National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for nh acid rain

  1. Controlling acid rain : policy issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, James A.

    1983-01-01

    The policy and regulatory ramifications of U.S. acid rain control programs are examined; particularly, the alternative of a receptor-oriented strategy as constrasted to emission-oriented proposals (e.g., the Mitchell bill) ...

  2. Controlling acid rain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, James A.

    1983-01-01

    High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn the northeastern USA are caused by the large scale combustion of fossil fuels within this region. Average precipitation acidity is pH 4.2, but spatial and temporal ...

  3. Acid rain information book. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-12-01

    Acid rain is one of the most widely publicized environmental issues of the day. The potential consequences of increasingly widespread acid rain demand that this phenomenon be carefully evaluated. Reveiw of the literature shows a rapidly growing body of knowledge, but also reveals major gaps in understanding that need to be narrowed. This document discusses major aspects of the acid rain phenomenon, points out areas of uncertainty, and summarizes current and projected research by responsible government agencies and other concerned organizations.

  4. Long range transport of acid rain precursors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, James A.

    1983-01-01

    A model of the long range transport of primary and secondary pollutants derived by Fay and Rosenzweig (1) is applied to the problem of the transport of acid rain precursors. The model describes the long term average (annual ...

  5. A ACID RAIN Audrey Gibson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    account for about 70 percent of annual SO2 emissions and 30 percent of NOx emissions in the United States acid and nitric acid. Sunlight increases the rate of most of these reactions. Electric utility plants and NOx are harmful to the lungs and can cause disease and premature death. Thursday, April 29, 2010 #12

  6. ARM - Lesson Plans: Acid Rain

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Home Room News Publications TraditionalPlans OutreachAcid

  7. Acid rain - A further look at the evidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katzenstein, A.W.

    1986-03-01

    There is widespread belief that acid rain is damaging lakes and forests in eastern North America, and that the threat of further damage is severe enough to warrant prompt remedial action. The cause of acid rain, hence ecological damage, is popularly held to be the sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) and nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/) created by the combustion of fossil fuels. This popular belief rests on a narrow selection of data, and is not substantiated by the broader body of knowledge which is available. Nevertheless, numerous bills have been introduced in Congress proposing large reductions in SO/sub 2/ emissions. For example, the first bill introduced in 1985 was S.52, ''The Acid Rain Control Act of 1985.'' It calls for reducing SO/sub 2/ emissions by 10 million tons annually. While the language of S.52 and similar bills is not specific on causes and effects of acid rain, the testimony before Congressional committees made it clear that the concerns focus on the actual or potential acidification of lakes and soils by acid rain, and actual or potential impacts of acid rain on fish, other aquatic life, trees, crops, and human health. This article assesses the merits of these contentions about acid rain by examining technical evidence that relates SO/sub 2/ emissions to the acidity of rain to actual or potential environmental impacts.

  8. Sulfur controls edge closer in acid-rain debate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-10-04

    The role of airborne sulfur emissions from midwestern and southern coal-fired power plants in exacerbating the acid rain problem is discussed. This problem is discussed from the standpoint of legislation, compliance costs, scrubber performance and cost, and chemistry of acid rains.

  9. The Acid Rain Program: What it Means to Mountain Streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Deborah

    ://www.epa.gov/airtrends/aqtrends.html #12;5 Title IV - Acid Rain Program · Power Sector Cap & Emission Trading Program for SO2 · 8) & Emission Trading ­ Title V ­ Permits ­ Title VI ­ Stratospheric Ozone 1http) · Environmental Monitoring #12;6 Recent Programs · NOx Budget Trading Program (NBP) 2000 · Ozone season NOx Cap

  10. An iterative process for international negociations on acid rain in Northern Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toint, Philippe

    An iterative process for international negociations on acid rain in Northern Europe using a general 138.48.4.14) #12; An iterative process for international negotiations on acid rain in Northern Europe transboundary pollution problem related to acid rain in Northern Europe. This simulation shows the need

  11. 1984 issues: gas decontrol, energy tax, acid rain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betts, M.

    1983-12-01

    Energy analysts predict that Congress will propose a limited natural gas deregulation bill, an energy tax to offset budget deficits, and acid rain legislation that will focus on scrubber requirements for boilers. Politics will play an important role in whether legislation materializes since Democrats generally favor federal conservation programs and Republicans want to speed up deregulation. The November election will indicate which direction Congress will lean. (DCK)

  12. Acid rain control strategists overlook dust removal benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    Various strategies for controlling acid rain by reducing SO{sub 2} from existing utilities have failed to take into account the incidental particulate removal abilities of SO{sub 2} scrubbers. This has resulted in over-estimating the costs of acid rain control by 25% or more. This oversight has also caused utilities to invest in preliminary engineering of precipitator upgrades which will never have to be made if scrubbers are installed. While it seems inexplicable that a factor of this importance could have been overlooked by the industry, it is because of the unique situation in old U.S. utility power plants. These plants have relatively inefficient particulate control equipment which is not subject to new source performance standards. New power plants incorporate highly efficient particulate control devices so the ability of the downstream scrubbers to remove dust is irrelevant. The very small amount of particulate entering the scrubber from a highly efficient precipitator could be offset by escaping sulfate particles from a poorly operated scrubber. So an informal guideline was established to indicate that the scrubber had no overall effect on particulate emissions. The industry has generalized upon this guideline when, in fact, it only applies to new plants. The McIlvaine Company in its FGD Knowledge Network has thoroughly documented evidence that SO{sub 2} scrubbers will remove as much as 95% of the particulate being emitted from the relatively low efficiency precipitators operating on the nations existing coal-fired power plants.

  13. Suppression of rice methane emission by sulfate deposition in simulated acid rain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gauci, Vincent

    limitation had been lifted by the simulated acid rain S deposition. Citation: Gauci, V., N. B. Dise, G process and so the duration of paddy inundation and the employment of mid-season field drainage both

  14. Allowance trading activity and state regulatory rulings : evidence from the U.S. Acid Rain Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Elizabeth M.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Acid Rain Program is one of the first, and by far the most extensive, applications of a market based approach to pollution control. From the beginning, there has been concern whether utilities would participate ...

  15. Environmental Externalities in Electric Power Markets: Acid Rain, Urban Ozone, and Climate Change

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses the emissions resulting from the generation of electricity by utilities and their role in contributing to the environmental problems of acid rain, urban ozone, and climate change.

  16. Allowance trading activity and state regulatory rulings : evidence from the U.S. Acid Rain Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Elizabeth M.

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. Acid Rain Program is one of the first, and by far the most extensive, applications of a market based approach to pollution control. From the beginning, there has been concern whether utilities would participate ...

  17. Integrated Title V/acid rain permits: Transitioning through initial permit issuance and reopenings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomfield, C. [Environmental Protection Agency, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Titles IV and V of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (Act or CAA) created two new stationary source permitting programs, one specific to acid rain (Title IV), and a second for operating permits in general (Title V). The Phase 2 portion of the acid rain program was designed to be implemented through the Title V operating permit program, thereby subjecting all Phase 2 acid rain sources to the requirements of Title V. Permits issued pursuant to Phase 2 of the acid rain program will be viewed as a self-contained portion of the Title V operating permit and will be governed by regulations promulgated under both Title IV and Title V. The requirements imposed by Title IV may not always be consistent with the broader operating permit program requirements of Title V, and when inconsistency occurs, the acid rain requirements will take precedence. This nonalignment will perhaps be most apparent during two stages of initial permitting: (1) the transition period following Title V program approval when permit application, issuance, and effective dates differ between the two programs, and (2) at the point when acid rain permits must be reopened to incorporate Phase 2 NO{sub x} requirements. This paper explores strategies for streamlining implementation of the two programs with particular focus on these two coordination issues.

  18. Effects of acid rain on apple tree productivity and fruit quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsline, P.L.; Musselman, R.C.; Kender, W.J.; Dee, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Mature 'McIntosh', 'Empire', and 'Golden Delicious' apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh.) were sprayed with simulated acid rain solutions in the pH range of 2.5 to 5.5 at full bloom in 1980 and in 1981. In 1981, weekly sprays were applied at pH 2.75 and pH 3.25. Necrotic lesions developed on apple petals at pH 2.5 with slight injury appearing at pH 3.0 and pH 3.5. Apple foliage had no acid rain lesions at any of the pH levels tested. Pollen germination was reduced at ph 2.5 in 'Empire'. Slight fruit set reduction at pH 2.5 was observed in 'McIntosh'. The incidence of russetting on 'Golden Delicious' fruits was ameliorated by the presence of rain-exclusion chambers but was not affected by acid rain. With season-long sprays at pH 2.75, there was a slight delay in maturity and lower weight of 'McIntosh' apples. Even at the lowest pH levels no detrimental effects of simulated acid rain were found on apple tree productivity and fruit quality when measured as fruit set, seed number per fruit, and fruit size and appearance.

  19. Electric Utility Phase I Acid Rain Compliance Strategies for the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1994-01-01

    The Acid Rain Program is divided into two time periods; Phase I, from 1995 through 1999, and Phase II, starting in 2000. Phase I mostly affects power plants that are the largest sources of SO2 and NOx . Phase II affects virtually all electric power producers, including utilities and nonutilities. This report is a study of the effects of compliance with Phase I regulations on the costs and operations of electric utilities, but does not address any Phase II impacts.

  20. Effects of acid rain on apple tree productivity and fruit quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsline, P.L.; Musselman, R.C.; Kender, W.J.; Dee, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Mature McIntosh, Empire, and Golden Delicious apple trees (Malus domestica) were sprayed with simulated acid rain solutions in the pH range of 2.5 to 5.5 at full bloom in 1980 and 1981. In 1981, weekly sprays were applied at pH 2.75 and pH 3.25. Necrotic lesions developed on apple petals at pH 2.5 with slight injury appearing at pH 3.0 and 3.5. Apple foliage had no acid rain lesions at any of the pH levels tested. Pollen germination was reduced at pH 2.5 in Empire. Slight fruit set reduction at pH 2.5 was observed in McIntosh. Even at the lowest pH levels no detrimental effects of simulated acid rain were found on apple tree productivity and fruit quality when measured as fruit set, seed number per fruit, and fruit size and appearance.

  1. Voluntary compliance with market-based environment poliy [sic] : evidence from the U.S. acid rain program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montero, Juan Pablo

    The U.S. acid rain program, Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, is a pioneering experience in environmental regulation by setting a market for electric utility emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and by including ...

  2. Acid rain in China. Rapid industrialization has put citizens and ecosystems at risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorjoern Larssen; Espen Lydersen; Dagang Tang [and others] [Norwegian Institute for Water Research and University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)

    2006-01-15

    Acid rain emerged as an important environmental problem in China in the late 1970s. Many years of record economic growth have been accompanied by increased energy demand, greater coal combustion, and larger emissions of pollutants. As a result of significant emissions and subsequent deposition of sulfur, widespread acid rain is observed in southern and southwestern China. In fact, the deposition of sulfur is in some places higher than what was reported from the 'black triangle' in central Europe in the early 1980s. In addition, nitrogen is emitted from agriculture, power production, and a rapidly increasing number of cars. As a result, considerable deposition of pollutants occurs in forested areas previously thought to be pristine. Little is known about the effects of acid deposition on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems in China. This article presents the current situation and what to expect in the future, largely on the basis of results from a five-year Chinese-Norwegian cooperative project. In the years ahead, new environmental challenges must be expected if proper countermeasures are not put into place. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  3. The future of emissions trading in light of the acid rain experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLean, B.J.; Rico, R.

    1995-12-31

    The idea of emissions trading was developed more than two decades ago by environmental economists eager to provide new ideas for how to improve the efficiency of environmental protection. However, early emissions trading efforts were built on the historical {open_quotes}command and control{close_quotes} infrastructure which has dominated U.S. environmental protection until today. The {open_quotes}command and control{close_quotes} model initially had advantages that were of a very pragmatic character: it assured large pollution reductions in a time when large, cheap reductions were available and necessary; and it did not require a sophisticated government infrastructure. Within the last five years, large-scale emission trading programs have been successfully designed and started that are fundamentally different from the earlier efforts, creating a new paradigm for environmental control just when our understanding of environmental problems is changing as well. The purpose of this paper is to focus on the largest national-scale program--the Acid Rain Program--and from that experience, forecast when emission trading programs may be headed based on our understanding of the factors currently influencing environmental management. The first section of this paper will briefly review the history of emissions trading programs, followed by a summary of the features of the Acid Rain Program, highlighting those features that distinguish it from previous efforts. The last section addresses the opportunities for emissions trading (and its probable future directions).

  4. Allowance trading activity and state regulatory rulings: Evidence from the US Acid Rain Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, E.M.

    1997-12-31

    The US Acid Rain Program is one of the first, and by far the most extensive, applications of a market based approach to pollution control. From the beginning, there has been concern whether utilities would participate in allowance trading, and whether regulatory activity at the state level would further complicate utilities` decision to trade allowances. This paper finds that public utility commission regulation has encouraged allowance trading activity in states with regulatory rulings, but that allowance trading activity has not been limited to states issuing regulations. Until there is evidence suggesting that significant additional cost savings could have been obtained if additional allowance trading activity had occurred in states without regulations or that utilities in states with regulations are still not taking advantage of all cost saving trading opportunities, this analysis suggests that there is little reason to believe that allowance trading activity is impeded by public utility commission regulations.

  5. Acid rain regs will be falling on utilities in '84, but not too hard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smock, R.

    1984-01-01

    Regulations will probably call for sulfur dioxide scrubber retrofits on some older power plants in 1984, but because the action will likely be administrative under the Clean Air Act rather than new legislation, the rulings will be less harsh. A response to Canadian pressures was delayed when administration attention focused on military problems and rejected the first Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposals submitted by the new director as too costly. Failure to take action in 1984, however, will be politically damaging to the administration during an election year. A lack of scientific data hampers decision making, but EPA scientists predict there will be enough information by 1988 to accurately quantify acid-rain damage. EPA must decide which states to include in the regulations, how much to reduce sulfur dioxide emissions, and how to allocate quotas. Complicating the issue is the effect on the jobs of high-sulfur coal miners and the high capital costs of scrubbers. A low-cost retrofit may be possible with a furnace-injection technique now under study. 2 figures, 3 tables. (DCK)

  6. Berry Brook Watershed 2011 Rain Barrel Sale for Dover Residents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Allowing rain water to soak into the soil decreases stormwater runoff and helps recharge your groundwaterBerry Brook Watershed 2011 Rain Barrel Sale for Dover Residents Order Online: www Road Dover, NH 03824 Final day to ORDER: Orders must reach SkyJuice by June 18 Pick up your Rain Barrel

  7. Chemical alteration of limestone and marble samples exposed to acid rain and weathering in the eastern United States, 1984--1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimann, K.J.

    1991-06-01

    In a long-term program that began in 1984, limestone and marble briquettes have been exposed to both anthropogenic acid deposition and natural weathering of four field sites in the eastern United States. Similar tests began at an Ohio site in 1986. Effects of exposure on the briquettes and other materials at the sites are evaluated periodically by several federal agencies cooperating in the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). A primary contribution of Argonne National Laboratory to the NAPAP has been chemical analysis to determine changes in the samples caused by exposure to the environment. Wet chemical analysis was used to detect sulfates, nitrates, fluorides, chlorides, and a series of metal cations in sequential layers of stone removed from the briquettes after field exposure. Results from the first four years of the program indicate that rinsing by rain keeps skyward-facing stone relatively clean of reaction products, especially sulfate, the most abundant product. On groundward-facing samples, sulfate concentrations increased linearly with exposure time, and values were proportional to atmospheric SO{sub 2} concentrations at the site. Sulfate concentrations in groundward samples were much higher in limestone than in marble, because of the greater porosity of the limestone. A steep sulfate gradient was seen in both sample types from the surface to the interior. On skyward surfaces, material losses per rain event due to complete dissolution of accumulated sulfates were approximately equal to concentrations measured in runoff. Preexposed limestone samples had sulfate accumulations deep in their interiors, while fresh, unexposed limestone did not. No substantial changes in cation accumulations wee detected in either limestone or marble.

  8. Formation of NH{sub 3} during the pyrolysis of a brown coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, C.Z.; Pang, Y.; Li, X.G. [Monash Univ., Clayton, Victoria (Australia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1998-12-31

    Emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO, NO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O) from power generation using coal are an important environmental problem, contributing to the formation of photochemical smog and acid rain or to the enhancement of greenhouse effects and to the enhanced depletion of stratospheric ozone. During pyrolysis, the nitrogen in coal, as a part of coal organic matter, is converted into NOx precursors (eg. NH{sub 3}, HCN, HNCO and the nitrogen in tar and char). These NOx precursors may then be converted into either NOx or N{sub 2} during subsequent combustion or gasification/combustion. The conversion efficiency of these NOx precursors into NOx depends strongly upon the type of NOx precursor. Knowledge of the formation of these NOx precursors during pyrolysis is therefore essential for the accurate predictions of NOx emissions from large scale power plants, and therefore for the development of optimum strategies for NOx reduction. Formation of NH{sub 3} during the pyrolysis of a Victorian brown coal (Loy Yang) has been studied in a novel reactor. The experimental results obtained suggest that a considerable amount of the nitrogen in the nascent char could be converted into NH{sub 3} if the char is held at high temperatures for a long period of time. The formation of NH{sub 3} from the thermal cracking of char was seen to last for more than an hour even at temperatures as high as 700--900 C. The experimental results seem to suggest that the differences in reactor geometries would account at least partially for some of the discrepancies in the literature regarding the formation of NH{sub 3} during the pyrolysis of coals. It is thought that NH{sub 3} may be formed from the hydrogenation of the N sites in the char by the active hydrogen generated from the thermal cracking of the char.

  9. Rain sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

    1991-05-14

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

  10. Rain sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Danny A. (Richland, WA); Tomich, Stanley D. (Richland, WA); Glover, Donald W. (Prosser, WA); Allen, Errol V. (Benton City, WA); Hales, Jeremy M. (Kennewick, WA); Dana, Marshall T. (Richland, WA)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of said precipitation from said chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device.

  11. Acid Rain Program 2 0 0 5 P R O G R E S S R E P O R T

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    in Air Quality, Acid Deposition, and Ecological Effects ......14 Air Quality ..................................................................................................28 EPA-430-R-06-015 Clean Air Markets Division Office of Air and Radiation U.S. Environmental, air quality, and ecological effects. · Future programs that build on the ARP to further address

  12. West Texas Rain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2006-01-01

    Commission, Culberson County Underground Water District and county officials to install a 2,500-gallon rainwater harvesting tank at the Culberson County Courthouse. West Texas Rain Rainwater harvesting demonstration sites save water and money (Above... Left) One of the three rainwater harvesting demonstrations is located at the Culberson County Courthouse in Van Horn. This 2,500-gallon tank has been installed to catch and store the rainwater. (Above Right) Landscape irrigation using the harvested...

  13. Automated Rain Sampler for Real time pH and Conductivity Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weerasinghe, R; Jayananda, M K; Sonnadara, D U J

    2015-01-01

    To monitor the acidity of rain water in real time, a rain water sampling system was developed. The rain sampler detects the initial rain after a dry spell and collects a water sample. Before performing the measurements, the pH probe is calibrated using a standard buffer solution whereas the conductivity probe is calibrated using deionized water. After calibrating the probes the pH and the conductivity of the collected rain water sample are measured using the pH and the conductivity probe. Weather parameters such as air temperature, humidity and pressure are also recorded simultaneously. The pH and conductivity measurement data including weather parameters are transmitted to central station using a GSM modem for further analysis. The collected rain water sample is preserved at the remote monitoring station for post chemical analysis. A programmable logic controller controls the entire process.

  14. 5, 1133111375, 2005 NH total ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 5, 11331­11375, 2005 NH total ozone increase S. Dhomse et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction On the possible causes of recent increases in NH total ozone from a statistical analysis of satellite data from License. 11331 #12;ACPD 5, 11331­11375, 2005 NH total ozone increase S. Dhomse et al. Title Page Abstract

  15. Thermomagnetic Torque in Nh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adair, Thomas W.; McClurg, G. R.

    1970-01-01

    raises the question of whether the Scott torque has the same sign as the molecular g~ factor in ammonia as it does in all other gases. The research reported here shows that NH3 is quite normal. Progress on a detailed theory for the transport... torque. The new ap- paratus' used in the present work gave no measur- able torque at zero magnetic field, and therefore no correction was needed. The ammonia was high-purity gas from the Mathe- son Gas Products Company with a stated purity of 99. 99...

  16. Optical Rain Gauge and Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge Comparisons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access toOctober 1996TechnologiesDistribution, and FilmRain Gauge and

  17. Publisher's Note: "Ab initio potential energy surfaces for NH,,3 -...-NH,,3 -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Publisher's Note: "Ab initio potential energy surfaces for NH,,3 - ...-NH,,3 - ... with analytical.174.143.43. Redistribution subject to AIP license or copyright; see http://jcp.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;

  18. Rain, Rain, Don't Go Away Taking a 360-Degree View of Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    Rain, Rain, Don't Go Away Taking a 360-Degree View of Water The Science of Photography National Flood Studies Field Campaign ­ 6 Taking a 360-Degree View of Water ­ 8 From GLOBE Star Student to GLOBE

  19. The Effect of Rain on ERS Scatterometer Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    measurements in rainy conditions [1] [2]. In a raining area, rain striking the water surface creates splashThe Effect of Rain on ERS Scatterometer Measurements Congling Nie and David G. Long Department evidence of rain surface per- turbation in recent studies of surface radar backscatter, the rain effects

  20. Dimethyl sulfide in the Amazon rain forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jardine, Kolby; Yanez-Serrano, A. M.; Williams, J.; Kunert, N.; Jardine, A.; Taylor, T.; Abrell, L.; Artaxo, Paulo; Guenther, Alex B.; Hewitt, C. N.; House, E.; Florentino, A. P.; Manzi, A.; Higuchi, N.; Kesselmeier, J.; Behrendt, T.; Veres, P. R.; Derstroff, B.; Fuentes, J.; Martin, Scot T.; Andreae, M. O.

    2015-01-01

    Surface-to-atmosphere emissions of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) may impact global climate 44 through the formation of gaseous sulfuric acid, which can yield secondary sulfate 45 aerosols and contribute to new particle formation. While oceans are generally 46 considered the dominant source of DMS, a shortage of ecosystem observations prevents 47 an accurate analysis of terrestrial DMS sources. Using mass spectrometry, we quantified 48 ambient DMS mixing ratios within and above a primary rainforest ecosystem in the 49 central Amazon Basin in real-time (2010-2011) and at high vertical resolution (2013-50 2014). Elevated but highly variable DMS mixing ratios were observed within the 51 canopy, showing clear evidence of a net ecosystem source to the atmosphere during 52 both day and night in both the dry and wet seasons. Periods of high DMS mixing ratios 53 lasting up to 8 hours (up to 160 ppt) often occurred within the canopy and near the 54 surface during many evenings and nights. Daytime gradients showed mixing ratios (up 55 to 80 ppt) peaking near the top of the canopy as well as near the ground following a rain 56 event. The spatial and temporal distribution of DMS suggests that ambient levels and 57 their potential climatic impacts are dominated by local soil and plant emissions. A soil 58 source was confirmed by measurements of DMS emission fluxes from Amazon soils as 59 a function of temperature and soil moisture. Furthermore, light and temperature 60 dependent DMS emissions were measured from seven tropical tree species. Our study 61 has important implications for understanding terrestrial DMS sources and their role in 62 coupled land-atmosphere climate feedbacks. 63

  1. Apple Tree, NH Big Tree for May By Anne Krantz, NH Big Tree Team,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Apple Tree, NH Big Tree for May By Anne Krantz, NH Big Tree Team, UNH Cooperative Extension The explosion of apple blossoms in May transforms the most gnarled old tree into a delicate cloud of beauty (1817-1862) in his essay "The Wild Apple Tree," described the blossoms perfectly: `The flowers

  2. Disdrometer and Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartholomew. MJ

    2009-12-01

    The Distromet disdrometer model RD-80 and NovaLynx tipping bucket rain gauge model 260-2500E-12 are two devices deployed a few meters apart to measure the character and amount of liquid precipitation. The main purpose of the disdrometer is to measure drop size distribution, which it does over 20 size classes from 0.3 mm to 5.4 mm. The data from both instruments can be used to determine rain rate. The disdrometer results can also be used to infer several properties including drop number density, radar reflectivity, liquid water content, and energy flux. Two coefficients, N0 and ?, from an exponential fit between drop diameter and drop number density, are routinely calculated. Data are collected once a minute. The instruments make completely different kinds of measurements. Rain that falls on the disdrometer sensor moves a plunger on a vertical axis. The disdrometer transforms the plunger motion into electrical impulses whose strength is proportional to drop diameter. The rain gauge is the conventional tipping bucket type. Each tip collects an amount equivalent to 0.01 in. of water, and each tip is counted by a data acquisition system anchored by a Campbell CR1000 data logger.

  3. Incentive mechanisms as a strategic option for acid rain compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A.; McDermott, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 (P.L. 101--549) establishes the use of flexible emission compliance strategies for electric utilities to reduce the emissions of add precursors (SO[sub 2], NO[sub 2]). To control SO[sub 2] emissions, tradeable emission allowances will be used; NO[sub 2] emissions will be controlled by an emission standard, but a utility is permitted to average NO[sub 2] emissions systemwide to meet the standard. Both of these policies promote flexibility and cost savings for the utility while achieving the prescribed emission reduction goals of P.L. 101--549. The use of SO[sub 2] emission allowances has two notable benefits: A utility has the choice of a wide range of compliance methods allowing it to minimize compliance costs and second; the use of transferable emission allowances promote technological innovation with respect to emissions reduction/control. This report discusses the use of regulatory incentives towards the achievement of a Title IV goal of cost reduction of SO[sub 2] emissions.

  4. Incentive mechanisms as a strategic option for acid rain compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A.; McDermott, K.A.

    1991-12-31

    Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 (P.L. 101--549) establishes the use of flexible emission compliance strategies for electric utilities to reduce the emissions of add precursors (SO{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}). To control SO{sub 2} emissions, tradeable emission allowances will be used; NO{sub 2} emissions will be controlled by an emission standard, but a utility is permitted to average NO{sub 2} emissions systemwide to meet the standard. Both of these policies promote flexibility and cost savings for the utility while achieving the prescribed emission reduction goals of P.L. 101--549. The use of SO{sub 2} emission allowances has two notable benefits: A utility has the choice of a wide range of compliance methods allowing it to minimize compliance costs and second; the use of transferable emission allowances promote technological innovation with respect to emissions reduction/control. This report discusses the use of regulatory incentives towards the achievement of a Title IV goal of cost reduction of SO{sub 2} emissions.

  5. Why we started a Volunteer Rain Gauge Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    in their backyards #12;4-inch diameter High capacity rain gauges Aluminum foil-wrapped Styrofoam hail pads Snow

  6. Sediment detachment by rain power Emmanuel J. Gabet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabet, Emmanuel "Manny"

    , washload, kinematic wave Citation: Gabet, E. J., and T. Dunne, Sediment detachment by rain power, Water, detaching soil particles and displacing water. We use the term, rain power, to describe the rate at whichSediment detachment by rain power Emmanuel J. Gabet Department of Geological Sciences, University

  7. Category:Concord, NH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County,Camilla, Georgia: Energy014771°,NorthCLEAN WebinarNH Jump to:

  8. Heavy rains hamper Louisiana gas line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horner, C.

    1983-06-01

    Despite heavy rains and flooding a 36-mile gas pipeline loop for Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Corp. was completed from north of Starks (at the end of Transco's south Louisiana lateral) to the Lake Charles area. Somastic-coated, 42-in. grade X-60 pipe comprises 90% of the route. The contract included multiple 30-42 in. fabrications, installation of six 42-in. gate valves, and expansion of the Gillis compressor station.

  9. Rain Machine (Solar Still) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct. 7,DOE HDBK-1113-2008 April 2008 DOE98Rain Machine (Solar

  10. Jack Rains | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATIONIntroducing theActivation byIs aItemPolarTool andJack Rains

  11. GARDENSA RAIN GARDEN MANUAL FOR SOUTH CAROLINA As development increases, so

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    #12;Rain gardens should be located in an area to which rain water typically flows. If a depression a storm will produce more than 1 inch of rain in 24 hours, excess water should be able to leave the rain an overflow so that excess water from larger storms can be diverted out of the rain garden. To prevent

  12. nh Gi Tn Hi Ti Nguyn Thin Nhin do Trn Du Deep Horizon Gim nh bt Nhm Tng ni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    vàng và cá kim. Thit b dây câu vàng s vô tình bt phi nhng loài cá khác cng nh nhng cá th còn quá nh ca là thi gian ngh ngi. Các d án cng cung cp cho nhng ng dân tham gia hai loi thit b ánh bt thay th - tr

  13. Proton transfer dynamics of the reaction H3O ,,NH3 ,H2O...NH4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrar, James M.

    Proton transfer dynamics of the reaction H3O¿ ,,NH3 ,H2O...NH4 ¿ studied using the crossed, Rochester, New York 14627 Received 29 September 2003; accepted 8 October 2003 The proton transfer reaction sharply asymmetry, and the maximum is close to the velocity and direction of the precursor ammonia beam

  14. Simultaneous Wind and Rain Retrieval for ERS Scatterometer Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Simultaneous Wind and Rain Retrieval for ERS Scatterometer Measurements Congling Nie and David G on the ESCAT wind-only retrieval has been evaluated. For high incidence angle measurements, the additional scattering of rain causes estimated wind speeds to appear higher than expected. It is also noted

  15. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Karl Kong, Pei Wen Lei, Yabo Li, Rain Yuan Rain Tian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that are currently used to collect food scraps at UBC are cleaned at the Composting Facility located at the south, Yabo Li, Rain Yuan Rain Tian AN INVETIGATION INTO ORGANIC WASTE BIN LINERS APSC 262 April 10, 2014 1036 Technology and Society Instructor Name: Paul Winkelman AN INVETIGATION INTO ORGANIC WASTE BIN LINERS

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE SELECTIVE REDUCTION OF NO BY NH3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas, D.

    2014-01-01

    in this study. with coal type. limiting the NH The optimumlight oil and several types of coal, and have provided somecombustion air. Several types of coal with different sulfur

  17. Heavy pollution suppresses light rain in China: observations and modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Gong, Daoyi; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai R.; Bennartz, Ralph; Chen, Deliang; Wang, Weiguo

    2009-08-15

    Long-term observational data reveal that both the frequency and amount of light rain have decreased in eastern China (EC) for 1956-2005 with high spatial coherency. This is different from the trend of total rainfall observed in EC, which decreases in northern EC and increases in southern EC. To examine the cause of the light rain trends, we analyzed the long-term variability of atmospheric water vapor and its correlation with light rain events. Results show very weak relationships between large-scale moisture transport and light rain in EC. This suggests that light rain trend in EC is not driven by large-scale circulation changes. Because of human activities, pollutant emission has increased dramatically in China for the last few decades, leading to significant reductions in visibility between 1960 and 2000. Cloud-resolving model simulations show that aerosols corresponding to heavily polluted conditions can significantly increase the cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and reduce droplet sizes compared to pristine conditions. This can lead to a significant decline in raindrop concentration and delay raindrop formation because smaller cloud droplets are less efficient in the collision and coalescence processes. Together with weaker convection, the precipitation frequency and amount are significantly reduced in the polluted case. Satellite data also reveal higher CDNC and smaller droplet size over polluted land in EC relative to pristine regions, which is consistent with the model results. This evidence suggests that the significantly increased aerosol particles produced by air pollution are at least partly responsible for the decreased light rain events observed in China over the past fifty years.

  18. Atmospheric deposition of ^Be by rain events, in central Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    Atmospheric deposition of ^Be by rain events, in central Argentina Juri Ayub, J. , Di Gregorio, B Aplicada San Luis. UniversidadNacional de San Luis - CONICET. Ejercito de los Andes 950. Argentina. 2 Buenos Aires, Argentina 3. Escuela de Cienciay Tecnologia, Universidad Nacional de San Martin. Martin de

  19. Water and Energy Savings, and Carbon Emission Reductions From Rain Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    Water and Energy Savings, and Carbon Emission Reductions From Rain Water Harvesting, Combined Heat Infrastructure Ecology Decentralized Water Resource Development: Low Impact Development (LID) Decentralized Energy Production: Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Policies for Adoption of Rain Water Harvesting

  20. Selective Catalytic Oxidation (SCO) of NH3 to N2 for Hot Exhaust...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oxidation (SCO) of NH3 to N2 for Hot Exhaust Treatment Selective Catalytic Oxidation (SCO) of NH3 to N2 for Hot Exhaust Treatment Investigation of a series of transition metal...

  1. Study of On-Board Ammonia (NH3) Generation for SCR Operation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Study of On-Board Ammonia (NH3) Generation for SCR Operation Study of On-Board Ammonia (NH3) Generation for SCR Operation The feasibility of on-board ammonia generation was...

  2. Observations of Precipitation Size and Fall Speed Characteristics within Coexisting Rain and Wet Snow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuter, Sandra

    Snow SANDRA E. YUTER Department of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences, North Carolina State are compared among samples obtained in mixed precipitation (rain and wet snow) and rain in the Oregon Cascade Mountains and in dry snow in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. Coexisting rain and snow particles

  3. Photometric Model of a Rain Drop Kshitiz Garg and Shree K. Nayar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nayar, Shree K.

    conditions such as haze and fog, rain drops are large and visible to the naked eye. Each drop refracts and photometric models show that each rain drop behaves like a wide-angle lens that redirects light from a large of rain is highly complex. Unlike the particles that cause other weather conditions such as haze and fog

  4. Aerosol control on depth of warm rain in convective clouds Mahen Konwar,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Aerosol control on depth of warm rain in convective clouds Mahen Konwar,1 R. S. Maheskumar,1 J. R effective radius (re) increased with distance above cloud base (D). Warm rain became detectable, i.e., rain water content >0.01 g/Kg, at the tops of growing convective clouds when re exceeded 12 mm. The re

  5. Rain-induced subsurface airflow and Lisse effect Haipeng Guo,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    is low, and the maximum water-level rise is less than the maximum air pressure induced by rain and the water table depth. Citation: Guo, H., J. J. Jiao, and E. P. Weeks (2008), Rain-induced subsurface] Water table fluctuation may induce subsurface airflow [Jiao and Li, 2004] and airflow caused by rain

  6. RAIN AND WIND ESTIMATION FROM SEAWINDS IN HURRICANES AT ULTRA HIGH RESOLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    RAIN AND WIND ESTIMATION FROM SEAWINDS IN HURRICANES AT ULTRA HIGH RESOLUTION Brent A. Williams method for estimating wind and rain in hurricanes from SeaWinds at ultra-high resolution is developed. We use a hurricane model to generate prior distributions for the wind speed, wind di- rection, and rain

  7. 1 -NH Coverts Project: 1995-2002 Program Evaluation The New Hampshire Coverts Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    1 - NH Coverts Project: 1995-2002 Program Evaluation The New Hampshire Coverts Project In Their Own, sexual orientation, or veteran's status. #12;2 - NH Coverts Project: 1995-2002 Program Evaluation of responses to open-ended question (#12) 19 #12;3 - NH Coverts Project: 1995-2002 Program Evaluation

  8. Effects of reactant rotational excitations on H{sub 2} + NH{sub 2} ? H + NH{sub 3} reactivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Hongwei; Guo, Hua

    2014-12-28

    Rotational mode specificity of the title reaction is examined using an initial state selected time-dependent wave packet method on an accurate ab initio based global potential energy surface. This penta-atomic reaction presents an ideal system to test several dynamical approximations, which might be useful for future quantum dynamics studies of polyatomic reactions, particularly with rotationally excited reactants. The first approximation involves a seven-dimensional (7D) model in which the two non-reactive N–H bonds are fixed at their equilibrium geometry. The second is the centrifugal sudden (CS) approximation within the 7D model. Finally, the J-shifting (JS) model is tested, again with the fixed N–H bonds. The spectator-bond approximation works very well in the energy range studied, while the centrifugal sudden and J-shifting integral cross sections (ICSs) agree satisfactorily with the coupled-channel counterparts in the low collision energy range, but deviate at the high energies. The calculated integral cross sections indicate that the rotational excitation of H{sub 2} somewhat inhibits the reaction while the rotational excitations of NH{sub 2} have little effect. These findings are compared with the predictions of the sudden vector projection model. Finally, a simple model is proposed to predict rotational mode specificity using K-averaged reaction probabilities.

  9. A General Systems Theory for Rain Formation in Warm Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Selvam

    2014-08-15

    A cumulus cloud model which can explain the observed characteristics of warm rain formation in monsoon clouds is presented. The model is based on classical statistical physical concepts and satisfies the principle of maximum entropy production. Atmospheric flows exhibit selfsimilar fractal fluctuations that are ubiquitous to all dynamical systems in nature, such as physical, chemical, social, etc and are characterized by inverse power law form for power (eddy energy) spectrum signifying long-range space-time correlations. A general systems theory model for atmospheric flows developed by the author is based on the concept that the large eddy energy is the integrated mean of enclosed turbulent (small scale) eddies. This model gives scale-free universal governing equations for cloud growth processes. The model predicted cloud parameters are in agreement with reported observations, in particular, the cloud dropsize distribution. Rain formation can occur in warm clouds within 30minutes lifetime under favourable conditions of moisture supply in the environment.

  10. Cometary panspermia explains the red rain of Kerala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godfrey Louis; A. Santhosh Kumar

    2003-10-05

    Red coloured rain occurred in many places of Kerala in India during July to September 2001 due to the mixing of huge quantity of microscopic red cells in the rainwater. Considering its correlation with a meteor airbust event, this phenomenon raised an extraordinary question whether the cells are extraterrestrial. Here we show how the observed features of the red rain phenomenon can be explained by considering the fragmentation and atmospheric disintegration of a fragile cometary body that presumably contains a dense collection of red cells. Slow settling of cells in the stratosphere explains the continuation of the phenomenon for two months. The red cells under study appear to be the resting spores of an extremophilic microorganism. Possible presence of these cells in the interstellar clouds is speculated from its similarity in UV absorption with the 217.5 nm UV extinction feature of interstellar clouds.

  11. Rains County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergy Marketing Corp Jump to: navigation,Rainier,Rains

  12. Summer rain pulse size and rainwater uptake by three dominant desert plants in a desertified grassland ecosystem in northwestern China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water sources derived from small (rain events, A. ordosia took advantage of deeper soil waterSummer rain pulse size and rainwater uptake by three dominant desert plants in a desertified composition, Rain pulse size, Summer precipitation Abstract To examine the different effects of rain pulse

  13. Light rain events change over North America, Europe and Asia for 1973-2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Gong, Daoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2010-10-28

    Long-term daily precipitation data from NCDC are used to investigate the changes of light rain events from 1973-2009 over North America, Europe and Asia. Results reveal that the trend of light rain events presents a remarkably diverse feature in different regions, while an overall decrease trend can be found over the continents in northern hemisphere. In North America, most of stations show a decrease trend for light rain on the annual basis but a decrease trend can also be found for moderate and heavy rain. The opposite trends are observed over the stations in Europe and the trend of light rain is not significant when averaged for all the stations. In Asia, especially East Asia, the light rain days show an overwhelming decrease trend with high spatial coherency. Meanwhile the moderate and heavy rain events (> 10 mm/day) have increased, suggesting a remarkable shift of precipitation from light to heavy rain in East Asia. While both the warming at a global scale and increased atmospheric aerosols due to air pollution at a regional scale (e.g. East Asia) may have affected the light rain changes, it remains a challenging task to quantitatively detect and separate the cause of light rain changes in different regions. ?

  14. Hollow-fiber gas-membrane process for removal of NH{sub 3} from solution of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qin, Y.; Cabral, J.M.S.; Wang, S.

    1996-07-01

    A hollow-fiber supported gas membrane process for the separation of NH{sub 3} from aqueous solutions containing both NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A lumen laminar flow and radial diffusion model was applied to calculate the membrane wall transfer coefficient from the data stripping a single volatile component, NH{sub 3} or CO{sub 2}, from their individual aqueous solutions. Influence of the type of membranes and operating conditions on mass-transfer rate were discussed, especially the influence of the membrane transfer coefficient on the film mass-transfer coefficient in the lumen. Appropriate configurations of the hollow-fiber modules for stripping of a single component were analyzed to optimize mass transfer. To predict the stripping of NH{sub 3} from a solution containing NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2}, a mathematical model incorporating local chemical equilibria and Nernst-Planck diffusion was developed to describe the mass transport. The models described the experimental data fairly well. The experimental results showed that the supported gas membrane process can be used to remove NH{sub 3} effectively from aqueous media containing NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2}.

  15. Progress on Acidic Zirconia Mixed Oxides for Efficient NH3-SCR Catalysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Details progress on non-zeolitic zirconia-based mixed oxides as promising new SCR catalyst materials and results of engine bench testing of full-size SCR prototype confirms Details progress on non-zeolitic zirconia-based mixed oxides as promising new SCR catalyst materials and results of engine bench testing of full-size SCR prototype confirms potential for formulation of Euro 6 SCR catalysts

  16. Progress on Acidic Zirconia Mixed Oxides for Efficient NH3-SCR...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    zirconia-based mixed oxides as promising new SCR catalyst materials and results of engine bench testing of full-size SCR prototype confirms potential for formulation of Euro...

  17. Rain or Shine: We Cycle for Science | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report Appendices |ProjectKnow Your PowerWeatherize »Rain or Shine:

  18. Modeling Study of SCR/PGM Interactions in NH3 Slip Catalysts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The focus of this research is on the optimization of NH3 slip catalyst performance by simulating the behavior of different SCR/PGM configurations.

  19. Opal Palmer Adisa. It Begins With Tears (Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann Press, 1997).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devlin, Leslie

    1997-01-01

    Opal Palmer Adisa. It Begins With Tears (Portsmouth, NH:Tears, is the first novel of Opal Palmer Adisa. She was born

  20. With Chest Waders, Hip Boots, Or Rain Gear R. O. Parker Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in addition to the boots and rain gear (fig. 1). FEET FIRST When you fall feet first into the water, airWith Chest Waders, Hip Boots, Or Rain Gear R. O. Parker Jr. Neither chest wade rs, hip boots, nor rain ge a r will cause you to drown if you don't panic . Wade rs, the m ost dreaded of the thre e, can

  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - 16.0855_Raines Draft Rev 4

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Management Update Project Management Update Bob Raines Director, Project Management Systems and Assessments * Everybody's Favorite Subject Cost Estimating * Cost Estimating * EVMS...

  2. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 45, NO. 3, MARCH 2007 621 A C-Band Wind/Rain Backscatter Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    signature is altered by rain. Rain striking the water creates splash products including rings, stalksIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 45, NO. 3, MARCH 2007 621 A C-Band Wind/Rain--With the confirmed evidence of rain surface pertur- bation in recent studies, the rain effects on C

  3. nh Gi Thit Hi Ti Nguyn Thin Nhin Do S C Trn Du Deepwater Horizon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    lên các bãi bin trng bng phng. Vt liu này cng có th nm thành di nh dài hai dm theo ng mc thy triu và di mc thy triu thuc phía Vnh Fort Pickens, thnh thong khách thm cng hay bi li ch này. Các mnh nh nha

  4. On the infiltration of rain water through the soil with runo# of the excess water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fasano, Antonio

    On the infiltration of rain water through the soil with runo# of the excess water Iacopo Borsi '' Viale Morgagni 67/A, 50134 Firenze, Italy Abstract This paper deals with the modelling of the rain water infiltration through the soil above the aquifer in case of runo# of the excess water. The main feature

  5. Rain splash of dry sand revealed by high-speed imaging and sticky paper splash targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mudd, Simon Marius

    Rain splash of dry sand revealed by high-speed imaging and sticky paper splash targets David Jon by raindrop impacts. We use high-speed imaging of drop impacts on dry sand to describe the drop (2007), Rain splash of dry sand revealed by high-speed imaging and sticky paper splash targets, J

  6. Seasonal controls on the exchange of carbon and water in an Amazonian rain forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    Seasonal controls on the exchange of carbon and water in an Amazonian rain forest Lucy R. Hutyra,1 controls on the exchange of carbon and water in an Amazonian rain forest, J. Geophys. Res., 112, G03008 response to climate and weather. This study presents 4 years of eddy covariance data for CO2 and water

  7. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Water Management through Rain Gardens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (4m x 5m) and can hold vast amounts of water at any given time. The bowl shaped rain garden must is an important parameter since the soil used effects the water absorption ability of the rain garden. The optimalUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Water Management through

  8. The roles of cloud drop effective radius and LWP in determining rain properties in marine stratocumulus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    The roles of cloud drop effective radius and LWP in determining rain properties in marine that adding cloud condensation nuclei to marine stratocumulus can prevent their breakup from closed into open in terms of cloud drop effective radius (re). Rain is initiated when re near cloud top is around 12­14 mm

  9. 1996 update on compliance and emissions trading under the U.S. acid rain program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellerman, A. Denny

    1998-01-01

    November 1997This paper reports on the second year of compliance with the sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions-reduction and -trading provisions of the Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). The material is intended ...

  10. Estimated increases in the cost of electricity under three acid-rain control bills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillsman, E.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Alvic, D.R. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Several bills were introduced in the past two Congresses to reduce emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides from electric power plants. The effects of these bills on electricity costs depend on features of the bills, on the mix of generating capacity owned by different electric utilities, on the technologies available for complying with the legislation, and on the time horizon used to calculate the costs. A system of computer software has been developed to make utility-specific estimates of the effects of different legislation on electricity costs. This paper presents sample results from a larger analysis of six pieces of legislation. These results suggest that the emissions trading systems proposed in some legislation, and adopted in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1991, may have less effect than expected on the cost of complying with the legislation. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Costs to Maryland utilities and ratepayers of an acid-rain control strategy: an update analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahal, M.I.

    1988-03-01

    In 1985, the Power Plant Research Program (PPRP) published a study that developed estimates of cost and electric-rate impacts for a hypothetical control scenario for each major electric utility operating in the State. This report updates that earlier study by incorporating new information. Important differences include revised financial/accounting assumptions, a decline in the cost premium for low-sulfur coal, increases in scrubber construction costs and changes in control strategies. Also, the update incorporates control of NOx emissions. The original study was limited to evaluating the costs of controlling sulfur-emissions only.

  12. Lessons from Phase 2 compliance with the U.S. Acid Rain Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellerman, A. Denny

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides preliminary answers to four questions concerning the behavior of agents operating under the SO2 Allowance Trading Program that could not be adequately answered until several years' data on compliance ...

  13. The efficiency and robustness of allowance banking in the U.S. Acid Rain Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellerman, A. Denny

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides an empirical evaluation of the efficiency of allowance banking (i.e., abating more in early periods in order to abate less in later periods) in the nationwide market for sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission ...

  14. Simulation of an Ar/NH{sub 3} low pressure magnetized direct current discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zhi [School of Science, University of Science and Technology Liaoning, Anshan 114051 (China); School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao Zhen [School of Chemistry and Life Science, Anshan Normal University, Anshan 114007 (China); School of Chemical Engineering, University of Science and Technology Liaoning, Anshan 114051 (China); Li Xuehui [Physiccal Science and Technical College, Dalian University, Dalian 116622 (China)

    2013-01-15

    A two-dimensional fluid model has been used to investigate the properties of plasma in an Ar/NH{sub 3} low pressure magnetized direct current discharge. We compared the simulation results with the theoretical and experimental results of the other gas discharge in which the magnetic field is considered. Results that obtained using this method are in good agreement with literature. The simulation results show that the positive ammonia ion density follows the positive argon ion density. The Ar{sub 2}{sup +} density is slightly higher than the Ar{sup +} density at 100 mTorr. The largest ammonia ion is NH{sub 3}{sup +} ion, followed by NH{sub 2}{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, and NH{sup +} ions. The contribution of NH{sup +} ions to the density of the positive ammonia ions is marginal. The influence of pressure on the plasma discharge has been studied by simulation, and the mechanisms have been discussed. The average plasma density increases as pressure increased. The plasma density appears to be more inhomogeneous than that at the lower pressure. The ratio of charge particles changed as pressure increased. The Ar{sup +} density is slightly higher than the Ar{sub 2}{sup +} density as the pressure increased. It makes NH{sub 4}{sup +} ratio increase as pressure increased. It shows that the electron temperature drops with rising pressure by numerical calculation.

  15. Global distributions, time series and error characterization of atmospheric ammonia (NH[subscript 3]) from IASI satellite observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Damme, M.

    Ammonia (NH[subscript 3]) emissions in the atmosphere have increased substantially over the past decades, largely because of intensive livestock production and use of fertilizers. As a short-lived species, NH[subscript 3] ...

  16. Summer rain pulse size and rainwater uptake by three dominant desert plants in a desertified grassland ecosystem in northwestern China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    Summer rain pulse size and rainwater uptake by three dominant desert plants in a desertified composition, Rain pulse size, Summer precipitation Abstract To examine the different effects of rain pulse with different pulse sizes based on the changes in the hydrogen isotope ratios (dD) of their stem water 7 days

  17. Deep-Ultraviolet Resonance Raman Excitation Profiles of NH4NO3, PETN, TNT, HMX, and RDX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asher, Sanford A.

    Deep-Ultraviolet Resonance Raman Excitation Profiles of NH4NO3, PETN, TNT, HMX, and RDX Manash nitrate (NH4NO3), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), trinitrotoluene (TNT), nitroamine (HMX. The ultraviolet (UV) resonance Raman/differential Raman cross-sections of NH4NO3, PETN, TNT, HMX, and RDX

  18. CHARACTERIZATION STUDIES OF THE SELECTIVE REDUCTION OF NO by NH3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, N.J.

    2013-01-01

    and Maloney, K.L. , "NOx Reduction with Ammonia: Laboratoryand Hashizawa, K. , "Reduction of NOx in Combustion ExhaustSelective Noncatalytic Reduction of NOx with NH3," EPRI NOx

  19. NH3 generation over commercial Three-Way Catalysts and Lean-NOx...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    generation over commercial Three-Way Catalysts and Lean-NOx Traps NH3 generation over commercial Three-Way Catalysts and Lean-NOx Traps Research to identify most promising...

  20. NH3 generation over commercial Three-Way Catalysts and Lean-NOx Traps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Research to identify most promising catalytic formulations and operation for the in-situ generation of NH3, storage on a downstream SCR catalyst, and utilized to reduce the remaining NOx

  1. Rare Earth ? N = N* fs fGHZ fp nH fl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    Rare Earth ? #12;N to date N = N* fs fGHZ fp nH fl ·N* = 4 x 1011 ·fs = 0.2 ·fGHZ = 0.1 ·fp = 0.8 ·nH = 2 ·fl = 1.0 N = 1.3 x 1010 #12;The Goldilocks Effect Earth is "Just Right" Yes, life on Earth has adapted to Earth, but ... Earth has just the right mass to be ·Tectonically-active ·Retain

  2. Soil Acidity and Manganese Nutrition of Corn and Soybeans as Affected by Lime and Nitrogen Applications in an Oxisol under a No-Till System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caires, Eduardo Fávero; Garbuio, Fernando José; Joris, Hélio Antonio Wood; Pereira, Paulo Roberto da Silva Filho

    2009-01-01

    control soil acidity in NT, lime is broadcast on the surfacethat examined the effect of lime and N applications soilacid loamy soil. Dolomitic lime was surface applied and N-NH

  3. Volume 130, number 6 CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 24 October1986 VIBRATIONAL DEPENDENCE OF THE NH,+ (v2)+NO AND NO+(v) +NH,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    bending mode ( vz=O-12) causes no marked change in the charge transfer cross section, while in the reverse vibrational levels. We find that the vibrational excitation of the NH: v2 umbrella bending mode (v, = O-12 with the hope of con- firming or refuting this model. 2. Experimental In a previous paper we reported

  4. Heat and moisture transfer through building envelope components subjected to outdoor weather conditions including rain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayamaha, S.E.G. [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1997-05-01

    Singapore experiences a warm and humid climate with abundant rainfall during the entire year. Such conditions are typical of tropical climates where many of today`s metropolitan cities are situated. Rain has been found to affect the thermal performance of building components in two ways, namely, by cooling the surface during rain and thereafter by drying of the absorbed moisture after rain. However, existing software used for predicting the thermal performance of building components do not consider such effects and are therefore inadequate for accurate estimation of the thermal performance of building components in tropical climates. To overcome these limitations, this study was carried out to investigate the simultaneous heat and moisture flow through porous building materials exposed to outdoor conditions such as solar radiation and rain.

  5. Analysis of TRMM Precipitation Radar Algorithms and Rain over the Tropics and Southeast Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Funk, Aaron

    2013-12-10

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR) 2A23 algorithm classifies rain echo as stratiform or convective while the 2A25 algorithm corrects vertical profiles of radar reflectivity for attenuation ...

  6. Dimethyl sulfide in the Amazon rain forest: DMS in the Amazon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jardine, K.; Yañez-Serrano, A. M.; Williams, J.; Kunert, N.; Jardine, A.; Taylor, T.; Abrell, L.; Artaxo, P.; Guenther, A.; Hewitt, C. N.; et al

    2015-01-08

    Surface-to-atmosphere emissions of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) may impact global climate 44 through the formation of gaseous sulfuric acid, which can yield secondary sulfate 45 aerosols and contribute to new particle formation. While oceans are generally 46 considered the dominant source of DMS, a shortage of ecosystem observations prevents 47 an accurate analysis of terrestrial DMS sources. Using mass spectrometry, we quantified 48 ambient DMS mixing ratios within and above a primary rainforest ecosystem in the 49 central Amazon Basin in real-time (2010-2011) and at high vertical resolution (2013-50 2014). Elevated but highly variable DMS mixing ratios were observed within themore »51 canopy, showing clear evidence of a net ecosystem source to the atmosphere during 52 both day and night in both the dry and wet seasons. Periods of high DMS mixing ratios 53 lasting up to 8 hours (up to 160 ppt) often occurred within the canopy and near the 54 surface during many evenings and nights. Daytime gradients showed mixing ratios (up 55 to 80 ppt) peaking near the top of the canopy as well as near the ground following a rain 56 event. The spatial and temporal distribution of DMS suggests that ambient levels and 57 their potential climatic impacts are dominated by local soil and plant emissions. A soil 58 source was confirmed by measurements of DMS emission fluxes from Amazon soils as 59 a function of temperature and soil moisture. Furthermore, light and temperature 60 dependent DMS emissions were measured from seven tropical tree species. Our study 61 has important implications for understanding terrestrial DMS sources and their role in 62 coupled land-atmosphere climate feedbacks. 63« less

  7. Dimethyl sulfide in the Amazon rain forest: DMS in the Amazon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jardine, K.; Yañez-Serrano, A. M.; Williams, J.; Kunert, N.; Jardine, A.; Taylor, T.; Abrell, L.; Artaxo, P.; Guenther, A.; Hewitt, C. N.; House, E.; Florentino, A. P.; Manzi, A.; Higuchi, N.; Kesselmeier, J.; Behrendt, T.; Veres, P. R.; Derstroff, B.; Fuentes, J. D.; Martin, S. T.; Andreae, M. O.

    2015-01-08

    Surface-to-atmosphere emissions of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) may impact global climate 44 through the formation of gaseous sulfuric acid, which can yield secondary sulfate 45 aerosols and contribute to new particle formation. While oceans are generally 46 considered the dominant source of DMS, a shortage of ecosystem observations prevents 47 an accurate analysis of terrestrial DMS sources. Using mass spectrometry, we quantified 48 ambient DMS mixing ratios within and above a primary rainforest ecosystem in the 49 central Amazon Basin in real-time (2010-2011) and at high vertical resolution (2013-50 2014). Elevated but highly variable DMS mixing ratios were observed within the 51 canopy, showing clear evidence of a net ecosystem source to the atmosphere during 52 both day and night in both the dry and wet seasons. Periods of high DMS mixing ratios 53 lasting up to 8 hours (up to 160 ppt) often occurred within the canopy and near the 54 surface during many evenings and nights. Daytime gradients showed mixing ratios (up 55 to 80 ppt) peaking near the top of the canopy as well as near the ground following a rain 56 event. The spatial and temporal distribution of DMS suggests that ambient levels and 57 their potential climatic impacts are dominated by local soil and plant emissions. A soil 58 source was confirmed by measurements of DMS emission fluxes from Amazon soils as 59 a function of temperature and soil moisture. Furthermore, light and temperature 60 dependent DMS emissions were measured from seven tropical tree species. Our study 61 has important implications for understanding terrestrial DMS sources and their role in 62 coupled land-atmosphere climate feedbacks. 63

  8. Morphology of rain water channelization in systematically varied model sandy soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Wei; C. M. Cejas; R. Barrois; R. Dreyfus; D. J. Durian

    2014-03-13

    We visualize the formation of fingered flow in dry model sandy soils under different raining conditions using a quasi-2d experimental set-up, and systematically determine the impact of soil grain diameter and surface wetting property on water channelization phenomenon. The model sandy soils we use are random closely-packed glass beads with varied diameters and surface treatments. For hydrophilic sandy soils, our experiments show that rain water infiltrates into a shallow top layer of soil and creates a horizontal water wetting front that grows downward homogeneously until instabilities occur to form fingered flows. For hydrophobic sandy soils, in contrast, we observe that rain water ponds on the top of soil surface until the hydraulic pressure is strong enough to overcome the capillary repellency of soil and create narrow water channels that penetrate the soil packing. Varying the raindrop impinging speed has little influence on water channel formation. However, varying the rain rate causes significant changes in water infiltration depth, water channel width, and water channel separation. At a fixed raining condition, we combine the effects of grain diameter and surface hydrophobicity into a single parameter and determine its influence on water infiltration depth, water channel width, and water channel separation. We also demonstrate the efficiency of several soil water improvement methods that relate to rain water channelization phenomenon, including pre-wetting sandy soils at different level before rainfall, modifying soil surface flatness, and applying superabsorbent hydrogel particles as soil modifiers.

  9. Tunable far infrared laser spectroscopy of van der Waals bonds: Ar-NH sub 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gwo, Dz-Hung (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA) California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1989-11-01

    Hyperfine resolved vibration-rotation-tunneling spectra of Ar--NH{sub 3} and (NH{sub 3}){sub 2}, generated in a planar supersonic jet, have been measured with the Berkeley tunable far infrared laser spectrometer. Among the seven rotationally assigned bands, one band belongs to Ar--NH{sub 3}, and the other six belong to (NH{sub 3}){sub 2}. To facilitate the intermolecular vibrational assignment for Ar--NH{sub 3}, a dynamics study aided by a permutation-inversion group theoretical treatment is performed on the rovibrational levels. The rovibrational quantum number correlation between the free internal rotor limit and the semi-rigid limit is established to provide a basic physical picture of the evolution of intermolecular vibrational component states. An anomalous vibronically allowed unique Q branch vibrational band structure is predicted to exist for a near prolate binary complex containing an inverting subunit. According to the model developed in this work, the observed band of Ar--NH{sub 3} centered at 26.470633(17) cm{sup {minus}1} can correlate only to either the fundamental dimeric stretching band for the A{sub 2} states with the NH{sub 3} inversional quantum number v{sub i} = 1, or the K{sub a} = 0 {l arrow} 0 subband of the lowest internal-rotation-inversion difference band. Although the estimated nuclear quadrupole coupling constant favors a tentative assignment in terms of the first possibility, a definitive assignment will require far infrared data and a dynamical model incorporating a potential surface.

  10. Numerical analysis of a mixture of Ar/NH{sub 3} microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zhi [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); School of Science, University of Science and Technology Liaoning, Anshan 114051 (China); Zhao Zhen [Chemistry Department, Anshan Normal University, Anshan 114007 (China); School of Chemical Engineering, University of Science and Technology Liaoning, Anshan 114051 (China); Li Xuehui [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Physical Science and Technical College, Dalian University, Dalian 116622 (China)

    2012-06-01

    A two-dimensional fluid model has been used to investigate the properties of plasma in Ar/NH{sub 3} microwave electron cyclotron resonance discharge at low pressure. The electromagnetic field model solved by the three-dimensional Simpson method is coupled to a fluid plasma model. The finite difference method was employed to discrete the governing equations. 40 species (neutrals, radicals, ions, and electrons) are consisted in the model. In total, 75 electron-neutral, 43 electron-ion, 167 neutral-neutral, 129 ion-neutral, 28 ion-ion, and 90 3-body reactions are used in the model. According to the simulation, the distribution of the densities of the considered plasma species has been showed and the mechanisms of their variations have been discussed. It is found that the main neutrals (Ar*, Ar**, NH{sub 3}{sup *}, NH, H{sub 2}, NH{sub 2}, H, and N{sub 2}) are present at high densities in Ar/NH{sub 3} microwave electron cyclotron resonance discharge when the mixing ratio of Ar/NH{sub 3} is 1:1 at 20 Pa. The density of NH is more than that of NH{sub 2} atom. And NH{sub 3}{sup +} are the most important ammonia ions. But the uniformity of the space distribution of NH{sub 3}{sup +} is lower than the other ammonia ions.

  11. Thermal Durability of Cu-CHA NH3-SCR Catalysts for Diesel NOx Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmieg, Steven J.; Oh, Se H.; Kim, Chang H.; Brown, David B.; Lee, Jong H.; Peden, Charles HF; Kim, Do Heui

    2012-04-30

    Multiple catalytic functions (NOx conversion, NO and NH3 oxidation, NH3 storage) of a commercial Cu-zeolite urea/NH3-SCR catalyst were assessed in a laboratory fixed-bed flow reactor system after differing degrees of hydrothermal aging. Catalysts were characterized by using x-ray diffraction (XRD), 27Al solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) / energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy to develop an understanding of the degradation mechanisms during catalyst aging. The catalytic reaction measurements of laboratory-aged catalysts were performed, which allows us to obtain a universal curve for predicting the degree of catalyst performance deterioration as a function of time at each aging temperature. Results show that as the aging temperature becomes higher, the zeolite structure collapses in a shorter period of time after an induction period. The decrease in SCR performance was explained by zeolite structure destruction and/or Cu agglomeration, as detected by XRD/27Al NMR and by TEM/EDX, respectively. Destruction of the zeolite structure and agglomeration of the active phase also results in a decrease in the NO/NH3 oxidation activity and the NH3 storage capacity of the catalyst. Selected laboratory aging conditions (16 h at 800oC) compare well with a 135,000 mile vehicle-aged catalyst for both performance and characterization criteria.

  12. A Review & Assessment of Current Operating Conditions Allowable Stresses in ASME Section III Subsection NH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. W. Swindeman

    2009-12-14

    The current operating condition allowable stresses provided in ASME Section III, Subsection NH were reviewed for consistency with the criteria used to establish the stress allowables and with the allowable stresses provided in ASME Section II, Part D. It was found that the S{sub o} values in ASME III-NH were consistent with the S values in ASME IID for the five materials of interest. However, it was found that 0.80 S{sub r} was less than S{sub o} for some temperatures for four of the materials. Only values for alloy 800H appeared to be consistent with the criteria on which S{sub o} values are established. With the intent of undertaking a more detailed evaluation of issues related to the allowable stresses in ASME III-NH, the availabilities of databases for the five materials were reviewed and augmented databases were assembled.

  13. USING NEXRAD AND RAIN GAUGE PRECIPITATION DATA FOR HYDROLOGIC CALIBRATION OF SWAT IN A NORTHEASTERN WATERSHED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sexton, Aisha M.; Sadeghi, Ali M.; Zhang, Xuesong; Srinivasan, Ragahvan; Shirmohammadi, Adel

    2010-05-10

    The value of watershed?scale, hydrologic and water quality models to ecosystem management is increasingly evident as more programs adopt these tools to evaluate the effectiveness of different management scenarios and their impact on the environment. Quality of precipitation data is critical for appropriate application of watershed models. In small watersheds, where no dense rain gauge network is available, modelers are faced with a dilemma to choose between different data sets. In this study, we used the German Branch (GB) watershed (~50 km2), which is included in the USDA Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP), to examine the implications of using surface rain gauge and next?generation radar (NEXRAD) precipitation data sets on the performance of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The GB watershed is located in the Coastal Plain of Maryland on the eastern shore of Chesapeake Bay. Stream flow estimation results using surface rain gauge data seem to indicate the importance of using rain gauges within the same direction as the storm pattern with respect to the watershed. In the absence of a spatially representative network of rain gauges within the watershed, NEXRAD data produced good estimates of stream flow at the outlet of the watershed. Three NEXRAD datasets, including (1)*non?corrected (NC), (2) bias?corrected (BC), and (3) inverse distance weighted (IDW) corrected NEXRAD data, were produced. Nash?Sutcliffe efficiency coefficients for daily stream flow simulation using these three NEXRAD data ranged from 0.46 to 0.58 during calibration and from 0.68 to 0.76 during validation. Overall, correcting NEXRAD with rain gauge data is promising to produce better hydrologic modeling results. Given the multiple precipitation datasets and corresponding simulations, we explored the combination of the multiple simulations using Bayesian model averaging.

  14. NH13A: No-source tsunami forecasting for Alaska communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolkova, Elena

    NH13A: No-source tsunami forecasting for Alaska communities Dmitry Nicolsky (UAF) djnicolsky://nctr.pmel.noaa.gov/ Wave trains to Alaska: direction structure (time history) tsunami source R E S P and accurate regional tsunami forecasts · A deep-ocean detector and a coastal site can be connected

  15. On the Differences in Storm Rainfall from Hurricanes Isidore and Lili. Part I: Satellite Observations and Rain Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Haiyan

    and freshwater flooding is the number one cause of death from hurricanes in the United States (Elsberry 2002 1998­2000, Lonfat et al. (2004) showed that the maximum azimuthally averaged rainfall rate is about 12. of rain (24 h) 1 ] and Tropical Storm Allison (2001, $6 billion in damages, 27 deaths, 35­40 in. of rain

  16. Two Dimensional Polyamides Prepared From Unsaturated Carboxylic Acids And Amines.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Huang, Zhi Heng (East Lansing, MI); Wright, Stacy C. (Lansing, MI); Danzig, Morris (Northbrook, IL); Taylor, Andrew C. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2002-07-17

    A polyamide and a process for preparing the polyamide are disclosed. The process comprises reacting in a reaction mixture a monomer selected from unsaturated carboxylic acids, esters of unsaturated carboxylic acids, anhydrides of unsaturated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof, and a first amine to form an intermediate reaction product in the reaction mixture, wherein the first amine is selected from RR.sub.1 NH, RNH.sub.2, RR.sub.1 NH.sub.2.sup.+, RNH.sub.3.sup.+ and mixtures thereof, wherein R and R.sub.1 can be the same or different and each contain between about 1 and 50 carbon atoms and are optionally substituted with heteroatoms oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus and combinations thereof, and reacting the intermediate reaction product and a second amine to form a polyamide, wherein the second amine is selected from R.sub.2 R.sub.3 NH, R.sub.2 NH.sub.2, R.sub.2 R.sub.3 NH.sub.2.sup.+, R.sub.2 NH.sub.3.sup.+ and mixtures thereof wherein R.sub.2 and R.sub.3 can be the same or different and each contain between about 1 and 50 carbon atoms and are optionally substituted with heteroatoms oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus and combinations thereof, wherein multiple of the R, R.sub.1, R.sub.2, and R.sub.3 are in vertically aligned spaced relationship along a backbone formed by the polyamide. In one version of the invention, the monomer is selected from maleic anhydride, maleic acid esters, and mixtures thereof. In another version of the invention, the first amine is an alkylamine, such as tetradecylamine, and the second amine is a polyalkylene polyamine, such as pentaethylenehexamine. In yet another version of the invention, the first amine and the second amine are olefinic or acetylenic amines, such as the reaction products of an alkyldiamine and an acetylenic carboxylic acid. The first amine and the second amine may be the same or different depending on the desired polyamide polymer structure.

  17. Network Coded Information Raining over High-Speed Rail through IEEE 802.16j

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valaee, Shahrokh

    Network Coded Information Raining over High-Speed Rail through IEEE 802.16j Christopher Sue, Sameh propose a two-hop wireless network architecture for high-speed rail employing 802.16j. Due to its backward in high-speed rail communications and better exploit relay diversity. We refer to our proposed scheme

  18. Formation and evolution of coronal rain observed by SDO/AIA on February 22, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vashalomidze, Z; Zaqarashvili, T V; Oliver, R; Shergelashvili, B; Ramishvili, G; Poedts, S; De Causmaecker, P

    2015-01-01

    The formation and dynamics of coronal rain are currently not fully understood. Coronal rain is the fall of cool and dense blobs formed by thermal instability in the solar corona towards the solar surface with acceleration smaller than gravitational free fall. We aim to study the observational evidence of the formation of coronal rain and to trace the detailed dynamics of individual blobs. We used time series of the 171 \\AA\\, and 304 \\AA\\, spectral lines obtained by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) above active region AR 11420 on February 22, 2012. Observations show that a coronal loop disappeared in the 171 \\AA\\ channel and appeared in the 304 \\AA\\ line$\\text{}\\text{}$ more than one hour later, which indicates a rapid cooling of the coronal loop from 1 MK to 0.05 MK. An energy estimation shows that the radiation is higher than the heat input, which indicates so-called catastrophic cooling. The cooling was accompanied by the formation of coronal rain in the fo...

  19. Midweek increase in U.S. summer rain and storm heights suggests air pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Midweek increase in U.S. summer rain and storm heights suggests air pollution invigorates air pollution suppresses cloud-drop coalescence and early rainout during the growth of thunderstorms explained by the difference in composition of aerosol pollution at that time. This ``weekend effect'' may

  20. Rain Forest Islands in the Chilean Semiarid Region: Fog-dependency,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rain Forest Islands in the Chilean Semiarid Region: Fog-dependency, Ecosystem Persistence and Tree that these forests persist as a result of fog-water inputs. If so, then because fog-water deposition is spatially by the direction of fog input should determine forest structure and tree regeneration patterns. To investigate

  1. WeatherJuly2015,Vol.70,No.7 Is there a Rhythm Of The Rain?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Paul

    accessed through channels such as artists' websites and YouTube (our choice of data- base is discussed198198 Weather­July2015,Vol.70,No.7 Is there a Rhythm Of The Rain? An analysis of weather have ana- lysed how our environment has influenced music: Wagner (1972) looked at weather in classical

  2. Adaptive FIR Filtering of Range Sidelobes for Air and Spaceborne Rain Mapping Stephen P. Lohmeier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    Adaptive FIR Filtering of Range Sidelobes for Air and Spaceborne Rain Mapping Stephen P. Lohmeier and Telecommunications Center Abstract ­ This paper describes an adaptive finite-impulse response (FIR) filteringB [1] sidelobe levels. Although others have used wavelets to achieve suppression [2]. To measure light

  3. A phase screen model for simulating numerically the propagation of a laser beam in rain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lukin, I P; Rychkov, D S; Falits, A V [Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Lai, Kin S; Liu, Min R [DSO National Laboratories 20 (Singapore)

    2009-09-30

    The method based on the generalisation of the phase screen method for a continuous random medium is proposed for simulating numerically the propagation of laser radiation in a turbulent atmosphere with precipitation. In the phase screen model for a discrete component of a heterogeneous 'air-rain droplet' medium, the amplitude screen describing the scattering of an optical field by discrete particles of the medium is replaced by an equivalent phase screen with a spectrum of the correlation function of the effective dielectric constant fluctuations that is similar to the spectrum of a discrete scattering component - water droplets in air. The 'turbulent' phase screen is constructed on the basis of the Kolmogorov model, while the 'rain' screen model utiises the exponential distribution of the number of rain drops with respect to their radii as a function of the rain intensity. Theresults of the numerical simulation are compared with the known theoretical estimates for a large-scale discrete scattering medium. (propagation of laser radiation in matter)

  4. Crowdsourcing, Climate Change and Student Science: The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    it one of the most innovative citizen science programs in the nation. Students of all ages at over 100Crowdsourcing, Climate Change and Student Science: The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow: Dr. Nolan Doesken Address: Department of Atmospheric Science 1371 Campus Delivery Colorado State

  5. RADARSAT SCANSAR WIND RETRIEVAL AND RAIN EFFECTS ON SCANSAR MEASUREMENTS UNDER HURRICANE CONDITIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    RADARSAT SCANSAR WIND RETRIEVAL AND RAIN EFFECTS ON SCANSAR MEASUREMENTS UNDER HURRICANE CONDITIONS CB, Provo, Utah 84602 ABSTRACT RADARSAT-1 ScanSAR SWA images of Hurricane Katrina are used-band polarization ratio models have been proposed, none have been well verified in hurricane conditions. Although C

  6. HURRICANE IMAGING RADIOMETER WIND SPEED AND RAIN RATE RETRIEVAL: [PART-1] DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMPROVED OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    HURRICANE IMAGING RADIOMETER WIND SPEED AND RAIN RATE RETRIEVAL: [PART-1] DEVELOPMENT U.S.A * selnimri@mail.ucf.edu 2 NOAA/AOML/Hurricane Research Division, Miami, Florida, USA 3 Space model has been developed to support the analysis and design of the new airborne Hurricane Imaging

  7. Atmospheric deposition of {sup 7}Be by rain events, incentral Argentina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayub, J. Juri; Velasco, H.; Rizzotto, M. [Grupo de Estudios Ambientales. Instituto de Matematica Aplicada San Luis. Universidad National de San Luis--CONICET. Ejercito de los Andes 950. Argentina (Argentina); Di Gregorio, D. E.; Huck, H. [Departamento de Fisica, Comision National de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 San Martin, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad National de San Martin. Martin de Irigoyen 3100, 1650 San Martin, Provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina. (Argentina)

    2008-08-07

    Beryllium-7 is a natural radionuclide that enters into the ecosystems through wet and dry depositions and has numerous environmental applications in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Atmospheric wet deposition of {sup 7}Be was measured in central Argentina. Rain traps were installed (1 m above ground) and individual rain events have been collected. Rain samples were filtered and analyzed by gamma spectrometry. The gamma counting was undertaken using a 40%-efficient p-type coaxial intrinsic high-purity natural germanium crystal built by Princeton Gamma-Tech. The cryostat was made from electroformed high-purity copper using ultralow-background technology. The detector was surrounded by 50 cm of lead bricks to provide shielding against radioactive background. The detector gamma efficiency was determined using a water solution with known amounts of chemical compounds containing long-lived naturally occurring radioisotopes, {sup 176}Lu, {sup 138}La and {sup 40}K. Due to the geometry of the sample and its position close to the detector, the efficiency points from the {sup 176}Lu decay, had to be corrected for summing effects. The measured samples were 400 ml in size and were counted curing one day. The {sup 7}Be detection limit for the present measurements was as low as 0.2 Bq l{sup -1}. Thirty two rain events were sampled and analyzed (November 2006-May 2007). The measured values show that the events corresponding to low rainfall (<20 mm) are characterized by significantly higher activity concentrations (Bq l{sup -1}). The activity concentration of each individual event varied from 0.8 to 3.5 Bq l{sup -1}, while precipitations varied between 4 and 70 mm. The integrated activity by event of {sup 7}Be was fitted with a model that takes into account the precipitation amount and the elapsed time between two rain events. The integrated activities calculated with this model show a good agreement with experimental values.

  8. WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH, VOL. 25, NO. 3, PAGES 577-579, MARCH 1989 Comment on "Are Rain Rate Processes Self-Similar?"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH, VOL. 25, NO. 3, PAGES 577-579, MARCH 1989 Comment on "Are Rain Rate the properties of the rain field with those of its fluctu- ations in such a way that neither of their theorems are rele- vant to the problem of stochasticself-similar rain modeling. We would thereforelike to take

  9. Acidity and catalytic activity of zeolite catalysts bound with silica and alumina 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Xianchun

    2004-09-30

    . The acidities of the bound catalysts and the zeolite powder are determined by NH3-TPD and FTIR. The textures of these catalysts are analyzed on a BET machine with nitrogen as a probe molecule. The micropore surface area and micropore volume are determined by t...

  10. GM Media-Sept 21, 2007 PBS, NH4Cl and KCl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GM Media- Sept 21, 2007 PBS, NH4Cl and KCl Final volume(L) 1 50 mM PBS 100 mM 200 mM Ingredient keep the PBS solution at room temperature. GM Media Preparation: For each litter of GM media add, mineral, and PBS solution if you are not going to use them inside MFC. Combine them prior to make GM media

  11. Acidity characterization of a titanium and sulfate modified vermiculite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernandez, W.Y.; Centeno, M.A.; Odriozola, J.A.; Moreno, S.; Molina, R.

    2008-07-01

    A natural vermiculite has been modified with titanium and sulfated by the intercalation and impregnation method in order to optimize the acidity of the clay mineral, and characterization of samples were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption isotherms, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and temperature programmed desorption with ammonia (TPD-NH{sub 3}). All the modified solids have a significantly higher number of acidic sites with respect to the parent material and in all of these, Broensted as well as Lewis acidity are identified. The presence of sulfate appears not to increase the number of acidic centers in the modified clay. For the materials sulfated with the intercalation method, it is observed that the strength of the acidic sites found in the material increases with the nominal sulfate/metal ratio. Nevertheless, when elevated quantities of sulfur are deposited, diffusion problems in the heptane reaction appear.

  12. [(CH3)4N][(C5H5NH)0.8((CH3)3NH)0.2]U2Si9O23F4 (USH-8): An Organically Templated Open-Framework Uranium Silicate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiqu

    -Framework Uranium Silicate Xiqu Wang, Jin Huang, and Allan J. Jacobson* Department of Chemistry, Uni pyramids we obtained also a number of open-framework uranium silicates.18,19 These new compounds were-framework uranium fluorosilicate [(CH3)4N][(C5H5NH)0.8((CH3)3NH)0.2]U2Si9O23F4 (USH- 8) that has been synthesized

  13. Basic Installation Guidelines & Instructions for your SkyJuice Rain Barrel 1. Your rain barrel must be placed on a surface that is flat and level. Use a spade to flatten the area for placement of the barrel.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the barrel by the spigot. To maintain the tight connection, open the barrel and tighten the nut on the inside of dish soap to the rain barrel to stop the mosquitoes from laying eggs in the water. Dish soap

  14. Coronal rain in magnetic arcades: Rebound shocks, Limit cycles, and Shear flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, X; Keppens, R; Van Doorsselaere, T

    2015-01-01

    We extend our earlier multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations of coronal rain occurring in magnetic arcades with higher resolution, grid-adaptive computations covering a much longer ($>6$ hour) timespan. We quantify how in-situ forming blob-like condensations grow along and across field lines and show that rain showers can occur in limit cycles, here demonstrated for the first time in 2.5D setups. We discuss dynamical, multi-dimensional aspects of the rebound shocks generated by the siphon inflows and quantify the thermodynamics of a prominence-corona-transition-region like structure surrounding the blobs. We point out the correlation between condensation rates and the cross-sectional size of loop systems where catastrophic cooling takes place. We also study the variations of the typical number density, kinetic energy and temperature while blobs descend, impact and sink into the transition region. In addition, we explain the mechanisms leading to concurrent upflows while the blobs descend. As a resu...

  15. Measurement and Modeling of Spatial NH3 Storage Distributions in a Commercial Small Port Cu Zeolite Urea SCR Catalyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A modified Spaci-IR technique can measure transient NH3 and NOx concentrations; data have been used to calibrate and validate an SCR model, with good agreement between experiments and simulations.

  16. SPECTROSCOPIC INVESTIGATION OF (NH4)2S TREATED GaSeTe FOR RADIATION DETECTOR APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, A; Laurence, T; Conway, A; Behymer, E; Sturm, B; Voss, L; Nikolic, R; Payne, S; Mertiri, A; Pabst, G; Mandal, K; Burger, A

    2009-08-04

    The surface of the layered III-VI chalcogenide semiconductor GaSeTe was treated with (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S at 60 C to modify the surface chemistry and determine the effect on transport properties. Room temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurements were used to assess the effect of the (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S treatment on surface defect states. Evaluation of the subsequent surface chemistry was performed with high-resolution core-level photoemission measurements. Metal overlayers were deposited on the (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S treated surfaces and the I-V characteristics were measured. The measurements were correlated to understand the effect of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S modification of the interfacial electronic structure with the goal of optimizing the metal/GaSeTe interface for radiation detector devices.

  17. The red rain phenomenon of Kerala and its possible extraterrestrial origin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godfrey Louis; A. Santhosh Kumar

    2006-01-02

    A red rain phenomenon occurred in Kerala, India starting from 25th July 2001, in which the rainwater appeared coloured in various localized places that are spread over a few hundred kilometers in Kerala. Maximum cases were reported during the first 10 days and isolated cases were found to occur for about 2 months. The striking red colouration of the rainwater was found to be due to the suspension of microscopic red particles having the appearance of biological cells. These particles have no similarity with usual desert dust. An estimated minimum quantity of 50,000 kg of red particles has fallen from the sky through red rain. An analysis of this strange phenomenon further shows that the conventional atmospheric transport processes like dust storms etc. cannot explain this phenomenon. The electron microscopic study of the red particles shows fine cell structure indicating their biological cell like nature. EDAX analysis shows that the major elements present in these cell like particles are carbon and oxygen. Strangely, a test for DNA using Ethidium Bromide dye fluorescence technique indicates absence of DNA in these cells. In the context of a suspected link between a meteor airburst event and the red rain, the possibility for the extraterrestrial origin of these particles from cometary fragments is discussed.

  18. Rain water transport and storage in a model sandy soil with hydrogel particle additives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Wei; D. J. Durian

    2014-02-10

    We study rain water infiltration and drainage in a dry model sandy soil with superabsorbent hydrogel particle additives by measuring the mass of retained water for non-ponding rainfall using a self-built 3D laboratory set-up. In the pure model sandy soil, the retained water curve measurements indicate that instead of a stable horizontal wetting front that grows downward uniformly, a narrow fingered flow forms under the top layer of water-saturated soil. This rain water channelization phenomenon not only further reduces the available rain water in the plant root zone, but also affects the efficiency of soil additives, such as superabsorbent hydrogel particles. Our studies show that the shape of the retained water curve for a soil packing with hydrogel particle additives strongly depends on the location and the concentration of the hydrogel particles in the model sandy soil. By carefully choosing the particle size and distribution methods, we may use the swollen hydrogel particles to modify the soil pore structure, to clog or extend the water channels in sandy soils, or to build water reservoirs in the plant root zone.

  19. The Roles of Cloud Drop Effective Radius and LWP in Determining Rain Properties in Marine Stratocumulus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.

    2012-07-04

    Numerical simulations described in previous studies showed that adding cloud condensation nuclei to marine stratocumulus can prevent their breakup from closed into open cells. Additional analyses of the same simulations show that the suppression of rain is well described in terms of cloud drop effective radius (re). Rain is initiated when re near cloud top is around 12-14 um. Cloud water starts to get depleted when column-maximum rain intensity (Rmax) exceeds 0.1 mm h-1. This happens when cloud-top re reaches 14 um. Rmax is mostly less than 0.1 mm h-1 at re<14 um, regardless of the cloud water path, but increases rapidly when re exceeds 14 um. This is in agreement with recent aircraft observations and theoretical observations in convective clouds so that the mechanism is not limited to describing marine stratocumulus. These results support the hypothesis that the onset of significant precipitation is determined by the number of nucleated cloud drops and the height (H) above cloud base within the cloud that is required for cloud drops to reach re of 14 um. In turn, this can explain the conditions for initiation of significant drizzle and opening of closed cells providing the basis for a simple parameterization for GCMs that unifies the representation of both precipitating and non-precipitating clouds as well as the transition between them. Furthermore, satellite global observations of cloud depth (from base to top), and cloud top re can be used to derive and validate this parameterization.

  20. Structural transitions of ternary imide Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, C.; Gao, M. X.; Pan, H. G. Liu, Y. F.

    2014-08-25

    Phase transitions and energetic properties of Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} with different crystal structures are investigated by experiments and first-principles calculations. The Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} with the primitive cubic and orthorhombic structure is obtained by dynamically dehydrogenating a Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}-2LiH mixture up to 280?°C under an initial vacuum and 9.0?bars H{sub 2}, respectively. It is found that the obtained orthorhombic Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} is converted to a primitive cubic structure as the dehydrogenation temperature is further increased to 400?°C or performed by a 36?h of high-energetic ball milling. Moreover, the primitive cubic phase can be converted to an orthorhombic phase after heating at 280?°C under 9.0?bars H{sub 2} for 1?h. Thermodynamic calculations show that the orthorhombic phase is the ground state structure of Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2}. The mechanism for phase transitions of Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} is also discussed from the angle of energy.

  1. ATOC 3500/CHEM 3151 Spring 2014 The San Joaquin, acid rain, and using a simple "box" model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    are there in this "box?" (b) The major source of air pollution in the valley is from steam generators used in the oil in the United States - experiences extended periods of stagnant air in the wintertime. These episodes are often air temperature is 15 o C and the pressure is 1000 mb, how many molecules of air

  2. Solid-state actinide acid phosphites from phosphorous acid melts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oh, George N. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Burns, Peter C., E-mail: pburns@nd.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The reaction of UO{sub 3} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 3} at 100 °C and subsequent reaction with dimethylformamide (DMF) produces crystals of the compound (NH{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}){sub 2})[UO{sub 2}(HPO{sub 2}OH)(HPO{sub 3})]. This compound crystallizes in space group P2{sub 1}/n and consists of layers of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids that share equatorial vertices with phosphite units, separated by dimethylammonium. In contrast, the reaction of phosphorous acid and actinide oxides at 210 °C produces a viscous syrup. Subsequent dilution in solvents and use of standard solution-state methods results in the crystallization of two polymorphs of the actinide acid phosphites An(HPO{sub 2}OH){sub 4} (An=U, Th) and of the mixed acid phosphite–phosphite U(HPO{sub 3})(HPO{sub 2}OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)·2(H{sub 2}O). ?- and ?-An(HPO{sub 2}OH){sub 4} crystallize in space groups C2/c and P2{sub 1}/n, respectively, and comprise a three-dimensional network of An{sup 4+} cations in square antiprismatic coordination corner-sharing with protonated phosphite units, whereas U(HPO{sub 3})(HPO{sub 2}OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}·(H{sub 2}O) crystallizes in a layered structure in space group Pbca that is composed of An{sup 4+} cations in square antiprismatic coordination corner-sharing with protonated phosphites and water ligands. We discuss our findings in using solid inorganic reagents to produce a solution-workable precursor from which solid-state compounds can be crystallized. - Graphical abstract: Reaction of UO{sub 3} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 3} at 100 °C and subsequent reaction with DMF produces crystals of (NH{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}){sub 2})[UO{sub 2}(HPO{sub 2}OH)(HPO{sub 3})] with a layered structure. Reaction of phosphorous acid and actinide oxides at 210 °C produces a viscous syrup and further solution-state reactions result in the crystallization of the actinide acid phosphites An(HPO{sub 2}OH){sub 4} (An=U, Th), with a three-dimensional network structure, and the mixed acid phosphite–phosphite U(HPO{sub 3})(HPO{sub 2}OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}·(H{sub 2}O) with a layered structure. - Highlights: • U(VI), U(IV) and Th(IV) phosphites were synthesized by solution-state methods. • A new uranyl phosphite structure is based upon uranyl phosphite anionic sheets. • New U and Th phosphites have framework structures.

  3. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  4. A little rain doesn't fix it: Farmers and ranchers remain cautious as drought continues 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalisek, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    and climate, along with the #17;#19;.#16;#25; billion of agricultural losses in #25;#24;#23;#23; plus crop, hay and livestock losses, leave the question: What is the outlook for agricultural crops, forage and livestock this year? Agricultural outlook ?It... rain doesn?t #30;x it continued Forage outlook #31;e drought took a toll on pastures, leaving most ranchers without any hay to cut and bare spots in the forage for livestock. ?A lot of our pastures, speci#28;cally hay meadows, were probably...

  5. Rain or Shine, Students Keep Their Race Cars Going - News Feature | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on GlobalRachel2 RadiometerRafael L. BrasRain or Shine,

  6. The thermal decomposition of NH{sub 2}OH and subsequent reactions : ab initio transition state theory and reflected shock tube experiments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klippenstein, S. J.; Harding, L. B.; Ruscic, B.; Sivaramakrishnan, R.; Srinivasan, N. K.; Su, M.-C.; Michael, J. V.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Sonoma State Univ.

    2009-01-01

    Primary and secondary reactions involved in the thermal decomposition of NH{sub 2}OH are studied with a combination of shock tube experiments and transition state theory based theoretical kinetics. This coupled theory and experiment study demonstrates the utility of NH{sub 2}OH as a high temperature source of OH radicals. The reflected shock technique is employed in the determination of OH radical time profiles via multipass electronic absorption spectrometry. O-atoms are searched for with atomic resonance absorption spectrometry. The experiments provide a direct measurement of the rate coefficient, k{sub 1}, for the thermal decomposition of NH{sub 2}OH. Secondary rate measurements are obtained for the NH{sub 2} + OH (5a) and NH{sub 2}OH + OH (6a) abstraction reactions. The experimental data are obtained for temperatures in the range from 1355 to 1889 K and are well represented by the respective rate expressions: log[k/(cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1})] = (?10.12 {+-} 0.20) + (?6793 {+-} 317 K/T) (k{sub 1}); log[k/(cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1})] = (?10.00 {+-} 0.06) + (?879 {+-} 101 K/T) (k{sub 5a}); log[k/(cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1})] = (?9.75 {+-} 0.08) + (?1248 {+-} 123 K/T) (k{sub 6a}). Theoretical predictions are made for these rate coefficients as well for the reactions of NH{sub 2}OH + NH{sub 2}, NH{sub 2}OH + NH, NH + OH, NH{sub 2} + NH{sub 2}, NH{sub 2} + NH, and NH + NH, each of which could be of secondary importance in NH{sub 2}OH thermal decomposition. The theoretical analyses employ a combination of ab initio transition state theory and master equation simulations. Comparisons between theory and experiment are made where possible. Modest adjustments of predicted barrier heights (i.e., by 2 kcal/mol or less) generally yield good agreement between theory and experiment. The rate coefficients obtained here should be of utility in modeling NO{sub x} in various combustion environments.

  7. Selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3 over a Cu-SSZ-13 catalyst prepared by a solid state ion exchange method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Di; Gao, Feng; Peden, Charles HF; Li, Junhui; Kamasamudram, Krishna; Epling, William S.

    2014-06-01

    A novel solid state method was developed to synthesize Cu-SSZ-13 catalysts with excellent NH3-SCR performance and durable hydrothermal stability. After the solid state ion exchange (SSIE) process, the SSZ framework structure and surface area was maintained. In-situ DRIFTS and NH3-TPD experiments provide evidence that isolated Cu ions were successfully exchanged into the pores, which are the active centers for the NH3-SCR reaction.

  8. Rain-Induced Increase in Background Radiation Detected by Radiation Portal Monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hausladen, Paul; Blessinger, Christopher S; Guzzardo, Tyler; Livesay, Jake

    2012-07-01

    A complete understanding of both the steady state and transient background measured by Radiation Portal Monitors (RPMs) is essential to predictable system performance, as well as maximization of detection sensitivity. To facilitate this understanding, a test bed for the study of natural background in RPMs has been established at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This work was performed in support of the Second Line of Defense Program's mission to detect the illicit movement of nuclear material. In the present work, transient increases in gamma ray counting rates in RPMs due to rain are investigated. The increase in background activity associated with rain, which has been well documented in the field of environmental radioactivity, originates from the atmospheric deposition of two radioactive daughters of radon-222, namely lead-214 and bismuth-214 (henceforth {sup 222}Rn, {sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Bi). In this study, rainfall rates recorded by a co-located weather station are compared with RPM count rates and High Purity Germanium spectra. The data verifies these radionuclides are responsible for the dominant transient natural background fluctuations in RPMs. Effects on system performance and potential mitigation strategies are discussed.

  9. The red rain phenomenon of Kerala and its possible extraterrestrial origin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louis, G; Louis, Godfrey

    2006-01-01

    A red rain phenomenon occurred in Kerala, India starting from 25th July 2001, in which the rainwater appeared coloured in various localized places that are spread over a few hundred kilometers in Kerala. Maximum cases were reported during the first 10 days and isolated cases were found to occur for about 2 months. The striking red colouration of the rainwater was found to be due to the suspension of microscopic red particles having the appearance of biological cells. These particles have no similarity with usual desert dust. An estimated minimum quantity of 50,000 kg of red particles has fallen from the sky through red rain. An analysis of this strange phenomenon further shows that the conventional atmospheric transport processes like dust storms etc. cannot explain this phenomenon. The electron microscopic study of the red particles shows fine cell structure indicating their biological cell like nature. EDAX analysis shows that the major elements present in these cell like particles are carbon and oxygen. St...

  10. Overview of the oxidation and scavenging characteristics of April rains (OSCAR) experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Easter, R.C.; Dana, M.T.; Thorp, J.M.; Busness, K.M.; Hales, J.M.; Raynor, G.S.; Benkovitz, C.M.; Tanner, R.L.; Shannon, J.D.

    1984-04-01

    The OSCAR (Oxidation and Scavenging Characteristics of April Rains) field experiment was conducted in April, 1981, as part of the MAP3S/RAINE program. The OSCAR study was designed to provide detailed characterizations of the physicochemical and dynamical features of selected cyclonic storm systems as they traversed the eastern U.S. Major experiment components included sequential precipitation chemistry measurements, aircraft measurements both in cloud and in clear air in storm inflow regions, surface-level air chemistry measurements, and supporting meteorological measurements. The precipitation chemisty network consisted of an intermediate-density network with 37 sampling sites covering the region from southern Ontario to Tennessee and from Illinois to New Hampshire, and a high-density network with 47 sampling sites located in a 100 by 100 km area in northeast Indiana. A total of four storm events were studied during the experiment. The report describes the design and operational aspects for the high-density and intermediate-density components of the experiment, and the composition of the integrated OSCAR data set which has been developed. A synoptic meteorological description of the four storm events studied during OSCAR is also provided. 17 references, 13 figures, 8 tables.

  11. Modelling chemical degradation of concrete during leaching with rain and soil water types

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacques, D., E-mail: djacques@sckcen.b [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Institute for Environment, Health, and Safety, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Wang, L.; Martens, E.; Mallants, D. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Institute for Environment, Health, and Safety, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2010-08-15

    Percolation of external water through concrete results in the degradation of cement and changes the concrete pore water and solid phase composition. The assessment of long-term degradation of concrete is possible by means of model simulation. This paper describes simulations of chemical degradation of cement for different types of rain and soil water at an ambient earth surface temperature (10 {sup o}C). Rain and soil water types were derived using generic equations and measurement of atmospheric boundary conditions representative for North-Belgium. An up-to-date and consistent thermodynamic model is used to calculate the geochemical changes during chemical degradation of the concrete. A general pattern of four degradation stages was simulated with the third stage being the geochemically most complex stage involving reactions with calcium-silicate hydrates, AFm and AFt phases. Whereas the sequence of the dissolution reactions was relatively insensitive to the composition of the percolating water, the duration of the different reactions depends strongly on the percolating water composition. Major identified factors influencing the velocity of cement degradation are the effect of dry deposition and biological activity increasing the partial pressure of CO{sub 2(g)} in the soil air phase (and thus increasing the inorganic carbon content in the percolating water). Soil weathering processes have only a minor impact, at least for the relatively inert sandy material considered in this study.

  12. NH3 formation and utilization in regenerationof Pt/Ba/Al2O3 NOx storage-reduction catalyst with H2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Partridge Jr, William P [ORNL; Choi, Jae-Soon [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The nature of H2 regeneration of a model Pt/Ba/Al2O3 LNT catalyst was investigated with specific focus on intra-catalyst formation and utilization of NH3 and its role in catalyst regeneration. In-situ measurements of the transient intra-catalyst species (H2, NH3, N2, NOx) distributions at different temperatures were used to detail the reaction evolution along the catalyst axis. Comparison of the species transients identifies unique individual natures for the reductant (H2), inert product (N2) and intermediate-reductant product (NH3) which readily explain the conventional effluent species sequence as an integral effect. The data demonstrates that NH3 is created on similar timescales as the N2 product inside the catalyst, but consumed as aggressively as H2 reductant along the catalyst. This spatiotemporal NH3 behavior experimentally confirms that Intermediate-NH3 regeneration pathway is active. Analysis at 200 and 325 C indicates equivalent local NOx storage, H2 consumption and regeneration effectiveness, but differing NH3/N2 ratio, suggesting a temperature-dependence of partitioning between Direct-H2 and Intermediate-NH3 regeneration pathways. Further experimental and numerical work is needed to more clearly understand the partitioning between the possible regeneration pathways. Nevertheless, the experimental data show that intermediate NH3 plays a significant role in LNT catalyst regeneration.

  13. High Velocity Rain: The Terminal Velocity of Model of Galactic Infall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert A. Benjamin; Laura Danly

    1996-12-18

    A model is proposed for determining the distances to falling interstellar clouds in the galactic halo by measuring the cloud velocity and column density and assuming a model for the vertical density distribution of the Galactic interstellar medium. It is shown that falling clouds with $N(H I) \\sim 0.4 kpc$ one or more of the following occurs: (1) the neutral fraction of the cloud decreases to $\\sim 31 \\pm 14%$, (2) the density drops off faster than characterized by Reynolds, or (3) there is a systematic decrease in drag coefficient with increasing z.

  14. Closed-loop control of a SCR system using a NOx sensor cross-sensitive to NH3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for an automotive selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system, for which the feedback is based on a NOx sensor illustrate the performance of the proposed approach. Keywords: Automotive emissions; Diesel engines; NOx, a mechanism is introduced to prevent large NH3-slip that could result from misinterpretation of data produced

  15. Adapted from laboratory protocols of the Center for Freshwater Biology, University of New Hampshire, Durham, N.H. 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    , Durham, N.H. 2010 UNH CFB Protocol for the Monitoring of Cyanobacteria & Microcystins in Drinking Water delivery to UNH CFB lab. 5. Freeze the sample if delivery/ drop-off time exceeds 12 hours. Analyses: a, Quantiplate-ELISA Kit, (Portland, Me) with increased sensitivity (UNH, CFB). Results will be reported as ng

  16. Role of hydrogen-bonding and its interplay with octahedral tilting in CH3NH3PbI3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jung-Hoon; Bristowe, Nicholas C.; Bristowe, Paul D.; Cheetham, Anthony K.

    2015-03-05

    First principles calculations on the hybrid perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 predict strong hydrogen-bonding which influences the structure and dynamics of the methylammonium cation and reveal its interaction with the tilting of the PbI6 octahedra...

  17. Ultralow Absorption Coefficient and Temperature Dependence of Radiative Recombination of CH3NH3PbI3 Perovskite from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perovskite from Photoluminescence Chog Barugkin, Jinjin Cong, The Duong, Shakir Rahman, Hieu T. Nguyen perovskite methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) films from 675 to 1400 nm. Unlike other methods used of organic-inorganic halide perovskite- based solar cells has attracted enormous interest from the entire PV

  18. Access Management in Multi-Administration Networks S. P. Lord, N.H. Pope, and Susan Stepney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stepney, Susan

    Access Management in Multi-Administration Networks S. P. Lord, N.H. Pope, and Susan Stepney GEC by different administrations, and allowing these administrations to maintain autonomy but to use each others services. Consider also what happens if these administrations have different policies on how access should

  19. An Examination of Version 5 Rainfall Estimates from the TRMM Microwave Imager, Precipitation Radar, and Rain Gauges on Global, Regional, and Storm Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    , and Rain Gauges on Global, Regional, and Storm Scales STEPHEN W. NESBITT1 AND EDWARD J. ZIPSER Department TRMM rainfall products with Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) global rain gauge analyses is done to evaluate the overall biases of the TMI and PR to "ground truth" to examine regional differences

  20. Effect of sulfated CaO on NO reduction by NH{sub 3} in the presence of excess oxygen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tianjin Li; Yuqun Zhuo; Yufeng Zhao; Changhe Chen; Xuchang Xu [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education

    2009-04-15

    The effect of sulfated CaO on NO reduction by NH{sub 3} in the presence of excess oxygen was investigated to evaluate the potential of simultaneous SO{sub 2} and NO removal at the temperature range of 700-850{sup o}C. The physical and chemical properties of the CaO sulfation products were analyzed to investigate the NO reduction mechanism. Experimental results showed that sulfated CaO had a catalytic effect on NO reduction by NH{sub 3} in the presence of excess O{sub 2} after the sulfation reaction entered the transition control stage. With the increase of CaO sulfation extent in this stage, the activity for NO reduction first increased and then decreased, and the selectivity of NH{sub 3} for NO reduction to N{sub 2} increased. The byproduct (NO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O) formation during NO reduction experiments was negligible. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis showed that neither CaSO{sub 3} nor CaS was detected, indicating that the catalytic activity of NO reduction by NH{sub 3} in the presence of excess O{sub 2} over sulfated CaO was originated from the CaSO{sub 4} product. These results revealed that simultaneous SO{sub 2} and NOx control by injecting NH{sub 3} into the dry flue gas desulfurization process for NO reduction might be achieved. 38 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Verification of Allowable Stresses In ASME Section III Subsection NH For Grade 91 Steel & Alloy 800H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. W. Swindeman; M. J. Swindeman; B. W. Roberts; B. E. Thurgood; D. L. Marriott

    2007-11-30

    The database for the creep-rupture of 9Cr-1Mo-V (Grade 91) steel was collected and reviewed to determine if it met the needs for recommending time-dependent strength values, S{sub t}, for coverage in ASME Section III Subsection NH (ASME III-NH) to 650 C (1200 F) and 600,000 hours. The accumulated database included over 300 tests for 1% total strain, nearly 400 tests for tertiary creep, and nearly 1700 tests to rupture. Procedures for analyzing creep and rupture data for ASME III-NH were reviewed and compared to the procedures used to develop the current allowable stress values for Gr 91 for ASME II-D. The criteria in ASME III-NH for estimating S{sub t} included the average strength for 1% total strain for times to 600,000 hours, 80% of the minimum strength for tertiary creep for times to 600,000 hours, and 67% of the minimum rupture strength values for times to 600,000 hours. Time-temperature-stress parametric formulations were selected to correlate the data and make predictions of the long-time strength. It was found that the stress corresponding to 1% total strain and the initiation of tertiary creep were not the controlling criteria over the temperature-time range of concern. It was found that small adjustments to the current values in III-NH could be introduced but that the existing values were conservative and could be retained. The existing database was found to be adequate to extend the coverage to 600,000 hours for temperatures below 650 C (1200 F).

  2. Update and Improve Subsection NH –– Alternative Simplified Creep-Fatigue Design Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tai Asayama

    2009-10-26

    This report described the results of investigation on Task 10 of DOE/ASME Materials NGNP/Generation IV Project based on a contract between ASME Standards Technology, LLC (ASME ST-LLC) and Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). Task 10 is to Update and Improve Subsection NH -- Alternative Simplified Creep-Fatigue Design Methods. Five newly proposed promising creep-fatigue evaluation methods were investigated. Those are (1) modified ductility exhaustion method, (2) strain range separation method, (3) approach for pressure vessel application, (4) hybrid method of time fraction and ductility exhaustion, and (5) simplified model test approach. The outlines of those methods are presented first, and predictability of experimental results of these methods is demonstrated using the creep-fatigue data collected in previous Tasks 3 and 5. All the methods (except the simplified model test approach which is not ready for application) predicted experimental results fairly accurately. On the other hand, predicted creep-fatigue life in long-term regions showed considerable differences among the methodologies. These differences come from the concepts each method is based on. All the new methods investigated in this report have advantages over the currently employed time fraction rule and offer technical insights that should be thought much of in the improvement of creep-fatigue evaluation procedures. The main points of the modified ductility exhaustion method, the strain range separation method, the approach for pressure vessel application and the hybrid method can be reflected in the improvement of the current time fraction rule. The simplified mode test approach would offer a whole new advantage including robustness and simplicity which are definitely attractive but this approach is yet to be validated for implementation at this point. Therefore, this report recommends the following two steps as a course of improvement of NH based on newly proposed creep-fatigue evaluation methodologies. The first step is to modify the current approach by incorporating the partial advantages the new method offer, and the second step is to replace the current method by the simplified test approach when it has become technically mature enough. The recommendations are basically in line with the work scope of the Task Force on Creep-Fatigue of the Subgroup on Elevated Temperature Design of the Standards Committee of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Committee Section III.

  3. Traces of Radioactive 131I in Rain Water Samples in Romania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margineanu, Romul; Apostu, Ana; Gomoiu, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of I-131 (T1/2 = 8.04 days) have been performed in IFIN-HH's underground laboratory situated in Unirea salt mine from Slanic-Prahova, Romania. The rain water samples were collected in March 27th in Brasov and March 27th and 29th in Slanic. The samples were measured using a high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer equipped with a GeHP detector having a FWHM = 1.80 keV at 1332.48 keV at the second Co-60 gammaray, and a relative efficiency of 22.8 %. The results show a specific activity of I-131 of 0.35 \\pm 0.04 Bq/dm^3 in Brasov and 0.39 \\pm 0.04 Bq/dm^3, 0.13 \\pm 0.03 Bq/dm^3 and 0.71 \\pm 0.06 Bq/dm^3 in Slanic.

  4. Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding in Disubstituted Ethanes. A Comparison of NH,,,O-and OH,,,O-Hydrogen Bonding through Conformational Analysis of 4-Amino-4-oxobutanoate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding in Disubstituted Ethanes. A Comparison of NH,,,O- and OH,,,O- Hydrogen Bonding through Conformational Analysis of 4-Amino-4-oxobutanoate (succinamate) and Monohydrogen 1 of amide NH,,,O- and carboxyl OH,,,O- hydrogen bonds were investigated via conformational analysis

  5. Investigation of carbon distribution with {sup 14}C as tracer for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration through NH{sub 4}HCO{sub 3} production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhongxian Cheng; Youhua Ma; Xin Li; Wei-Ping Pan [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology

    2007-12-15

    This work studies carbon fate using the {sup 14}C tracer technique in ecosystems when synthesized fertilizer is applied. The concept of aqueous ammonia solution scrubbing CO{sub 2} from flue gas is used in the fertilizer synthesis. Products after the capture are ammonium bicarbonate (ABC, NH{sub 4}HCO{sub 3}) or long-term effect ammonium bicarbonate (LEABC, NH{sub 4}HCO{sub 3}), an economic source of nitrogen fertilizer. The ABC or LEABC is used as a 'carrier' to transport CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere to the crops and soil. An indoor greenhouse was built, and wheat was chosen as the plant to study in this ecosystem. The investigated ecosystem consists of plant (wheat), soils with three different pH values (alkaline, neutral, and acidic), and three types of underground water (different Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} concentrations). After biological assimilation and metabolism in wheat receiving ABC or LEABC, it was found that a considerable amount (up to 10%) of the carbon source was absorbed by the wheat with increased biomass production. The majority of the unused carbon source (up to 76%) percolated into the soil as carbonates, such as environmentally benign calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}). Generally speaking, alkaline soil has a higher capability to capture and store carbon. For the same soil, there is no apparent difference in carbon capturing capability between ABC and LEABC. These findings answer the question of how carbon is distributed after synthesized ABC or LEABC is applied into the ecosystem. In addition, a separate postexperiment on carbon forms that existed in the soil was made. It was found that up to 88% of the trapped carbon existed in the form of insoluble salts (i.e., CaCO{sub 3}) in alkaline soils. This indicates that alkaline soil has a greater potential for storing carbon after the use of the synthesized ABC or LEABC from exhausted CO{sub 2}. 21 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Week 4, Rain in my Brain On top of the Harbor Cone, Otago Peninsula, Pacific Ocean in the distance.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardsley, John

    Week 4, Rain in my Brain On top of the Harbor Cone, Otago Peninsula, Pacific Ocean in the distance of the ocean or of this beautiful city from on-high and it all comes back that we're here, a dream come true

  7. Volcanic Ash Fall--A "Hard Rain" of Abrasive Particles U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V Volcanic Ash Fall--A "Hard Rain" of Abrasive Particles U.S. Department of the Interior U olcanic ash consists of tiny jagged particles of rock and natural glass blasted into the air by a volcano. Ash can threaten the health of people and live- stock, pose a hazard to flying jet aircraft, damage

  8. IMPROVED MICROWAVE REMOTE SENSING OF HURRICANE WIND SPEED AND RAIN RATES USING THE HURRICANE IMAGING RADIOMETER (HIRAD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    IMPROVED MICROWAVE REMOTE SENSING OF HURRICANE WIND SPEED AND RAIN RATES USING THE HURRICANE@mail.ucf.edu ABSTRACT The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is a new imaging technology microwave remote sensor for hurricane observations that is currently under development by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

  9. Acid Violence in Pakistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zia, Taiba

    2013-01-01

    Jordan. “Acid Attacks: Bangladesh’s Efforts to Stop thesubcontinent, especially in Bangladesh and Pakistan, and inon acid crimes in Bangladesh, for instance). Reliable data

  10. Excellent activity and selectivity of Cu-SSZ-13 in the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kim, Do Heui; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2010-10-21

    Superior activity and selectivity of a Cu ion-exchanged SSZ-13 zeolite in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with NH3 were observed, in comparison to Cu-beta and Cu-ZSM-5 zeolites. Cu-SSZ-13 was not only more active in the NOx SCR reaction over the entire temperature range studied (up to 550 °C), but also more selective toward nitrogen formation, resulting in significantly lower amounts of NOx by-products (i.e., NO2 and N2O) than the other two zeolites. In addition, Cu-SSZ-13 demonstrated the highest activity and N2 formation selectivity in the oxidation of NH3. The results of this study strongly suggest that Cu-SSZ-13 is a promising candidate as a catalyst for NOx SCR with great potential in after-treatment systems for either mobile or stationary sources.

  11. RELAP5 assessment using semiscale SBLOCA test S-NH-1. International Agreement Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, E.J.; Chung, B.D.; Kim, H.J.

    1993-06-01

    2-inch cold leg break test S-NH-1, conducted at the 1/1705 volume scaled facility Semiscale was analyzed using RELAP5/MOD2 Cycle 36.04 and MOD3 Version 5m5. Loss of HPIS was assumed, and reactor trip occurred on a low PZR pressure signal (13.1 MPa), and pumps began an unpowered coastdown on SI signal (12.5 MPa). The system was recovered by opening ADV`s when the PCT became higher than 811 K. Accumulator was finally injected into the system when the primary system pressure was less than 4.0 MPa. The experiment was terminated when the pressure reached the LPIS actuation set point RELAP5/MOD2 analysis demonstrated its capability to predict, with a sufficient accuracy, the main phenomena occurring in the depressurization transient, both from a qualitative and quantitative points of view. Nevertheless, several differences were noted regarding the break flow rate and inventory distribution due to deficiencies in two-phase choked flow model, horizontal stratification interfacial drag, and a CCFL model. The main reason for the core to remain nearly fully covered with the liquid was the under-prediction of the break flow by the code. Several sensitivity calculations were tried using the MOD2 to improve the results by using the different options of break flow modeling (downward, homogeneous, and area increase). The break area compensating concept based on ``the integrated break flow matching`` gave the best results than downward junction and homogeneous options. And the MOD3 showed improvement in predicting a CCFL in SG and a heatup in the core.

  12. Study of NH stretching vibrations in small ammonia clusters by infrared spectroscopy in He droplets and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Sartakov, Boris G.; Vilesov, Andrey F.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2007-08-09

    Infrared spectra of the NH stretching vibrations of (NH3)n clusters (n=2-4) have been obtained using the helium droplet isolation technique and first principles electronic structure anharmonic calculations. The measured spectra exhibit well-resolved bands, which have been assigned to the ?1, ?3, and 2?4 modes of the ammonia fragments in the clusters. The formation of a hydrogen bond in ammonia dimers leads to an increase of the infrared intensity by about a factor of four. In the larger clusters the infrared intensity per hydrogen bond is close to the one for dimers and approaches the value in the NH3 crystal. The intensity of the 2?4 overtone band in the trimer and tetramer increases by a factor of 10 relative to that in the monomer and dimer, and is comparable to the intensity of the ?1 and ?3 fundamental bands in larger clusters. This indicates the onset of the strong anharmonic coupling of the 2?4 and ?1 modes in larger clusters. The experimental assignments are compared to the ones obtained from first principles electronic structure anharmonic calculations for the dimer and trimer clusters. The anharmonic calculations were performed at the Møller-Plesset (MP2) level of electronic structure theory and were based on a second-order perturbative evaluation of rovibrational parameters and their effects on the vibrational spectra and average structures. In general there is excellent (<20 cm-1) agreement between the experimentally measured band origins for the N-H stretching frequencies and the calculated anharmonic vibrational frequencies. However, the calculations were found to overestimate the infrared intensities in clusters by about a factor of four. This work was supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy, in part by the Chemical Sciences program and in part by the Engineering and Geosciences Division. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  13. High-temperature phase transformation and topochemical nature in ferroelastic (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Kwang-Sei; Oh, In-Hwan; Ko, Jae-Hyeon

    2014-04-01

    The electrical conductivity of ferroelastic ammonium sulfate (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} revealed an anomaly at around 130 °C (=403 K, T{sub P}) on heating with large and irreversible thermal hysteresis through thermal cycle. Ferroelastic domain walls and surface morphology of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} were investigated by hot-stage polarizing microscopy. Structural phase transition from an orthorhombic ferroelastic phase to a hexagonal paraelastic phase was not identified at T{sub P} upon heating. On further heating above T{sub P}, microscopic spots appeared and grew on the crystal surface, suggesting that the high-temperature anomaly at T{sub P} was an indication of an onset of thermal decomposition controlled by topochemical factors. The increase of electrical conductivity above T{sub P} was attributed to proton migration. - Graphical abstract: Surface morphology of the (100) face of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} on heating, showing chemical reaction at the surface. - Highlights: • We investigate the high-temperature phase transformation of ammonium sulfate. • The increasing conductivity upon heating is attributed to proton migration. • Structural phase transition from orthorhombic to hexagonal phase is not confirmed. • High-temperature anomaly is related to an onset of thermal decomposition. • The nature of the high-temperature anomaly is topochemical controlled by defects.

  14. National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program Report to Congress: An Integrated Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uhart, M.; et al,

    2005-08-01

    Under Title IX of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, Congress reauthorized the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) to continue coordinating acid rain research and monitoring, as it had done during the previous decade, and to provide Congress with periodic reports. In particular, Congress asked NAPAP to assess all available data and information to answer two questions: (1) What are the costs, benefits, and effectiveness of Title IV? This question addresses the costs and economic impacts of complying with the Acid Rain Program as well as benefit analyses associated with the various human health and welfare effects, including reduced visibility, damages to materials and cultural resources, and effects on ecosystems. (2) What reductions in deposition rates are needed to prevent adverse ecological effects? This complex questions addresses ecological systems and the deposition levels at which they experience harmful effects. The results of the assessment of the effects of Title IV and of the relationship between acid deposition rates and ecological effects were to be reported to Congress quadrennially, beginning with the 1996 report to Congress. The objective of this Report is to address the two main questions posed by Congress and fully communicate the results of the assessment to decision-makers. Given the primary audience, most of this report is not written as a technical document, although information supporting the conclusions is provided along with references.

  15. Time-Resolved XAFS Spectroscopic Studies of B-H and N-H Oxidative Addition to Transition Metal Catalysts Relevant to Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitterwolf, Thomas E.

    2014-12-09

    Successful catalytic dehydrogenation of aminoborane, H3NBH3, prompted questions as to the potential role of N-H oxidative addition in the mechanisms of these processes. N-H oxidative addition reactions are rare, and in all cases appear to involve initial dative bonding to the metal by the amine lone pairs followed by transfer of a proton to the basic metal. Aminoborane and its trimethylborane derivative block this mechanism and, in principle, should permit authentic N-H oxidative attrition to occur. Extensive experimental work failed to confirm this hypothesis. In all cases either B-H complexation or oxidative addition of solvent C-H bonds dominate the chemistry.

  16. A Pyrrolyl-based Triazolophane: A Macrocyclic Receptor With CH and NH Donor Groups That Exhibits a Preference for Pyrophosphate Anions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sessler, Jonathan L.; Cia, Jiajia; Gong, Han-Yuan; Yang, Xiauping; Arambula, Jonathan F.; Hay, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    A pyrrolyl-based triazolophane, incorporating CH and NH donor groups, acts as a receptor for the pyrophosphate anion in chloroform solution. It shows selectivity for this trianion, followed by HSO{sub 4}{sup -} > H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup -} > Cl{sup -} > Br{sup -} (all as the corresponding tetrabutylammonium salts), with NH-anion interactions being more important than CH-anion interactions. In the solid state, the receptor binds the pyrophosphate anion in a clip-like slot via NH and CH hydrogen bonds.

  17. Acid Strength and Bifunctional Catalytic Behavior of Alloys Comprised of Noble Metals and Oxophilic Metal Promoters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hibbitts, David D.; Tan, Qiaohua; Neurock, Matthew

    2014-06-01

    The promotion of metal catalysts with partially oxidized oxophilic MOx species, such as ReOx-promoted Rh, has been demonstrated to produce Brønsted acid sites that can promote hydrogenolysis of oxygenate intermediates such as those found in biomass-derived species. A wide variety of alloy compositions and structures are examined in this work to investigate strongly acidic promoters by using DFT-calculated deprotonation energies (DPE) as a measure of acid strength. Sites with the highest acid strength had DPE less than 1100 kJ mol-1, similar to DPE values of heteropolyacids or acid-containing zeolites, and were found on alloys composed of an oxophilic metal (such as Re or W) with a noble metal (such as Rh or Pt). NH3 adsorbs more strongly to sites with increasing acid strength and the activation barriers for acid-catalyzed ring opening of a furan ring decrease with increasing acid strength, which was also shown to be stronger for OH acid sites bound to multiple oxophilic metal atoms in a three-fold configuration rather than OH sites adsorbed in an atop configuration on one oxophilic metal, indicating that small MOx clusters may yield sites with the highest acid strength.

  18. Asphaltene damage in matrix acidizing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinojosa, Roberto Antonio

    1996-01-01

    were acidized with three stage treatments of 15% hydrochloric acid (HCl), 12% HCL-3% hydrofluoric acid (HF) and 15% HCL. No additives were used in the acid. Comparisons were made between cores acidized with a variety of saturating fluids. Petrographic...

  19. Current and Future Carbon Budgets of Tropical Rain Forest: A Cross Scale Analysis. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberbauer, S. F.

    2004-01-16

    The goal of this project was to make a first assessment of the major carbon stocks and fluxes and their climatic determinants in a lowland neotropical rain forest, the La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. Our research design was based on the concurrent use of several of the best available approaches, so that data could be cross-validated. A major focus of our effort was to combine meteorological studies of whole-forest carbon exchange (eddy flux), with parallel independent measurements of key components of the forest carbon budget. The eddy flux system operated from February 1998 to February 2001. To obtain field data that could be scaled up to the landscape level, we monitored carbon stocks, net primary productivity components including tree growth and mortality, litterfall, woody debris production, root biomass, and soil respiration in a series of replicated plots stratified across the major environmental gradients of the forest. A second major focus of this project was on the stocks and changes of carbon in the soil. We used isotope studies and intensive monitoring to investigate soil organic stocks and the climate-driven variation of soil respiration down the soil profile, in a set of six 4m deep soil shafts stratified across the landscape. We measured short term tree growth, climate responses of sap flow, and phenology in a suite of ten canopy trees to develop individual models of tree growth to daytime weather variables.

  20. Characterization of Cu-SSZ-13 NH3 SCR Catalysts: an in situ FTIR Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szanyi, Janos; Kwak, Ja Hun; Zhu, Haiyang; Peden, Charles HF

    2013-01-23

    The adsorption of CO and NO over Cu-SSZ-13 zeolite catalysts, highly active in the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3, was investigated by FTIR spectroscopy, and the results obtained were compared to those collected from other Cu-ion exchanged zeolites (Y,FAU and ZSM-5). At low CO pressures at room temperature (295 K) CO form monocarbonyls exclusively on the Cu+ ions, while in the presence of gas phase CO dicarbonyls on Cu+ and adsorbed CO on Cu2+ centers form, as well. At low (cryogenic) sample temperatures tricarbonyl formation on Cu+ sites was also observed. The adsorption of NO produces IR bands that can be assigned to nitrosyls bound to both Cu+ and Cu2+ centers, and NO+ species located in charge compensating cationic positions of the chabasite framework. On the reduced Cu-SSZ-13 samples the formation of N2O was also detected. The assignment of the adsorbed NOx species was aided by adsorption experiments with isotopically labeled 15NO. The movement of Cu ions from the sterically hindered six member ring position to the more accessible cavity positions as a result of their interaction with adsorbates (NO and H2O) was clearly evidenced. Comparisons of the spectroscopy data obtained in the static transmission IR system to those collected in the flow-through diffuse reflectance cell points out that care must be taken when conclusions are drawn about the adsorptive and reactive properties of metal cation centers based on a set of data collected under well defined, specific experimental conditions. Financial support was provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program. This work was performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The EMSL is a national scientific user facility supported by the US DOE, Office of Biological and Environmental Research. PNNL is a multi-program national laboratory operated for the US DOE by Battelle.

  1. Evaluation of Cloud-resolving and Limited Area Model Intercomparison Simulations using TWP-ICE Observations. Part 2: Rain Microphysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varble, Adam; Zipser, Edward J.; Fridlind, Ann; Zhu, Ping; Ackerman, Andrew; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Fan, Jiwen; Hill, Adrian; Shipway, Ben; Williams, Christopher R.

    2014-12-27

    Ten 3D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations and four 3D limited area model (LAM) simulations of an intense mesoscale convective system observed on January 23-24, 2006 during the Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) are compared with each other and with observations and retrievals from a scanning polarimetric radar, co-located UHF and VHF vertical profilers, and a Joss-Waldvogel disdrometer in an attempt to explain published results showing a low bias in simulated stratiform rainfall. Despite different forcing methodologies, similar precipitation microphysics errors appear in CRMs and LAMs with differences that depend on the details of the bulk microphysics scheme used. One-moment schemes produce too many small raindrops, which biases Doppler velocities low, but produces rain water contents (RWCs) that are similar to observed. Two-moment rain schemes with a gamma shape parameter (?) of 0 produce excessive size sorting, which leads to larger Doppler velocities than those produced in one-moment schemes, but lower RWCs than observed. Two moment schemes also produce a convective median volume diameter distribution that is too broad relative to observations and thus, may have issues balancing raindrop formation, collision coalescence, and raindrop breakup. Assuming a ? of 2.5 rather than 0 for the raindrop size distribution improves one-moment scheme biases, and allowing ? to have values greater than 0 may improve two-moment schemes. Under-predicted stratiform rain rates are associated with under-predicted ice water contents at the melting level rather than excessive rain evaporation, in turn likely associated with convective detrainment that is too high in the troposphere and mesoscale circulations that are too weak. In addition to stronger convective updrafts than observed, limited domain size prevents a large, well-developed stratiform region from developing in CRMs, while a dry bias in ECMWF analyses does the same to the LAMs.

  2. Synthesis of the Long-Sought Unsubstituted Aminodiboranate Na(H3B-NH2-BH3) and Its N-Alkyl Analogs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girolami, Gregory S.

    storage materials.1-9 For example, ammonia borane, NH3 ·BH3, has an especially high gravimetric hydrogen as hydrogen storage materials.15-18 In a different context, metal complexes of amino- and amidoboranes can

  3. The role of land surface processes on the mesoscale simulation of the July 26, 2005 heavy rain event over Mumbai, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    The role of land surface processes on the mesoscale simulation of the July 26, 2005 heavy rain Mesoscale convection Weather research and forecast model Indian summer monsoon Land surface processes

  4. Vegetation History And Logging Disturbance: Effects On Rain Forest In The Lope Reserve, Gabon (With Special Emphasis On Elephants and Apes) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Lee JT

    An investigation of the effects of commercial mechanised selective logging on rain forest vegetation and mammals, was undertaken in the Lope Reserve, central Gabon, between January 1989 to July 1991. Vegetation in Lope ...

  5. The Common Occurrence of Highly Supercooled Drizzle and Rain near the Coastal Regions of the Western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chemke, Rei; DeMott, Paul J.; Sullivan, Ryan C.; Rasmussen, R M.; McDonough, Frank; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Jonsson, Haf; Suski, Kaitlyn; Cazorla, Alberto; Prather, Kimberly

    2013-09-05

    The formation of highly supercooled rain was documented by aircraft observations in clouds at a wide range of conditions near the coastal region of the western United States. Several case studies are described in detail using combined cloud and aerosol measurements to document both the highly super-cooled condition and the relatively pristine aerosol conditions under which it forms. The case studies include: (1) Marine convective clouds over the coastal waters of northern California, as measured by cloud physics probes flown on a Gulfstream-1 aircraft during the CALWATER campaign in February and early March 2011. The clouds had extensive drizzle in their tops, which extended downward to the 0°C isotherm as supercooled rain. Ice multiplication was observed only in mature parts of the clouds where cloud water was already depleted. (2) Orographically triggered convective clouds in marine air mass over the foothills of the Sierra Nevada to the east of Sacramento, as measured in CALWATER. Supercooled rain was observed down to -21°C. No indications for ice multiplication were evident. (3) Orographic layer clouds over Yosemite National Park, also measured in CALWATER. The clouds had extensive drizzle at -21°C, which intensified with little freezing lower in the cloud, and (4) Supercooled drizzle drops in layer clouds near Juneau, Alaska, as measured by the Wyoming King Air as part of a FAA project to study aircraft icing in this region. Low concentrations of CCN was a common observation in all these clouds, allowing for the formation of clouds with small concentration of large drops that coalesced into supercooled drizzle and raindrops. Another common observation was the absence of ice nuclei and/or ice crystals in measurable concentrations was associated with the persistent supercooled drizzle and rain. Average ice crystal concentrations were 0.007 l-1 at the top of convective clouds at -12°C and 0.03 l-1 in the case of layer clouds at -21°C. In combination these two conditions provide ideal conditions for the formation of highly supercooled drizzle and rain. These results help explain the anomalously high incidences of aircraft icing at cold temperatures in U.S. west coast clouds (Bernstein et al., 2004) and highlight the need to include aerosol effects when simulating aircraft icing with cloud models. These case studies can also serve as benchmarks for explicit cloud microphysics models attempting to simulate the formation of precipitation in these types of pristine conditions.

  6. Formic Acid Mechanical,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tonghun

    that make building block chemicals. Ethanol is blended with gasoline, reducing our dependence on petroleum for high valued products, including: Aspartic acid Glucaric acid Glycerol Sorbitol Some companies already

  7. Plant fatty acid hydroxylases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Somerville, Chris (Portola Valley, CA); Broun, Pierre (Burlingame, CA); van de Loo, Frank (Lexington, KY)

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  8. [NH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 2}NH{sub 3}][Co(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]: Chemical preparation, crystal structure, thermal decomposition and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rekik, Walid; Naili, Houcine; Mhiri, Tahar [Laboratoire de l'Etat Solide, Departement de Chimie, Faculte des Sciences de Sfax, BP 802, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Bataille, Thierry [Sciences Chimiques de Rennes (CNRS, UMR 6226), Groupe Materiaux Inorganiques: Chimie Douce et Reactivite, Universite de Rennes I, Avenue du General Leclerc, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France)], E-mail: thierry.bataille@univ-rennes1.fr

    2008-10-02

    Cobalt ethylenediammonium bis(sulfate) tetrahydrate, [NH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 2}NH{sub 3}][Co(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}], has been synthesised by slow evaporation at room temperature. It crystallises in the triclinic system, space group P1-bar, with the unit cell parameters: a = 6.8033(2), b 7.0705(2), c = 7.2192(3) A, {alpha} = 74.909(2){sup o}, {beta} = 72.291(2){sup o}, {gamma} = 79.167(2){sup o}, Z = 1 and V = 317.16(2) A{sup 3}. The Co(II) atom is octahedrally coordinated by four water molecules and two sulfate tetrahedra leading to trimeric units [Co(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]. These units are linked to each other and to the ethylenediammonium cations through OW-H...O and N-H...O hydrogen bonds, respectively. The zero-dimensional structure is described as an alternation between cationic and anionic layers along the crystallographic b-axis. The dehydration of the precursor proceeds through three stages leading to crystalline intermediary hydrate phases and an anhydrous compound. The magnetic measurements show that the title compound is predominantly paramagnetic with weak antiferromagnetic interactions.

  9. Nucleic acid detection assays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James E.

    2005-04-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  10. Nucleic acid detection compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor I. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James L. (Madison, WI)

    2008-08-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  11. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Waunakee, WI); Lyamichev, Victor I. (Madison, WI); Brow; Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James E. (Madison, WI)

    2010-11-09

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  12. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor L. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James E. (Madison, WI)

    2007-12-11

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  13. Regeneration of field-spent activated carbon catalysts for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeon, Jong Ki; Kim, Hyeonjoo; Park, Young-Kwon; Peden, Charles HF; Kim, Do Heui

    2011-10-15

    In the process of producing liquid crystal displays (LCD), the emitted NOx is removed over an activated carbon catalyst by using selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH3 at low temperature. However, the catalyst rapidly deactivates primarily due to the deposition of boron discharged from the process onto the catalyst. Therefore, this study is aimed at developing an optimal regeneration process to remove boron from field-spent carbon catalysts. The spent carbon catalysts were regenerated by washing with a surfactant followed by drying and calcination. The physicochemical properties before and after the regeneration were investigated by using elemental analysis, TG/DTG (thermogravimetric/differential thermogravimetric) analysis, N2 adsorption-desorption and NH3 TPD (temperature programmed desorption). Spent carbon catalysts demonstrated a drastic decrease in DeNOx activity mainly due to heavy deposition of boron. Boron was accumulated to depths of about 50 {mu}m inside the granule surface of the activated carbons, as evidenced by cross-sectional SEM-EDX analysis. However, catalyst activity and surface area were significantly recovered by removing boron in the regeneration process, and the highest NOx conversions were obtained after washing with a non-ionic surfactant in H2O at 70 C, followed by treatment with N2 at 550 C.

  14. Observational results of a multi-telescope campaign in search of interstellar urea [(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}CO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remijan, Anthony J.; Snyder, Lewis E.; Kuo, Hsin-Lun; Looney, Leslie W.; Friedel, Douglas N.; McGuire, Brett A.; Golubiatnikov, G. Yu; Lovas, Frank J.; Ilyushin, V. V.; Alekseev, E. A.; Dyubko, S. F.; McCall, Benjamin J.; Hollis, Jan M.

    2014-03-10

    In this paper, we present the results of an observational search for gas phase urea [(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}CO] observed toward the Sgr B2(N-LMH) region. We show data covering urea transitions from ?100 GHz to 250 GHz from five different observational facilities: the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland-Association (BIMA) Array, the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA), the NRAO 12 m telescope, the IRAM 30 m telescope, and the Swedish-ESO Submillimeter Telescope (SEST). The results show that the features ascribed to urea can be reproduced across the entire observed bandwidth and all facilities by best-fit column density, temperature, and source size parameters which vary by less than a factor of two between observations merely by adjusting for telescope-specific parameters. Interferometric observations show that the emission arising from these transitions is cospatial and compact, consistent with the derived source sizes and emission from a single species. Despite this evidence, the spectral complexity of both (NH{sub 2}){sub 2}CO and of Sgr B2(N) makes the definitive identification of this molecule challenging. We present observational spectra, laboratory data, and models, and discuss our results in the context of a possible molecular detection of urea.

  15. Nucleic acid detection kits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann; Kwiatkowski, Robert W.; Vavra, Stephanie H.

    2005-03-29

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of nucleic acid from various viruses in a sample.

  16. Nutrient dynamics and nitrogen trace gas flux during ecosystem development in montane rain forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, R.H.; Vitousek, P.M.

    1995-01-01

    Patterns of nitrogen trace gas emissions, soil nitrogen flux, and nutrient availability were evaluated at five sites that form a chronosequence in Hawaiian montane rain forest. The estimated age of basaltic parent material from which soils developed at the Kilauea site was 200 yr, 6000 yr at the Puu Makaala site, 185000 yr at the Kohala site, 1.65 x 10{sup 6} yr at the Molokai site, and 4.5 x 10{sup 6} yr at the Kauai site. Peak net N mineralization and nitrification values were found in soils from the 185000-yr-old Kohala site. Nitrogen content of foliage and leaf litter was highest in the intermediate age sites (Puu Makaala and Kohala) and N and P retranslocation was lowest at the Puu Makaala site. Soil cores fertilized with nitrogen had significantly higher rates of root ingrowth than control cores at the two youngest sites (200 and 6000 yr old) but not in older sites (185000 and 4.5 x 10{sup 6}-yr-old sites) and total fine root growth into control cores was greatest at the Kohala site. The highest N{sub 2}O emissions were found at the 185000-yr-old Kohala site, while the highest combined flux of N{sub 2}O + NO was observed at the 4.5 x 10{sup 6}-yr-old Kauai site. While overall N{sub 2}O emission rates were correlated with rates of N transformations, soil water content appeared to influence the magnitude of emissions of N{sub 2}O and the ratios of emissions of NO vs. N{sub 2}O. N{sub 2}O emissions occurred when water-filled pore space (WFPS) values were >40%, with highest emissions in at least two sites observed at WFPS values of 75%. Among sites, high N{sub 2}O emissions were associated with high soil N transformation rates. Large NO fluxes were observed only at the Kauai site when WFPS values were <60%. 50 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Microorganisms for producing organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

    2014-09-30

    Organic acid-producing microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-producing microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, and others. Further modifications to the microorganisms increase production of such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others. Methods of producing such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers are also provided.

  18. Unusual defect physics in CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} perovskite solar cell absorber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Wan-Jian Shi, Tingting; Yan, Yanfa

    2014-02-10

    Thin-film solar cells based on Methylammonium triiodideplumbate (CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}) halide perovskites have recently shown remarkable performance. First-principle calculations show that CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} has unusual defect physics: (i) Different from common p-type thin-film solar cell absorbers, it exhibits flexible conductivity from good p-type, intrinsic to good n-type depending on the growth conditions; (ii) Dominant intrinsic defects create only shallow levels, which partially explain the long electron-hole diffusion length and high open-circuit voltage in solar cell. The unusual defect properties can be attributed to the strong Pb lone-pair s orbital and I p orbital antibonding coupling and the high ionicity of CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}.

  19. 4D Density Determination of NH Radicals in an MSE Microplasma Combining Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence and Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visser, Martin; Schenk, Andreas; Gericke, Karl-Heinz [Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie Hans-Sommer-Str. 10, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2010-10-13

    An application of microplasmas is surface modification under mild conditions and of small, well defined areas. For this, an understanding of the plasma composition is of importance. First results of our work on the production and detection of NH radicals in a capacitively coupled radio frequency (RF) microplasma are presented. A microstructured comb electrode was used to generate a glow discharge in a hydrogen/nitrogen gas mixture by applying 13.56 MHz RF voltage. The techniques of planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) and cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) are used for space and time resolved, quantitative detection of the NH radical in the plasma. The rotational temperature was determined to be 820 K and, the density 5.1x10{sup 12} cm{sup 3}. Also, time dependent behaviour of the NH production was observed.

  20. Recovery of organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verser, Dan W. (Golden, CO); Eggeman, Timothy J. (Lakewood, CO)

    2009-10-13

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  1. Recovery of organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verser, Dan W. (Menlo Park, CA); Eggeman, Timothy J. (Lakewood, CO)

    2011-11-01

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  2. Reversible Acid Gas Capture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dave Heldebrant

    2012-12-31

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientist David Heldebrant demonstrates how a new process called reversible acid gas capture works to pull carbon dioxide out of power plant emissions.

  3. HYDROFLUORIC ACID Safety Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Lloyd M.

    in industrial processes: glass etching, metal cleaning, laboratory reagents, etc. Can be found in household products: rust removers, automotive detailing products, stain removers. #12;Hydrofluoric Acid ­ Chemical

  4. Solvent extraction of Li+, H3O+ and NH4+ into nitrobenzene by using sodium dicarbollylcobaltate and calix[4]arene-bis(t-octylbenzo-18-crown-6)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makrlik, Emanuel; Selucky, P.; Vanura, Petr; Moyer, Bruce A

    2013-01-01

    From extraction experiments and c-activity measurements, the exchange extraction constants corresponding to the general equilibrium M+ (aq) + NaL+ (nb) , ML+ (nb) + Na+ (aq) taking place in the two-phase water nitrobenzene system (M+ = Li+, H3O+, NH+4; L = calix[4]arene-bis(t-octylbenzo-18-crown-6); aq = aqueous phase, nb = nitrobenzene phase) were evaluated. Furthermore, the stability constants of the ML+ complexes in nitrobenzene saturated with water were calculated; they were found to increase in the following cation order: zH3O+ < Li+ < NH+4.

  5. Microstructures and properties of CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3?x}Cl{sub x} hybrid solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzuki, Kohei E-mail: oku@mat.usp.ac.jp; Suzuki, Atsushi E-mail: oku@mat.usp.ac.jp; Zushi, Masahito E-mail: oku@mat.usp.ac.jp; Oku, Takeo E-mail: oku@mat.usp.ac.jp

    2015-02-27

    Halide-perovskite CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} was produced on mesoporous TiO{sub 2} layer by spin-coating a precursor solution of PbCl{sub 2} and CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}I in dimethylformamide. The role of the annealing process and chlorine (Cl) doping for the perovskite-phase formation was investigated. It was found that crystallization of the perovskite materials was stimulated by the annealing process, and that longer annealing time is necessary for the Cl-doped perovskite compared with that of non-doped perovskite phase.

  6. Secondary economic impact of acid deposition control legislation in six coal producing states: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, M.J.; Guthrie, S.J.

    1988-12-01

    Among the difficult policy questions on the US environmental agenda is what to do about emissions to the earth's atmosphere of pollutants that may result in ''acid rain''. The Congress has considered several pieces of legislation spelling out potential approaches to the problem and setting goals for emission reduction, mostly emphasizing the control of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen. Significant policy concern is the dollar costs to the nation's economy of achieving the intended effects of the legislation and the potential impacts on economic activity---in particular, losses of both coal mining and secondary service sector employment in states and regions dependent on the mining of high sulfur coal. There are several direct economic effects of regulations such as the acid rain control legislation. One of the more obvious effects was the switching from high sulfur coal to low sulfur coal. This would result in increases in employment and coal business procurements in low sulfur coal mining regions, but also would result in lower employment and lower coal business procurements in high sulfur coal mining areas. The potential negative effects are the immediate policy concern and are the focus of this report. 15 refs., 1 fig., 17 tabs.

  7. Synthesis of iron oxides and the influence of organic acids on the resolubilization of iron minerals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Eric Thacher

    1984-01-01

    to renew Fe in solution (Viets and Lindsay, 1973). Furthermore, a chelate test could be used to simulate the dissolution of oxide phases with high specific surface areas or poor crystallinity. Borggaard (1976) used EDTA buffered at pH 5. 2 and lower... and reducing agents, buffered in 1. 0 N NH4 acetate at pH 3. 5 and 4. 75, Dissolution rate in oxalic acid decreased in the following order: ferrihydrite, lep1docroc1te, and goeth1te. Rate of Fe ox1de dissolution 1n the presence of com- plexing and reducing...

  8. Rabies Requirements for NH 4-H Animals Upon the recommendation of the New Hampshire State Veterinarian, all mammals shown or exhibited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Rabies Requirements for NH 4-H Animals Upon the recommendation of the New Hampshire State Veterinarian, all mammals shown or exhibited at New Hampshire 4-H events including fairs, shows, clinics, 4-H and fairs may have additional vaccination and health requirements as recommended by the New Hampshire State

  9. Phase Transformations of the Ternary System (NH4)2SO4-H2SO4-H2O and the Implications for Cirrus Cloud Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the presence of NH4 + ions in the aerosol of the upper troposphere. Low-temperature ternary phase diagrams distribution alters the cloud's radiative properties, persistence, and surface area available for heterogeneous radiation, which insulates or warms Earth, and scattering the sun's visible radiation upward, thus cooling

  10. Detailed modeling and laser-induced fluorescence imaging of nitric oxide in a NH3-seeded non-premixed methane/air flame

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, John B.

    non-premixed methane/air flame John B. Bell, Marcus S. Day, Joseph F. Grcar Computing Sciences-induced fluorescence imaging of nitric oxide in a NH3-seeded non-premixed methane/air flame Abstract In this paper we study the formation of NO in laminar, nitrogen diluted methane diffusion flames that are seeded

  11. Environmental radiological monitoring of air, rain, and snow on and near the Hanford Site, 1945-1957

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanf, R.W.; Thiede, M.E.

    1994-03-01

    This report is a result of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The goal of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received from emissions since 1944 at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Members of the HEDR Project`s Environmental Monitoring Data Task have developed databases of historical environmental measurements of such emissions. Hanford documents were searched for information on the radiological monitoring of air, rain, and snow at and near the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The monitoring information was reviewed and summarized. The end product is a yearly overview of air, rain, and snow samples as well as ambient radiation levels in the air that were measured from 1945 through 1957. The following information is provided in each annual summary: the media sampled, the constituents (radionuclides) measured/reported, the sampling locations, the sampling frequencies, the sampling methods, and the document references. For some years a notes category is included that contains additional useful information. For the years 1948 through 1957, tables summarizing the sampling locations for the various sample media are also included in the appendix. A large number of documents were reviewed to obtain the information in this report. A reference list is attached to the end of each annual summary. All of the information summarized here was obtained from reports originating at Hanford. These reports are all publicly available and can be found in the Richland Operations Office (RL) public reading room. The information in this report has been compiled without analysis and should only be used as a guide to the original documents.

  12. Rainwater harvesting systems that collect and convey rain-water from roofs to storage tanks are often the best or only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    PROBLEM Rainwater harvesting systems that collect and convey rain- water from roofs to storage-yearrecord Rigorous analysis of rainwater harvesting system design can improve reliability and water quality CEE-yield of the rainwater harvesting systems, defining reliability as days per year on which the community's water de- mand

  13. An Investigation of Ammonia Extraction from Liquid Manure Using a Gas-Permeable Membrane Pollution of air, soil and water caused by excessive ammonia (NH3) emission and deposition from animal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    An Investigation of Ammonia Extraction from Liquid Manure Using a Gas-Permeable Membrane Summary Pollution of air, soil and water caused by excessive ammonia (NH3) emission and deposition from animal by extracting it from liquid manure and potentially using the recovered NH3 as fertilizer. For this purpose, lab

  14. THE ROTATIONAL SPECTRUM OF ANTI-ETHYLAMINE (CH3CH2NH2) FROM 10 TO 270 GHz: A LABORATORY STUDY AND ASTRONOMICAL SEARCH IN SGR B2(N)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziurys, Lucy M.

    AND ASTRONOMICAL SEARCH IN SGR B2(N) A. J. Apponi, M. Sun, D. T. Halfen,1 and L. M. Ziurys Departments of Chemistry identification of methylamine (CH3NH2) and ethylamine (CH3CH2NH2) in the aerogel collectors (Sandford et al. 2006

  15. DRAFT of 2015 Natural Resources Stewards Course Curriculum Overview Fridays, beginning Sept. 4, 2015 Dec. 4, 2015, 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at NH Fish and Game Dept.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Game Dept. Session 4 9/25/15 1:00 pm - 8:00 pm Permaculture Day ­ Nottingham, NH Special session and Sustainable Design Services Session 5 10/02/15 8:30 am - 4:00 pm Permaculture Principles and Ethics & Reading the Forested Landscape ­ Society for the Protection of NH Forests permaculture principles introduced forces

  16. Fatty Acid Carcass Mapping 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turk, Stacey N.

    2010-01-14

    We hypothesized that subcutaneous (s.c.) adipose tissue would differ in monounsaturated (MUFA) and saturated fatty acid (SFA) composition among different depots throughout a beef carcass. To test this, 50 carcasses from a variety of breed types...

  17. MOSE: zooming on the Meso-NH mesoscale model performances at the surface layer at ESO sites (Paranal and Armazones)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lascaux, Franck; di Arcetri, INAF / Osservatorio Astrofisico; 10.1117/12.925934

    2012-01-01

    In the context of the MOSE project, in this contribution we present a detailed analysis of the Meso-NH mesoscale model performances and their dependency on the model and orography horizontal resolutions in proximity of the ground. The investigated sites are Cerro Paranal (site of the ESO Very Large Telescope - VLT) and Cerro Armazones (site of the ESO European Extremely Large Telescope - E-ELT), in Chile. At both sites, data from a rich statistical sample of different nights are available - from AWS (Automated Weather Stations) and masts - giving access to wind speed, wind direction and temperature at different levels near the ground (from 2 m to 30 m above the ground). In this study we discuss the use of a very high horizontal resolution (dX=0.1 km) numerical configuration that overcomes some specific limitations put in evidence with a standard configuration with dX=0.5 km. In both sites results are very promising. The study is co-funded by ESO and INAF.

  18. Density Functional Studies of Stoichiometric Surfaces of Orthorhombic Hybrid Perovskite CH3NH3PbI3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yun; Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G; Zhang, Haimin; Liu, Porun; Yang, Huagui; Zhao, Huijun

    2015-01-01

    Organic/inorganic hybrid perovskite materials are highly attractive for dye-sensitized solar cells as demonstrated by their rapid advances in energy conversion efficiency. In this work, the structures, energetics, and electronic properties for a range of stoichiometric surfaces of the orthorhombic perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 are theoretically studied using density functional theory. Various possible spatially and constitutionally isomeric surfaces are considered by diversifying the spatial orientations and connectivities of surface Pb-I bonds. The comparison of the surface energies for the most stable configurations identified for various surfaces shows that the stabilities of stoichiometric surfaces are mainly dictated by the coordination numbers of surface atoms, which are directly correlated with the numbers of broken bonds. Additionally, Coulombic interactions between I anions and organic countercations on the surface also contribute to the stabilization. Electronic properties are compared between the most stable (100) surface and the bulk phase, showing generally similar features except for the lifted band degeneracy and the enhanced bandgap energy for the surface. These studies on the stoichiometric surfaces serve as the first step toward gaining a fundamental understanding of the interfacial properties in the current structural design of perovskite based solar cells, in order to achieve further breakthroughs in solar conversion efficiencies.

  19. Effects of constraints in general branched molecules: A quantitative ab initio study in HCO-L-Ala-NH2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Echenique; J. L. Alonso; Ivan Calvo

    2006-12-04

    A general approach to the design of accurate classical potentials for protein folding is described. It includes the introduction of a meaningful statistical measure of the differences between approximations of the same potential energy, the definition of a set of Systematic and Approximately Separable and Modular Internal Coordinates (SASMIC), much convenient for the simulation of general branched molecules, and the imposition of constraints on the most rapidly oscillating degrees of freedom. All these tools are used to study the effects of constraints in the Conformational Equilibrium Distribution (CED) of the model dipeptide HCO-L-Ala-NH2. We use ab initio Quantum Mechanics calculations including electron correlation at the MP2 level to describe the system, and we measure the conformational dependence of the correcting terms to the naive CED based in the Potential Energy Surface (PES) without any simplifying assumption. These terms are related to mass-metric tensors determinants and also occur in the Fixman's compensating potential. We show that some of the corrections are non-negligible if one is interested in the whole Ramachandran space. On the other hand, if only the energetically lower region, containing the principal secondary structure elements, is assumed to be relevant, then, all correcting terms may be neglected up to peptides of considerable length. This is the first time, as far as we know, that the analysis of the conformational dependence of these correcting terms is performed in a relevant biomolecule with a realistic potential energy function.

  20. Syntheses and crystal structures of a series of new divalent metal phosphonates with imino-bis(methylphosphonic acid)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Bingping; Prosvirin, Andrey V.; Zhao, Han-Hua; Mao, Jiang-Gao . E-mail: mjg@ms.fjirsm.ac.cn

    2006-01-15

    Hydrothermal reactions of divalent transition metal salts with imino-bis(methylphosphonic acid), NH(CH{sub 2}PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}){sub 2} (H{sub 4}L) afforded three new metal phosphonates, namely, Cu[NH(CH{sub 2}PO{sub 3}H){sub 2}] 1, {l_brace}Co[NH{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}PO{sub 3}H)(CH{sub 2}PO{sub 3})](H{sub 2}O){sub 2}{r_brace}.H{sub 2}O 2 and Mn[NH{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}PO{sub 3}H)(CH{sub 2}PO{sub 3})](H{sub 2}O) 3. When HO{sub 2}C(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}N(CH{sub 2}PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}){sub 2} was used as the phosphonate ligand and 4,4'-bipy as the second metal linker, {l_brace}Cu{sub 4}[NH(CH{sub 2}PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}(4,4'-bipy)(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}{r_brace}.9H{sub 2}O 4 with a pillared layered architecture was obtained. The NH(CH{sub 2}PO{sub 3}){sub 2} anion resulted from the cleavage of the HO{sub 2}C(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}-group during the reaction. Although compounds 1-3 have a same M/L ratio (1:1), they exhibit totally different structures.Compound 1 has a linear chain structure, in which each pair of square-pyramidal coordinated copper(II) ions are bridged by two phosphonate oxygen atoms to form a Cu{sub 2}O{sub 2} dimeric unit, and such dimeric units are further interconnected via phosphonate groups to form a [010] chain. Compound 2 has a layered architecture built from CoO{sub 6} octahedra bridged by phosphonate ligands. In compound 3, the interconnection of the manganese(II) ions by bridging imino-diphosphonate ligands leads to a 3D network. Compound 4 has a pillar-layered structure, the layers composed of Cu(II) ions bridged by aminodiphosphonate ligands are interconnected by 4,4'-bipy ligands to form channels along c-axis. Several factors that affect the structures of the metal phosphonates formed have also been discussed. Compounds 2 and 3 show predominant antiferromagnetic interactions between magnetic centers. -- Graphical abstract: Four new metal phosphonates, namely, Cu[NH(CH{sub 2}PO{sub 3}H){sub 2}] 1, {l_brace}Co[NH{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}PO{sub 3}H)(CH{sub 2}PO{sub 3})](H{sub 2}O){sub 2}{r_brace}.H{sub 2}O 2, Mn[NH{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}PO{sub 3}H)(CH{sub 2}PO{sub 3})](H{sub 2}O) 3 and {l_brace}Cu{sub 4}[NH(CH{sub 2}PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}(4,4'-bipy)(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}{r_brace}.9H{sub 2}O 4 have been synthesized and structurally characterized. Compound 1 has a linear chain structure, and compound 2 is layered. Compound 3 is three dimensional whereas compound 4 has a pillar-layered structure. Compounds 2 and 3 show predominant antiferromagnetic interactions between magnetic centers.

  1. Direct Observation of Long Electron-Hole Diffusion Distance beyond 1 Micrometer in CH3NH3PbI3 Perovskite Thin Film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yu; Li, Yunlong; Wang, Wei; Bian, Zuqiang; Xiao, Lixin; Wang, Shufeng; Gong, Qihuang

    2015-01-01

    In high performance perovskite based on CH3NH3PbI3, the formerly reported short charge diffusion distance is a confliction to thick working layer in solar cell devices. We carried out a study on charge diffusion in spin-coated CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite thin film by transient fluorescent spectroscopy. A thickness-dependent fluorescent lifetime was found. This effect correlates to the defects at crystal grain boundaries. By coating the film with electron or hole transfer layer, PCBM or Spiro-OMeTAD respectively, we observed the charge transfer directly through the fluorescent decay. One-dimensional diffusion model was applied to obtain long charge diffusion distances, which is ~1.3 micron for electrons and ~5.2 micron for holes. This study gives direct support to the high performance of perovskite solar cells.

  2. Consequences of Confinement in Zeolite Acid Catalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gounder, Rajamani Pachayappan

    2011-01-01

    diameters of propane and n-butane. Scheme 3.5. MOR crystaldehydrogenation of propane, n-butane and isobutane. CHAPTERkJ mol -1 ] Propane n n-Butane n-P Pentane n-H Hexane Figure

  3. Synthesis of acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moens, Luc (Lakewood, CO)

    2003-06-24

    A process of preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinc acid comprising: a) dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and hexamethylenetetramine in a solvent selected from the group consisting of water, ethyl acetate, chloroform, acetone, ethanol, tetrahydrofuran and acetonitrile, to form a quaternary ammonium salt of the lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate; and b) hydrolyzing the quaternary ammonium salt with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid.

  4. The Origin and Coupling Mechanism of the Magnetoelectric Effect in TM Cl 2 -4SC(NH 2 ) 2 ( TM = Ni and Co)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mun, Eundeok; Wilcox, Jason; Manson, Jamie L.; Scott, Brian; Tobash, Paul; Zapf, Vivien S.

    2014-01-01

    Most research on multiferroics and magnetoelectric effects to date has focused on inorganic oxides. Molecule-based materials are a relatively new field in which to search for magnetoelectric multiferroics and to explore new coupling mechanisms between electric and magnetic order. We present magnetoelectric behavior in NiCl 2 -4SC(NH 2 ) 2 (DTN) and CoCl 2 -4SC(NH 2 ) 2 (DTC). These compounds form tetragonal structures where the transition metal ion (Ni or Co) is surrounded by four electrically polar thiourea molecules [SC(NH 2 ) 2 ]. By tracking the magnetic and electric properties of these compounds as a function ofmore »magnetic field, we gain insights into the coupling mechanism by observing that, in DTN, the electric polarization tracks the magnetic ordering, whereas in DTC it does not. For DTN, all electrically polar thiourea molecules tilt in the same direction along the c -axis, breaking spatial-inversion symmetry, whereas, for DTC, two thiourea molecules tilt up and two tilt down with respect to c -axis, perfectly canceling the net electrical polarization. Thus, the magnetoelectric coupling mechanism in DTN is likely a magnetostrictive adjustment of the thiourea molecule orientation in response to magnetic order. « less

  5. Modeling of plasma chemistry in an atmospheric pressure Ar/NH{sub 3} cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge described using the one-dimensional fluid model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zhi [School of Science, University of Science and Technology Liaoning, Anshan 114051 (China); School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao Zhen [School of Chemistry and Life Science, Anshan Normal University, Anshan 114007 (China); School of Chemical Engineering, University of Science and Technology Liaoning, Anshan 114051 (China); Li Xuehui [Physical Science and Technical College, Dalian University, Dalian 116622 (China)

    2013-01-15

    The keynote of our research is to study the gas phase chemistry in an atmospheric pressure Ar/NH{sub 3} cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge, which is very important to produce the iron-nitride magnetic fluid. For this purpose, a home-made one dimensional fluid model with the Scharfetter-Gummel method has been developed. The equations solved are the particle balances, assuming a drift-diffusion approximation for the fluxes, and the electron energy equation. The self-consistent electric field is obtained by the simultaneous solution of Poisson's equation. The simulations were carried out for the different ammonia concentrations (2%, 3.5%, and 7%), at a voltage of 1 kV, and a driving frequency of 20 kHz. It concluded that the major ion products of Ar are Ar{sup +} and Ar{sub 2}{sup +}. Ar{sup +} is the most important positive ions, followed by Ar{sub 2}{sup +}. It is shown that the NH{sup +} density is smaller than that of the other ammonia ions. The density of NH{sub 4}{sup +} is more than that of the other ammonia ions when the ammonia concentration increased. The diffuse mode can be established after the discharge was ignited, and the mode changes to filamentary mode with an increase in ammonia concentration.

  6. Plant fatty acid hydroxylase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Somerville, Chris (Portola Valley, CA); van de Loo, Frank (Lexington, KY)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to the identification of nucleic acid sequences and constructs, and methods related thereto, and the use of these sequences and constructs to produce genetically modified plants for the purpose of altering the composition of plant oils, waxes and related compounds.

  7. Fatty acid-producing hosts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfleger, Brian F; Lennen, Rebecca M

    2013-12-31

    Described are hosts for overproducing a fatty acid product such as a fatty acid. The hosts include an exogenous nucleic acid encoding a thioesterase and, optionally, an exogenous nucleic acid encoding an acetyl-CoA carboxylase, wherein an acyl-CoA synthetase in the hosts are functionally delected. The hosts prefereably include the nucleic acid encoding the thioesterase at an intermediate copy number. The hosts are preferably recominantly stable and growth-competent at 37.degree. C. Methods of producing a fatty acid product comprising culturing such hosts at 37.degree. C. are also described.

  8. Acidizing of Sandstone Reservoirs Using HF and Organic Acids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Fei

    2012-10-19

    Mud acid, which is composed of HCl and HF, is commonly used to remove the formation damage in sandstone reservoirs. However, many problems are associated with HCl, especially at high temperatures. Formic-HF acids have served as an alternative...

  9. Acid Placement in Acid Jetting Treatments in Long Horizontal Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sasongko, Hari

    2012-07-16

    In the Middle East, extended reach horizontal wells (on the order of 25,000 feet of horizontal displacement) are commonly acid stimulated by jetting acid out of drill pipe. The acid is jetted onto the face of the openhole wellbore as the drill pipe...

  10. Acid placement and coverage in the acid jetting process 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikhailov, Miroslav I.

    2009-05-15

    Many open-hole acid treatments are being conducted by pumping acid through jetting ports placed at the end of coiled tubing or drill pipe. The filter-cake on the bore-hole is broken by the jet; the acid-soluble material is dissolved, creating...

  11. Carboxylic acid sorption regeneration process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, C.J.; Poole, L.J.

    1995-05-02

    Carboxylic acids are sorbed from aqueous feedstocks into an organic liquid phase or onto a solid adsorbent. The acids are freed from the sorbent phase by treating it with aqueous alkylamine thus forming an alkylammonium carboxylate which is dewatered and decomposed to the desired carboxylic acid and the alkylamine. 10 figs.

  12. Pantothenic acid biosynthesis in zymomonas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tao, Luan; Tomb, Jean-Francois; Viitanen, Paul V.

    2014-07-01

    Zymomonas is unable to synthesize pantothenic acid and requires this essential vitamin in growth medium. Zymomonas strains transformed with an operon for expression of 2-dehydropantoate reductase and aspartate 1-decarboxylase were able to grow in medium lacking pantothenic acid. These strains may be used for ethanol production without pantothenic acid supplementation in seed culture and fermentation media.

  13. Composition for nucleic acid sequencing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korlach, Jonas (Ithaca, NY); Webb, Watt W. (Ithaca, NY); Levene, Michael (Ithaca, NY); Turner, Stephen (Ithaca, NY); Craighead, Harold G. (Ithaca, NY); Foquet, Mathieu (Ithaca, NY)

    2008-08-26

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  14. Invasive cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor I. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James E. (Madison, WI)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  15. Transition metal ion-assisted photochemical generation of alkyl halides and hydrocarbons from carboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carraher, Jack; Pestovsky, Oleg; Bakac, Andreja

    2012-03-14

    Near-UV photolysis of aqueous solutions of propionic acid and aqueous Fe3+ in the absence of oxygen generates a mixture of hydrocarbons (ethane, ethylene and butane), carbon dioxide, and Fe2+. The reaction becomes mildly catalytic (about five turnovers) in the presence of oxygen which converts a portion of alkyl radicals to oxidizing intermediates that reoxidize Fe2+. The photochemistry in the presence of halide ions (X? = Cl?, Br?) generates ethyl halides via halogen atom abstraction from FeXn3?n by ethyl radicals. Near-quantitative yields of C2H5X are obtained at ?0.05 M X?. Competition experiments with Co(NH3)5Br2+ provided kinetic data for the reaction of ethyl radicals with FeCl2+ (k = (4.0 ± 0.5) × 106 M?1 s?1) and with FeBr2+ (k = (3.0 ± 0.5) × 107 M?1 s?1). Photochemical decarboxylation of propionic acid in the presence of Cu2+ generates ethylene and Cu+. Longer-chain acids also yield alpha olefins as exclusive products. These reactions become catalytic under constant purge with oxygen which plays a dual role. It reoxidizes Cu+ to Cu2+, and removes gaseous olefins to prevent accumulation of Cu+(olefin) complexes and depletion of Cu2+. The results underscore the profound effect that the choice of metal ions, the medium, and reaction conditions exert on the photochemistry of carboxylic acids.

  16. Exploiting parameter space in MOFs: a 20-fold enhancement of phosphate-ester hydrolysis with UiO-66-NH 2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Katz, Michael J.; Moon, Su-Young; Mondloch, Joseph E.; Beyzavi, M. Hassan; Stephenson, Casey J.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Farha, Omar K.

    2015-02-24

    The hydrolysis of nerve agents is of primary concern due to the severe toxicity of these agents. Using a MOF-based catalyst (UiO-66), we have previously demonstrated that the hydrolysis can occur with relatively fast half-lives of 50 minutes. However, these rates are still prohibitively slow to be efficiently utilized for some practical applications (e.g., decontamination wipes used to clean exposed clothing/skin/vehicles). We thus turned our attention to derivatives of UiO-66 in order to probe the importance of functional groups on the hydrolysis rate. Three UiO-66 derivatives were explored; UiO-66-NO2 and UiO-66-(OH)2 showed little to no change in hydrolysis rate. However,more »UiO-66-NH2 showed a 20 fold increase in hydrolysis rate over the parent UiO-66 MOF. Half-lives of 1 minute were observed with this MOF. In order to probe the role of the amino moiety, we turned our attention to UiO-67, UiO-67-NMe2 and UiO-67-NH2. In these MOFs, the amino moiety is in close proximity to the zirconium node. We observed that UiO-67-NH2 is a faster catalyst than UiO-67 and UiO-67-NMe2. We conclude that the role of the amino moiety is to act as a proton-transfer agent during the catalytic cycle and not to hydrogen bond or to form a phosphorane intermediate.« less

  17. Regulatory Safety Issues in the Structural Design Criteria of ASME Section III Subsection NH and for Very High Temperatures for VHTR & GEN IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William J. O’Donnell; Donald S. Griffin

    2007-05-07

    The objective of this task is to identify issues relevant to ASME Section III, Subsection NH [1], and related Code Cases that must be resolved for licensing purposes for VHTGRs (Very High Temperature Gas Reactor concepts such as those of PBMR, Areva, and GA); and to identify the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code to cover the unresolved safety issues. Subsection NH was originally developed to provide structural design criteria and limits for elevated-temperature design of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems and some gas-cooled systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its Advisory Committee for Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) reviewed the design limits and procedures in the process of reviewing the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) for a construction permit in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and identified issues that needed resolution. In the years since then, the NRC and various contractors have evaluated the applicability of the ASME Code and Code Cases to high-temperature reactor designs such as the VHTGRs, and identified issues that need to be resolved to provide a regulatory basis for licensing. This Report describes: (1) NRC and ACRS safety concerns raised during the licensing process of CRBR , (2) how some of these issues are addressed by the current Subsection NH of the ASME Code; and (3) the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code and Code Cases to cover unresolved regulatory issues for very high temperature service.

  18. Preparation of Single Phase Films of CH3NH3Pb(I1-xBrx)3 with Sharp Optical Band Edges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadhanala, Aditya; Deschler, Felix; Thomas, Tudor H; Dutton, Siân E.; Goedel, Karl C.; Hanusch, Fabian C.; Lai, May L.; Steiner, Ullrich; Bein, Thomas; Docampo, Pablo; Cahen, David; Friend, Richard H.

    2014-07-09

    ?inorganic perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3?xClx) solar cells now show photovoltaic (PV) performance1?4 approaching 18%,5,6 and high charge-carrier mobilities.7 Perovskite films have also shown promising photoluminescence quantum efficiencies (PLQEs) of more than 70% and lasing... .; Grat?zel, M.; Mhaisalkar, S.; Sum, T. C. Low-Temperature Solution- Processed Wavelength-Tunable Perovskites for Lasing. Nat. Mater. 2014, 13, 476?480. (9) Deschler, F.; Price, M.; Pathak, S.; Klintberg, L. E.; Jarausch, D.- D.; Higler, R.; Hu?ttner, S...

  19. Synthesis and Evaluation of Cu/SAPO-34 Catalysts for NH3-SCR 2: Solid-state Ion Exchange and One-pot Synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Feng; Walter, Eric D.; Washton, Nancy M.; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2015-01-01

    Cu-SAPO-34 catalysts are synthesized using two methods: solid-state ion exchange (SSIE) and one-pot synthesis. SSIE is conducted by calcining SAPO-34/CuO mixtures at elevated temperatures. For the one-pot synthesis method, Cu-containing chemicals (CuO and CuSO4) are added during gel preparation. A high-temperature calcination step is also needed for this method. Catalysts are characterized with surface area/pore volume measurements, temperature programmed reduction (TPR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Catalytic properties are examined using standard ammonia selective catalytic reduction (NH3-SCR) and ammonia oxidation reactions. In Cu-SAPO-34 samples formed using SSIE, Cu presents both as isolated Cu2+ ions and unreacted CuO. The former is highly active and selective in NH3-SCR, while the latter catalyzes a side reaction; notably, the non-selective oxidation of NH3 above 350 ºC. Using the one-pot method followed by a high-temperature aging treatment, it is possible to form Cu SAPO-34 samples with predominately isolated Cu2+ ions at low Cu loadings. However at much higher Cu loadings, isolated Cu2+ ions that bind weakly with the CHA framework and CuO clusters also form. These Cu moieties are very active in catalyzing non-selective NH3 oxidation above 350 ºC. Low-temperature reaction kinetics indicate that Cu-SAPO-34 samples formed using SSIE have core-shell structures where Cu is enriched in the shell layers; while Cu is more evenly distributed within the one-pot samples. Reaction kinetics also suggest that at low temperatures, the local environment next to Cu2+ ion centers plays little role on the overall catalytic properties. The authors gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle under contract number DE-AC05-76RL01830. The authors also thank Shari Li (PNNL) for surface area/pore volume measurements, and Bruce W. Arey (PNNL) for SEM measurements. Discussions with Drs. A. Yezerets, K. Kamasamudram, J.H. Li, N. Currier and J.Y. Luo from Cummins, Inc. and H.Y. Chen and H. Hess from Johnson-Matthey are greatly appreciated.

  20. Extraction of uranium: comparison of stripping with ammonia vs. strong acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moldovan, B.; Grinbaum, B.; Efraim, A.

    2008-07-01

    Following extraction of uranium in the first stage of solvent extraction using a tertiary amine, typically Alamine 336, the stripping of the extracted uranium is accomplished either by use of an aqueous solution of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} /NH{sub 4}OH or by strong-acid stripping using 400-500 g/L H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Both processes have their merits and determine the downstream processing. The classical stripping with ammonia is followed by addition of strong base, to precipitate ammonium uranyl sulfate (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}UO{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}, which yields finally the yellow cake. Conversely, stripping with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, followed by oxidation with hydrogen peroxide yields uranyl oxide as product. At the Cameco Key Lake operation, both processes were tested on a pilot scale, using a Bateman Pulsed Column (BPC). The BPC proved to be applicable to both processes. It met the process criteria both for extraction and stripping, leaving less than 1 mg/L of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in the raffinate, and product solution had the required concentration of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} at high flux and reasonable height of transfer unit. In the Key Lake mill, each operation can be carried out in a single column. The main advantages of the strong-acid stripping over ammonia stripping are: (1) 60% higher flux in the extraction, (2) tenfold higher concentration of the uranium in the product solution, and (3) far more robust process, with no need of pH control in the stripping and no need to add acid to the extraction in order to keep the pH above the point of precipitation of iron compounds. The advantages of the ammoniacal process are easier stripping, that is, less stages needed to reach equilibrium and lower concentration of modifier needed to prevent the creation of a third phase. (authors)

  1. ARM - Datastreams - rain

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments? We wouldDatastreamsnoaaradbrw Documentation XDC documentation DataDatastreamspws

  2. ARM - Instrument - rain

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrn Documentation NOAACRN : XDCgovInstrumentsptr-ms Documentation ARM

  3. ARM - Campaign Instrument - rain

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us atgovInstrumentsradgovInstrumentsrain

  4. ARM - Cloud and Rain

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us agovInstrumentswrf-chem Comments? We Outreach

  5. Singin' in the Rain

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D-NicholasReports andRobert(SC)Siegfried

  6. DISTRIBUTION OF LANTHANIDE AND ACTINIDE ELEMENTS BETWEEN BIS-(2-ETHYLHEXYL)PHOSPHORIC ACID AND BUFFERED LACTATE SOLUTIONS CONTAINING SELECTED COMPLEXANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudisill, Tracy S.; Diprete, David P.; Thompson, Major C.

    2013-04-15

    With the renewed interest in the closure of the nuclear fuel cycle, the TALSPEAK process is being considered for the separation of Am and Cm from the lanthanide fission products in a next generation reprocessing plant. However, an efficient separation requires tight control of the pH which likely will be difficult to achieve on a large scale. To address this issue, we measured the distribution of lanthanide and actinide elements between aqueous and organic phases in the presence of complexants which were potentially less sensitive to pH control than the diethylenetriaminepentaacetic (DTPA) used in the process. To perform the extractions, a rapid and accurate method was developed for measuring distribution coefficients based on the preparation of lanthanide tracers in the Savannah River National Laboratory neutron activation analysis facility. The complexants tested included aceto-, benzo-, and salicylhydroxamic acids, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN), and ammonium thiocyanate (NH{sub 4}SCN). The hydroxamic acids were the least effective of the complexants tested. The separation factors for TPEN and NH{sub 4}SCN were higher, especially for the heaviest lanthanides in the series; however, no conditions were identified which resulted in separations factors which consistently approached those measured for the use of DTPA.

  7. Nucleic acid detection methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, C.L.; Yaar, R.; Szafranski, P.; Cantor, C.R.

    1998-05-19

    The invention relates to methods for rapidly determining the sequence and/or length a target sequence. The target sequence may be a series of known or unknown repeat sequences which are hybridized to an array of probes. The hybridized array is digested with a single-strand nuclease and free 3{prime}-hydroxyl groups extended with a nucleic acid polymerase. Nuclease cleaved heteroduplexes can be easily distinguish from nuclease uncleaved heteroduplexes by differential labeling. Probes and target can be differentially labeled with detectable labels. Matched target can be detected by cleaving resulting loops from the hybridized target and creating free 3-hydroxyl groups. These groups are recognized and extended by polymerases added into the reaction system which also adds or releases one label into solution. Analysis of the resulting products using either solid phase or solution. These methods can be used to detect characteristic nucleic acid sequences, to determine target sequence and to screen for genetic defects and disorders. Assays can be conducted on solid surfaces allowing for multiple reactions to be conducted in parallel and, if desired, automated. 18 figs.

  8. Nucleic Acid Detection Methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Cassandra L. (Boston, MA); Yaar, Ron (Brookline, MA); Szafranski, Przemyslaw (Boston, MA); Cantor, Charles R. (Boston, MA)

    1998-05-19

    The invention relates to methods for rapidly determining the sequence and/or length a target sequence. The target sequence may be a series of known or unknown repeat sequences which are hybridized to an array of probes. The hybridized array is digested with a single-strand nuclease and free 3'-hydroxyl groups extended with a nucleic acid polymerase. Nuclease cleaved heteroduplexes can be easily distinguish from nuclease uncleaved heteroduplexes by differential labeling. Probes and target can be differentially labeled with detectable labels. Matched target can be detected by cleaving resulting loops from the hybridized target and creating free 3-hydroxyl groups. These groups are recognized and extended by polymerases added into the reaction system which also adds or releases one label into solution. Analysis of the resulting products using either solid phase or solution. These methods can be used to detect characteristic nucleic acid sequences, to determine target sequence and to screen for genetic defects and disorders. Assays can be conducted on solid surfaces allowing for multiple reactions to be conducted in parallel and, if desired, automated.

  9. EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL ELUANTS FOR NON-ACID ELUTION OF CESIUM FROM SPHERICAL RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE RESIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adu-Wusu, K.; Nash, C.; Pennebaker, F.

    2011-10-23

    Ion Exchange column loading and elution of cesium from spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde resin have been conducted for two potential non-acid eluants -(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}CO{sub 3} and CH{sub 3}COONH{sub 4}. The results revealed encouraging cesium elution performance. 100% elution was achieved in at most 22 hours ({approx}28 bed volumes) of elution. Elution performance was fairly high at 6 hours ({approx}8 bed volumes) of elution for some of the eluants and also practically comparable to the benchmark acid eluant (HNO{sub 3}). Hence, it is quite possible 100% percent elution will be closer to the 6th hour than the 22nd hour. Elution is generally enhanced by increasing the concentration and pH of the eluants, and combining the eluants.

  10. AFFECTS OF MECHANICAL MILLING AND METAL OXIDE ADDITIVES ON SORPTION KINETICS OF 1:1 LiNH2/MgH2 MIXTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdy, C.; Anton, D.; Gray, J.

    2010-12-08

    The destabilized complex hydride system composed of LiNH{sub 2}:MgH{sub 2} (1:1 molar ratio) is one of the leading candidates of hydrogen storage with a reversible hydrogen storage capacity of 8.1 wt%. A low sorption enthalpy of {approx}32 kJ/mole H{sub 2} was first predicted by Alapati et al. utilizing first principle density function theory (DFT) calculations and has been subsequently confirmed empirically by Lu et al. through differential thermal analysis (DTA). This enthalpy suggests that favorable sorption kinetics should be obtainable at temperatures in the range of 160 C to 200 C. Preliminary experiments reported in the literature indicate that sorption kinetics are substantially lower than expected in this temperature range despite favorable thermodynamics. Systematic isothermal and isobaric sorption experiments were performed using a Sievert's apparatus to form a baseline data set by which to compare kinetic results over the pressure and temperature range anticipated for use of this material as a hydrogen storage media. Various material preparation methods and compositional modifications were performed in attempts to increase the kinetics while lowering the sorption temperatures. This paper outlines the results of these systematic tests and describes a number of beneficial additions which influence kinetics as well as NH{sub 3} formation.

  11. Acidic gas capture by diamines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rochelle, Gary (Austin, TX); Hilliard, Marcus (Missouri City, TX)

    2011-05-10

    Compositions and methods related to the removal of acidic gas. In particular, the present disclosure relates to a composition and method for the removal of acidic gas from a gas mixture using a solvent comprising a diamine (e.g., piperazine) and carbon dioxide. One example of a method may involve a method for removing acidic gas comprising contacting a gas mixture having an acidic gas with a solvent, wherein the solvent comprises piperazine in an amount of from about 4 to about 20 moles/kg of water, and carbon dioxide in an amount of from about 0.3 to about 0.9 moles per mole of piperazine.

  12. The utilization of tricarboxylic acid cycle acids and the uptake of succinic acid by Neurospora crassa 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilliland, Patti Lynn

    1978-01-01

    molecules not directly involved in the TCA cycle, aspartate and glutamate, have been the subject of several investigations, primarily in relation to amino acid transport. The uptake of the dicarboxylic amino acids is fre- quently studied in conjunction... with the uptake of the structurally similar TCA cycle compounds (22, 44, 76). In 1968, Jacobson snd Metzenberg (29) reported that aspartate and glutamate uptake by N. crassa was gene-controlled. Pall (44) has described a mycelial amino acid transport system...

  13. Carbonic Acid Pretreatment of Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Peter van Walsum; Kemantha Jayawardhana; Damon Yourchisin; Robert McWilliams; Vanessa Castleberry

    2003-05-31

    This project sought to address six objectives, outlined below. The objectives were met through the completion of ten tasks. 1) Solidify the theoretical understanding of the binary CO2/H2O system at reaction temperatures and pressures. The thermodynamics of pH prediction have been improved to include a more rigorous treatment of non-ideal gas phases. However it was found that experimental attempts to confirm theoretical pH predictions were still off by a factor of about 1.8 pH units. Arrhenius experiments were carried out and the activation energy for carbonic acid appears to be substantially similar to sulfuric acid. Titration experiments have not yet confirmed or quantified the buffering or acid suppression effects of carbonic acid on biomass. 2) Modify the carbonic acid pretreatment severity function to include the effect of endogenous acid formation and carbonate buffering, if necessary. It was found that the existing severity functions serve adequately to account for endogenous acid production and carbonate effects. 3) Quantify the production of soluble carbohydrates at different reaction conditions and severity. Results show that carbonic acid has little effect on increasing soluble carbohydrate concentrations for pretreated aspen wood, compared to pretreatment with water alone. This appears to be connected to the release of endogenous acids by the substrate. A less acidic substrate such as corn stover would derive benefit from the use of carbonic acid. 4) Quantify the production of microbial inhibitors at selected reaction conditions and severity. It was found that the release of inhibitors was correlated to reaction severity and that carbonic acid did not appear to increase or decrease inhibition compared to pretreatment with water alone. 5) Assess the reactivity to enzymatic hydrolysis of material pretreated at selected reaction conditions and severity. Enzymatic hydrolysis rates increased with severity, but no advantage was detected for the use of carbonic acid compared to water alone. 6) Determine optimal conditions for carbonic acid pretreatment of aspen wood. Optimal severities appeared to be in the mid range tested. ASPEN-Plus modeling and economic analysis of the process indicate that the process could be cost competitive with sulfuric acid if the concentration of solids in the pretreatment is maintained very high (~50%). Lower solids concentrations result in larger reactors that become expensive to construct for high pressure applications.

  14. ANTIBODY PURIFICATION USING CAPRYLIC ACID In mildly acidic conditions, the addition of short-chain fatty acids such as caprylic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mecham, Robert

    ANTIBODY PURIFICATION USING CAPRYLIC ACID In mildly acidic conditions, the addition of short-chain fatty acids such as caprylic acid to serum will precipitate most serum proteins with the exception or ammonium sulfate precipitation, caprylic acid will yield a relatively pure antibody preparation. 1. Measure

  15. Understanding NOx SCR Mechanism and Activity on Cu/Chabazite Structures throughout the Catalyst Life Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ribeiro, Fabio; Delgass, Nick; Gounder, Rajmani; Schneider, William F.; Miller, Jeff; Yezerets, Aleksey; McEwen, Jean-Sabin; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken

    2014-12-09

    Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) compounds contribute to acid rain and photochemical smog and have been linked to respiratory ailments. NOx emissions regulations continue to tighten, driving the need for high performance, robust control strategies. The goal of this project is to develop a deep, molecular level understanding of the function of Cu-SSZ-13 and Cu-SAPO-34 materials that catalyze the SCR of NOx with NH3.

  16. Calculation of exact vibrational spectra for P{sub 2}O and CH{sub 2}NH using a phase space wavelet basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Thomas, E-mail: tom.halverson@ttu.edu; Poirier, Bill [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, P.O. Box 41061, Lubbock, Texas 79409-1061 (United States)

    2014-05-28

    ‘‘Exact” quantum dynamics calculations of vibrational spectra are performed for two molecular systems of widely varying dimensionality (P{sub 2}O and CH{sub 2}NH), using a momentum-symmetrized Gaussian basis. This basis has been previously shown to defeat exponential scaling of computational cost with system dimensionality. The calculations were performed using the new “SWITCHBLADE” black-box code, which utilizes both dimensionally independent algorithms and massive parallelization to compute very large numbers of eigenstates for any fourth-order force field potential, in a single calculation. For both molecules considered here, many thousands of vibrationally excited states were computed, to at least an “intermediate” level of accuracy (tens of wavenumbers). Future modifications to increase the accuracy to “spectroscopic” levels, along with other potential future improvements of the new code, are also discussed.

  17. Qualifying composition dependent p and n self-doping in CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Qi; Shao, Yuchuan; Huang, Jinsong; Xie, Haipeng; Lyu, Lu; Liu, Xiaoliang; Gao, Yongli

    2014-10-20

    We report the observation of self-doping in perovskite. CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} was found to be either n- or p-doped by changing the ratio of methylammonium halide (MAI) and lead iodine (PbI{sub 2}) which are the two precursors for perovskite formation. MAI-rich and PbI{sub 2}-rich perovskite films are p and n self-doped, respectively. Thermal annealing can convert the p-type perovskite to n-type by removing MAI. The carrier concentration varied as much as six orders of magnitude. A clear correlation between doping level and device performance was also observed.

  18. Metabolism of Thioctic Acid in Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grisebach, Hans; Fuller, R.C.; Calvin, M.

    1956-01-01

    METABOLISM OF THlOCTlC ACID IN ALGAE TWO-WEEK LOAN COPY ThisMETABOLISM OF THIOCTIC ACID IN ALGAE Hans Grisebach, R. , C.METABOLISM OF THIOCTIC ACID IN ALGAE Hans Grisebach, R. C.

  19. Carbonic Acid Shows Promise in Geology, Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Surprising Secrets of Carbonic Acid Probing the Surprising Secrets of Carbonic Acid Berkeley Lab Study Holds Implications for Geological and Biological Processes October 23,...

  20. In vivo incorporation of unnatural amino acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Wang, Lei (San Diego, CA); Anderson, John Christopher (San Diego, CA); Chin, Jason W. (Cambridge, GB); Liu, David R. (Lexington, MA); Magliery, Thomas J. (North Haven, CT); Meggers, Eric L. (Philadelphia, PA); Mehl, Ryan Aaron (Lancaster, PA); Pastrnak, Miro (San Diego, CA); Santoro, Stephen William (Cambridge, MA); Zhang, Zhiwen (San Diego, CA)

    2012-05-08

    The invention provides methods and compositions for in vivo incorporation of unnatural amino acids. Also provided are compositions including proteins with unnatural amino acids.

  1. In vivo incorporation of unnatural amino acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter (La Jolla, CA); Wang, Lei (San Diego, CA); Anderson, John Christopher (San Diego, CA); Chin, Jason W. (Cambridge, GB); Liu, David R. (Lexington, MA); Magliery, Thomas J. (North Haven, CT); Meggers, Eric (Philadelphia, PA); Mehl, Ryan Aaron (Lancaster, PA); Pastrnak, Miro (San Diego, CA); Santoro, Stephen William (Cambridge, MA); Zhang, Zhiwen (San Diego, CA)

    2011-03-29

    The invention provides methods and compositions for in vivo incorporation of unnatural amino acids. Also provided are compositions including proteins with unnatural amino acids.

  2. In vivo incorporation of unnatural amino acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter (La Jolla, CA); Wang, Lei (San Diego, CA); Anderson, John Christopher (San Diego, CA); Chin, Jason W. (Cambridge, GB); Liu, David R. (Lexington, MA); Magliery, Thomas J. (North Haven, CT); Meggers, Eric (Philadelphia, PA); Mehl, Ryan Aaron (Lancaster, PA); Pastrnak, Miro (San Diego, CA); Santoro, Steven William (Cambridge, MA); Zhang, Zhiwen (San Diego, CA)

    2008-05-06

    The invention provides methods and compositions for in vivo incorporation of unnatural amino acids. Also provided are compositions including proteins with unnatural amino acids.

  3. In vivo incorporation of unnatural amino acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Wang, Lei (San Diego, CA); Anderson, John Christopher (San Diego, CA); Chin, Jason W. (Cambridge, GB); Liu, David R. (Lexington, MA); Magliery, Thomas J. (North Haven, CT); Meggers, Eric L. (Philadelphia, PA); Mehl, Ryan Aaron (Lancaster, PA); Pastrnak, Miro (San Diego, CA); Santoro, Stephen William (Cambridge, MA); Zhang, Zhiwen (San Diego, CA)

    2012-02-14

    The invention provides methods and compositions for in vivo incorporation of unnatural amino acids. Also provided are compositions including proteins with unnatural amino acids.

  4. In vivo incorporation of unnatural amino acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Wang, Lei (San Diego, CA); Anderson, John Christopher (San Diego, CA); Chin, Jason W. (Cambridge, GB); Liu, David R. (Lexington, MA); Magliery, Thomas J. (North Haven, CT); Meggers, Eric L. (Philadelphia, PA); Mehl, Ryan Aaron (Lancaster, PA); Pastrnak, Miro (San Diego, CA); Santoro, Stephen William (Cambridge, MA); Zhang, Zhiwen (San Diego, CA)

    2011-10-04

    The invention provides methods and compositions for in vivo incorporation of unnatural amino acids. Also provided are compositions including proteins with unnatural amino acids.

  5. In vivo incorporation of unnatural amino acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter (La Jolla, CA); Wang, Lei (San Diego, CA); Anderson, John Christopher (San Diego, CA); Chin, Jason W. (Cambridge, GB); Liu, David R. (Lexington, MA); Magliery, Thomas J. (North Haven, CT); Meggers, Eric (Philadelphia, PA); Mehl, Ryan Aaron (Lancaster, PA); Pastrnak, Miro (San Diego, CA)

    2009-12-29

    The invention provides methods and compositions for in vivo incorporation of unnatural amino acids. Also provided are compositions including proteins with unnatural amino acids

  6. Nitrate and Prussic Acid Poisoning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stichler, Charles; Reagor, John C.

    2001-09-05

    Nitrate and prussic acid poisoning in cattle are noninfectious conditions that can kill livestock. This publication explains the causes and symptoms of these conditions as well as preventive measures and sampling and testing steps....

  7. Seasonalepisodic control of acid deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, James A.

    1988-01-01

    This report contains the climatological, technical and economic factors for episodic and seasonal control of emissions in existing power plants. Analyzing a large data set of acid deposition for the years 1982-85, we find ...

  8. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1995-09-12

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  9. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Alexandratos, Spiro D. (Knoxville, TN); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Naperville, IL); Chiarizia, Ronato (Oak Park, IL)

    1995-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  10. Non-thermal plasma-assisted NOx reduction over Na-Y zeolites: The promotional effect of acid sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Peden, Charles HF; Szanyi, Janos

    2006-06-01

    The effect of acid sites on the catalytic activities of a series of H+-modified Na-Y zeolites was investigated in the non-thermal plasma assisted NOx reduction reaction using a simulated diesel engine exhaust gas mixture. The acid sites were formed by NH4+ ion exchange and subsequent heat treatment of a NaY zeolite. The catalytic activities of these H+-modified NaY zeolites significantly increased with the number of acid sites. This NOx conversion increase was correlated with the decrease in the amount of unreacted NO2. The increase in the number of acid sites did not change the NO level, it stayed constant. Temperature programmed desorption following NO2 adsorption showed the appearance of a high temperature desorption peak at 453 K in addition to the main desorption feature of 343 K observed for the base Na-Y. The results of both the IR and TPD experiments revealed the formation of crotonaldehyde, resulting from condensation reaction of adsorbed acetaldehyde. Strong adsorptions of both NOx and hydrocarbon species are proposed to be responsible for the higher catalytic activity of H+-modified Na-Y zeolites in comparison to the base NaY material

  11. Can extractive reserves save the rain forest: A ecological and socioeconomic comparison of non-timber forest product extraction systems in Peten, Guatemala, and West Kalimantan, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salafsky, N.; Dugelby, B.L.; Terborgh, J.W.

    1992-04-01

    Extractive reserves in tropical rain forests, in which only non-timber products are harvested, have been heralded by some conservationists as a means of maintaining biodiversity while providing income for local people. The study of extraction systems in Peten, Guatemala, and in West Kalimantan, Indonesia, leads to a more tempered conclusion, for while the Peten program was quite successful, the Kalimantan program was not. The study finds the success of an extractive reserve to be contingent on: (1) ecological conditions, and (2) socioeconomic and political factors. Although the study focuses on market-oriented extractive reserves, many of the issues discussed apply as well to other land uses such as the collection of non-timber forest products for household consumption or small-scale timber extraction.

  12. Structure of duplex DNA containing the cisplatin 1,2-{Pt(NH3)2}[superscript 2]+-d(GpG) crosslink at 1.77 [Angstrom] resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todd, Ryan C.

    We report the 1.77-Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of a dodecamer DNA duplex with the sequence 5?-CCTCTGGTCTCC-3? that has been modified to contain a single engineered 1,2-cis-{Pt(NH3)2}2+-d(GpG) cross-link, the major ...

  13. Experimental and Theoretical EPR Study of Jahn?Teller-Active [HIPTN[subscript 3]N]MoL Complexes (L = N[subscript 2], CO, NH[subscript 3])

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNaughton, Rebecca L.

    The trigonally symmetric Mo(III) coordination compounds [HIPTN[subscript 3]N]MoL (L = N[subscript 2], CO, NH[subscript 3]; [HIPTN3N]Mo = [(3,5-(2,4,6-i-Pr[subscript 3]C[subscript 6]H[subscript 2])[subscript 2]C[subscript ...

  14. Acid sorption regeneration process using carbon dioxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, C. Judson (Kensington, CA); Husson, Scott M. (Anderson, SC)

    2001-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are sorbed from aqueous feedstocks onto a solid adsorbent in the presence of carbon dioxide under pressure. The acids are freed from the sorbent phase by a suitable regeneration method, one of which is treating them with an organic alkylamine solution thus forming an alkylamine-carboxylic acid complex which thermally decomposes to the desired carboxylic acid and the alkylamine.

  15. Thermal Stability of Acetohydroxamic Acid/Nitric Acid Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudisill, T.S.

    2002-03-13

    The transmutation of transuranic actinides and long-lived fission products in spent commercial nuclear reactor fuel has been proposed as one element of the Advanced Accelerator Applications Program. Preparation of targets for irradiation in an accelerator-driven subcritical reactor would involve dissolution of the fuel and separation of uranium, technetium, and iodine from the transuranic actinides and other fission products. The UREX solvent extraction process is being developed to reject and isolate the transuranic actinides in the acid waste stream by scrubbing with acetohydroxamic acid (AHA). To ensure that a runaway reaction will not occur between nitric acid and AHA, an analogue of hydroxyl amine, thermal stability tests were performed to identify if any processing conditions could lead to a runaway reaction.

  16. Ammonium–cobalt–nickel phosphates, NH{sub 4}[Co{sub 1?x}Ni{sub x}PO{sub 4}]·H{sub 2}O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torre-Fernández, Laura; Trobajo, Camino [Departamentos de Química Física y Analítica y Química Orgánica e Inorgánica, Universidad de Oviedo-CINN, Oviedo, Asturias 33006 (Spain); Pedro, Imanol de [CITIMAC, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cantabria, 39005 Santander (Spain); Alfonso, Belén F. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Oviedo, Oviedo, Asturias 33007 (Spain); Fabelo, Oscar [Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, France and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Blanco, Jesús A. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Oviedo, Oviedo, Asturias 33007 (Spain); García, José R., E-mail: jrgm@uniovi.es [Departamentos de Química Física y Analítica y Química Orgánica e Inorgánica, Universidad de Oviedo-CINN, Oviedo, Asturias 33006 (Spain); García-Granda, Santiago [Departamentos de Química Física y Analítica y Química Orgánica e Inorgánica, Universidad de Oviedo-CINN, Oviedo, Asturias 33006 (Spain)

    2013-10-15

    The ammonium–cobalt–nickel phosphates, NH{sub 4}[Co{sub 1?x}Ni{sub x}PO{sub 4}]·H{sub 2}O (x=0.00, 0.34, 0.59, 0.70, 1.00), and the deuterated forms, ND{sub 4}[Co{sub 1?x}Ni{sub x}PO{sub 4}]·D{sub 2}O (x=0.00, 0.38, 0.48, 0.69, 0.85), have been synthesized under mild hydrothermal conditions and characterised using X-ray and neutron diffraction, chemical and thermal analysis, and magnetic measurements. Their crystal structures, including hydrogen positions, were determined by Rietveld refinement using single-crystal X-ray and neutron powder diffraction data. The space group of these orthorhombic crystals modifies as a function of their composition. The magnetic susceptibility and magnetization measurements of these ammonium–cobalt–nickel phosphates show antiferromagnetic behaviour, and the Neel temperature evolves from 5.5 K (x=0.00) up to 13.2 K (x=1.00). - Graphical abstract: We obtained single crystals for all the members of the family. In this series, although all crystals are orthorhombic, the space group changes as a function of the composition, showing how the single-crystal diffraction data is capable to manifest structural subtleties that had not been described before for this group of materials. All the investigated materials behave antiferromagnetically with ordering temperatures from 5.5 K up to 13.2 K. Display Omitted - Highlights: • The ammonium–cobalt–nickel phosphates, NH{sub 4}[Co{sub 1?x}Ni{sub x}PO{sub 4}]·H{sub 2}O (x=0.00, 0.34, 0.59, 0.70, 1.00) and the deuterated forms ND4[Co1-xNixPO4]·D{sub 2}O (x=0.00, 0.38, 0.49, 0.68, 0.85) have synthesized by hydrothermal synthesis. • The structural studies of these compounds are introduced as a function of the composition. • The magnetic studies show an antiferromagnetically behavior with ordering temperatures from 5.5 K to 13.2 K.

  17. Method for production of petroselinic acid and OMEGA12 hexadecanoic acid in transgenic plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ohlrogge, J.B.; Cahoon, E.B.; Shanklin, J.; Somerville, C.R.

    1995-07-04

    The present invention relates to a process for producing lipids containing the fatty acid, petroselinic acid, in plants. The production of petroselinic acid is accomplished by genetically transforming plants which do not normally accumulate petroselinic acid with a gene for a {omega}12 desaturase from another species which does normally accumulate petroselinic acid. 19 figs.

  18. Method for production of petroselinic acid and OMEGA12 hexadecanoic acid in transgenic plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ohlrogge, John B. (Okemos, MI); Cahoon, Edgar B. (Lansing, MI); Shanklin, John (Upton, NY); Somerville, Christopher R. (Okemos, MI)

    1995-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process for producing lipids containing the fatty acid petroselinic acid in plants. The production of petroselinic acid is accomplished by genetically transforming plants which do not normally accumulate petroselinic acid with a gene for a .omega.12 desaturase from another species which does normally accumulate petroselinic acid.

  19. Imaging ion-molecule reactions: Charge transfer and C-N bond formation in the C{sup +}+ NH{sub 3} system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pei, Linsen; Farrar, James M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

    2012-05-28

    The velocity mapping ion imaging method is applied to the ion-molecule reactions occurring between C{sup +} and NH{sub 3}. The velocity space images are collected over the relative collision energy range from 1.5 to 3.3 eV, allowing both product kinetic energy distributions and angular distributions to be obtained from the data. The charge transfer process appears to be direct, dominated by long-range electron transfer that results in minimal deflection of the products. The product kinetic energy distributions are consistent with a process dominated by energy resonance. The kinetic energy distributions for C-N bond formation appear to scale with the total available energy, providing strong evidence that energy in the [CNH{sub 3}]{sup +} precursor to products is distributed statistically. The angular distributions for C-N bond formation show pronounced forward-backward symmetry, as expected for a complex that resembles a prolate symmetric top decaying along its symmetry axis.

  20. MOSE: a feasibility study for optical turbulence forecasts with the Meso-Nh mesoscale model to support AO facilities at ESO sites (Paranal and Armazones)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masciadri, E; 10.1117/12.925924

    2012-01-01

    We present very encouraging preliminary results obtained in the context of the MOSE project, an on-going study aiming at investigating the feasibility of the forecast of the optical turbulence and meteorological parameters (in the free atmosphere as well as in the boundary and surface layer) at Cerro Paranal (site of the Very Large Telescope - VLT) and Cerro Armazones (site of the European Extremely Large Telescope - E-ELT), both in Chile. The study employs the Meso-Nh atmospheric mesoscale model and aims at supplying a tool for optical turbulence forecasts to support the scheduling of the scientific programs and the use of AO facilities at the VLT and the E-ELT. In this study we take advantage of the huge amount of measurements performed so far at Paranal and Armazones by ESO and the TMT consortium in the context of the site selection for the E-ELT and the TMT to constraint/validate the model. A detailed analysis of the model performances in reproducing the atmospheric parameters (T, V, p, H, ...) near the g...

  1. Application of x-ray tomography to optimization of new NOx/NH3 mixed potential sensors for vehicle on-board emissions control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Mark A; Brosha, Eric L; Mukundan, Rangachary; Garzon, Fernando H

    2009-01-01

    Mixed potential sensors for the detection of hydrocarbons, NO{sub x}, and NH{sub 3} have been previously developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The LANL sensors have a unique design incorporating dense ceramic-pelletlmetal-wire electrodes and porous electrolytes. The performance of current-biased sensors using an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte and platinum and La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}CrO{sub 3} electrodes is reported. X-ray tomography has been applied to non-destructively examine internal structures of these sensors. NO{sub x} and hydrocarbon response of the sensors under various bias conditions is reported, and very little NO{sub x} response hysteresis was observed. The application of a 0.6 {mu}A bias to these sensors shifts the response from a hydrocarbon response to a NO{sub x} response equal for both NO and NO{sub 2} species at approximately 500 {sup o}C in air.

  2. LOW-TEMPERATURE ION TRAP STUDIES OF N{sup +}({sup 3} P{sub ja} ) + H{sub 2}(j) {yields} NH{sup +} + H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zymak, I.; Hejduk, M.; Mulin, D.; Plasil, R.; Glosik, J.; Gerlich, D.

    2013-05-01

    Using a low-temperature 22-pole ion trap apparatus, detailed measurements for the title reaction have been performed between 10 K and 100 K in order to get some state specific information about this fundamental hydrogen abstraction process. The relative population of the two lowest H{sub 2} rotational states, j = 0 and 1, has been varied systematically. NH{sup +} formation is nearly thermo-neutral; however, to date, the energetics are not known with the accuracy required for low-temperature astrochemistry. Additional complications arise from the fact that, so far, there is no reliable theoretical or experimental information on how the reactivity of the N{sup +} ion depends on its fine-structure (FS) state {sup 3} P{sub ja} . Since in the present trapping experiment, thermalization of the initially hot FS population competes with hydrogen abstraction, the evaluation of the decay of N{sup +} ions over long storage times and at various He and H{sub 2} gas densities provides information on these processes. First assuming strict adiabatic behavior, a set of state specific rate coefficients is derived from the measured thermal rate coefficients. In addition, by recording the disappearance of the N{sup +} ions over several orders of magnitude, information on nonadiabatic transitions is extracted including FS-changing collisions.

  3. Acidizing High-Temperature Carbonate Formations Using Methanesulfonic Acid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortega, Alexis

    2015-03-25

    Hydrochloric acid (HCl) is the most commonly used stimulation fluid for high-temperature wells drilled in carbonate reservoirs due to its high dissolving power and low cost. However, the high corrosion rate of HCl on well tubulars could make its use...

  4. An assessment of acid fog

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipfert, F.W.

    1992-12-31

    Airborne particles have long been associated with adverse effects on public health, begin with the notorious air pollution disasters of several decades ago. Although H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was identified early on as a potential causal factors during these episodes (in part because of concern for potential health effects of particle acidity per se has intensified only recently. Most of the recent aerometric research in the US on acid fog has focused on the ability of clouds and fog to deliver acidity to vegetation and ecosystems. Strong acids are characterized chemically by their pH or H{sup +} concentration. For fog, concentrations are referred to the droplet liquid content; for other (i.e., ``clear air``) aerosols, to the volume of air sampled. A useful measure of the relationship between aerosol and fog is obtained by comparing their mass concentrations on the basis of the same volume of air, by multiplying fogwater concentrations by liquid water content (LWC). This paper reviews fog measurement capability, physical properties and chemistry, and presents a simple urban airshed model which is used to simulate the evolution of fog and aerosol concentrations under urban stagnation conditions.

  5. Process for forming sulfuric acid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Wen-Tong P. (Upper St. Clair, PA)

    1981-01-01

    An improved electrode is disclosed for the anode in a sulfur cycle hydrogen generation process where sulfur dioxie is oxidized to form sulfuric acid at the anode. The active compound in the electrode is palladium, palladium oxide, an alloy of palladium, or a mixture thereof. The active compound may be deposited on a porous, stable, conductive substrate.

  6. Replica amplification of nucleic acid arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Church, George M. (Brookline, MA)

    2002-01-01

    A method of producing a plurality of a nucleic acid array, comprising, in order, the steps of amplifying in situ nucleic acid molecules of a first randomly-patterned, immobilized nucleic acid array comprising a heterogeneous pool of nucleic acid molecules affixed to a support, transferring at least a subset of the nucleic acid molecules produced by such amplifying to a second support, and affixing the subset so transferred to the second support to form a second randomly-patterned, immobilized nucleic acid array, wherein the nucleic acid molecules of the second array occupy positions that correspond to those of the nucleic acid molecules from which they were amplified on the first array, so that the first array serves as a template to produce a plurality, is disclosed.

  7. Modeling of Acid Fracturing in Carbonate Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Jawad, Murtada s

    2014-06-05

    The acid fracturing process is a thermal, hydraulic, mechanical, and geochemical (THMG)-coupled phenomena in which the behavior of these variables are interrelated. To model the flow behavior of an acid into a fracture, mass and momentum balance...

  8. PREDICTING TEMPERATURE BEHAVIOR IN CARBONATE ACIDIZING TREATMENTS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Xuehao

    2010-01-16

    ........................................................................................ 4 1.4 Objective and Procedures .................................................................. 4 1.5 Outline .............................................................................................. 5 2. ACID INJECTION PROBLEM.......................................................... 10 2.4 Wormhole Growth Model.................................................................. 11 2.5 Modified Volumetric Model .............................................................. 14 2.6 Solution of Acid Injection Problem...

  9. Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenhalgh, W.O.

    1987-02-27

    Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and thence quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal. 1 fig.

  10. Fuel cell electrolyte membrane with acidic polymer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamrock, Steven J. (Stillwater, MN); Larson, James M. (Saint Paul, MN); Pham, Phat T. (Little Canada, MN); Frey, Matthew H. (Cottage Grove, MN); Haugen, Gregory M. (Edina, MN); Lamanna, William M. (Stillwater, MN)

    2009-04-14

    An electrolyte membrane is formed by an acidic polymer and a low-volatility acid that is fluorinated, substantially free of basic groups, and is either oligomeric or non-polymeric.

  11. Chemical Additive Selection in Matrix Acidizing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weidner, Jason 1981-

    2011-05-09

    critical detail of weak acid chemistry. One concern when using any acid in oilfield operations is the corrosion of well tubulars. Thus operators often choose to pump corrosion inhibitor, a chemical additive electrostatically attracted... to the negative charge of the well casing or production tubing, to decrease the rate at which the acid accesses well tubular surfaces (Crowe and Minor 1985). A typical working concentration of corrosion inhibitor is 1-2 wt% of injected acid (Smith et al. 1978...

  12. Production of high molecular weight polylactic acid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonsignore, Patrick V. (Joilet, IL)

    1995-01-01

    A degradable high molecular weight poly(lactic acid). A poly(lactic acid) has a terminal end group of one of carboxyl or hydroxyl groups with low molecular weight poly(lactic acid) units coupled with linking agents of di-isocyanates, bis-epoxides, bis-oxazolines and bis-ortho esters. The resulting high molecular weight poly(lactic acid) can be used for applications taking advantage of the improved physical properties.

  13. Production of high molecular weight polylactic acid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonsignore, P.V.

    1995-11-28

    A degradable high molecular weight poly(lactic acid) is described. The poly(lactic acid) has a terminal end group of one of carboxyl or hydroxyl groups with low molecular weight poly(lactic acid) units coupled with linking agents of di-isocyanates, bis-epoxides, bis-oxazolines and bis-ortho esters. The resulting high molecular weight poly(lactic acid) can be used for applications taking advantage of the improved physical properties.

  14. Metabolically active eukaryotic communities in extremely acidic mine drainage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Brett J; Lutz, M A; Dawson, S C; Bond, P L; Banfield, J F

    2004-01-01

    Microbial communities in acid mine drainage. FEMS Microbiol.Biogeochem- istry of acid mine drainage at Iron Mountain,in an extreme acid mine drainage environment. Appl. Environ.

  15. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2014-08-26

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  16. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deiters, Alexander (La Jolla, CA); Cropp, T. Ashton (San Diego, CA); Chin, Jason W. (Cambridge, GB); Anderson, J. Christopher (San Francisco, CA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA)

    2011-02-15

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  17. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deiters, Alexander (La Jolla, CA); Cropp, T. Ashton (Bethesda, MD); Chin, Jason W. (Cambridge, GB); Anderson, J. Christopher (San Francisco, CA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA)

    2011-08-09

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNAsyn-thetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  18. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, Ashton T; Chin, Jason W; Anderson, Christopher J; Schultz, Peter G

    2013-05-21

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  19. Synthesis of an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moens, L.

    1999-05-25

    A process is disclosed for preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid comprising. The process involves dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and an alkali metal diformylamide in an organic solvent selected from the group consisting of acetonitrile, methanol, tetrahydrofuran, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran and methylformate or mixtures to form a suspension of an alkyl 5-(N,N-diformylamino) levulinate ester; and hydrolyzing the alkyl 5-(N,N-diformylamino) levulinate with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-amino levulinic acid.

  20. Synthesis of an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moens, Luc (Lakewood, CO)

    1999-01-01

    A process of preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid comprising: dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and an alkali metal diformylamide in an organic solvent selected from the group consisting of acetonitrile, methanol, tetrahydrofuran, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran and methylformate or mixtures thereof to form a suspension of an alkyl 5-(N,N-diformylamino) levulinate ester; and hydrolyzing said alkyl 5-(N,N-diformylamino) levulinate with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-amino levulinic acid.

  1. NH Coverts Project Advisory Committee Meeting Notes, April 3, 2015 NH Fish & Game, Concord, NH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Members Present: Peter Beblowski, Antrim Karen Bennett, UNH Coop. Extension Cynthia Bruss, Springfield integrating wildlife-friendly agriculture into the list of `land management' options. Upcoming 2015 Workshop #12;- Cynthia pointed out the need for a presentation in the state on reptiles (particularly, snakes

  2. Final Report for NSF Grant CHE-9421727

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, William D.

    ranging from air pollution (acid rain) due to oil combustion to catalyst poisoning in industrial processes

  3. Thermal Stability Of Formohydroxamic Acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F. F.; Rudisill, T. S.

    2011-10-21

    The thermal stability of formohydroxamic acid (FHA) was evaluated to address the potential for exothermic decomposition during storage and its use in the uranium extraction process. Accelerating rate calorimetry showed rapid decomposition at a temperature above 65 {degree}?C; although, the rate of pressure rise was greater than two orders of magnitude less than the lower bound for materials which have no explosive properties with respect to transportation. FHA solutions in water and nitric acid did not reach runaway conditions until 150 {degree}?C. Analysis by differential scanning calorimetry showed that FHA melted at 67 {degree}?C and thermally decomposed at 90 {degree}?C with an enthalpy of -1924 J/g. The energics of the FHA thermal decomposition are comparable to those measured for aqueous solutions of hydroxylamine nitrate. Solid FHA should be stored in a location where the temperature does not exceed 20-25 {degree}?C. As a best practice, the solid material should be stored in a climate-controlled environment such as a refrigerator or freezer. FHA solutions in water are not susceptible to degradation by acid hydrolysis and are the preferred way to handle FHA prior to use.

  4. Hydrochloric Acid-Catalyzed Levulinic Acid Formation from Cellulose: Data and Kinetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Hydrochloric Acid-Catalyzed Levulinic Acid Formation from Cellulose: Data and Kinetic Model.com). In this study, the kinetics of the acid catalyzed hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel PH101 of conditions: 160­200 C, hydrochloric acid concentrations of 0.309­0.927 M (11.3­33.8 g/l), cellulose

  5. Acid Diversion in Carbonate Reservoirs Using Polymer-Based In-Situ Gelled Acids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomaa, Ahmed Mohamed Mohamed

    2012-07-16

    and determine factors that impact its performance. Lab test of polymer-based in-situ gelled acids reveal that polymer and other additives separate out of the acid when these acids are prepared in high salinity water. In coreflood tests, in-situ gelled acid...

  6. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-06-06

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  7. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-05-30

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  8. Acid Fracture and Fracture Conductivity Study of Field Rock Samples 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Underwood, Jarrod

    2013-11-15

    Acid fracturing is a well stimulation strategy designed to increase the productivity of a producing well. The parameters of acid fracturing and the effects of acid interaction on specific rock samples can be studied experimentally. Acid injection...

  9. Micro-electro-mechanical systems phosphoric acid fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopchak, David A. (Livermore, CA); Morse, Jeffrey D. (Martinez, CA); Upadhye, Ravindra S. (Pleasanton, CA); Kotovsky, Jack (Oakland, CA); Graff, Robert T. (Modesto, CA)

    2010-08-17

    A phosphoric acid fuel cell system comprising a porous electrolyte support, a phosphoric acid electrolyte in the porous electrolyte support, a cathode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte, and an anode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte.

  10. Micro-electro-mechanical systems phosphoric acid fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopchak, David A. (Livermore, CA); Morse, Jeffrey D. (Martinez, CA); Upadhye, Ravindra S. (Pleasanton, CA); Kotovsky, Jack (Oakland, CA); Graff, Robert T. (Modesto, CA)

    2010-12-21

    A phosphoric acid fuel cell system comprising a porous electrolyte support, a phosphoric acid electrolyte in the porous electrolyte support, a cathode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte, and an anode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte.

  11. Double stranded nucleic acid biochips

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chernov, Boris; Golova, Julia

    2006-05-23

    This invention describes a new method of constructing double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) microarrays based on the use of pre-synthesized or natural DNA duplexes without a stem-loop structure. The complementary oligonucleotide chains are bonded together by a novel connector that includes a linker for immobilization on a matrix. A non-enzymatic method for synthesizing double-stranded nucleic acids with this novel connector enables the construction of inexpensive and robust dsDNA/dsRNA microarrays. DNA-DNA and DNA-protein interactions are investigated using the microarrays.

  12. Self-assembling multimeric nucleic acid constructs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cantor, Charles R. (Boston, MA); Niemeyer, Christof M. (Bremen, DE); Smith, Cassandra L. (Boston, MA); Sano, Takeshi (Boston, MA); Hnatowich, Donald J. (Brookline, MA); Rusckowski, Mary (Southborough, MA)

    1996-01-01

    The invention is directed to constructs and compositions containing multimeric forms of nucleic acid. Multimeric nucleic acids comprise single-stranded nucleic acids attached via biotin to streptavidin and bound with a functional group. These constructs can be utilized in vivo to treat or identify diseased tissue or cells. Repeated administrations of multimeric nucleic acid compositions produce a rapid and specific amplification of nucleic acid constructs and their attached functional groups. For treatment purposes, functional groups may be toxins, radioisotopes, genes or enzymes. Diagnostically, labeled multimeric constructs may be used to identify specific targets in vivo or in vitro. Multimeric nucleic acids may also be used in nanotechnology and to create self-assembling polymeric aggregates such as membranes of defined porosity, microcircuits and many other products.

  13. Self-assembling multimeric nucleic acid constructs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cantor, Charles R. (Boston, MA); Niemeyer, Christof M. (Bremen, DE); Smith, Cassandra L. (Boston, MA); Sano, Takeshi (Boston, MA); Hnatowich, Donald J. (Brookline, MA); Rusckowski, Mary (Southborough, MA)

    1999-10-12

    The invention is directed to constructs and compositions containing multimeric forms of nucleic acid. Multimeric nucleic acids comprise single-stranded nucleic acids attached via biotin to streptavidin and bound with a functional group. These constructs can be utilized in vivo to treat or identify diseased tissue or cells. Repeated administrations of multimeric nucleic acid compositions produce a rapid and specific amplification of nucleic acid constructs and their attached functional groups. For treatment purposes, functional groups may be toxins, radioisotopes, genes or enzymes. Diagnostically, labeled multimeric constructs may be used to identify specific targets in vivo or in vitro. Multimeric nucleic acids may also be used in nanotechnology and to create self-assembling polymeric aggregates such as membranes of defined porosity, microcircuits and many other products.

  14. Self-assembling multimeric nucleic acid constructs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cantor, C.R.; Niemeyer, C.M.; Smith, C.L.; Sano, Takeshi; Hnatowich, D.J.; Rusckowski, M.

    1996-10-01

    The invention is directed to constructs and compositions containing multimeric forms of nucleic acid. Multimeric nucleic acids comprise single-stranded nucleic acids attached via biotin to streptavidin and bound with a functional group. These constructs can be utilized in vivo to treat or identify diseased tissue or cells. Repeated administrations of multimeric nucleic acid compositions produce a rapid and specific amplification of nucleic acid constructs and their attached functional groups. For treatment purposes, functional groups may be toxins, radioisotopes, genes or enzymes. Diagnostically, labeled multimeric constructs may be used to identify specific targets in vivo or in vitro. Multimeric nucleic acids may also be used in nanotechnology and to create self-assembling polymeric aggregates such as membranes of defined porosity, microcircuits and many other products. 5 figs.

  15. Carboxylic acid accelerated formation of diesters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tustin, G.C.; Dickson, T.J.

    1998-04-28

    This invention pertains to accelerating the rate of formation of 1,1-dicarboxylic esters from the reaction of an aldehyde with a carboxylic acid anhydride or a ketene in the presence of a non-iodide containing a strong Bronsted acid catalyst by the addition of a carboxylic acid at about one bar pressure and between about 0 and 80 C in the substantial absence of a hydrogenation or carbonylation catalyst.

  16. Understanding Naphthenic Acid Corrosion in Refinery Settings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick, Brian Neil

    2015-01-01

    R. & Tordo, S. , 2005. Crude oil price differentials andfiles/08105.Technical Paper_Crude Oil Price DifferentialsAcids Present in Crude Oils Using Nanospray Fourier

  17. Investigating intermediates in 6-methylsalicylic acid biosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potter, Helen Katherine

    2011-07-12

    .3.1 Chlorination ............................................................................................ 174 A2.3.2 Coupling of amino acids.......................................................................... 174 A2.3.3 Protecting groups...

  18. Acid Doped Membranes for High Temperature PEMFC

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on Acid Doped Membranes for High Temperature PEMFC to the High Temperature Membrane Working Group, May 25, 2004 in Philadelphia, PA.

  19. Organic acid-tolerant microorganisms and uses thereof for producing organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

    2014-05-06

    Organic acid-tolerant microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-tolerant microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3HP), acrylic acid, and propionic acid. Further modifications to the microorganisms such as increasing expression of malonyl-CoA reductase and/or acetyl-CoA carboxylase provide or increase the ability of the microorganisms to produce 3HP. Methods of generating an organic acid with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers include replacing acsA or homologs thereof in cells with genes of interest and selecting for the cells comprising the genes of interest with amounts of organic acids effective to inhibit growth of cells harboring acsA or the homologs.

  20. Effects of Acid Additives on Spent Acid Flowback through Carbonate Cores 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nasir, Ehsaan Ahmad

    2012-07-16

    these challenges, different chemicals, or additives, are added to the acid solution such as corrosion inhibitors and iron control agents. These additives may change the relative permeability of the spent acid, and formation wettability, and may either hinder...

  1. A method to attenuate U(VI) mobility in acidic waste plumes using humic acids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, J.

    2011-01-01

    base properties of a goethite surface model: A theoreticalcomplexation of U(VI) on goethite (alpha-FeOOH). Geochim.acid and humic-acid on goethite, gibbsite and imogolite. J.

  2. Experimental Investigation on the Effect of Permeability on the Optimum Acid Flux in Carbonate Matrix Acidizing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Etten, Jordan Ruby

    2015-05-05

    stimulation design. Optimum interstitial velocity determines the injection rate for a treatment, and the optimum pore volume to breakthrough, PVbt-opt, suggests the total volume of acid needed. Studies of carbonate matrix acidizing have focused on the role...

  3. Non-essential amino acid metabolism in rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crooks, James Darrell

    1971-01-01

    -bound amino acids were studied' The amino acids studied were asparagine, aspartic acid, glutamine, glutamic acid, glycine, alanine, arginine, and praline. Growth rates of rats increased with increased levels of glutamate in the diet. Effects of level... of dietary glutamic acid on endogenous pool size;, of the free amino acids were studied. No consistent patterns were observed. The pool sizes of all but four of the free amino acids increased after the ingestion of a meal. Glucose levels decreased...

  4. Bulk gold catalyzed oxidation reactions of amines and isocyanides and iron porphyrin catalyzed N-H and O-H bond insertion/cyclization reactions of diamines and aminoalcohols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klobukowski, Erik

    2011-12-29

    This work involves two projects. The first project entails the study of bulk gold as a catalyst in oxidation reactions of isocyanides and amines. The main goal of this project was to study the activation and reactions of molecules at metal surfaces in order to assess how organometallic principles for homogeneous processes apply to heterogeneous catalysis. Since previous work had used oxygen as an oxidant in bulk gold catalyzed reactions, the generality of gold catalysis with other oxidants was examined. Amine N-oxides were chosen for study, due to their properties and use in the oxidation of carbonyl ligands in organometallic complexes. When amine N-oxides were used as an oxidant in the reaction of isocyanides with amines, the system was able to produce ureas from a variety of isocyanides, amines, and amine N-oxides. In addition, the rate was found to generally increase as the amine N-oxide concentration increased, and decrease with increased concentrations of the amine. Mechanistic studies revealed that the reaction likely involves transfer of an oxygen atom from the amine N-oxide to the adsorbed isocyanide to generate an isocyanate intermediate. Subsequent nucleophilic attack by the amine yields the urea. This is in contrast to the bulk gold-catalyzed reaction mechanism of isocyanides with amines and oxygen. Formation of urea in this case was proposed to proceed through a diaminocarbene intermediate. Moreover, formation of the proposed isocyanate intermediate is consistent with the reactions of metal carbonyl ligands, which are isoelectronic to isocyanides. Nucleophilic attack at coordinated CO by amine N-oxides produces CO{sub 2} and is analogous to the production of an isocyanate in this gold system. When the bulk gold-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenation of amines was examined with amine N-oxides, the same products were afforded as when O{sub 2} was used as the oxidant. When the two types of oxidants were directly compared using the same reaction system and conditions, it was found that the oxidative dehydrogenation of dibenzylamine to Nbenzylidenebenzylamine, with N-methylmorpholine N-oxide (NMMO), was nearly quantitative (96%) within 24 h. However, the reaction with oxygen was much slower, with only a 52% yield of imine product over the same time period. Moreover, the rate of reaction was found to be influenced by the nature of the amine N-oxide. For example, the use of the weakly basic pyridine N-oxide (PyNO) led to an imine yield of only 6% after 24 h. A comparison of amine N-oxide and O2 was also examined in the oxidation of PhCH{sub 2}OH to PhCHO catalyzed by bulk gold. In this reaction, a 52% yield of the aldehyde was achieved when NMMO was used, while only a 7% product yield was afforded when O{sub 2} was the oxidant after 48 h. The bulk gold-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclic amines generates amidines, which upon treatment with Aerosil and water were found to undergo hydrolysis to produce lactams. Moreover, 5-, 6-, and 7-membered lactams could be prepared through a one-pot reaction of cyclic amines by treatment with oxygen, water, bulk gold, and Aerosil. This method is much more atom economical than industrial processes, does not require corrosive acids, and does not generate undesired byproducts. Additionally, the gold and Aerosil catalysts can be readily separated from the reaction mixture. The second project involved studying iron(III) tetraphenylporphyrin chloride, Fe(TPP)Cl, as a homogeneous catalyst for the generation of carbenes from diazo reagents and their reaction with heteroatom compounds. Fe(TPP)Cl, efficiently catalyzed the insertion of carbenes derived from methyl 2-phenyldiazoacetates into O-H bonds of aliphatic and aromatic alcohols. Fe(TPP)Cl was also found to be an effective catalyst for tandem N-H and O-H insertion/cyclization reactions when 1,2-diamines and 1,2-alcoholamines were treated with diazo reagents. This approach provides a one-pot process for synthesizing piperazinones and morpholinones and related analogues such as quinoxalinones and benzoxazin-2-ones.

  5. Producing dicarboxylic acids using polyketide synthases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-10-29

    The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing a dicarboxylic acid (diacid). Such diacids include diketide-diacids and triketide-diacids. The invention includes recombinant nucleic acid encoding the PKS, and host cells comprising the PKS. The invention also includes methods for producing the diacids.

  6. Nitrates and Prussic Acid in Forages 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

    2003-01-06

    When nitrates and prussic acid accumulate in forage, the feed may not be safe for livestock consumption. Learn the symptoms of nitrate and prussic acid poisoning and which plants are most likely to pose a risk to livestock. Also learn sampling...

  7. Nanoparticles modified with multiple organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cook, Ronald Lee (Lakewood, CO); Luebben, Silvia DeVito (Golden, CO); Myers, Andrew William (Arvada, CO); Smith, Bryan Matthew (Boulder, CO); Elliott, Brian John (Superior, CO); Kreutzer, Cory (Brighton, CO); Wilson, Carolina (Arvada, CO); Meiser, Manfred (Aurora, CO)

    2007-07-17

    Surface-modified nanoparticles of boehmite, and methods for preparing the same. Aluminum oxyhydroxide nanoparticles are surface modified by reaction with selected amounts of organic acids. In particular, the nanoparticle surface is modified by reactions with two or more different carboxylic acids, at least one of which is an organic carboxylic acid. The product is a surface modified boehmite nanoparticle that has an inorganic aluminum oxyhydroxide core, or part aluminum oxyhydroxide core and a surface-bonded organic shell. Organic carboxylic acids of this invention contain at least one carboxylic acid group and one carbon-hydrogen bond. One embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that have been surface modified with two or more acids one of which additional carries at least one reactive functional group. Another embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that have been surface modified with multiple acids one of which has molecular weight or average molecular weight greater than or equal to 500 Daltons. Yet, another embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that are surface modified with two or more acids one of which is hydrophobic in nature and has solubility in water of less than 15 by weight. The products of the methods of this invention have specific useful properties when used in mixture with liquids, as filler in solids, or as stand-alone entities.

  8. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, M.M.; Shoup, T.

    1998-10-06

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is [{sup 18}F]-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an {alpha}-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of {alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid.

  9. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, M.M.; Shoup, T.

    1998-09-15

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is [{sup 18}F]-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an {alpha}-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of {alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid.

  10. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Mark M. (Atlanta, GA); Shoup, Timothy (Decatur, GA)

    1998-09-15

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is ›.sup.18 F!-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an .alpha.-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of .alpha.-aminoisobutyric acid.

  11. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Mark M. (Atlanta, GA); Shoup, Timothy (Decatur, GA)

    1998-10-06

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is ›.sup.18 F!-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an .alpha.-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of .alpha.-aminoisobutyric acid.

  12. Organic Acid Production by Filamentous Fungi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    12 Organic Acid Production by Filamentous Fungi Jon K. Magnuson and Linda L. Lasure 1. Introduction Many of the commercial production processes for organic acids are excellent examples of fungal overshadowed by the successful deploy- ment of the -lactam processes.Yet, in terms of productivity, fungal

  13. Morphology control of open-framework zinc phosphate Zn{sub 4}(H{sub 3}O)(NH{sub 4}){sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4} via microwave-assisted technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Ling; Song, Yu; Yang, Wei; Xue, Run-Miao; Zhai, Shang-Ru; An, Qing-Da

    2013-08-15

    Open-framework zinc phosphates were synthesized by microwave-assisted technique, and it was shown that the morphology of as-prepared materials could be easily tailored by changing synthesis temperature, reaction time and pH value. During the synthesis, when the reaction temperature increases from 130 °C to 220 °C, the products transformed from hexagonal prisms to polyhedron along with the disappearance of the hexagonal prisms vertical plane. Simultaneously, both the reaction time and pH value could promote the nucleation and growth of crystal particles. More interestingly, the target products with different morphologies could be obtained by varying the usage of NaOH or NH{sub 3}·H{sub 2}O at 130 °C during the microwave synthesis process. - Graphical abstract: Zinc phosphates with variable morphologies can be obtained by simply tuning the microwave-heating temperatures. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Synthesis of open-framework Zn{sub 4} (H{sub 3}O) (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4} compounds employing microwave technique. • Dependence of morphology on the reaction conditions. • Morphology transformation from hexagonal prisms to polyhedron was observed.

  14. Spatiotemporal distribution of NOx storage and impact on NH3 and N2O selectivities during lean/rich cycling of a Ba-based lean NOx trap catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Jae-Soon [ORNL; Partridge Jr, William P [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL; Kim, Miyoung [ORNL; Koci, Petr [Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague, Czech Republic; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    We summarize results from an investigation of the spatiotemporal distribution of NO{sub x} storage and intermediate gas species in determining the performance of a fully formulated, Ba-based, lean NO{sub x} trap catalyst under lean/rich cycling conditions. By experimentally resolving spatiotemporal profiles of gas composition, we found that stored NO{sub x} was significantly redistributed along the monolith axis during the rich phase of the cycle by release and subsequent downstream re-adsorption. Sulfur poisoning of upstream NO{sub x} storage sites caused the active NO{sub x}-storage zone to be displaced downstream. This axial displacement in turn influenced rich-phase NO{sub x} release and re-adsorption. As sulfur poisoning increased, NH3 slip at the catalyst exit also increased due to its formation closer to the catalyst outlet and decreased exposure to downstream oxidation by surface oxygen. N{sub 2}O formation was found to be associated with nitrate reduction rather than oxidation of NH3 by stored oxygen. We propose that the observed evolution of N{sub 2}O selectivity with sulfation can be explained by changes in the spatiotemporal distribution of NO{sub x} storage resulting in either increased or decreased number of precious-metal sites surrounded by nitrates.

  15. Sandstone Acidizing Using Chelating Agents and their Interaction with Clays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Noble Thekkemelathethil 1987-

    2013-01-09

    in the application of acidizing, coreflood tests were performed on Berea and Bandera sandstone cores. Another disadvantage of mud acid has been the fast spending at clay mineral surfaces leading to depletion of acid strength, migration of fines, and formation...

  16. Experimental Study of Acid Fracture Conductivity of Austin Chalk Formation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nino Penaloza, Andrea

    2013-05-01

    Acid fracture conductivity and the effect of key variables in the etching process during acid fracturing can be assessed at the laboratory scale. This is accomplished by using an experimental apparatus that simulates acid injection fluxes comparable...

  17. Experimental High Velocity Acid Jetting in Limestone Carbonates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Christopher

    2014-04-30

    Acid jetting is a well stimulation technique that is used in carbonate reservoirs. It typically involves injecting acid down hole at high flow rates through small orifices which cause high velocities of acid to strike the borehole wall...

  18. Studies of metaphosphate acids and metaphosphate anhydrides in aprotic media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakarawet, Khetpakorn

    2015-01-01

    The chemistry of metaphosphate acids has historically been studied in aqueous media, where acid-catalyzed hydrolysis and solvent leveling effects of these strong acids have prevented their observations and rigorous ...

  19. Production of Succinic Acid for Lignocellulosic Hydrolysates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davison, B.H.; Nghiem, J.

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) is to add and test new metabolic activities to existing microbial catalysts for the production of succinic acid from renewables. In particular, they seek to add to the existing organism the ability to utilize xylose efficiently and simultaneously with glucose in mixtures of sugars or to add succinic acid production to another strain and to test the value of this new capability for production of succinic acid from industrial lignocellulosic hydrolyasates. The Contractors and Participant are hereinafter jointly referred to as the 'Parties'. Research to date in succinic acid fermentation, separation and genetic engineering has resulted in a potentially economical process based on the use of an Escherichia coli strain AFP111 with suitable characteristics for the production of succinic acid from glucose. Economic analysis has shown that higher value commodity chemicals can be economically produced from succinic acid based on repliminary laboratory findings and predicted catalytic parameters. The initial target markets include succinic acid itself, succinate salts, esters and other derivatives for use as deicers, solvents and acidulants. The other commodity products from the succinic acid platform include 1,4-butanediol, {gamma}-butyrolactone, 2-pyrrolidinone and N-methyl pyrrolidinone. Current economic analyses indicate that this platform is competitive with existing petrochemical routes, especially for the succinic acid and derivatives. The report presents the planned CRADA objectives followed by the results. The results section has a combined biocatalysis and fermentation section and a commercialization section. This is a nonproprietary report; additional proprietary information may be made available subject to acceptance of the appropriate proprietary information agreements.

  20. Quantifying wet scavenging processes in aircraft observations of nitric acid and cloud condensation nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Paul

    -product of combustion, is highly soluble and removed efficiently from clouds by rain. Regional carbon monoxide (CO, reactive nitrogen, a trace by-product of fossil-fuel combustion, plays a central role in much

  1. Chip-based sequencing nucleic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2014-08-26

    A system for fast DNA sequencing by amplification of genetic material within microreactors, denaturing, demulsifying, and then sequencing the material, while retaining it in a PCR/sequencing zone by a magnetic field. One embodiment includes sequencing nucleic acids on a microchip that includes a microchannel flow channel in the microchip. The nucleic acids are isolated and hybridized to magnetic nanoparticles or to magnetic polystyrene-coated beads. Microreactor droplets are formed in the microchannel flow channel. The microreactor droplets containing the nucleic acids and the magnetic nanoparticles are retained in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel and sequenced.

  2. Phenolic acid esterases, coding sequences and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blum, David L. (San Diego, CA); Kataeva, Irina (Athens, GA); Li, Xin-Liang (Athens, GA); Ljungdahl, Lars G. (Athens, GA)

    2002-01-01

    Described herein are four phenolic acid esterases, three of which correspond to domains of previously unknown function within bacterial xylanases, from XynY and XynZ of Clostridium thermocellum and from a xylanase of Ruminococcus. The fourth specifically exemplified xylanase is a protein encoded within the genome of Orpinomyces PC-2. The amino acids of these polypeptides and nucleotide sequences encoding them are provided. Recombinant host cells, expression vectors and methods for the recombinant production of phenolic acid esterases are also provided.

  3. HLB Progress on Tahiti acid lime grafted onto eight rootstocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuchi, E. S.; Reiff, E. T.; Sempionato, O. R.; Parolin, L. G.; Bassanezi, R. B.

    2014-01-01

    Progress on Tahiti acid lime grafted onto eight rootstocksthe main Tahiti (Persian) lime producer in Brazil with 65%the performance of Tahiti acid lime grafted onto eight

  4. High Temperature Fuel Cell (Phosphoric Acid) Manufacturing R...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Temperature Fuel Cell (Phosphoric Acid) Manufacturing R&D More Documents & Publications Molten Carbonate and Phosphoric Acid Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview and Gap Analysis 2011...

  5. Microbial engineering for the production of fatty acids and fatty...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Microbial engineering for the production of fatty acids and fatty acid derivatives Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microbial engineering for the production of fatty...

  6. Molten Carbonate and Phosphoric Acid Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) and phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) stationary fuel cell power plants. Molten Carbonate and Phosphoric Acid Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview...

  7. Guidance Document SafeHandlingofHydrofluoricAcid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -sleeved, buttoned lab coat, long pants and closed-toe shoes. Other PPE may be required, such as face shield, foot hydrofluoric acid in containers made of polyethylene, polypropylene, Teflon, lead or platinum. Do not use

  8. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Alexandratos, Spiro D. (Knoxville, TN); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Naperville, IL); Chiarizia, Ronato (Oak Park, IL)

    1994-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene disphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  9. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1996-07-23

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  10. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Alexandratos, Spiro D. (Knoxville, TN); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Naperville, IL); Chiarizia, Ronato (Oak Park, IL)

    1996-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  11. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1994-01-25

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 9 figures.

  12. 3D characterization of acidized fracture surfaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malagon Nieto, Camilo

    2007-09-17

    generated by the profilometer identified hydrodynamic channels that could not be identified by the naked eye in acidized surfaces. The plots clarified the existence of rock heterogeneities and revealed how the processes of dissolution function in chalk rock...

  13. Replica amplification of nucleic acid arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Church, George M. (Brookline, MA); Mitra, Robi D. (Chestnut Hill, MA)

    2010-08-31

    Disclosed are improved methods of making and using immobilized arrays of nucleic acids, particularly methods for producing replicas of such arrays. Included are methods for producing high density arrays of nucleic acids and replicas of such arrays, as well as methods for preserving the resolution of arrays through rounds of replication. Also included are methods which take advantage of the availability of replicas of arrays for increased sensitivity in detection of sequences on arrays. Improved methods of sequencing nucleic acids immobilized on arrays utilizing single copies of arrays and methods taking further advantage of the availability of replicas of arrays are disclosed. The improvements lead to higher fidelity and longer read lengths of sequences immobilized on arrays. Methods are also disclosed which improve the efficiency of multiplex PCR using arrays of immobilized nucleic acids.

  14. A Direct, Biomass-Based Synthesis of Benzoic Acid: Formic Acid-Mediated Deoxygenation of the Glucose-Derived Materials Quinic Acid and Shikimic Acid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    R.G.B and J.A.E. ). Keywords: biomass · carboxylic acids ·10.1002/cssc.201000111 A Direct, Biomass-Based Synthesis ofaro- matic compounds from biomass resources could provide a

  15. Primer on lead-acid storage batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    This handbook was developed to help DOE facility contractors prevent accidents caused during operation and maintenance of lead-acid storage batteries. Major types of lead-acid storage batteries are discussed as well as their operation, application, selection, maintenance, and disposal (storage, transportation, as well). Safety hazards and precautions are discussed in the section on battery maintenance. References to industry standards are included for selection, maintenance, and disposal.

  16. Amplification of trace amounts of nucleic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Church, George M. (Brookline, MA); Zhang, Kun (Brighton, MA)

    2008-06-17

    Methods of reducing background during amplification of small amounts of nucleic acids employ careful analysis of sources of low level contamination. Ultraviolet light can be used to reduce nucleic acid contaminants in reagents and equipment. "Primer-dimer" background can be reduced by judicious design of primers. We have shown clean signal-to-noise with as little as starting material as one single human cell (.about.6 picogram), E. coli cell (.about.5 femtogram) or Prochlorococcus cell (.about.3 femtogram).

  17. Genetically encoded fluorescent coumarin amino acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Jiangyun (San Diego, CA); Xie, Jianming (San Diego, CA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA)

    2012-06-05

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that can incorporate the coumarin unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal synthetases, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing proteins containing the unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine and related translation systems.

  18. Genetically encoded fluorescent coumarin amino acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Jiangyun (San Diego, CA); Xie, Jianming (San Diego, CA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA)

    2010-10-05

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that can incorporate the coumarin unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl) ethylglycine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal synthetases, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing proteins containing the unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine and related translation systems.

  19. NO reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perry, R.A.

    1996-05-21

    A method of reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with an amount of HNCO at a temperature effective for heat-induced decomposition of cyanuric acid, said amount and temperature being effective for the resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream, said cyanuric acid being particulate and having a particle size of less than 90 {micro}m. 1 fig.

  20. Biologically produced acid precipitable polymeric lignin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, Don L. (Moscow, ID); Pometto, III, Anthony L. (Moscow, ID)

    1984-01-01

    A water soluble, acid precipitable polymeric degraded lignin (APPL), having a molecular weight of at least 12,000 daltons, and comprising, by percentage of total weight, at least three times the number of phenolic hydroxyl groups and carboxylic acid groups present in native lignin. The APPL may be modified by chemical oxidation and reduction to increase its phenolic hydroxyl content and reduce the number of its antioxidant inhibitory side chains, thereby improving antioxidant properties.

  1. Heterogeneous organic acid uptake on soot surfaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levitt, Nicholas Paul

    2009-05-15

    several monocarboxylic and dicarboxylic acids and soots formed by combustion of methane, propane, and kerosene. Soot was deposited by either alowing the flame to come into contact with the deposition surface (activated) similar to industrial channel... Function of Injector Distance........ 25 7 Comparison of Uptake Coeficients as a Function of Exposure Number for Steric Acid Uptake on Diferent Amounts of Activated Propane Soot.......................... 29 8 IR Spectra of Propane Soot Deposited...

  2. Acetic Acid (H3COOH): GaAs; Pb; Ti Hydrochloric Acid (HCl): Al; Cr; Cu; Fe2O3; Ga; GaAs; GaN; In; Fe; Pb; Ni; NiO, Ni2O3; Sn;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garmestani, Hamid

    ferrocyanide (s) KMnO4 : potassium permanganate (s) FeCl3 : ferric chloride (s) NH4SO5 : ammonium persulfate (s

  3. High external quantum efficiency and fill-factor InGaN/GaN heterojunction solar cells grown by NH3-based molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lang, J. R.; Neufeld, C. J.; Hurni, C. A.; Cruz, S. C.; Matioli, E.; Mishra, U. K.; Speck, J. S.

    2011-04-01

    High external quantum efficiency (EQE) p-i-n heterojunction solar cellsgrown by NH3 -based molecular beam epitaxy are presented. EQE values including optical losses are greater than 50% with fill-factors over 72% when illuminated with a 1 sun AM0 spectrum. Optical absorptionmeasurements in conjunction with EQE measurements indicate an internal quantum efficiency greater than 90% for the InGaN absorbing layer. By adjusting the thickness of the top p-type GaN window contact layer, it is shown that the short-wavelength (<365 nm) quantum efficiency is limited by the minority carrier diffusion length in highly Mg-doped p-GaN.

  4. Hydrogen storage in a combined M.sub.xAlH.sub.6/M'.sub.y(NH.sub.2).sub.z system and methods of making and using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Jun (Salt Lake City, UT); Fang, Zhigang Zak (Salt Lake City, UT); Sohn, Hong Yong (Salt Lake City, UT)

    2012-04-03

    As a promising clean fuel for vehicles, hydrogen can be used for propulsion, either directly or in fuel cells. Hydrogen storage compositions having high storage capacity, good dehydrogenation kinetics, and hydrogen release and uptake reactions which are reversible are disclosed and described. Generally a hydrogen storage composition of a metal aluminum hexahydride and a metal amide can be used. A combined system (Li.sub.3AIH.sub.6/3LiNH.sub.2) with a very high inherent hydrogen capacity (7.3 wt %) can be carried out at moderate temperatures, and with approximately 95% of that inherent hydrogen storage capacity (7.0%) is reversible over repeated cycling of release and uptake.

  5. Energy densification of biomass-derived organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheeler, M. Clayton; van Walsum, G. Peter; Schwartz, Thomas J.; van Heiningen, Adriaan

    2013-01-29

    A process for upgrading an organic acid includes neutralizing the organic acid to form a salt and thermally decomposing the resulting salt to form an energy densified product. In certain embodiments, the organic acid is levulinic acid. The process may further include upgrading the energy densified product by conversion to alcohol and subsequent dehydration.

  6. Transcription factor-based biosensors for detecting dicarboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dietrich, Jeffrey; Keasling, Jay

    2014-02-18

    The invention provides methods and compositions for detecting dicarboxylic acids using a transcription factor biosensor.

  7. Purification Or Organic Acids Using Anion Exchange Chromatography.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ponnampalam; Elankovan (Okemos, MI)

    2001-09-04

    Disclosed is a cost-effective method for purifying and acidifying carboxylic acids, including organic acids and amino acids. The method involves removing impurities by allowing the anionic form of the carboxylic acid to bind to an anion exchange column and washing the column. The carboxylic anion is displaced as carboxylic acid by washing the resin with a strong inorganic anion. This method is effective in removing organic carboxylic acids and amino acids from a variety of industrial sources, including fermentation broths, hydrolysates, and waste streams.

  8. Addendum to Guarantee Testing Results from the Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project: Additiona NH3, NOx, and CO Testing Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel P. Connell; James E. Locke

    2008-03-01

    On March 28-30 and May 1-4, 2007, CONSOL Energy Inc. Research & Development (CONSOL R&D) performed flue gas sampling at AES Greenidge to verify the performance of the multi-pollutant control system recently installed by Babcock Power Environmental Inc. (BPEI) on the 107-MW Unit 4 (Boiler 6). The multi-pollutant control system includes combustion modifications and a hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR)/in-duct selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, followed by a Turbosorp{reg_sign} circulating fluidized bed dry scrubber system and baghouse to reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HCl, HF, and particulate matter. Mercury removal is provided via the co-benefits afforded by the in-duct SCR, dry scrubber, and baghouse and by injection of activated carbon upstream of the scrubber, as required. The testing in March and May demonstrated that the multi-pollutant control system attained its performance targets for NO{sub x} emissions, SO{sub 2} removal efficiency, acid gas (SO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF) removal efficiency, and mercury removal efficiency. However, the ammonia slip measured between the SCR outlet and air heater inlet was consistently greater than the guarantee of 2 ppmvd {at} 3% O{sub 2}. As a result, additional testing was performed on May 30-June 1 and on June 20-21, 2007, in conjunction with tuning of the hybrid NO{sub x} control system by BPEI, in an effort to achieve the performance target for ammonia slip. This additional testing occurred after the installation of a large particle ash (LPA) screen and removal system just above the SCR reactor and a fresh SCR catalyst layer in mid-May. This report describes the results of the additional tests. During the May 30-June 1 sampling period, CONSOL R&D and Clean Air Engineering (CAE) each measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the air heater inlet, downstream of the in-duct SCR reactor. In addition, CONSOL R&D measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the economizer outlet, upstream of the SCR reactor, and CAE measured flue gas NO{sub x} and CO concentrations at the sampling grids located at the inlet and outlet of the SCR reactor. During the June 20-21 sampling period, CONSOL R&D measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the air heater inlet. All ammonia measurements were performed using a modified version of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Conditional Test Method (CTM) 027. The NO{sub x} and CO measurements were performed using U.S. EPA Methods 7E and 10, respectively.

  9. Evaluation of acid fracturing based on the "acid fracture number" concept 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alghamdi, Abdulwahab

    2006-08-16

    Acid fracturing is one of the preferred methods to stimulate wells in carbonate reservoirs. It consists of injecting an acid solution at high enough pressure to break down the formation and to propagate a two-wing crack away from the wellbore...

  10. System for agitating the acid in a lead-acid battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weintraub, Alvin (Schenectady, NY); MacCormack, Robert S. (Glenville, NY)

    1987-01-01

    A system and method for agitating the acid in a large lead-sulfuric acid storage battery of the calcium type. An air-lift is utilized to provide the agitation. The air fed to the air-lift is humidified prior to being delivered to the air-lift.

  11. Asthmatic responses to airborne acid aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostro, B.D.; Lipsett, M.J.; Wiener, M.B.; Selner, J.C. )

    1991-06-01

    Controlled exposure studies suggest that asthmatics may be more sensitive to the respiratory effects of acidic aerosols than individuals without asthma. This study investigates whether acidic aerosols and other air pollutants are associated with respiratory symptoms in free-living asthmatics. Daily concentrations of hydrogen ion (H+), nitric acid, fine particulates, sulfates and nitrates were obtained during an intensive air monitoring effort in Denver, Colorado, in the winter of 1987-88. A panel of 207 asthmatics recorded respiratory symptoms, frequency of medication use, and related information in daily diaries. We used a multiple regression time-series model to analyze which air pollutants, if any, were associated with health outcomes reported by study participants. Airborne H+ was found to be significantly associated with several indicators of asthma status, including moderate or severe cough and shortness of breath. Cough was also associated with fine particulates, and shortness of breath with sulfates. Incorporating the participants' time spent outside and exercise intensity into the daily measure of exposure strengthened the association between these pollutants and asthmatic symptoms. Nitric acid and nitrates were not significantly associated with any respiratory symptom analyzed. In this population of asthmatics, several outdoor air pollutants, particularly airborne acidity, were associated with daily respiratory symptoms.

  12. Sulfuric acid-sulfur heat storage cycle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norman, John H. (LaJolla, CA)

    1983-12-20

    A method of storing heat is provided utilizing a chemical cycle which interconverts sulfuric acid and sulfur. The method can be used to levelize the energy obtained from intermittent heat sources, such as solar collectors. Dilute sulfuric acid is concentrated by evaporation of water, and the concentrated sulfuric acid is boiled and decomposed using intense heat from the heat source, forming sulfur dioxide and oxygen. The sulfur dioxide is reacted with water in a disproportionation reaction yielding dilute sulfuric acid, which is recycled, and elemental sulfur. The sulfur has substantial potential chemical energy and represents the storage of a significant portion of the energy obtained from the heat source. The sulfur is burned whenever required to release the stored energy. A particularly advantageous use of the heat storage method is in conjunction with a solar-powered facility which uses the Bunsen reaction in a water-splitting process. The energy storage method is used to levelize the availability of solar energy while some of the sulfur dioxide produced in the heat storage reactions is converted to sulfuric acid in the Bunsen reaction.

  13. IMPROVED PROCESSES TO REMOVE NAPHTHENIC ACIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; William A. Goddard; Yongchun Tang

    2004-04-28

    In the first year of this project, we have established our experimental and theoretical methodologies for studies of the catalytic decarboxylation process. We have developed both glass and stainless steel micro batch type reactors for the fast screening of various catalysts with reaction substrates of model carboxylic acid compounds and crude oil samples. We also developed novel product analysis methods such as GC analyses for organic acids and gaseous products; and TAN measurements for crude oil. Our research revealed the effectiveness of several solid catalysts such as NA-Cat-1 and NA-Cat-2 for the catalytic decarboxylation of model compounds; and NA-Cat-5{approx}NA-Cat-9 for the acid removal from crude oil. Our theoretical calculations propose a three-step concerted oxidative decarboxylation mechanism for the NA-Cat-1 catalyst.

  14. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.

    1996-10-08

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer is described made from monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4-oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2 by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  15. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonsignore, Patrick V. (Joliet, IL); Coleman, Robert D. (Wheaton, IL)

    1996-01-01

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4-oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2 by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  16. Photoenhanced anaerobic digestion of organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weaver, Paul F. (Golden, CO)

    1990-01-01

    A process is described for rapid conversion of organic acids and alcohols anaerobic digesters into hydrogen and carbon dioxide, the optimal precursor substrates for production of methane. The process includes addition of photosynthetic bacteria to the digester and exposure of the bacteria to radiant energy (e.g., solar energy). The process also increases the pH stability of the digester to prevent failure of the digester. Preferred substrates for photosynthetic bacteria are the organic acid and alcohol waste products of fermentative bacteria. In mixed culture with methanogenic bacteria or in defined co-culture with non-aceticlastic methanogenic bacteria, photosynthetic bacteria are capable of facilitating the conversion or organic acids and alcohols into methane with low levels of light energy input.

  17. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonsignore, Patrick V. (Joliet, IL); Coleman, Robert D. (Wheaton, IL)

    1994-01-01

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene and polyethylene glycols, propylene and polypropylene glycols, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4 -oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  18. Adsorption of fulvic acid on goethite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filius, J.D.; Lumsdon, D.G.; Meeussen, J.C.L.; Hiemstra, T.; Riemsduk, W.H. van

    2000-01-01

    The adsorption of fulvic acid by goethite was determined experimentally as a function of concentration, pH, and ionic strength. The data were described with the CD-MUSIC model of Hiemstra and Van Riemsdijk (1996), which allows the distribution of charge of the bound fulvate molecule over a surface region. Simultaneously, the concentration, pH, and salt dependency of the binding of fulvic acid can be described. Using the same parameters, the basic charging behavior of the goethite in the absence of fulvic acid could be described well. The surface species used in the model indicate that inner sphere coordination of carboxylic groups of the fulvate molecule is important at low pH, whereas at high pH the outer sphere coordination with reactive groups of the fulvate molecule with high proton affinity is important.

  19. Acid/Base Recovery From Sodium Sulfate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niksa, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    at the cathode: Overall: Na,SO. + 2H 4 0 ~ H 2 S0 4 + 2NaOH Anode: H 2 0 ~ 0, + H' + 4e' Cathode: 4H,O + 4e-~ 2H,O + 40f1 The ELTECH "electrolytic" process differs from an "electrodialytic" process in that there is an anode and cathode set for each cell...Re TANK TAN" BASE TO PRODUCT STORAGE FIGURE 6b Three Compartment cell H2O BeL NA2S04 NA2COJ~ NAOH RECTifiER DJ WATER BRINE H?ATER:--O- , , I CATHODE HYDROGEN D BRINE FILTERS ACID TO PRODUCT STORAGE ~JJ 1-------""'B---1 ACID ACID D...

  20. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.

    1994-11-01

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer were selected from the class consisting of ethylene and polyethylene glycols, propylene and polypropylene glycols, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4 -oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide where the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  1. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.

    1990-06-26

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene and polyethylane glycols (PVB 6/22/90), propylene and and polypropylene (PVB 6/22/90) glycols, P-dioxanone, 1, 5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4 -oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  2. Acid mine water aeration and treatment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackman, Terry E. (Finleyville, PA); Place, John M. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1987-01-01

    An in-line system is provided for treating acid mine drainage which basically comprises the combination of a jet pump (or pumps) and a static mixer. The jet pump entrains air into the acid waste water using a Venturi effect so as to provide aeration of the waste water while further aeration is provided by the helical vanes of the static mixer. A neutralizing agent is injected into the suction chamber of the jet pump and the static mixer is formed by plural sections offset by 90 degrees.

  3. Formic acid fuel cells and catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Masel, Richard I.; Larsen, Robert; Ha, Su Yun

    2010-06-22

    An exemplary fuel cell of the invention includes a formic acid fuel solution in communication with an anode (12, 134), an oxidizer in communication with a cathode (16, 135) electrically linked to the anode, and an anode catalyst that includes Pd. An exemplary formic acid fuel cell membrane electrode assembly (130) includes a proton-conducting membrane (131) having opposing first (132) and second surfaces (133), a cathode catalyst on the second membrane surface, and an anode catalyst including Pd on the first surface.

  4. Effect of Conjugated Linoleic Acid or Oleic Acid Addition on Fatty Acid Composition Profiles of Poultry Meat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Dae Keun

    2011-08-08

    and fish oil diet had a lower C20:4 (arachidonic acid, AA, n-6) deposition but showed a higher n-3/n-6 ratio in breast and thigh meat than those fed a flaxseed oil diet and CLA and flaxseed oil diet (P < 0.05). The C20:4 and n-3/n-6 ratio of breast...

  5. A method to attenuate U(VI) mobility in acidic waste plumes using humic acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, J.; Dong, W.; Tokunaga, T.K.

    2011-02-01

    Acidic uranium (U) contaminated plumes have resulted from acid-extraction of plutonium during the Cold War and from U mining and milling operations. A sustainable method for in-situ immobilization of U under acidic conditions is not yet available. Here, we propose to use humic acids (HAs) for in-situ U immobilization in acidic waste plumes. Our laboratory batch experiments show that HA can adsorb onto aquifer sediments rapidly, strongly and practically irreversibly. Adding HA greatly enhanced U adsorption capacity to sediments at pH below 5.0. Our column experiments using historically contaminated sediments from the Savannah River Site under slow flow rates (120 and 12 m/y) show that desorption of U and HA were non-detectable over 100 pore-volumes of leaching with simulated acidic groundwaters. Upon HA-treatment, 99% of the contaminant [U] was immobilized at pH < 4.5, compared to 5% and 58% immobilized in the control columns at pH 3.5 and 4.5, respectively. These results demonstrated that HA-treatment is a promising in-situ remediation method for acidic U waste plumes. As a remediation reagent, HAs are resistant to biodegradation, cost effective, nontoxic, and easily introducible to the subsurface.

  6. New Methods for the Synthesis of alpha-Amino Acid Derivatives From N-tert-Butanesulfinyl Imines AND The Synthesis and Application of Novel Amino Acid Based N-tert-Butanesulfinyl Amide Organocatalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbage, Melissa Ann

    2009-01-01

    products were obtained in ? 98:2 dr. This chemistry will be1.27c 1.27b S S O method A: R = Me; 90%, 98:2 dr method B:R = Et; 65%, 98:2 dr O S method B: 73%, 95:5 dr O NH S NH

  7. Cell Metabolism Fatty Acid Flippase Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chou, James

    Cell Metabolism Article Fatty Acid Flippase Activity of UCP2 Is Essential for Its Proton Transport and pathological cell growth and differentiation. Mitochondria stores energy as a pro- ton gradient across their inner membrane. Uncou- pling proteins (UCPs) can dissipate the gradient to produce heat or regulate

  8. Method for the production of dicarboxylic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nghiem, Nhuan Phu (Knoxville, TN); Donnelly, Mark (Warrenville, IL); Millard, Cynthia S. (Plainfield, IL); Stols, Lucy (Woodridge, IL)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an economical fermentation method for the production of carboxylic acids comprising the steps of a) inoculating a medium having a carbon source with a carboxylic acid-producing organism; b) incubating the carboxylic acid-producing organism in an aerobic atmosphere to promote rapid growth of the organism thereby increasing the biomass of the organism; c) controllably releasing oxygen to maintain the aerobic atmosphere; d) controllably feeding the organism having increased biomass with a solution containing the carbon source to maintain the concentration of the carbon source within the medium of about 0.5 g/L up to about 1 g/L; e) depriving the aerobic atmosphere of oxygen to produce an anaerobic atmosphere to cause the organism to undergo anaerobic metabolism; f) controllably feeding the organism having increased biomass a solution containing the carbon source to maintain the concentration of the carbon source within the medium of .gtoreq.1 g/L; and g) converting the carbon source to carboxylic acids using the anaerobic metabolism of the organism.

  9. Method for the production of dicarboxylic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nghiem, N.P.; Donnelly, M.; Millard, C.S.; Stols, L.

    1999-02-09

    The present invention is an economical fermentation method for the production of carboxylic acids comprising the steps of (a) inoculating a medium having a carbon source with a carboxylic acid-producing organism; (b) incubating the carboxylic acid-producing organism in an aerobic atmosphere to promote rapid growth of the organism thereby increasing the biomass of the organism; (c) controllably releasing oxygen to maintain the aerobic atmosphere; (d) controllably feeding the organism having increased biomass with a solution containing the carbon source to maintain the concentration of the carbon source within the medium of about 0.5 g/l up to about 1 g/l; (e) depriving the aerobic atmosphere of oxygen to produce an anaerobic atmosphere to cause the organism to undergo anaerobic metabolism; (f) controllably feeding the organism having increased biomass a solution containing the carbon source to maintain the concentration of the carbon source within the medium of {>=}1 g/l; and (g) converting the carbon source to carboxylic acids using the anaerobic metabolism of the organism. 7 figs.

  10. Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; Kangshi Wang; Yongchun Tang; William A. Goddard

    2005-12-09

    In the past three years, we followed the work plan as we suggested in the proposal and made every efforts to fulfill the project objectives. Based on our large amount of creative and productive work, including both of experimental and theoretic aspects, we received important technical breakthrough on naphthenic acid removal process and obtained deep insight on catalytic decarboxylation chemistry. In detail, we established an integrated methodology to serve for all of the experimental and theoretical work. Our experimental investigation results in discovery of four type effective catalysts to the reaction of decarboxylation of model carboxylic acid compounds. The adsorption experiment revealed the effectiveness of several solid materials to naphthenic acid adsorption and acidity reduction of crude oil, which can be either natural minerals or synthesized materials. The test with crude oil also received promising results, which can be potentially developed into a practical process for oil industry. The theoretical work predicted several possible catalytic decarboxylation mechanisms that would govern the decarboxylation pathways depending on the type of catalysts being used. The calculation for reaction activation energy was in good agreement with our experimental measurements.

  11. Persistent Ion Pairing in Aqueous Hydrochloric Acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, Marcel D.; Fulton, John L.; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Schenter, Gregory K.; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2014-07-03

    For strong acids, like hydrochloric acid, the complete dissociation into an excess proton and conjugated base as well as the formation of independent solvated charged fragments is assumed. The existence of a chloride-Hyronium (Cl-H3O+) contact ion pairs even in moderate concentration hydrochloric acid (2.5 m) demonstrates that the counter ions do not behave merely as spectators. Through the use of modern extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements in conjunction with state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) simulations, we are able to obtain an unprecedented view into the molecular structure of medium to high concentrated electrolytes. Here we report that the Cl-H3O+ contact ion pair structure persists throughout the entire concentration range studied and that these structures differ significantly from moieties studied in micro-solvated hydrochloric acid clusters. Characterizing distinct populations of these ion pairs gives rise to a novel molecular level description of how to think about the activity of the proton that impacts our picture of the pH scale. Funding for CJM, GKS, and JLF was provided by DOE Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Science, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. Funding for MDB was provided throught the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. MB was funded through Argonne National Laboratory.

  12. Producing a trimethylpentanoic acid using hybrid polyketide synthases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Keasling, Jay D

    2014-10-07

    The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing trimethylpentanoic acid. The present invention also provides for a host cell comprising the PKS and when cultured produces the trimethylpentanoic acid. The present invention also provides for a method of producing the trimethylpentanoic acid, comprising: providing a host cell of the present invention, and culturing said host cell in a suitable culture medium such that the trimethylpentanoic acid is produced, optionally isolating the trimethylpentanoic acid, and optionally, reducing the isolated trimethylpentanoic acid into a trimethylpentanol or an iso-octane.

  13. Further Investigation of Fluoboric Acid in Sandstone Acidizing Using ^(11)B and ^(19)F NMR 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pituckchon, Arpajit

    2014-05-01

    spending, owing to its slow hydrolytic reaction to produce HF, as well as the stabilization and desensitization of undissolved fines with borosilicate. A more comprehensive understanding of how the chemistry of fluoboric acid and its reaction products...

  14. Modeling Acid Transport and Non-Uniform Etching in a Stochastic Domain in Acid Fracturing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mou, Jianye

    2010-10-12

    Success of acid fracturing depends on uneven etching along the fracture surfaces caused by heterogeneities such as variations in local mineralogy and variations in leakoff behavior. The heterogeneities tend to create channeling characteristics...

  15. A method to attenuate U(VI) mobility in acidic waste plumes using humic acids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, J.

    2011-01-01

    uranium (U) contamination in groundwaters have resulted from mining,uranium (U) contaminated plumes have resulted from acid-extraction of plutonium during the Cold War and from U mining

  16. Synthesis of amino acid derivatives of indole-3-acetic acid Ying Liu*, Liang Zhao, Liang Liu, Lin-Yi Wei and Lu-Hua Lai*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luhua, Lai

    Synthesis of amino acid derivatives of indole-3-acetic acid Ying Liu*, Liang Zhao, Liang Liu, Lin, Beijing, 100871, China Amino acid derivatives of a modified indole-3-acetic acid have been synthesised on the IR, 1H NMR, MS spectra. Keywords: indole-3-acetic acid, amino acid, dipeptide-like compound Indole-3

  17. Succinic Acid Production with Reduced By-Product Formation in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -product acetic acid. The gram ratio of suc- cinic acid to acetic acid was 25.8:1, which is 6.5 times higher than ratio of succinic acid to acetic acid and succinic acid yield de- creased, suggesting that glucose enhanced acetic acid formation irrespective of the presence of glycerol. Glyc- erol consumption by A

  18. Technological and economic potential of poly(lactic acid) and lactic acid derivatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Datta, R.; Tsai, S.P.; Bonsignore, P.; Moon, S.H.; Frank, J.R.

    1993-10-01

    Lactic acid has been an intermediate-volume specialty chemical (world production {approximately}40,000 tons/yr) used in a wide range of food processing and industrial applications. lactic acid h,as the potential of becoming a very large volume, commodity-chemical intermediate produced from renewable carbohydrates for use as feedstocks for biodegradable polymers, oxygenated chemicals, plant growth regulators, environmentally friendly ``green`` solvents, and specially chemical intermediates. In the past, efficient and economical technologies for the recovery and purification of lactic acid from crude fermentation broths and the conversion of tactic acid to the chemical or polymer intermediates had been the key technology impediments and main process cost centers. The development and deployment of novel separations technologies, such as electrodialysis (ED) with bipolar membranes, extractive distillations integrated with fermentation, and chemical conversion, can enable low-cost production with continuous processes in large-scale operations. The use of bipolar ED can virtually eliminate the salt or gypsum waste produced in the current lactic acid processes. In this paper, the recent technical advances in tactic and polylactic acid processes are discussed. The economic potential and manufacturing cost estimates of several products and process options are presented. The technical accomplishments at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the future directions of this program at ANL are discussed.

  19. Accurate ab initio-based adiabatic global potential energy surface for the 2{sup 2}A? state of NH{sub 2} by extrapolation to the complete basis set limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Y. Q.; Ma, F. C.; Sun, M. T.

    2013-10-21

    A full three-dimensional global potential energy surface is reported first time for the title system, which is important for the photodissociation processes. It is obtained using double many-body expansion theory and an extensive set of accurate ab initio energies extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Such a work can be recommended for dynamics studies of the N({sup 2}D) + H{sub 2} reaction, a reliable theoretical treatment of the photodissociation dynamics and as building blocks for constructing the double many-body expansion potential energy surface of larger nitrogen/hydrogen containing systems. In turn, a preliminary theoretical study of the reaction N({sup 2}D)+H{sub 2}(X{sup 1}?{sub g}{sup +})(?=0,j=0)?NH(a{sup 1}?)+H({sup 2}S) has been carried out with the method of quasi-classical trajectory on the new potential energy surface. Integral cross sections and thermal rate constants have been calculated, providing perhaps the most reliable estimate of the integral cross sections and the rate constants known thus far for such a reaction.

  20. Effective hole extraction using MoO{sub x}-Al contact in perovskite CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Yixin; Nardes, Alexandre M.; Zhu, Kai

    2014-05-26

    We report an 11.4%-efficient perovskite CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} solar cell using low-cost molybdenum oxide/aluminum (i.e., MoO{sub x}/Al) as an alternative top contact to replace noble/precious metals (e.g., Au or Ag) for extracting photogenerated holes. The device performance of perovskite solar cells using a MoO{sub x}/Al top contact is comparable to that of cells using the standard Ag top contact. Analysis of impedance spectroscopy measurements suggests that using 10-nm-thick MoO{sub x} and Al does not affect charge-recombination properties of perovskite solar cells. Using a thicker (20-nm) MoO{sub x} layer leads to a lower cell performance caused mainly by a reduced fill factor. Our results suggest that MoO{sub x}/Al is promising as a low-cost and effective hole-extraction contact for perovskite solar cells.

  1. Herschel-HIFI observations of H2O, NH3 and N2H+ toward high-mass starless and proto-stellar clumps identified by the Hi-GAL survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olmi, Luca; Codella, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Our present understanding of high-mass star formation still remains very schematic. In particular, it is not yet clear how much of the difference between low-mass and high-mass star formation occurs during the earliest star formation phases. The chemical characteristics of massive cold clumps, and the comparison with those of their low-mass counterparts, could provide crucial clues about the exact role that chemistry plays in differentiating the early phases of low-mass and high-mass star formation. Water, in particular, is a unique probe of physical and chemical conditions in star-forming regions. Using the HIFI instrument of Herschel we have observed the ortho-NH3 (1_0-0_0) (572GHz), ortho-H2O (1_10-1_01) (557GHz) and N2H+ (6-5) (559GHz) lines toward a sample of high-mass starless and proto-stellar clumps selected from the "Herschel} Infrared Galactic Plane Survey" (Hi-GAL). We compare our results to previous studies of low-mass and high-mass proto-stellar objects. At least one of the three molecular lines ...

  2. Identification of the essential and free amino acids of the freshwater shrimp, Macrobrachium ohione 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyajima, Lester Shigemi

    1975-01-01

    MATERIALS AND METHODS. Essential Amino Acid Identification Tissue Amino Acid Composition Total Protein Determination Free Amino Acid Concentration 16 16 17 RESULTS. 19 Essential Amino Acid Identification Tissue Amino Acid Composition Total Protein... Determination Free Amino Acid Concentration 19 19 23 25 DISCUSSION 27 Essential Amino Acid Identification 27 Tissue Amino Acid Composition Total Protein Determination Free Amino Acid Concentration 28 31 32 SUMMARY. LITERATURE CITED 35 37 vii...

  3. Lubrication from mixture of boric acid with oils and greases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erdemir, A.

    1995-07-11

    Lubricating compositions are disclosed including crystalline boric acid and a base lubricant selected from oils, greases and the like. The lubricity of conventional oils and greases can also be improved by adding concentrates of boric acid.

  4. Lubrication from mixture of boric acid with oils and greases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erdemir, Ali (Naperville, IL)

    1995-01-01

    Lubricating compositions including crystalline boric acid and a base lubricant selected from oils, greases and the like. The lubricity of conventional oils and greases can also be improved by adding concentrates of boric acid.

  5. The Effect of Heterogeneity on Matrix Acidizing of Carbonate Rocks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keys, Ryan S.

    2010-07-14

    In matrix acidizing, the goal is to dissolve minerals in the rock to increase well productivity. This is accomplished by injecting an application-specific solution of acid into the formation at a pressure between the pore ...

  6. Effect of exposure environment on the interactions between acid...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effect of exposure environment on the interactions between acid gas (H2S and CO2) and pozzolan-amended wellbore cement under acid gas co-sequestration conditions Citation Details...

  7. Topical vitamin-A-acid therapy for cutaneous metastatic melanoma.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, N; Meyskens, F L

    1980-01-01

    21: 236-7. 2. Bollag W, Ott F. Vitamin A acid in benign andZesch A. Penetration of vitamin A acid into human skin. Actaphosphoryl derivatives of vitamin A in biological membranes.

  8. Microbial engineering for the production of fatty acids and fatty...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for the production of fatty acids and fatty acid derivatives Some aspects of this invention relate to methods useful for the conversion of a carbon source to a biofuel or...

  9. Type B Accident Investigation of the Acid Vapor Inhalation on...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of the Acid Vapor Inhalation on June 7, 2005, in TA-48, Building RC-1 Room 402 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Type B Accident Investigation of the Acid Vapor Inhalation on...

  10. Acid Fracturing Feasibility Study for Heterogeneous Carbonate Formation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suleimenova, Assiya

    2015-03-03

    Acid fracturing is a stimulation technique that is commonly used by the industry to increase productivity or injectivity of wells in carbonate reservoirs. To determine a feasibility of acid fracturing treatment for a heterogeneous formation...

  11. The Alta Mine: A Multidisciplinary Analysis of an Acid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    i #12;The Alta Mine: A Multidisciplinary Analysis of an Acid Mine Drainage Environment LRES 442, and environmental microbiology; all disciplines highly appropriate to the study of acid mine/rock drainage

  12. Brønsted Acidity in Metal-Organic Frameworks | Center for Gas...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brnsted Acidity in Metal-Organic Frameworks Previous Next List Jiang, Juncong and Yaghi, Omar, M. Bronsted Acidity in Metal-Organic Frameworks. Chem. Rev., 115, 6966-6997 (2015)....

  13. Nucleic acid based fluorescent sensor for copper detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Yi; Liu, Juewen

    2013-04-02

    A nucleic acid enzyme responsive to copper, comprising an oligonucleotide comprising a nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO:1, wherein the nucleic acid enzyme is not self-cleaving.

  14. Production of hydroxylated fatty acids in genetically modified plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Somerville, Chris; Broun, Pierre; van de Loo, Frank; Boddupalli, Sekhar S.

    2005-08-30

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  15. Evaporative Hydrochloric Acid Recovery: Something Old, Something New... 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cullivan, B.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the new application of an old teclmology, evaporative recovery, to recover spent hydrochloric acid.

  16. Method for removing fluoride contamination from nitric acid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pruett, David J. (Knoxville, TN); Howerton, William B. (Kingston, TN)

    1982-01-01

    Fluoride ions are removed from nitric acid solution by contacting the vaporized solution with alumina or zirconium.

  17. Production of hydroxylated fatty acids in genetically modified plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Somerville, Chris (Portola Valley, CA); Broun, Pierre (Burlingame, CA); van de Loo, Frank (Weston, AU); Boddupalli, Sekhar S. (Manchester, MI)

    2011-08-23

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  18. Synthesis and Metabolism of Carbonyl-C14 Pyruvic and Hydroxypyruvic Acids in Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milhaud, Gerhard; Benson, Andrew A.; Calvin, M.

    1955-01-01

    AND HYDROXYPYRUVIC ACIDS IN ALGAE Cerhard Milhaud, Andrew A.HYDROXYPYRUYIC ACIDS IN ALGAE Gerhard Milhaud, * - Andrew A.AND HYDROXYPYRUVIC ACIDS IN ALGAE Gerhard Milhaud, Andrew A.

  19. Investigating fatty acid biosynthesis within the algal chloroplast using Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blatti, Jillian L.

    2012-01-01

    acid biosynthesis in microalgae for sustainable biodiesel. (acid biosynthesis in microalgae for biofuel through protein-acid biosynthesis in microalgae through protein-protein

  20. Community Genomic, Proteomic, and Transcriptomic Analyses of Acid Mine Drainage Biofilm Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goltsman, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    T, Banfield J. 2004. Acid mine drainage biogeochemistry atof eukaryotes in acid mine drainage biofilm communities.III) bacteria in acid mine drainage biofilms. Appl Environ

  1. Amino acid biosignatures : implications for the detection of extinct or extant microbial communities on Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubrey, Andrew D.

    2008-01-01

    acid racemization to geochronology and geothermometry. Orig.Amino Acid Racemization to Geochronology and Geothermometry.acid racemization to geochronology and geothermometry. Orig.

  2. Amino Acid Biosignatures - Implications for the Detection of Extinct or Extant Microbial Communities on Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubrey, Andrew D

    2008-01-01

    acid racemization to geochronology and geothermometry. Orig.Amino Acid Racemization to Geochronology and Geothermometry.acid racemization to geochronology and geothermometry. Orig.

  3. Sulfate and acid resistant concrete and mortar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1998-06-30

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction and other applications, which hardenable mixtures demonstrate significant levels of acid and sulfate resistance while maintaining acceptable compressive strength properties. The acid and sulfate hardenable mixtures of the invention containing fly ash comprise cementitious materials and a fine aggregate. The cementitous materials may comprise fly ash as well as cement. The fine aggregate may comprise fly ash as well as sand. The total amount of fly ash in the hardenable mixture ranges from about 60% to about 120% of the total amount of cement, by weight, whether the fly ash is included as a cementious material, fine aggregate, or an additive, or any combination of the foregoing. In specific examples, mortar containing 50% fly ash and 50% cement in cementitious materials demonstrated superior properties of corrosion resistance. 6 figs.

  4. IMPROVED PROCESSES TO REMOVE NAPHTHENIC ACIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; Kangshi Wang, William A. Goddard, Yongchun Tang

    2005-05-05

    In the second year of this project, we continued our effort to develop low temperature decarboxylation catalysts and investigate the behavior of these catalysts at different reaction conditions. We conducted a large number of dynamic measurements with crude oil and model compounds to obtain the information at different reaction stages, which was scheduled as the Task2 in our work plan. We developed a novel adsorption method to remove naphthenic acid from crude oil using naturally occurring materials such as clays. Our results show promise as an industrial application. The theoretical modeling proposed several possible reaction pathways and predicted the reactivity depending on the catalysts employed. From all of these studies, we obtained more comprehensive understanding about catalytic decarboxylation and oil upgrading based on the naphthenic acid removal concept.

  5. Sulfate and acid resistant concrete and mortar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction and other applications, which hardenable mixtures demonstrate significant levels of acid and sulfate resistance while maintaining acceptable compressive strength properties. The acid and sulfate hardenable mixtures of the invention containing fly ash comprise cementitious materials and a fine aggregate. The cementitous materials may comprise fly ash as well as cement. The fine aggregate may comprise fly ash as well as sand. The total amount of fly ash in the hardenable mixture ranges from about 60% to about 120% of the total amount of cement, by weight, whether the fly ash is included as a cementious material, fine aggregate, or an additive, or any combination of the foregoing. In specific examples, mortar containing 50% fly ash and 50% cement in cementitious materials demonstrated superior properties of corrosion resistance.

  6. Closure device for lead-acid batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ledjeff, Konstantin (Schwalbach, DE)

    1983-01-01

    A closure device for lead-acid batteries includes a filter of granulated activated carbon treated to be hydrophobic combined with means for preventing explosion of emitted hydrogen and oxygen gas. The explosion prevention means includes a vertical open-end tube within the closure housing for maintaining a liquid level above side wall openings in an adjacent closed end tube. Gases vent from the battery through a nozzle directed inside the closed end tube against an impingement surface to remove acid droplets. The gases then flow through the side wall openings and the liquid level to quench any possible ignition prior to entering the activated carbon filter. A wick in the activated carbon filter conducts condensed liquid back to the closure housing to replenish the liquid level limited by the open-end tube.

  7. Lightweight, durable lead-acid batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lara-Curzio, Edgar (Lenoir City, TN); An, Ke (Knoxville, TX); Kiggans, Jr., James O. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dudney, Nancy J. (Knoxville, TN); Contescu, Cristian I. (Knoxville, TN); Baker, Frederick S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Armstrong, Beth L. (Clinton, TN)

    2011-09-13

    A lightweight, durable lead-acid battery is disclosed. Alternative electrode materials and configurations are used to reduce weight, to increase material utilization and to extend service life. The electrode can include a current collector having a buffer layer in contact with the current collector and an electrochemically active material in contact with the buffer layer. In one form, the buffer layer includes a carbide, and the current collector includes carbon fibers having the buffer layer. The buffer layer can include a carbide and/or a noble metal selected from of gold, silver, tantalum, platinum, palladium and rhodium. When the electrode is to be used in a lead-acid battery, the electrochemically active material is selected from metallic lead (for a negative electrode) or lead peroxide (for a positive electrode).

  8. Lightweight, durable lead-acid batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lara-Curzio, Edgar; An, Ke; Kiggans, Jr., James O; Dudney, Nancy J; Contescu, Cristian I; Baker, Frederick S; Armstrong, Beth L

    2013-05-21

    A lightweight, durable lead-acid battery is disclosed. Alternative electrode materials and configurations are used to reduce weight, to increase material utilization and to extend service life. The electrode can include a current collector having a buffer layer in contact with the current collector and an electrochemically active material in contact with the buffer layer. In one form, the buffer layer includes a carbide, and the current collector includes carbon fibers having the buffer layer. The buffer layer can include a carbide and/or a noble metal selected from of gold, silver, tantalum, platinum, palladium and rhodium. When the electrode is to be used in a lead-acid battery, the electrochemically active material is selected from metallic lead (for a negative electrode) or lead peroxide (for a positive electrode).

  9. Nucleic acids, compositions and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Preston, III, James F. (Micanopy, FL); Chow, Virginia (Gainesville, FL); Nong, Guang (Gainesville, FL); Rice, John D. (Gainesville, FL); St. John, Franz J. (Baltimore, MD)

    2012-02-21

    The subject invention provides at least one nucleic acid sequence encoding an aldouronate-utilization regulon isolated from Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, a bacterium which efficiently utilizes xylan and metabolizes aldouronates (methylglucuronoxylosaccharides). The subject invention also provides a means for providing a coordinately regulated process in which xylan depolymerization and product assimilation are coupled in Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 to provide a favorable system for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biobased products. Additionally, the nucleic acid sequences encoding the aldouronate-utilization regulon can be used to transform other bacteria to form organisms capable of producing a desired product (e.g., ethanol, 1-butanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,3-propanediol, succinate, lactate, acetate, malate or alanine) from lignocellulosic biomass.

  10. Nucleic acid compositions and the encoding proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Preston, III, James F.; Chow, Virginia; Nong, Guang; Rice, John D.; St. John, Franz J.

    2014-09-02

    The subject invention provides at least one nucleic acid sequence encoding an aldouronate-utilization regulon isolated from Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, a bacterium which efficiently utilizes xylan and metabolizes aldouronates (methylglucuronoxylosaccharides). The subject invention also provides a means for providing a coordinately regulated process in which xylan depolymerization and product assimilation are coupled in Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 to provide a favorable system for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biobased products. Additionally, the nucleic acid sequences encoding the aldouronate-utilization regulon can be used to transform other bacteria to form organisms capable of producing a desired product (e.g., ethanol, 1-butanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,3-propanediol, succinate, lactate, acetate, malate or alanine) from lignocellulosic biomass.

  11. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  12. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA); Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA); Yao, Jian (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2008-11-11

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  13. Production of carboxylic acid and salt co-products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanchar, Robert J.; Kleff, Susanne; Guettler, Michael V.

    2014-09-09

    This invention provide processes for producing carboxylic acid product, along with useful salts. The carboxylic acid product that is produced according to this invention is preferably a C.sub.2-C.sub.12 carboxylic acid. Among the salts produced in the process of the invention are ammonium salts.

  14. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2015-04-14

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  15. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2014-02-25

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  16. Method for nucleic acid isolation using supercritical fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nivens, D.E.; Applegate, B.M.

    1999-07-13

    A method is disclosed for detecting the presence of a microorganism in an environmental sample involves contacting the sample with a supercritical fluid to isolate nucleic acid from the microorganism, then detecting the presence of a particular sequence within the isolated nucleic acid. The nucleic acid may optionally be subjected to further purification. 4 figs.

  17. Mineralogical transformations controlling acid mine drainage1 T. Peretyazhko*1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgos, William

    Mineralogical transformations controlling acid mine drainage1 chemistry2 3 4 5 T. Peretyazhko*1 , J drainage, schwertmannite, mineralogical transformations65 #12;4 1. Introduction66 Acid mine drainage (AMD tetyana.peretyazhko@pnl.gov.35 #12;2 Abstract36 The role of Fe(III) minerals in controlling acid mine

  18. SIMULATING TRANSPORT AND GEOCHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE THROUGH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    SIMULATING TRANSPORT AND GEOCHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE THROUGH DISCRETELY FRACTURED Waste Management ABSTRACT A modelling study is performed to assess the evolution of acid mine drainage-geochemical and geo-mechanical models for predicting environmental impacts of acid mine drainage in complex mining

  19. Electricity Generation from Synthetic Acid-Mine Drainage (AMD) Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electricity Generation from Synthetic Acid-Mine Drainage (AMD) Water using Fuel Cell Technologies, 2007. Acid-mine drainage (AMD) is difficult and costly to treat. We investigated a new approach to AMD and systems suitable for scale-up. Introduction Acid-mine drainage (AMD) is a serious environmental problem

  20. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA); Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA); Yao, Jian (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2012-02-14

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  1. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2013-07-16

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  2. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1994-09-06

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 4 figs.

  3. Method for nucleic acid isolation using supercritical fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nivens, David E. (11912 Kingsgate Rd., Knoxville, TN 37911); Applegate, Bruce M. (3700 Sutherland Ave. #Q2, Knoxville, TN 37911)

    1999-01-01

    A method for detecting the presence of a microorganism in an environmental sample involves contacting the sample with a supercritical fluid to isolate nucleic acid from the microorganism, then detecting the presence of a particular sequence within the isolated nucleic acid. The nucleic acid may optionally be subjected to further purification.

  4. Nickel Sequestration in a Kaolinite-Humic Acid Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Nickel Sequestration in a Kaolinite-Humic Acid Complex M A A R T E N N A C H T E G A A L * A N D D to elucidate the effect of humic acid (HA) coatings on the formation and stabilization of nickel precipitates of ubiquitous coating materials such as humic acids. Introduction The mobility and bioavailability of trace

  5. Investigating dicarboxylic acid complexation on random stacked birnessite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    GEOC 180 Investigating dicarboxylic acid complexation on random stacked birnessite Michael J. Borda the adsorptive characteristics of RSB towards C1 -C6 dicarboxylic acids as a proxy for this important functional organic acids and RSB at the molecular scale, and under aqueous conditions representative of natural soil

  6. EGVI endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA); Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA); Yao, Jian (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2010-10-12

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6, and the corresponding EGVI amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  7. EGVI endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA); Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA); Yao, Jian (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2010-10-05

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6, and the corresponding EGVI amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  8. EGVI endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA); Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA); Yao, Jian (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2008-04-01

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6, and the corresponding EGVI amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  9. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA); Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA); Yao, Jian (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2009-05-05

    The present invention provides an endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  10. Impact of Acid Additives on Elastic Modulus of Viscoelastic Surfactants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Waqar Ahmad

    2012-02-14

    (Al-Nakhli, Ayman Raja et al. 2008). 9 CHAPTER II EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE/ METHODS Acid Preparation Live Surfactant-Based Acid: Two acid formulas were used in this work: For surfactant A (AROMAX APA-T), 5 wt% of amidoamine oxide...

  11. The Effects of Initial Condition of Fracture Surfaces, Acid Spending, and Type on Conductivity of Acid Fracture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almomen, Ali Mansour

    2013-07-24

    . Another area of interest is the variation of conductivity along the fracture due to acid spending. We also investigated the contact time, acid system type, and treatment temperature effects on conductivity using San Andres dolomite cores. The results...

  12. Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietz, Mark (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

    2003-01-01

    An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

  13. Myriant Succinic Acid Biorefinery | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecialAPPENDIX FOrigin of Contamination in ManyMyriant Succinic Acid

  14. LABORATORY DETECTION OF THIOCYANIC ACID HSCN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruenken, S.; Yu, Z.; Gottlieb, C. A.; McCarthy, M. C.; Thaddeus, P., E-mail: sbruenken@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: cgottlieb@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: mccarthy@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: pthaddeus@cfa.harvard.ed [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2009-12-01

    The rotational spectrum of thiocyanic acid HSCN, a highly polar isomer of the well-known astronomical molecule isothiocyanic acid HNCS, has been measured in two radio bands: in the centimeter-wave band by Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy in a molecular beam, and in the millimeter-wave band by long-path absorption spectroscopy in a low-pressure glow discharge. Twelve spectroscopic constants were derived from more than 60 a-type rotational transitions between 11 and 346 GHz with J up to 30 and K{sub a} <= 6, including seven centimeter-wave transitions with resolved hyperfine structure. With these constants the rotational spectrum in the K{sub a} = 0 and K{sub a} = 1 ladders-those most likely to be observed in space-can now be calculated up to 400 GHz with formal uncertainties of less than 0.2 km s{sup -1} in equivalent radial velocity. Thiocyanic acid was recently identified in Sgr B2 by Halfen et al. following the laboratory measurements, and there is possible evidence for it in cold dark clouds, with the implication that HSCN may be detectable in many galactic sources.

  15. RECLAIMing Air, Redefining Democracy : : A History of the Regional Clean Air Incentives Market, Environmental Justice, and Risk, 1960 - present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tribbett, Krystal L.

    2014-01-01

    acid rain: reduce these emissions by using lower sulfur content fuel, or by installing control technology known as scrubbers

  16. Analysis of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: A forecast of the electric utility industry response to Title IV, Acid Deposition Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molburg, J.C.; Fox, J.A.; Pandola, G.; Cilek, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 incorporate, for the first time, provisions aimed specifically at the control of acid rain. These provisions restrict emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) from electric power generating stations. The restrictions on SO{sub 2} take the form of an overall cap on the aggregate emissions from major generating plants, allowing substantial flexibility in the industry`s response to those restrictions. This report discusses one response scenario through the year 2030 that was examined through a simulation of the utility industry based on assumptions consistent with characterizations used in the National Energy Strategy reference case. It also makes projections of emissions that would result from the use of existing and new capacity and of the associated additional costs of meeting demand subject to the emission limitations imposed by the Clean Air Act. Fuel-use effects, including coal-market shifts, consistent with the response scenario are also described. These results, while dependent on specific assumptions for this scenario, provide insight into the general character of the likely utility industry response to Title IV.

  17. Analysis of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: A forecast of the electric utility industry response to Title IV, Acid Deposition Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molburg, J.C.; Fox, J.A.; Pandola, G.; Cilek, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 incorporate, for the first time, provisions aimed specifically at the control of acid rain. These provisions restrict emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and oxides of nitrogen (NO[sub x]) from electric power generating stations. The restrictions on SO[sub 2] take the form of an overall cap on the aggregate emissions from major generating plants, allowing substantial flexibility in the industry's response to those restrictions. This report discusses one response scenario through the year 2030 that was examined through a simulation of the utility industry based on assumptions consistent with characterizations used in the National Energy Strategy reference case. It also makes projections of emissions that would result from the use of existing and new capacity and of the associated additional costs of meeting demand subject to the emission limitations imposed by the Clean Air Act. Fuel-use effects, including coal-market shifts, consistent with the response scenario are also described. These results, while dependent on specific assumptions for this scenario, provide insight into the general character of the likely utility industry response to Title IV.

  18. Nucleic acid analysis using terminal-phosphate-labeled nucleotides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korlach, Jonas (Ithaca, NY); Webb, Watt W. (Ithaca, NY); Levene, Michael (Ithaca, NY); Turner, Stephen (Ithaca, NY); Craighead, Harold G. (Ithaca, NY); Foquet, Mathieu (Ithaca, NY)

    2008-04-22

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  19. Continuous-flow free acid monitoring method and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strain, J.E.; Ross, H.H.

    1980-01-11

    A free acid monitoring method and apparatus is provided for continuously measuring the excess acid present in a process stream. The disclosed monitoring system and method is based on the relationship of the partial pressure ratio of water and acid in equilibrium with an acid solution at constant temperature. A portion of the process stream is pumped into and flows through the monitor under the influence of gravity and back to the process stream. A continuous flowing sample is vaporized at a constant temperature and the vapor is subsequently condensed. Conductivity measurements of the condensate produces a nonlinear response function from which the free acid molarity of the sample process stream is determined.

  20. Continuous-flow free acid monitoring method and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strain, James E. (Kingston, TN); Ross, Harley H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1981-01-01

    A free acid monitoring method and apparatus is provided for continuously measuring the excess acid present in a process stream. The disclosed monitoring system and method is based on the relationship of the partial pressure ratio of water and acid in equilibrium with an acid solution at constant temperature. A portion of the process stream is pumped into and flows through the monitor under the influence of gravity and back to the process stream. A continuous flowing sample is vaporized at a constant temperature and the vapor is subsequently condensed. Conductivity measurements of the condensate produces a nonlinear response function from which the free acid molarity of the sample process stream is determined.

  1. Improvement of ASME NH for Grade 91

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernard Riou

    2007-10-09

    This report has been prepared in the context of Task 3 of the ASME/DOE Gen IV material project. It has been identified that creep-fatigue evaluation procedures presently available in ASME (1) and RCC-MR (2) have been mainly developed for austenitic stainless steels and may not be suitable for cyclic softening materials such as mod 9 Cr 1 Mo steel (grade 91). The aim of this document is, starting from experimental test results, to perform a review of the procedures and, if necessary, provide recommendations for their improvements.

  2. Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    9 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History Pipeline Volumes 0 0 336 199 95 373 2007-2014 Pipeline Prices -- -- 7.54 2.62 6.65 4.06 2007-2014...

  3. NH Timber Yield Tax Overview (RSA 79)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    land. The bond is usually equal to the amount of expected yield tax. When can you appeal: If a taxpayer denies the appeal then the taxpayer may appeal to the Department of Revenue within 180 days of the tax

  4. Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan FebCubic Feet)PricePricethethePrice4) Part26,767 18,297 19,826

  5. Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan FebCubic Feet)PricePricethethePrice4) Part26,767 18,297

  6. Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Jeff G; Lyamichev, Victor I; Mast, Andrea L; Brow, Mary Ann D

    2012-10-16

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

  7. Ancillary effects of selected acid deposition control policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moe, R.J.; Lyke, A.J.; Nesse, R.J.

    1986-08-01

    NAPAP is examining a number of potential ways to reduce the precursors (sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides) to acid deposition. However, the policies to reduce acid deposition will have other physical, biological and economic effects unrelated to acid deposition. For example, control policies that reduce sulfur dioxide emissions may also increase visibility. The effects of an acid deposition policy that are unrelated to acid deposition are referred to as ''ancillary'' effects. This reserch identifies and characterizes the principle physical and economic ancillary effects associated with acid deposition control and mitigation policies. In this study the ancillary benefits associated with four specific acid deposition policy options were investigated. The four policy options investigated are: (1) flue gas desulfurization, (2) coal blending or switching, (3) reductions in automobile emissions of NO/sub x/, and (4) lake liming. Potential ancillary benefits of each option were identified and characterized. Particular attention was paid to the literature on economic valuation of potential ancillary effects.

  8. Processes to remove acid forming gases from exhaust gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, S.G.

    1994-09-20

    The present invention relates to a process for reducing the concentration of NO in a gas, which process comprises: (A) contacting a gas sample containing NO with a gaseous oxidizing agent to oxidize the NO to NO[sub 2]; (B) contacting the gas sample of step (A) comprising NO[sub 2] with an aqueous reagent of bisulfite/sulfite and a compound selected from urea, sulfamic acid, hydrazinium ion, hydrazoic acid, nitroaniline, sulfanilamide, sulfanilic acid, mercaptopropanoic acid, mercaptosuccinic acid, cysteine or combinations thereof at between about 0 and 100 C at a pH of between about 1 and 7 for between about 0.01 and 60 sec; and (C) optionally contacting the reaction product of step (A) with conventional chemical reagents to reduce the concentrations of the organic products of the reaction in step (B) to environmentally acceptable levels. Urea or sulfamic acid are preferred, especially sulfamic acid, and step (C) is not necessary or performed. 16 figs.

  9. Role of acid catalysis in dimethyl ether conversion processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tartamella, T.L.; Lee, S.

    1996-12-31

    Acidity plays an important role in the conversion of methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) to hydrocarbons and oxygenates. In the conversion to hydrocarbons over zeolite catalyst, Broensted acidity is the main contributor to the first hydrocarbon formed. Here, acidity is also an important factor in determining olefin, paraffin, and aromatic content in the final product distribution. Catalyst life has also been found to be related to acidity content in zeolites. DME conversion to oxygenates is especially dependent on high acidity catalysts. Superacids like BF{sub 3}, HF-BF{sub 3}, and CF{sub 3}COOH have been used in the past for conversion of DME in carbonylation reactions to form methyl acetate and acetic acid at high pressures. Recently, heteropoly acids and their corresponding metal substituted salts have been used to convert DME to industrially important petrochemicals resulting in shorter reaction times and without the use of harsh operating conditions.

  10. Effect of Hydrolysis on the Properties of a New Viscoelastic Surfactant-Based Acid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Zhenhua

    2013-08-07

    Viscoelastic surfactants (VES) have been widely used in acidizing and acid fracturing. They are used as diversion agents during matrix acid treatments and leakoff control agents during acid fracturing. At high temperatures, ...

  11. Triptolide, a diterpenoid triepoxide, induces antitumor proliferation via activation of c-Jun NH{sub 2}-terminal kinase 1 by decreasing phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity in human tumor cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyata, Yoshiki [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, School of Pharmacy, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Sato, Takashi [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, School of Pharmacy, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan)]. E-mail: satotak@ps.toyaku.ac.jp; Ito, Akira [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, School of Pharmacy, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan)

    2005-11-04

    Triptolide, a diterpenoid triepoxide extracted from the Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook f., exerts antitumorigenic actions against several tumor cells, but the intracellular target signal molecule(s) for this antitumorigenesis activity of triptolide remains to be identified. In the present study, we demonstrated that triptolide, in a dose-dependent manner, inhibited the proliferation of human fibrosarcoma HT-1080, human squamous carcinoma SAS, and human uterine cervical carcinoma SKG-II cells. In addition, triptolide was found to decrease phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity. A PI3K inhibitor, LY-294002, mimicked the triptolide-induced antiproliferative activity in HT-1080, SAS, and SKG-II cells. There was no change in the activity of Akt or protein kinase C (PKC), both of which are downstream effectors in the PI3K pathway. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of Ras, Raf, and mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 was not modified in HT-1080 cells treated with triptolide. However, the phosphorylation of c-Jun NH{sub 2}-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) was found to increase in both triptolide- and LY-294002-treated cells. Furthermore, the triptolide-induced inhibition of HT-1080 cell proliferation was not observed by JNK1 siRNA-treatment. These results provide novel evidence that PI3K is a crucial target molecule in the antitumorigenic action of triptolide. They further suggest a possible triptolide-induced inhibitory signal for tumor cell proliferation that is initiated by the decrease in PI3K activity, which in turn leads to the augmentation of JNK1 phosphorylation via the Akt and/or PKC-independent pathway(s). Moreover, it is likely that the activation of JNK1 is required for the triptolide-induced inhibition of tumor proliferation.

  12. Nucleic Acid Database: a Repository of Three-Dimensional Information about Nucleic Acids

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Berman, H. M.; Olson, W. K.; Beveridge, D. L.; Westbrook, J.; Gelbin, A.; Demeny, T.; Hsieh, S. H.; Srinivasan, A. R.; Schneider, B.

    The Nucleic Acid Database (NDB) provides 3-D structural information about nucleic acids.  It is a relational database designed to facilitate the easy search for nucleic acid structures using any of the stored primary or derived structural features. Reports can then be created describing any properties of the selected structures and structures may be viewed in several different formats, including the mmCIF format, the NDB Atlas format, the NDB coordinate format, or the PDB coordinate format. Browsing structure images created directly from coordinates in the repository can also be done. More than 7000 structures have been released as of May 2014. This website also includes a number of specialized tools and interfaces. The NDB Project is funded by the National Institutes of Health and has been funded by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy in the past.

  13. Thng 9, 2011 Xu t b n b i O ce of International A airs M i thng tin trong t ri ny u c trn m ng. c thng tin chi ti t v c p nh t, xin vui lng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    ng. có thông tin chi ti t và c p nh t, xin vui lòng tra c u t i website c a chúng tôi : http Loan Chng trình ào t o c p b ng cho sinh viên qu c t Liên h v i chúng tôi International Student Taiwan University ( i h c qu c gia ài Loan) Room 419, 4F, 2nd Administration Building (Phòng 419, T ng 4

  14. Effect of dietary cysteine, methionine, and sterculic acid on fatty acid distribution in rat adipose tissue 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brotze, Mary Frances

    1968-01-01

    . Statistical Anal sis The data were treated according to the analysis of variance for data with a single criterion of classifica- tion(24). Each of the ratios for the triglyceride frac- tion were analyzed as: Source oi Variation De rees of Freedom Total... ACIDS IN ADIPOSE TISSUE OF THE RAT B. Free Fatty Acid Fraction Group No. Sterculia f~oa ao 1 Methionine level in diet Cysteine level in diet 16/16:1 18/18:1 18/18:2 18:1/18:2 III IV VI VII VIII 0. 2 0. 2 0. 2 0. 2 low low high...

  15. Nucleic acid amplification using modular branched primers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ulanovsky, Levy (Westmont, IL)

    2001-01-01

    Methods and compositions expand the options for making primers for use in amplifying nucleic acid segments. The invention eliminates the step of custom synthesis of primers for Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR). Instead of being custom-synthesized, a primer is replaced by a combination of several oligonucleotide modules selected from a pre-synthesized library. A modular combination of just a few oligonucleotides essentially mimics the performance of a conventional, custom-made primer by matching the sequence of the priming site in the template. Each oligonucleotide module has a segment that matches one of the stretches within the priming site.

  16. Human platelet aggregation and phospholipid fatty acid composition during omega-3 fatty acid enriched egg consumption: influence of nutrient intake and omega-3 fatty acid source 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatch, Sandra D

    1997-01-01

    , normolipidemic individuals (n=30) consumed four typical, linolenic acid-rich (LNA; 18:3n-3), or docosahexaenoic acid-rich (DHA; 22:6n-3) eggs weekly for alternating six-week periods, separated by four-week washouts, in a completely randomized design. According...

  17. Reactive Distillation for Esterification of Bio-based Organic Acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fields, Nathan; Miller, Dennis J.; Asthana, Navinchandra S.; Kolah, Aspi K.; Vu, Dung; Lira, Carl T.

    2008-09-23

    The following is the final report of the three year research program to convert organic acids to their ethyl esters using reactive distillation. This report details the complete technical activities of research completed at Michigan State University for the period of October 1, 2003 to September 30, 2006, covering both reactive distillation research and development and the underlying thermodynamic and kinetic data required for successful and rigorous design of reactive distillation esterification processes. Specifically, this project has led to the development of economical, technically viable processes for ethyl lactate, triethyl citrate and diethyl succinate production, and on a larger scale has added to the overall body of knowledge on applying fermentation based organic acids as platform chemicals in the emerging biorefinery. Organic acid esters constitute an attractive class of biorenewable chemicals that are made from corn or other renewable biomass carbohydrate feedstocks and replace analogous petroleum-based compounds, thus lessening U.S. dependence on foreign petroleum and enhancing overall biorefinery viability through production of value-added chemicals in parallel with biofuels production. Further, many of these ester products are candidates for fuel (particularly biodiesel) components, and thus will serve dual roles as both industrial chemicals and fuel enhancers in the emerging bioeconomy. The technical report from MSU is organized around the ethyl esters of four important biorenewables-based acids: lactic acid, citric acid, succinic acid, and propionic acid. Literature background on esterification and reactive distillation has been provided in Section One. Work on lactic acid is covered in Sections Two through Five, citric acid esterification in Sections Six and Seven, succinic acid in Section Eight, and propionic acid in Section Nine. Section Ten covers modeling of ester and organic acid vapor pressure properties using the SPEAD (Step Potential Equilibrium and Dynamics) method.

  18. The effect of gibberellic acid on ion uptake and the radiobiosynthesis of gebberellic acid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprayberry, Billy Alan

    1959-01-01

    of the Jerusalem artichoke was pretreated with an auxin (2, 4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) prior to the introduc- tion of a salt (RbC1), the rate of salt uptake was considerably reduced; but when the auxin and salt were supplied to the plant tissue...

  19. Bioreactor for acid mine drainage control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaluski, Marek H. (Butte, MT); Manchester, Kenneth R. (Butte, MT)

    2001-01-01

    A bioreactor for reacting an aqueous heavy metal and sulfate containing mine drainage solution with sulfate reducing bacteria to produce heavy metal sulfides and reduce the sulfuric acid content of the solution. The reactor is an elongated, horizontal trough defining an inlet section and a reaction section. An inlet manifold adjacent the inlet section distributes aqueous mine drainage solution into the inlet section for flow through the inlet section and reaction section. A sulfate reducing bacteria and bacteria nutrient composition in the inlet section provides sulfate reducing bacteria that with the sulfuric acid and heavy metals in the solution to form solid metal sulfides. The sulfate reducing bacteria and bacteria nutrient composition is retained in the cells of a honeycomb structure formed of cellular honeycomb panels mounted in the reactor inlet section. The honeycomb panels extend upwardly in the inlet section at an acute angle with respect to the horizontal. The cells defined in each panel are thereby offset with respect to the honeycomb cells in each adjacent panel in order to define a tortuous path for the flow of the aqueous solution.

  20. Investigating the Effects of Core Length on Pore Volume to Breakthrough (PVBT) Behavior in Carbonate Core Samples during Matrix Acidizing with Hydrochloric Acid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nour, Mohamed

    2014-05-06

    Most literature contains Hydrochloric acid (HCl) carbonate acidizing experiments performed on short (2 - 6 inch) cores. These cores do not accurately represent reservoir conditions, as spent acid is not propagated for any appreciable distance along...

  1. An Improved Model for Sandstone Acidizing and Study of the Effect of Mineralogy and Temperature on Sandstone Acidizing Treatments and Simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agarwal, Amit Kumar

    2013-01-14

    Sandstone acidizing is a complex operation because the acidizing fluid reacts with a variety of minerals present in the formation that results in a wide range of reaction products. The hydrofluoric acid (HF) reaction rate differs widely from mineral...

  2. Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1992-03-31

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 5 figs.

  3. Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

    1992-01-01

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  4. The corrosion of aluminum in boric acid solutions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bass, Henry Kinsolving

    1956-01-01

    An investigation of the corrosion of aluminum in boric acid solutions was made. The total immersion, continuous agitation method of testing was used. Commercially pure aluminum and two aluminum alloys were exposed to various concentrations of boric acid...THE CORROSION OF ALUMINUM IN BORIC ACID SOLUTIONS A Thesis By HENRI KINSOLVING BASS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College oi' Texas' in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  5. Integrated 3D Acid Fracturing Model for Carbonate Reservoir Stimulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Xi

    2014-06-23

    and illustrates the application of the approach with examples. The results from this study show that the new model can successfully design and optimize acid fracturing treatments....

  6. Dissociation of strong acid revisited: X-ray photoelectron spectroscop...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations of HNO3 in water Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dissociation of strong acid revisited:...

  7. RECOVERY OF LACTIC ACID FROM AMERICAN CRYSTAL SUGAR COMPANY WASTEWATER...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    project was to recover lactic acid. However, the presence of a variety of indigenous bacteria in the wastewater stream and technical issues related to recovery and purification...

  8. GLYCOLIC ACID PHYSICAL PROPERTIES, IMPURITIES, AND RADIATION EFFECTS ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickenheim, B.; Bibler, N.

    2010-06-08

    The DWPF is pursuing alternative reductants/flowsheets to increase attainment to meet closure commitment dates. In fiscal year 2009, SRNL evaluated several options and recommended the further assessment of the nitric/formic/glycolic acid flowsheet. SRNL is currently performing testing with this flowsheet to support the DWPF down-select of alternate reductants. As part of the evaluation, SRNL was requested to determine the physical properties of formic and glycolic acid blends. Blends of formic acid in glycolic acid were prepared and their physical properties tested. Increasing amounts of glycolic acid led to increases in blend density, viscosity and surface tension as compared to the 90 wt% formic acid that is currently used at DWPF. These increases are small, however, and are not expected to present any difficulties in terms of processing. The effect of sulfur impurities in technical grade glycolic acid was studied for its impact on DWPF glass quality. While the glycolic acid specification allows for more sulfate than the current formic acid specification, the ultimate impact is expected to be on the order of 0.03 wt% sulfur in glass. Note that lower sulfur content glycolic acid could likely be procured at some increased cost if deemed necessary. A paper study on the effects of radiation on glycolic acid was performed. The analysis indicates that substitution of glycolic acid for formic acid would not increase the radiolytic production rate of H{sub 2} and cause an adverse effect in the SRAT or SME process. It has been cited that glycolic acid solutions that are depleted of O{sub 2} when subjected to large radiation doses produced considerable quantities of a non-diffusive polymeric material. Considering a constant air purge is maintained in the SRAT and the solution is continuously mixed, oxygen depletion seems unlikely, however, if this polymer is formed in the SRAT solution, the rheology of the solution may be affected and pumping of the solution may be hindered. A series of tests to determine whether the polymer will be formed is currently being outlined. The first phase will be a simple experiment where a simulated SRAT supernatant containing the 80:20 blend of glycolic - formic acid could be irradiated in the Co-60 gamma source at SRNL to a very large dose resembling the dose received by the radioactive SRAT solution after several weeks. The resulting solution could then be heated to simulate refluxing in the SRAT process. Finally a radioactive demonstration of the SRAT process should be performed in the SRNL Shielded Cells to confirm successful execution of the glycolic - formic acid flowsheet.

  9. Effects of Lime and Carbonate of Lime on Acid Phosphate. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1917-01-01

    question whether part of the readion does not take place in the filter paper, when the fertilizer is being washed with water to re- move the water-soluble phosphoric acid. To test this, we mixed carbonate of lime with acid phosphate and determined... EXPERIMENTS. We made some pot experiments to test the effect of lime on acid phosphate, but we are not altogether ea'tisfied with the mgy some of these crops grew. Details: Soils 3653, 4643, 4580, 4596, 4581, 4589, 4591. Additions : Ac 1 gram acid...

  10. A First Look at Yeast Fatty Acid Synthase

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    synthesis is carried out by fatty acid sythase (FAS), which catalyzes cycles of multistep chemical reactions that are essentially the same in all organisms. FAS uses one...

  11. A First Look at Yeast Fatty Acid Synthase

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synthase Print Fatty acids are the major constituents of eukaryotic and bacterial cellular membranes. They are used for functionally important post-translational protein...

  12. A First Look at Yeast Fatty Acid Synthase

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2007 00:00 Fatty acids are the major constituents of eukaryotic and bacterial cellular membranes. They are used for functionally important post-translational protein...

  13. Stabilized epoxygenated fatty acids regulate inflammation, pain, angiogenesis and cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    Review Stabilized epoxygenated fatty acids regulate inflammation, pain, angiogenesis and cancer Cancer Center, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, United States b Department of Food Science

  14. Quantum Chemical Calculations of Sulfate Adsorption at the Al-and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    such as Ca2+ and Mg2+ are often replaced by Al3+ in regions affected by acid rain (1). In acid mine drainage

  15. An insect assay for essential fatty acids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerur, Dundappa Ramachandrappa

    1956-01-01

    Ltc sn6 arachl@ontc acl6s 'es members sf' the essential fatty acid group. naut; defzolencp spmy&ms in the rat, associated cath e. fat &red Met, axes s) retardee@ growth, 'b) increased z YAM a%one o ' SMce She orz. g~l recognlM;on of zznolekc...'QPGP-, ' I T~ OP QQFg~V25 P8j. , X%4&4?C 4IQ? o e''e t ~ e jt 0 e s'o X o, s t tp ~ s o o o p e o * |p 0 o ~ t v o t s o ~ ~ o o o s", I" 'a "- "" K'1844X PCS, BCVlCV p e t's ?'o s e e tt p t e t p t a ~ t' o' o s o 's ~ s' 't o t' ~, ~ o'o a' A~t8ng58...

  16. Synthesis of alpha-amino acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, J.W. Jr.

    1983-01-25

    A method is described for synthesizing alpha amino acids proceeding through novel intermediates of the formulas: R[sub 1]R[sub 2]C(OSOCl)CN, R[sub 1]R[sub 2]C(Cl)CN and [R[sub 1]R[sub 2]C(CN)O][sub 2]SO wherein R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] are each selected from hydrogen monovalent substituted and unsubstituted hydrocarbon radicals of 1 to 10 carbon atoms. The use of these intermediates allows the synthesis steps to be exothermic and results in an overall synthesis method which is faster than the synthesis methods of the prior art. No Drawings

  17. Multivariate analysis of homogeneous nucleation rate measurements. Nucleation in the p-toluic acid/sulfuric acid/water system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multivariate analysis of homogeneous nucleation rate measurements. Nucleation in the p-toluic acid. Building on these results, the powerful utility of multivariate statistical methods is demonstrated here

  18. GLYCOLIC ACID PHYSICAL PROPERTIES, IMPURITIES, AND RADIATION EFFECTS ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, D.; Pickenheim, B.; Hay, M.

    2011-06-20

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is pursuing alternative reductants/flowsheets to increase attainment to meet closure commitment dates. In fiscal year 2009, SRNL evaluated several options and recommended the further assessment of the nitric/formic/glycolic acid flowsheet. SRNL is currently performing testing with this flowsheet to support the DWPF down-select of alternate reductants. As part of the evaluation, SRNL was requested to determine the physical properties of formic and glycolic acid blends. Blends of formic acid in glycolic acid were prepared and their physical properties tested. Increasing amounts of glycolic acid led to increases in blend density, viscosity and surface tension as compared to the 90 wt% formic acid that is currently used at DWPF. These increases are small, however, and are not expected to present any difficulties in terms of processing. The effect of sulfur impurities in technical grade glycolic acid was studied for its impact on DWPF glass quality. While the glycolic acid specification allows for more sulfate than the current formic acid specification, the ultimate impact is expected to be on the order of 0.03 wt% sulfur in glass. Note that lower sulfur content glycolic acid could likely be procured at some increased cost if deemed necessary. A paper study on the effects of radiation on glycolic acid was performed. The analysis indicates that substitution of glycolic acid for formic acid would not increase the radiolytic production rate of H{sub 2} and cause an adverse effect in the SRAT or SME process. It has been cited that glycolic acid solutions that are depleted of O{sub 2} when subjected to large radiation doses produced considerable quantities of a non-diffusive polymeric material. Considering a constant air purge is maintained in the SRAT and the solution is continuously mixed, oxygen depletion seems unlikely, however, if this polymer is formed in the SRAT solution, the rheology of the solution may be affected and pumping of the solution may be hindered. However, an irradiation test with a simulated SRAT product supernate containing glycolic acid in an oxygen depleted atmosphere found no evidence of polymerization.

  19. EFFECTS OF NITRIC ACID ON CRITICALITY SAFETY ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williamson, B.

    2011-08-18

    As nitric acid molarity is increased, there are two competing phenomena affecting the reactivity of the system. First, there is interaction between each of the 10 wells in the basket-like insert. As the molarity of the nitric acid solution is increased (it moves from 100% water to 100% HNO{sub 3}), the hydrogen atom density decreases by about 80%. However, it remains a relatively efficient moderator. The moderating ratio of nitric acid is about 90% that of water. As the media between the wells is changed from 100% water to 100% nitric acid, the density of the media increases by 50%. A higher density typically leads to a better reflector. However, when the macroscopic scattering cross sections are considered, nitric acid is a much worse reflector than water. The effectiveness of nitric acid as a reflector is about 40% that of water. Since the media between the wells become a worse reflector and still remains an effective moderator, interaction between the wells increases. This phenomenon will cause reactivity to increase as nitric acid molarity increases. The seond phenomenon is due to the moderating ratio changing in the high concentration fissile-nitric acid solution in the 10 wells. Since the wells contain relatively small volumes of high concentration solutions, a small decrease in moderating power has a large effect on reactivity. This is due to the fact that neutrons are more likely to escape the high concentration fissile solution before causing another fission event. The result of this phenomenon is that as nitric acid molarity increases, reactivity decreases. Recent studies have shown that the second phenomenon is indeed the dominating force in determining reactivity changes in relation to nitric acid molarity changes. When considering the system as a whole, as nitric acid molarity increases, reactivity decreases.

  20. Method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolf, G.A.; Smith, J.W.; Ihle, N.C.

    1982-07-08

    A method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete is described wherein the phosphoric acid is reacted with Ca(OH)/sub 2/ to form a precipitate of hydroxyapatite and the hydroxyapatite is mixed with Portland cement to form concrete.