}=NO+NO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), methyl bromide (CH{sub 3}Br), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) and other species. These emissions and their subsequent products act as pollutants and affect greenhouse warming of the atmosphere. One important by-product of biomass burning is tropospheric ozone, which is a pollutant that also absorbs infrared radiation. Ozone is formed when CO, CH{sub 4}, and NMHCs react in the presence of NO{sub {times}} and sunlight. Ozone concentrations in tropical regions (where the bulk of biomass burning occurs) may increase due to biomass burning. Additionally, biomass burning can increase the concentration of nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), a key component of acid rain.

Atherton, C.S.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Effect of Conjugated Linoleic Acid or Oleic Acid Addition on Fatty Acid Composition Profiles of Poultry Meat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two different studies were conducted to reduce the overall amount of omega-6 fatty acids in broiler chickens. The first experiment was performed to determine the effects of dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and omega-3 fatty acid combination on the omega-6 fatty acid accumulation in broiler chicken breast and thigh meat. Eight broilers from each treatment were processed at 4 and 6 weeks of age, respectively. Regarding the diets containing five different fat sources, broiler chickens fed CLA and fish oil diet had a lower C20:4 (arachidonic acid, AA, n-6) deposition but showed a higher n-3/n-6 ratio in breast and thigh meat than those fed a flaxseed oil diet and CLA and flaxseed oil diet (P 0.05). However, the addition of CLA and fish oil to the diet resulted in a increase of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) concentration in broiler chicken breast and thigh meat when compared to that of fish oil diet (P<0.05). The second experiment was conducted based on six different combination of n-3 and n-9 fatty acids. One bird per pen was processed, and each bird was weighed, and blood, liver, breast and thigh samples from the bird were collected. Although the generation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was not affected due to combination of n-3 and n-9 fatty acids in our diets, the deposition of n-6 fatty acids including C18:2 and C20:4 was decreased in broiler chicken breast and/or thigh muscles as n-3 fatty acids were supplied to broiler chickens for 9 weeks. Eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5, EPA, n-3) addition to poultry diet (FEO) did not reduce the deposition of C18:2 and/or C20:4 as much as C22:6 (FDO) did. When C20:5 and C22:6 were blended to poultry diet (FHO) and fed to broiler chickens for 9 weeks, synergistic effects were observed. Reduction of C20:4 was obtained when FHO diet was fed to broiler chickens, and it may be induced due to decreased expression of delta-6 desaturase mRNA.

Shin, Dae Keun

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Volume 2, is the second book in a series devoted entirely to conjugated linoleic acid. Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2 Health Nutrition Biochemistry Hardback Books Health - Nutrition

428

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation book has four main focuses and sections. Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats divis

429

PREDICTING TEMPERATURE BEHAVIOR IN CARBONATE ACIDIZING TREATMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To increase the successful rate of acid stimulation, a method is required to diagnose the effectiveness of stimulation which will help us to improve stimulation design and decide whether future action, such as diversion, is needed. For this purpose, it is important to know how much acid enters each layer in a multilayer carbonate formation and if the low-permeability layer is treated well. This work develops a numerical model to determine the temperature behavior for both injection and flow-back situations. An important phenomenon in this process is the heat generated by reaction, affecting the temperature behavior significantly. The result of the thermal model showed significant temperature effects caused by reaction, providing a mechanism to quantitatively determine the acid flow profile. Based on this mechanism, a further inverse model can be developed to determine the acid distribution in each layer.

Tan, Xuehao

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Replica amplification of nucleic acid arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are improved methods of making and using immobilized arrays of nucleic acids, particularly methods for producing replicas of such arrays. Included are methods for producing high density arrays of nucleic acids and replicas of such arrays, as well as methods for preserving the resolution of arrays through rounds of replication. Also included are methods which take advantage of the availability of replicas of arrays for increased sensitivity in detection of sequences on arrays. Improved methods of sequencing nucleic acids immobilized on arrays utilizing single copies of arrays and methods taking further advantage of the availability of replicas of arrays are disclosed. The improvements lead to higher fidelity and longer read lengths of sequences immobilized on arrays. Methods are also disclosed which improve the efficiency of multiplex PCR using arrays of immobilized nucleic acids.

Church, George M. (Brookline, MA); Mitra, Robi D. (Chestnut Hill, MA)

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

431

Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 9 figures.

Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

1994-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

432

The Spatial Analysis of Acid Precipitation Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kriging, an interpolation procedure that minimizes interpolation error and gives an accurate estimate of that error, is shown to be an appropriate objective analysis procedure for the study of spatial variability and structure in acid ...

Peter L. Finkelstein

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

A Direct, Biomass-Based Synthesis of Benzoic Acid: Formic Acid-Mediated Deoxygenation of the Glucose-Derived Materials Quinic Acid and Shikimic Acid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R.G.B and J.A.E. ). Keywords: biomass · carboxylic acids ·10.1002/cssc.201000111 A Direct, Biomass-Based Synthesis ofaro- matic compounds from biomass resources could provide a

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Optimizing amino acid groupings for GPCR classification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivation: There is much interest in reducing the complexity inherent in the representation of the 20 standard amino acids within bioinformatics algorithms by developing a so-called reduced alphabet. Although there is no universally applicable ...

Matthew N. Davies; Andrew Secker; Alex A. Freitas; Edward Clark; Jon Timmis; Darren R. Flower

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Dynamic Protonation Equilibrium of Solvated Acetic Acid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the first time, the dynamic protonation equilibrium between an amino acid side chain analogue and bulk water as well as the diffusion properties of the excess proton were successfully reproduced through unbiased computer simulations. During a 50 ns Q-HOP MD simulation, two different regimes of proton transfer were observed. Extended phases of frequent proton swapping between acetic acid and nearby water were separated by phases where the proton freely diffuses in the simulation box until it is captured again by acetic acid. The pKa of acetic acid was calculated around 3.0 based on the relative population of protonated and deprotonated states and the diffusion coefficient of excess proton was computed from the average mean squared displacement in the simulation. Both calculated values agree well with the experimental measurements.

Gu, Wei; Frigato, Tomaso; Straatsma, TP; Helms, Volkhard H.

2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

436

Thermodynamic Properties of Acetic Acid + Hydrocarbons ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermodynamic Properties of Acetic Acid + Hydrocarbons Mixtures L. Negadi1,C,S, N. Ainous2, A. Negadi1, I. Mokbel2, A. Kaci3 and J. Jose2 ...

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

437

Biologically produced acid precipitable polymeric lignin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water soluble, acid precipitable polymeric degraded lignin (APPL), having a molecular weight of at least 12,000 daltons, and comprising, by percentage of total weight, at least three times the number of phenolic hydroxyl groups and carboxylic acid groups present in native lignin. The APPL may be modified by chemical oxidation and reduction to increase its phenolic hydroxyl content and reduce the number of its antioxidant inhibitory side chains, thereby improving antioxidant properties.

Crawford, Don L. (Moscow, ID); Pometto, III, Anthony L. (Moscow, ID)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Primer on lead-acid storage batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This handbook was developed to help DOE facility contractors prevent accidents caused during operation and maintenance of lead-acid storage batteries. Major types of lead-acid storage batteries are discussed as well as their operation, application, selection, maintenance, and disposal (storage, transportation, as well). Safety hazards and precautions are discussed in the section on battery maintenance. References to industry standards are included for selection, maintenance, and disposal.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

A macromolecular delivery vehicle for protein-based vaccines: Acid ...  

... methane, was designed as the key acid-cleavable crosslinking monomer used to prepare acid-degradable protein-loaded microgels by inverse ...

440

Preferential Acidic, Alkaline and Neutral Solubility of Metallic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

water is a neutral liquid, representative of exposure to surface water or groundwater. Acetic acid is a weak organic acid, and is an indicator of potential leaching during...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh acid rain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

(2-ethylhexyl)-mono (2-ethylhexyl) ester Phosphonic acid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparison among different extractants, as (2-ethylhexyl)-mono (2-ethylhexyl) ester Phosphonic acid (P507), Secondary-octyl phenoxy acetic acid (CA-12) and  ...

442

Synthesis of a New Asymmetric Dialkylphophinic Acid and Its ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Besides, as to symmetrical dialkylphosphinic acids when the branched chain ... Di-(2,4,4'-trimethylpentyl)-phosphinic acid (main component of Cyanex 272).

443

Nitric acid requirement for treating sludge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) precipitate hydrolysis process produces sufficient oxidant (nitrate) such that the resulting blend of formic acid treated sludge and the aqueous product from hydrolysis (PHA) produces a melter feed of acceptable redox (i.e. Fe+2/Total Fe <0.33). With implementation of Late Washing (to reduce the nitrite content of the tetraphenyborate slurry produced during In-Tank Precipitation to 0.01M or less), HAN is no longer required during hydrolysis. As a result, the nitrate content of the melter feed will be reduced greater than an order-of-magnitude and the resulting melter feed produced will be too reducing. If formic acid treatment of the sludge is retained, it will be necessary to trim the melter feed with an oxidant to attain a proper redox. Rather than trimming the melter feed with an oxidant subsequent to the SRAT cycle in which formic acid is used to acidify the sludge, the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) has recommended this be accomplished by conversion to nitric acid addition to the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) in place of formic acid (1). This memorandum specifies the stoichiometric bases for determining the nitric acid requirement for the SRAT.

Hsu, C.W.

1992-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

444

Effects of Acid Additives on Spent Acid Flowback through Carbonate Cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Matrix acidizing is a well stimulation technique used to remove formation damage in the near wellbore region. But it comes with an associated set of challenges such as corrosion of the tubulars and iron precipitation in the formation. To counter these challenges, different chemicals, or additives, are added to the acid solution such as corrosion inhibitors and iron control agents. These additives may change the relative permeability of the spent acid, and formation wettability, and may either hinder or improve spent acid clean-up. Such effects of additives on the spent acid clean-up have not been documented. The aim of this research effort was to document the aforementioned change in the spent acid concentration (by using one additive at a time) before and after gas flowback. This was achieved by acidizing cores and creating wormholes halfway through them, then CT scanning them to observe the spent acid region. Later on, gas was flown through the core opposite to the direction of acid injection for 2 hours, and another CT scan was taken. The difference between the two CT scans was documented. Using a different additive each time, a series of such CT scans was obtained to develop an idea about whether the said additive was beneficial or detrimental to spent acid clean-up. It was found that the corrosion inhibitor FA-CI performed the best in terms of spent acid recovery after gas flowback for both Indiana Limestone and Texas Cream Chalk cores. Moreover, the corrosion inhibitor MI-CI was the worst for Indiana Limestone and the non-emulsifying agent M-NEA the worst for Texas Cream Chalk for spent acid recovery after gas flowback.

Nasir, Ehsaan Ahmad

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Rain Rate and Water Content in Hurricanes Compared with Summer Rain in Miami, Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid water content (g m?3), precipitation rate (mm h?1), and radar reflectivity (dBZ) are inferred from cross sections of particle images obtained by aircraft. Each dataset is presented in a probability format to display changing functional ...

Robert A. Black; John Hallett

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Acid Diversion in Carbonate Reservoirs Using Polymer-Based In-Situ Gelled Acids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diversion in carbonates is more difficult than in sandstones because of the ability of acid to significantly increase the permeability in carbonates as it reacts in the pore spaces and flow channels of matrix. In-situ gelled acids that are based on polymers have been used in the field for several years and were the subject of many lab studies. An extensive literature survey reveals that there are conflicting opinions about using these acids. On one hand, these acids were used in the field with mixed results. Recent lab work indicated that these acids can cause damage under certain conditions. There is no agreement on when this system can be successfully applied in the field. Therefore, this study was conducted to better understand this acid system and determine factors that impact its performance. Lab test of polymer-based in-situ gelled acids reveal that polymer and other additives separate out of the acid when these acids are prepared in high salinity water. In coreflood tests, in-situ gelled acid formed a gel inside 20” long core samples, and the acid changed its direction several times. Unexpectantly, the core's permeability was reduced at low shear rate. Wormhole length increased as the shear rate was increased; while the diameter of the wormhole increased as the acid cumulative injected volume was increased. CT scan indicated the presence of gel residue inside and around the wormhole. Gel residue increased at low shear rates. Material balance on the cross-linker indicated that a significant amount of the crosslinker was retained in the core. Based on the results obtained from this study the in-situ gelled acids should be used only at low HCl concentrations (5 wt percent HCl). Acid should be prepared in low salinity water and the acid injection rate should be determined based on the expected shear rate in the formation. A core flood experiment is recommended to confirm optimum injected rate. Well flow back is needed to minimize the residual gel inside the formation. The data obtained in this study can be used as a guideline for injection rate selection.

Gomaa, Ahmed Mohamed Mohamed

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Sulfuric acid-sulfur heat storage cycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of storing heat is provided utilizing a chemical cycle which interconverts sulfuric acid and sulfur. The method can be used to levelize the energy obtained from intermittent heat sources, such as solar collectors. Dilute sulfuric acid is concentrated by evaporation of water, and the concentrated sulfuric acid is boiled and decomposed using intense heat from the heat source, forming sulfur dioxide and oxygen. The sulfur dioxide is reacted with water in a disproportionation reaction yielding dilute sulfuric acid, which is recycled, and elemental sulfur. The sulfur has substantial potential chemical energy and represents the storage of a significant portion of the energy obtained from the heat source. The sulfur is burned whenever required to release the stored energy. A particularly advantageous use of the heat storage method is in conjunction with a solar-powered facility which uses the Bunsen reaction in a water-splitting process. The energy storage method is used to levelize the availability of solar energy while some of the sulfur dioxide produced in the heat storage reactions is converted to sulfuric acid in the Bunsen reaction.

Norman, John H. (LaJolla, CA)

1983-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

448

Pakistan Vet. J., 24(3): 2004 EFFECTS OF ASCORBIC ACID AND ACETYLSALICYLIC ACID  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pakistan Vet. J., 24(3): 2004 109 EFFECTS OF ASCORBIC ACID AND ACETYLSALICYLIC ACID SUPPLEMENTATION Sciences, Lahore-54000, Pakistan ABSTRACT A total of 100, day-old broiler chicks were randomly divided production in the tropics. In Pakistan, temperature remains well beyond the higher side of thermoneutral zone

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

449

System for agitating the acid in a lead-acid battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for agitating the acid in a large lead-sulfuric acid storage battery of the calcium type. An air-lift is utilized to provide the agitation. The air fed to the air-lift is humidified prior to being delivered to the air-lift.

Weintraub, Alvin (Schenectady, NY); MacCormack, Robert S. (Glenville, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Energy densification of biomass-derived organic acids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for upgrading an organic acid includes neutralizing the organic acid to form a salt and thermally decomposing the resulting salt to form an energy densified product. In certain embodiments, the organic acid is levulinic acid. The process may further include upgrading the energy densified product by conversion to alcohol and subsequent dehydration.

Wheeler, M. Clayton

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

451

Purification Or Organic Acids Using Anion Exchange Chromatography.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a cost-effective method for purifying and acidifying carboxylic acids, including organic acids and amino acids. The method involves removing impurities by allowing the anionic form of the carboxylic acid to bind to an anion exchange column and washing the column. The carboxylic anion is displaced as carboxylic acid by washing the resin with a strong inorganic anion. This method is effective in removing organic carboxylic acids and amino acids from a variety of industrial sources, including fermentation broths, hydrolysates, and waste streams.

Ponnampalam; Elankovan (Okemos, MI)

2001-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

452

Nucleic Acid Standards - Standard Ref. Frame  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Standard Reference Standard Reference Standard Reference Frame Supplemental Information Ideal Geometries X-PLOR Parameters Valence Geometries RNA Ontology Consortium mmCIF Resources PDBML Resources A Standard Reference Frame for the Description of Nucleic Acid Base-pair Geometry A common point of reference is needed to describe the three-dimensional arrangements of bases and base pairs in nucleic acid structures. [1]. For example, parts of a structure, which appear "normal" according to one computational scheme, may be highly unusual according to another and vice versa. It is thus difficult to carry out comprehensive comparisons of nucleic acid structures and to pinpoint unique conformational features in individual structures. In order to resolve these issues, a group of

453

Electrostatic precipitation of condensed acid mist  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to develop and demonstrate a compact, wet electrostatic collector for condensed acid mist in power plant flue gas. The following are project objectives: (1) fabrication of laboratory-version of the WESP; (2) optimization of the WESP performance through laboratory tests with a non-volatile simulant aerosol having a size distribution similar to the acid mist; (3) demonstration of adequate collection of actual acid mist in a pilot coal combustion facility under conditions simulating full-scale power plant burning high-sulfur coal; (4) development of computer model of the WESP process must be developed to assist in the process optimization, interpretation of test results, and extrapolation to full scale; and (5) solicitation of utility participation in a follow-on demonstration of the WESP concept at a full-scale power plant. The WESP fabrication, laboratory and pilot combustor testing, and computer modeling is discussed. 5 refs., 5 figs.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Photoenhanced anaerobic digestion of organic acids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for rapid conversion of organic acids and alcohols in anaerobic digesters into hydrogen and carbon dioxide, the optimal precursor substrates for production of methane. The process includes addition of photosynthetic bacteria to the digester and exposure of the bacteria to radiant energy (e.g., solar energy). The process also increases the pH stability of the digester to prevent failure of the digester. Preferred substrates for photosynthetic bacteria are the organic acid and alcohol waste products of fermentative bacteria. In mixed culture with methanogenic bacteria or in defined co-culture with non-aceticlastic methanogenic bacteria, photosynthetic bacteria are capable of facilitating the conversion of organic acids and alcohols into methane with low levels of light energy input. 8 figs.

Weaver, P.F.

1989-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

455

Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer were selected from the class consisting of ethylene and polyethylene glycols, propylene and polypropylene glycols, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4 -oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide where the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Photoenhanced anaerobic digestion of organic acids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for rapid conversion of organic acids and alcohols anaerobic digesters into hydrogen and carbon dioxide, the optimal precursor substrates for production of methane. The process includes addition of photosynthetic bacteria to the digester and exposure of the bacteria to radiant energy (e.g., solar energy). The process also increases the pH stability of the digester to prevent failure of the digester. Preferred substrates for photosynthetic bacteria are the organic acid and alcohol waste products of fermentative bacteria. In mixed culture with methanogenic bacteria or in defined co-culture with non-aceticlastic methanogenic bacteria, photosynthetic bacteria are capable of facilitating the conversion or organic acids and alcohols into methane with low levels of light energy input.

Weaver, Paul F. (Golden, CO)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene and polyethylane glycols (PVB 6/22/90), propylene and and polypropylene (PVB 6/22/90) glycols, P-dioxanone, 1, 5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4 -oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.

1990-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

458

IMPROVED PROCESSES TO REMOVE NAPHTHENIC ACIDS  

SciTech Connect

In the first year of this project, we have established our experimental and theoretical methodologies for studies of the catalytic decarboxylation process. We have developed both glass and stainless steel micro batch type reactors for the fast screening of various catalysts with reaction substrates of model carboxylic acid compounds and crude oil samples. We also developed novel product analysis methods such as GC analyses for organic acids and gaseous products; and TAN measurements for crude oil. Our research revealed the effectiveness of several solid catalysts such as NA-Cat-1 and NA-Cat-2 for the catalytic decarboxylation of model compounds; and NA-Cat-5{approx}NA-Cat-9 for the acid removal from crude oil. Our theoretical calculations propose a three-step concerted oxidative decarboxylation mechanism for the NA-Cat-1 catalyst.

Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; William A. Goddard; Yongchun Tang

2004-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

459

Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene and polyethylene glycols, propylene and polypropylene glycols, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4 -oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

Bonsignore, Patrick V. (Joliet, IL); Coleman, Robert D. (Wheaton, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4-oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2 by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

Bonsignore, Patrick V. (Joliet, IL); Coleman, Robert D. (Wheaton, IL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh acid rain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Calidad del aire en la zona centro y oriente de la ciudad de Manizales : influencia del material particulado (pm10) y lluvia ácida = air quality in center and east zone of Manizales city : influence of particulate matter (pm10) and acid rain.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??González Duque, Carlos Mario (2012) Calidad del aire en la zona centro y oriente de la ciudad de Manizales : influencia del material particulado (pm10)… (more)

González Duque, Carlos Mario

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

LES ACIDES GRAS TRANS DU BEURRE II. —  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

origine est essentiellement endogène car les aliments naturels habituellement distribués aux vaches) au cours de l'hydro- génation biologique portant sur les acides oléique, linoléique et linolénique

Recanati, Catherine

463

Separators for valve regulated lead acid batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews some aspects of the past history of the valve regulated lead acid (VRLA) battery in relationship to microglass separators that have been used from the conception of VRLA technology. It also focuses on some aspects of compression properties of the separator.

Zguris, G.C. [Hollingsworth & Vose Co., West Groton, MT (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Method for the production of dicarboxylic acids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an economical fermentation method for the production of carboxylic acids comprising the steps of (a) inoculating a medium having a carbon source with a carboxylic acid-producing organism; (b) incubating the carboxylic acid-producing organism in an aerobic atmosphere to promote rapid growth of the organism thereby increasing the biomass of the organism; (c) controllably releasing oxygen to maintain the aerobic atmosphere; (d) controllably feeding the organism having increased biomass with a solution containing the carbon source to maintain the concentration of the carbon source within the medium of about 0.5 g/l up to about 1 g/l; (e) depriving the aerobic atmosphere of oxygen to produce an anaerobic atmosphere to cause the organism to undergo anaerobic metabolism; (f) controllably feeding the organism having increased biomass a solution containing the carbon source to maintain the concentration of the carbon source within the medium of {>=}1 g/l; and (g) converting the carbon source to carboxylic acids using the anaerobic metabolism of the organism. 7 figs.

Nghiem, N.P.; Donnelly, M.; Millard, C.S.; Stols, L.

1999-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

465

Method for the production of dicarboxylic acids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an economical fermentation method for the production of carboxylic acids comprising the steps of a) inoculating a medium having a carbon source with a carboxylic acid-producing organism; b) incubating the carboxylic acid-producing organism in an aerobic atmosphere to promote rapid growth of the organism thereby increasing the biomass of the organism; c) controllably releasing oxygen to maintain the aerobic atmosphere; d) controllably feeding the organism having increased biomass with a solution containing the carbon source to maintain the concentration of the carbon source within the medium of about 0.5 g/L up to about 1 g/L; e) depriving the aerobic atmosphere of oxygen to produce an anaerobic atmosphere to cause the organism to undergo anaerobic metabolism; f) controllably feeding the organism having increased biomass a solution containing the carbon source to maintain the concentration of the carbon source within the medium of .gtoreq.1 g/L; and g) converting the carbon source to carboxylic acids using the anaerobic metabolism of the organism.

Nghiem, Nhuan Phu (Knoxville, TN); Donnelly, Mark (Warrenville, IL); Millard, Cynthia S. (Plainfield, IL); Stols, Lucy (Woodridge, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past three years, we followed the work plan as we suggested in the proposal and made every efforts to fulfill the project objectives. Based on our large amount of creative and productive work, including both of experimental and theoretic aspects, we received important technical breakthrough on naphthenic acid removal process and obtained deep insight on catalytic decarboxylation chemistry. In detail, we established an integrated methodology to serve for all of the experimental and theoretical work. Our experimental investigation results in discovery of four type effective catalysts to the reaction of decarboxylation of model carboxylic acid compounds. The adsorption experiment revealed the effectiveness of several solid materials to naphthenic acid adsorption and acidity reduction of crude oil, which can be either natural minerals or synthesized materials. The test with crude oil also received promising results, which can be potentially developed into a practical process for oil industry. The theoretical work predicted several possible catalytic decarboxylation mechanisms that would govern the decarboxylation pathways depending on the type of catalysts being used. The calculation for reaction activation energy was in good agreement with our experimental measurements.

Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; Kangshi Wang; Yongchun Tang; William A. Goddard

2005-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

467

Corrosion free phosphoric acid fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A phosphoric acid fuel cell with an electrolyte fuel system which supplies electrolyte via a wick disposed adjacent a cathode to an absorbent matrix which transports the electrolyte to portions of the cathode and an anode which overlaps the cathode on all sides to prevent corrosion within the cell.

Wright, Maynard K. (Bethel Park, PA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Sulfuric acid thermoelectrochemical system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermoelectrochemical system in which an electrical current is generated between a cathode immersed in a concentrated sulfuric acid solution and an anode immersed in an aqueous buffer solution of sodium bisulfate and sodium sulfate. Reactants consumed at the electrodes during the electrochemical reaction are thermochemically regenerated and recycled to the electrodes to provide continuous operation of the system.

Ludwig, Frank A. (Rancho Palos Verdes, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Therapeutic efficacy of dimercaptosuccinic acid and thiamine/ascorbic acid on lead intoxication in rats  

SciTech Connect

Thiamine, folic acid, pyridoxine and ascorbic acid either individually or in combination have been proven to be effective in reducing the toxic manifestations of lead and in enhancing the antidotal efficacy of CaNa{sub 2}EDTA. In a recent report from the authors' laboratory, it was observed that given combination of thiamine and ascorbic acid with thiol chelators improved the ability of the animals to excrete lead thereby reducing body lead burden. In view of the beneficial effect of these two vitamins, it was considered of interest to evaluate their potential to modify the prophylactic action of DMS in lead intoxication in rat after repeated administration.

Tandon, S.K.; Flora, S.J.S. (Industrial Toxicology Research Centre, Lucknow (India))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Reaction of Calcite and Dolomite with In-Situ Gelled Acids, Organic Acids, and Environmentally Friendly Chelating Agent (GLDA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Well stimulation is the treatment remedy when oil/gas productivity decreases to unacceptable economical limits. Well stimulation can be carried out through either "Matrix Acidizing" or fracturing with both "Hydraulic Fracturing" and "Acid Fracturing" techniques. "Matrix Acidizing" and "Acid Fracturing" applications involve injecting an acid to react with the formation and dissolve some of the minerals present and recover or increase the permeability. The permeability enhancement is achieved by creating conductive channels "wormholes" in case of "Matrix Acidizing" or creating uneven etching pattern in case of "Acid Fracturing" treatments. In both cases, and to design a treatment successfully, it is necessary to determine the distance that the live acid will be able to penetrate inside the formation, which in turn, determines the volume of the acid needed to carry out the treatment. This distance can be obtained through lab experiments, if formation cores are available, or estimated by modeling the treatment. The successful model will depend on several chemical and physical processes that take place including: the acid transport to the surface of the rock, the speed of the reaction of the acid with the rock, which is often referred to as "Reaction Rate", and the acid leak-off. The parameters describing these processes such as acid diffusion coefficient and reaction kinetics have to be determined experimentally to ensure accurate and reliable modeling. Hydrochloric acid and simple organic acids such as acetic and citric acids have been used extensively for stimulation treatments. The diffusion and reaction kinetics of these acids, in a straight form, were investigated thoroughly in literature. However, solely these acids are used in a simple form in the field. Acid systems such as gelled, crosslinked gelled, surfactant-based, foam-based, or emulsified acids are used to either retard the reaction rate or to enhance acid diversion. Literature review shows that additional work is needed to understand the reaction and report the diffusion and kinetics of these systems with carbonate. In addition, a new chelating agent (GLDA) was recently introduced as a stand-alone stimulating fluid. The kinetics and the mass transfer properties of this acid were not studied before. Therefore, the objective of this work is to study the reaction of different acid systems with calcite and dolomite and report the mass transport and kinetic data experimentally. Lactic acid, a chelating agent (GLDA), and in-situ gelled HCl-formic acids were investigated in this study. In some cases, rheology measurements and core flood experiments were conducted. The data were combined with the reaction study to understand the behavior of these acids and examine their efficiency if injected in the formation.

Rabie, Ahmed 1978-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Glossary - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

electricity electricity Acid rain: Also called acid precipitation or acid deposition, acid rain is precipitation containing harmful amounts of nitric and sulfuric acids formed primarily by sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides released into the atmosphere when fossil fuels are burned. It can be wet precipitation (rain, snow, or fog) or dry precipitation (absorbed gaseous and particulate matter, aerosol particles or dust). Acid rain has a pH below 5.6. Normal rain has a pH of about 5.6, which is slightly acidic. The term pH is a measure of acidity or alkalinity and ranges from 0 to 14. A pH measurement of 7 is regarded as neutral. Measurements below 7 indicate increased acidity, while those above indicate increased alkalinity. Adequacy (electric): The ability of the electric system to supply the

472

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Counties Source: US DOE Energy Information Administration 2002; US EPA Acid Rain 2002, EGRID 2000. Electrical Electrical Generators Generators Annual CO Annual CO 2 2 Emissions...

473

Power plant emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel ... acid rain program in the eastern half of the United States. ... and settlements under the Clean Air Act's New Source Review ...

474

Water quality trends in the Blackwater River watershed Canaan Valley, West Virginia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Blackwater River, historically an excellent brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) fishery, has been affected by logging, fires, coal mining, acid rain, and land development. Trends… (more)

Smith, Jessica M., M.S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Slow Strain Rate Testing to Evaluate the Susceptibility of Welded ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combustion products of fossil fuels are causing great damage through pollution, acid rains and the greenhouse effect. Hydrogen can be stored in three  ...

476

Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids Final Technical Report (From October 1, 2002 to September 30, 2005) Principle Authors Aihua Zhang, Qisheng Ma, Kangshi Wang, Yongchun Tang (co-PI), William A. Goddard (PI), Date Report was issued: December 9, 2005 DOE Award number: DE-FC26-02NT15383 Name and Address of Submitting Organization California Institute of Technology 1200 East California Blvd., Pasadena, CA91125 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

477

Nucleic Acid Standards - Sugar and Phosphate Constituents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sugar and Phosphate Constituents Sugar and Phosphate Constituents The following tables contain the complete references for the structures used in a statistical survey of well-refined mononucleoside, mononucleotide, dinucleoside monophosphate, and trinucleoside diphosphate crystal structures found in the Cambridge Structural Database and the Nucleic Acid Database that appeared in The Journal of the American Chemical Society (Anke Gelbin, Bohdan Schneider, Lester Clowney, Shu-Hsin Hsieh, Wilma K. Olson, and Helen M. Berman. "Geometric Parameters in Nucleic Acids: Sugar Phosphate Constituents" (1996) 118, 519-529.) Table 1: References for Mononucleoside and Mononucleotide Structures Table 2: References for Dinucleoside Monophosphate and Trinucleoside Diphosphate Structures The following tables are summaries of the bond lengths, angles, and torsion

478

Sulfate and acid resistant concrete and mortar  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction and other applications, which hardenable mixtures demonstrate significant levels of acid and sulfate resistance while maintaining acceptable compressive strength properties. The acid and sulfate hardenable mixtures of the invention containing fly ash comprise cementitious materials and a fine aggregate. The cementitous materials may comprise fly ash as well as cement. The fine aggregate may comprise fly ash as well as sand. The total amount of fly ash in the hardenable mixture ranges from about 60% to about 120% of the total amount of cement, by weight, whether the fly ash is included as a cementious material, fine aggregate, or an additive, or any combination of the foregoing. In specific examples, mortar containing 50% fly ash and 50% cement in cementitious materials demonstrated superior properties of corrosion resistance. 6 figs.

Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

479

Closure device for lead-acid batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A closure device for lead-acid batteries includes a filter of granulated activated carbon treated to be hydrophobic combined with means for preventing explosion of emitted hydrogen and oxygen gas. The explosion prevention means includes a vertical open-end tube within the closure housing for maintaining a liquid level above side wall openings in an adjacent closed end tube. Gases vent from the battery through a nozzle directed inside the closed end tube against an impingement surface to remove acid droplets. The gases then flow through the side wall openings and the liquid level to quench any possible ignition prior to entering the activated carbon filter. A wick in the activated carbon filter conducts condensed liquid back to the closure housing to replenish the liquid level limited by the open-end tube.

Ledjeff, Konstantin (Schwalbach, DE)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Lightweight, durable lead-acid batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A lightweight, durable lead-acid battery is disclosed. Alternative electrode materials and configurations are used to reduce weight, to increase material utilization and to extend service life. The electrode can include a current collector having a buffer layer in contact with the current collector and an electrochemically active material in contact with the buffer layer. In one form, the buffer layer includes a carbide, and the current collector includes carbon fibers having the buffer layer. The buffer layer can include a carbide and/or a noble metal selected from of gold, silver, tantalum, platinum, palladium and rhodium. When the electrode is to be used in a lead-acid battery, the electrochemically active material is selected from metallic lead (for a negative electrode) or lead peroxide (for a positive electrode).

Lara-Curzio, Edgar (Lenoir City, TN); An, Ke (Knoxville, TX); Kiggans, Jr., James O. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dudney, Nancy J. (Knoxville, TN); Contescu, Cristian I. (Knoxville, TN); Baker, Frederick S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Armstrong, Beth L. (Clinton, TN)

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Lightweight, durable lead-acid batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lightweight, durable lead-acid battery is disclosed. Alternative electrode materials and configurations are used to reduce weight, to increase material utilization and to extend service life. The electrode can include a current collector having a buffer layer in contact with the current collector and an electrochemically active material in contact with the buffer layer. In one form, the buffer layer includes a carbide, and the current collector includes carbon fibers having the buffer layer. The buffer layer can include a carbide and/or a noble metal selected from of gold, silver, tantalum, platinum, palladium and rhodium. When the electrode is to be used in a lead-acid battery, the electrochemically active material is selected from metallic lead (for a negative electrode) or lead peroxide (for a positive electrode).

Lara-Curzio, Edgar; An, Ke; Kiggans, Jr., James O; Dudney, Nancy J; Contescu, Cristian I; Baker, Frederick S; Armstrong, Beth L

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

482

Sulfate and acid resistant concrete and mortar  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction and other applications, which hardenable mixtures demonstrate significant levels of acid and sulfate resistance while maintaining acceptable compressive strength properties. The acid and sulfate hardenable mixtures of the invention containing fly ash comprise cementitious materials and a fine aggregate. The cementitous materials may comprise fly ash as well as cement. The fine aggregate may comprise fly ash as well as sand. The total amount of fly ash in the hardenable mixture ranges from about 60% to about 120% of the total amount of cement, by weight, whether the fly ash is included as a cementious material, fine aggregate, or an additive, or any combination of the foregoing. In specific examples, mortar containing 50% fly ash and 50% cement in cementitious materials demonstrated superior properties of corrosion resistance.

Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

PROCESS FOR PRODUCING ALKYL ORTHOPHOSPHORIC ACID EXTRACTANTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is given for producing superior alkyl orthophosphoric acid extractants for use in solvent extraction methods to recover and purify various metals such as uranium and vanadium. The process comprises slurrying P/sub 2/O/ sub 5/ in a solvent diluent such as kerosene, benzene, isopropyl ether, and the like. An alipbatic alcohol having from nine to seventeen carbon atoms, and w- hcrein ihc OH group is situated inward of the terminal carbon atoms, is added to the slurry while the reaction temperature is mainiained below 60 deg C. The alcohol is added in the mole ratio of about 2 to l, alcohol to P/sub 2/O/sub 5/. A pyrophosphate reaotion product is formed in the slurry-alcohol mixture. Subsequently, the pyrophosphate reaction product is hydrolyzed with dilute mineral acid to produce the desired alkyl orthophosphoric aeid extractant. The extraetant may then be separated and utilized in metal-recovery, solvent- extraction processes. (AEC)

Grinstead, R.R.

1962-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

484

Acid treatment removes zinc sulfide scale restriction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that removal of zinc sulfide (ZnS) scale with acid restored an offshore Louisiana well's production to original rates. The zinc sulfide scale was determined to be in the near well bore area. The selected acid had been proven to control iron sulfide (FeS) scales in sour wells without causing harm to surface production equipment, tubing, and other downhole hardware. The successful removal of the blockage re-established previous production rates with a 105% increase in flowing tubing pressure. On production for a number of months, a high rate, high-pressure offshore well was experiencing unusually rapid pressure and rate declines. A small sample of the restrictive material was obtained during the wire line operations. The well was subsequently shut in while a laboratory analysis determined that zinc sulfide was the major component of the obstruction.

Biggs, K. (Kerr McGee Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Allison, D. (Otis Engineering Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Ford, W.G.F. (Halliburton Co., Duncan, OK (United States))

1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

485

Nucleic acids, compositions and uses thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The subject invention provides at least one nucleic acid sequence encoding an aldouronate-utilization regulon isolated from Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, a bacterium which efficiently utilizes xylan and metabolizes aldouronates (methylglucuronoxylosaccharides). The subject invention also provides a means for providing a coordinately regulated process in which xylan depolymerization and product assimilation are coupled in Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 to provide a favorable system for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biobased products. Additionally, the nucleic acid sequences encoding the aldouronate-utilization regulon can be used to transform other bacteria to form organisms capable of producing a desired product (e.g., ethanol, 1-butanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,3-propanediol, succinate, lactate, acetate, malate or alanine) from lignocellulosic biomass.

Preston, III, James F. (Micanopy, FL); Chow, Virginia (Gainesville, FL); Nong, Guang (Gainesville, FL); Rice, John D. (Gainesville, FL); St. John, Franz J. (Baltimore, MD)

2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

486

IMPROVED PROCESSES TO REMOVE NAPHTHENIC ACIDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the second year of this project, we continued our effort to develop low temperature decarboxylation catalysts and investigate the behavior of these catalysts at different reaction conditions. We conducted a large number of dynamic measurements with crude oil and model compounds to obtain the information at different reaction stages, which was scheduled as the Task2 in our work plan. We developed a novel adsorption method to remove naphthenic acid from crude oil using naturally occurring materials such as clays. Our results show promise as an industrial application. The theoretical modeling proposed several possible reaction pathways and predicted the reactivity depending on the catalysts employed. From all of these studies, we obtained more comprehensive understanding about catalytic decarboxylation and oil upgrading based on the naphthenic acid removal concept.

Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; Kangshi Wang, William A. Goddard, Yongchun Tang

2005-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

487

A First Look at Yeast Fatty Acid Synthase  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A First Look at Yeast Fatty Acid Synthase Print A First Look at Yeast Fatty Acid Synthase Print Fatty acids are the major constituents of eukaryotic and bacterial cellular membranes. They are used for functionally important post-translational protein modifications, and chains of fatty acids are the main storage compartments of an organism's chemical energy. Fatty acid synthesis is carried out by fatty acid sythase (FAS), which catalyzes cycles of multistep chemical reactions that are essentially the same in all organisms. FAS uses one acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) and seven malonyl-CoA molecules to synthesize the 16-carbon palmitic acid, the most abundant fatty acid in eukaryotes. Now, for the first time, a group of researchers has determined the atomic structure of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae FAS derived from two crystals of the enzyme, using data collected at ALS Beamlines 8.2.1 and 8.2.2, as well as other synchrotron facilities.

488

Acid-catalyzed dehydrogenation of amine-boranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acid-catalyzed dehydrogenation of amine-boranes Acid-catalyzed dehydrogenation of amine-boranes Acid-catalyzed dehydrogenation of amine-boranes A method of dehydrogenating an amine-borane using an acid-catalyzed reaction. June 25, 2013 Acid-catalyzed dehydrogenation of amine-boranes A method of dehydrogenating an amine-borane using an acid-catalyzed reaction. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Acid-catalyzed dehydrogenation of amine-boranes A method of dehydrogenating an amine-borane using an acid-catalyzed reaction. The method generates hydrogen and produces a solid polymeric product. The method of dehydrogenating amine-boranes may be used to generate hydrogen for power generation sources such as fuel cells. U.S. Patent No.: 7,645,902 (DOE S-104,909) Patent Application Filing Date: June 22, 2006

489

A First Look at Yeast Fatty Acid Synthase  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A First Look at Yeast Fatty Acid Synthase Print A First Look at Yeast Fatty Acid Synthase Print Fatty acids are the major constituents of eukaryotic and bacterial cellular membranes. They are used for functionally important post-translational protein modifications, and chains of fatty acids are the main storage compartments of an organism's chemical energy. Fatty acid synthesis is carried out by fatty acid sythase (FAS), which catalyzes cycles of multistep chemical reactions that are essentially the same in all organisms. FAS uses one acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) and seven malonyl-CoA molecules to synthesize the 16-carbon palmitic acid, the most abundant fatty acid in eukaryotes. Now, for the first time, a group of researchers has determined the atomic structure of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae FAS derived from two crystals of the enzyme, using data collected at ALS Beamlines 8.2.1 and 8.2.2, as well as other synchrotron facilities.

490

trans Fatty acid content of foods in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Growing evidence that dietary consumption of trans fatty acid (TFA) increases the risk of cardiovascular disease has made TFA a hot topic among people, food industries, and government officials in China. trans Fatty acid content of foods in China

491

Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe.

Lucas, Joe N. (San Ramon, CA); Straume, Tore (Tracy, CA); Bogen, Kenneth T. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Pressure Acid Leaching Vanadium from Stone coal - Programmaster ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vanadium extraction from stone-coal was investigated by pressure acid ... The results show that with the leaching time for 3~4h, temperature at 150?, sulfuric acid consumption of 25%~30%, ... Calcium Reductants – A historical review.

493

Lubrication from mixture of boric acid with oils and greases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lubricating compositions including crystalline boric acid and a base lubricant selected from oils, greases and the like. The lubricity of conventional oils and greases can also be improved by adding concentrates of boric acid.

Erdemir, Ali (Naperville, IL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Nucleic acid based fluorescent sensor for copper detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nucleic acid enzyme responsive to copper, comprising an oligonucleotide comprising a nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO:1, wherein the nucleic acid enzyme is not self-cleaving.

Lu, Yi; Liu, Juewen

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

495

Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

Dietz, Mark (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Heterogeneous organic acid uptake on soot surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric particulates have been known to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and therefore their presence can indirectly affect important processes such as global radiation balance through cloud formation. Soot particles are well known to be atmospheric constituents, but the hydrophobic nature of fresh soot likely prohibits them from encouraging cloud development. Soot aged through contact with oxygenated organic compounds may become hydrophilic enough to promote water uptake. In this study I have observed the interaction between a number of carboxylic acids and soot from different fuel sources and formation mechanisms. A low pressure fast flow reactor was used to control the contact between the solid phase soot and gas phase organics, while chemical ionization-mass spectrometry was utilized to monitor concentrations of gas phase organics. Most acids irreversibly deposited on the soot surfaces, and the uptake coefficient was measured in the wide range of 9.0 x 10-4 to 1.0 x 10-1. The Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) surface areas of the soots were measured and the soot bulk and surface chemical compositions were investigated with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectroscopy to help explain differences in uptake. By comparing the mono and dicarboxylic acids and the information gathered from soot physiochemical properties I have discussed possible uptake mechanisms.

Levitt, Nicholas Paul

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Botanical Oils Containing Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Botanical Oils Containing Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids. Summary: The Chemical Sciences Division has developed ...

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

498

Method for removing fluoride contamination from nitric acid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fluoride ions are removed from nitric acid solution by contacting the vaporized solution with alumina or zirconium.

Pruett, David J. (Knoxville, TN); Howerton, William B. (Kingston, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Process for chemical reaction of amino acids and amides ...  

Process for chemical reaction of amino acids and amides yielding selective conversion products United States Patent Application

500

Marine Oil Fatty Acid Profile Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing provider for Marine Products and Marine Oil Fatty Acid Profile to test Fatty Acid Composition with AOCS methods Ce 1b-89 or Ce 1i-07. Marine Oil Fatty Acid Profile Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Proficiency Prog