National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for ng ph ase

  1. SolASE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SolASE Jump to: navigation, search Name: SolASE Address: P.O. Box 927122 Place: San Diego, California Zip: 92192 Region: Southern CA Area Sector: Solar Product: Commercializes...

  2. Advanced Solar Electric Inc ASE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc (ASE) Place: Thousand Oaks, California Zip: 91320 Product: US-based PV system installer. References: Advanced Solar Electric Inc (ASE)1 This article is a stub. You...

  3. American Solar Energy Society ASES | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Society ASES Jump to: navigation, search Name: American Solar Energy Society (ASES) Place: Boulder, Colorado Zip: 80301 Sector: Solar Product: Dedicated to advancing the use...

  4. Blue Ng | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ng Jump to: navigation, search Name: Blue-Ng Place: Bath, United Kingdom Zip: BA1 1SR Sector: Biomass Product: UK-based company that constructs and operates combined heat and...

  5. DOE Selects ASE to Manage and Operate its National Renewable...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ASE to Manage and Operate its National Renewable Energy Laboratory DOE Selects ASE to Manage and Operate its National Renewable Energy Laboratory July 29, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis ...

  6. PVT-NG sensor final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Dean James; Brusseau, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    This document is a final report for the polyvinyl toluene (PVT) neutron-gamma (PVT-NG) project, which was sponsored by the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO). The PVT-NG sensor uses PVT detectors for both gamma and neutron detection. The sensor exhibits excellent spectral resolution and gain stabilization, which are features that are beneficial for detection of both gamma-ray and neutron sources. In fact, the ability to perform isotope identification based on spectra that were measured by the PVT-NG sensor was demonstrated. As described in a previous report, the neutron sensitivity of the first version of the prototype was about 25% less than the DNDO requirement of 2.5 cps/ng for bare Cf-252. This document describes design modifications that were expected to improve the neutron sensitivity by about 50% relative to the PVT-NG prototype. However, the project was terminated before execution of the design modifications after portal vendors demonstrated other technologies that enable neutron detection without the use of He-3. Nevertheless, the PVT-NG sensor development demonstrated several performance goals that may be useful in future portal designs.

  7. PLJ3ASE RUSH ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    for F U Beta Stamping wrahor8.fm jqtip6 of U heated in 900 P salt No Ro 5 bath. ' :,.a r ' .. ? ' ). ;..- *fhv 11 - n ... .I < Oil 3 PH kmph No. . . , r, . ...

  8. Test Report for NG Sensors GTX-1000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manginell, Ronald P.

    2015-02-01

    This report describes initial testing of the NG Sensor GTX-1000 natural gas monitoring system. This testing showed that the retention time, peak area stability and heating value repeatability of the GTX-1000 were promising for natural gas measurements in the field or at the well head. The repeatability can be less than 0.25% for LHV and HHV for the Airgas standard tested in this report, which is very promising for a first generation prototype. Ultimately this system should be capable of 0.1% repeatability in heating value at significant size and power reductions compared with competing systems.

  9. NREL Solar Researcher Honored with ASES Abbot Award - News Releases | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Researcher Honored with ASES Abbot Award July 21, 2006 Photo of Dr. Chuck Kutscher, recipient of the Charles Greeley Abbot Award. Dr. Chuck Kutscher The American Solar Energy Society (ASES) honored Dr. Chuck Kutscher of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) with the Charles Greeley Abbot Award during the recent ASES SOLAR 2006 conference. The Abbot Award recognizes individuals who have made significant career contributions to the field of solar

  10. DOE Selects ASE to Manage and Operate its National Renewable Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory | Department of Energy ASE to Manage and Operate its National Renewable Energy Laboratory DOE Selects ASE to Manage and Operate its National Renewable Energy Laboratory July 29, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the Alliance for Sustainable Energy (ASE) LLC has been selected as the management and operating contractor for DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado. The cost-plus award-fee contract is

  11. ASE/CAGI Meeting about Compressors and Compressed Air System Efficiency |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy ASE/CAGI Meeting about Compressors and Compressed Air System Efficiency ASE/CAGI Meeting about Compressors and Compressed Air System Efficiency On April 25, 2013, several representatives of energy efficiency advocacy organizations met with staff and members of the Compressed Air and Gas Institute (CAGI) along with some compressed air experts at the offices of the Alliance to Save Energy to explore and discuss a consensus approach to advancing energy efficiency of

  12. DOE/AMO NG Infrastructure R & D & Methane emissions Mitigation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    emission rates NYSEARCH RFP issued on 11314 for PhII controlled testing 5 small Unmanned Aerial System (sUAS) Application Development 6 Objectives Confirm FAA ...

  13. Detec%ng the Onset of Drizzle Using ARM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Detec%ng the Onset of Drizzle Using ARM Observa%ons and a Steady-State 1-D Column Model PAVLOS KOLLIAS HAIYANG YU ANDREW LESAGE JINGJING TIAN ANDREW DZAMBO MIKAEL WITTE Outline * Mo%va%ons * Methods * Modeling the onset of drizzle * Observa%ons of drizzle onset * "Synergy" of Results * Conclusions Low, Drizzling Clouds * Near-surface radia%ve proper%es (e.g. scaWering, absorp%on, cloud "morphology"). * Drizzle affects aerosols' in/direct radia%ve effects. * Classic

  14. X-ray irradiation induced changes in electron transport in stabilized a-Se photoconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walornyj, M.; Kasap, S. O.

    2013-12-07

    We have examined the effect of high-dose x-ray irradiation on electron transport in stabilized amorphous selenium (a-Se) x-ray photoconductive films (of the type used in x-ray image detectors) by measuring the electron lifetime ?{sub e} through interrupted-field time-of-flight experiments. X-ray induced effects have been examined through two types of experiments. In recovery experiments, the a-Se was preirradiated with and without an applied field (5 V/?m) during irradiation with sufficient dose (typically ?20 Gy at 21 C) to significantly reduce the electron lifetime by ?50%, and then the recovery of the lifetime was monitored as a function of time at three different temperatures, 10 C, 21 C, and 35 C. The lifetime recovery kinetics was exponential with a relaxation time ?{sub r} that is thermally activated with an activation energy of 1.66 eV. ?{sub r} is a few hours at 21 C and only a few minutes at 35 C. In experiments examining the irradiation induced effects, the a-Se film was repeatedly exposed to x-ray radiation and the changes in the drift mobility and lifetime were monitored as a function of accumulated dose D. There was no observable change in the drift mobility. At 21 C, the concentration of x-ray induced deep traps (or capture centers), N{sub d}, increases linearly with D (N{sub d} ? D) whereas at 35 C, the recovery process prevents a linear increase in N{sub d} with D, and N{sub d} saturates. In all cases, even under high dose irradiation (?50 Gy), the lifetime was recoverable to its original equilibrium (pre-exposure) value within a few relaxation times.

  15. THE CHANDRA ACIS SURVEY OF M33 (ChASeM33): THE FINAL SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuellmann, R.; Gaetz, T. J.; Plucinsky, P. P.; Challis, P.; Edgar, R. J.; Kirshner, R. P.; Kuntz, K. D.; Blair, W. P.; Williams, B. F.; Pietsch, W.; Haberl, F.; Long, K. S.; Sasaki, M.; Winkler, P. F.; Pannuti, T. G.; Helfand, D. J.; Hughes, J. P.; Mazeh, T.; Shporer, A.

    2011-04-01

    This study presents the final source catalog of the Chandra ACIS Survey of M33 (ChASeM33). With a total exposure time of 1.4 Ms, ChASeM33 covers {approx}70% of the D{sub 25} isophote (R {approx} 4.0 kpc) of M33 and provides the deepest, most complete, and detailed look at a spiral galaxy in X-rays. The source catalog includes 662 sources, reaches a limiting unabsorbed luminosity of {approx}2.4x10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1} in the 0.35-8.0 keV energy band, and contains source positions, source net counts, fluxes and significances in several energy bands, and information on source variability. The analysis challenges posed by ChASeM33 and the techniques adopted to address these challenges are discussed. To constrain the nature of the detected X-ray source, hardness ratios were constructed and spectra were fit for 254 sources, follow-up MMT spectra of 116 sources were acquired, and cross-correlations with previous X-ray catalogs and other multi-wavelength data were generated. Based on this effort, 183 of the 662 ChASeM33 sources could be identified. Finally, the luminosity function (LF) for the detected point sources as well as the one for the X-ray binaries (XRBs) in M33 is presented. The LFs in the soft band (0.5-2.0 keV) and the hard band (2.0-8.0 keV) have a limiting luminosity at the 90% completeness limit of 4.0 x 10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1} and 1.6 x 10{sup 35} erg s{sup -1}(for D = 817 kpc), respectively, which is significantly lower than what was reported by previous XRB population studies in galaxies more distant than M33. The resulting distribution is consistent with a dominant population of high-mass XRBs as would be expected for M33.

  16. NEW ENGLAND NG SUPPLY LIMITED- FE Dkt. 16-103-NG- FOR LONG TERM AUTHORIZATION TO EXPORT NATURAL GAS TO CANADA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy gives notice of receipt of an Application filed August 3, 2016 by New England NG Supply Limited (New England), requesting long-term authorization to export natural gas...

  17. FPDS-NG Change Management Notice for the Oklahoma Tornado and Storm

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A new National Interest Action value for the 'Oklahoma Tornado and Storm 2013' has been added to the FPDS-NG Production system.

  18. McPhD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is a research code designed to explore the applications of the Haskell programming language to Monte Carlo algorithms. June 29, 2013 software McPhD is a research code designed...

  19. Next Generation * Natural Gas (NG)2 Information Requirements--Executive Summary

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has initiated the Next Generation * Natural Gas (NG)2 project to design and implement a new and comprehensive information program for natural gas to meet customer requirements in the post-2000 time frame.

  20. pH optrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Northrup, M. Allen; Langry, Kevin C.

    1993-01-01

    A process is provided for forming a long-lasting, stable, pH-sensitive dye-acrylamide copolymer useful as a pH-sensitive material for use in an optrode or other device sensitive to pH. An optrode may be made by mechanically attaching the copolymer to a sensing device such as an optical fiber.

  1. Photo-crystallization in a-Se layer structures: Effects of film-substrate interface-rigidity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindberg, G. P.; Gross, N.; Weinstein, B. A.; O'Loughlin, T.; Mishchenko, A.; Reznik, A.; Abbaszadeh, S.; Karim, K. S.; Belev, G.

    2014-11-21

    Amorphous selenium (a-Se) films deposited on rigid substrates can undergo photo-induced crystallization (PC) even at temperatures (T) well below the glass transition, T{sub g}???313?K. Substrate-generated shear strain is known to promote the PC process. In the present work, we explore the influence of different substrates (Si and glass), and different film-layer-substrate combinations, on the PC in a variety of a-Se films and film-structures. The intermediate layers (indium tin oxide and polyimide) are chosen to promote conductivity and/or to be a buffer against interface strain in structures of interest for digital imaging applications. The PC characteristics in these samples are evaluated and compared using optical microscopy, atomic-force microscopy, Raman mapping, and T-dependent Raman spectroscopy. Both the presence of a soft intermediate layer, and the thermal softening that occurs for T increasing through T{sub g}, inhibit the tendency for the onset of PC. The extensive PC mapping results in the wide range of samples studied here, as well as the suppression of PC near T{sub g} in this array of samples, strongly support the generality of this behavior. As a consequence, one may expect that the stability of a-Se films against PC can be enhanced by decreasing the rigidity of the film-substrate interface. In this regard, advanced film structures that employ flexible substrates, soft intermediate layers, and/or are designed to be operated near T{sub g} should be explored.

  2. Philosophy\tof\tNetwork\tOpera3ng Systems\tand\tIntent\tAPIs Inder...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and development * Scrip3ng interface, Python programming model * Focus on Intent APIs as ... Policy as a Service, uses SQL Policy Language, Interfaces to OpenStack modules * ...

  3. DOE/AMO NG Infrastructure R & D & Methane emissions Mitigation workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Proprietary and Confidential to NYSEARCH/NGA DOE/AMO NG INFRASTRUCTURE R & D & METHANE EMISSIONS MITIGATION WORKSHOP November 2014 David Merte & Daphne D'Zurko, NYSEARCH/NGA dmerte@northeastgas.org ddzurko@northeastgas.org NYSEARCH 2 NYSEARCH Program Research Areas * Improved Installation, Maintenance & Repair * Pipeline Integrity/Direct & Remote Assessment * Pipe Location * Leak Detection * Real-time Sensing and Inspection for Distribution * Environment/Reducing Greenhouse

  4. Summer Ferreira, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ferreira, Ph.D. - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  5. Matrix effect on vibrational frequencies: Experiments and simulations for HCl and HNgCl (Ng = Kr and Xe)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalinowski, Jaroslaw; Rsnen, Markku; Lignell, Antti; Khriachtchev, Leonid; Gerber, R. Benny; Department of Physical Chemistry, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904, Israel and Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, California 92697

    2014-03-07

    We study the environmental effect on molecules embedded in noble-gas (Ng) matrices. The experimental data on HXeCl and HKrCl in Ng matrices is enriched. As a result, the H?Xe stretching bands of HXeCl are now known in four Ng matrices (Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe), and HKrCl is now known in Ar and Kr matrices. The order of the H?Xe stretching frequencies of HXeCl in different matrices is ?(Ne) < ?(Xe) < ?(Kr) < ?(Ar), which is a non-monotonous function of the dielectric constant, in contrast to the classical order observed for HCl: ?(Xe) < ?(Kr) < ?(Ar) < ?(Ne). The order of the H?Kr stretching frequencies of HKrCl is consistently ?(Kr) < ?(Ar). These matrix effects are analyzed theoretically by using a number of quantum chemical methods. The calculations on these molecules (HCl, HXeCl, and HKrCl) embedded in single Ng{sup ?} layer cages lead to very satisfactory results with respect to the relative matrix shifts in the case of the MP4(SDQ) method whereas the B3LYP-D and MP2 methods fail to fully reproduce these experimental results. The obtained order of frequencies is discussed in terms of the size available for the Ng hydrides in the cages, probably leading to different stresses on the embedded molecule. Taking into account vibrational anharmonicity produces a good agreement of the MP4(SDQ) frequencies of HCl and HXeCl with the experimental values in different matrices. This work also highlights a number of open questions in the field.

  6. ASE Program Certification Standards

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

  7. ASES Solar 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solar 2015 is three-day conference with sessions for discussing pre-publication research at the forefront of your field, forums, and networking opportunities.

  8. pH Meter probe assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hale, Charles J.

    1983-01-01

    An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe.

  9. pH Meter probe assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hale, C.J.

    1983-11-15

    An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe. 1 fig.

  10. Structure of Naegleria Tet-like dioxygenase (NgTet1) in complexes with a reaction intermediate 5-hydroxymethylcytosine DNA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hashimoto, Hideharu; Pais, June E.; Dai, Nan; Corrêa, Jr., Ivan R.; Zhang, Xing; Zheng, Yu; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-08-31

    The family of ten-eleven translocation (Tet) dioxygenases is widely distributed across the eukaryotic tree of life, from mammals to the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi. Like mammalian Tet proteins, the Naegleria Tet-like protein, NgTet1, acts on 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and generates 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) in three consecutive, Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent oxidation reactions. The two intermediates, 5hmC and 5fC, could be considered either as the reaction product of the previous enzymatic cycle or the substrate for the next cycle. Here we present a new crystal structure of NgTet1 in complex with DNA containing a 5hmC. Along with the previously solvedmore » NgTet1–5mC structure, the two complexes offer a detailed picture of the active site at individual stages of the reaction cycle. In the crystal, the hydroxymethyl (OH-CH2-) moiety of 5hmC points to the metal center, representing the reaction product of 5mC hydroxylation. The hydroxyl oxygen atom could be rotated away from the metal center, to a hydrophobic pocket formed by Ala212, Val293 and Phe295. Such rotation turns the hydroxyl oxygen atom away from the product conformation, and exposes the target CH2 towards the metal-ligand water molecule, where a dioxygen O2 molecule would occupy to initiate the next round of reaction by abstracting a hydrogen atom from the substrate. The Ala212-to-Val (A212V) mutant profoundly limits the product to 5hmC, probably due to the reduced hydrophobic pocket size restricts the binding of 5hmC as a substrate.« less

  11. Spatiotemporal Monte Carlo transport methods in x-ray semiconductor detectors: Application to pulse-height spectroscopy in a-Se

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang Yuan; Badal, Andreu; Allec, Nicholas; Karim, Karim S.; Badano, Aldo

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: The authors describe a detailed Monte Carlo (MC) method for the coupled transport of ionizing particles and charge carriers in amorphous selenium (a-Se) semiconductor x-ray detectors, and model the effect of statistical variations on the detected signal. Methods: A detailed transport code was developed for modeling the signal formation process in semiconductor x-ray detectors. The charge transport routines include three-dimensional spatial and temporal models of electron-hole pair transport taking into account recombination and trapping. Many electron-hole pairs are created simultaneously in bursts from energy deposition events. Carrier transport processes include drift due to external field and Coulombic interactions, and diffusion due to Brownian motion. Results: Pulse-height spectra (PHS) have been simulated with different transport conditions for a range of monoenergetic incident x-ray energies and mammography radiation beam qualities. Two methods for calculating Swank factors from simulated PHS are shown, one using the entire PHS distribution, and the other using the photopeak. The latter ignores contributions from Compton scattering and K-fluorescence. Comparisons differ by approximately 2% between experimental measurements and simulations. Conclusions: The a-Se x-ray detector PHS responses simulated in this work include three-dimensional spatial and temporal transport of electron-hole pairs. These PHS were used to calculate the Swank factor and compare it with experimental measurements. The Swank factor was shown to be a function of x-ray energy and applied electric field. Trapping and recombination models are all shown to affect the Swank factor.

  12. Determination Of Ph Including Hemoglobin Correction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maynard, John D.; Hendee, Shonn P.; Rohrscheib, Mark R.; Nunez, David; Alam, M. Kathleen; Franke, James E.; Kemeny, Gabor J.

    2005-09-13

    Methods and apparatuses of determining the pH of a sample. A method can comprise determining an infrared spectrum of the sample, and determining the hemoglobin concentration of the sample. The hemoglobin concentration and the infrared spectrum can then be used to determine the pH of the sample. In some embodiments, the hemoglobin concentration can be used to select an model relating infrared spectra to pH that is applicable at the determined hemoglobin concentration. In other embodiments, a model relating hemoglobin concentration and infrared spectra to pH can be used. An apparatus according to the present invention can comprise an illumination system, adapted to supply radiation to a sample; a collection system, adapted to collect radiation expressed from the sample responsive to the incident radiation; and an analysis system, adapted to relate information about the incident radiation, the expressed radiation, and the hemoglobin concentration of the sample to pH.

  13. N,N'-DICYCLOHEXYL-N"-ISOTRIDECYLGUANIDINE AS SUPPRESSOR FOR THE NEXT GENERATION CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION (NG-CSSX) PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Nathan C; Roach, Benjamin D; Williams, Neil J; Bonnesen, Peter V; Rajbanshi, Arbin; Moyer, Bruce A

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purity, concentration, and source of the N,N'-dicyclohexyl-N"-isotridecylguanidine (DCiTG) suppressor (guanidine) used in the NG-CSSX process were found to influence solvent performance. As the starting isotridecanol used in the preparation of DCiTG is comprised of a mixture of branched-chain aliphatic alcohols, varying in composition with manufacturer, the resulting DCiTG itself is a mixture. Thus, it is necessary to address how the solvent performance will be affected by the different preparations of the DCiTG solvent component. In this study, four preparations of DCiTG from three sources were analyzed and evaluated for purity and performance, both in the absence and presence of an anionic surfactant impurity.

  14. Adam Bratis, Ph.D. | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Adam Bratis, Ph.D. Adam Bratis, Ph.D. Biofuels Program Manager Adam.Bratis@nrel.gov | 303-384-7852 Areas of Expertise Adam Bratis joined the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in 2008. His role is to manage NREL's research and development efforts in support of the Department of Energy's mission in the biomass arena. This includes technical and managerial oversight in the areas of biochemical conversion, thermochemical conversion, algal biofuels, techno-economic and life-cycle analyses,

  15. Effect of burst and recombination models for Monte Carlo transport of interacting carriers in a-Se x-ray detectors on Swank noise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Yuan; Karim, Karim S.; Badano, Aldo

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The authors describe the modification to a previously developed Monte Carlo model of semiconductor direct x-ray detector required for studying the effect of burst and recombination algorithms on detector performance. This work provides insight into the effect of different charge generation models for a-Se detectors on Swank noise and recombination fraction. Methods: The proposed burst and recombination models are implemented in the Monte Carlo simulation package, ARTEMIS, developed byFang et al. [Spatiotemporal Monte Carlo transport methods in x-ray semiconductor detectors: Application to pulse-height spectroscopy in a-Se, Med. Phys. 39(1), 308319 (2012)]. The burst model generates a cloud of electron-hole pairs based on electron velocity, energy deposition, and material parameters distributed within a spherical uniform volume (SUV) or on a spherical surface area (SSA). A simple first-hit (FH) and a more detailed but computationally expensive nearest-neighbor (NN) recombination algorithms are also described and compared. Results: Simulated recombination fractions for a single electron-hole pair show good agreement with Onsager model for a wide range of electric field, thermalization distance, and temperature. The recombination fraction and Swank noise exhibit a dependence on the burst model for generation of many electron-hole pairs from a single x ray. The Swank noise decreased for the SSA compared to the SUV model at 4 V/?m, while the recombination fraction decreased for SSA compared to the SUV model at 30 V/?m. The NN and FH recombination results were comparable. Conclusions: Results obtained with the ARTEMIS Monte Carlo transport model incorporating drift and diffusion are validated with the Onsager model for a single electron-hole pair as a function of electric field, thermalization distance, and temperature. For x-ray interactions, the authors demonstrate that the choice of burst model can affect the simulation results for the generation of many

  16. Theoretical investigation of HNgNH{sub 3}{sup +} ions (Ng = He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Kunqi; Sheng, Li

    2015-04-14

    The equilibrium geometries, harmonic frequencies, and dissociation energies of HNgNH{sub 3}{sup +} ions (Ng = He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) were investigated using the following method: Becke-3-parameter-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP), Boese-Matrin for Kinetics (BMK), second-order Mller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), and coupled-cluster with single and double excitations as well as perturbative inclusion of triples (CCSD(T)). The results indicate that HHeNH{sub 3}{sup +}, HArNH{sub 3}{sup +}, HKrNH{sub 3}{sup +}, and HXeNH{sub 3}{sup +} ions are metastable species that are protected from decomposition by high energy barriers, whereas the HNeNH{sub 3}{sup +} ion is unstable because of its relatively small energy barrier for decomposition. The bonding nature of noble-gas atoms in HNgNH{sub 3}{sup +} was also analyzed using the atoms in molecules approach, natural energy decomposition analysis, and natural bond orbital analysis.

  17. Adaora Nwokoye, Ph.D | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Adaora Nwokoye, Ph.D About Us Adaora Nwokoye, Ph.D - Science and Technology Policy Fellow, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  18. Jacqueline R. Yang, Ph.D. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Jacqueline R. Yang, Ph.D. About Us Jacqueline R. Yang, Ph.D. - Deputy CIO for Architecture Engineering, Technology, and Innovation

  19. Mark Elless, Ph.D. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mark Elless, Ph.D. About Us Mark Elless, Ph.D. - Technology Manager, Bioenergy Technologies Office Most Recent Biofuels and Barbecue Chips: Small Business Develops Process to ...

  20. Effect of burst and recombination models for Monte Carlo transport of interacting carriers in a-Se x-ray detectors on Swank noise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Yuan; Karim, Karim S.; Badano, Aldo

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The authors describe the modification to a previously developed Monte Carlo model of semiconductor direct x-ray detector required for studying the effect of burst and recombination algorithms on detector performance. This work provides insight into the effect of different charge generation models for a-Se detectors on Swank noise and recombination fraction. Methods: The proposed burst and recombination models are implemented in the Monte Carlo simulation package, ARTEMIS, developed byFang et al. [“Spatiotemporal Monte Carlo transport methods in x-ray semiconductor detectors: Application to pulse-height spectroscopy in a-Se,” Med. Phys. 39(1), 308–319 (2012)]. The burst model generates a cloud of electron-hole pairs based on electron velocity, energy deposition, and material parameters distributed within a spherical uniform volume (SUV) or on a spherical surface area (SSA). A simple first-hit (FH) and a more detailed but computationally expensive nearest-neighbor (NN) recombination algorithms are also described and compared. Results: Simulated recombination fractions for a single electron-hole pair show good agreement with Onsager model for a wide range of electric field, thermalization distance, and temperature. The recombination fraction and Swank noise exhibit a dependence on the burst model for generation of many electron-hole pairs from a single x ray. The Swank noise decreased for the SSA compared to the SUV model at 4 V/μm, while the recombination fraction decreased for SSA compared to the SUV model at 30 V/μm. The NN and FH recombination results were comparable. Conclusions: Results obtained with the ARTEMIS Monte Carlo transport model incorporating drift and diffusion are validated with the Onsager model for a single electron-hole pair as a function of electric field, thermalization distance, and temperature. For x-ray interactions, the authors demonstrate that the choice of burst model can affect the simulation results for the generation

  1. Structure of Naegleria Tet-like dioxygenase (NgTet1) in complexes with a reaction intermediate 5-hydroxymethylcytosine DNA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hashimoto, Hideharu; Pais, June E.; Dai, Nan; Corrêa, Jr., Ivan R.; Zhang, Xing; Zheng, Yu; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-08-31

    The family of ten-eleven translocation (Tet) dioxygenases is widely distributed across the eukaryotic tree of life, from mammals to the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi. Like mammalian Tet proteins, the Naegleria Tet-like protein, NgTet1, acts on 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and generates 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) in three consecutive, Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent oxidation reactions. The two intermediates, 5hmC and 5fC, could be considered either as the reaction product of the previous enzymatic cycle or the substrate for the next cycle. Here we present a new crystal structure of NgTet1 in complex with DNA containing a 5hmC. Along with the previously solved NgTet1–5mC structure, the two complexes offer a detailed picture of the active site at individual stages of the reaction cycle. In the crystal, the hydroxymethyl (OH-CH2-) moiety of 5hmC points to the metal center, representing the reaction product of 5mC hydroxylation. The hydroxyl oxygen atom could be rotated away from the metal center, to a hydrophobic pocket formed by Ala212, Val293 and Phe295. Such rotation turns the hydroxyl oxygen atom away from the product conformation, and exposes the target CH2 towards the metal-ligand water molecule, where a dioxygen O2 molecule would occupy to initiate the next round of reaction by abstracting a hydrogen atom from the substrate. The Ala212-to-Val (A212V) mutant profoundly limits the product to 5hmC, probably due to the reduced hydrophobic pocket size restricts the binding of 5hmC as a substrate.

  2. Development of the Next-Generation Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (NG-CSSX) Process for Cesium Removal from High-Level Tank Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, Bruce A; Bonnesen, Peter V; Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Sloop Jr, Frederick {Fred} V; Williams, Neil J; Birdwell Jr, Joseph F; Lee, Denise L; Leonard, Ralph; Fink, Samuel D; Peters, Thomas B.; Geeting, Mark W

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the chemical performance of the Next-Generation Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (NG-CSSX) process in its current state of development for removal of cesium from the alkaline high-level tank wastes at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the US Department of Energy (USDOE) complex. Overall, motivation for seeking a major enhancement in performance for the currently deployed CSSX process stems from needs for accelerating the cleanup schedule and reducing the cost of salt-waste disposition. The primary target of the NG-CSSX development campaign in the past year has been to formulate a solvent system and to design a corresponding flowsheet that boosts the performance of the SRS Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) from a current minimum decontamination factor of 12 to 40,000. The chemical approach entails use of a more soluble calixarene-crown ether, called MaxCalix, allowing the attainment of much higher cesium distribution ratios (DCs) on extraction. Concurrently decreasing the Cs-7SB modifier concentration is anticipated to promote better hydraulics. A new stripping chemistry has been devised using a vitrification-friendly aqueous boric acid strip solution and a guanidine suppressor in the solvent, resulting in sharply decreased DCs on stripping. Results are reported herein on solvent phase behavior and batch Cs distribution for waste simulants and real waste together with a preliminary flowsheet applicable for implementation in the MCU. The new solvent will enable MCU to process a much wider range of salt feeds and thereby extend its service lifetime beyond its design life of three years. Other potential benefits of NG-CSSX include increased throughput of the SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), currently under construction, and an alternative modular near-tank application at Hanford.

  3. Un~ted States Env~ronmental Monltor~ng EPA.600 '4-88, 021 Envtronmental Protect~on Systems Laboratory DOE/OP/00539/060

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Env~ronmental Monltor~ng EPA.600 '4-88, 021 Envtronmental Protect~on Systems Laboratory DOE/OP/00539/060 Agency P 0. Box 93478 June 1988 Las Vegas NV 89193-5478 Research and Development Off-Site Environmental Monitoring Report Radiation Monitoring Around United States 1 ' 7 L 8 f Nuclear Test Areas This page intentionally left blank EPA-60014-88-021 DOE/DPI0053?-060 May 1988 OFF-SITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT R a d i a t i o n M o n i t o r i n g Around U n i t e d States Nuclear Test

  4. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Emily Warren, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    philosophy degree in engineering for sustainable development from the University of Cambridge in 2006. She completed her Ph.D. at Caltech, studying the growth and energy...

  5. J. Chris Ford, Ph.D. | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Chris Ford, Ph.D. - Technical Advisor to the Director Office of Economic Impact and Diversity Most Recent by Chris Ford Unlocking Growth Opportunities for Minority Businesses...

  6. Energy Department Seeks Recent Ph.D. Recipients for Postdoctoral...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Research Projects to Spur Innovation in Solar Energy Energy Department Seeks Recent Ph.D. ... to solar energy deployment, using big data to solve solar's biggest challenges, and ...

  7. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - John Wohlgemuth, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John Wohlgemuth, Ph.D. Principal Scientist Photo of John Wohlgemuth. 303-384-7982 Task Focus: Standards development, module failure analysis and the development of accelerated...

  8. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Hasitha Mahabaduge, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hasitha Mahabaduge, Ph.D. Postdoctoral Researcher Photo of Hasitha Mahabaduge 303-384-7350 Hasitha.Mahabaduge@nrel.gov Dr. Hasitha Mahabaduge's primary research interests include...

  9. Richard J. French, Ph.D. | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular beam mass spectrometry Molecular structure Instrumentation and controls Laboratory equipment design and construction Computer-aided design (CAD) Education Ph.D., ...

  10. Consideration of Factors Affecting Strip Effluent PH and Sodium Content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.

    2015-07-29

    A number of factors were investigated to determine possible reasons for why the Strip Effluent (SE) can sometimes have higher than expected pH values and/or sodium content, both of which have prescribed limits. All of the factors likely have some impact on the pH values and Na content.

  11. Ng_NERSC_ASCR.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the cavity shape due to fabrication errors. This discovery was achieved as a team effort between SLAC, TOPS, and JLab which underscores the importance of the SciDAC...

  12. Method for producing rapid pH changes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clark, John H.; Campillo, Anthony J.; Shapiro, Stanley L.; Winn, Kenneth R.

    1981-01-01

    A method of initiating a rapid pH change in a solution by irradiating the solution with an intense flux of electromagnetic radiation of a frequency which produces a substantial pK change to a compound in solution. To optimize the resulting pH change, the compound being irradiated in solution should have an excited state lifetime substantially longer than the time required to establish an excited state acid-base equilibrium in the solution. Desired pH changes can be accomplished in nanoseconds or less by means of picosecond pulses of laser radiation.

  13. Method for producing rapid pH changes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clark, J.H.; Campillo, A.J.; Shapiro, S.L.; Winn, K.R.

    A method of initiating a rapid pH change in a solution comprises irradiating the solution with an intense flux of electromagnetic radiation of a frequency which produces a substantial pK change to a compound in solution. To optimize the resulting pH change, the compound being irradiated in solution should have an excited state lifetime substantially longer than the time required to establish an excited state acid-base equilibrium in the solution. Desired pH changes can be accomplished in nanoseconds or less by means of picosecond pulses of laser radiation.

  14. MICfiAEL WHALEN-SHXW, Ph.D. *

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    r' q p MICfiAEL WHALEN-SHXW, Ph.D. * 7041 Zane Trail Road Circleville, Ohio 43113 (614) ... ( . . . * * @ ' 1 ) 1 3 IS Mbt?Jrn 4 ' D DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an ...

  15. David W. Mulder, Ph.D. | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    W. Mulder David W. Mulder, Ph.D. Research Scientist, Scientist III David.Mulder@nrel.gov | 303-384-7486 Research Interests David W. Mulder's research interests revolve around ...

  16. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Nick Bosco, PhD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nick Bosco, PhD Senior Scientist Photo of vv 303-384-6337 Nick.Bosco@nrel.gov Task Focus: Failure Analysis and Accelerated Testing Specializes in: Infrared imaging and other...

  17. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Andriy Zakutayev, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Andriy Zakutayev, Ph.D. Scientist 303-384-6467 Andriy.Zakutayev@nrel.gov Andriy Zakutayev is a scientist working in the field of renewable energy technologies. The applied...

  18. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Nancy M. Haegel, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nancy M. Haegel, Ph.D. Center Director, Materials Science Photo of Nancy Haegel 303 384 6548 Nancy.Haegel@nrel.gov Dr. Nancy Haegel is Center Director of the Materials Science...

  19. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Mark Campanelli, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mark Campanelli, Ph.D. Postdoctoral Researcher 303-384-6469 Mark.Campanelli@nrel.gov Mark Campanelli graduated with a master's degree and a doctorate in mathematics from Montana...

  20. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Teresa Barnes, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Teresa Barnes, Ph.D. Senior Scientist 303-384-6682 Teresa.Barnes@nrel.gov Dr. Barnes received a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering from the University of Maryland in 2000...

  1. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Benjamin G. Lee, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Benjamin G. Lee, Ph.D. Research Scientist Photo of Benjamin Lee 303-384-7869 Benjamin.Lee@nrel.gov Benjamin Lee earned his bachelor's degree from the California Institute of...

  2. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Stephan Lany, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stephan Lany, Ph.D. Scientist V Photo of Stephan Lany 303-384-6652 Stephan.Lany@nrel.gov Stephan Lany is a computational materials scientist with a background in electronic...

  3. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Bill McMahon, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bill McMahon, Ph.D. Senior Scientist 303-384-6578 Bill.McMahon@nrel.gov Dr. Bill McMahon received a bachelor's degree in engineering physics from the Colorado School of Mines in...

  4. Tina Kaarsberg, Ph.D. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tina Kaarsberg, Ph.D. About Us Tina Kaarsberg, Ph.D. - SBIR/STTR Program Manager, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Most Recent New SBIR All-in-One Web Tool Helps Small Businesses Navigate Nine Websites October 27 Small Business Innovation Research Projects to Make a Big Impact on Clean Energy Economy June 16 Small Business Innovation Research: Bringing Clean Energy Technologies to the Marketplace May 1

  5. Daniel A. Ruddy, Ph.D. | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A. Ruddy Daniel A. Ruddy, Ph.D. Inorganic and Materials Chemist, Senior Scientist Dan.Ruddy@nrel.gov | 303-384-6322 Research Interests Inorganic chemistry and catalysis New synthetic pathways to functional materials Renewable fuels production and processes Biomass conversion catalysis Areas of Expertise Dan received a Ph.D. degree in Inorganic Chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley in 2008. His doctoral research combined synthetic molecular and materials chemistry with detailed

  6. Comparing Metal Leaching and Toxicity from High pH, Low pH, and High Ammonia Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Phillips, Jana Randolph; Fagan, Lisa Anne; Drake, Meghan M; Ruther, Rose Emily; Fisher, L. Suzanne; Amonette, J. E.

    2007-01-01

    Previous work with both class F and class C fly ash indicated minimal leaching from most fly ashes tested. However, the addition of NOx removal equipment might result in higher levels of ammonia in the fly ash. We have recently been testing fly ash with a wide range of pH (3.7-12.4) originating from systems with NOx removal equipment. Leaching experiments were done using dilute CaCl2 solutions in batch and columns and a batch nitric acid method. All methods indicated that the leaching of heavy metals was different in the highest ammonia sample tested and the high pH sample. However, toxicity testing with the Microtox system has indicated little potential toxicity in leachates except for the fly ash at the highest pH (12.4). When the leachate from the high pH fly ash was neutralized, toxicity was eliminated.

  7. Comparing metal leaching and toxicity from high pH, low pH, and high ammonia fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palumbo, Anthony V.; Tarver, Jana R.; Fagan, Lisa A.; McNeilly, Meghan S.; Ruther, Rose; Fisher, L. S.; Amonette, James E.

    2007-07-01

    Previous work with both class F and class C fly ash indicated minimal leaching from most fly ashes tested. However, the addition of NOx removal equipment might result in higher levels of ammonia in the fly ash. We have recently been testing fly ash with a wide range of pH (3.712.4) originating from systems with NOx removal equipment. Leaching experiments were done using dilute CaCl2 solutions in batch and columns and a batch nitric acid method. All methods indicated that the leaching of heavy metals was different in the highest ammonia sample tested and the high pH sample. However, toxicity testing with the Microtox* system has indicated little potential toxicity in leachates except for the fly ash at the highest pH (12.4). When the leachate from the high pH fly ash was neutralized, toxicity was eliminated.

  8. FPDS-NG National Interest Action (NIA) Code to Track Procurement Actions Made in Support of the Pacific Earthquake and Tsunami

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this Policy Flash is to advise Contracting Officers of the establishment of a new National Interest Action (NIA) Code to track procurement actions made in support of the Pacific Earthquake and Tsunami. As explained below, this action does not trigger or otherwise authorize agencies to use any Emergency Acquisition Flexibilities in Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) 18.2. Effective immediately, procurement actions in direct response to the Pacific earthquake and tsunami should be reported in FPDS-NG using the NIA code "Pacific Earthquake/Tsunami 2011." The NIA value for Pacific Earthquake and Tsunami is currently valid from March 11, 2011, to September 12, 2011. Since responses to this incident may be conducted inside or outside the United States, Contracting Officers should ensure that "Place of Performance" data accurately reflects where the work will be performed. Note: This NIA Code should be used only to facilitate cost collection and reporting. Use of this NIA Code does not authorize or justify use of any Emergency Acquisition Flexibilities in FAR 18.2. However, the acquisition flexibilities described in FAR 18.1 may be available, as well as others in agency acquisition supplements, to support the response to the Pacific Earthquake and Tsunami.

  9. Near-infrared noninvasive spectroscopic determination of pH

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alam, Mary K.; Robinson, Mark R.

    1998-08-11

    Methods and apparatus for, preferably, determining noninvasively and in vitro pH in a human. The non-invasive method includes the steps of: generating light at three or more different wavelengths in the range of 1000 nm to 2500 nm; irradiating blood containing tissue; measuring the intensities of the wavelengths emerging from the blood containing tissue to obtain a set of at least three spectral intensities v. wavelengths; and determining the unknown values of pH. The determination of pH is made by using measured intensities at wavelengths that exhibit change in absorbance due to histidine titration. Histidine absorbance changes are due to titration by hydrogen ions. The determination of the unknown pH values is performed by at least one multivariate algorithm using two or more variables and at least one calibration model. The determined pH values are within the physiological ranges observed in blood containing tissue. The apparatus includes a tissue positioning device, a source, at least one detector, electronics, a microprocessor, memory, and apparatus for indicating the determined values.

  10. Activity-based protein profiling of secreted cellulolytic enzyme activity dynamics in Trichoderma reesei QM6a, NG14, and RUT-C30

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Lindsey N.; Culley, David E.; Hofstad, Beth A.; Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Zink, Erika M.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Smith, Richard D.; Callister, Stephen J.; Magnuson, Jon M.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2013-12-01

    Development of alternative, non-petroleum based sources of bioenergy that can be applied in the short-term find great promise in the use of highly abundant and renewable lignocellulosic plant biomass.1 This material obtained from different feedstocks, such as forest litter or agricultural residues, can yield liquid fuels and other chemical products through biorefinery processes.2 Biofuels are obtained from lignocellulosic materials by chemical pretreatment of the biomass, followed by enzymatic decomposition of cellulosic and hemicellulosic compounds into soluble sugars that are converted to desired chemical products via microbial metabolism and fermentation.3, 4 To release soluble sugars from polymeric cellulose multiple enzymes are required, including endoglucanase, exoglucanase, and ?-glucosidase.5, 6 However, the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose into soluble sugars remains a significant limiting factor to the efficient and economically viable utilization of lignocellulosic biomass for transport fuels.7, 8 The primary industrial source of cellulose and hemicellulases is the mesophilic soft-rot fungus Trichoderma reesei,9 having widespread applications in food, feed, textile, pulp, and paper industries.10 The genome encodes 200 glycoside hydrolases, including 10 cellulolytic and 16 hemicellulolytic enzymes.11 The hypercellulolytic catabolite derepressed strain RUT-C30 was obtained through a three-step UV and chemical mutagenesis of the original T. reesei strain QM6a,12, 13 in which strains M7 and NG14 were intermediate, having higher cellulolytic activity than the parent strain but less activity and higher catabolite repression than RUT-C30.14 Numerous methods have been employed to optimize the secreted enzyme cocktail of T. reesei including cultivation conditions, operational parameters, and mutagenesis.3 However, creating an optimal and economical enzyme mixture for production-scale biofuels synthesis may take thousands of experiments to identify.

  11. PhD Comics' guide to fusion makes the complex understandable...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PhD Comics' guide to fusion makes the complex understandable June 12, 2014 (Photo by PhD Comics, www.phdcomics.comTV) A scene from PhD Comics' Jorge Cham's video "What is Fusion" ...

  12. Measurement and control of pH in hydrothermal solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wesolowski, D.J.; Palmer, D.A.; Mesmer, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    Hydrogen-electrode concentration cells with liquid junction are routinely used to measure the pH of aqueous solutions from 0 to 300 C. Results include the dissociation constants of common acids and bases and the hydrolysis and complexation of metal ions in aqueous electrolytes over a wide range of salinities. Recently, we have utilized these cells to examine the sorption of H{sup +} on mineral surfaces, the solubility of minerals with continuous in situ pH measurement, and the thermal decompositon rates of organic acids.

  13. C W L WHALEN-SHAW, Ph.D,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    k C W L WHALEN-SHAW, Ph.D, t 7041 Zane Trail Road Circleville, Ohio 431 13 (614) 474-1129 ... 2. The layered pigment containing 30% Ti02 and 70% l-clay yields a 79:2 brightness. ...

  14. Flexible high-temperature pH probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bielawski, John C.; Outwater, John O.; Halbfinger, George P.

    2003-04-22

    A flexible pH probe device is provided for use in hot water and other high temperature environments up to about 590.degree. F. The pH probe includes a flexible, inert tubular probe member, an oxygen anion conducting, solid state electrolyte plug located at the distal end of the tubular member, oxide powder disposed at the distal end of the tubular member; a metal wire extending along the tubular member and having a distal end in contact with the oxide powder so as to form therewith an internal reference electrode; and a compression fitting forming a pressure boundary seal around a portion of the tubular member remote from the distal end thereof. Preferably, the tubular member is made of polytetrafluoroethylene, and the solid state electrolyte plug is made of stabilized zirconia. The flexibility of the probe member enables placement of the electrode into the area of interest, including around corners, into confined areas and the like.

  15. SAMPLING DEVICE FOR pH MEASUREMENT IN PROCESS STREAMS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Michelson, C.E.; Carson, W.N. Jr.

    1958-11-01

    A pH cell is presented for monitoring the hydrogen ion concentration of a fluid in a process stream. The cell is made of glass with a side entry arm just above a reservoir in which the ends of a glass electrode and a reference electrode are situated. The glass electrode contains the usual internal solution which is connected to a lead. The reference electrode is formed of saturated calomel having a salt bridge in its bottom portion fabricated of a porous glass to insure low electrolyte flow. A flush tube leads into the cell through which buffer and flush solutions are introduced. A ground wire twists about both electrode ends to insure constant electrical grounding of the sample. The electrode leads are electrically connected to a pH meter of aay standard type.

  16. Yannick J. Bomble, Ph.D. | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yannick J. Bomble Yannick J. Bomble, Ph.D. Senior Research Scientist Yannick.Bomble@nrel.gov | 303-384-7729 Research Interests Development of thermophilic bacteria for improved biomass deconstruction Biomass degrading mechanisms of thermophilic bacteria Metabolic modeling and pathway engineering in microbes for upgrading sugar to fuels and high value chemicals Metabolic enzyme characterization, modeling, and engineering (thermostability, cofactor specificity, binding, rate limiting step)

  17. Re-designing the PhEDEx Security Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, C.-H.; Wildish, T.; Zhang, X.

    2014-01-01

    PhEDEx, the data-placement tool used by the CMS experiment at the LHC, was conceived in a more trusting time. The security model provided a safe environment for site agents and operators, but offerred little more protection than that. Data was not sufficiently protected against loss caused by operator error or software bugs or by deliberate manipulation of the database. Operators were given high levels of access to the database, beyond what was actually needed to accomplish their tasks. This exposed them to the risk of suspicion should an incident occur. Multiple implementations of the security model led to difficulties maintaining code, which can lead to degredation of security over time. In order to meet the simultaneous goals of protecting CMS data, protecting the operators from undue exposure to risk, increasing monitoring capabilities and improving maintainability of the security model, the PhEDEx security model was redesigned and re-implemented. Security was moved from the application layer into the database itself, fine-grained access roles were established, and tools and procedures created to control the evolution of the security model over time. In this paper we describe this work, we describe the deployment of the new security model, and we show how these enhancements improve security on several fronts simultaneously.

  18. Microsoft Word - 2013 KCP ASES Final

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2013 Annual Site Environmental Summary U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Kansas City Plant September 2014 i U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Annual Site Environmental Summary Report Kansas City Plant Table of Contents Page U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration ................ i Table of Contents ...................................................................................................... i

  19. From Neighborhoods to Nationwide, ASE Congressional briefing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    eere.energy.gov 1 From Neighborhoods to Nationwide Danielle Sass Byrnett Supervisor, Better Buildings Residential Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrades eere.energy.gov 2 Better ...

  20. Microsoft Word - 2013 KCP ASES Final

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... The overlying shale contains a poorly-defined coal horizon ... Three natural gas-fired hot water boilers provide heating ... at the Central Utility Plant (CUP), a fuel cell ...

  1. PH adjustment of power plant cooling water with flue gas/fly...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PH adjustment of power plant cooling water with flue gasfly ash Citation Details In-Document Search Title: PH adjustment of power plant cooling water with flue gasfly ash A...

  2. Brine pH Modification Scale Control Technology. 2. A Review.pdf...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Brine pH Modification Scale Control Technology. 2. A Review.pdf Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Brine pH Modification Scale...

  3. Recent Ph.D. Recipients Sought for Innovative Research in Solar...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recent Ph.D. Recipients Sought for Innovative Research in Solar Energy Recent Ph.D. Recipients Sought for Innovative Research in Solar Energy March 23, 2016 - 2:57pm Addthis ...

  4. Microfluidic device having an immobilized pH gradient and page...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    pH gradient and page gels for protein separation and analysis Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microfluidic device having an immobilized pH gradient and page gels ...

  5. Role of pH in metal adsorption from aqueous solutions containing chelating agents on chitosan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, F.C.; Tseng, R.L.; Juang, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    The role of pH in adsorption of Cu(II) from aqueous solutions containing chelating agents on chitosan was emphasized. Four chelating agents including ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), citric acid, tartaric acid, and sodium gluconate were used. It was shown that the adsorption ability of Cu(II) on chitosan from its chelated solutions varied significantly with pH variations. The competition between coordination of Cu(II) with unprotonated chitosan and electrostatic interaction of the Cu(II) chelates with protonated chitosan took place because of the change in solution pH during adsorption. The maximum adsorption capacity was obtained within each optimal pH range determined from titration curves of the chelated solutions. Coordination of Cu(II) with the unprotonated chitosan was found to dominate at pH below such an optimal pH value.

  6. Microfluidic device having an immobilized pH gradient and page gels for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    protein separation and analysis (Patent) | SciTech Connect device having an immobilized pH gradient and page gels for protein separation and analysis Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microfluidic device having an immobilized pH gradient and page gels for protein separation and analysis Disclosed is a novel microfluidic device enabling on-chip implementation of a two-dimensional separation methodology. Previously disclosed microscale immobilized pH gradients (IPG) are combined with

  7. PhD Comics' guide to fusion makes the complex understandable | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Lab PhD Comics' guide to fusion makes the complex understandable By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe June 12, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook A scene from PhD Comics' Jorge Cham's video "What is Fusion" features interviews with PPPL physicists on location and employs animation to allow the scientists to explain magnetic fusion. (Photo by PhD Comics, www.phdcomics.com/TV) A scene from PhD Comics' Jorge Cham's video "What is Fusion" features

  8. Kathryn Clay, Ph.D. Vice President of Policy Strategy American...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Remarks of Kathryn Clay, Ph.D. Vice President of Policy Strategy American Gas Association PUBLIC MEETING ON ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE SITING DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUADRENNIAL ENERGY ...

  9. Influence of pH and sequence in peptide aggregation via molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enciso, Marta; Schütte, Christof; Delle Site, Luigi

    2015-12-28

    We employ a recently developed coarse-grained model for peptides and proteins where the effect of pH is automatically included. We explore the effect of pH in the aggregation process of the amyloidogenic peptide KTVIIE and two related sequences, using three different pH environments. Simulations using large systems (24 peptides chains per box) allow us to describe the formation of realistic peptide aggregates. We evaluate the thermodynamic and kinetic implications of changes in sequence and pH upon peptide aggregation, and we discuss how a minimalistic coarse-grained model can account for these details.

  10. ORISE: Recent Ph.D. recipients wanted for Energy Efficiency and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recent Ph.D. recipients wanted for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Research Awards Applications being accepted through the end of April FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE March 4, 2014...

  11. Influence of in vitro assay pH and chyme composition on As bioaccessib...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Influence of in vitro assay pH and chyme composition on As bioaccessibility in contaminated soils Authors: Smith, Euan ; Scheckel, Kirk ; Miller, Bradley W. ; Weber, John ; ...

  12. High Temperature Chemical Sensing Tool: Preliminary pH and reference electrode test results

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Grzegorz Cieslewski

    2014-09-30

    Project: High Temperature Chemical Sensing Tool for Distributed Mapping of Fracture Flow in EGS. Preliminary pH and reference electrode test results.

  13. Thomas D. Foust, Ph.D, P.E. | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thomas D. Foust, Ph.D, P.E. Director, National Bioenergy Center Thomas.Foust@nrel.gov | ... Affiliated Research Programs United Nations Bioenergy and Sustainability Assessment ...

  14. Method and apparatus for maintaining the pH in zinc-bromine battery systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grimes, Patrick G.

    1985-09-10

    A method and apparatus for maintaining the pH level in a zinc-bromine battery features reacting decomposition hydrogen with bromine in the presence of a catalyst. The catalyst encourages the formation of hydrogen and bromine ions. The decomposition hydrogen is therefore consumed, alloying the pH of the system to remain substantially at a given value.

  15. With 400th Ph.D. grad, UW-Madison celebrates a half century of fusion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab With 400th Ph.D. grad, UW-Madison celebrates a half century of fusion energy American Fusion News Category: U.S. Universities Link: With 400th Ph.D. grad, UW-Madison celebrates a half century of fusion energy

  16. Consideration of factors affecting strip effluent pH and sodium content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.

    2015-07-29

    A number of factors were investigated to determine possible reasons for why the Strip Effluent (SE) can sometimes have higher than expected pH values and/or sodium content, both of which have prescribed limits. All of the factors likely have some impact on the pH values and Na content.

  17. Origin of the instability of octadecylamine Langmuir monolayer at low pH

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Avazbaeva, Zaure; Sung, Woongmo; Lee, Jonggwan; Phan, Minh Dinh; Shin, Kwanwoo; Vaknin, David; Kim, Doseok

    2015-11-30

    In this paper, it has been reported that an octadecylamine (ODA) Langmuir monolayer becomes unstable at low pH values with no measurable surface pressure at around pH 3.5, suggesting significant dissolution of the ODA molecule into the subphase solution (Albrecht, Colloids Surf. A 2006, 284–285, 166–174). However, by lowering the pH further, ODA molecules reoccupy the surface, and a full monolayer is recovered at pH 2.5. Using surface sum-frequency spectroscopy and pressure–area isotherms, it is found that the recovered monolayer at very low pH has a larger area per molecule with many gauche defects in the ODA molecules as comparedmore » to that at high pH values. This structural change suggests that the reappearance of the monolayer is due to the adsorbed Cl– counterions to the protonated amine groups, leading to partial charge neutralization. This proposition is confirmed by intentionally adding monovalent salts (i.e., NaCl, NaBr, or NaI) to the subphase to recover the monolayer at pH 3.5, in which the detailed structure of the monolayer is confirmed by sum frequency spectra and the adsorbed anions by X-ray reflectivity.« less

  18. Origin of the instability of octadecylamine Langmuir monolayer at low pH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avazbaeva, Zaure; Sung, Woongmo; Lee, Jonggwan; Phan, Minh Dinh; Shin, Kwanwoo; Vaknin, David; Kim, Doseok

    2015-11-30

    In this paper, it has been reported that an octadecylamine (ODA) Langmuir monolayer becomes unstable at low pH values with no measurable surface pressure at around pH 3.5, suggesting significant dissolution of the ODA molecule into the subphase solution (Albrecht, Colloids Surf. A 2006, 284–285, 166–174). However, by lowering the pH further, ODA molecules reoccupy the surface, and a full monolayer is recovered at pH 2.5. Using surface sum-frequency spectroscopy and pressure–area isotherms, it is found that the recovered monolayer at very low pH has a larger area per molecule with many gauche defects in the ODA molecules as compared to that at high pH values. This structural change suggests that the reappearance of the monolayer is due to the adsorbed Cl– counterions to the protonated amine groups, leading to partial charge neutralization. This proposition is confirmed by intentionally adding monovalent salts (i.e., NaCl, NaBr, or NaI) to the subphase to recover the monolayer at pH 3.5, in which the detailed structure of the monolayer is confirmed by sum frequency spectra and the adsorbed anions by X-ray reflectivity.

  19. pH effect on structural and optical properties of nanostructured zinc oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munef, R. A.

    2015-03-30

    ZnO nanostructures were Deposited on Objekttrager glasses for various pH values by chemical bath deposition method using Zn (NO3)2·6H2O (zinc nitrate hexahydrate) solution at 75°C reaction temperature without any posterior treatments. The ZnO nanostructures obtained were characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD, UV). The structure was hexagonal and it was found that some peaks disappear with various pH values. The grain sizes of ZnO films increases from 22-to-29nm with increasing pH. The transmission of the films was (85-95%)

  20. T.M. Bull Bennett, PhD | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    T.M. Bull Bennett, PhD About Us T.M. Bull Bennett, PhD T.M. Bull Bennett, PhD Dr. T. M. Bull Bennett (Mi'kmaq), was born in Brunswick, ME, and grew up in the mountains and prairies of Wyoming. As an undergraduate he studied field ecology earning a BS in Biology from Black Hills State University. He completed his MS in Zoology and Physiology at the University of Wyoming where he studied captive propagation of black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) as part of the National Black-Footed Ferret

  1. WBU-14-0011- In the Matter of Dr. Paul M. Cole, Ph.D

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On November 3, 2014, the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) issued a decision denying a jurisdictional appeal filed by Dr. Paul M. Cole, Ph.D (Dr. Cole), a former Oak Ridge Institute for Science...

  2. PAA-15-0001- In the Matter of Rolf E. Carlson, PhD

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On July 31, 2015, OHA issued a decision denying a Privacy Act Appeal filed by Rolf E. Carlson, PhD from a determination issued to him by the DOE’s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)....

  3. ORISE report shows number of health physics Ph.D.s declined in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORISE report shows number of health physics Ph.D.s declined in 2009 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE June 15, 2010 FY10-37 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-Health physics undergraduate degrees increased...

  4. Microfluidic device having an immobilized pH gradient and page...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and page gels for protein separation and analysis Title: Microfluidic device having an immobilized pH gradient and page gels for protein separation and analysis Disclosed is a ...

  5. Paul J. Merges, PhD Director, Bureau of Radiation New York State...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AU62 & 1993 Paul J. Merges, PhD Director, Bureau of Radiation New York State Department of Environmental Conservation 50 Wolf Road Albany, New York 12233 1; Dear Dr. Merges: Your ...

  6. Paul W. King, Ph.D., M.S. | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Paul W. King Paul W. King, Ph.D., M.S. Scientist VI - Supervisor, Photobiology Group Paul.King@nrel.gov | 303-384-6277 Research Interests Paul King's research interests are broadly ...

  7. pH effect on the separation of uranium fluoride effluents by the reverse osmosis process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yun Chen ); Min-Lin Chu; Mu-Chang Shieh , Lung-tan, )

    1992-04-01

    Ammonium fluoride solutions and uranium fluoride effluents (UFE) with solute concentrations from 0.101 to 7,920 kg/m{sup 3}, at pH 2.80 to 9.60, have been treated with a continuous feedback reverse osmosis (RO) process. The solute rejections of NH{sub 4}{sup +}, F{sup {minus}}, and U{sup 6+} depend heavily on the feed pH value. For ammonium fluoride solutions, the rejection ratio of NH{sub 4}{sup +} decreases sharply from ca. 90 to 44.2% with the feed pH increased from 3.30 to 9.60, while that of F{sup {minus}} increases abruptly from 44.8 to 99.9% at the same pH change. For UFE solutions, the rejection ratio of U{sup 6+} remains greater than 90% at pH 2.80-7.13, while that of F{sup {minus}} decreases steadily from 96.4 to 18.8% with decreasing feed pH. Accordingly, the fluoride ions can be separated from UFE solutions under acidic conditions. The changes of solute rejection with feed pH can be explained by the different solubilities of the solutes in the membrane at different pH values. The UFE solutions with {alpha} and {beta} activities at 20.4-53.7 and 8.99-21.3 ({times} 10{sup 5} Baq/m{sup 3}) can be reduced to a level lower than 2.41 and 3.37 ({times}10{sup 5} Baq/m{sup 3}), respectively, by the current RO process.

  8. Ames Laboratory Ph.D. Student is awarded Margaret Butler Fellowship | The

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ames Laboratory Ph.D. Student is awarded Margaret Butler Fellowship Contacts: For Release: July 26, 2016 Colleen Bertoni, Ames Laboratory Steve Karsjen, Public Affairs, 515-294-5643 AMES, Iowa - U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University PhD student Colleen Bertoni has been named this year's recipient of the Margaret Butler Fellowship in Computational Science. Bertoni will spend 2017 at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF), a DOE user facility at

  9. Final Report: Support for Polytechnic PhD Student, September 24, 1996 - June 30, 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myerson, Allan S.

    2000-01-19

    Polytechnic University PhD student working on research projects in the area of fossil energy and renewable energy were supported in this program and did their research work at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the Department of Applied Sciences. One of these students had completed an MS degree in Chemical Engineering at Howard University while doing his research at Brookhaven. This student continued his studies by becoming a Polytechnic PhD student while doing his research work at Brookhaven.

  10. Violeta Sànchez i Nogué, Ph.D. | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Violeta Sànchez i Nogué Violeta Sànchez i Nogué, Ph.D. Postdoctoral Researcher, Biochemical Process Research Violeta.SancheziNogue@nrel.gov | 303-384-6641 Research Interests Production of chemicals and fuels from biomass feedstocks involving biotechnological steps Microbial tolerance to biomass feedstocks Metabolic engineering for the production of value-added compounds Areas of Expertise Fermentation technology Metabolic engineering Education Ph.D., Engineering, Division of Applied

  11. Theory of signal and noise in double-gated nanoscale electronic pH sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Go, Jonghyun; Nair, Pradeep R.; Alam, Muhammad A.

    2012-08-01

    The maximum sensitivity of classical nanowire (NW)-based pH sensors is defined by the Nernst limit of 59 mV/pH. For typical noise levels in ultra-small single-gated nanowire sensors, the signal-to-noise ratio is often not sufficient to resolve pH changes necessary for a broad range of applications. Recently, a new class of double-gated devices was demonstrated to offer apparent 'super-Nernstian' response (>59 mV/pH) by amplifying the original pH signal through innovative biasing schemes. However, the pH-sensitivity of these nanoscale devices as a function of biasing configurations, number of electrodes, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) remains poorly understood. Even the basic question such as 'Do double-gated sensors actually resolve smaller changes in pH compared to conventional single-gated sensors in the presence of various sources of noise?' remains unanswered. In this article, we provide a comprehensive numerical and analytical theory of signal and noise of double-gated pH sensors to conclude that, while the theoretical lower limit of pH-resolution does not improve for double-gated sensors, this new class of sensors does improve the (instrument-limited) pH resolution.

  12. Effect of pH on the heavy metal-clay mineral interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altyn, O.; Oezbelge, H.O.; Dogu, T.; Oezbelge, T.A.

    1997-12-31

    Adsorption and ion exchange of Pb and Cd on the surface of kaolinite and montmorillonite were studied with a strong emphasis on the pH values of solutions containing heavy metal ions. The pH range studied was 2.5 - 9. For kaolinite at a clay/solution ratio of 1/10 (w/w), Pb removal changes from 20 to 30% for an initial Pb concentration of 1640 ppm, and Cd removal changes from 10 to 20% for an initial Cd concentration of 1809 ppm. Due to its high exchange capacity, montmorillonite can remove more heavy metal than kaolinite. Removal rates for montmorillonite can reach up to 90% for both Pb and Cd. In the pH range of 3-6, there is a plateau for the removal rates. At pH values higher than 6, removal seems to increase artificially due to the precipitation of heavy metals. Under similar conditions for both clays, the rate of removal of Pb is always higher than that of Cd. As the pH value decreases for montmorillonite, there is a strong tendency for decreased surface area and swelling, as indicated by BET surface area measurements, adsorbed layer thickness and pore size distribution data. In the range of pH values studied, X-ray diffraction analysis showed the appearance of a characteristic (001) peak for montmorillonite, indicating that the crystalline structure of the clay was intact during the experiments.

  13. Effect of CO{sub 2} air mixtures on the pH of air-stripped water...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    pH of air-stripped water at Treatment Facility D Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of COsub 2 air mixtures on the pH of air-stripped water at Treatment Facility ...

  14. Influence of acidic pH on hydrogen and acetate production by an electrosynthetic microbiome

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    LaBelle, Edward V.; Marshall, Christopher W.; Gilbert, Jack A.; May, Harold D.; Battista, John R.

    2014-10-15

    Production of hydrogen and organic compounds by an electrosynthetic microbiome using electrodes and carbon dioxide as sole electron donor and carbon source, respectively, was examined after exposure to acidic pH (~5). Hydrogen production by biocathodes poised at -600 mV vs. SHE increased>100-fold and acetate production ceased at acidic pH, but ~5–15 mM (catholyte volume)/day acetate and>1,000 mM/day hydrogen were attained at pH ~6.5 following repeated exposure to acidic pH. Cyclic voltammetry revealed a 250 mV decrease in hydrogen overpotential and a maximum current density of 12.2 mA/cm2 at -765 mV (0.065 mA/cm2 sterile control at -800 mV) by the Acetobacterium-dominatedmore » community. Supplying -800 mV to the microbiome after repeated exposure to acidic pH resulted in up to 2.6 kg/m3/day hydrogen (≈2.6 gallons gasoline equivalent), 0.7 kg/m3/day formate, and 3.1 kg/m3/day acetate ( = 4.7 kg CO2 captured).« less

  15. pH control of the structure, composition, and catalytic activity of sulfated zirconia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, Vladimir K.; Materials Science Department, Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 ; Baranchikov, Alexander Ye.; Kopitsa, Gennady P.; Lermontov, Sergey A.; Yurkova, Lyudmila L.; Gubanova, Nadezhda N.; Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Orlova Roscha, Gatchina 188300 ; Ivanova, Olga S.; Lermontov, Anatoly S.; Rumyantseva, Marina N.; Vasilyeva, Larisa P.; Sharp, Melissa; Pranzas, P. Klaus; Tretyakov, Yuri D.

    2013-02-15

    We report a detailed study of structural and chemical transformations of amorphous hydrous zirconia into sulfated zirconia-based superacid catalysts. Precipitation pH is shown to be the key factor governing structure, composition and properties of amorphous sulfated zirconia gels and nanocrystalline sulfated zirconia. Increase in precipitation pH leads to substantial increase of surface fractal dimension (up to {approx}2.7) of amorphous sulfated zirconia gels, and consequently to increase in specific surface area (up to {approx}80 m{sup 2}/g) and simultaneously to decrease in sulfate content and total acidity of zirconia catalysts. Complete conversion of hexene-1 over as synthesized sulfated zirconia catalysts was observed even under ambient conditions. - Graphical abstract: Surface fractal dimension of amorphous sulfated zirconia and specific surface area and catalytic activity of crystalline sulfated zirconia as a function of precipitation pH. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural transformation of amorphous hydrous zirconia into sulfated zirconia is studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Precipitation pH controls surface fractal dimension of amorphous zirconia gels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Precipitation pH is the key factor governing properties of sulfated zirconia.

  16. Influence of acidic pH on hydrogen and acetate production by an electrosynthetic microbiome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaBelle, Edward V.; Marshall, Christopher W.; Gilbert, Jack A.; May, Harold D.; Battista, John R.

    2014-10-15

    Production of hydrogen and organic compounds by an electrosynthetic microbiome using electrodes and carbon dioxide as sole electron donor and carbon source, respectively, was examined after exposure to acidic pH (~5). Hydrogen production by biocathodes poised at -600 mV vs. SHE increased>100-fold and acetate production ceased at acidic pH, but ~5–15 mM (catholyte volume)/day acetate and>1,000 mM/day hydrogen were attained at pH ~6.5 following repeated exposure to acidic pH. Cyclic voltammetry revealed a 250 mV decrease in hydrogen overpotential and a maximum current density of 12.2 mA/cm2 at -765 mV (0.065 mA/cm2 sterile control at -800 mV) by the Acetobacterium-dominated community. Supplying -800 mV to the microbiome after repeated exposure to acidic pH resulted in up to 2.6 kg/m3/day hydrogen (≈2.6 gallons gasoline equivalent), 0.7 kg/m3/day formate, and 3.1 kg/m3/day acetate ( = 4.7 kg CO2 captured).

  17. Structural Bioinformatics-Based Prediction of Exceptional Selectivity of p38 MAP Kinase Inhibitor PH-797804

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xing, Li; Shieh, Huey S.; Selness, Shaun R.; Devraj, Rajesh V.; Walker, John K.; Devadas, Balekudru; Hope, Heidi R.; Compton, Robert P.; Schindler, John F.; Hirsch, Jeffrey L.; Benson, Alan G.; Kurumbail, Ravi G.; Stegeman, Roderick A.; Williams, Jennifer M.; Broadus, Richard M.; Walden, Zara; Monahan, Joseph B.; Pfizer

    2009-07-24

    PH-797804 is a diarylpyridinone inhibitor of p38{alpha} mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase derived from a racemic mixture as the more potent atropisomer (aS), first proposed by molecular modeling and subsequently confirmed by experiments. On the basis of structural comparison with a different biaryl pyrazole template and supported by dozens of high-resolution crystal structures of p38{alpha} inhibitor complexes, PH-797804 is predicted to possess a high level of specificity across the broad human kinase genome. We used a structural bioinformatics approach to identify two selectivity elements encoded by the TXXXG sequence motif on the p38{alpha} kinase hinge: (i) Thr106 that serves as the gatekeeper to the buried hydrophobic pocket occupied by 2,4-difluorophenyl of PH-797804 and (ii) the bidentate hydrogen bonds formed by the pyridinone moiety with the kinase hinge requiring an induced 180{sup o} rotation of the Met109-Gly110 peptide bond. The peptide flip occurs in p38{alpha} kinase due to the critical glycine residue marked by its conformational flexibility. Kinome-wide sequence mining revealed rare presentation of the selectivity motif. Corroboratively, PH-797804 exhibited exceptionally high specificity against MAP kinases and the related kinases. No cross-reactivity was observed in large panels of kinase screens (selectivity ratio of >500-fold). In cellular assays, PH-797804 demonstrated superior potency and selectivity consistent with the biochemical measurements. PH-797804 has met safety criteria in human phase I studies and is under clinical development for several inflammatory conditions. Understanding the rationale for selectivity at the molecular level helps elucidate the biological function and design of specific p38{alpha} kinase inhibitors.

  18. PH adjustment of power plant cooling water with flue gas/fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, Patrick V.; Krumhansl, James L.

    2015-09-22

    A system including a vessel including a heat source and a flue; a turbine; a condenser; a fluid conduit circuit disposed between the vessel, the turbine and the condenser; and a diverter coupled to the flue to direct a portion of an exhaust from the flue to contact with a cooling medium for the condenser water. A method including diverting a portion of exhaust from a flue of a vessel; modifying the pH of a cooling medium for a condenser with the portion of exhaust; and condensing heated fluid from the vessel with the pH modified cooling medium.

  19. Dissolved oxygen and pH relationships in northern Australian mangrove waterways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boto, K.G.; Bunt, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    Consistent, highly significant linear correlations (R2 greater than or equal to 0.8) between pH and dissolved oxygen levels have been found in northern Australian mangrove waterways. These properties seem to be influenced by dissolved organic matter, mainly polyphenolic compounds, present in the creeks and tidal channel waters.

  20. Adsorption behavior of copper and zinc in soils: Influence of pH on adsorption characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Msaky, J.J. ); Calvet, R. )

    1990-08-01

    The authors studied adsorption of copper and zinc on three different soils: a brown silty soil, an Oxisol, and a Podzol. They determined the amounts adsorbed and the shapes of adsorption isotherms as a function of the pH of the adsorbing medium at a constant ionic strength. The adsorbed amount-pH relationship depended strongly on the natures of the metallic cation and of the soil. The pH greatly influenced the characteristics of adsorption isotherms. They based interpretation on the variations with the pH of both adsorbent affinity for the metal in relation to the surface electric charge and chemical speciation in solution. The adsorption mechanism in the Oxisol probably involves monohydroxylated cations but is more determined by bivalent cations in the brown silty soil and the Podzol. From a general point of view, adsorption of copper and zinc cannot be represented with a single adsorption constant, but should be described by adsorption isotherms obtained at various pH values.

  1. Aqueous biphasic extraction process with pH and particle control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, D.J.; Mensah-Biney, R.

    1995-05-02

    A process for aqueous biphasic extraction of metallic oxides and the like from substances containing silica. Control of media pH enables efficient and effective partition of mixture components. The inventive method may be employed to remove excess silica from kaolin clay. 2 figs.

  2. Aqueous biphasic extraction process with pH and particle control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, David J.; Mensah-Biney, R.

    1995-01-01

    A process for aqueous biphasic extraction of metallic oxides and the like from substances containing silica. Control of media pH enables efficient and effective partition of mixture components. The inventive method may be employed to remove excess silica from kaolin clay.

  3. Thermoluminescence Characteristics of Nanocrystalline LiF Phosphors Synthesized at Different pH Values

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, A. K.; Dogra, R.; Kumar, Shalendra; Mishra, S. K.; Lochab, S. P.; Kumar, Ravi

    2011-07-15

    Nanocrystalline lithium fluoride (LiF) phosphors have been prepared by the chemical co-precipitation method at different pH values (7.0, 8.0, 9.0). The formation of nanocrystalline structure has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope. The thermolumniscence (TL) properties of LiF phosphors irradiated with gamma rays at different doses have been studied. The analysis of TL glow curve has revealed the existence of two well resolved glow peaks, one low temperature peak at around 145 deg. C and other one at higher temperature around 375 deg. C. The LiF nano-crystallites synthesized at 8.00 pH have been found to show maximum TL intensity at studied gamma doses (0.1 Gy-15 Gy).

  4. Proton mediated control of biochemical reactions with bioelectronic pH modulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Deng, Yingxin; Miyake, Takeo; Keene, Scott; Josberger, Erik E.; Rolandi, Marco

    2016-04-07

    In Nature, protons (H+) can mediate metabolic process through enzymatic reactions. Examples include glucose oxidation with glucose dehydrogenase to regulate blood glucose level, alcohol dissolution into carboxylic acid through alcohol dehydrogenase, and voltage-regulated H+ channels activating bioluminescence in firefly and jellyfish. Artificial devices that control H+ currents and H+ concentration (pH) are able to actively influence biochemical processes. Here, we demonstrate a biotransducer that monitors and actively regulates pH-responsive enzymatic reactions by monitoring and controlling the flow of H+ between PdHx contacts and solution. The present transducer records bistable pH modulation from an “enzymatic flip-flop” circuit that comprises glucose dehydrogenasemore » and alcohol dehydrogenase. Furthermore, the transducer also controls bioluminescence from firefly luciferase by affecting solution pH.« less

  5. Method of determining pH by the alkaline absorption of carbon dioxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hobbs, David T.

    1992-01-01

    A method for measuring the concentration of hydroxides in alkaline solutions in a remote location using the tendency of hydroxides to absorb carbon dioxide. The method includes the passing of carbon dioxide over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the carbon dioxide solution. A comparison of the measurements yields the absorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to absorption fraction.

  6. Zhong Wang, Ph.D. Group Lead, Genome Analysis National Microbiome Initiative

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Explore Spark for Metagenome assembly Zhong Wang, Ph.D. Group Lead, Genome Analysis National Microbiome Initiative Environmental microbial communities are complex 1 10 100 1000 10000 Human Soil Number of Species Cow >90% of the species haven't been seen before Decode Metagenome Metagenome Short Reads Shotgun Sequencing Metagenome Assembly Assembled Genomes Billions of pieces Terabytes in size "Big Data" Library of Books Shredded Library "reconstructed" Library Genome ~=

  7. pH Adjustment of Power Plant Cooling Water with Flue Gas/ Fly Ash - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search pH Adjustment of Power Plant Cooling Water with Flue Gas/ Fly Ash Sandia National Laboratories Contact SNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Market Sheet (801 KB) Technology Marketing SummaryIncreased recycling of power plant cooling water calls for low-cost means of preventing the formation of calcium carbonate and silicate scale. Hardness (Ca and Mg) and silica are two of

  8. Ronald D. Ripple, PhD Mervin Bovaird Professor of Energy Business and Finance

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    natural gas markets: Prospects for US exports? Ronald D. Ripple, PhD Mervin Bovaird Professor of Energy Business and Finance The University of Tulsa, USA 2015 EIA Energy Conference Washington, D.C. June 15-16, 2015 Outline 2 ! Global natural gas ! How has the past year affected projections of global natural gas markets? ! Effects of lower prices " Will lower prices affect Australia's LNG exports? " Will lower prices affect US export opportunities? ! Shipping cost differentials ! Japan

  9. J-Lab scientist wins award for graphene invention he developed as a Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    student at William & Mary (The College of William and Mary, Ideation) | Jefferson Lab J-Lab scientist wins award for graphene invention he developed as a Ph.D. student at William & Mary (The College of William and Mary, Ideation) External Link: http://www.wm.edu/research/ideation/science-and-technology/j-lab-scientist-wins-... By jlab_admin on Fri, 2012-06-1

  10. George Taylor, Ph.D. Founder, Palmetto Energy Institute Senior Fellow, ATI Center for Energy Studies

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Copyright © 2013 PERF George Taylor, Ph.D. Founder, Palmetto Energy Institute Senior Fellow, ATI Center for Energy Studies EIA Workshop on LCOE / LACE July 25, 2013 Improving the Completeness and Accuracy of Levelized Cost of Electricity Calculations Copyright © 2013 PERF EIA 2012 Annual Energy Outlook Estimated Levelized Cost of New Generation Sources, 2017 U.S. Average Levelized Costs ($2010 per MWh) for plants entering service in 2017 Levelized Fixed Variable Trans- Total Capacity Capital

  11. Diamond formation due to a pH drop during fluid–rock interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sverjensky, Dimitri A.; Huang, Fang

    2015-11-03

    Diamond formation has typically been attributed to redox reactions during precipitation from fluids or magmas. Either the oxidation of methane or the reduction of carbon dioxide has been suggested, based on simplistic models of deep fluids consisting of mixtures of dissolved neutral gas molecules without consideration of aqueous ions. The role of pH changes associated with water–silicate rock interactions during diamond formation is unknown. Here we show that diamonds could form due to a drop in pH during water–rock interactions. We use a recent theoretical model of deep fluids that includes ions, to show that fluid can react irreversibly with eclogite at 900 °C and 5.0 GPa, generating diamond and secondary minerals due to a decrease in pH at almost constant oxygen fugacity. Overall, our results constitute a new quantitative theory of diamond formation as a consequence of the reaction of deep fluids with the rock types that they encounter during migration. Diamond can form in the deep Earth during water–rock interactions without changes in oxidation state.

  12. Diamond formation due to a pH drop during fluid–rock interactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sverjensky, Dimitri A.; Huang, Fang

    2015-11-03

    Diamond formation has typically been attributed to redox reactions during precipitation from fluids or magmas. Either the oxidation of methane or the reduction of carbon dioxide has been suggested, based on simplistic models of deep fluids consisting of mixtures of dissolved neutral gas molecules without consideration of aqueous ions. The role of pH changes associated with water–silicate rock interactions during diamond formation is unknown. Here we show that diamonds could form due to a drop in pH during water–rock interactions. We use a recent theoretical model of deep fluids that includes ions, to show that fluid can react irreversibly withmore » eclogite at 900 °C and 5.0 GPa, generating diamond and secondary minerals due to a decrease in pH at almost constant oxygen fugacity. Overall, our results constitute a new quantitative theory of diamond formation as a consequence of the reaction of deep fluids with the rock types that they encounter during migration. Diamond can form in the deep Earth during water–rock interactions without changes in oxidation state.« less

  13. Synthesis and new structure shaping mechanism of silica particles formed at high pH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Henan; Zhao, Yu; Akins, Daniel L.

    2012-10-15

    For the sol-gel synthesis of silica particles under high pH catalytic conditions (pH>12) in water/ethanol solvent, we have deduced that the competing dynamics of chemical etching and sol-gel process can explain the types of silica particles formed and their morphologies. We have demonstrated that emulsion droplets that are generated by adding tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) to a water-ethanol solution serve as soft templates for hollow spherical silica (1-2 {mu}m). And if the emulsion is converted by the sol-gel process, one finds that suspended solid silica spheres of diameter of {approx}900 nm are formed. Moreover, several other factors are found to play fundamental roles in determining the final morphologies of silica particles, such as by variation of the pH (in our case, using OH{sup -}) to a level where condensation dominates; by changing the volume ratios of water/ethanol; and using an emulsifier (specifically, CTAB) - Graphical abstract: 'Local chemical etching' and sol-gel process have been proposed to interpret the control of morphologies of silica particles through varying initial pHs in syntheses. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different initial pHs in our syntheses provides morphological control of silica particles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 'Local chemical etching' and sol-gel process describes the formation of silica spheres. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of emulsions generates hollow silica particles.

  14. Influence of pH on the adsorption of uranium ions by oxidized activated carbon and chitosan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, G.I.; Park, H.S.; Woo, S.I.

    1999-03-01

    The adsorption characteristics of uranyl ions on surface-oxidized carbon were compared with those of powdered chitosan over a wide pH range. In particular, an extensive analysis was made on solution pH variation during the adsorption process or after adsorption equilibrium. Uranium adsorption on the two adsorbents was revealed to be strongly dependent on the initial pH of the solution. A quantitative comparison of the adsorption capacities of the two adsorbents was made, based on the isotherm data obtained at initial pH 3, 4, and 5. In order to analyze the adsorption kinetics incorporated with pH effects, batch experiments at various initial pH values were carried out, and solution pH profiles with the adsorption time were also evaluated. The breakthrough behavior in a column packed with oxidized carbon was also characterized with respect to the variation of effluent pH. Based on these experimental results, the practical applicability of oxidized carbon for uranium removal from acidic radioactive liquid waste was suggested.

  15. In Situ Spectrophotometric Determination of pH under Geologic CO2 Sequestration Conditions: Method Development and Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Hongbo; Thompson, Christopher J.; Qafoku, Odeta; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2013-02-25

    Injecting massive amounts of CO2 into deep geologic formations will cause a range of coupled thermal, hydrodynamic, mechanical, and chemical changes. A significant perturbation in water-saturated formations is the pH drop in the reservoir fluids due to CO2 dissolution. Knowing the pH under geological CO2 sequestration conditions is important for a better understanding of the short- and long-term risks associated with geological CO2 sequestration and will help in the design of sustainable sequestration projects. Most previous studies on CO2-rock-brine interactions have utilized thermodynamic modeling to estimate the pH. In this work, a spectrophotometric method was developed to determine the in-situ pH in CO2-H2O-NaCl systems in the presence and absence of reservoir rock by observing the spectra of a pH indicator, bromophenol blue, with a UV-visible spectrophotometer. Effects of temperature, pressure, and ionic strength on the pH measurement were evaluated. Measured pH values in CO2-H2O-NaCl systems were compared with several thermodynamic models. Results indicate that bromophenol blue can be used to accurately determine the pH of brine in contact with supercritical CO2 under geologic CO2 sequestration conditions.

  16. PH Sensitive Polymers for Improving Reservoir Sweep and Conformance Control in Chemical Flooring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukul Sharma; Steven Bryant; Chun Huh

    2008-03-31

    There is an increasing opportunity to recover bypassed oil from depleted, mature oilfields in the US. The recovery factor in many reservoirs is low due to inefficient displacement of the oil by injected fluids (typically water). The use of chemical flooding methods to increase recovery efficiencies is severely constrained by the inability of the injected chemicals to contact the bypassed oil. Low sweep efficiencies are the primary cause of low oil recoveries observed in the field in chemical flooding operations even when lab studies indicate high oil recovery efficiency. Any technology that increases the ability of chemical flooding agents to better contact the remaining oil and reduce the amount of water produced in conjunction with the produced oil will have a significant impact on the cost of producing oil domestically in the US. This translates directly into additional economically recoverable reserves, which extends the economic lives of marginal and mature wells. The objective of this research project was to develop a low-cost, pH-triggered polymer for use in IOR processes to improve reservoir sweep efficiency and reservoir conformance in chemical flooding. Rheological measurements made on the polymer solution, clearly show that it has a low viscosity at low pH and exhibits a sudden increase in viscosity (by 2 orders of magnitude or more) at a pH of 3.5 to 4. This implies that the polymer would preferentially flow into zones containing water since the effective permeability to water is highest in these zones. As the pH of the zone increases due to the buffering capacity of the reservoir rock, the polymer solution undergoes a liquid to gel transition causing a sharp increase in the viscosity of the polymer solution in these zones. This allows operationally robust, in-depth conformance treatment of such water bearing zones and better mobility control. The rheological properties of HPAM solutions were measured. These include: steady-shear viscosity and

  17. Development of On-Line Spectroscopic pH Monitoring for Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plants: Weak Acid Schemes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casella, Amanda J.; Hylden, Laura R.; Campbell, Emily L.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Peterson, James M.; Smith, Frances N.; Bryan, Samuel A.

    2015-05-19

    Knowledge of real-time solution properties and composition is a necessity for any spent nuclear fuel reprocessing method. Metal-ligand speciation in aqueous solutions derived from the dissolved commercial spent fuel is highly dependent upon the acid concentration/pH, which influences extraction efficiency and the resulting speciation in the organic phase. Spectroscopic process monitoring capabilities, incorporated in a counter current centrifugal contactor bank, provide a pathway for on-line real-time measurement of solution pH. The spectroscopic techniques are process-friendly and can be easily configured for on-line applications, while classic potentiometric pH measurements require frequent calibration/maintenance and have poor long-term stability in aggressive chemical and radiation environments. Our research is focused on developing a general method for on-line determination of pH of aqueous solutions through chemometric analysis of Raman spectra. Interpretive quantitative models have been developed and validated under the range of chemical composition and pH using a lactic acid/lactate buffer system. The developed model was applied to spectra obtained on-line during solvent extractions performed in a centrifugal contactor bank. The model predicted the pH within 11% for pH > 2, thus demonstrating that this technique could provide the capability of monitoring pH on-line in applications such as nuclear fuel reprocessing.

  18. ASES Solar 2003 Americas Secure Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Florida Solar Energy CenterUniversity of Central Florida 1679 Clearlake Road, Cocoa, Florida 32922, USA (321) 638-1000 All rights reserved. Disclaimer The Florida Solar Energy ...

  19. ASE/CAGI Meeting about Compressors and Compressed Air System...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ASECAGI Meeting about Compressors and Compressed Air System Efficiency On April 25, 2013, several representatives of energy ... Natural Gas Transmission, Storage and Distribution System ...

  20. Davinia Salvachúa Rodríguez, Ph.D. | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Davinia Salvachúa Rodríguez Davinia Salvachúa Rodríguez, Ph.D. Staff Scientist Davinia.Salvachua@nrel.gov | 303-384-7699 Research Interests Lignin conversion by fungi and bacteria to value-added compounds (Figure 1) Ligninolytic enzymes: a tool for lignin depolymerization (Figure 1) Biomass sugars upgrading to advanced biofuels and valuable co-products (Figure 2) Development of fermentation strategies to produce diverse organic acids (i.e. succinic acid, muconic acid, hexanoic acid) by

  1. Method of determining pH by the alkaline absorption of carbon dioxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1992-10-06

    A method is described for measuring the concentration of hydroxides in alkaline solutions in a remote location using the tendency of hydroxides to absorb carbon dioxide. The method includes the passing of carbon dioxide over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the carbon dioxide solution. A comparison of the measurements yields the absorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to absorption fraction. 2 figs.

  2. ORISE report shows number of health physics Ph.D.s declined in 2009

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORISE report shows number of health physics Ph.D.s declined in 2009 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE June 15, 2010 FY10-37 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-Health physics undergraduate degrees increased slightly in 2009 continuing a six-year trend, but doctorate degrees reported a 40-year low, says a report recently released by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education. The report also showed the number of M.S. degrees was 21 percent less than in 2008. The ORISE report, Health Physics Enrollments and Degrees

  3. ORISE: After a Brief Decline, Recent Foreign Ph.D. Graduates are Staying in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the U.S. at Near-record Levels After a Brief Decline, Recent Foreign Ph.D. Graduates are Staying in the U.S. at Near-record Levels FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Feb. 3, 2010 FY10-20 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-Two years after completing doctoral degrees at United States (U.S.) universities, 67% of foreign students graduating in 2005 remained in the U.S., according to a new report issued by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) and funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). This is a

  4. Validation of pH meters, balances and other supporting laboratory equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noon, J.P.

    1995-12-01

    Good Laboratory Practice Standards specify that equipment used for the generation, measurement or assessment of data shall be adequately tested, calibrated and/or standardized, inspected, cleaned and maintained. The validation of less sophisticated instruments and equipment, such as pH meters and balances, is often given little attention when validation procedures are discussed. In this presentation the salient factors to consider when establishing validation strategies for several specific ancillary pieces of equipment will be reviewed. In addition, practical procedures including form for entering validation data and frequency of validation operations will be presented.

  5. Nonlinear ultrasonic characterization of precipitation in 17-4PH stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matlack, Kathryn; Bradley, Harrison A.; Thiele, Sebastian; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Wall, James J.; Jung, Hee Joon; Qu, Jianmin; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2015-04-01

    The extension of operational lifetime of most US nuclear reactors will cause reactor pressure vessel to be exposed to increased levels of neutron radiation damage. This research is part of a broader effort to develop a nondestructive evaluation technique to monitor radiation damage in reactor pressure vessel steels. The main contributor to radiation embrittlement in these steels is the formation of copper-rich precipitates. In this work, a precipitate hardenable martensitic alloy, 17-4PH stainless steel is exposed to thermal aging treatments, and used as a surrogate material to study the effects of copper precipitates on the measured acoustic nonlinearity parameter. Previous work has demonstrated the effectiveness of these nonlinear ultrasonic (NLU) measurements in the characterization of radiation-induced microstructural changes in neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels. NLU measurements using Rayleigh surface waves are performed on 17-4PH samples subjected to isothermal aging. NLU measurements are interpreted with hardness, thermo-electric power, TEM, and atom probe tomography measurements. The Rayleigh wave measurements showed a decrease in the acoustic nonlinearity parameter with increasing aging time, consistent with evidence of increasing number density of nucleated precipitates.

  6. Monomer volume fraction profiles in pH responsive planar polyelectrolyte brushes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mahalik, Jyoti P.; Yang, Yubo; Deodhar, Chaitra V.; Ankner, John Francis; Lokitz, Bradley S.; Kilbey, II, S. Michael; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Kumar, Rajeev

    2016-03-06

    Spatial dependencies of monomer volume fraction profiles of pH responsive polyelectrolyte brushes were investigated using field theories and neutron reflectivity experiments. In particular, planar polyelectrolyte brushes in good solvent were studied and direct comparisons between predictions of the theories and experimental measurements are presented. The comparisons between the theories and the experimental data reveal that solvent entropy and ion-pairs resulting from adsorption of counterions from the added salt play key roles in affecting the monomer distribution and must be taken into account in modeling polyelectrolyte brushes. Furthermore, the utility of this physics-based approach based on these theories for the predictionmore » and interpretation of neutron reflectivity profiles in the context of pH responsive planar polyelectrolyte brushes such as polybasic poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) and polyacidic poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) brushes is demonstrated. The approach provides a quantitative way of estimating molecular weights of the polymers polymerized using surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.« less

  7. Measurements of Eh and pH in Compacted MX-80 Bentonite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlsson, Torbjoern; Muurinen, Arto

    2007-07-01

    The low-content free water and high swelling pressure in compacted bentonite, planned to be used as a buffer in nuclear waste repositories, create adverse conditions for direct measurements of the chemical conditions. This paper presents laboratory results from online measurements with Eh and pH electrodes in water-saturated compacted MX-80 bentonite. The Eh was measured with Au and Pt wires as electrodes, while the pH was determined with IrOx electrodes. The latter were prepared in accordance with the method by Yao et al. [1]. The measurements were carried out in two types of cells: 'squeezing cells' and 'diffusion cells'. The squeezing cell excludes almost completely all chemical interactions between the sample and the surrounding environment outside the cell. The diffusion cell, on the other hand, contains a sample that stays in contact with an external solution and therefore allows following of the physico-chemical interaction between the sample and the external solution. The measuring electrodes were positioned inside the cell in the compacted bentonite, while the reference electrode was positioned outside the cell. (authors)

  8. Atomic structure of the sweet-tasting protein thaumatin I at pH 8.0 reveals the large disulfide-rich region in domain II to be sensitive to a pH change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Ohta, Keisuke; Mikami, Bunzo; Kitabatake, Naofumi; Tani, Fumito

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure of a recombinant thaumatin at pH 8.0 determined at a resolution of 1.0 A. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Substantial fluctuations of a loop in domain II was found in the structure at pH 8.0. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer B-factors for Lys137, Lys163, and Lys187 were significantly affected by pH change. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An increase in mobility might play an important role in the heat-induced aggregation. -- Abstract: Thaumatin, an intensely sweet-tasting plant protein, elicits a sweet taste at 50 nM. Although the sweetness remains when thaumatin is heated at 80 Degree-Sign C for 4 h under acid conditions, it rapidly declines when heating at a pH above 6.5. To clarify the structural difference at high pH, the atomic structure of a recombinant thaumatin I at pH 8.0 was determined at a resolution of 1.0 A. Comparison to the crystal structure of thaumatin at pH 7.3 and 7.0 revealed the root-mean square deviation value of a C{alpha} atom to be substantially greater in the large disulfide-rich region of domain II, especially residues 154-164, suggesting that a loop region in domain II to be affected by solvent conditions. Furthermore, B-factors of Lys137, Lys163, and Lys187 were significantly affected by pH change, suggesting that a striking increase in the mobility of these lysine residues, which could facilitate a reaction with a free sulfhydryl residue produced via the {beta}-elimination of disulfide bonds by heating at a pH above 7.0. The increase in mobility of lysine residues as well as a loop region in domain II might play an important role in the heat-induced aggregation of thaumatin above pH 7.0.

  9. Lack of correlation between extended pH monitoring and scintigraphy in the evaluation of infants with gastroesophageal reflux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolia, V.; Calhoun, J.A.; Kuhns, L.R.; Kauffman, R.E. )

    1990-05-01

    Sixty-nine infants younger than 1 year of age, with symptoms of persistent vomiting, recurrent choking, apnea, persistent cough, or stridor, were evaluated for gastroesophageal reflux. All infants underwent extended intraesophageal pH monitoring for 16 to 24 hours as well as gastroesophageal scintigraphy with technetium 99m sulfur colloid to study the correlation between the two tests. Forty-eight infants exhibited reflux with extended pH monitoring whereas 46 infants showed reflux with scintigraphy. However, the diagnosis of reflux in individual patients by extended pH monitoring corresponded poorly with the diagnosis of reflux in the same patients by scintigraphy. Similarly, no correlation was observed between extended pH monitoring and scintigraphy results, whether expressed as percent gastric emptying or as gastroesophageal reflux ratio. We conclude that extended pH monitoring and scintigraphy measure different pathophysiologic phenomena and detect reflux under different conditions. The ability of these tests to detect reflux may be complementary and they may be of greatest value when used together to enhance the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnostic evaluation. Extended pH monitoring and scintigraphy should not be used interchangeably to monitor gastroesophageal reflux.

  10. RESULTS OF ANALYTICAL SAMPLE CROSSCHECKS FOR NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT EXTRACTION SAMPLES ISOPAR L CONCENTRATION AND PH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2011-09-29

    As part of the implementation process for the Next Generation Cesium Extraction Solvent (NGCS), SRNL and F/H Lab performed a series of analytical cross-checks to ensure that the components in the NGCS solvent system do not constitute an undue analytical challenge. For measurement of entrained Isopar{reg_sign} L in aqueous solutions, both labs performed similarly with results more reliable at higher concentrations (near 50 mg/L). Low bias occurred in both labs, as seen previously for comparable blind studies for the baseline solvent system. SRNL recommends consideration to use of Teflon{trademark} caps on all sample containers used for this purpose. For pH measurements, the labs showed reasonable agreement but considerable positive bias for dilute boric acid solutions. SRNL recommends consideration of using an alternate analytical method for qualification of boric acid concentrations.

  11. Controlling the pH of acid cheese whey in a two-stage anaerobic digester with sodium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghaly, A.E.; Ramkumar, D.R.

    1999-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion of cheese whey offers a two-fold benefit: pollution potential reduction and biogas production. The biogas, as an energy source, could be used to reduce the consumption of traditional fuels in the cheese plant. However, as a result of little or no buffering capacity of whey, the pH of the anaerobic digester drops drastically and the process is inhibited. In this study, the effect of controlling the pH of the second chamber of a two-stage, 150 L anaerobic digester operating on cheese whey on the quality and quantity of biogas and the pollution potential reduction, was investigated using sodium hydroxide. The digester was operated at a temperature of 35 C and a hydraulic retention time of 15 days for three runs (no pH control, pH control with no reseeding, and ph control with reseeding) each lasting 50 days. The results indicated that operating the digester without pH control resulted in a low pH (3.3) which inhibited the methanogenic bacteria. The inhibition was irreversible and the digester did not recover (no methane production) when the pH was restored to 7.0 without reseeding, as the observed increased gas production was a false indication of recovery because the gas was mainly carbon dioxide. The addition of base resulted in a total alkalinity of 12,000 mg/L as CaCO{sub 3}. When the system was reseeded and the pH controlled, the total volatile acid concentration was 15,100 mg/L (as acetic acid), with acetic (28%), propionic (21%), butyric (25%), valeric (8%), and caproic (15%) acids as the major constituents. The biogas production was 62.6 L/d (0.84 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3}/d) and the methane content was 60.7%. Reductions of 27.3, 30.4 and 23.3% in the total solids, chemical oxygen demand and total kjeldahl nitrogen were obtained, respectively. The ammonium nitrogen content increased significantly (140%).

  12. Effect of pH on Structural Changes in Perch Hemoglobin that Can Alter Redox Stability and Heme Affinity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, Mark P.; Aranda, IV, Roman; He, Cai; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2010-01-07

    pH can be manipulated to alter the oxidative stability of fish-based foods during storage. X-ray diffraction was used to investigate the ability of reduced pH to cause structural changes in fish hemoglobins that lead to enhanced oxidative degradation. Decreasing pH from 8.0 to 6.3 and 5.7 created a large channel for solvent entry into the heme crevice of perch hemoglobin beta chains. The proton-induced opening of this channel occurred between site CD3 and the heme-6-propionate. Solvent entry into the heme crevice can enhance metHb formation and hemin loss, processes that accelerate lipid oxidation. Reduced pH also decreased the distance between Ile at E11 in one of the alpha chains and the ligand above the heme iron atom. This sterically displaces O{sub 2} and protonated O{sub 2} which increases metHb formation. These studies demonstrate that pH reduction causes structural changes in perch hemoglobin which increase oxidative degradation of the heme pigment.

  13. A microbial fuel cell operating at low pH using an acidophile, Acidiphilium cryptum.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borole, Abhijeet P; Cesar, Scott A; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Tsouris, Costas

    2008-01-01

    A microbial fuel cell using an acidophilic microorganism, Acidiphilium cryptum, as the anode biocatalyst was investigated. The mode of electron transfer by this organism to the electrode was studied. Electricity production in the presence of a mediator was demonstrated using its natural electron acceptor, iron, as well as phenosafranin as the electron mediating agent. Production of Fe(II), as a result of iron reduction, at a pH of 4.0 or below was found to support electricity production. Accumulation of the oxidized iron, Fe(III) as a result of electron donation to the electrode, however, restricted higher current output. Addition of nitrilotriacetic acid helped resolve the problem by redissolution of deposited Fe(III). Further, use of phenosafranin as a secondary mediator resulted in improvement in power output. At a cell loading equivalent to OD600 of 1.0, a power output of 12.7 mW/m2 was obtained in a two-chamber air-sparged fuel cell. Potential for direct electron transfer was also investigated but not detected under the conditions studied.

  14. Alturas LLC- FE Dkt. No. 14-55-NG (FTA)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy gives notice of receipt of an application filed on April 18, 2014, by Alturas LLC requesting long-term authority to export up to a total of 1.5 million metric tons ...

  15. completed-ng-projects | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Completed Natural Gas and Unconventional Resources Projects Project Number Project Name Primary Performer 09122-32 A Geomechanical Model for Gas Shales Based on the Integration of ...

  16. The effects of low pH and elevated aluminum on yellowstone cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farag, A.M. ); Woodward, D.F. ); Little, E.E.; Steadman, B. ); Vertucci, F.A. )

    1993-04-01

    Although acid deposition is not considered a problem in the western US, surface waters in high elevations and fish inhabiting these waters may be vulnerable to acidification. This study examined the sensitivity of a wester salmonid to acid and aluminum stress. Yellowstone cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri; YSC) were exposed for 7 d during each of four early life stages, or continuously from fertilization to 40 d post-hatch, to decreased pH and elevated Al. The authors monitored survival, growth, whole-body ion content, and behavior of the exposed fish. Sensitivity of early life stages of YSC may be expressed by survival or by survival and sublethal effects. In their study, eggs were the most sensitive life stage of YSC to low pH if survival alone was considered. However, the sublethal effects on growth, tissue ion content, and behavior revealed the alevins and swim-up larvae were more sensitive to reduced pH and increased Al than eggs or eyed embryos. They also observed that survival was significantly decreased if YSC were exposed to pH 6.0 and 50 [mu]g Al per liter continuously from fertilization to 40 d post-hatch.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence for Microbacterium laevaniformans Strain OR221, a Bacterium Tolerant to Metals, Nitrate, and Low pH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Steven D; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Panikov, Nikolai; Ariyawansa, Thilini; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Johnson, Courtney M; Land, Miriam L; Utturkar, Sagar M; Epstein, Slava

    2012-01-01

    Microbacterium laevaniformans strain OR221 was isolated from subsurface sediments obtained from the Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge, TN. It was characterized as a bacterium tolerant to heavy metals such as uranium, nickel, cobalt, cadmium, as well as nitrate and low pH. We present its draft genome sequence.

  18. THE SENSITIVITY OF CARBON STEELS' SUSCEPTIBILITY TO LOCALIZED CORROSION TO THE PH OF NITRATE BASED NUCLEAR WASTES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOOMER KD

    2010-01-14

    The Hanford tank reservation contains approximately 50 million gallons of liquid legacy radioactive waste from cold war weapons production, which is stored in 177 underground storage tanks. The tanks will be in use until waste processing operations are completed. The wastes tend to be high pH (over 10) and nitrate based. Under these alkaline conditions carbon steels tend to be passive and undergo relatively slow uniform corrosion. However, the presence of nitrate and other aggressive species, can lead to pitting and stress corrosion cracking. This work is a continuation of previous work that investigated the propensity of steels to suffer pitting and stress corrosion cracking in various waste simulants. The focus of this work is an investigation of the sensitivity of the steels' pitting and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility tosimulant pH. Previous work demonstrated that wastes that are high in aggressive nitrate and low in inhibitory nitrite are susceptible to localized corrosion. However, the previous work involved wastes with pH 12 or higher. The current work involves wastes with lower pH of 10 or 11. It is expected that at these lower pHs that a higher nitrite-to-nitrate ratio will be necessary to ensure tank integrity. This experimental work involved both electrochemical testing, and slow strain rate testing at either the free corrosion potential or under anodic polarization. The results of the current work will be discussed, and compared to work previously presented.

  19. Separation of switchgrass bio-oil by water/organic solvent addition and pH adjustment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Park, Lydia Kyoung-Eun; Ren, Shoujie; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Ye, X. Philip; Borole, Abhijeet P.; Tsouris, Costas

    2016-01-29

    Applications of bio-oil are limited by its challenging properties including high moisture content, low pH, high viscosity, high oxygen content, and low heating value. Separation of switchgrass bio-oil components by adding water, organic solvents (hexadecane and octane), and sodium hydroxide may help to overcome these issues. Acetic acid and phenolic compounds were extracted in aqueous and organic phases, respectively. Polar chemicals, such as acetic acid, did not partition in the organic solvent phase. Acetic acid in the aqueous phase after extraction is beneficial for a microbial-electrolysis-cell application to produce hydrogen as an energy source for further hydrodeoxygenation of bio-oil. Organicmore » solvents extracted more chemicals from bio-oil in combined than in sequential extraction; however, organic solvents partitioned into the aqueous phase in combined extraction. When sodium hydroxide was added to adjust the pH of aqueous bio-oil, organic-phase precipitation occurred. As the pH was increased, a biphasic aqueous/organic dispersion was formed, and phase separation was optimized at approximately pH 6. The neutralized organic bio-oil had approximately 37% less oxygen and 100% increased heating value than the initial centrifuged bio-oil. In conclusion, the less oxygen content and increased heating value indicated a significant improvement of the bio-oil quality through neutralization.« less

  20. Molecular basis of the structural stability of a Top7-based scaffold at extreme pH and temperature conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soares, Thereza A.; Boschek, Curt B.; Apiyo, David O.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Straatsma, TP

    2010-07-01

    The development of stable scaffolds that can tolerate environmental extremes has an immense potential for applications in industry and defense. Recently, we have engineered an eight-residue loop into the de novo designed Top7 protein, which specifically binds the glycoprotein CD4. The robust properties of the Top7, coupled with the ease in production, make it a robust scaffold to design novel functionalities for use under extreme environmental conditions. In the present work, a series of explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations are reported which investigates the effect of mutations and extreme conditions of temperature and pH on the structure, stability, and dynamics of the native and engineered Top7. These simulations indicate that i. The structural dynamics of the engineered and native Top7 in solution are equivalent under corresponding conditions of pH and temperature. Ensemble-averaged structures of the native and engineered Top7 maintain the overall tertiary structure pattern, albeit with loss of helical content when at low pH and high-temperature conditions. Mutations of residues E43A, D46A, E67A, E69A, EA81A along the ?-helices of the engineered Top7 did not lead to significant changes in the native fold under pH 2 and 400 K, suggesting that the helices can accommodate varying sequences. iii. The anti-parallel ?-sheet is the structural core responsible for the stability of the native and engineered Top7 and is well maintained under extreme pH and temperature conditions. These findings indicate that the insertion of an eight-residue loop into the structure of Top7 does not adversely affect the global fold or the structural stability of the Top7 scaffold.

  1. REE Sorption Study on sieved -50 +100 mesh fraction of Media #1 in Brine #1 with Different Starting pH's at 70C

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gary Garland

    2015-09-29

    This is a continuation of the REE sorption study for shaker bath tests on 2g media #1 in 150mL brine #1 with different starting pH's at 70C. In a previous submission we reported data for shaker bath tests for brine #1 with starting pH's of 3.5, 4.5 and 5.5. In this submission we these pH's compared to starting brine #1 pH's of 6, and 7.

  2. Correlating hydrogen oxidation and evolution activity on platinum at different pH with measured hydrogen binding energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, WC; Zhuang, ZB; Gao, MR; Zheng, J; Chen, JGG; Yan, YS

    2015-01-08

    The hydrogen oxidation/evolution reactions are two of the most fundamental reactions in distributed renewable electrochemical energy conversion and storage systems. The identification of the reaction descriptor is therefore of critical importance for the rational catalyst design and development. Here we report the correlation between hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity and experimentally measured hydrogen binding energy for polycrystalline platinum examined in several buffer solutions in a wide range of electrolyte pH from 0 to 13. The hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity obtained using the rotating disk electrode method is found to decrease with the pH, while the hydrogen binding energy, obtained from cyclic voltammograms, linearly increases with the pH. Correlating the hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity to the hydrogen binding energy renders a monotonic decreasing hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity with the hydrogen binding energy, strongly supporting the hypothesis that hydrogen binding energy is the sole reaction descriptor for the hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity on monometallic platinum.

  3. Evaluation of experimentally measured and model-calculated pH for rock-brine-CO2 systems under geologic CO2 sequestration conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Hongbo; Thompson, Christopher J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2013-11-14

    pH is an essential parameter for understanding the geochemical reactions that occur in rock-brine-CO2 systems when CO2 is injected into deep geologic formations for long-term storage. Due to a lack of reliable experimental methods, most laboratory studies conducted under geological CO2 sequestration (GCS) conditions have relied on thermodynamic modeling to estimate pH. The accuracy of these model predictions is typically uncertain. In our previous work, we have developed a method for pH determination by in-situ spectrophotometry. In the present work, we expanded the applicable pH range for this method and measured the pH of several rock-brine-CO2 systems at GCS conditions for five rock samples collected from ongoing GCS demonstration projects. Experimental measurements were compared with pH values calculated using several geochemical modeling approaches. The effect of different thermodynamic databases on the accuracy of model prediction was evaluated. Results indicate that the accuracy of model calculations is rock-dependent. For rocks comprised of carbonate and sandstone, model results generally agreed well with experimentally measured pH; however, for basalt, significant differences were observed. These discrepancies may be due to the models’ failure to fully account for certain reaction occurring between the basalt minerals the CO2-saturated brine solutions.

  4. Effects of pH and anion on hydrogen sorption/desorption at/within oxide-derived Pd electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, C.C.; Wen, T.C.

    1995-05-01

    A lot of interest in the electrochemical behavior of H and D sorption within/at palladium has been prompted by Fleischmann and Pons` reports which had claimed to observe that nuclear fusion was induced by electrochemical compression of deuterium within a palladium lattice, although there are some disputes of this work in the open literature. Oxide-derived Pd electrodes were obtained by cathodic polarization of Pd oxide-coated titanium electrodes (fabricated by thermal decomposition) at 0 V (RHE) for 30 min in 1.5 mol/dm{sup 3} NaOH. Hydrogen adsorption/absorption (denoted hereafter as sorption) and desorption within/at these electrodes were obtained using cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronopotentiometry, and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV). CV results revealed that {beta}-PdH formation/oxidation is more reversible in either concentrated acid or base solutions than in intermediate pH media and the rate of {beta}-PDH desorption is faster in a pH solution <10. The oxidation of {beta}-PDH is electron transfer controlled in intermediate pH media, especially in weakly basic solutions due to the adsorption of H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}/HPO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}. The sequence of anions with respect to increasing ability to inhibit hydrogen sorption is: CH{sub 3}COO{sup {minus}} < Cl{sup {minus}} < HSO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} {approx_equal} ClO{sub 4} < HC{sub 2}O{sub 4} < H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}.

  5. Microfluidic device having an immobilized pH gradient and PAGE gels for protein separation and analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommer, Gregory J.; Hatch, Anson V.; Singh, Anup K.; Wang, Ying-Chih

    2012-12-11

    Disclosed is a novel microfluidic device enabling on-chip implementation of a two-dimensional separation methodology. Previously disclosed microscale immobilized pH gradients (IPG) are combined with perpendicular polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) microchannels to achieve orthogonal separations of biological samples. Device modifications enable inclusion of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in the second dimension. The device can be fabricated to use either continuous IPG gels, or the microscale isoelectric fractionation membranes we have also previously disclosed, for the first dimension. The invention represents the first all-gel two-dimensional separation microdevice, with significantly higher resolution power over existing devices.

  6. Microfluidic device having an immobilized pH gradient and page gels for protein separation and analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommer, Gregory J; Hatch, Anson V; Singh, Anup K; Wang, Ying-Chih

    2014-05-20

    Disclosed is a novel microfluidic device enabling on-chip implementation of a two-dimensional separation methodology. Previously disclosed microscale immobilized pH gradients (IPG) are combined with perpendicular polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) microchannels to achieve orthogonal separations of biological samples. Device modifications enable inclusion of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in the second dimension. The device can be fabricated to use either continuous IPG gels, or the microscale isoelectric fractionation membranes we have also previously disclosed, for the first dimension. The invention represents the first all-gel two-dimensional separation microdevice, with significantly higher resolution power over existing devices.

  7. Leaching characteristics of toxic constituents from coal fly ash mixed soils under the influence of pH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komonweeraket, Kanokwan; Cetin, Bora; Benson, Craig H.; Aydilek, Ahmet H.; Edil, Tuncer B.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • The impact of pH on the leaching of elements and metals from fly ash mixed soils. • Generally Ca, Cd, Mg, and Sr follows a cationic leaching pattern. • The leaching of As and Se shows an oxyanionic leaching pattern. • The leaching behavior of elements does not change based on material type. • Different fly ash types show different abilities in immobilizing trace elements. - Abstract: Leaching behaviors of Arsenic (As), Barium (Ba), Calcium (Ca), Cadmium (Cd), Magnesium (Mg), Selenium (Se), and Strontium (Sr) from soil alone, coal fly ash alone, and soil-coal fly ash mixtures, were studied at a pH range of 2–14 via pH-dependent leaching tests. Seven different types of soils and coal fly ashes were tested. Results of this study indicated that Ca, Cd, Mg, and Sr showed cationic leaching pattern while As and Se generally follows an oxyanionic leaching pattern. On the other hand, leaching of Ba presented amphoteric-like leaching pattern but less pH-dependent. In spite of different types and composition of soil and coal fly ash investigated, the study reveals the similarity in leaching behavior as a function of pH for a given element from soil, coal fly ash, and soil-coal fly ash mixtures. The similarity is most likely due to similar controlling mechanisms (e.g., solubility, sorption, and solid-solution formation) and similar controlling factors (e.g., leachate pH and redox conditions). This offers the opportunity to transfer knowledge of coal fly ash that has been extensively characterized and studied to soil stabilized with coal fly ash. It is speculated that unburned carbon in off-specification coal fly ashes may provide sorption sites for Cd resulting in a reduction in concentration of these elements in leachate from soil-coal fly ash mixture. Class C fly ash provides sufficient CaO to initiate the pozzolanic reaction yielding hydrated cement products that oxyanions, including As and Se, can be incorporated into.

  8. E&nr Ph. S. W.. Wahhgt~n. D.C. 200242174, TIkpbnc (202) 48a60uo

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    75' 00.955 L' E&nr Ph. S. W.. Wahhgt~n. D.C. 200242174, TIkpbnc (202) 48a60uo 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CR CA.d M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decoaunissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES M /4.0-03 kl 77.0% I - The attached elimination reconunendation was prepared in accordance rlL.0~ with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The

  9. U

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    race b ased m ethods t o c reate s urrogate applica*ons. 8 Current s tatus * In 2 014, c ame a cross a n i nteres*ng p aper b y Babak B ehzad ( then a s tudent o f M arc Snir)...

  10. Planet hunters. VII. Discovery of a new low-mass, low-density planet (PH3 C) orbiting Kepler-289 with mass measurements of two additional planets (PH3 B and D)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitt, Joseph R.; Fischer, Debra A.; Wang, Ji; Margossian, Charles; Brewer, John M.; Giguere, Matthew J.; Agol, Eric; Deck, Katherine M.; Rogers, Leslie A.; Gazak, J. Zachary; Holman, Matthew J.; Jek, Kian J.; Omohundro, Mark R.; Winarski, Troy; Lintott, Chris; Simpson, Robert; Lynn, Stuart; Parrish, Michael; Schawinski, Kevin; Schwamb, Megan E.; and others

    2014-11-10

    We report the discovery of one newly confirmed planet (P = 66.06 days, R {sub P} = 2.68 ± 0.17 R {sub ⊕}) and mass determinations of two previously validated Kepler planets, Kepler-289 b (P = 34.55 days, R {sub P} = 2.15 ± 0.10 R {sub ⊕}) and Kepler-289-c (P = 125.85 days, R {sub P} = 11.59 ± 0.10 R {sub ⊕}), through their transit timing variations (TTVs). We also exclude the possibility that these three planets reside in a 1:2:4 Laplace resonance. The outer planet has very deep (∼1.3%), high signal-to-noise transits, which puts extremely tight constraints on its host star's stellar properties via Kepler's Third Law. The star PH3 is a young (∼1 Gyr as determined by isochrones and gyrochronology), Sun-like star with M {sub *} = 1.08 ± 0.02 M {sub ☉}, R {sub *} = 1.00 ± 0.02 R {sub ☉}, and T {sub eff} = 5990 ± 38 K. The middle planet's large TTV amplitude (∼5 hr) resulted either in non-detections or inaccurate detections in previous searches. A strong chopping signal, a shorter period sinusoid in the TTVs, allows us to break the mass-eccentricity degeneracy and uniquely determine the masses of the inner, middle, and outer planets to be M = 7.3 ± 6.8 M {sub ⊕}, 4.0 ± 0.9M {sub ⊕}, and M = 132 ± 17 M {sub ⊕}, which we designate PH3 b, c, and d, respectively. Furthermore, the middle planet, PH3 c, has a relatively low density, ρ = 1.2 ± 0.3 g cm{sup –3} for a planet of its mass, requiring a substantial H/He atmosphere of 2.1{sub −0.3}{sup +0.8}% by mass, and joins a growing population of low-mass, low-density planets.

  11. Activated RhoA Binds to the Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain of PDZ-RhoGEF, a Potential Site for Autoregulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Zhe; Medina, Frank; Liu, Mu-ya; Thomas, Celestine; Sprang, Stephen R.; Sternweis, Paul C.

    2010-07-19

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) catalyze exchange of GDP for GTP by stabilizing the nucleotide-free state of the small GTPases through their Dbl homology/pleckstrin homology (DH {center_dot} PH) domains. Unconventionally, PDZ-RhoGEF (PRG), a member of the RGS-RhoGEFs, binds tightly to both nucleotide-free and activated RhoA (RhoA {center_dot} GTP). We have characterized the interaction between PRG and activated RhoA and determined the structure of the PRG-DH {center_dot} PH-RhoA {center_dot} GTP{gamma}S (guanosine 5{prime}-O-[{gamma}-thio]triphosphate) complex. The interface bears striking similarity to a GTPase-effector interface and involves the switch regions in RhoA and a hydrophobic patch in PRG-PH that is conserved among all Lbc RhoGEFs. The two surfaces that bind activated and nucleotide-free RhoA on PRG-DH {center_dot} PH do not overlap, and a ternary complex of PRG-DH {center_dot} PH bound to both forms of RhoA can be isolated by size-exclusion chromatography. This novel interaction between activated RhoA and PH could play a key role in regulation of RhoGEF activity in vivo.

  12. Large area graphene ion sensitive field effect transistors with tantalum pentoxide sensing layers for pH measurement at the Nernstian limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fakih, Ibrahim, E-mail: ibrahim.fakih@mail.mcgill.ca; Sabri, Shadi; Szkopek, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.szkopek@mcgill.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2A7 (Canada); Mahvash, Farzaneh [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2A7 (Canada); Dpartement de Chimie et Biochimie, Universite du Qubec Montral, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3P8 (Canada); Nannini, Matthieu [McGill Nanotools Microfab, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2A7 (Canada); Siaj, Mohamed [Dpartement de Chimie et Biochimie, Universite du Qubec Montral, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3P8 (Canada)

    2014-08-25

    We have fabricated and characterized large area graphene ion sensitive field effect transistors (ISFETs) with tantalum pentoxide sensing layers and demonstrated pH sensitivities approaching the Nernstian limit. Low temperature atomic layer deposition was used to deposit tantalum pentoxide atop large area graphene ISFETs. The charge neutrality point of graphene, inferred from quantum capacitance or channel conductance, was used to monitor surface potential in the presence of an electrolyte with varying pH. Bare graphene ISFETs exhibit negligible response, while graphene ISFETs with tantalum pentoxide sensing layers show increased sensitivity reaching up to 55?mV/pH over pH 3 through pH 8. Applying the Bergveld model, which accounts for site binding and a Guoy-Chapman-Stern picture of the surface-electrolyte interface, the increased pH sensitivity can be attributed to an increased buffer capacity reaching up to 10{sup 14} sites/cm{sup 2}. ISFET response was found to be stable to better than 0.05 pH units over the course of two weeks.

  13. Foreign nationals who receive science or engineering Ph.D.`s from US universities: Stay rates and characteristics of stayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finn, M.G.; Pennington, L.A.; Anderson, K.H.

    1995-04-01

    This report studies the behavior of foreign nationals who received Ph.D. degrees in science or engineering from US universities during the period 1984--1990. It addresses two distinct questions: What proportion of foreign students stay to work in the United States after graduation; and do foreign students who leave the United States differ from those who stay? Descriptive statistics are provided to answer the first question. These estimates of stay rates have small margins of error because they were produced from the tax payment records of the Social Security Administration. The estimates of stay rates in also provide a partial answer to the second question as well as we are able to provide stay rates for different degree fields and different countries of citizenship, thereby identifying country-specific and field-specific differences in stay rates.

  14. ESTIMATED NEPTUNIUM SEDIMENT SORPTION VALUES AS A FUNCTION OF PH AND MEASURED BARIUM AND RADIUM KD VALUES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D.

    2011-01-13

    The objective of this document is to provide traceability and justification for a select few new geochemical data used in the Special Analysis entitled 'Special Analysis for the Dose Assessment of the Final Inventories in Center Slit Trenches One through Five'. Most values used in the Special Analysis came from the traditional geochemical data package, however, some recent laboratory measurements have made it possible to estimate barium K{sub d} values. Additionally, some recent calculations were made to estimate neptunium K{sub d} values as a function of pH. The assumptions, justifications, and calculations needed to generate these new values are presented in this document, and the values are summarized.

  15. The spinodal decomposition in 17-4PH stainless steel subjected to long-term aging at 350 deg. C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Jun Zou Hong; Li Cong; Qiu Shaoyu; Shen Baoluo

    2008-05-15

    The influence of aging time on the microstructure evolution of 17-4 PH martensitic stainless steel was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results showed that the martensite decomposed by a spinodal decomposition mechanism after the alloy was subjected to long-term aging at 350 deg. C. The fine scale spinodal decomposition of {alpha}-ferrite brought about a Cr-enriched bright stripe and a Fe-enriched dark stripe, i.e., {alpha}' and {alpha} phases, separately, which were perpendicular to the grain boundary. The spinodal decomposition started at the grain boundary. Then with prolonged aging time, the decomposition microstructure expanded from the grain boundary to interior. The wavelength of the spinodally decomposed microstructure changed little with extended aging time.

  16. Radium-226 and low pH in groundwater due to oxidation of authigenic pyrite; Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KUBILIUS, WALTER

    2005-12-21

    The origin of elevated radium-226 in groundwater beneath a sanitary landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS) was investigated. Nearly one hundred monitoring wells are developed in the Steed Pond Aquifer (SPA), which consists of 100-150 ft of Coastal Plain sand, iron oxides, and minor clay. Wells screened in the upper and middle portions of the aquifer have average Ra-226 between 0.5 and 2.5 pCi/L, and average pHs above 4.7. However, wells screened near the base of the aquifer exhibit higher average Ra-226 concentrations of 2.5 to 4.6 pCi/L, with some measurements exceeding the MCL of 5 pCi/L, and show average pHs of 4.1 to 4.7. These wells are not downgradient of the landfill, and are not impacted by landfill leachate. The Crouch Branch Confining Unit (CBCU) underlies the aquifer, and is composed partly of reduced gray/brown clay with lignite and authigenic pyrite. Gamma ray logs show that the SPA has low gamma counts, but the CBCU is consistently elevated. Groundwater with high radium/low pH also contains elevated sulfate concentrations. pH calculations indicate that sulfate is in the form of sulfuric acid. A model for the origin of elevated Ra-226 levels in deeper SPA wells envisions infiltration of oxygenated SPA groundwater into reduced pyritic CBCU sediments, with consequent oxidative pyrite dissolution, and acidification of groundwater. Then, naturally occurring CBCU radium dissolves, and mixes into the Steed Pond Aquifer.

  17. An experimental and numerical analysis of hydrogen assisted cracking and weldability test methodology. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dighde, R.M.

    1993-12-31

    The preferred method for increasing resistance to hydrogen-assisted cracking (HAC) is the application of an adequate preheating temperature, T(sub ph). The suitability of given welding conditions, including T(sub ph), in avoiding HAC is generally assessed through the use of Tekken and Lehigh weldability restraint tests. The safe welding conditions determined from these tests are then applied in industrial fabrication. It is observed that these safe welding conditions do not always avoid HAC in actual weldments. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the weldability testing procedure in its entirety against the more general industrial fabrication practice and understand the inherent differences. The differences arising, at different stages of weldability testing procedure, from weld hydrogen measurement technique, weldability testing procedure, hydrogen diffusion behavior, residual stress development, and dimensional differences in weldability tests and actual weldments were analyzed in detail using an experimental and numerical approach. The weld hydrogen measurement results indicated that the existing hydrogen measurement standards do not measure the weld hydrogen levels in actual weldments, and should, therefore, be modified for use in weldability testing procedure. The Tekken and Lehigh weldability test results suggested that weld induced variation at stress concentration locations strongly influences the HAC tendency and crack propagation behavior. Finite element analysis (FEA) of hydrogen diffusion behavior in weldability tests and actual weld grooves indicated that hydrogen diffusion is a strong function of the groove shape and the weld thermal cycle, and hence, direct applicability of weldability test results to actual weldments can be misleading. Elasto-plastic thermo-mechanical behavior of Tekken and Lehigh weldability tests during welding was carried out using FEA.

  18. Solubility Measurements of Crystalline NiO in Aqueous Solution as a Function of Temperature and pH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, Donald; Benezeth, Pascale; Xiao, Caibin {nmn}; Wesolowski, David J; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Results of solubility experiments involving crystalline nickel oxide (bunsenite) in aqueous solutions are reported as functions of temperature (0 to 350 C) and pH at pressures slightly exceeding (with one exception) saturation vapor pressure. These experiments were carried out in either flow-through reactors or a hydrogen-electrode concentration cell for mildly acidic to near neutral pH solutions. The results were treated successfully with a thermodynamic model incorporating only the unhydrolyzed aqueous nickel species (viz., Ni2+ ) and the neutrally charged hydrolyzed species (viz., Ni(OH)02 ). The thermodynamic quantities obtained at 25 C and infinite dilution are, with 2 uncertainties: log10Ko s0 = (12.40 0.29), rGo m = (70.8 1.7) kJ mol 1; rHo m = (105.6 1.3) kJ mol 1; rSo m = (116.6 3.2) J K 1 mol 1; rCo p,m = (0 13) J K 1 mol 1; and log10Ko s2 = (8.76 0.15); rGo m = (50.0 1.7) kJ mol 1; rHo m = (17.7 1.7) kJ mol 1; rSo m = (108 7) J K 1 mol 1; rCo p,m = (108 3) J K 1 mol 1. These results are internally consistent, but the latter set differs from those gleaned from previous studies recorded in the literature. The corresponding thermodynamic quantities for the formation of Ni2+ and Ni(OH)02 are also estimated. Moreover, the Ni(OH) 3 anion was never observed, even in relatively strong basic solutions (mOH = 0.1 mol kg 1), contrary to the conclusions drawn from all but one previous study.

  19. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  20. Influence of pH on the quantum-size-controlled photoelectrochemical etching of epitaxial InGaN quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Xiaoyin; Lu, Ping; Fischer, Arthur J.; Coltrin, Michael E.; Wang, George T.; Koleske, Daniel D.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.

    2015-11-18

    Illumination by a narrow-band laser has been shown to enable photoelectrochemical (PEC) etching of InGaN thin films into quantum dots with sizes controlled by the laser wavelength. Here, we investigate and elucidate the influence of solution pH on such quantum-size-controlled PEC etch process. We find that although a pH above 5 is often used for PEC etching of GaN-based materials, oxides (In2O3 and/or Ga2O3) form which interfere with quantum dot formation. Furthermore, at pH below 3, however, oxide-free QDs with self-terminated sizes can be successfully realized.

  1. Influence of pH on the quantum-size-controlled photoelectrochemical etching of epitaxial InGaN quantum dots

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xiao, Xiaoyin; Lu, Ping; Fischer, Arthur J.; Coltrin, Michael E.; Wang, George T.; Koleske, Daniel D.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.

    2015-11-18

    Illumination by a narrow-band laser has been shown to enable photoelectrochemical (PEC) etching of InGaN thin films into quantum dots with sizes controlled by the laser wavelength. Here, we investigate and elucidate the influence of solution pH on such quantum-size-controlled PEC etch process. We find that although a pH above 5 is often used for PEC etching of GaN-based materials, oxides (In2O3 and/or Ga2O3) form which interfere with quantum dot formation. Furthermore, at pH below 3, however, oxide-free QDs with self-terminated sizes can be successfully realized.

  2. Artium mater in relativistic astrophysics : New perspectives for a European-Latin American PhD program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chardonnet, Pascal

    2015-12-17

    Following the successful scientific space missions by the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO) in Chile, as well as the high-energy particle activities at CERN in Genve, we have created a Ph.D. program dedicated to the formation of scientists in the field of relativistic astrophysics. The students of such a program will lead the theoretical developments of one of the most active fields of research, based on the above observational and experimental facilities. This program needs expertise in the most advanced topics of mathematical and theoretical physics, and in relativistic field theories. It requires the ability to model the observational data received from the above facilities, as well as all the basic knowledge in astronomy, astrophysics and cosmology. This activity is necessarily international, no single university can cover the broad expertises. From this, the proposed program of the IRAP Ph.D., in one of the youngest and most dynamical French universities, pole of research and teaching in the Euro-Mediterranean region (PRES): the University of Nice. It benefits from the presence of the astrophysics research institute of Observatoire de la Cte d’Azur involved in relativistic and non-photonic astrophysics. The participation of the Freie Universitaet Berlin, Oldenburg and Bremen Universities and of the Einstein Institute in Potsdam offers the possibility of teaching in relativistic field theories at the highest level. The University of Savoy offers the link to the particle physics at CERN. The activities at the University of Rome, at Stockholm University and at ICRANet offer teaching programs in all the fields of relativistic astrophysics, including cosmology, the physics of gravitational collapse, gamma-ray bursts, and black hole physics. Finally, the University of Ferrara will be present with lectures and researches in the topics they have pioneered such as x-ray astrophysics and observational cosmology. Through ICRANet

  3. Leaching characteristics of selected South African fly ashes: Effect of pH on the release of major and trace species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gitari, W.M.; Fatoba, O.O.; Petrik, L.F.; Vadapalli, V.R.K.

    2009-07-01

    Fly ash samples from two South African coal-fired power stations were subjected to different leaching tests under alkaline and acidic conditions in an attempt to assess the effect of pH on the leachability of species from the fly ashes and also assess the potential impact of the fly ashes disposal on groundwater and the receiving environment. To achieve this, German Standard leaching (DIN-S4) and Acid Neutralization Capacity (ANC) tests were employed. Ca, Mg, Na, K and SO{sub 4} were significantly leached into solution under the two leaching conditions with the total amounts in ANC leachates higher than that of DIN-S4. This indicates that a large fraction of the soluble salts in unweathered fly ash are easily leached. These species represents the fraction that can be flushed off initially from the surface of ash particles on contacting the ash with water. The amounts of toxic trace elements such as As, Se, Cd, Cr and Pb leached out of the fly ashes when in contact with de-mineralized water (DIN-S4 test) were low and below the Target Water Quality Range (TWQR) of South Africa. This is explained by their low concentrations in the fly ashes and their solubility dependence on the pH of the leaching solution. However the amounts of some minor elements such as B, Mn, Fe, As and Se leached out at lower pH ranging between 10 to 4 (ANC test) were slightly higher than the TWQR, an indication that the pH of the leaching solution plays a significant role on the leaching of species in fly ash. The high concentrations of the toxic elements released from the fly ashes at lower pH gives an indication that the disposal of the fly ash could have adverse effects on the receiving environment if the pH of the solution contacting the ashes is not properly monitored.

  4. Impedance Characteristics and Polarization Behavior of a Microbial Fuel Cell in Response to Short-Term Changes in Medium pH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Sokhee; Mench, Matthew M; Regan, John M.

    2011-01-01

    pH oppositely influences anode and cathode performance in microbial fuel cells. The differential electrochemical effects at each electrode and the resultant full-cell performance were analyzed in medium pH from 6.0 to 8.0. Potentials changed -60 mV/pH for the anode and -68 mV/pH for the cathode, coincident with thermodynamic estimations. Open circuit voltage reached a maximum (741 mV) at pH 7, and maximum power density was highest (712 mW/m{sup 2}) at pH 6.5 as the cathode performance improved at lower pH. Maximum current density increased and apparent half-saturation potential (E{sub KA}) decreased with increasing medium pH due to improved anode performance. An equivalent circuit model composed of two time constant processes accurately fit bioanode impedance data. One of these processes was consistently the rate-limiting step for acetate-oxidizing exoelectrogenesis, with its pH-varying charge transfer resistance R{sub 2} ranging from 2- to 321-fold higher than the pH-independent charge transfer resistance R{sub 1}. The associated capacitance C{sub 2} was 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than C{sub 1}. R{sub 2} was lowest near E{sub KA} and increased by several orders of magnitude at anode potentials above E{sub KA}, while R{sub 1} was nearly stable. However, fits deviated slightly at potentials above E{sub KA} due to emerging impedance possibly associated with diffusion and excessive potential.

  5. REE Sorption Study of Sieved -50 +100 mesh Media #1 in Brine #1 with Different Starting pH's at 70C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Garland

    2015-07-21

    This dataset described shaker table experiments ran with sieved -50 +100 mesh media #1 in brine #1 that have 2ppm each of the 7 REE metals at different starting pH's of 3.5, 4.5, and 5.5. The experimental conditions are 2g media to 150mL of REE solution, at 70C.

  6. Effects of pH and stress intensity on crack growth rate in Alloy 600 in lithiated + borated water at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebak, R.B.; Szklarska-Smialowska, Z.; McIlree, A.R.

    1992-12-31

    Primary water stress corrosion cracking studies were performed on Alloy 600. Constant load tests were conducted at 330 and 350{degrees}C in solutions containing dissolved hydrogen, boric acid (0 < B < 1200 ppm) and lithium hydroxide (0 < Li < 10 ppm). In the PWR working conditions range, that is, 6.9 < pH < 7.4 (or 0.5 ppm < Li < 3.5), there is little effect of the solution pH on the intergranular crack growth rate (IGSCC). However, there is a strong influence of the stress intensity on the IGSCC. K{sub ISCC} {approx} 5-10 MPa{radical}m. Dissolution plays an important role in the IGSCC process.

  7. Influence of pH on electrochemical and corrosion behavior of aluminum in media containing oxo anions of the oxidizing type

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikhailovskii, Y.N.; Berdzenishvili, G.A.

    1986-07-01

    This paper investigates the influence of CrO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, MnO/sub 4//sup -/, VO/sub 4//sup 3 -/, MoO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, and WO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ on the potential and corrosion rate of aluminum in chloride-fluoride solutions with pH from 2 to 12. In neutral solutions on aluminum there is formed a mixed oxide-hydroxide layer with excess hydroxides which inhibits the corrosion of aluminum. Vanadates, molybdates, and tungstates in neutral solutions also formed mixed oxide-hydroxide layers with excess OH/sup -/ on the surface of the aluminum. This paper clearly displays the general laws of variation of the corrosion-electrochemical properties of aluminum in relation to pH in the presence of oxoanions of the oxidizing type.

  8. Effect of hydrogen sulfide partial pressure, pH, and chloride content on the SSC resistance of martensitic stainless steels and martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, D.D.

    1999-11-01

    Centrifugal compressor applications require the use of martensitic stainless and martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels at high hydrogen sulfide partial pressures. These materials do not perform well when tested with standard TM0177 test solutions. This paper describes the effect of hydrogen sulfide partial pressure, pH, and chloride content on their SSC resistance and explains their successful field operational experience. Environmental limits are determined for several materials and heat treat conditions.

  9. Influence of CO sub 2 -HCO sub 3 sup minus levels and pH on growth, succinate production, and enzyme activities of Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuelov, N.S.; Lamed, R.; Lowe, S. ); Zeikus, J.G. Michigan Biotechnology Inst., Lansing )

    1991-10-01

    Growth and succinate versus lactate production from glucose by Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens was regulated by the level of available carbon dioxide and culture pH. At pH 7.2, the generation time was almost doubled and extensive amounts of lactate were formed in comparison with growth at pH 6.2. The succinate yield and the yield of ATP per mole of glucose were significantly enhanced under excess-CO{sub 2}-HOC{sub 3}{sup {minus}} growth conditions and suggest that there exists a threshold level of Co{sub 2} for enhanced succinate production in A. succiniciproducens. Glucose was metabolized via the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas route, and phosphoenopyruvate carboxykinase levels increased while lactate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase levels decreased under excess-CO{sub 2}-HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} growth conditions. Kinetic analysis of succinate and lactate formation in continuous culture indicated that the growth rate-linked production rate coefficient (K) cells was much higher for succinate (7.2 versus 1.0 g/g of cells per h) while the non-growth-rate-related formation rate coefficient (K{prime}) was higher for lactate (1.1 versus 0.3 g/g of cells per h). The data indicate that A. succiniciproducens, unlike other succinate-producing anaerobes which also form propionate, can grow rapidly and form high final yields of succinate at pH 6.2 and with excess CO{sub 2}-HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} as a consequence of regulating electron sink metabolism.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of thermoalkaliphilic Caldalkalibacillus thermarum strain TA2.A1 Reveals Molecular Adaptations to Extreme pH and Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalamorz, Falk; Keis, Stefanie; Stanton, Jo-Ann; Brown, Steven D; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Land, Miriam L; Han, Cliff; Martin, S L.; Morgan, Hugh; Cook, Greg

    2011-01-01

    The genes and molecular machines that allow for a thermoalkaliphilic lifestyle have not been defined. To address this goal, we report on the improved high-quality draft genome sequence of Caldalkalibacillus thermarum strain TA2.A1, an obligately aerobic bacterium that grows optimally at pH 9.5 and 65 to 70 C on a wide variety of carbon and energy sources.

  11. Influence of the pH value of a colloidal gold solution on the absorption spectra of an LSPR-assisted sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Jin; Li, Wenbin; Zhu, Mao; Zhang, Wei; Niu, Wencheng; Liu, Guohua

    2014-03-15

    The localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) of gold particles assembled on a crystal plate are a powerful tool for biological sensors. Here, we prepare gold colloids in different pH solutions. We monitor the effects of the particle radius and particle coverage on the absorption spectra of AT-cut (r-face dihedral angle of about 3°) crystal plates supporting gold nanoparticles. The surface morphologies were monitored on silicon dioxide substrates using ultraviolet and visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results showed that the gold particle coverage decreases with increasing pH value of the gold colloid solution. This phenomenon demonstrates that self-assembled gold surfaces were formed via the electrostatic adsorption of gold particles on the positively charged, ionized amino groups on the crystal plates in the acidic solution. The spectrum of gold nanoparticles with different coverage degree on the crystal plates showed that the LSPR properties are highly dependent on pH.

  12. Watershed scale fungal community characterization along a pH gradient in a subsurface environment co-contaminated with uranium and nitrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jasrotia, Puja; Green, Stefan; Canion, Andy; Overholt, Will; Prakash, Om; Wafula, Dennis; Hubbard, Daniela; Watson, David B; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Brooks, Scott C; Kostka,

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize fungal communities in a subsurface environment co-contaminated with uranium and nitrate at the watershed scale, and to determine the potential contribution of fungi to contaminant transformation (nitrate attenuation). The abundance, distribution and diversity of fungi in subsurface groundwater samples were determined using quantitative and semi-quantitative molecular techniques, including quantitative PCR of eukaryotic SSU rRNA genes and pyrosequencing of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. Potential bacterial and fungal denitrification was assessed in sediment-groundwater slurries amended with antimicrobial compounds and in fungal pure cultures isolated from subsurface. Our results demonstrate that subsurface fungal communities are dominated by members of the phylum Ascomycota, and a pronounced shift in fungal community composition occurs across the groundwater pH gradient at the field site, with lower diversity observed under acidic (pH < 4.5) conditions. Fungal isolates recovered from subsurface sediments were shown to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide, including cultures of the genus Coniochaeta that were detected in abundance in pyrosequence libraries of site groundwater samples. Denitrifying fungal isolates recovered from the site were classified, and found to be distributed broadly within the phylum Ascomycota, and within a single genus within the Basidiomycota. Potential denitrification rate assays with sediment-groundwater slurries showed the potential for subsurface fungi to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide under in situ acidic pH conditions.

  13. Influence of pH and chloride concentration on the pitting and crevice corrosion behavior of high-alloy stainless steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pardo, A.; Otero, E.; Merino, M.C.; Lopez, M.D.; Utrilla, M.V.; Moreno, F.

    2000-04-01

    Localized corrosion resistance (pitting and crevice corrosion) of two high-alloy stainless steels (superduplex and superaustenitic) was studied in solutions with chloride concentrations of 200, 400, 600, and 6,000 ppm at pH values ranging from 2 to 6.5. Critical temperatures for pitting and crevice corrosion were calculated for these test media using electrochemical techniques (continuous current). From results obtained for cyclic polarization, the critical pitting temperature (CPT) and critical crevice temperature (CCT) of these materials in the different test media were determined. Under the tested conditions, the resistance of these materials to localized corrosion was very high. Only in test conditions of higher aggressivity (6,000 ppm CL{sup {minus}} and pH 6.5), pitting or crevice corrosion was observed. In those cases, values of pitting potential (E{sub pit}) and crevice potential (E{sub cre}) showed little tendency to decrease with an increase in CL{sup {minus}} concentration, temperature, and pH. Moreover, the CPT of these steels was determined in a ferric chloride (FeCl{sub 3}) medium, which corresponds to the standard ASTM G48 practice (Method A).

  14. Effects of water temperature and pH on toxicity of terbufos, trichlorfon, 4-nitrophenol and 2,4-dinitrophenol to the amphipod Gammarus pseudolimnaeus and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howe, G.E.; Marking, L.L.; Bills, T.D.; Rach, J.J. . National Fisheries Research Center); Mayer, F.L. Jr. . Environmental Research Lab.)

    1994-01-01

    Acute toxicity tests were conducted to determine (a) the individual and interactive effects of water temperature (7, 12, 17 C), pH (6.5, 7.5, 8.5, 9.5), and time on the toxicity of terbufos, trichlorfon, 4-nitrophenol, and 2,4-dinitrophenol to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and the amphipod Gammarus pseudolimnaeus, and (b) the individual and interactive effects of water temperature and pH on chemical bioconcentration during acute tests with rainbow trout and Gammarus exposed to terbufos, 4-nitrophenol, and 2,4-dinitrophenol. The toxicity of all four chemicals was significantly affected by pH in all tests, except for Gammarus exposed to terbufos. The toxicity of terbufos to rainbow trout and Gammarus was less at pH 7.5 than at higher or lower pH. The toxicity of both nitrophenols decreased as pH increased, whereas the toxicity of trichlorfon increased with pH. The effect of pH on trichlorfon toxicity decreased with temperature. Temperature significantly affected the toxicity of all four chemicals to both species. Toxicity increased with temperature in all tests, except for rainbow trout exposed to nitrophenols; toxicity decreased as temperature increased for rainbow trout. Chemical bioconcentration was also significantly affected by temperature and pH and was directly related to toxicity in most tests. Significant interactive effects between toxicity-modifying factors were also frequently observed. Temperature and pH effects on chemical toxicity need to be considered in chemical hazard assessment to ensure adequate protection of aquatic organisms.

  15. ASE Certification for Light/Medium Duty CNG/LPG Training Programs

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

  16. Multivariable analysis of the effects of Li, H{sub 2}, and pH on PWR primary water stress corrosion cracking. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eason, E.D.; Merton, A.A.; Wright, J.E.

    1996-05-01

    The effects of Li, pH and H, on primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 600 were investigated for temperatures between 320 and 330{degrees}C. Specimens included in the study were reverse U-bends (RUBs) made from several different heats of Alloy 600. The characteristic life, {eta}, which represents the time until 63.2% of the population initiates PWSCC, was computed using a modified Weibull statistical analysis algorithm and was analyzed for effects of the water chemistry variables previously mentioned. It was determined that the water chemistry variables are less sensitive than the metallurgical characteristics defined by the heat, heat treatment and initial stress state of the specimen (diameter and style of RUB); the maximum impact of chemistry effects was 0.13 to 0.59 standard deviations compared to a range of three (3) standard deviations for all variables. A first-order model was generated to estimate the effect of changes in pH, Li and H, concentrations on the characteristic life. The characteristic time to initiate cracks, {eta}, is not sensitive to Li and H{sub 2} concentrations in excess of 3.5 ppm and 25 ml/kg, respectively. Below these values, (1) {eta} decreases by {approximately}20% when [Li] is increased from 0.7 to 3.5 ppm; (2) {eta} decreases by {approximately}9% when [H{sub 2}] is increased from 13.1 to 25.0 ml/kg; and (3) {eta} decreases by {approximately}14% when pH is increased from 7.0 to 7.4, in each case holding the other two variables constant.

  17. Effect of pH on the release of radionuclides and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resins collected from operating nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W. )

    1991-06-01

    Data are presented on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small-scale waste--form specimens collected during solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station were leach-tested and subjected to compressive strength testing in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Technical Position on Waste Form'' (Revision 1). Samples of untreated resin waste collected from each solidification vessel before the solidification process were analyzed for concentrations of radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to determine the quantities of these chemicals in the waste-form specimens. The chelating agents included oxalic, citric, and picolinic acids. In order to determine the effect of leachant chemical composition and pH on the stability and leachability of the waste forms, waste-form specimens were leached in various leachants. Results of this study indicate that differences in pH do not affect releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms, but that differences in leachant chemistry and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. Also, this study indicates that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents are similar for waste- form specimens that decomposed and those that retained their general physical form. 36 refs., 60 figs., 28 tabs.

  18. In situ infrared study on the effect of pH on anion adsorption at Pt(111) electrodes from acid sulfate solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faguy, P.W.; Marinkovic, N.S.; Adzic, R.R.

    1996-01-24

    From the in situ FTIR spectroscopy of the electrode/electrolyte solution interface at pH values of 1.2, 2.0 and 3.4, it can be confirmed that the adsorbate associated with the anomalous peaks in the cyclic voltammetry of Pt(111) in sulfate- and bisulfate-containing solutions is not the sulfate anion. The structure of the bisulfate-like adsorbate is tentatively postulated to be a sulfate ion/hydronium ion ion pair: SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}xH{sub 3}O{sup +}. Over the potentials in question, and only in solutions with appreciable HSO{sub 4}{sup -} concentration, can IR bands be found that are associated with the adsorbed species. 36 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - Sweetnam NG Disc Slides - April 7 2010 final.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas: U.S. Markets in a Global Context 2010 Energy Conference U.S. Energy Information Administration Johns Hopkins University - SAIS p y April 7, 2010 - Washington, DC Natural Gas: U.S. Markets is a Global Context, April 7, 2010 Richard Newell, March 2, 2010 1 Richard Newell, SAIS, December 14, 2009 1 April 7, 2010 Washington, DC Discussion Outline * Setting the context * Demand/supply outlook for 3 regions - United States United States - OECD Europe - China * Evolution of the global gas market -

  20. POLICY FLASH 2013-55 FPDS-NG Change Management Notice for the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Kevin M. Smith, of the Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division, at Kevin.M.Smith@hq.doe.gov, or at (202) ...

  1. POLICY FLASH 2013-55 FPDS-NG Change Management Notice for the...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    policy-flashes Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Kevin M. Smith, of the Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division, at Kevin.M.Smith@hq.doe.gov...

  2. Energia del Caribe, S.A.- FE DKT. NO. 16-18-NG

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy gives notice of receipt of an Application filed February 10, 2016 by Energia del Caribe, S.A. (Energia), requesting long-term authorization to export natural gas to...

  3. Microsoft Word - NG_ResQrySys_UsersGuide_Sept2015-FINAL.docx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... the Query System is a web-based system, no download or installation is necessary. All that is needed to run the Query System is a PC with up-to-date web-browsing software (such ...

  4. Techgen S.A. de C.V.- 14-94-NG

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy gives notice of receipt of an Application filed July 15, 2014, by Techgen S.A. de C.V.(Techgen), seeking a long-term multi-contract authorization to export up to 56.2...

  5. Emissions from In-Use NG, Propane, and Diesel Fueled Heavy Duty...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Emissions tests of in-use heavy-duty vehicles showed that, natural gas- and propane-fueled vehicles have high emissions of NH3 and CO, compared to diesel vehicles, while meeting ...

  6. Emissions from In-Use NG, Propane, and Diesel Fueled Heavy Duty Vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Emissions tests of in-use heavy-duty vehicles showed that, natural gas- and propane-fueled vehicles have high emissions of NH3 and CO, compared to diesel vehicles, while meeting certification requirements

  7. Highly robust hydrogen generation by bio-inspired Ir complexes for dehydrogenation of formic acid in water: Experimental and theoretical mechanistic investigations at different pH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Wan -Hui; Fujita, Etsuko; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Xu, Shaoan; Onishi, Naoya; Manaka, Yuichi; Suna, Yuki; Kambayashi, Hide; Muckerman, James T.; Himeda, Yuichiro

    2015-07-30

    Hydrogen generation from formic acid (FA), one of the most promising hydrogen storage materials, has attracted much attention due to the demand for the development of renewable energy carriers. Catalytic dehydrogenation of FA in an efficient and green manner remains challenging. Here, we report a series of bio-inspired Ir complexes for highly robust and selective hydrogen production from FA in aqueous solutions without organic solvents or additives. One of these complexes bearing an imidazoline moiety (complex 6) achieved a turnover frequency (TOF) of 322,000 h⁻¹ at 100 °C, which is higher than ever reported. The novel catalysts are very stable and applicable in highly concentrated FA. For instance, complex 3 (1 μmol) affords an unprecedented turnover number (TON) of 2,050,000 at 60 °C. Deuterium kinetic isotope effect experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations employing a “speciation” approach demonstrated a change in the rate-determining step with increasing solution pH. This study provides not only more insight into the mechanism of dehydrogenation of FA but also offers a new principle for the design of effective homogeneous organometallic catalysts for H₂ generation from FA.

  8. Highly robust hydrogen generation by bio-inspired Ir complexes for dehydrogenation of formic acid in water: Experimental and theoretical mechanistic investigations at different pH

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Wan -Hui; Fujita, Etsuko; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Xu, Shaoan; Onishi, Naoya; Manaka, Yuichi; Suna, Yuki; Kambayashi, Hide; Muckerman, James T.; Himeda, Yuichiro

    2015-07-30

    Hydrogen generation from formic acid (FA), one of the most promising hydrogen storage materials, has attracted much attention due to the demand for the development of renewable energy carriers. Catalytic dehydrogenation of FA in an efficient and green manner remains challenging. Here, we report a series of bio-inspired Ir complexes for highly robust and selective hydrogen production from FA in aqueous solutions without organic solvents or additives. One of these complexes bearing an imidazoline moiety (complex 6) achieved a turnover frequency (TOF) of 322,000 h⁻¹ at 100 °C, which is higher than ever reported. The novel catalysts are very stablemore » and applicable in highly concentrated FA. For instance, complex 3 (1 μmol) affords an unprecedented turnover number (TON) of 2,050,000 at 60 °C. Deuterium kinetic isotope effect experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations employing a “speciation” approach demonstrated a change in the rate-determining step with increasing solution pH. This study provides not only more insight into the mechanism of dehydrogenation of FA but also offers a new principle for the design of effective homogeneous organometallic catalysts for H₂ generation from FA.« less

  9. Amino acid modified Ni catalyst exhibits reversible H2 oxidation/production over a broad pH range at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, Arnab; DuBois, Daniel L.; Roberts, John A.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2014-11-18

    Hydrogenases interconvert H2 and protons at high rates and with high energy efficiencies, providing inspiration for the development of molecular catalysts. Studies designed to determine how the protein scaffold can influence a catalytically active site has led to the synthesis of amino acid derivatives, [Ni(PCy2NAmino acid2)2]2+ (CyAA), of [Ni(PR2NR'2)2]2+ complexes. It is shown that these CyAA derivatives can catalyze fully reversible H2 production/oxidation, a feature reminiscent of enzymes. The reversibility is achieved in acidic aqueous solutions, 0.25% H2/Ar, and elevated temperatures (tested up to 348 K) for the glycine (CyGly), arginine (CyArg), and arginine methyl ester (CyArgOMe) derivatives. As expected for a reversible process, the activity is dependent upon H2 and proton concentration. CyArg is significantly faster in both directions than the other two derivatives (~300 s-1 H2 production and 20 s-1 H2 oxidation; pH=1, 348 K). The significantly slower rates for CyArgOMe (35 s-1 production and 7 s-1 oxidation) compared to CyArg suggests an important role for the COOH group during catalysis. That CyArg is faster than CyGly (3 s-1 production and 4 s-1 oxidation under the same conditions) suggests that the additional structural features imparted by the guanidinium groups facilitate fast and reversible H2 addition/release. These observations demonstrate that appended, outer coordination sphere amino acids work in synergy with the active site and can play an equally important role for synthetic molecular electrocatalysts as the protein scaffold does for redox active enzymes. This work was funded by the Office of Science Early Career Research Program through the US DOE, BES (AD, WJS), and the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US DOE, BES (DLD, JASR). PNNL is operated by Battelle for the US DOE.

  10. The characteristic of carbon-coated LiFePO{sub 4} as cathode material for lithium ion battery synthesized by sol-gel process in one step heating and varied pH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Triwibowo, J.; Yuniarti, E.; Suharyadi, E.

    2014-09-25

    This research has been done on the synthesis of carbon coated LiFePO{sub 4} through sol-gel process. Carbon layer serves for improving electronic conductivity, while the variation of pH in the sol-gel process is intended to obtain the morphology of the material that may improve battery performance. LiFePO{sub 4}/C precursors are Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and FeC{sub 2}O{sub 4}.H{sub 2}O and citric acid. In the synthesis process, consisting of a colloidal suspension FeC{sub 2}O{sub 4}.H{sub 2}O and distilled water mixed with a colloidal suspension consisting of NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, and distilled water. Variations addition of citric acid is used to control the pH of the gel formed by mixing two colloidal suspensions. Sol in this study had a pH of 5, 5.4 and 5.8. The obtained wet gel is further dried in the oven and then sintered at a temperature 700C for 10 hours. The resulting material is further characterized by XRD to determine the phases formed. The resulting powder morphology is observed through SEM. Specific surface area of the powder was tested by BET, while the electronic conductivity characterized with EIS.

  11. Energia del Caribe, S.A. (Energia)- FE DKT. NO. 16-18-NG- EXPORT TO MEXICO

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy gives notice of receipt of an Application filed February 10, 2016 by Energia del Caribe, S.A. (Energia), requesting long-term authorization to export natural gas to...

  12. Microsoft Word - fuel_comparison_chart NG Updates 10_27_B_GCM HP(2).docx

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative F uels D ata C enter - F uel P roperties C omparison w ww.afdc.energy.gov 1 1 0/29/2014 Gasoline/E10 Low S ulfur Diesel Biodiesel Propane ( LPG) Compressed Natural G as (CNG) Liquefied Natural G as (LNG) Ethanol/E100 Methanol Hydrogen Electricity Chemical Structure [ 1] C 4 t o C 12 and Ethanol ≤ 1 0% C 8 t o C 25 Methyl e sters of C 12 t o C 22 fatty a cids C 3 H 8 ( majority) and C 4 H 10 (minority) CH 4 ( majority), C 2 H 6 a nd i nert gases CH 4 same a s CNG w ith inert g asses

  13. Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC- FE Dkt No. 15-14-NG

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On January 23, 2015, Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC (together, “Bear Head LNG”), filed an application for long-term, multi-contract authorization to engage in imports from,...

  14. The?Spectrum?of?Data?Intensive? Compu6ng?Ac6vi6es?at?L...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    oneyoumightwanttopayaFen5on to...) StandardApproach * KalmanBucysolvedproblemsexactlyfor linearsystems,Gaussiannoise,ad...

  15. Richard Gerber! Acting NERSC User Services Group Lead Edison Overview

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Acting NERSC User Services Group Lead Edison Overview --- 1 --- October 1 0, 2 013 Edison Addresses NERSC's Workload Needs 2 Characteris3c Descrip3on Comment Processor Intel I vy B ridge 2 .6 G Hz Fast, c u>ng---edge, c ommodity processor Node Dual---socket, 6 4 G B 1 866 M Hz m emory Large m emory p er n ode Excellent m emory b andwidth Interconnect Cray A ries, d ragonfly t opology Excellent l atency & b andwidth Excellent s caling AdapQve r ouQng e ases c ongesQon Storage 6.48 PB 140 G

  16. Effect of pH treatment on K-shell x-ray intensity ratios and K-shell x-ray-production cross sections in ZnCo alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kup Aylikci, N.; Aylikci, V.; Tirasoglu, E.; Cengiz, E.; Kahoul, A.; Karahan, I. H.

    2011-10-15

    In this study, empirical and semiempirical K-shell fluorescence yields ({omega}{sub K}) and K{beta}/K{alpha} intensity ratios from the available experimental data for elements with 23{<=}Z{<=}30 were calculated to compare them with elements in different alloys. The experimental data are fitted using the quantity [{omega}{sub K}/(1-{omega}{sub K})]{sup 1/4} vs Z to deduce the empirical K-shell fluorescence yields and K{beta}/K{alpha} intensity ratios. The empirical and semiempirical K-shell fluorescence yield values were used to calculate the K x-ray-production cross-section values for pure Co and Zn elements. Also, {sigma}{sub K{alpha}}, {sigma}{sub K{beta}} production cross sections and K{beta}/K{alpha} intensity ratios of Co and Zn have been measured in pure metals and in different alloy compositions which have different pH values. The samples were excited by 59.5-keV {gamma} rays from a {sup 241}Am annular radioactive source. K x rays emitted by samples were counted by an Ultra-LEGe detector with a resolution of 150 eV at 5.9 keV. The effect of pH values on alloy compositions and the effect of alloying on the fluorescence parameters of Co and Zn were investigated. The x-ray fluorescence parameters of Co and Zn in the alloying system indicate significant differences with respect to the pure metals. These differences are attributed to the reorganization of valence shell electrons and/or charge transfer phenomena.

  17. PhD and MPhil Thesis Classes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    experiment located in Batavia, IL. The dataset consists of 60,605 events passing the ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 4.11.1 The DataSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...

  18. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Jeffery Aguiar, Ph. D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Implications for Radiation Damage Evolution and Fast Ion Conduction."The Journal of Chemical Physics 140(19); 194701. Patel, M.K.; Tallman, D. J.; Valdez, J. A.; Aguiar, J.A.;...

  19. TUNL Ph.D. Degrees Theses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Jonathan M. Mueller, Prompt Neutron Polarization Asymmetries in Photofission of Isotopes of Thorium, Uranium, Neptunium, and Plutonium. Duke University, November 2013, Supervisors: ...

  20. Seonah Kim, Ph.D. | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fatty Acid Decarboxylase Engineering for Continuous Hydrocarbon Fuel Production (PI) Computational Pyrolysis Consortium - Zeolite Chemistry (subtask leader) Biochemical Process ...

  1. SEMINAR Ted Sargent PhD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    path to harvesting the abundant resource that is solar energy. The organic and polymer semiconductors at the heart of these devices generally absorb visible light; however,...

  2. PM_Ph_II_CAIP_F.book

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Career Development (PMCDP) » PMCDP/FPD Certification (renewal) PMCDP/FPD Certification (renewal) Continuous Learning Requirements: Persons certified under the PMCDP - and FAC-P/PM - are required to complete 80 continuous learning points (CLPs) biennially to maintain certification. All FPDs are required to report CLPs in FAITAS. Once inputted, the CLP requests are reviewed by the requestor's first-line supervisor and the respective PMCDP POC. If approved by both parties, the CLPs will be

  3. Review. Ernie Perry, PhD

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and what I see in terms of freight innovation and infrastructure to support our ... in freight planning and collaboration, and in freight policy and program areas. ...

  4. Guest Speaker: Jeff Thompson, PhD

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NYPD Detective Jeff Thompson will discuss how crisis negotiators have de-escalated tense situations, demonstrated empathy, built rapport and trust, and successfully influenced ...

  5. Microsoft Word - S08557_PhI

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Office of Legacy Management Mound, Ohio, Site Phase I Groundwater Monitoring Report ... left blank LMSMNDS08557 Office of Legacy Management Mound, Ohio, Site Phase I ...

  6. Lieve Laurens, Ph.D. | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Interests Dynamic biochemical composition of bioenergy-relevant biomass Coproduct ... Dynamic Biochemical Composition of Bioenergy-Relevant Biomass In order to understand the ...

  7. Ling Tao, Ph.D. | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Professional Experience Senior Engineer, National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable ... "Chapter 5: Conversion Technologies for Biofuels and Their Use," in SCOPE Bioenergy & ...

  8. Microsoft Word - Daum-PH.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effects of Spectral Dispersion of Cloud Droplet Size Distributions on Radiative Properties of Clouds and Dispersion Forcing P. H. Daum and Y. Liu Brookhaven National Laboratory Atmospheric Sciences Division Upton, New York Introduction Most studies of the indirect aerosol effect on cloud radiative properties have considered only changes in N caused by increasing the cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) concentration. In such studies, it is assumed that the change in r e , due to the increase in N,

  9. Jeff Griffin, Ph. D. Associate Laboratory Director

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jay Tilden Associate Administrator and Deputy Under Secretary for Counterterrorism and Counterproliferation Our Leadership Since April 2016, Mr. Tilden has served as the Associate Administrator for Counterterrorism and Counterproliferation with responsibility in preparing for, responding to, and successfully resolving nuclear and radiological accidents and incidents worldwide. The mission scope includes providing expertise, technically informed policy recommendations required to advance U.S.

  10. LANL: AOT & LANSCE The Pulse December 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory * Est. 1943 The Pulse-Newsletter of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and Accelerator Operations and Technology Division I N S I D E 2 From Alex's Desk 3 lANsCe-Ns hosts NNsA ACADemiC AlliANCe CeNter oF exCelleNCe leADer 4 Workshop oN isotope hArvestiNg At the FACility For rAre isotope BeAms iN situ ChArACterizA- tioN oF multiphAse polymeriC mAteriAls upoN DeFormAtioN 5 NeutroN sCAtteriNg reveAls the AtomiC motioN iN A NeW ClAss oF CerAmiC- metAl mAteriAls

  11. Congestion Heat Plot

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    SFTFwaMJpNg

  12. Nadya A. Fouad, Ph.D Romila Singh, Ph.D

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... A quarter of the women who did not enter the field reported ... workplace climate, both in terms of supports and barriers ... such as plans to search for alternative job ...

  13. Visible light absorption of TiO{sub 2} materials impregnated with tungstophosphoric acid ethanol–aqueous solution at different pH values. Evidence about the formation of a surface complex between Keggin anion and TiO{sub 2} surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rengifo-Herrera, Julián A. Blanco, Mirta N.; Pizzio, Luis R.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • TPA impregnation on TiO{sub 2} particles was done at different initial pH values. • Powders characterization evidenced the possible existence of TPA–TiO{sub 2} complexes. • Keggin anion complexed on TiO{sub 2} would be responsible of visible light absorption. - Abstract: TiO{sub 2} particles prepared by the sol–gel method were impregnated at different pH values (1.0, 2.0, 5.0 and 10.0) with a water–ethanol solution (50% V/V) of tungstophosphoric acid (TPA) (0.012 M). Similar preparation was carried out to synthesize TiO{sub 2} impregnated with [WO{sub 4}]{sup 2−} (TiW). These materials were characterized by different techniques such as UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV–vis DRS), magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance of {sup 31}P ({sup 31}P MAS NMR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman). Results revealed that TPA–TiO{sub 2} materials exhibit visible light absorption only when impregnation was done at pH 1.0 (TiTPA1) and 2.0 (TiTPA2). TiW powder did not show visible light absorption. XRD patterns show the presence of peaks at 2θ = 25.4° (1 0 1), 37.9° (0 0 4), 47.8° (2 0 0) and 54.3° associated to the anatase phase. Solid NMR, FT-IR and FT-Raman characterization showed that TiTPA1 and TiTPA2 samples contain Keggin ([PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 3−}) and lacunary anions ([PW{sub 11}O{sub 39}]{sup 7−}) respectively. On the other hand, FT-Raman results revealed a blue shifting and broadening of the band at 141 cm{sup −1} corresponding to anatase TiO{sub 2} and moreover, a broadening of bands at 900–1100 cm{sup −1} attributed to Keggin structures of TPA. Both spectral changes could be related to the formation of a surface complex between the Keggin anion of TPA and TiO{sub 2} surfaces. This interaction should be responsible for visible light absorption.

  14. Disclaimer

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    | b ra&le.com 1 Disclaimer This p resenta,on a nd a nalysis w ere p repared f or t he 2 015 E IA E nergy C onference. A ll results a nd a ny e rrors a re t he r esponsibility o f t he a uthor a nd d o n ot r epresent t he opinion o f T he B raAle G roup, I nc. o r i ts c lients. This p resenta,on d iscusses s ome g lobal e nergy t rends w ith t he a im o f s ,mula,ng debate. I t i s i ntended t o d escribe j ust o ne p ossible s cenario a mong m any, b ased o n assump,ons with respect to

  15. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Joseph J. Berry Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    thesis work focused on semiconductor spintronics with an emphasis on coherent spin ... Much of this work is foundational to efforts in the field of spintronics. From 2001 to ...

  16. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - John Simon, Ph.D.

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    interests include development of low-cost III-V solar cells, high-efficiency multi-junction solar cells, III-V semiconductor epitaxy, and development of novel semiconductor...

  17. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - John F. Geisz, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    303-384-6474 john.geisz@nrel.gov Dr. John Geisz is a principal scientist in the High Efficiency Crystalline Photovoltaics Group at NREL. He received his doctorate in chemical...

  18. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Daniel J. Friedman, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    303-384-6472 daniel.friedman@nrel.gov Dr. Daniel Friedman is the manager of the High Efficiency Crystalline Photovoltaics Group. He received his doctorate in applied physics...

  19. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Myles A. Steiner, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Steiner 303-384-7675 Myles.Steiner@nrel.gov Myles Steiner is a scientist in the High Efficiency Crystalline PV group at NREL, working primarily on III-V multijunction solar cells...

  20. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Pauls Stradins, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Si PV in the Energy Sciences directorate at NREL. The project core lies within the High-Efficiency Crystalline Materials Photovoltaics group. In addition, it involves theory,...

  1. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - David L. Young, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p. 073502. Young, D.L., B. Egaas, S. Pinegar, and P. Stradins. A new real-time quantum efficiency measurement system. in 33rd IEEE PVSC 2008. San Diego, CA: IEEE. Young, D.L.,...

  2. NREL: Biomass Research - Glen Ferguson, Ph.D.

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    These studies were in close collaboration with Professor Yves Chabal of the University of Texas at Dallas. At Indiana University he received several merit-based scholarships, ...

  3. NREL: Biomass Research - Jeffrey G. Linger, Ph.D.

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    H3 Drives Chromatin Assembly after Repair and Signals for the Completion of Repair." ... is Essential for the Recruitment of the General Transcription Machinery and Coactivators." ...

  4. PH/sub 3/ treatment for polymer stabilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1982-07-20

    Polymers are stabilized against oxidative degradation by treatment with phosphine gas. The treatment can be used in situ on polymeric components already in use.

  5. Young PhDs in Physics | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Results Prepared for South Coast Air Quality Management District by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory CRD-01-098 Fischer-Tropsch Synthetic Fuel Demonstration in a Southern California Vehicle Fleet Yosemite Waters Vehicle Evaluation Report Yosemite Waters Vehicle Evaluation Report i Alternative Fuel Trucks YOSEMITE WATERS VEHICLE EVALUATION REPORT Authors Leslie Eudy, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Robb Barnitt, NREL Teresa L. Alleman, NREL August 2005 Acknowledgements This

  6. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Peter Hacke, Ph.D.

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    modeling of degradation processes of PV modules, module integrated electronicssmall inverters, relating accelerated test results to field tests, and developing new methods for...

  7. W. Alexander Williams, Ph.D Designation and Certification Manager

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... 19, 1994. 2. Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, "Designation Survey Plan ... were performed using the computer capabilities inherent in the analyzer system. ...

  8. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Timothy J. Silverman, Ph.D.

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    Stabilization of CdTe PV Modules Using Bias and Light." IEEE Journal of Photovoltaics, 5 (1): 344-49. Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, NREL...

  9. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Aaron Ptak, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aaron.Ptak@nrel.gov Dr. Ptak is a Senior Scientist in the National Center for Photovoltaics. He received his doctorate from West Virginia University where he worked on growth...

  10. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Ingrid Repins, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "19.9%-efficient ZnOCdSCuInGaSe2 solar cell with 81.2% fill factor." Progress in Photovoltaics, 16 (3). http:dx.doi.org10.1002pip.822. Repins, I.L., Beall, C., Vora, N.,...