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Sample records for nez perce tribe

  1. Nez Perce Tribe- 1995 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In October 1995, the Nez Perce Tribe of Idaho's Department of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) received a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to establish a pilot plant for the production of "biodiesel," a biological alternative to #2 petroleum diesel fuel.

  2. Nez Perce Tribe Biodiesel Production Plant

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bio Nez Perce Tribe Bio - - Diesel Production Plant Diesel Production Plant Cassandra Cassandra Kipp Kipp Economic Development Economic Development Planner Planner Nez Perce Tribe Nez Perce Tribe What is Bio Diesel? What is Bio Diesel? A clean burning renewable fuel A clean burning renewable fuel made from agricultural made from agricultural products, such as: products, such as: Soybeans, Sunflower, Canola, Soybeans, Sunflower, Canola, Rapeseed, Animal Fats, Rapeseed, Animal Fats, Recycled

  3. Nez Perce Tribe- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The project will implement energy efficiency measures that include updates of several different elements in key Nez Perce tribal buildings in the town of Lapwai, Idaho.

  4. Idaho: Nez Perce Tribe Energy-Efficient Facilities Upgrade

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Nez Perce Tribe is located in the Pacific Northwest, where electrical energy costs are traditionally very low due to the hydropower generated in the area by the dam system. Even with relatively low energy costs, the Tribe recognized that even lower energy costs by implementing three relatively simple efficiency measures.

  5. EERE Success Story-Idaho: Nez Perce Tribe Energy-Efficient Facilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Upgrade | Department of Energy Idaho: Nez Perce Tribe Energy-Efficient Facilities Upgrade EERE Success Story-Idaho: Nez Perce Tribe Energy-Efficient Facilities Upgrade November 8, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Utilizing $67,000 of EERE's Tribal Energy Program funding, energy-efficiency upgrades were installed in five Nez Perce Reservation buildings that house a large portion of the Nez Perce Tribe's governing entities. The upgrades included replacing lighting fixtures with T8 fluorescent lamps and

  6. Council of Energy Resources Tribes 1993 summer internship report: Nez Perce Tribe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crow, J.S.

    1993-08-01

    This paper is designed to be a working part of a larger project which would deal with the topic of Tribal interests affected by the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management program and the approaches by which those Tribal interests can be advanced. Topics discussed in this paper include: background history of the Nez Perce Tribe`s relations with the US government; a Nez Perce view of tribal interests affected by DOE activities at Hanford; and a Nez Perce framework for private/governmental/tribal interest.

  7. Nez Perce Tribe Energy Efficient Facilities Installation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry Kinder

    2012-11-12

    Although Idaho's electrical rates are among the lowest in the country, the Nez Perce Tribe's electrical bills take a large bite out of the operating budget every year. Tribal programs are located in forty some buildings, in six counties, in two states. Ninety-five percent, or more, are heated electrically. The age of the Tribal office buildings located in Lapwai, Idaho vary from forty to over a hundred years old. Only sporadic updates, in the buildings themselves, have been made over the years. Working with the Tribe's electrical provider (Avista Corporation), it was determine that a minimum financial commitment could reap large rewards in the form of lower operating costs.

  8. Project Reports for Nez Perce Tribe- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The project will implement energy efficiency measures that include updates of several different elements in key Nez Perce tribal buildings in the town of Lapwai, Idaho.

  9. Idaho: Nez Perce Tribe Energy-Efficient Facilities Upgrade |...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Utilizing 67,000 of EERE's Tribal Energy Program funding, energy-efficiency upgrades were installed in five Nez Perce Reservation buildings that house a large portion of the Nez ...

  10. EERE Success Story-Idaho: Nez Perce Tribe Energy-Efficient Facilities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program; Stacy Charboneau, EM Richland ... Manager; Josiah Pinkham with Nez Perce Cultural Resources; and Jack Bell, Nez Perce ...

  11. Clearwater Focus Watershed; Nez Perce Tribe, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Ira

    2004-06-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division, approaches watershed restoration with a goal to protect, restore, and enhance a connected network of functioning habitat types capable of supporting all fish life stages. Its goal is also to re-establish normal patterns of production, dispersal, and exchange of genetic information within the 1855 Treaty Area. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Clearwater River Subbasin in 1996. Progress has been made in restoring the sub-basin by excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing, stabilizing stream banks, decommissioning roads, and upgrading culverts. Coordination of these projects is critical to the success of the restoration of the sub-basin. Coordination activities also includes: inter and intra-department coordination, sub-basin assessment and planning, involving government and private organizations, and treaty area coordination.

  12. Clearwater Focus Watershed; Nez Perce Tribe, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Ira

    2004-01-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division, approaches watershed restoration with a goal to protect, restore, and enhance a connected network of functioning habitat types capable of supporting all fish life stages. Its goal is also to re-establish normal patters of production, dispersal, and exchange of genetic information within the 1855 Treaty Area. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Clearwater River Subbasin in 1996. Progress has been made in restoring the sub-basin by excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing, stabilizing streambanks, decommissioning roads, and upgrading culverts. Coordination of these projects is critical to the success of the restoration of the sub-basin. Coordination includes: within department coordination, sub-basin assessment and planning, and treaty area coordination.

  13. Clearwater Focus Watershed; Nez Perce Tribe, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Ira; McRoberts, Heidi

    2006-12-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division, approaches watershed restoration with a goal to protect, restore, and enhance a connected network of functioning habitat types capable of supporting all fish life stages. The key objective of the Nez Perce Tribe Focus Coordinator position is to overcome fragmentation within the basin by managing communications with the subbasin, providing an overall framework and process for coordinated fisheries restoration and managing the planning, assessment, implementation, and monitoring and evaluation process. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Clearwater River Subbasin in 1996. Progress has been made in restoring the sub-basin by excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing, stabilizing stream banks, decommissioning roads, restoring fish passage, as well as other watershed restoration projects. Coordination of these projects is critical to the success of the restoration of the sub-basin. Coordination activities also includes: inter and intra-department coordination, sub-basin assessment and planning, involving government and private organizations, and treaty area coordination.

  14. Clearwater Focus Watershed; Nez Perce Tribe, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Ira

    2006-02-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division, approaches watershed restoration with a goal to protect, restore, and enhance a connected network of functioning habitat types capable of supporting all fish life stages. The key objective of the Nez Perce Tribe Focus Coordinator position is to overcome fragmentation within the basin by managing communications with the subbasin, providing an overall framework and process for coordinated fisheries restoration and managing the planning, assessment, implementation, and monitoring and evaluation process. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Clearwater River Subbasin in 1996. Progress has been made in restoring the sub-basin by excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing, stabilizing stream banks, decommissioning roads, restoring fish passage, as well as other watershed restoration projects. Coordination of these projects is critical to the success of the restoration of the sub-basin. Coordination activities also includes: inter and intra-department coordination, sub-basin assessment and planning, involving government and private organizations, and treaty area coordination.

  15. EIS-0213: Nez-Perce Tribal Hatchery Project (NPTH).

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the Nez Perce Tribe propose to supplement their existing program to restore chinook salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin in Idaho. This EIS evaluates the Proposed Action that the Nez Perce Tribe would build and operate two central incubation and rearing hatcheries and six satellite facilities.

  16. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery .

    1996-06-01

    Bonneville Power Administration, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Nez Perce Tribe propose a supplementation program to restore chinook salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin in Idaho. The Clearwater River is a tributary to the Snake River, which empties into the Columbia River. The Nez Perce Tribe would build and operate two central incubation and rearing hatcheries and six satellite facilities. Spring, summer and fall chinook salmon would be reared and acclimated to different areas in the Subbasin and released at the hatchery and satellite sites or in other watercourses throughout the Subbasin. The supplementation program differs from other hatchery programs because the fish would be released at different sizes and would return to reproduce naturally in the areas where they are released. Several environmental issues were identified during scoping: the possibility that the project would fail if mainstem Columbia River juvenile and adult passage problems are not solved; genetic risks to fish listed as endangered or threatened; potential impacts to wild and resident fish stocks because of increase competition for food and space; and water quality. The Proposed Action would affect several important aspects of Nez Perce tribal life, primarily salmon harvest, employment, and fisheries management.

  17. White Sturgeon Management Plan in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams; Nez Perce Tribe, 1997-2005 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nez Perce Tribe Resources Management Staff,

    2005-09-01

    White sturgeon in the Hells Canyon reach (HCR) of the Snake River are of cultural importance to the Nez Perce Tribe. However, subsistence and ceremonial fishing opportunities have been severely limited as a result of low numbers of white sturgeon in the HCR. Hydrosystem development in the Columbia River Basin has depressed numbers and productivity of white sturgeon in the HCR by isolating fish in impounded reaches of the basin, restricting access to optimal rearing habitats, reducing the anadromous forage base, and modifying early life-history habitats. Consequently, a proactive management plan is needed to mitigate for the loss of white sturgeon production in the HCR, and to identify and implement feasible measures that will restore and rebuild the white sturgeon population to a level that sustains viability and can support an annual harvest. This comprehensive and adaptive management plan describes the goals, objectives, strategies, actions, and expected evaluative timeframes for restoring the white sturgeon population in the HCR. The goal of this plan, which is to maintain a viable, persistent population that can support a sustainable fishery, is supported by the following objectives: (1) a natural, stable age structure comprising both juveniles and a broad spectrum of spawning age-classes; (2) stable or increasing numbers of both juveniles and adults; (3) consistent levels of average recruitment to ensure future contribution to reproductive potential; (4) stable genetic diversity comparable to current levels; (5) a minimum level of abundance of 2,500 adults to minimize extinction risk; and (6) provision of an annual sustainable harvest of 5 kg/ha. To achieve management objectives, potential mitigative actions were developed by a Biological Risk Assessment Team (BRAT). Identified strategies and actions included enhancing growth and survival rates by restoring anadromous fish runs and increasing passage opportunities for white sturgeon, reducing mortality rates

  18. Nez Perce Tribe Energy Efficient Facility Installation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The chief economic basis of this entire region is in agriculture and timber products. Geography Idaho has some of the cheapest electricity in the nation Power Supply Dworshak Dam ...

  19. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Complex; Operations and Maintenance and 2005 Annual Operation Plan, 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harty, Harold R.; Lundberg, Jeffrey H.; Penney, Aaron K.

    2005-02-01

    The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) responds directly to a need to mitigate for naturally-reproducing salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin. The overall goal is to produce and release fish that will survive to adulthood, spawn in the Clearwater River subbasin and produce viable offspring that will support future natural production and genetic integrity. Several underlying purposes of fisheries management will be maintained through this program: (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Columbia River subbasin anadromous fish resources. (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater River subbasin. (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project completion. (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations. (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits. (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal Management of Nez Perce Tribal hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery is a supplementation program that will rear and release spring, fall, and early-fall stocks of chinook salmon. Two life stages of spring chinook salmon will be released: parr and presmolts. Fall and early-fall chinook salmon will be released as subyearling smolts. The intent of NPTHC is to use conventional hatchery and Natural Rearing Enhancement Systems (NATURES) techniques to develop, increase and restore natural populations of spring and fall chinook salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin.

  20. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Complex; Operations and Maintenance and 2004 Annual Operation Plan, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harty, Harold R.; Penney, Aaron K.; Larson, Roy Edward

    2005-12-01

    The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) responds directly to a need to mitigate for naturally-reproducing salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin. The overall goal is to produce and release fish that will survive to adulthood, spawn in the Clearwater River subbasin and produce viable offspring that will support future natural production and genetic integrity. Several underlying purposes of fisheries management will be maintained through this program: (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Columbia River subbasin anadromous fish resources. (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater River subbasin. (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project completion. (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations. (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits. (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal Management of Nez Perce Tribal hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery is a supplementation program that will rear and release spring, fall, and early-fall stocks of chinook salmon. Two life stages of spring chinook salmon will be released: parr and presmolts. Fall and early-fall chinook salmon will be released as subyearling smolts. The intent of NPTHC is to use conventional hatchery and Natural Rearing Enhancement Systems (NATURES) techniques to develop, increase and restore natural populations of spring and fall chinook salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin.

  1. Head of EM Visits Northwest Tribes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EM Acting Assistant Secretary Mark Whitney recently traveled to Idaho, Oregon, and Washington to visit the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Wanapum Band, Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, and Nez Perce Tribe.

  2. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project; Operations and Maintenance and Planning and Design, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.; Penney, Aaron K.

    2005-12-01

    This report fulfills the contract obligations based on the Statement of Work (SOW) for the project as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2002 annual report combines information from two contracts with a combined value of $3,036,014. Bonneville Power Administration identifies them as follows; (1) Part I--Operations and Maintenance--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4504, and $2,682,635 which includes--Equipment costs of $1,807,105. (2) Part II--Planning and Design--Project No. 1983-35-04, Contract No. 4035, $352,379 for Clearwater Coho Restoration Master Plan development Based on NPPC authorization for construction and operation of NPTH, the annual contracts were negotiated for the amounts shown above under (1) and (2). Construction contracts were handled by BPA until all facilities are completed and accepted.

  3. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project, Operations and Maintenance and Planning and Design, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.; Penney, Aaron K.

    2006-03-01

    This report fulfills the contract obligations based on the Statement of Work (SOW) for the project as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2001 annual report combines information from two contracts with a combined value of $2,336,491. They are identified by Bonneville Power Administration as follows: (1) Operations and Maintenance--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4504, and (2) Planning and Design--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4035. The Operations and Maintenance (O&M) budget of $2,166,110 was divided as follows: Facility Development and Fish Production Costs--$860,463; and Equipment Purchases as capital cost--$1,305,647 for equipment and subcontracts. The Planning and Design (P&D) budget of $170,381 was allocated to development of a Coho master planning document in conjunction with Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery. The O&M budget expenditures represent personnel and fish production expenses; e.g., administration, management, coordination, facility development, personnel training and fish production costs for spring Chinook and Coho salmon. Under Objective 1: Fish Culture Training and Education, tribal staff worked at Clearwater Anadromous Hatchery (CAFH) an Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) facility to produce spring Chinook smolt and parr for release that are intended to provide future broodstock for NPTH. As a training exercise, BPA allowed tribal staff to rear Coho salmon at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) facility. This statement of work allows this type of training to prepare tribal staff to later rear salmon at Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery under Task 1.6. As a subset of the O&M budget, the equipment purchase budget of $1,305,647 less $82,080 for subcontracts provides operational and portable equipment necessary for NPTH facilities after construction. The equipment budget for the year was $1,223,567; this year's purchases amounted $287,364.48 (see

  4. Spring Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Supplementation in the Clearwater Subbasin ; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation Project, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backman, Thomas; Sprague, Sherman; Bretz, Justin

    2009-06-10

    The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) program has the following goals (BPA, et al., 1997): (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Clearwater Subbasin anadromous fish resources; (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater Subbasin; (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project initiation; (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations; (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits; and (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal management of Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. The NPTH program was designed to rear and release 1.4 million fall and 625,000 spring Chinook salmon. Construction of the central incubation and rearing facility NPTH and spring Chinook salmon acclimation facilities were completed in 2003 and the first full term NPTH releases occurred in 2004 (Brood Year 03). Monitoring and evaluation plans (Steward, 1996; Hesse and Cramer, 2000) were established to determine whether the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery program is achieving its stated goals. The monitoring and evaluation action plan identifies the need for annual data collection and annual reporting. In addition, recurring 5-year program reviews will evaluate emerging trends and aid in the determination of the effectiveness of the NPTH program with recommendations to improve the program's implementation. This report covers the Migratory Year (MY) 2007 period of the NPTH Monitoring & Evaluation (M&E) program. There are three NPTH spring Chinook salmon treatment streams: Lolo Creek, Newsome Creek, and Meadow Creek. In 2007, Lolo Creek received 140,284 Brood Year (BY) 2006 acclimated pre-smolts at an average weight of 34.9 grams per fish, Newsome Creek received 77,317 BY 2006 acclimated pre-smolts at an average of 24.9 grams

  5. EM Newsletters | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Umatilla Indian Reservation, and Nez Perce Tribe. April 29, 2015 SRNS employee Matthew Gay uses critical electronic rounds to take a reading at the Savannah River National...

  6. Huizenga Response to TWS Recs.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Visits Northwest Tribes Head of EM Visits Northwest Tribes May 28, 2015 - 12:00pm Addthis EM and Nez Perce officials visit the Bio-Control Center on the Nez Perce Reservation. From left to right: Kristen Ellis, EM Office of Intergovernmental and Community Activities Director; Gabe Bohnee, Manager of the Nez Perce Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program; Stacy Charboneau, EM Richland Operations Office (RL) Manager; Mark Whitney, EM Acting Assistant Secretary; Jill Conrad, RL Tribal

  7. CX-006935: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Idaho-Tribal Energy Program-Nez Perce TribeCX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1Date: 09/23/2011Location(s): Nez Perce Tribe, IdahoOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Savannah River Operations Office

  8. CX-003765: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Idaho-Tribe-Nez Perce TribeCX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1Date: 09/09/2010Location(s): IdahoOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  9. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercLargeComputersServers | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Large computers servers Pages using the property "BuildingSPElectrtyUsePercLargeComputersServers"...

  10. BPA-2012-01842-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the 1992 Dworshak Dam Mitigation Agreement between BPA, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, and the Nez Perce Tribe. I am specifically looking for a letter that Idaho...

  11. EA-1160: Northeast Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Project, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to enter into an agreement with the Nez Perce Tribe to acquire and manage...

  12. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercElevators | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ctrtyUsePercElevators" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.125907012528 + Sweden Building...

  13. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercPrinters | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ectrtyUsePercPrinters" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 1.29926142668 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 1.28348328161 + Sweden...

  14. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercAirCompressors | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    UsePercAirCompressors" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 1.86951260628 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building...

  15. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercLaundry | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lectrtyUsePercLaundry" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0...

  16. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercRefrigeration | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    yUsePercRefrigeration" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0...

  17. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercPumps | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PElectrtyUsePercPumps" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 8.91703516299 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 5.44401702405 + Sweden...

  18. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercCirculationFans | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    sePercCirculationFans" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 18.6715328229 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building...

  19. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercFans | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SPElectrtyUsePercFans" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 7.29539104961 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 16.7673965927 + Sweden...

  20. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercTotal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PElectrtyUsePercTotal" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 +...

  1. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercPcs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SPElectrtyUsePercPcs" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 36.5249084193 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 20.0932363649 + Sweden...

  2. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercElctrcHeating | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    yUsePercElctrcHeating" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 1.28146332495 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building...

  3. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercLargeKitchens | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    yUsePercLargeKitchens" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 1.06788610412 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building...

  4. ICEIWG Participating Tribes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    List of participating Tribes in the Indian Country Energy and Infrastructure Working Group (ICEIWG).

  5. Winnebago Tribe- 2014 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Following through with the Winnebago Tribe's commitment to reduce energy usage and consumption, the Winnebago Tribe Solar Project will focus on renewable energy production and energy cost savings consistent with protecting our natural environment.

  6. Winnebago Tribe- 2006 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The tribe will conduct a wind feasibility study to determine the viability of energy self-sufficiency on the reservation.

  7. Tulalip Tribes- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tulalip Tribes of Washington, a federally recognized Indian tribe, will assess the feasibility of developing biogas generation facilities to convert manure and other biomass resources into electricity to help meet the tribe's energy needs from a renewable energy source. Tulalip will research and report on how this type of development can improve water quality in Snohomish Watershed streams and rivers through improved treatment of manure and other biowaste products and possible water reuse from the facility.

  8. Yurok Tribe- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Yurok Tribe, with about 3500 people in northern California today, settled along the lower Klamath River on the Pacific Coast. The tribe will conduct a utility services study including the evaluation of utility service needs and existing infrastructure to determine the demand and need for power utility and the financial implications of creating the organization. Secondly, the tribe will evaluate the potential forms of organization and third, develop the steps to create the organization.

  9. Microsoft Word - Document2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    [mailto:SDininny@ap.org] Sent: Tuesday, March 05, 2013 1:11 PM To: Riehle, Dorothy C Subject: FOIA-Hanford Tanks Hi Dorothy, This is another request under the Freedom of Information Act. I would like electronic copies of correspondence in 2013 between any Northwest Native American tribes - including the Yakama Nation, Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla, Confederated Colville Tribes, and Nez Perce tribe - regarding leaking underground waste tanks at the Hanford nuclear reservation. In order to

  10. Winnebago Tribe - Wind Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska Wind Energy Feasibility Project Update November 18, 2008 ... Nebraska 2008 All Rights Reserved DOE Wind Project: Purpose * To initiate a study to ...

  11. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of Draft Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for Hanford Site, Richland Washington DOE/EIS- 0391 David Bernhard ERWM Program Nez Perce Tribe P.O. Box 365 Lapwai, ID 83540 February 16,2010 Additional Contributors: Stanley M. Sobczyk, Tony Smith and Dan Landeen 2 Presentation Overview of ERWM Findings * This is a summary to date of the Nez Perce Tribe ERWM findings on TC&WM EIS. This represents ERWM analysis of specific EIS comments only and is not the

  12. Winnebago Tribe- 2005 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska has experienced significant growth over the last five years. Estimated at over 10%, the growth trend has caused the tribe to examine the vital role that energy plays in supporting growth and economic development overall. The project seeks to: (1) investigate the opportunities for wind generation, improving the tribe's energy resource portfolio, and shaping the reservation load profile; (2) analyze renewable generation investment opportunities and their potential job creation and economic development benefits; and (3) conduct a tribal utility formation study to facilitate accomplishment of tribal goals.

  13. Council of Energy Resource Tribes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy TRIBAL ENERGY PROGRAM 2006 Program Review Meeting 23 October 2006 Council of Energy Resource Tribes Council of Energy Resource Tribes Presentation Outline * Project Overview - CERT/DOE Cooperative Agreement * Objectives * Project Status - Accomplishments - Technical/Management Issues - Activities yet to be completed * Future Plans CERT Mission ACOMA PUEBLO - BLACKFEET TRIBE CHEROKEE NATION - CHEYENNE ARAPAHO TRIBES - CHEYENNE RIVER SIOUX TRIBE -

  14. Hualapai Tribe- 1995 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Hualapai Tribe of northwestern Arizona suffers from nearly 70% unemployment and has limited income sources. A tourist facility on the Grand Canyon rim currently draws approximately 500 day-visitors but lack of water limits expansion potential.

  15. Yurok Tribe- 2007 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The tribe is interested in developing renewable energy on the reservation both to meet community energy needs in off-grid areas and to generate tribal revenues through commercial power sales.

  16. Blackfeet Tribe- 2006 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With some of the best wind resources in the U.S., the tribe will consider forming a Tribal Energy Organization capable of purchasing power and distributing its resources throughout the reservation.

  17. Hualapai Tribe- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The project will build on the potential for renewable energy development on the Hualapai Reservation that was identified during the Phase l renewable energy resource assessment conducted by the Hualapai Tribe since 2005.

  18. Blackfeet Tribe- 1994 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Blackfeet Tribe submitted a proposal on May 17, 1994, and received funding from the Department of Energy (DOE), under Title XXVI, Section 2606, Tribal Government Energy Assistance Program, pursuant to the Energy Policy Act of 1992.

  19. Colville Confederated Tribes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nespelem, Washington Tribal Utility Formation Grant DOE Tribal Energy Program Review Quarterly Progress Report May 4, 2015 * Colville Confederated Tribes Overview * Grant Overview & Location * Grant Objectives * Grant Progress & Current Status * Grant Next Steps * Appendix 1: Tribal Utility Authority (TUA) Development Agenda Colville Confederated Tribes Overview * Approximately 5,000 tribal members live on Reservation * Residential load is comprised of both tribal and non-tribal

  20. Hopi Tribe- 2005 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Hopi Tribe will conduct a feasibility study to determine if development of a utility-scale wind power project with a capacity of approximately 100 MW located on Hopi lands held in fee simple in northern Arizona is feasible. If the feasibility study determines there is no impact or minimal impact to the environment, the tribe may develop the wind power project on two large mesas called East and West Sunset Mountains approximately 16 miles southwest of the city of Winslow.

  1. Ponca Tribe of Nebraska

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ponca Tribe of Nebraska Michael Boggs - Energy Planner Project Earth Lover History - The Ponca's were a peaceful agricultural tribe located along the Niobrara river in northeastern Nebraska. - In the early 1870's the Ponca's were forced to leave Nebraska and settle in Oklahoma. - Almost 10 years later the Ponca's were allowed to return to Nebraska. Those that returned are now considered the Northern Ponca's and those that remained are considered the Southern Ponca's - During this time period the

  2. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cultural Resources Preserving and Protecting Hanford's Cultural Resources | An Overview | 2 Program Overview U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Cultural Resources Program * Tribal staffs are regularly consulted at the earliest opportunity for recommendations and advice on DOE-RL activities potentially affecting tribal rights and interests. * The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, the Nez Perce Tribe,

  3. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercHeatPumpsUsedForColg | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingSPElectrtyUsePercHeatPumpsUsedForColg Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Heat pumps used for cooling...

  4. SUSANA MARTiNEZ Governor JOHN A. SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MARTiNEZ Governor JOHN A. SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor November 9, 2011 NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT Hazardous Waste Bureau 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Phone (505) 476-6000 Fax (505) 476-6030 www.nmenv.state.nm.us CERTIFIED MAIL - RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED Farok Sharif DAVE MARTIN Secretary BUTCH TONGATE Deputy Secretary Edward Ziemianski, Acting Manager Carlsbad Field Office Department of Energy Washington TRU Solutions LLC P. O. Box 2078 P. O. Box

  5. Tonto Apache Tribe- 2014 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tonto Apache Tribe (TAT) will install solar arrays on two of the tribe's largest energy consuming buildings, helping to meet more than 60% of the buildings' total electricity needs.

  6. Yurok Tribe- 2005 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Yurok Tribe has a great need for improved energy services on the reservation. The members pay $328 per month per household on average for energy, with just a $9,000 median household income. The project will assess the need for energy efficiency services on the reservation, identify available resources, and develop an implementation plan for meeting these needs. With an unemployment rate of 42%, the job training component of this program will benefit the tribe. Past attempts have been made to provide energy efficiency and renewable energy maintenance services on the reservation, but many of these services have not endured because they were not tribe-driven. This project will build tribal expertise, increase awareness, and form collaborative relationships with local energy services.

  7. Ute Tribe Energy Conference & Expo

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An international gathering of energy producing Tribes, governments and companies envisioning a path forward towards a more sustainable future.

  8. Organization: Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    * Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma ØFederally Recognized Indian Tribe ØCentral Oklahoma (between OKC & Tulsa) ØStrong Commitment to Energy Efficiency & Renewables * BKJ Solutions, Inc. ØTribally Owned Construction Company ØConstruction with USACE, IHS, BIA & Tribe ØFuture Renewable Energy Development Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma's traditional jurisdictional lands FEASIBILITY GRANT * Objectives ØConduct in-Depth Feasibility Study of Wind Energy ØIdentify & Address Technical Issues Related

  9. Hoopa Valley Tribe- 2006 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Hoopa Valley Tribe will assess the feasibility of smaller-scale hydroelectric facilities (between 100 KW and 5 MW). The feasibility study will focus on analyzing, qualifying, and quantifying the opportunity for the tribe to develop, own and operate hydroelectric plants on tribal lands, either for direct use by the tribe, or for selling power.

  10. Hoopa Valley Tribe- 1994 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Hoopa Valley Tribe is located in a northern California valley about 45 miles from the nearest city. The tribe is located in remote and mountainous area. The tribe was experiencing high energy costs to operate its community swimming pool due to the equipment's age, inefficient design, and the lack of a pool cover.

  11. Final Report: Performance Modeling Activities in PERC2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allan Snavely

    2007-02-25

    Progress in Performance Modeling for PERC2 resulted in: • Automated modeling tools that are robust, able to characterize large applications running at scale while simultaneously simulating the memory hierarchies of mul-tiple machines in parallel. • Porting of the requisite tracer tools to multiple platforms. • Improved performance models by using higher resolution memory models that ever before. • Adding control-flow and data dependency analysis to the tracers used in perform-ance tools. • Exploring and developing several new modeling methodologies. • Using modeling tools to develop performance models for strategic codes. • Application of modeling methodology to make a large number of “blind” per-formance predictions on certain mission partner applications, targeting most cur-rently available system architectures. • Error analysis to correct some systematic biases encountered as part of the large-scale blind prediction exercises. • Addition of instrumentation capabilities for communication libraries other than MPI. • Dissemination the tools and modeling methods to several mission partners, in-cluding DoD HPCMO and two DARPA HPCS vendors (Cray and IBM), as well as to the wider HPC community via a series of tutorials.

  12. Oneida Tribe Energy Audits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Ray; Schubert, Eugene

    2014-08-15

    Project funding energy audits of 44 Tribally owned buildings operated by the Oneida Tribe of Indians of WI. Buildings were selected for their size, age, or known energy concerns and total over 1 million square feet. Audits include feasibility studies, lists of energy improvement opportunities, and a strategic energy plan to address cost effective ways to save energy via energy efficiency upgrades over the short and long term.

  13. Pascua Yaqui Tribe- 2012 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Pascua Yaqui Tribe (PYT) Renewable Energy Development and Deployment Feasibility Study will determine the technical and economic viability of future renewable projects.

  14. Protect and Restore Red River Watershed, 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bransford, Stephanie

    2009-05-04

    The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) and the Nez Perce National Forest (NPNF) have formed a partnership in completing watershed restoration activities, and through this partnership more work is accomplished by sharing funding and resources in our effort. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Red River Watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 2001. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed through road decommissioning and culvert replacement. From completing a watershed assessment to two NEPA efforts and a final stream restoration design, we will begin the effort of restoring the mainstem channel of Red River to provide spawning and rearing habitat for anadromous and resident fish species. Roads have been surveyed and prioritized for removal or improvement as well as culverts being prioritized for replacement to accommodate fish passage throughout the watershed. Another major, and extremely, important component of this project is the Red River Meadow Conservation Easement. We have begun the process of pursuing a conservation easement on approximately 270 acres of prime meadow habitat (Red River runs through this meadow and is prime spawning and rearing habitat).

  15. Rehabilitate Newsome Creek Watershed, 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bransford, Stephanie

    2009-05-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridgetop approach. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) and the Nez Perce National Forest (NPNF) have formed a partnership in completing watershed restoration activities, and through this partnership more work is accomplished by sharing funding and resources in our effort. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Newsome Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 1997. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed through road decommissioning and culvert replacement. Starting in FY 2001 and continuing into the present, a major stream restoration effort on the mainstem of Newsome Creek has been pursued. From completing a watershed assessment to a feasibility study of 4 miles of mainstem rehabilitation to carrying that forward into NEPA and a final design, we will begin the effort of restoring the mainstem channel of Newsome Creek to provide spawning and rearing habitat for anadromous and resident fish species. Roads have been surveyed and prioritized for removal or improvement as well as culverts being prioritized for replacement to accommodate fish passage throughout the watershed.

  16. Project Reports for Winnebago Tribe- 2014 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Following through with the Winnebago Tribe's commitment to reduce energy usage and consumption, the Winnebago Tribe Solar Project will focus on renewable energy production and energy cost savings...

  17. Hualapai Tribe- 2005 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Hualapai Tribe is located on the end of their existing utility grid which has subjected them to high costs and poor reliability of electric service. The first phase of the project will establish a tribally operated utility to provide service to tribal customers at Grand Canyon West, which has been operating without grid power for the past seven years. The second phase of the project will examine the feasibility and strategy for establishing a tribal utility to serve the remainder of the Hualapai Reservation.

  18. Tulalip Tribe - Biogas Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bio-Gas Project Daryl Williams November 18, 2008 Introduction Background Description of Project Partnership Feasibility Study/Business Plan Creation of Quil Ceda Power Funding Creation of Qualco Energy Closing Background Land-Use Changes from Agriculture to Other Types of Development Skykomish River WQ Problems Bacteria Nutrient Loading Relationship Between Tribes and Dairies Poor Economy for Dairy Operations Project Description Sewage Treatment for

  19. Ute Mountain Tribe- 1994 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Ute Mountain Ute tribe in southwestern Colorado brings in considerable income from its cattle-ranching operation, with a herd of nearly 2,000 head. Since annual rainfall is only 10-15 inches and the only stream is dry part of the year, the tribe must rely on groundwater for cattle watering.

  20. Hoopa Valley Tribe- 1995 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Hoopa Valley Tribe is located in remote area about 45 miles from the nearest city. There is not much to keep the youth busy. The tribe purchased a 3,672-square-foot metal building and dedicated it to be used as a youth center.

  1. Oklahoma Tribe to Install Solar Roof

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An Indian tribe in Anadarko, Oklahoma is installing solar panel roofs on two tribal government buildings.

  2. Additional Resources for Tribes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Additional Resources for Tribes Additional Resources for Tribes The following tribal and federal organizations, education and training opportunities, and tribal directories provide helpful information for Indian tribes and Alaska Natives. For resources specifically related to developing and financing energy projects on tribal lands, visit the Energy Resource Library. Resource Type Additional Resources for Tribes

  3. Penobscot Tribe- 2005 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Penobscot Nation includes 2,261 members and land holdings of 118,885 acres in various parcels located throughout northern, eastern, and western Maine, including rights to waters of the Penobscot River and many of its tributaries. The tribe is located in a region that has both a cold, harsh climate and very high energy costs. The objectives of the project are to develop an energy vision that in turn will lead to a more detailed, prioritized, long-term strategic plan. Two principle objectives are: (1) for the plan to address the cost burden of their current energy situation and explore ways to make existing tribal public facilities and private residences more energy efficient, and (2) for the plan to identify renewable energy development and production opportunities, always mindful of environmental impacts.

  4. Rosebud Sioux Tribe- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rosebud Sioux Tribe, located in Todd County in south-central South Dakota, installed a single 750-kW wind turbine that was dedicated in April 2003. While completing the design and financing of the single wind turbine, the tribe began defining a larger commercial opportunity — a 30-MW wind energy project for energy export into the larger electricity market. The project to be funded under this grant is the preconstruction development activities for a 30-MW commercial wind facility to provide economic benefits to the tribe and create jobs for tribal members.

  5. Spirit Lake Tribe- 1995 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    A long-range goal of the Spirit Lake Nation is to develop a tribally owned and operated municipal power company. The tribe has been awarded a Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) allocation starting in the year 2001.

  6. Yerington Paiute Tribe- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under this project, the Yerington Paiute Tribe will create an economic planning organization with decision-making powers separate from the Tribal Council body to facilitate the execution of the Energy Park and other renewable energy projects.

  7. Rosebud Sioux Tribe- 1999 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rosebud Sioux Tribe located in South Dakota through the Rosebud Sioux Tribal Utility Commission is installing a 750-kw NEG Micon wind turbine adjacent to their casino and motel complex at the south end of the Rosebud Sioux Reservation.

  8. Project Reports for Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California - 2015...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California - 2015 Project Project Reports for Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California - 2015 Project Under this grant, the Washoe Tribe of Nevada and ...

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - RAP IAP Presententation2.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Injury Assessment Plan River and Plateau Committee Hanford Advisory Board Larry Goldstein Larry Goldstein October 9, 2012 1 2 Who We Are State of Oregon State of Washington U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Commerce (NOAA) U S D t t f I t i (Fi h d Wildlif S i ) U.S. Department of Interior (Fish and Wildlife Service) Nez Perce Tribe Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian

  10. Standing Rock Sioux Tribe- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's (SRST) cultural identity demands that tribal development occur in a sustainable manner and in a manner protective of the tribe's natural resources to preserve them for following generations.

  11. Bishop Paiute Tribe 2015 Residential Solar Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Title: Bishop Paiute Tribe Residential Solar Program Prime Recipient: Bishop Paiute Tribe New Award Impacts: * 58 kW of new clean renewable energy on 22 low-income homes, ...

  12. ITEP Clean Power Plan and Tribes Training

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Institute of Environmental Professionals (ITEP) is hosting a Clean Power Plan and Tribes training provides detailed information for tribes to understand the Clean Power Plan and how it applies to their tribal lands.

  13. Three Affliated Tribes Renewable Energy Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belvin Pete; Kent Good; Krista Gordon; Ed McCarthy,

    2006-05-26

    The Three Affliated Tribes on the Fort Berthold Reservation studied the feasibility of a commercial wind facility on land selected and owned by the Tribes and examined the potential for the development of renewable energy resources on Tribal Lands.

  14. Council of Energy Resource Tribes - Project Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cooperative Agreement Grant #DE-FG36-03Go13039 October 2005 Roger Fragua Council of Energy Resource Tribes Council Of Energy Council Of Energy Resource Resource Tribes Tribes Overview & Policy Advocacy * CERT Mission & Programs * National Tribal Energy Vision * DOE Cooperative Agreement * CERT Initiatives CERT Mission "To support member Tribes as they develop their management capabilities and use their energy resources as the foundation for building stable, diversified

  15. Project Reports for Winnebago Tribe- 2006 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The tribe will conduct a wind feasibility study to determine the viability of energy self-sufficiency on the reservation.

  16. Midwest Alliance of Sovereign Tribes Summer Meeting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Midwest Alliance of Sovereign Tribes (MAST) Summer Meeting is a two-day meeting featuring tribal leader roundtable discussions.

  17. Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma Wind Feasibility Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma Wind Feasibility Study ORGANIZATION * Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma Federally Recognized Indian Tribe Central Oklahoma (between OKC & Tulsa) Strong Commitment to Energy Efficiency & Renewables * BKJ Solutions, Inc. Tribally Owned Construction Company Construction with USACE, IHS, BIA & Tribe Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma's traditional jurisdictional lands FEASIBILITY GRANT * Objectives Conduct in-Depth Feasibility Study of Wind Energy Identify & Address Technical

  18. Northern Cheyenne Tribe- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Northern Cheyenne Tribe, located in Rosebud and Bighorn counties in southeastern Montana, plans to conduct preconstruction activities for a 30-MW wind facility. The tribe was awarded a feasibility study grant in FY2002 for wind resource monitoring, and is accelerating the study and proceeding with development after the collected resource data was correlated to long-term wind resource data from a nearby site, and the resources confirmed. Activities include permitting, avian and cultural assessments, and the transmission and interconnection studies needed to obtain financing and power purchase agreements.

  19. Upper Skagit Indian Tribe- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under this project, the tribe will explore the feasibility of wind development in an effort to achieve energy self-sufficiency by reducing the tribe's long-term operational costs and providing reasonable capital cost rate of returns and to reduce the tribe's carbon footprint and impact on climate change.

  20. Project Reports for Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Confederated Tribes of the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Flathead Reservation: S&K Holding Company - 2004 Project | Department of Energy Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Confederated Tribes of the Flathead Reservation: S&K Holding Company - 2004 Project Project Reports for Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Confederated Tribes of the Flathead Reservation: S&K Holding Company - 2004 Project The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, whose tribal lands are located in western Montana, will assess the feasibility of a

  1. Mohegan Indian Tribe- 1995 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Located in Uncasville, Connecticut, the Mohegan Tribe of Indians of Connecticut is in an area classified by EPA as ozone non-attainment. The air shed of the reservation receives trans-boundary ozone and its precursors from upwind non-Native American sources. Therefore, conservation, prevention, and mitigation of air pollution are important. Use of sustainable energy is preferred.

  2. Rosebud Sioux Tribe- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) and Citizens Wind will complete the required pre-construction activities necessary to secure funding for the proposed 190 MW North Antelope Highlands wind farm, including identification of power purchasers, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) permitting requirements, transmission and interconnection studies, and subsequent interconnection agreements required to deliver energy to a specific set of potential purchasers.

  3. Ute Mountain Tribe- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ute Mountain Ute Tribe has the renewable resources and the opportunity to become a national leader in renewable energy production through its local and commercial-scale solar developments due to its proximity to key interconnections in the Four Corners area and interest from various companies that can fund such projects.

  4. Kenaitze Indian Tribe- 2004 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Kenaitze Indian Tribe, IRA, located in Kenai, Alaska, will conduct a renewable energy feasibility study to develop solar and wind energy resources for tribal operations and for future tribal housing, and will examine local conditions for energy development for sale to local energy providers.

  5. HANFORD SITE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Advisory Board Larry Goldstein November 1, 2012 1 2 Who We Are State of Oregon State of Washington U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Commerce (NOAA) U.S. Department of Interior (Fish and Wildlife Service) Nez Perce Tribe Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation 3 Trustees are governments, defined by CERCLA, who act to: Protect the public interest and to "make the public whole" for injuries to natural

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - HAB Cesium pathway latest.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management for the Low Activity Waste Pretreatment System (LAWPS) David Bernhard ERWM Program Nez Perce Tribe P.O. Box 365 Lapwai, ID 83540 September 23, 2015 2 Outline * Reasons for not returning cesium to tanks. * Current ORP plans are the only path to make critical decision timeline for 2022 startup. * Cesium pathways considered for WSC, several possible waste types. * Possible change in cesium removal to increase efficiency; experimental but could likely work and has advantages. Would be

  7. Grande Ronde Basin Supplementation Program; Lostine River, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onjukka, Sam T.; Harbeck, Jim

    2003-03-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) identified supplementation as a high priority to achieve its goal of increasing runs of anadromous fish in the Columbia Basin. Supplementation activities in the Lostine River and associated monitoring and evaluation conducted by the Nez Perce Tribe relate directly to the needs addressed in the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Measure 7.4L.1 of the Program mandates that appropriate research accompany any proposed supplementation. In addition, measure 7.3B.2 of the Program stresses the need for evaluating supplementation projects to assess their ability to increase production. Finally, Section 7.4D.3 encourages the study of hatchery rearing and release strategies to improve survival and adaptation of cultured fish. In 1997, Oregon Department of Fisheries and Wildlife (ODFW) requested a modification of Permit 1011 to allow the take of adult spring chinook salmon. In 1998, the Nez Perce Tribe also requested a permit specific to activities on Lostine River. The permit was issued in 2000. A special condition in the permits required the development of a long term management plan for the spring chinook salmon of the Grande Ronde Basin. The Nez Perce Tribe, ODFW, and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) completed a formal long range plan entitled ''Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program''. The program proposes to increase the survival of spring chinook salmon in the Grand Ronde Basin through hatchery intervention. Adult salmon from the Lostine River, Catherine Creek, and the Upper Grande Ronde River are used for a conventional supplementation program in the basin. The Nez Perce program currently operates under the ESA Section 10 Permit 1149.

  8. Grande Ronde Basin Supplementation Program; Lostine River, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onjukka, Sam T.; Harbeck, Jim

    2003-03-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) identified supplementation as a high priority to achieve its goal of increasing runs of anadromous fish in the Columbia Basin. Supplementation activities in the Lostine River and associated monitoring and evaluation conducted by the Nez Perce Tribe relate directly to the needs addressed in the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Measure 7.4L.1 of the Program mandates that appropriate research accompany any proposed supplementation. In addition, measure 7.3B.2 of the Program stresses the need for evaluating supplementation projects to assess their ability to increase production. Finally, Section 7.4D.3 encourages the study of hatchery rearing and release strategies to improve survival and adaptation of cultured fish. In 1997, Oregon Department of Fisheries and Wildlife (ODFW) requested a modification of Permit 1011 to allow the take of adult spring chinook salmon. In 1998, the Nez Perce Tribe also requested a permit specific to activities on Lostine River. The permit was issued in 2000. A special condition in the permits required the development of a long term management plan for the spring chinook salmon of the Grande Ronde Basin. The Nez Perce Tribe, ODFW, and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) completed a formal long range plan entitled ''Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program''. The program proposes to increase the survival of spring chinook salmon in the Grand Ronde Basin through hatchery intervention. Adult salmon from the Lostine River, Catherine Creek, and the Upper Grande Ronde River are used for a conventional supplementation program in the basin. The Nez Perce program currently operates under the ESA Section 10 Permit 1149.

  9. Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Flathead Reservation *6,500 enrolled members *3,700 living on the reservation *26,000 residents *26% Native American *Tribal members represent 56% of Native American population Tribal Council * 10 Tribal Council members * 7 Districts * 4 Year terms * Staggered elections (5 positions every 2 years) S & K Holding Company, Inc. * Created 1992 under Tribal Authority * Promote economic independence by maximizing economic opportunities for the Tribe and Tribal members in a culturally appropriate

  10. Makah Indian Tribe- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Makah Nation, located on the northwestern tip of the Olympic Peninsula, has determined that the most expedient way to ensure the success of developing a commercial wind project on native lands, while simultaneously maintaining an economically and politically advantageous position for the tribe, is by setting up the Makah Utility Authority as a vehicle for finance, business, and development. In this project, the Makah will complete the predevelopment tasks for the planned Makah 30-MW wind project and associated infrastructure.

  11. Karuk Tribe Strategic Energy Planning

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Karuk Tribe Strategic Energy Planning Journey To Success? The 5 P's of Success #1 - Partners Local utility company #2 - Politics! Community Development or Natural Resources? #3 - Plan Do you have one already? What are all of those acronyms? # 4 - Place Reservation Fee status land # 5 - Pfunding Where do we start? In Conclusion * Nothing happens fast! * As you move forward there will be more questions * Having a plan is critical to success * Never be afraid to ask for help * Utilize your partners

  12. White Mountain Apache Tribe- 2002 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The project will involve an examination of the feasibility of a cogeneration facility at the Fort Apache Timber Company (FATCO), an enterprise of the White Mountain Apache Tribe. FATCO includes a sawmill and a remanufacturing operation that process timber harvested on the tribe's reservation. The operation's main facility is located in the reservation's largest town, Whiteriver. In addition, the tribe operates an ancillary facility in the town of Cibeque on the reservation's west side.

  13. Fort Mojave Indian Tribe- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fort Mojave Tribe, whose reservation is located along the Colorado River in the states of Arizona, California, and Nevada, has a need for increased energy supplies resulting from aggressive and successful economic development projects undertaken by the tribe in the last decade. While it is possible to contract for additional energy supplies from fossil fuel sources, as an alternative, the tribe will investigate the feasibility and desirability of producing power from renewable energy sources.

  14. Upper Skagit Indian Tribe - Strategic Energy Planning

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Upper Skagit Indian Tribe Tribal Lands Location Tribal lands Tribal lands Two Tribe Land sites: Two Tribe Land sites: Bow Hill Complex Bow Hill Complex The Tribal economic center with both development The Tribal economic center with both development & undeveloped lands. & undeveloped lands. Helmick Road Reservation Helmick Road Reservation The community & government center with both The community & government center with both developed & newly required community lands.

  15. Peoria Tribe: Housing Authority- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Housing Authority of the Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma (Peoria Housing Authority or PHA) will conduct the "PHA Weatherization Training Project."

  16. Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin RFP

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oneida Tribe of Wisconsin released a request for proposals (RFP) seeking installer and investor for 700 kilowatts of roof-mounted photovoltaic systems on multiple Oneida tribal facilities.

  17. Solar Viewed as Triple Boon for Bishop Paiute Tribe | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    For the Bishop Paiute Tribe of California, clean energy projects offer a way to feed three ... Bishop Paiute Tribe is the fifth largest Tribe in California with 1,700 enrolled members. ...

  18. Pascua Yaqui Tribe DOE Solar Energy Feasibility and Deployment Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pascua Yaqui Tribe DOE Solar Energy Feasibility and Deployment Study Pascua Yaqui Tribe/DOE Solar Feasibility & Deployment Pascua Yaqui Tribe  The reservation is located in Tucson, Arizona  Reservation population approximately 4,000  Total tribal enrollment 18,000 Pascua Yaqui Tribe/DOE Solar Feasibility & Deployment History Pascua Yaqui Tribe/DOE Solar Feasibility & Deployment  In 1978, the Pascua Yaqui Tribe of Arizona became federally recognized and in 1994 the

  19. Energy Department to Help Tribes Advance Clean Energy Projects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Help Tribes Advance Clean Energy Projects and Increase Resiliency Energy Department to Help Tribes Advance Clean Energy Projects and Increase Resiliency February 25, 2015 - 12:35pm ...

  20. Key Renewable Energy Opportunities for Oklahoma Tribes | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Key Renewable Energy Opportunities for Oklahoma Tribes Key Renewable Energy Opportunities for Oklahoma Tribes August 13, 2012 Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Cox Convention Center The...

  1. Winnebago Tribe - Energy Options Analysis and Organization Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... To further the Tribe's goals for self-sufficiency and self- determination through empowerment in the Tribe's energy interests; to ensure adequate supply and quality of energy to ...

  2. Northern Cheyenne Tribe- 2002 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Northern Cheyenne Indian Tribe is a Federally Recognized Sovereign Nation, located in Big Horn and Rosebud counties in southeastern Montana. The study will assess the feasibility of a commercial wind facility on lands selected and owned by the Northern Cheyenne Nation and will examine the potential for the development of solar and biomass resources located on tribal lands. The feasibility study will focus on analyzing, qualifying, and quantifying the opportunity for the Northern Cheyenne Nation to develop, own, and operate a commercial wind facility on tribal lands.

  3. Santo Domingo Tribe – 2015 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This project’s objective is to design a photovoltaic (PV) system for the Santo Domingo Tribe (Tribe) community water pump and treatment (WPT) facility to offset the maximum amount of electricity extracted from the power grid while taking maximum advantage of net-metering and renewable energy certificate (REC) programs offered by Public Service of New Mexico (PNM).

  4. Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians- 2011 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Siletz Tribal Energy Program (STEP), housed in the tribe's Planning Department, will hire a data entry coordinator to collect, enter, analyze, and store all the current and future energy efficiency and renewable energy data pertaining to administrative structures the tribe owns and operates and homes in which tribal members live.

  5. Ponca Tribe of Nebraska- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under this project, the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska (PTN) will conduct an Energy Options Analysis (EOA) to empower tribal leadership with critical information to allow them to effectively screen energy options that will further develop the tribe's long-term strategic plan and energy vision.

  6. Renewable Energy Opportunities Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe Planning Department; Smiley, Steve; Bennett, Keith, DOE Project Officer

    2008-10-22

    The Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe has a vision to become self-sufficient in its energy needs and to maintain its culture and protect Mother Earth with respect and honor for the next seven generations. To achieve this vision, green energy sources such as solar, wind and biomass energy are the best energy paths to travel. In this feasibility study the Tribe has analyzed and provided data on the nature of the renewable resources available to the Tribe and the costs of implementing these technologies.

  7. Project Reports for Winnebago Tribe- 2005 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska has experienced significant growth over the last five years. Estimated at over 10%, the growth trend has caused the tribe to examine the vital role that energy plays in supporting growth and economic development overall. The project seeks to: (1) investigate the opportunities for wind generation, improving the tribe's energy resource portfolio, and shaping the reservation load profile; (2) analyze renewable generation investment opportunities and their potential job creation and economic development benefits; and (3) conduct a tribal utility formation study to facilitate accomplishment of tribal goals.

  8. Project Reports for Tulalip Tribes - 2003 Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tulalip Tribes - 2003 Project Project Reports for Tulalip Tribes - 2003 Project The Tulalip Tribes of Washington, a federally recognized Indian tribe, will assess the feasibility of developing biogas generation facilities to convert manure and other biomass resources into electricity to help meet the tribe's energy needs from a renewable energy source. Tulalip will research and report on how this type of development can improve water quality in Snohomish Watershed streams and rivers through

  9. Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Confederated Tribes of the Flathead Reservation- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under this project, the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) will assess the technical and economic feasibility of energy efficiency improvements to existing tribally owned buildings.

  10. Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Confederated Tribes of the Flathead Reservation- 2011 Energy Efficiency Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under this project, the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) will assess the technical and economic feasibility of energy efficiency improvements to existing tribally owned buildings.

  11. Project Reports for Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Confederated Tribes of the Flathead Reservation- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under this project, the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) will assess the technical and economic feasibility of energy efficiency improvements to existing tribally owned buildings.

  12. Restore McComas Meadows; Meadow Creek Watershed, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McRoberts, Heidi

    2006-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. Watershed restoration projects within the Meadow Creek watershed are coordinated and cost shared with the Nez Perce National Forest. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Meadow Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 1996. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed by excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing, planting trees in riparian areas within the meadow and its tributaries, prioritizing culverts for replacement to accommodate fish passage, and decommissioning roads to reduce sediment input. During this contract period work was completed on two culvert replacement projects; Doe Creek and a tributary to Meadow Creek. Additionally construction was also completed for the ditch restoration project within McComas Meadows. Monitoring for project effectiveness and trends in watershed conditions was also completed. Road decommissioning monitoring, as well as stream temperature, sediment, and discharge were completed.

  13. San Carlos Apache Tribe- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under this project, the San Carlos Apache Tribe will study the feasibility of solar energy projects within the reservation with the potential to generate a minimum of 1 megawatt (MW).

  14. Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska Solar Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The future of the tribe is directly related to the protection of our homelands, and how well we enable our children to continue our cultural traditions and manage our resources in ...

  15. Tribes and the New Energy Economy Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the COTA Holdings, this two-day conference brings tribes, government, and industry together to discuss the new energy economy. Attendees will hear speakers from the U.S. Department of...

  16. Coeur d'Alene Tribe- 2014 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under this grant, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe will replace all of the old compressors, the outdated evaporators, and all of the old refrigeration units in the Benewah Market.

  17. Project Reports for Yurok Tribe- 2007 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The tribe is interested in developing renewable energy on the reservation both to meet community energy needs in off-grid areas and to generate tribal revenues through commercial power sales.

  18. Project Reports for Hualapai Tribe- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The project will build on the potential for renewable energy development on the Hualapai Reservation that was identified during the Phase l renewable energy resource assessment conducted by the Hualapai Tribe since 2005.

  19. State Government Websites With Indian Tribe Information

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This list was compiled by the federal government's Interagency Working Group on Indian Affairs (IWGIA) as an aid to federal agency consultation with federally recognized Indian tribes. It is not...

  20. Karuk Tribe of California- 2007 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Karuk Tribe of California proposes a project to assess solar, microhydro, woody biomass, and wind energy resources on trust lands within its ancestral territory of present-day Humboldt and Siskiyou Counties in northern California.

  1. Tonto Apache Tribe – 2015 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tonto Apache Tribe (TAT) continues to enact its renewable energy initiative in building a 249-kilowatt (kW) solar photovoltaic (PV) system on the Tribe’s Mazatzal Hotel on the Tonto Apache Indian Reservation.

  2. Project Reports for Yerington Paiute Tribe

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under this project, the Yerington Paiute Tribe will create an economic planning organization with decision-making powers separate from the Tribal Council body to facilitate the execution of the Energy Park and other renewable energy projects.

  3. Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The overall objective of the Assessment of Wind Resource on Tribal Land project is to conduct a wind resource assessment in order to quantify the wind resource potential available on the Iowa Tribe's land.

  4. Project Reports for Blackfeet Tribe- 2006 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With some of the best wind resources in the U.S., the tribe will consider forming a Tribal Energy Organization capable of purchasing power and distributing its resources throughout the reservation.

  5. Northern Cheyenne Tribe - Wind Energy Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Northern Cheyenne Tribe 30 MW Wind Energy Development Grant Project Location * Colstrip coal fired power plant is 25 miles to the north. * Site can accommodate a 30 megawatt wind ...

  6. NREL: Technology Deployment - Technical Assistance for Tribes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tribes NREL's State, Local, and Tribal program partners with Native American Tribes and Alaska Native Villages, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and other federal agencies, non-profits, and intertribal organizations to provide resources and direct assistance that support clean energy technology delivery and connect motivated tribal governments with NREL's world-class science and analytics. American Indian land comprises approximately 2% of the total U.S. land base, representing an estimated

  7. Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs - Biomass Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    05 June 2005 A Case Study: A Case Study: Warm Springs Warm Springs Cal Mukumoto Cal Mukumoto Warm Springs Forest Warm Springs Forest Products Industries Products Industries Warm Springs Indian Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon Reservation of Oregon Warm Springs Forest Warm Springs Forest Products Industries (WSFPI) Products Industries (WSFPI) Enterprise of the Confederated Enterprise of the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon

  8. Northern Cheyenne Tribe - Wind Power Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Northern Cheyenne Tribe Wind Power Project Program Review 2006 Ingrid Gardner Project Overview * Project began in 2002 * Sole decision maker and final authority » NORTHERN CHEYENNE TRIBE * Technical Participant » Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. * Tribal Participant » TRIBAL EDA COMMITTEE » TRIBAL EDA PLANNER Project Design * Development Phase Approach - Long Term Wind Data Collected »RAWS SITE »AIR QUALITY SITES »ON-SITE MET TOWERS 50 meter tower 20 meter tower Project Design Cont. *

  9. Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe - Geothermal Energy Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tribe Geothermal Energy Project Donna Marie Noel Project Manager Water Resources Department (775) 574-0101 x16 dnoel@plpt.nsn.us GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES Bonham Ranch Sutcliffe Pyramid Rock Astor Pass Needles Rocks Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation PYRAMID LAKE PAIUTE TRIBE * Largest Nevada Reservation in land base and population, 2300 members * Reservation encompasses 470,000 acres & 330,000 acres cattle range * Pyramid Lake 115,000 acre lake surface * Terminus lake with Truckee River connector

  10. Hopi Tribe Clean Air Partnership Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HOPI TRIBE CLEAN AIR PARTNERSHIP PROJECT Roger Tungovia, Project Manager Ken Lomayestewa, Energy/Utility Specialist HOPI TRIBE Located in Northeast Arizona elevation from 3,900 to 7,500 feet. Land Base: 1.6 million acres - District 6: main residential area; Hopi Partitioned Lands (HPL); and Fee Simple Lands(aboriginal lands) Population: 12,500 plus with 7,500 living on the reservation 12 separate villages (each independent and autonomous from the Tribal Government) and two communities. Tribal

  11. Coho Salmon Master Plan, Clearwater River Basin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nez Perce Tribe; FishPro

    2004-10-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe has a desire and a goal to reintroduce and restore coho salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin at levels of abundance and productivity sufficient to support sustainable runs and annual harvest. Consistent with the Clearwater Subbasin Plan (EcoVista 2003), the Nez Perce Tribe envisions developing an annual escapement of 14,000 coho salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin. In 1994, the Nez Perce Tribe began coho reintroduction by securing eggs through U.S. v. Oregon; by 1998 this agreement provided an annual transfer of 550,000 coho salmon smolts from lower Columbia River hatchery facilities for release in the Clearwater River Subbasin. In 1998, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council authorized the Bonneville Power Administration to fund the development of a Master Plan to guide this reintroduction effort. This Master Plan describes the results of experimental releases of coho salmon in the Clearwater River Subbasin, which have been ongoing since 1995. These data are combined with results of recent coho reintroduction efforts by the Yakama Nation, general coho life history information, and historical information regarding the distribution and life history of Snake River coho salmon. This information is used to assess a number of alternative strategies aimed at restoring coho salmon to historical habitats in the Clearwater River subbasin. These data suggest that there is a high probability that coho salmon can be restored to the Clearwater River subbasin. In addition, the data also suggest that the re-establishment of coho salmon could be substantially aided by: (1) the construction of low-tech acclimation facilities; (2) the establishment of a 'localized' stock of coho salmon; and (3) the construction of hatchery facilities to provide a source of juvenile coho salmon for future supplementation activities. The Nez Perce Tribe recognizes that there are factors which may limit the success of coho reintroduction. As a result of these

  12. Federally-Recognized Tribes of the Columbia-Snake Basin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration

    1997-11-01

    This is an omnibus publication about the federally-recognized Indian tribes of the Columbia-Snake river basin, as presented by themselves. It showcases several figurative and literal snapshots of each tribe, bits and pieces of each tribe`s story. Each individual tribe or tribal confederation either submitted its own section to this publication, or developed its own section with the assistance of the writer-editor. A federally-recognized tribe is an individual Indian group, or confederation of Indian groups, officially acknowledged by the US government for purposes of legislation, consultation and benefits. This publication is designed to be used both as a resource and as an introduction to the tribes. Taken together, the sections present a rich picture of regional indian culture and history, as told by the tribes.

  13. Project Reports for Tonto Apache Tribe- 2014 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tonto Apache Tribe (TAT) will install solar arrays on two of the tribe's largest energy consuming buildings, helping to meet more than 60% of the buildings' total electricity needs.

  14. Wind & Hydro Energy Feasibility Study for the Yurok Tribe

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Wind & Hydro Energy Feasibility Study for the Yurok Tribe DOE Tribal Energy Program Review Meeting Award DE-FG36-07GO17078 October 27, 2010 Presented By: Austin Nova, Yurok Tribe ...

  15. Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians ("the Tribe") will obtain training in the use of Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) cameras for its staff, delivered in Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan.

  16. Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar: EPA Clean Power Plan: What Tribes...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Renewable Energy Webinar: EPA Clean Power Plan: What Tribes Need to Know Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar: EPA Clean Power Plan: What Tribes Need to Know November 18, 2015 11:00AM...

  17. Project Reports for Standing Rock Sioux Tribe- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's (SRST) cultural identity demands that tribal development occur in a sustainable manner and in a manner protective of the tribe's natural resources to preserve them for following generations.

  18. Project Reports for Yurok Tribe- 2005 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Yurok Tribe has a great need for improved energy services on the reservation. The members pay $328 per month per household on average for energy, with just a $9,000 median household income. The project will assess the need for energy efficiency services on the reservation, identify available resources, and develop an implementation plan for meeting these needs. With an unemployment rate of 42%, the job training component of this program will benefit the tribe. Past attempts have been made to provide energy efficiency and renewable energy maintenance services on the reservation, but many of these services have not endured because they were not tribe-driven. This project will build tribal expertise, increase awareness, and form collaborative relationships with local energy services.

  19. BIA Request for Proposals for Climate Adaptation Grants for Tribes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Download the Bureau of Indian Affairs Request for Proposals for Climate Adaptation Grants for Tribes, due November 29.

  20. Southern Ute Indian Tribe Solar Project Achieves Milestone | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Southern Ute Indian Tribe Solar Project Achieves Milestone Southern Ute Indian Tribe Solar Project Achieves Milestone January 11, 2016 - 10:30am Addthis Southern Ute Indian Tribe Solar Project Achieves Milestone The Southern Ute Indian Tribe has achieved a major milestone toward developing a roughly 1-megawatt solar photovoltaic (PV) system that will generate energy equivalent to a 15% offset of the total energy usage at about 10 tribally owned buildings on the Southern Ute Indian

  1. Karuk Tribe Strategic Energy Plan and Energy Options Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramona Taylor, Karuk Tribe; David Carter, Winzler and Kelly

    2009-03-31

    Energy planning document to assist the Karuk Tribe in making educated decisions about future energy priorities and implementation.

  2. Wind Resources on Tribal Land. Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holiday, Michelle

    2015-03-27

    Final project report submitted by the Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma for the Department of Energy Wind Energy Grant

  3. Shoshone-Bannock Tribes Officials Visit WIPP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shoshone-Bannock Tribes Officials Visiting Carlsbad for WIPP Training CARLSBAD, N.M., June 12, 2012- Photo caption: Two Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) officials are visiting the Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico, June 12-13, 2012, for emergency response training provided by WIPP. They were greeted on arrival at the CBFO, which has a cooperative agreement with the SBT, in-town offices and paused for a photo.

  4. Hoopa Valley Tribe - Small Hydropower Feasibility Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Micro-Hydro Feasibility Study Hoopa Valley Tribe Curtis Miller The Hoopa Valley Reservation was established in 1868 by executive order of Ulysses S. Grant and contains the aboriginal homeland of the Hupa People. It encompasses approximately 100,000 acres and is 96% owned by the Hoopa Tribe. Salmon are the life blood of the Hupa and Yurok and Karuk people There are over 1200 miles of major streams within the Hoopa Valley Reservation many of which support Salmon and Rainbow trout. 50-60 inches of

  5. Project Reports for Upper Skagit Indian Tribe- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under this project, the tribe will explore the feasibility of wind development in an effort to achieve energy self-sufficiency by reducing the tribe's long-term operational costs and providing reasonable capital cost rate of returns and to reduce the tribe's carbon footprint and impact on climate change.

  6. ITEP Training on Clean Power Plan and Tribes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Institute of Environmental Professionals (ITEP) is hosting a Clean Power Plan and Tribes training provides detailed information for tribes to understand the Clean Power Plan and how it applies to their tribal lands. The course will include instructional presentations and facilitated class discussions. Topics include what is the clean power plan, how the clean power plan affects tribes, and more.

  7. System Advisor Model Training for Tribes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy is hosting a two-day training for tribes on how to use the System Advisor Model, or SAM. The training will take place June 7–8, 2016, at...

  8. Standing Rock Sioux Tribe- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe (SRST) will perform a feasibility study and associated tasks over the course of two years on sites within the exterior boundaries of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation to support the future development ranging from 50 to 150 megawatts (MW) of wind power.

  9. Sault Tribe Building Efficiency Energy Audits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holt, Jeffrey W.

    2013-09-26

    The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians is working to reduce energy consumption and expense in Tribally-owned governmental buildings. The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians will conduct energy audits of nine Tribally-owned governmental buildings in three counties in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to provide a basis for evaluating and selecting the technical and economic viability of energy efficiency improvement options. The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians will follow established Tribal procurement policies and procedures to secure the services of a qualified provider to conduct energy audits of nine designated buildings. The contracted provider will be required to provide a progress schedule to the Tribe prior to commencing the project and submit an updated schedule with their monthly billings. Findings and analysis reports will be required for buildings as completed, and a complete Energy Audit Summary Report will be required to be submitted with the provider?s final billing. Conducting energy audits of the nine governmental buildings will disclose building inefficiencies to prioritize and address, resulting in reduced energy consumption and expense. These savings will allow Tribal resources to be reallocated to direct services, which will benefit Tribal members and families.

  10. Northeast Oregon Hatchery Spring Chinook Master Plan, Technical Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashe, Becky L.; Concannon, Kathleen; Johnson, David B.

    2000-04-01

    Spring chinook salmon populations in the Imnaha and Grande Ronde rivers are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and are at high risk of extirpation. The Nez Perce Tribe, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, are co-managers of conservation/restoration programs for Imnaha and Grande Ronde spring chinook salmon that use hatchery supplementation and conventional and captive broodstock techniques. The immediate goal of these programs is to prevent extirpation and provide the potential for restoration once factors limiting production are addressed. These programs redirect production occurring under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) from mitigation to conservation and restoration. Both the Imnaha and Grande Ronde conservation/restoration programs are described in ESA Section 10 permit applications and the co-managers refer to the fish production from these programs as the Currently Permitted Program (CPP). Recently, co-managers have determined that it is impossible to produce the CPP at Lookingglass Hatchery, the LSRCP facility intended for production, and that without additional facilities, production must be cut from these conservation programs. Development of new facilities for these programs through the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program is considered a new production initiative by the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) and requires a master plan. The master plan provides the NPPC, program proponents and others with the information they need to make sound decisions about whether the proposed facilities to restore salmon populations should move forward to design. This master plan describes alternatives considered to meet the facility needs of the CPP so the conservation program can be fully implemented. Co-managers considered three alternatives: modify Lookingglass Hatchery; use existing facilities elsewhere in the Basin; and use new facilities in

  11. Colville Confederated Tribes Tribal Energy Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TRIBAL ENERGY PROGRAM Colville Tribal Energy Recipient: Grant Goals and objectives: Starting in September 2009 and ending June 2015 The Colville Confederated Tribal Business Council will review recommendations by Colville Tribal Energy Program regarding Feasibility Reports to consider what avenue to take regarding a Utility. Reviewing data compiled, and utilizing all relevant analysis of legal and regulatory framework and considering issues BPA Constraints, the tribe will decide what Utility

  12. Lower Brule Sioux Tribe- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Lower Brule Sioux tribal reservation comprises 230,000 acres along the west bank of Lake Francis Case and Lake Sharpe, which were created by the Fort Randall and Big Bend dams of the Missouri. The tribe will assess the feasibility of using pumped-storage hydroelectric power to increase the value of wind-generated electricity. The proposed project would use a pump-back storage reservoir and hydroelectric turbines to supply power when the wind slows or stops.

  13. Yerington Paiute Tribe Energy Plan Version 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Consulting, BB9; Director, Environmental

    2014-04-01

    The Yerington Paiute Tribe has made energy management and planning a priority. The Tribal Council has recognized that energy is an important component of their goal of self-sufficiency. Recognizing energy development as a component of the Tribe’s natural resources provides for needed economic development.A number of priorities have been identified for energy development. These range from immediate housing needs such as weatherization and solar to interest in energy as economic development.

  14. Pascua Yaqui Tribe Solar Feasibility Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PASCUA YAQUI TRIBE SOLAR FEASIBILITY STUDY MARCH 26, 2014 PRESENTATION OVERVIEW * Introduction * Tortuga Ranch * Casino Del Sol * Camino de Oeste Site * Summary of Recommendations 2 INTRODUCTION * Vast potential for Pascua Yaqui to participate in the solar industry and work towards - Energy self-sufficiency - Diversifying bankable investments - Minimizing impacts on the environment * Energy prices for solar dropped significantly * Conventional energy pricing steadily rising 3 TORTUGA RANCH

  15. Karuk Tribe - Energy Analysis and Conservation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Funding Received: First Steps Toward Developing Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency on Tribal Lands Partnership: U.S. Department of Energy Karuk Tribe of California, Department of Natural Resources Winzler and Kelly Consulting Engineers Project Title: Energy Analysis and Conservation on Karuk Trust Lands Project Team: Karuk Department of Natural Resources * Sandi Tripp * Ramona Driver * Bill Tripp * Tribal Intern (TBA) Winzler and Kelly Engineers * Bob Ulibarri - Senior Planner * David Carter

  16. Karuk Tribe - Energy Analysis and Conservation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ayukii ^ First Steps Toward Developing Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency on Tribal Lands Partnerships U.S. Department of Energy Karuk Tribe Department of Natural Resources Winzler and Kelly Occupies Aboriginal land along the middle course of the Klamath and Salmon Rivers in Northern California. Aboriginal Territory includes an estimated 1.38 million acres of rugged, heavily forested land within the Klamath River Basin. The Karuk people have continuously resided in this area since the

  17. Kenaitze Indian Tribe - Renewable Energy Feasibility Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kenaitze Indian Tribe Kenai, Alaska Department of Energy Renewable Energy Feasibility Study 2005 Report Tribal Context * ~1000 Tribal members; Dena'ina Athabascan traditional culture * Involved in commercial and subsistence fishing (salmon) * Surrounded by oil and gas development * Very little Tribal land (corporation land) * Municipalities and federal land (Kenai National Wildlife Refuge) Tribal Context (Cont'd) * Tribal Programs: - Housing - Cultural - Environmental - Elders - Head Start -

  18. Key Renewable Energy Opportunities for Oklahoma Tribes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    KEY RENEWABLE ENERGY OPPORTUNITIES FOR OKLAHOMA TRIBES August 13, 2012 COX CONVENTION CENTER 100 West Sheridan Avenue, Oklahoma City, OK 73102 (405) 602-8500 The fifth in a series of planned U.S. DOE Office of Indian Energy-sponsored strategic energy development & investment forums, this forum is designed to give Oklahoma tribal leaders the opportunity to receive the latest updates on DOE's energy development efforts in Indian Country. The Forum will provide a venue for tribal leaders to

  19. Clean Energy Projects Helping Wisconsin Tribe Achieve Sustainability Goals

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Projects Helping Wisconsin Tribe Achieve Sustainability Goals Clean Energy Projects Helping Wisconsin Tribe Achieve Sustainability Goals January 13, 2014 - 11:19am Addthis Before (left) and after photo of historic Wunder Hall, where Milwaukee's Forest County Potawatomi Community completed a major energy upgrade project. The building now serves as the tribe's economic development center. | Courtesy of Forest County Potawatomi Community Before (left) and after photo of

  20. Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation and Traditional Territories

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Develop a Tribal Utility Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation DOE Tribal Energy Program Review, November 14-18 2011 Topics to Cover ØIntroduction ØColville Tribes characteristics ØTribal Energy Program/Strategic Energy Plan ØDOE Utility Feasibility Project Objectives ØColville Tribes Renewable Energy Projects ØConclusion Location Map Omak Industrial Park Site * Executive Order signed July 1872 * 14 Elected Business Council Members * Representing 4 Districts of 1.4 million

  1. Project Reports for White Mountain Apache Tribe- 2002 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The project will involve an examination of the feasibility of a cogeneration facility at the Fort Apache Timber Company (FATCO), an enterprise of the White Mountain Apache Tribe. FATCO includes a sawmill and a remanufacturing operation that process timber harvested on the tribe's reservation. The operation's main facility is located in the reservation's largest town, Whiteriver. In addition, the tribe operates an ancillary facility in the town of Cibeque on the reservation's west side.

  2. Key Renewable Energy Opportunities for Oklahoma Tribes | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Key Renewable Energy Opportunities for Oklahoma Tribes Key Renewable Energy Opportunities for Oklahoma Tribes August 13, 2012 Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Cox Convention Center The Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Energy Forum on Key Renewable Energy Opportunities for Oklahoma Tribes was held August 13, 2012, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The forum gave Oklahoma tribal leaders the opportunity to receive the latest updates on DOE's energy development efforts in Indian Country and

  3. NREL: Technology Deployment - Renewable Energy Project Helps Tribe Reduce

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Footprint by 20,000 Tons Renewable Energy Project Helps Tribe Reduce Carbon Footprint by 20,000 Tons News DOE Supports Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi Community Publications Advancing Energy Development in Indian Country Renewable Energy Development in Indian Country: A Handbook for Tribes Sponsors U.S. DOE Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Key Partners Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Contact Sarah Booth, 303-275-4383 A photo of a

  4. Pascua Yaqui Tribe - Renewable Energy Development and Deployment Feasibility Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pascua Yaqui Tribe Renewable Energy Development and Deployment Feasibility Study 2012 Pascua Yaqui Tribe * The Pascua Yaqui Tribe has a total enrollment of approximately 18,000. * A small reservaLon with 4,000 residents is located in SW Tucson, Arizona. Many members reside in several recognized communiLes in the Tucson and Phoenix area. History Ancestral Yaquis resided in Sonora, Mexico. Hundreds of years of transmigraLon established permanent communiLes throughout Southern Arizona. History * In

  5. Climate Action Champions: Blue Lake Rancheria Tribe, CA | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Blue Lake Rancheria Tribe, CA Climate Action Champions: Blue Lake Rancheria Tribe, CA The Blue Lake Rancheria, California, a federally recognized Native American tribal Government and community, is located on over 100 acres of land spanning the scenic Mad River in northwestern California. In its operational strategy, the Tribe has implemented the ‘seven generations’ philosophy, where actions taken today will have a positive impact for seven generations to come. This results

  6. Project Reports for Fort Mojave Indian Tribe- 2003 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Fort Mojave Tribe, whose reservation is located along the Colorado River in the states of Arizona, California, and Nevada, has a need for increased energy supplies resulting from aggressive and successful economic development projects undertaken by the tribe in the last decade. While it is possible to contract for additional energy supplies from fossil fuel sources, as an alternative, the tribe will investigate the feasibility and desirability of producing power from renewable energy sources.

  7. Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians is working to reduce energy consumption and expense in tribally owned governmental buildings.

  8. Microsoft Word - XX 13 Colville Tribe to celebrate opening of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    will significantly boost the availability of chinook salmon for the tribe and for sport fishing in the Columbia River as well as reintroduce spring chinook to the Okanogan...

  9. Bishop Paiute Tribe - 2010 Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bishop Paiute Tribe - 2010 Project This weatherization grant will develop weatherization core competencies and subsequent employment for tribal members who complete the basic and ...

  10. Project Reports for Bishop Paiute Tribe – 2015 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under this grant, the Bishop Paiute Tribe will conduct their solar program project's design, installation, inspection, and interconnection of 22 grid-tied solar electric systems.

  11. Yakama Nation, Confederated Tribes and Bands- 2008 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments (CATG) is a consortium of 10 Gwich'in and Koyukon Athabascan tribes located throughout the Yukon Flats.

  12. MHK Projects/Passamaquoddy Tribe Hydrokinetic Project | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tribe pre-proposal sites in Western Passage, Passamaquoddy Bay to help determine the feasibility of electrical power generation. UEK will conduct these tests from September 2008...

  13. Project Reports for Pascua Yaqui Tribe- 2012 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Pascua Yaqui Tribe (PYT) Renewable Energy Development and Deployment Feasibility Study will determine the technical and economic viability of future renewable projects.

  14. Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians Governmental Building...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians Governmental Building Energy Audits October 27, 2010 ... Approximately 1,600 Acres Held in Trust Upper Peninsula - 16,452 Square Miles ...

  15. Shoshone Tribe of the Wind River Reservation- 2006 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The tribe will determine the feasibility of developing a commercial wind facility on the reservation to maximize the economic benefits and create employment for tribal members.

  16. Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation- 2007 Wind Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Warm Springs Power and Water Enterprises (WSPWE) is a corporate entity owned by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation, located in central Oregon.

  17. Consultation with Indian Tribes in the Section 106 Review Process...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Indian tribe that attaches religious and cultural significance to historic properties that ... 106 and for Tribal Historic Preservation Officers and tribal cultural resource managers. ...

  18. Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California – 2015 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California will install seven ground-mounted solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays throughout its three communities in Nevada, covering approximately two acres cumulatively.

  19. Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California- 2011 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The main purpose of the proposed project will further the achievement and implementation of common goals and strategic energy plans of Nevada member tribes.

  20. Project Reports for Peoria Tribe: Housing Authority- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Housing Authority of the Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma (Peoria Housing Authority or PHA) will conduct the "PHA Weatherization Training Project."

  1. Winnebago Tribe - Wind Feasibility Project and Energy Options...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Leah Hunter, Energy Committee Member, Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska Tracey LeBeau, Red ... Management Facilities Project Consultant: Red Mountain Energy Partners Energy Options ...

  2. Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin- 2011 Energy Efficiency Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project will fund energy audits of approximately 44 tribally owned buildings operated by the Oneida Tribe, which total 1,031,905 square feet.

  3. Eleven Tribes Jump START Clean Energy Projects, Summer 2012 ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... and Kevin Davidson of the Hualapai Tribe Planning and Economic Development Department discuss utility-scale solar and wind project potential during a START site visit in Arizona. ...

  4. Project Reports for Hoopa Valley Tribe - 2006 Project | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Hoopa Valley Tribe - 2006 Project Project Reports for Hoopa Valley Tribe - 2006 Project The Hoopa Valley Tribe will assess the feasibility of smaller-scale hydroelectric facilities (between 100 KW and 5 MW). Learn more about this project or find details in the below status reports. October 2006 status report (13.8 MB) November 2007 status report (7.7 MB) Final report (3.04 MB) More Documents & Publications Project Reports for Yurok Tribe - 2007 Project Project Reports for Pueblo

  5. DOE-Supported Education and Training Programs Help Crow Tribe...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Robert Stewart, a Crow Tribe member and core education instructor for the program, helped ... coal-to-liquid (ICTL) technology, which reforms local Montana bituminous coal and ...

  6. Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation- 2007 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Warm Springs Power and Water Enterprises (WSPWE) is a corporate entity owned by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation, located in central Oregon.

  7. Minnesota Chippewa Tribe: White Earth Band- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several northern Minnesota tribes interested in building a common foundation for strategic tribal energy capacity have banded together for strategic energy resource planning.

  8. Council of Energy Resource Tribes - CERT's Technical Assistance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of strategic planning Identify energy conservation opportunities for Tribes Facilitate ... Project Status Databases and web access Energy Efficiency Guide Usage statistics for ...

  9. Clean Energy Projects Helping Wisconsin Tribe Achieve Sustainability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The building now serves as the tribe's economic development center. | Courtesy of Forest County Potawatomi Community Lizana Pierce Project Manager, Tribal Energy Program MORE ...

  10. Northern Cheyenne Tribe30 MW Wind Energy Development Grant

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Northern Cheyenne Tribe 30 MW Wind Energy Development Grant Project Location * Colstrip coal fired power plant is 25 miles to the north. * Transmission and interconnection study ...

  11. Project Reports for Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa - 2010 Project Project Reports for Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa - 2010 Project The Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi ...

  12. Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Confederated Tribes of the Flathead Reservation-2011 Hydropower Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This project is aimed at supporting one key component of a major multi-step undertaking on the part of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT): the acquisition of the Kerr Hydroelectric project and its subsequent operation as a wholesale power generation facility.

  13. Project Reports for Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Confederated Tribes of the Flathead Reservation- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under this project, the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) will determine technical and economic feasibility of a woody-biomass-fueled co-generation plant that would utilize fuels generated by tribal forest management activities to provide electricity and heat to tribal buildings at the tribal headquarters in Pablo, Montana, and/or generate electricity for the wholesale market.

  14. Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Confederated Tribes of the Flathead Reservation- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under this project, the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) will determine technical and economic feasibility of a woody-biomass-fueled co-generation plant that would utilize fuels generated by tribal forest management activities to provide electricity and heat to tribal buildings at the tribal headquarters in Pablo, Montana, and/or generate electricity for the wholesale market.

  15. Project Reports for Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Confederated Tribes of the Flathead Reservation- 2011 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This project is aimed at supporting one key component of a major multi-step undertaking on the part of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT): the acquisition of the Kerr Hydroelectric project and its subsequent operation as a wholesale power generation facility.

  16. CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report: David Conrad, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-09-01

    The intern`s report contains a Master`s thesis entitled, ``An implementation analysis of the US Department of Energy`s American Indian policy as part of its environmental restoration and waste management mission.`` This thesis examines the implementation of a working relationship between the Nez Perce Tribe and the US Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management at the Hanford reservation. It examines the relationship using a qualitative methodology and three generations of policy analysis literature to gain a clear understanding of the potential for successful implementation.

  17. Upper Skagit Indian Tribe- 2005 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Upper Skagit Indian Tribe lands consist of 550 acres of the Bow Hill Complex with reservation and new development economic lands located in Skagit County, Washington, adjacent to Interstate 5. The strategic energy plan would complete an assessment of the existing economic enterprises including hotel, convention center, and casino, plus potential green energy sources to serve the existing and developing facilities. The strategic energy analysis would complete an assessment of 50 acres acquired in October 2004, to build more low-income houses, and identify energy improvements for the existing fully developed 74 acres of the Helmick Road Reservation established in 1981.

  18. Ponca Tribe of Nebraska - Project Earth Lover

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Stephanie Prichard-Slobotski ž The traditional Ponca homeland ž Original land holdings ž Forced removal ž Standing Bear ž Termination Era ž Restoration ž PL 101-484 ž Current land holdings ž Service Delivery Areas Ponca Tribe of Nebraska is governed by a nine member Tribal Council with staggered 4 year terms. We have five divisions: *Tribal Affairs *Health Services *Economic Development *Tribal Court *Northern Ponca Housing Authority Departments: *Culture

  19. Project Reports for Hualapai Tribe- 2005 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Hualapai Tribe is located on the end of their existing utility grid which has subjected them to high costs and poor reliability of electric service. The first phase of the project will establish a tribally operated utility to provide service to tribal customers at Grand Canyon West, which has been operating without grid power for the past seven years. The second phase of the project will examine the feasibility and strategy for establishing a tribal utility to serve the remainder of the Hualapai Reservation.

  20. Hoopa Valley Tribe - Small Hydro Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydro Power Feasibility Study Hoopa Valley Tribe Curtis Miller cmiller@hoopa-nsn.gov (530)-625-5515 There are over 1200 miles of major streams within the Hoopa Valley Reservation many of which support Salmon, Steelhead and Rainbow trout. 50-60 inches of rainfall /year In the beginning In FY 2005 the Hoopa Tribal EPA received a grant from DOE to conduct a 2 year feasibility study for small scale hydropower on 7 major tributaries of the Reservation that flow into the Trinity River Concept of

  1. Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation- 2004 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation, located on the Little Missouri River in central North Dakota, will analyze, qualify, and quantify the feasibility of developing, owning, and operating a commercial wind facility on lands selected and owned by the tribe.

  2. IE: Projects_Ponca Tribe of Nebraska- 2011 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Under this project, the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska (PTN) will conduct an Energy Options Analysis (EOA) to empower tribal leadership with critical information to allow them to effectively screen energy options that will further develop the tribe's long-term strategic plan and energy vision.

  3. DOE Announces Consultation Sessions with Alaska Native Tribes and Corporations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy will host seven tribal consultation sessions and seven stakeholder outreach meetings with Alaska Native federally recognized Tribes and corporations on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region. The sessions will give Alaska Native Tribes and corporations an opportunity to provide input on a 10-year plan to develop renewable energy resources in the Arctic region.

  4. Project Reports for Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians- 2011 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Siletz Tribal Energy Program (STEP), housed in the tribe's Planning Department, will hire a data entry coordinator to collect, enter, analyze, and store all the current and future energy efficiency and renewable energy data pertaining to administrative structures the tribe owns and operates and homes in which tribal members live.

  5. Project Reports for Ponca Tribe of Nebraska- 2011 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Under this project, the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska (PTN) will conduct an Energy Options Analysis (EOA) to empower tribal leadership with critical information to allow them to effectively screen energy options that will further develop the tribe's long-term strategic plan and energy vision.

  6. Yakutat T’lingit Tribe – 2014 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Yakutat T’lingit Tribe will carry out the recommended energy efficiency measures outlined in an investment grade energy audit for two buildings leased by the Tribe but owned by the Yak-Tat Kwaan, Inc., an Alaska Native village corporation established under the Alaska Native Claims Act.

  7. San Carlos Apache Tribe - Energy Organizational Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, James; Albert, Steve

    2012-04-01

    The San Carlos Apache Tribe (SCAT) was awarded $164,000 in late-2011 by the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Tribal Energy Program's "First Steps Toward Developing Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency on Tribal Lands" Grant Program. This grant funded:  The analysis and selection of preferred form(s) of tribal energy organization (this Energy Organization Analysis, hereinafter referred to as "EOA").  Start-up staffing and other costs associated with the Phase 1 SCAT energy organization.  An intern program.  Staff training.  Tribal outreach and workshops regarding the new organization and SCAT energy programs and projects, including two annual tribal energy summits (2011 and 2012). This report documents the analysis and selection of preferred form(s) of a tribal energy organization.

  8. Project Reports for Penobscot Tribe- 2005 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Penobscot Nation includes 2,261 members and land holdings of 118,885 acres in various parcels located throughout northern, eastern, and western Maine, including rights to waters of the Penobscot River and many of its tributaries. The tribe is located in a region that has both a cold, harsh climate and very high energy costs. The objectives of the project are to develop an energy vision that in turn will lead to a more detailed, prioritized, long-term strategic plan. Two principle objectives are: (1) for the plan to address the cost burden of their current energy situation and explore ways to make existing tribal public facilities and private residences more energy efficient, and (2) for the plan to identify renewable energy development and production opportunities, always mindful of environmental impacts.

  9. DOE, Tribes sign a renewal of the Agreement in Principle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE, Tribes sign a renewal of the Agreement in Principle FORT HALL--The Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the Department of Energy - Idaho Operations Office recently signed a new Agreement in Principle, thus renewing the formal relationship between the two parties for another five-year period. Lee Juan Tyler, Vice Chairman of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (left) and Elizabeth Sellers, manager, DOE Idaho Operations Office (Right) Photo courtesy of Lori Edmo-Suppah, Sho-Ban News. The photo shows the

  10. Project Reports for Rosebud Sioux Tribe- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rosebud Sioux Tribe, located in Todd County in south-central South Dakota, installed a single 750-kW wind turbine that was dedicated in April 2003. While completing the design and financing of the single wind turbine, the tribe began defining a larger commercial opportunity — a 30-MW wind energy project for energy export into the larger electricity market. The project to be funded under this grant is the preconstruction development activities for a 30-MW commercial wind facility to provide economic benefits to the tribe and create jobs for tribal members.

  11. Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

    2007-10-01

    He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe

  12. Washoe Tribe - Alternative Energy Feasibility Study and Neveda Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Organization Enhancement Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2012 Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program Review Washoe Tribe of Nevada & California Presented by Tara Hess, Environmental Specialist II 1 Overview of Tribe The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California is a federally recognized Indian Tribe organized pursuant to the Indian Reorganization Act of June 18, 1934 (48 Stat. 984), as amended. The Tribe is governed by a twelve-member, elected Tribal Council that includes two representatives from each of the four Community Councils, two off-

  13. Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma - Assessment of Wind Resource on Tribal Land

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tribe of Oklahoma The Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma is a federally recognized Indian Tribe eligible for the special programs and services provided by the United States to Indian Tribes, and is recognized as possessing and exercising powers of self- government. Mission The overall objective of the Tribe is to improve the economic and social quality of life for Tribal members and adjacent communities, and to secure the rights, powers and privileges common to a sovereign entity of government. The

  14. Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin – 2015 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin (OTIW) plans to install solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays on the roofs of up to nine tribal buildings. Each building will undergo the necessary engineering and design to meet system and code requirements.

  15. Project Reports for Gwitchyaa Zhee Gwich'in Tribe: Gwitchyaa...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    statement of the Gwichyaa Zhee Gwich'in Tribal Government (GZGTG) to promote economic and social development. The tribe strives to achieve this goal for its people and for its...

  16. Washoe Tribe Alternative Energy Feasibility Study Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Jennifer

    2014-10-01

    The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California was awarded funding to complete the Washoe Tribe Alternative Energy Feasibility Study project. The main goal of the project was to complete an alternative energy feasibility study. This study was completed to evaluate “the potential for development of a variety of renewable energy projects and to conduct an alternative energy feasibility study that determines which alternative energy resources have the greatest economic opportunity for the Tribe, while respecting cultural and environmental values” (Baker-Tilly, 2014). The study concluded that distributed generation solar projects are the best option for renewable energy development and asset ownership for the Washoe Tribe. Concentrating solar projects, utility scale wind projects, geothermal, and biomass resource projects were also evaluated during the study and it was determined that these alternatives would not be feasible at this time.

  17. Fort Peck Tribes - First Steps Towards Renewable Energy Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    develop the Tribes' energy resources Use the "SEP" and "EOA" as the first step in meeting this objective Project Location The project is located in the NE corner of MT Tribal ...

  18. Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation- 2002 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Warm Springs Power Enterprises, a corporate entity owned and operated by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, will conduct a 36-month comprehensive wind energy resource assessment and development feasibility study.

  19. Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation- 1999 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Three Affiliated Tribes are interested in exploring wind energy to determine how this renewable energy technology can be utilized to foster local economic development and contribute toward tribal energy independence by providing clean, renewable energy.

  20. Project Reports for Karuk Tribe of California- 2007 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Karuk Tribe of California proposes a project to assess solar, microhydro, woody biomass, and wind energy resources on trust lands within its ancestral territory of present-day Humboldt and Siskiyou Counties in northern California.

  1. DOE-Supported Education and Training Programs Help Crow Tribe...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Robert Stewart, a Crow Tribe member and core education instructor for the program, helped ... actually built it and it worked," said Stewart. "They were telling each other they are ...

  2. Project Reports for San Carlos Apache Tribe- 2012 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Under this project, the San Carlos Apache Tribe will study the feasibility of solar energy projects within the reservation with the potential to generate a minimum of 1 megawatt (MW).

  3. Project Reports for Rosebud Sioux Tribe- 1999 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rosebud Sioux Tribe located in South Dakota through the Rosebud Sioux Tribal Utility Commission is installing a 750-kw NEG Micon wind turbine adjacent to their casino and motel complex at the south end of the Rosebud Sioux Reservation.

  4. Project Reports for Tonto Apache Tribe – 2015 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under this grant, Tonto Apache Tribe plans to build a 249-kilowatt (kW) solar photovoltaic (PV) system on the tribe’s Mazatzal Hotel on the Tonto Apache Indian Reservation.

  5. Project Reports for Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma- 2010 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The overall objective of the Assessment of Wind Resource on Tribal Land project is to conduct a wind resource assessment in order to quantify the wind resource potential available on the Iowa Tribe's land.

  6. DOI - Policy on Consultation with Indian Tribes | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Policy on Consultation with Indian Tribes Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: DOI - Policy on Consultation with Indian...

  7. Project Reports for Coeur d'Alene Tribe- 2014 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Under this grant, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe will replace all of the old compressors, the outdated evaporators, and all of the old refrigeration units in the Benewah Market.

  8. Project Reports for Standing Rock Sioux Tribe- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe (SRST) will perform a feasibility study and associated tasks over the course of two years on sites within the exterior boundaries of the Standing Rock Sioux...

  9. New Renewable Energy Development Resources for Tribes | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    highlighted in red, military bases in green, and tribal lands in purple. Of the Tribes identified in the paper as being in close proximity to military bases, 54% are located ...

  10. Minnesota Chippewa Tribe: White Earth Band- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The project will consist of a detailed feasibility study for a biogas/biomass-fired electric combined heat and power (CHP) facility to be located on tribal land adjacent to the Tribe's casino and hotel in Mahnomen, Minnesota.

  11. Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth February 23, 2012 - ... In pursuit of its long-term energy goal of reducing its carbon footprint to zero, the ...

  12. Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs - Geothermal Feasibility Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Springs The Confederated Tribes Of Warm Springs Presentation to DOE Department of Renewable Energy Presentation to DOE Department of Renewable Energy October, 2005 for Geothermal Development Potential on Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon repared by: Warm Springs Power Enterprises History with Energy Developments History with Energy Developments * * Intro to Power business in 1955 with the development of the Pelt Intro to Power business in 1955 with the development of the

  13. Rosebud Sioux Tribe - Next Steps Toward Wind Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Montileaux Owl Feather War Bonnet Wind Farm Rosebud Sioux Tribe Resource Development Office/Tribal Utilities Commission Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen) Dept. of Energy Grant DOE Funding $448,551.00 DISGEN Cost share/in-kind $78,750.00 RST/TUC Cost share/in-kind $27,272.00 Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Resource Development Phil Two Eagle, Resource Dev. Dir. Ken Haukaas, Wind Farm Coordinator Dr. Bill Akard, Sinte Gleska University, Cultural Resources RST Tribal Utilities Tony Rogers,

  14. Alaska Native Tribes Receive Technical Assistance for Local Clean Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Projects | Department of Energy Alaska Native Tribes Receive Technical Assistance for Local Clean Energy Projects Alaska Native Tribes Receive Technical Assistance for Local Clean Energy Projects May 24, 2012 - 5:47pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON, D.C. - As part of the Obama Administration's commitments to reducing America's reliance on imported oil and protecting our nation's air and water, the U.S. Energy Department and the Denali Commission announced today that

  15. Bishop Paiute Tribe - 2015 Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Project Bishop Paiute Tribe - 2015 Project Summary The Bishop Paiute Tribe Residential Solar Program project consists of the design, installation, inspection, and interconnection of 22 grid-tied solar electric systems, with rated capacity totaling at least 58 kilowatts (kW), on qualified existing low-income single-family homes within the Bishop Paiute Reservation. The systems will provide homeowners with cost savings of at least 15% in displaced electricity. Community volunteers and tribal job

  16. Project Reports for Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation - 2002

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project | Department of Energy Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation - 2002 Project Project Reports for Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation - 2002 Project Colville Indian Power and Veneer (CIPV), a subsidiary of the Colville Tribal Enterprise Corporation (CTEC), generates 12 to 15 megawatts of renewable, biomass electric power using hog fuel from its own and nearby forest product operations. The electricity generated exceeds CIPV's and other tribal enterprise power

  17. Project Reports for Yakama Nation, Confederated Tribes and Bands - 2008

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project | Department of Energy Yakama Nation, Confederated Tribes and Bands - 2008 Project Project Reports for Yakama Nation, Confederated Tribes and Bands - 2008 Project It is the intention of the Yakama Nation (YN) to make improvements on the Wapato Irrigation Project (WIP) for the benefit of all stakeholders. Learn more about this project or find details in the below status reports. November 2008 status report (3.29 MB) November 2009 status report (8.95 MB) More Documents &

  18. Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe - Pyramid Lake Energy Project - Geothermal Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tribe Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe Pyramid Lake Energy Project Pyramid Lake Energy Project Geothermal Assessment Geothermal Assessment Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation 40 miles north of Reno 475,000 acres Pyramid Lake 125,000 surface acres Northern Reservation Needles Area Needles Geyser Needles Geyser Exploration conducted Exploration conducted in 1968 in 1968 Hot water was found Hot water was found at 160 degrees f at 160 degrees f Was not considered Was not considered feasible feasible PLEP

  19. Indian Country Energy Roundup: Positioning Tribes to Thrive | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Indian Country Energy Roundup: Positioning Tribes to Thrive Indian Country Energy Roundup: Positioning Tribes to Thrive Addthis 1 of 9 During the Agua Caliente Tribal Renewable Energy Project Development and Finance Workshop, attendees toured the solar installations on the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indian Reservation. Image: Sherry Stout, NREL 2 of 9 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy hosted a three-day Community-Scale Tribal Renewable Energy Project

  20. American Indian tribes and electric industry restructuring: Issues and opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howarth, D.; Busch, J.; Starrs, T.

    1997-07-01

    The US electric utility industry is undergoing a period of fundamental change that has significant implications for Native American tribes. Although many details remain to be determined, the future electric power industry will be very different from that of the present. It is anticipated that the new competitive electric industry will be more efficient, which some believe will benefit all participants by lowering electricity costs. Recent developments in the industry, however, indicate that the restructuring process will likely benefit some parties at the expense of others. Given the historical experience and current situation of Native American tribes in the US, there is good reason to pay attention to electric industry changes to ensure that the situation of tribes is improved and not worsened as a result of electric restructuring. This paper provides a review of electricity restructuring in the US and identifies ways in which tribes may be affected and how tribes may seek to protect and serve their interests. Chapter 2 describes the current status of energy production and service on reservations. Chapter 3 provides an overview of the evolution of the electric industry to its present form and introduces the regulatory and structural changes presently taking place. Chapter 4 provides a more detailed discussion of changes in the US electric industry with a specific focus on the implications of these changes for tribes. Chapter 5 presents a summary of the conclusions reached in this paper.

  1. Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Confederated Tribes of the Flathead Reservation: S&K Holding Company- 2004 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, whose tribal lands are located in western Montana, will assess the feasibility of a commercial wind facility, possibly linked to a pumped storage hydropower project.

  2. A Step Towards Conservation for Interior Alaska Tribes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimberly Carlo

    2012-07-07

    This project includes a consortium of tribes. The tribes include Hughes (representing the consortium) Birch Creek, Huslia, and Allakaket. The project proposed by Interior Regional Housing Authority (IRHA) on behalf of the villages of Hughes, Birch Creek, Huslia and Allakaket is to develop an energy conservation program relevant to each specific community, educate tribe members and provide the tools to implement the conservation plan. The program seeks to achieve both energy savings and provide optimum energy requirements to support each tribe's mission. The energy management program will be a comprehensive program that considers all avenues for achieving energy savings, from replacing obsolete equipment, to the design and construction of energy conservation measures, the implementation of energy saving operation and maintenance procedures, the utilization of a community-wide building energy management system, and a commitment to educating the tribes on how to decrease energy consumption. With the implementation of this program and the development of an Energy Management Plan, these communities can then work to reduce the high cost of living in rural Alaska.

  3. Winning the Future: Tonto Apache Tribe Uses DOE Funding to Gain...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Winning the Future: Tonto Apache Tribe Uses DOE Funding to Gain Momentum on Solar Energy Development Winning the Future: Tonto Apache Tribe Uses DOE Funding to Gain Momentum on ...

  4. Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians- 2011 Energy Audit Training Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians ("the Tribe") will obtain training in the use of Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) cameras for its staff, delivered in Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan.

  5. Project Reports for Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians ("the Tribe") will obtain training in the use of Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) cameras for its staff, delivered in Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan.

  6. Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation - Tribal Utility Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    O N F E D E R A T E D T R I B E S O F T H E C O L V I L L E R E S E R V A T I O N T R I B A L E N E R G Y P R O G R A M N O V E M B E R 1 3 - 1 6 , 2 0 1 2 Tribal Utility Feasibility Study Outline — History on the Colville Tribe — Colville Tribal Energy Program/Strategic Energy Plan — Impacts of Tribal Utility — Tasks for Feasibility Study — Colville Tribes Renewable Energy Projects — Conclusion History on the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation *Executive

  7. Project Reports for Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation- 2005 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Two phases of work are proposed that build upon the current economic development goals of the Fort Peck Tribes

  8. Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation- 2005 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Two phases of work are proposed that build upon the current economic development goals of the Fort Peck Tribes.

  9. Climate Action Champions: Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, MI |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, MI Climate Action Champions: Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, MI The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians is a 44,000-strong federally recognized Indian tribe that is an economic, social and cultural force in its community across the eastern Upper Peninsula counties of Chippewa, Luce, Mackinac, Schoolcraft, Alger, Delta and Marquette, with housing and tribal centers, casinos, and other enterprises that employ

  10. NREL Supports Native American Tribes in Clean Energy Transformational

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leadership - News Feature | NREL NREL Supports Native American Tribes in Clean Energy Transformational Leadership March 30, 2016 Photo of a group of wind turbines in an open area. A wind farm developed in California by the Campo Band of Mission Indians of the Kumeyaay Nation. Photo from Campo Band In the redwood country of northern California, where arboreal giants can live to be 2,000 years old and can reach heights of more than 375 feet, the Blue Lake Rancheria Tribe has also grown

  11. Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs - Wind Energy Power Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Springs Power and Water Enterprise Use of DOE Grant DE-PS36-06GO96037 For Engineering Cost Assessment For Wind Energy Power Development On The Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon. Prepared by: Warm Springs Power & Water Enterprises The Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs * Home of the Warm Springs, Wasco, and Paiute tribes, the Warm Springs Reservation is inhabited by nearly 4,500 tribal members, most of whom live in or around the town of Warm Springs. * Within the community, the

  12. Project Reports for Northern Cheyenne Tribe- 2003 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Northern Cheyenne Tribe, located in Rosebud and Bighorn counties in southeastern Montana, plans to conduct preconstruction activities for a 30-MW wind facility. The tribe was awarded a feasibility study grant in FY2002 for wind resource monitoring, and is accelerating the study and proceeding with development after the collected resource data was correlated to long-term wind resource data from a nearby site, and the resources confirmed. Activities include permitting, avian and cultural assessments, and the transmission and interconnection studies needed to obtain financing and power purchase agreements.

  13. Renewable Energy Development in Indian Country: A Handbook for Tribes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P O R T L A N D S E A T T L E M E N L O P A R K S A L T L A K E C I T Y aterwynne.com By Douglas C. MacCourt Chair, Indian Law Practice Ater Wynne LLP A Project for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. June 2010 Edition Renewable Energy Development in Indian Country: A Handbook for Tribes Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A4-48078 June 2010 RENEWABLE ENERGY DEVELOPMENT IN INDIAN COUNTRY: A HANDBOOK FOR TRIBES A Project for the National Renewable

  14. Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians- 2002 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians ("the tribe") will commission a study to determine the feasibility of a wind power plant as an alternative energy source in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. The study will analyze the economic and technical feasibility of a small wind power installation and a large-scale wind power plant. The study will include a wind resource assessment, transmission system analysis, engineering and conceptual designs and estimates, environmental impact, economic viability, market and regulatory analyses, and assessments. The feasibility study is intended to result in a comprehensive business plan sufficient to obtain financing for the construction, development, and operation of a wind energy plant.

  15. Fossil Energy Oil and Natural Gas Capabilities for Tribes Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Attend this webinar to hear from U.S. Department of Energy Fossil Energy Program staff about the Program’s oil and gas portfolio, technologies, and research capabilities that may be of interest to Tribes and tribal energy resource development organizations.

  16. Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians - Governmental Building...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Indians Governmental Building Energy Audits November 19, 2009 Summary of Sault Tribe ... Approximately 1,600 Acres Held in Trust L a k e H u r o n L a k e S u p e r i o r ...

  17. Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation- 2002 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A 12-month feasibility study conducted by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) will 1) identify and quantify the various types of renewable energy resources on the Umatilla Indian Reservation (UIR), 2) assess their technical, economic and environmental feasibility for development, and 3) determine their match with long-term tribal goals, development plans, tribal community preference, and tradition.

  18. USDA Agricultural Conservation Easement Program Webinar for Tribes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the American Indian Higher Education Consortium, this webinar will cover details on the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) new Agricultural Conservation Easement Program (ACEP) established in the 2014 Farm Bill. It will specifically discuss the implications of ACEP for Tribes and tribal owners.

  19. Project Reports for Rosebud Sioux Tribe- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) and Citizens Wind will complete the required pre-construction activities necessary to secure funding for the proposed 190 MW North Antelope Highlands wind farm, including identification of power purchasers, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) permitting requirements, transmission and interconnection studies, and subsequent interconnection agreements required to deliver energy to a specific set of potential purchasers.

  20. Gwitchyaa Zhee Gwich'in Tribe- 2014 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the mission statement of the Gwichyaa Zhee Gwich'in Tribal Government (GZGTG) to promote economic and social development. The tribe strives to achieve this goal for its people and for its staff members, and this project will support those goals by installing energy efficiency measures and a renewable energy system.

  1. Project Reports for Kenaitze Indian Tribe- 2004 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Kenaitze Indian Tribe, IRA, located in Kenai, Alaska, will conduct a renewable energy feasibility study to develop solar and wind energy resources for tribal operations and for future tribal housing, and will examine local conditions for energy development for sale to local energy providers.

  2. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allgood, Tiffany L.; Sorter, Andy

    2015-01-13

    The Coeur d'Alene Tribe's Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study (EEFS) is the culminating document that compiles the energy efficiency and building performance assessment and project prioritization process completed on 36 Tribally owned and operated facilities within Tribal lands. The EEFS contains sections on initial findings, utility billing analyses, energy conservation measures and prioritization and funding sources and strategies for energy project implementation.

  3. Project Reports for Ute Mountain Tribe- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ute Mountain Ute Tribe has the renewable resources and the opportunity to become a national leader in renewable energy production through its local and commercial-scale solar developments due to its proximity to key interconnections in the Four Corners area and interest from various companies that can fund such projects.

  4. Project Reports for Santo Domingo Tribe – 2015 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under this grant, the Santo Domingo Tribe plans to design a photovoltaic system for the community water pump and treatment facility to offset the maximum amount of electricity extracted from the power grid while taking maximum advantage of net-metering and renewable energy certificate programs offered by Public Service of New Mexico.

  5. Central Council Tlingit Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Central Council Tlingit Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska Tlingit Haida Regional Housing Authority Tribal DOE Programs 1. Alaska Native Weatherization Training Program 2. Low-income Multifamily Energy Efficiency Building Audits Alaska Southeast Alaska Alaska State Legislature Funding Weatherization Program Senator Lyman Hoffman, Bethel Alaska Wife Lillian and children; Madilyn, Elizabeth, Karis, Bethany and Douglas State of Alaska Weatherization Program * Wx Workers needed for State of Alaska WAP -

  6. Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs - Geothermal Feasibility Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Enterprises Geothermal Power Development Feasibility Study Warm Springs Indian Reservation US Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program Review October 23-27 2006 Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Warm Springs, Oregon Project Participants Project Participants * * Jim Manion, GM, Warm Springs Power & Water Ent. Jim Manion, GM, Warm Springs Power & Water Ent. * * David McClain, DW McClain Associates David McClain, DW McClain Associates * * GeothermEx Inc. GeothermEx Inc. * * Power

  7. Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs - Geothermal Feasibility Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Springs Presentation to DOE Department of Renewable Energy October , 2007 For Geothermal Development Potential On Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon Lands Prepared by: Warm Springs Power & Water Enterprises History With Energy Developments Intro to Power business in 1955 with the development of the Pelton Project. 1970 with the installation of three 3 MW steam turbines at Warm Springs Forest Products Industries (WSFPI). 1982 completed the installation of the Pelton

  8. Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs - Wind Feasibility Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Enterprises Wind Energy Development Feasibility Study Warm Springs Indian Reservation Oregon Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Warm Springs, Oregon US Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program Review October 23-27 2006 Project Participants * Warm Springs Power & Water Enterprises * CTWS Dept. of Natural Resources * DW McClain and Associates: Project Management * OSU Energy Research Laboratory: Wind Modeling * Elcon Associates: Transmission System Studies * Northwest Wildlife

  9. Project Reports for Lower Brule Sioux Tribe- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Lower Brule Sioux tribal reservation comprises 230,000 acres along the west bank of Lake Francis Case and Lake Sharpe, which were created by the Fort Randall and Big Bend dams of the Missouri. The tribe will assess the feasibility of using pumped-storage hydroelectric power to increase the value of wind-generated electricity. The proposed project would use a pump-back storage reservoir and hydroelectric turbines to supply power when the wind slows or stops.

  10. Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The main goal of the proposed feasibility project is to create a Comprehensive Feasibility Project Plan based on the feasibility study that identifies which alternative energy resource offers the greatest return per dollar on Washoe land and determines whether a large-scale alternative energy project is an economically viable alternative for the Washoe Tribe to invest in given current technology while respecting cultural and environmental values.

  11. Ute Mountain Ute Tribe Community-Scale Solar Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, Jim; Knight, Tawnie

    2014-01-30

    Parametrix Inc. conducted a feasibility study for the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe to determine whether or not a community-scale solar farm would be feasible for the community. The important part of the study was to find where the best fit for the solar farm could be. In the end, a 3MW community-scale solar farm was found best fit with the location of two hayfield sites.

  12. Project Reports for Makah Indian Tribe- 2003 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Makah Nation, located on the northwestern tip of the Olympic Peninsula, has determined that the most expedient way to ensure the success of developing a commercial wind project on native lands, while simultaneously maintaining an economically and politically advantageous position for the tribe, is by setting up the Makah Utility Authority as a vehicle for finance, business, and development. In this project, the Makah will complete the predevelopment tasks for the planned Makah 30-MW wind project and associated infrastructure.

  13. Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation Office of Energy/Economic Development November 15, 2011 EECBG * Train 6 installers of GSHP at the IGSHPA * Install 9 GSHP on Tribal houses * Monitor savings via electric bills Ground Source Heat Pump Installer Training * International Ground Source Heat Pump Association (IGSHPA) * Aug 23-26, 2011 * Stillwater, Oklahoma * Certified in Socket & Butt Fusion IGSHPA Training Installer Team IGSHPA Training GSHP Geothermal Drilling

  14. Tonto Apache Tribe Presents: Renewable Energy Grant Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presents The Department of Energy (2014) Project - Renewable Energy Grant Presentation & Follow up: Team Includes: The Tonto Apache Tribe, SunRenu Solar, & The Department of Energy Presenters: Joe Bresette - Grant Developer, TAT Barry Coe - Principal, SRS 2014 Department of Energy Renewable Energy Grant Program Presentation Outline * Tribal Overview * Summary of Project Objectives * Locations * Timelines and goals * Future Projects * Next Steps 2014 Department of Energy Renewable Energy

  15. Ute Mountain Ute Tribe - Local Scale Solar Energy Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable Energy Committee Agenda * Introduction to the Tribe and Tribal Natural Resources * Looking to the Future, Expanding the Portfolio of Natural Resource Development * Focus on solar energy development * The DOE-funded feasibility study * Reservation of approximately 600,000 acres, with lands located in Colorado, Utah, and New Mexico * Tribal communities in Towaoc (southwestern Colorado) and White Mesa (Southeastern Utah) * Approximately 2,300 enrolled Tribal members (but non- members live

  16. Coeur dAlene Tribe Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Project, Plummer, Idaho

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stacey J. Fox, Environmental Planner, Coeur d'Alene Tribe Natural Resource Department, Environmental Programs Office, Plummer, Idaho Presentation Outline - Coeur d'Alene Tribe Background - History of the Tribal Natural Resource Department - Energy Work Prior to the EECBG - EECBG Project Objectives - Progress-to-Date - Lessons Learned - Examples of EECBG Energy Audit Report Findings - New Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study Objectives - Contact Information Coeur d'Alene Tribe Background - The

  17. Tribal Energy Program 2011 Program Review: Washoe Tribe of Nevada & California

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Nevada & California Presented by Tara Hess-McGeown The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California is a federally recognized Indian Tribe organized pursuant to the Indian Reorganization Act of June 18, 1934 (48 Stat. 984), as amended. The Tribe is governed by a twelve-member, elected Tribal Council that includes two representatives from each of the four Community Councils, two off- reservation representatives, a Reno/Sparks Indian Colony representative, and a Tribal Chairman elected at-large.

  18. Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma's Assessment of Wind Resources on Tribal Land

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma's Assessment of Wind Resources on Tribal Land DOE's Tribal Energy Program Review March 24-27, 2014 - Denver, CO Overview  Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma  Iowa Tribe Long Term Energy Vision  Historical Renewable Energy Timeline  Project Objectives  Wind Study Reports  New Location Update  Changes and Challenges  Next Steps and Final Report Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma  Tribal enrollment is over 780  Organized under the Oklahoma Indian Welfare Act, which authorized the

  19. President Obama Announces New Advances and Commitments to Support Tribes at White House Tribal Nations Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The White House brought together tribal leaders from federally recognized tribes to participate in the 7th Annual White House Tribal Nations Conference on Nov. 5, 2015.

  20. Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians- 2011 Building Energy Efficiency Audit Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sault Tribe will conduct energy audits of tribally owned governmental buildings located across three counties in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.

  1. Interior Department Awards $3.7 Million to 13 Tribes for Renewable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Economic Development (IEED) has awarded 3.7 million to 13 tribes that are developing renewable energy resources for their communities. IEED selected six geothermal, four...

  2. Project Reports for Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin- 2015 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under this grant, Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin plans to install solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays on the roofs of up to nine tribal buildings.

  3. Project Reports for Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation- 2007 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Warm Springs Power and Water Enterprises (WSPWE) is a corporate entity owned by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation, located in central Oregon.

  4. Project Reports for Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The main purpose of the proposed project will further the achievement and implementation of common goals and strategic energy plans of Nevada member tribes.

  5. Project Reports for Shoshone Tribe of the Wind River Reservation- 2006 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The tribe will determine the feasibility of developing a commercial wind facility on the reservation to maximize the economic benefits and create employment for tribal members.

  6. Project Reports for Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians- 2010 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians is working to reduce energy consumption and expense in tribally owned governmental buildings.

  7. Project Reports for Minnesota Chippewa Tribe: White Earth Band- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several northern Minnesota tribes interested in building a common foundation for strategic tribal energy capacity have banded together for strategic energy resource planning.

  8. Project Reports for Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa - 2010

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project | Department of Energy Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa - 2010 Project Project Reports for Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa - 2010 Project The Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa Wind Energy Feasibility Study project will prepare the tribe for the development of clean, dependable, renewable wind energy on tribal land. Learn more about this project or find details in the below status reports. November 2009 status report (17.53 MB) October 2010 status

  9. Project Reports for Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sault Tribe will conduct energy audits of tribally owned governmental buildings located across three counties in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.

  10. Umatilla Tribes to Grow Native Plants for Hanford | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Umatilla Tribes to Grow Native Plants for Hanford Umatilla Tribes to Grow Native Plants for Hanford January 2, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation’s field station, located in Mission, Ore., will be home to one-of-a-kind research and development for revegetation efforts. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation's field station, located in Mission, Ore., will be home to one-of-a-kind research and development for revegetation

  11. Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin Energy Optimization Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troge, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Oneida Nation is located in Northeast Wisconsin. The reservation is approximately 96 square miles (8 miles x 12 miles), or 65,000 acres. The greater Green Bay area is east and adjacent to the reservation. A county line roughly splits the reservation in half; the west half is in Outagamie County and the east half is in Brown County. Land use is predominantly agriculture on the west 2/3 and suburban on the east 1/3 of the reservation. Nearly 5,000 tribally enrolled members live in the reservation with a total population of about 21,000. Tribal ownership is scattered across the reservation and is about 23,000 acres. Currently, the Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin (OTIW) community members and facilities receive the vast majority of electrical and natural gas services from two of the largest investor-owned utilities in the state, WE Energies and Wisconsin Public Service. All urban and suburban buildings have access to natural gas. About 15% of the population and five Tribal facilities are in rural locations and therefore use propane as a primary heating fuel. Wood and oil are also used as primary or supplemental heat sources for a small percent of the population. Very few renewable energy systems, used to generate electricity and heat, have been installed on the Oneida Reservation. This project was an effort to develop a reasonable renewable energy portfolio that will help Oneida to provide a leadership role in developing a clean energy economy. The Energy Optimization Model (EOM) is an exploration of energy opportunities available to the Tribe and it is intended to provide a decision framework to allow the Tribe to make the wisest choices in energy investment with an organizational desire to establish a renewable portfolio standard (RPS).

  12. Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation- 2005 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 1991, the tribe commissioned a geological assessment of the Mt. Jefferson area that identified an area of high geothermal resource potential. The current tribal council considers the development of renewable energy resources to be a priority (to diversify tribal enterprises) and have authorized further study of the feasibility of developing a geothermal power plant. This feasibility study will analyze cost, risk, contract, and schedule factors to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the viability of a 30-50 MW commercial power plant on the eastern slope of the Mt. Jefferson stratovolcano.

  13. Project Reports for Northern Cheyenne Tribe- 2002 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Northern Cheyenne Indian Tribe is a Federally Recognized Sovereign Nation, located in Big Horn and Rosebud counties in southeastern Montana. The study will assess the feasibility of a commercial wind facility on lands selected and owned by the Northern Cheyenne Nation and will examine the potential for the development of solar and biomass resources located on tribal lands. The feasibility study will focus on analyzing, qualifying, and quantifying the opportunity for the Northern Cheyenne Nation to develop, own, and operate a commercial wind facility on tribal lands.

  14. Project Reports for Upper Skagit Indian Tribe- 2005 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Upper Skagit Indian Tribe lands consist of 550 acres of the Bow Hill Complex with reservation and new development economic lands located in Skagit County, Washington, adjacent to Interstate 5. The strategic energy plan would complete an assessment of the existing economic enterprises including hotel, convention center, and casino, plus potential green energy sources to serve the existing and developing facilities. The strategic energy analysis would complete an assessment of 50 acres acquired in October 2004, to build more low-income houses, and identify energy improvements for the existing fully developed 74 acres of the Helmick Road Reservation established in 1981.

  15. Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Energy Feasibility Project Update

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tribes of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Umatilla Indian Reservation Energy Feasibility Project Update Energy Feasibility Project Update National Renewable Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Laboratory Denver, Colorado Denver, Colorado October 19, 2004 October 19, 2004 CTUIR Background CTUIR Background Treaty of 1855 Treaty of 1855 - - Sesquicentennial Sesquicentennial commemoration commemoration Approximately 2420 Tribal members Approximately 2420 Tribal

  16. Project Reports for Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation- 2004 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation, located on the Little Missouri River in central North Dakota, will analyze, qualify, and quantify the feasibility of developing, owning, and operating a commercial wind facility on lands selected and owned by the tribe.

  17. Shoshone-Bannock Tribes Describe Ancestry on Tour with Department Officials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    IDAHO FALLS, Idaho – Leaders of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, whose ancestral homelands include the 890 square miles containing the DOE's Idaho Site, shared the spiritual and historical importance of the site to the Tribes in a recent cultural resources tour with EM Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Mark Whitney.

  18. Winning the Future: Tonto Apache Tribe Uses DOE Funding to Gain Momentum on Solar Energy Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tonto Apache Tribe in Payson, Arizona, undertook a decades-long reservation infrastructure development effort that is still ongoing. In 2004, the small tribe was still actively looking for ways to fulfill its long-term vision, which is focused on sustainability and residential growth.

  19. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix D: Exhibits.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    The Columbia River and its tributaries are the primary water system in the Pacific Northwest, draining some 219,000 square miles in seven states and another 39,500 square miles in British Columbia. Beginning in the 1930`s, the Columbia River has been significantly modified by construction of 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries, along with dozens of non-Federal projects. Construction and subsequent operation of these water development projects have contributed to eight primary uses of the river system, including navigation, flood control, irrigation, electric power generation, fish migration, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation, and water supply and quality considerations. Increasing stress on the water development of the Columbia River and its tributaries has led primary Federal agencies to undertake intensive analysis and evaluation of the operation of these projects. These agencies are the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation, who operate the large Federal dams on the river, and the Bonneville Power Administration who sells the power generated at the dams. This review, termed the System Operation Review (SOR), has as its ultimate goal to define a strategy for future operation of the major Columbia River projects which effectively considers the needs of all river uses. This volume, Appendix D: Cultural resources appendix, Technical imput includes the following: Development of geomorphology based framework for cultural resources management, Dworshak Reservoir, Idaho; Impact profiles for SOR reservoirs; comments from the following Native American tribes: Burns Paiute Tribe; Coville Confederated Tribes; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation; Confederated Tribes and bands of the Yakama Indian Nation (comments); Nez Perce Tribe; Coeur D`Alene Tribe; Spokane Tribe of Indians; The confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

  20. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water and Wildlife Program : Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility Master Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Ronald L.; Woodward-Lilengreen, Kelly L.; Vitale, Angelo J.

    1999-09-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) receives and reviews proposals to mitigate for fish and wildlife losses and refers approved measures to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for funding. The Northwest Power Act (Act) calls on the Council to include measures in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) to address system-wide fish and wildlife losses. The Act further states that the Council may include in its Program measures that provide off-site mitigation--mitigation physically removed from the hydro project(s) that caused the need to mitigate. The Program includes a goal ''to recover and preserve the health of native resident fish injured by the hydropower system, where feasible, and, where appropriate, to use resident fish to mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the system.'' Among those recommended measures are off-site mitigation for losses of anadromous fisheries including the measure under analysis in this Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility Master Plan, proposed by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. To meet the need for off-site mitigation for anadromous fish losses in the Columbia River Basin in a manner consistent with the objectives of the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe is proposing that the BPA fund the design, construction, operations and maintenance of a trout production facility on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. Measures for establishing a Coeur d'Alene fish production facility have been a part of the Council's Program since 1987. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility is intended to rear and release westslope cutthroat trout into rivers and streams with the express purpose of increasing the numbers of fish spawning, incubating and rearing in the natural environment. It will use the modern technology that hatcheries offer to overcome the mortality resulting from habitat degradation in lakes, rivers, and streams after eggs are laid in the gravel. Supplementation of

  1. CX-005129: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Upgrade of Secondary Containment Facilities at Hatwai SubstationCX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 01/18/2011Location(s): Nez Perce County, IdahoOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  2. EIS-0265-SA-168: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Perce Tribe, and Potlatch Corporation are proposing to stabilize streambanks along Jim Brown Creek near Weippe, Idaho in Clearwater County. PDF icon : Supplement Analysis for the...

  3. Eleven Tribes Jump START Clean Energy Projects, Summer 2012 (Newsletter)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-06-01

    This newsletter describes key activities of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs for Summer 2012. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE-IE) has selected 11 Tribes - five in Alaska and six in the contiguous United States - to receive on-the-ground technical support for community-based energy efficiency and renewable energy projects as part of DOE-IE's Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program. START finalists were selected based on the clarity of their requests for technical assistance and the ability of START to successfully work with their projects or community. Technical experts from DOE and its National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will work directly with community-based project teams to analyze local energy issues and assist the Tribes in moving their projects forward. In Alaska, the effort will be bolstered by DOE-IE's partnership with the Denali Commission, which will provide additional assistance and expertise, as well as funding to fuel the Alaska START initiative.

  4. Solar Feasibility Study May 2013 - San Carlos Apache Tribe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, Jim; Duncan, Ken; Albert, Steve

    2013-05-01

    The San Carlos Apache Tribe (Tribe) in the interests of strengthening tribal sovereignty, becoming more energy self-sufficient, and providing improved services and economic opportunities to tribal members and San Carlos Apache Reservation (Reservation) residents and businesses, has explored a variety of options for renewable energy development. The development of renewable energy technologies and generation is consistent with the Tribe’s 2011 Strategic Plan. This Study assessed the possibilities for both commercial-scale and community-scale solar development within the southwestern portions of the Reservation around the communities of San Carlos, Peridot, and Cutter, and in the southeastern Reservation around the community of Bylas. Based on the lack of any commercial-scale electric power transmission between the Reservation and the regional transmission grid, Phase 2 of this Study greatly expanded consideration of community-scale options. Three smaller sites (Point of Pines, Dudleyville/Winkleman, and Seneca Lake) were also evaluated for community-scale solar potential. Three building complexes were identified within the Reservation where the development of site-specific facility-scale solar power would be the most beneficial and cost-effective: Apache Gold Casino/Resort, Tribal College/Skill Center, and the Dudleyville (Winkleman) Casino.

  5. South Fork Salmon River Watershed Restoration, 2008-2009 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaney, Mark D.

    2009-04-15

    The watershed restoration work elements within the project area, the South Fork Salmon River Watershed, follow the watershed restoration approach adopted by the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management (DFRM) - Watershed Division. The vision of the Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division focuses on protecting, restoring, and enhancing watersheds and treaty resources within the ceded territory of the Nez Perce Tribe under the Treaty of 1855 with the United States Federal Government. The program uses a holistic approach, which encompasses entire watersheds, ridge top to ridge top, emphasizing all cultural aspects and strategies that rely on natural fish production and healthy river ecosystems. The Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division strives towards maximizing historic ecosystem productivity and health for the restoration of anadromous and resident fish populations and the habitat on which all depend on for future generations Originally, this project was funded to create a step/pool stream channel that was appropriate to restore fish passage where the 'Glory Hole Cascade' is currently located at the Stibnite Mine. Due to unforeseen circumstances at the time, the project is unable to move forward as planned and a request for a change in scope of the project and an expansion of the geographic area in which to complete project work was submitted. No additional funds were being requested. The ultimate goal of this project is to work with the holistic, ridge top to ridge top approach to protect and restore the ecological and biological functions of the South Fork Salmon River Watershed to assist in the recovery of threatened and endangered anadromous and resident fish species. FY 2008 Work Elements included two aquatic organism passage (AOP) projects to restore habitat connectivity to two fish-bearing tributaries to the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, Salt and Profile Creeks. The Work Elements also included road survey and assessment activities

  6. Exploration 3-D Seismic Field Test/Native Tribes Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Herbert B.; Chen, K.C.; Guo, Genliang; Johnson, W.I.; Reeves,T.K.; Sharma,Bijon

    1999-04-27

    To determine current acquisition procedures and costs and to further the goals of the President's Initiative for Native Tribes, a seismic-survey project is to be conducted on Osage tribal lands. The goals of the program are to demonstrate the capabilities, costs, and effectiveness of 3-D seismic work in a small-operator setting and to determine the economics of such a survey. For these purposes, typical small-scale independent-operator practices are being followed and a shallow target chose in an area with a high concentration of independent operators. The results will be analyzed in detail to determine if there are improvements and/or innovations which can be easily introduced in field-acquisition procedures, in processing, or in data manipulation and interpretation to further reduce operating costs and to make the system still more active to the small-scale operator.

  7. Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation- 2002 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Colville Indian Power and Veneer (CIPV), a subsidiary of the Colville Tribal Enterprise Corporation (CTEC), generates 12 to 15 megawatts of renewable, biomass electric power using hog fuel from its own and nearby forest product operations. The electricity generated exceeds CIPV's and other tribal enterprise power needs by five to seven megawatts. The extra power is sold by CIPV into the grid. But the nearest existing substation is at such a distance that one megawatt is lost in transmission due to thermal line losses. These line losses amount to between $160,000 and $260,000 per year in lost revenue, depending upon transmission volume and market rates for electricity. The construction of a substation on reservation land to link into the local power grid will reduce transmission losses, increase the load that can be carried, and create another level of self-sufficiency for the tribe for their industrial power needs.

  8. Energy Department Makes $2.5 Million Available for Native American Tribes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Develop Renewable Energy Resources | Department of Energy $2.5 Million Available for Native American Tribes to Develop Renewable Energy Resources Energy Department Makes $2.5 Million Available for Native American Tribes to Develop Renewable Energy Resources June 14, 2005 - 4:54pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that it is making nearly $2.5 million available to 18 Native American tribes to advance the use of renewable energy and energy

  9. Project Reports for Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin - 2011 Project |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin - 2011 Project Project Reports for Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin - 2011 Project This project will fund energy audits of approximately 44 tribally owned buildings operated by the Oneida Tribe, which total 1,031,905 square feet. Learn more about this project or find details in the below status reports. November 2011 status report (1015.63 KB) March 2014 status report (19 MB) Final report (2.46 MB) More Documents &

  10. Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar: EPA Clean Power Plan: What Tribes Need to Know

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will present on the final rule for the Clean Power Plan and the proposed Federal Plan and Model Rules with a focus on what tribes need to know.

  11. Project Reports for Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation- 2002 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Warm Springs Power Enterprises, a corporate entity owned and operated by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, will conduct a 36-month comprehensive wind energy resource assessment and development feasibility study.

  12. ITEP Webinar: Crafting a Remediation and Prevention Plan for Your Tribes or Village

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP), this free, two-part webinar series is aimed toward tribes, Alaska Native Villages, and Pacific Islanders. The second part is...

  13. Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska- 2011 Energy Retrofit Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska (CCTHITA or Central Council), headquartered in Juneau, Alaska, authorized a Level II energy audit of its Juneau facilities. The Level II audit was completed in August 2010.

  14. Project Reports for Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska (CCTHITA or Central Council), headquartered in Juneau, Alaska, authorized a Level II energy audit of its Juneau facilities.

  15. Two Tribes Recognized as Climate Action Champions During White House Tribal Nations Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Two Tribes are among the winners of the Climate Action Champions competition, the White House announced on Wednesday, December 3, at the White House Tribal Nations Conference in Washington, D.C.

  16. Workshop Helps Empower Tribes to Make Renewable Energy Project Development Decisions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Twenty participants from 13 Tribes participated in a Commercial-Scale Renewable Energy Project Development and Finance Workshop hosted by the Office of Indian Energy July 9-11.

  17. DOE-Supported Education and Training Programs Help Crow Tribe Promote Energy Independence and Education

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Two Department of Energy-supported programs are helping the Crow Tribe in Montana produce energy with minimal environmental impact, educate future generations and prepare its community for future jobs in energy fields.

  18. Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska (CCTHITA or Central Council), headquartered in Juneau, Alaska, authorized a Level II energy audit of its Juneau facilities. The Level II audit was completed in August 2010.

  19. Colville Confederated Tribes' Performance Project Wildlife Mitigation Acquisitions, Annual Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, Richard; Berger, Matthew; Tonasket, Patrick

    2006-12-01

    The Colville Confederated Tribes Wildlife Mitigation Project is protecting lands as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. The Mitigation Project protects and manages 54,606 acres for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species that are important to the Colville Tribes. With the inclusion of 2006 acquisitions, the Colville Tribes have acquired approximately 32,018 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. This annual report for 2006 briefly describes that four priority land acquisitions that were considered for enrollment into the Colville Tribes Mitigation Project during the 2006 contract period.

  20. Project Reports for Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California- 2015 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under this grant, the Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California will install seven ground-mounted solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays throughout its three communities in Nevada, covering approximately two acres cumulatively.

  1. San Carlos Apache Tribe Set to Break Ground on New Solar Project...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    This spring, the San Carlos Apache Tribe is planning to break ground on a new tribally financed and owned 1.1-megawatt (MW) solar photovoltaic (PV) array. The PV system will ...

  2. Working In Indian Country: Building Successful Business Relationships with American Indian Tribes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sponsored by Association on American Indian Affairs, this interactive one-day workshop is designed for federal, state, and local government officials and business leaders who need or are required to develop working relationships with Indian tribes and organizations.

  3. Project Reports for Minnesota Chippewa Tribe: White Earth Band- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The project will consist of a detailed feasibility study for a biogas/biomass-fired electric combined heat and power (CHP) facility to be located on tribal land adjacent to the Tribe's casino and hotel in Mahnomen, Minnesota.

  4. Interior Department Awards $3.7 Million to 13 Tribes for Renewable Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of the Interior announced on March 11 that its Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) has awarded $3.7 million to 13 tribes that are developing renewable energy resources for their communities.

  5. Working in Indian Country: Building Successful Business Relationships with American Indian Tribes Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sponsored by the Association on American Indian Affairs, this one-day conference is for federal, state, and local government officials and business leaders who have a need to develop working relationships with tribes and organizations.

  6. Energy Department to Sign MOU with Interior Department to Assist Indian Tribes to Develop Energy Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy announced that it will sign a Memorandum of Understanding with the U.S. Department of the Interior to assist Indian Tribes throughout the United States to develop their energy resources.

  7. Project Reports for Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation- 1999 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Three Affiliated Tribes are interested in exploring wind energy to determine how this renewable energy technology can be utilized to foster local economic development and contribute toward tribal energy independence by providing clean, renewable energy.

  8. EM's New Project of the Month Focuses on Tribes' Work with Native...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM is highlighting important work by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in a new Project of the Month on EM's public Web site, ...

  9. Consultation with Indian Tribes in the Section 106 Review Process: A

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Handbook (ACHP, 2012) | Department of Energy Consultation with Indian Tribes in the Section 106 Review Process: A Handbook (ACHP, 2012) Consultation with Indian Tribes in the Section 106 Review Process: A Handbook (ACHP, 2012) Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) requires federal agencies to take into account the effects of their undertakings on historic properties and provide the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) reasonable opportunity to comment on

  10. New Biomass System Helps Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin Reduce Its

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon Footprint | Department of Energy Biomass System Helps Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin Reduce Its Carbon Footprint New Biomass System Helps Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin Reduce Its Carbon Footprint April 21, 2016 - 10:42am Addthis On April 20, Office of Indian Energy Director Chris Deschene (second from right) joined other key stakeholders for the official opening of the Menominee Tribal Enterprises biomass combined heat and power district energy plant in Wisconsin. Photo

  11. Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa Wind Energy Feasibility Study project will prepare the tribe for the development of clean, dependable, renewable wind energy on tribal land. The feasibility study reports resulting from this project, including technical and business analyses, will be used to obtain contracts and financing required to develop and implement a wind turbine project on the Meskwaki Settlement.

  12. Guidance for Indian Tribes and Native Hawaiian Organizations: What to Ask

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Federal Agency in the Section 106 Process (ACHP, 2013) | Department of Energy Guidance for Indian Tribes and Native Hawaiian Organizations: What to Ask the Federal Agency in the Section 106 Process (ACHP, 2013) Guidance for Indian Tribes and Native Hawaiian Organizations: What to Ask the Federal Agency in the Section 106 Process (ACHP, 2013) This guidance from the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation is intended to assist tribal and Native Hawaiian organization officials in

  13. Project Reports for Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Alaska: Tlingit and Haida Regional Housing Authority - 2010 Project | Department of Energy Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska: Tlingit and Haida Regional Housing Authority - 2010 Project Project Reports for Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska: Tlingit and Haida Regional Housing Authority - 2010 Project This project meets the Tlingit-Haida Regional Housing Authority (THRHA) need to expand weatherization services and jobs for tribal

  14. Washoe Tribe Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Jennifer

    2014-11-06

    The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California was awarded funding from the Department of Energy to complete the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project. The main goal of the project was to enhance the capacity of the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium (NITEC) to effectively assist tribes within Nevada to technically manage tribal energy resources and implement tribal energy projects.

  15. Leading the Charge: Native Leaders Give Tribes a Voice on White House

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Climate Task Force | Department of Energy Native Leaders Give Tribes a Voice on White House Climate Task Force Leading the Charge: Native Leaders Give Tribes a Voice on White House Climate Task Force March 13, 2014 - 10:56am Addthis Chairwoman Karen Diver, Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa (MN) Chairwoman Karen Diver, Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa (MN) Mayor Reggie Joule, Northwest Arctic Borough (AK) Mayor Reggie Joule, Northwest Arctic Borough (AK) Chairwoman Karen

  16. Renewable Energy Development in Indian Country: A Handbook for Tribes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacCourt, D. C.

    2010-06-01

    This handbook is designed to be an accessible reference for those who are new to tribal energy project development or seek a refresher on key development issues as they navigate the project development process. It builds upon the wealth of feedback and experiences shared by tribal and other participants in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's tribal energy training sessions to provide tribal leaders, tribal economic and energy enterprises, and those supporting them with a general overview of the renewable energy project development process as well as detailed guidance on the following: how to structure a renewable energy project transaction to protect tribal interests, with an emphasis on joint project development efforts undertaken with nontribal parties; key energy development agreements, including power sale agreements, transmission and interconnection agreements, and land leases; and ways tribes can finance renewable energy projects, including the sources of funding or financing that may be available, the types of investors that may be available, and federal tax incentives for renewable energy projects.

  17. Tribal Wind Assessment by the Eastern Shoshone Tribe of the Wind River Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pete, Belvin; Perry, Jeremy W.; Stump, Raphaella Q.

    2009-08-28

    The Tribes, through its consultant and advisor, Distributed Generation Systems (Disgen) -Native American Program and Resources Division, of Lakewood CO, assessed and qualified, from a resource and economic perspective, a wind energy generation facility on tribal lands. The goal of this feasibility project is to provide wind monitoring and to engage in preproject planning activities designed to provide a preliminary evaluation of the technical, economic, social and environmental feasibility of developing a sustainable, integrated wind energy plan for the Eastern Shoshone and the Northern Arapahoe Tribes, who resides on the Wind River Indian Reservation. The specific deliverables of the feasibility study are: 1) Assessments of the wind resources on the Wind River Indian Reservation 2) Assessments of the potential environmental impacts of renewable development 3) Assessments of the transmission capacity and capability of a renewable energy project 4) Established an economic models for tribal considerations 5) Define economic, cultural and societal impacts on the Tribe

  18. Project Reports for Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians- 2002 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians ("the tribe") will commission a study to determine the feasibility of a wind power plant as an alternative energy source in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. The study will analyze the economic and technical feasibility of a small wind power installation and a large-scale wind power plant. The study will include a wind resource assessment, transmission system analysis, engineering and conceptual designs and estimates, environmental impact, economic viability, market and regulatory analyses, and assessments. The feasibility study is intended to result in a comprehensive business plan sufficient to obtain financing for the construction, development, and operation of a wind energy plant.

  19. St. Regis Mohawk Tribe Paves the Way to a Sustainable Future; Kicks Off

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Community Solar Initiative | Department of Energy St. Regis Mohawk Tribe Paves the Way to a Sustainable Future; Kicks Off Community Solar Initiative St. Regis Mohawk Tribe Paves the Way to a Sustainable Future; Kicks Off Community Solar Initiative June 12, 2015 - 1:51pm Addthis Six photovoltaic arrays generate 32 kilowatts of energy to power 20 units at the Akwesasne Housing Authority’s (AHA) Sunrise Acres housing complex on the St. Regis Mohawk Reservation. Pictured from left to right

  20. Aug. 5 Webinar to Showcase Best Practices in Procurement for Tribes |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 5 Webinar to Showcase Best Practices in Procurement for Tribes Aug. 5 Webinar to Showcase Best Practices in Procurement for Tribes July 30, 2015 - 1:21pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy, in partnership with the Western Area Power Administration, will present the next Tribal Renewable Energy Series webinar, Best Practices in Procurement, on Wednesday, Aug. 5, 2015, from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mountain time. This webinar will cover: How

  1. Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California Community-Scale Clean Energy Deployment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    WHAT I DID WITH MY SUMMER VACATION WHY Tarija Glacier Department of Energy Deployment of Clean Energy and Energy Efficiency Projects on Indian Land Topic Area 2: Community-Scale Clean Energy Deployment Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California Washoe Tribe Clean Energy Project * Principal Investigator: Jennifer Johnson, Interim WEPD Program Director * Install seven photovoltaic arrays on Tribally owned buildings, 8 kW to 38 kW each, totaling 161 kW * ~288,282 kWh/yr generation saving $29,889/yr *

  2. Leading the Charge: Doug MacCourt Advises Tribes on Energy Policy |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Doug MacCourt Advises Tribes on Energy Policy Leading the Charge: Doug MacCourt Advises Tribes on Energy Policy October 22, 2015 - 12:16pm Addthis MacCourt_Doug.jpg Leading the Charge is a regular feature spotlighting the movers and shakers in energy development on tribal lands. This issue we had the opportunity to speak with long-time Indian energy champion Doug MacCourt, who joined the DOE Office of Indian Energy as Senior Policy Advisor in July 2015. MacCourt has more

  3. Hihan Sapa Wapaha Tate Woilagyapi Owl Feather War Bonnet Wind Farm Rosebud Sioux Tribe

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Donald Hihan Sapa Wapaha Tate Woilagyapi Owl Feather War Bonnet Wind Farm Rosebud Sioux Tribe Resource Development Office/Tribal Utilities Commission Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen) Dept. of Energy Grant DOE Funding $448,551.00 DISGEN Cost share/in-kind $78,750.00 RST/TUC Cost share/in-kind $27,272.00 The Participants: Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Resource Development Phil Two Eagle, Resource Dev. Dir. Ken Haukaas, Wind Farm Coordinator Dr. Bill Akard, Sinte Gleska University, Cultural

  4. Comprehensive Renewable Energy Feasibility Study for the Makah Indian Tribe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RobertLynette; John Wade; Larry Coupe

    2005-03-31

    The purpose of this project was to determine the technical feasibility, economic viability, and potential impacts of installing and operating a wind power station and/or small hydroelectric generation plants on the Makah reservation. The long-term objective is to supply all or a portion of Tribe's electricity from local, renewable energy sources in order to reduce costs, provide local employment, and reduce power outages. An additional objective was for the Tribe to gain an understanding of the requirements, costs, and benefits of developing and operating such plants on the reservation. The Makah Indian Reservation, with a total land area of forty-seven square miles, is located on the northwestern tip of the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State. Four major watersheds drain the main Reservation areas and the average rainfall is over one hundred inches per year. The reservation's west side borders the Pacific Ocean, but mostly consists of rugged mountainous terrain between 500 and 1,900 feet in elevation. Approximately 1,200 tribal members live on the Reservation and there is an additional non-Indian residential population of about 300. Electric power is provided by the Clallam County PUD. The annual usage on the reservation is approximately 16,700 mWh. Project Work Wind Energy--Two anemometer suites of equipment were installed on the reservation and operated for a more than a year. An off-site reference station was identified and used to project long-term wind resource characteristics at the two stations. Transmission resources were identified and analyzed. A preliminary financial analysis of a hypothetical wind power station was prepared and used to gauge the economic viability of installation of a multi-megawatt wind power station. Small Hydroelectric--Two potential sites for micro/small-hydro were identified by analysis of previous water resource studies, topographical maps, and conversations with knowledgeable Makah personnel. Field trips were conducted to

  5. Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation - Renewable Energy Feasibility Study - October 2005

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Feasibility Study Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Department of Science and Engineering Project Location Project Location cont. Umatilla Indian Reservation Project Overview * Solar (solar thermal, photovoltaic) * Wind * Biomass * Biofuel (bio diesel, ethanol) * Conservation * Efficiency Objectives * Promote renewable energy for sustaining natural resources (including Air quality) * Asses selected renewable technologies for use on the Umatilla Indian Reservation - Solar,

  6. Developing Clean Energy Projects on Tribal Lands: Data and Resources for Tribes (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-12-01

    This is a outreach brochure (booklet) for the DOE Office of Indian Energy summarizing the renewable energy technology potential on tribal lands. The booklet features tech potential maps for various technologies, information about the activities of DOE-IE, and resources for Tribes.

  7. Project Reports for Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation- 2002 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    A 12-month feasibility study conducted by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) will 1) identify and quantify the various types of renewable energy resources on the Umatilla Indian Reservation (UIR), 2) assess their technical, economic and environmental feasibility for development, and 3) determine their match with long-term tribal goals, development plans, tribal community preference, and tradition.

  8. Tribal Energy Program, Assisting Tribes to Realize Their Energy Visions (Brochure), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-06-01

    This 12-page brochure provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Tribal Energy Program and describes the financial, technical, and educational assistance it provides to help tribes develop their renewable energy resources and reduce their energy consumption.

  9. Project Reports for Shoshone-Paiute Tribes of the Duck Valley Reservation- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Shoshone-Paiute Tribes will conduct a feasibility study to address the reliability and deliverability of the electric distribution system on the Duck Valley Reservation in Owyhee, Nevada. Secondary objectives include a reduction in energy-related expenditures by tribal businesses and households, creating jobs, and preserving the environment.

  10. Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation- 1994 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fort Peck Assiniboine and Sioux tribes in northeastern Montana are conducting a wind resource assessment at five sites on their reservation, in conjunction with the Bechtel Corp. Preliminary data collected in mid-1995 showed average wind speeds between 16.3 and 16.8 mph at four of the sites.

  11. Shoshone-Paiute Tribes of the Duck Valley Reservation- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Shoshone-Paiute Tribes will conduct a feasibility study to address the reliability and deliverability of the electric distribution system on the Duck Valley Reservation in Owyhee, Nevada. Secondary objectives include a reduction in energy-related expenditures by tribal businesses and households, creating jobs, and preserving the environment.

  12. Te-Moak Tribe of Western Shoshone: Battle Mountain Colony- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Feasibility Study for the Battle Mountain Renewable Energy Park project ("Feasibility Study") will assess the feasibility, benefits, and impacts of a 5-megawatt (MW) solar photovoltaic (PV) generating system (the "Solar Project" or "Energy Park") on the Te-Moak Tribe of Western Shoshone Indians of Nevada Battle Mountain Colony in Battle Mountain, Nevada.

  13. Project Reports for Te-Moak Tribe of Western Shoshone: Battle Mountain Colony- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Feasibility Study for the Battle Mountain Renewable Energy Park project ("Feasibility Study") will assess the feasibility, benefits, and impacts of a 5-megawatt (MW) solar photovoltaic (PV) generating system (the "Solar Project" or "Energy Park") on the Te-Moak Tribe of Western Shoshone Indians of Nevada Battle Mountain Colony in Battle Mountain, Nevada.

  14. Gwitchyaa Zhee Gwich'in Tribe: Gwitchyaa Zhee Gwich'in Tribal Government- 2014 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the mission statement of the Gwichyaa Zhee Gwich'in Tribal Government (GZGTG) to promote economic and social development. The tribe strives to achieve this goal for its people and for its staff members, and this project will support those goals by installing energy efficiency measures and a renewable energy system.

  15. Video Highlights How Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe is Cutting Energy Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the help of a U.S. Department of Energy grant and in partnership with the Clallam County Public Utility District, the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe is saving money on their utility bills after installing ductless heat pumps in 42 tribal members’ homes.

  16. Section 106 Consultation Between Federal Agencies and Indian Tribes Regarding Federal Permits, Licenses, and Assistance Questions and Answers (ACHP, 2008)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Advisory Council on Historic Preservation guidance uses a question-and-answer format to explain issues related to Section 106 consultation between federal agencies and Indian tribes related to permits, licenses, and assistance.

  17. Final Technical Report. Sault Tribe Building Efficiency Audits of Tribally-Owned Governmental Buildings and Residential Tribal Housing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holt, Jeffrey W.

    2015-03-27

    The Tribe is working to reduce energy consumption and expense in Tribally-owned governmental buildings and low income housing sites. In 2009, the Tribe applied to the U. S. Department of Energy for funding to conduct energy audits of Tribally-owned governmental buildings. Findings from the energy audits would define the extent and types of energy efficiency improvements needed, establish a basis for energy priorities, strategies and action plans, and provide a benchmark for measuring improvements from energy efficiency implementations. In 2010, the DOE awarded a grant in the amount of $95,238 to the Tribe to fund the energy audits of nine governmental buildings and to pay for travel expenses associated with attendance and participation at the DOE annual program reviews. In 2011, the Tribe applied for and was awarded a DOE grant in the amount of $75,509 to conduct energy audits of the remaining 30 Tribally-owned governmental buildings. Repeating mobilization steps performed during the first DOE energy audits grant, the Tribe initiated the second round of governmental building energy audits by completing energy auditor procurement. The selected energy auditor successfully passed DOE debarment and Sault Tribe background clearances. The energy audits contract was awarded to U. P. Engineers and Architects, Inc. of Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. The Tribe continued mobilizing for the energy audits by providing the energy auditor with one year of electric, gas and water utility invoice copies per building, as well as supplemental building information, such as operating hours. The Tribe also contacted building occupants to coordinate scheduling for the on-site energy audit inspections and arranged for facilities management personnel to guide the energy auditor through the buildings and answer questions regarding building systems.

  18. Former Tribal Energy Program Intern Guides Tribes Toward a More Sustainable Path

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Suzanne Singer is working at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as an Energy and Thermal Fluids Analyst where she has an ongoing project to produce Sankey diagrams to analyze energy data and life cycle flows on tribal lands. Applying the knowledge and insights she gained from her work at LLNL, her internship, and her science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education, Singer is educating Tribes on how to use their own resources and land to live a more sustainable lifestyle.

  19. Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project goals are to buy, install, and operate a 660-kW wind turbine on the Fort Peck Reservation in the northeast corner of Montana. This collaborative between the tribes, Fort Peck Community College, the Foundation for the American Indian, Tribal Enterprise Community, the local school district, and Montana-Dakota Utilities will defray electricity costs through the use of wind power and use the savings to develop community and education programs, and to foster employment.

  20. Project Reports for Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California- 2010 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The main goal of the proposed feasibility project is to create a Comprehensive Feasibility Project Plan based on the feasibility study that identifies which alternative energy resource offers the greatest return per dollar on Washoe land and determines whether a large-scale alternative energy project is an economically viable alternative for the Washoe Tribe to invest in given current technology while respecting cultural and environmental values.

  1. Standing Rock Sioux Tribe - Lakota/Dakota Nation: Establishment of Renewable Energy & Energy Development Office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8540 fwasinzi@standingrock.org Establishment of Renewable Energy & Energy Development Office Standing Rock Sioux Tribe - Lakota/Dakota Nation OVERVIEW: BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON STANDING ROCK RESERVATION SITTING BULL COLLEGE WIND TURBINE EECBG ENERGY EFFICIENCY & WIND TURBINE INSTALLATION AT SITTING BULL COLLEGE WIND ASSESSMENT STUDY ESTABLISHMENT OF RENEWABLE ENERGY & ENERGY DEVELOPMENT OFFICE (REEDO) STANDING ROCK ONE OF SEVEN RESERVATIONS OF THE GREAT SIOUX NATION LOCATED IN

  2. Project Reports for Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation- 2003 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Project goals are to buy, install, and operate a 660-kW wind turbine on the Fort Peck Reservation in the northeast corner of Montana. This collaborative between the tribes, Fort Peck Community College, the Foundation for the American Indian, Tribal Enterprise Community, the local school district, and Montana-Dakota Utilities will defray electricity costs through the use of wind power and use the savings to develop community and education programs, and to foster employment.

  3. Lower Brule Sioux Tribe Wind-Pump Storage Feasibility Study Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shawn A. LaRoche; Tracey LeBeau; Innovation Investments, LLC

    2007-04-20

    The Lower Brule Sioux Tribe is a federally recognized Indian tribe organized pursuant to the 1934 Wheeler-Howard Act (“Indian Reorganization Act”). The Lower Brule Sioux Indian Reservation lies along the west bank of Lake Francis Case and Lake Sharpe, which were created by the Fort Randall and Big Bend dams of the Missouri River pursuant to the Pick Sloan Act. The grid accessible at the Big Bend Dam facility operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is less than one mile of the wind farm contemplated by the Tribe in this response. The low-head hydroelectric turbines further being studied would be placed below the dam and would be turned by the water released from the dam itself. The riverbed at this place is within the exterior boundaries of the reservation. The low-head turbines in the tailrace would be evaluated to determine if enough renewable energy could be developed to pump water to a reservoir 500 feet above the river.

  4. Project Reports for Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation- 2005 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 1991, the tribe commissioned a geological assessment of the Mt. Jefferson area that identified an area of high geothermal resource potential. The current tribal council considers the development of renewable energy resources to be a priority (to diversify tribal enterprises) and have authorized further study of the feasibility of developing a geothermal power plant. This feasibility study will analyze cost, risk, contract, and schedule factors to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the viability of a 30-50 MW commercial power plant on the eastern slope of the Mt. Jefferson stratovolcano.

  5. Workshop Provides Hands-On Project Development Training for 26 Tribes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy hosted a second tribal renewable energy project development and finance Workshop September 18-20 at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, this time focusing on community- and facility-scale development. Forty-two participants, including representatives from 26 Tribes as well as several federal agencies, took part in this most recent training opportunity to learn about the potential of and how to develop and finance these unique and smaller scale projects that can serve to reduce costs, increase reliability, and support tribal goals for energy self-sufficiency.

  6. Wind Generation Feasibility Study for Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa (Meskwaki Nation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasley, Larry C.

    2013-03-19

    1.2 Overview The Meskwaki Nation will obtain an anemometer tower. Install the tower at the site that has been pre-qualified as the site most likely to produce maximum electric power from the wind. It will collect meteorological data from the tower’s sensors for a one year period, as required for due diligence to identify the site as appropriate for the installation of a wind turbine to provide electric power for the community. Have the collected data analyzed by a meteorologist and a professionally certified wind engineer to produce the reports of expected power generation at the site, for the specific wind turbine(s) under consideration for installation. 1.2.1 Goals of the Tribe The feasibility study reports, including technical and business analyses will be used to obtain contracts and financing required to develop and implement a wind turbine project on the Meskwaki Settlement. Our goal is to produce two (2) mega watts of power and to reduce the cost for electricity currently being paid by the Meskwaki Casino. 1.2.2 Project Objectives Meet the energy needs of the community with clean energy. Bring renewable energy to the settlement in a responsible, affordable manner. Maximize both the economic and the spiritual benefits to the tribe from energy independence. Integrate the Tribe’s energy policies with its economic development goals. Contribute to achieving the Tribe’s long-term goals of self-determination and sovereignty. 1.2.3 Project Location The precise location proposed for the tower is at the following coordinates: 92 Degrees, 38 Minutes, 46.008 Seconds West Longitude 41 Degrees, 59 Minutes, 45.311 Seconds North Latitude. A circle of radius 50.64 meters, enclosing and area of 1.98 acres in PLSS Township T83N, Range R15W, in Iowa. In relative directions, the site is 1,650 feet due west of the intersection of Highway 30 and 305th Street in Tama, Iowa, as approached from the direction of Toledo, Iowa. It is bounded on the north

  7. Project Reports for Gwitchyaa Zhee Gwich'in Tribe: Gwitchyaa Zhee Gwich'in Tribal Government- 2014 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the mission statement of the Gwichyaa Zhee Gwich'in Tribal Government (GZGTG) to promote economic and social development. The tribe strives to achieve this goal for its people and for its staff members, and this project will support those goals by installing energy efficiency measures and a renewable energy system.

  8. Human Capacity Building in Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy System Maintenance for the Yurok Tribe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, R. A.' Zoellick, J J.

    2007-07-31

    From July 2005 to July 2007, the Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in the implementation of a program designed to build the Tribe’s own capacity to improve energy efficiency and maintain and repair renewable energy systems in Tribal homes on the Yurok Reservation. Funding for this effort was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Tribal Program under First Steps grant award #DE-FG36-05GO15166. The program’s centerpiece was a house-by-house needs assessment, in which Tribal staff visited and conducted energy audits at over fifty homes. The visits included assessment of household energy efficiency and condition of existing renewable energy systems. Staff also provided energy education to residents, evaluated potential sites for new household renewable energy systems, and performed minor repairs as needed on renewable energy systems.

  9. Strategic Energy Planning (Area 1) Consultants Reports to Citizen Potawatomi Nation Federally Recognized Indian Tribe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Marvin; Bose, James; Beier, Richard; Chang, Young Bae

    2004-12-01

    The assets that Citizen Potawatomi Nation holds were evaluated to help define the strengths and weaknesses to be used in pursuing economic prosperity. With this baseline assessment, a Planning Team will create a vision for the tribe to integrate into long-term energy and business strategies. Identification of energy efficiency devices, systems and technologies was made, and an estimation of cost benefits of the more promising ideas is submitted for possible inclusion into the final energy plan. Multiple energy resources and sources were identified and their attributes were assessed to determine the appropriateness of each. Methods of saving energy were evaluated and reported on and potential revenue-generating sources that specifically fit the tribe were identified and reported. A primary goal is to create long-term energy strategies to explore development of tribal utility options and analyze renewable energy and energy efficiency options. Associated goals are to consider exploring energy efficiency and renewable economic development projects involving the following topics: (1) Home-scale projects may include construction of a home with energy efficiency or renewable energy features and retrofitting an existing home to add energy efficiency or renewable energy features. (2) Community-scale projects may include medium to large scale energy efficiency building construction, retrofit project, or installation of community renewable energy systems. (3) Small business development may include the creation of a tribal enterprise that would manufacture and distribute solar and wind powered equipment for ranches and farms or create a contracting business to include energy efficiency and renewable retrofits such as geothermal heat pumps. (4) Commercial-scale energy projects may include at a larger scale, the formation of a tribal utility formed to sell power to the commercial grid, or to transmit and distribute power throughout the tribal community, or hydrogen production

  10. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project : Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservaton 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeCaire, Richard

    1998-01-01

    In the early 1980's the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, the Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife developed a management plan for Lake Roosevelt on the restoration and enhancement of kokanee salmon populations using hatchery out plants and the restoration of natural spawning runs. The plan was incorporated into the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) in their 1987 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife program as partial mitigation for hydropower caused fish losses resulting from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project, as part of a basin wide effort, is evaluating the status of the natural production kokanee in streams tributary to Lakes Roosevelt and Rufus Woods and is examining entrainment through Grand Coulee Dam. The goal of this project is the protection and enhancement of the natural production kokanee in these two lakes. The project is currently collecting data under four phases or parts. Since 1991, Lake Whatcom Washington origin kokanee have been planted in considerable numbers into the waters of Lake Roosevelt. A natural production kokanee fishery has persisted in the lake since the early 1970's(Cash, 1995), (Scholz, 1991). Historical information alludes to wild Kokanee production in the San Poil River, Nespelem River, Big Sheep Creek, Ora-Pa-Ken Creek, Deep Creek and Onion Creeks. The genetic makeup of the fish within the fishery is unknown, as is their contribution to the fishery. The level of influence by the hatchery out planted stock on wild fish stocks is unknown as well. Project outcomes will indicate the genetic fitness for inclusion of natural production kokanee stocks into current Bonneville Power Administration funded hatchery programs. Other findings may determine contribution/interaction of/between wild/hatchery kokanee stocks found in the waters of Lake Franklin D. Roosevelt.

  11. Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Reservation - Wind Development on the Fort Peck Reservation and Energy Options Analysis Project - Project Photos

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Ft Peck Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes Ft Peck Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes Poplar, Montana Poplar, Montana DOE Grant Projects Status Report: DOE Grant Projects Status Report: 1. Wind Development Project 1. Wind Development Project 2. Energy Options Analysis 2. Energy Options Analysis Tracey LeBeau & Jim Williamson Tracey LeBeau & Jim Williamson October 2006 October 2006 2 Wind Project Wind Project * * Two 50KW wind turbines erected July 2006 Two 50KW wind turbines erected July 2006

  12. FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR A PETROLEUM REFINERY FOR THE JICARILLA APACHE TRIBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Jones

    2004-10-01

    A feasibility study for a proposed petroleum refinery for the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation was performed. The available crude oil production was identified and characterized. There is 6,000 barrels per day of crude oil production available for processing in the proposed refinery. The proposed refinery will utilize a lower temperature, smaller crude fractionation unit. It will have a Naphtha Hydrodesulfurizer and Reformer to produce high octane gasoline. The surplus hydrogen from the reformer will be used in a specialized hydrocracker to convert the heavier crude oil fractions to ultra low sulfur gasoline and diesel fuel products. The proposed refinery will produce gasoline, jet fuel, diesel fuel, and a minimal amount of lube oil. The refinery will require about $86,700,000 to construct. It will have net annual pre-tax profit of about $17,000,000. The estimated return on investment is 20%. The feasibility is positive subject to confirmation of long term crude supply. The study also identified procedures for evaluating processing options as a means for American Indian Tribes and Native American Corporations to maximize the value of their crude oil production.

  13. DOE Partnerships with States, Tribes and Other Federal Programs Help Responders Prepare for Challenges Involving Transport of Radioactive Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsha Keister

    2001-02-01

    DOE Partnerships with States, Tribes and Other Federal Programs Help Responders Prepare for Challenges Involving Transport of Radioactive Materials Implementing adequate institutional programs and validating preparedness for emergency response to radiological transportation incidents along or near U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) shipping corridors poses unique challenges to transportation operations management. Delayed or insufficient attention to State and Tribal preparedness needs may significantly impact the transportation operations schedule and budget. The DOE Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) has successfully used a cooperative planning process to develop strong partnerships with States, Tribes, Federal agencies and other national programs to support responder preparedness across the United States. DOE TEPP has found that building solid partnerships with key emergency response agencies ensures responders have access to the planning, training, technical expertise and assistance necessary to safely, efficiently and effectively respond to a radiological transportation accident. Through the efforts of TEPP over the past fifteen years, partnerships have resulted in States and Tribal Nations either using significant portions of the TEPP planning resources in their programs and/or adopting the Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) program into their hazardous material training curriculums to prepare their fire departments, law enforcement, hazardous materials response teams, emergency management officials, public information officers and emergency medical technicians for responding to transportation incidents involving radioactive materials. In addition, through strong partnerships with Federal Agencies and other national programs TEPP provided technical expertise to support a variety of radiological response initiatives and assisted several programs with integration of the nationally recognized MERRTT program

  14. Financial assistance to states and tribes to support emergency preparedness and response and the safe transportation of hazardous shipments: 1996 Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradbury, J.A.; Leyson, J.; Lester, M.K.

    1996-07-01

    This report revises and updates the 1995 report Financial Assistance to States and Tribes to Support Emergency Preparedness and Response and the Safe Transportation of Hazardous Shipments, PNL-10260 (UC-620). The presentation of data and some of the data reported have been changed; these data supersede those presented in the earlier publication. All data have been updated to fiscal year 1995, with the exception of FEMA data that are updated to fiscal year 1994 only. The report identifies and summarizes existing sources of financial assistance to States and Tribes in preparing and responding to transportation emergencies and ensuring the safe transportation of hazardous shipments through their jurisdictions. It is intended for use as an information resource for the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Transportation, Emergency Management, and Analytical Services (EM-76).

  15. Standing Rock Sioux Tribe - Lakota/Dakota Nation Feasibility Study Supporting Wind Development and Establishment of Renewable Energy and Energy Development Office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (Washee Zee) 701-854-3437 fwasinzi@standingrock.org Standing Rock Sioux Tribe - Lakota/Dakota Nation  BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON STANDING ROCK RESERVATION  SITTING BULL COLLEGE WIND TURBINE  EECBG ENERGY EFFICIENCY & WIND TURBINE INSTALLATION AT SITTING BULL COLLEGE  WIND ASSESSMENT STUDY  ESTABLISHMENT OF RENEWABLE ENERGY & ENERGY DEVELOPMENT OFFICE (REEDO)  WIND FEASIBILITY STUDY  OCETI SAKOWIN POWER PROJECT  ONE OF SEVEN RESERVATIONS OF THE GREAT SIOUX NATION

  16. Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation North Fork John Day River Basin Anadromous Fish Enhancement Project, Annual Report for FY 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macy, Tom L.; James, Gary A.

    2003-03-01

    The CTUIR North Fork John Day River Basin Anadromous Enhancement Project (NFJDAFEP) identified and prioritized stream reaches in The North Fork John day River basin for habitat improvements during the 2000 project period. Public out reach was emphasized during this first year of the project. We presented multiple funding and enhancement options to landowners. We concentrated on natural recovery methods, riparian fencing and off-stream livestock water developments. Under this BPA contract four riparian easements were signed protecting almost 5 miles of tributary streams. There are nine offstream water developments associated with these easements. Some landowners chose to participate in other programs based on Tribal outreach efforts. Two landowners chose NRCS programs for enhancement and one chose OWEB as a funding source. Two landowners implemented there own enhancement measures protecting 3 miles of stream. Cooperation between the NRCS/FSA/SWCDs and the Tribe to create joint projects and develop alternative funding scenarios for riparian enhancement was a major effort. The Tribe also worked with the North Fork John Day Watershed Council, USFS and ODFW to coordinate projects and support similar projects throughout the John Day Basin. We provided input to the John Day Summary prepared for the NWPPC by ODFW. The Tribe worked with the Umatilla National Forest on the Clear Creek Dredgetailings Rehabilitation project and coordinated regularly with USFS Fisheries, Hydrology and Range staff.

  17. Hanford Blog Archive - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 2010 November 26, 2010 PHOTO GALLERY: Josiah Pinkham, a cultural resource specialist with the Nez Perce tells Hanford managers about his culture. The training was part of the Richland Operations office efforts to improve cultural resource and tribal training for federal employees at Hanford. November 26, 2010 PHOTO GALLERY: American Indian Heritage Month speaker Virginia Beavert talks about teaching her native Sahaptin language. Beavert visited the Richland Operations Office to inform

  18. Couse/Tenmile Creeks Watershed Project Implementation : 2007 Conservtion Projects. [2007 Habitat Projects Completed].

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asotin County Conservation District

    2008-12-10

    The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on private lands within Asotin County watersheds. The Tenmile Creek watershed is a 42 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Asotin Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Couse Creek watershed is a 24 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Tenmile Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Both watersheds are almost exclusively under private ownership. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has documented wild steelhead and rainbow/redband trout spawning and rearing in Tenmile Creek and Couse Creek. The project also provides Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation throughout Asotin County, but the primary focus is for the Couse and Tenmile Creek watersheds. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Farm Service Agency (FSA), Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRFB), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. The Asotin Subbasin Plan identified priority areas and actions for ESA listed streams within Asotin County. Couse Creek and Tenmile Creek are identified as protection areas in the plan. The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) has been successful in working with landowners to protect riparian areas throughout Asotin County. Funding from BPA and other agencies has also been instrumental in protecting streams throughout Asotin County by utilizing the ridge top to ridge top approach.

  19. Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation and Enhancement Project Operations and Maintenance Program; Brood Year 1998: Johnson Creek Chinook Salmon Supplementation, Biennial Report 1998-2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, Mitch; Gebhards, John

    2003-05-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration, has implemented a small scale chinook salmon supplementation program on Johnson Creek, a tributary in the South Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. The Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement project was established to enhance the number of threatened Snake River summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to Johnson Creek through artificial propagation. Adult chinook salmon collection and spawning began in 1998. A total of 114 fish were collected from Johnson Creek and 54 fish (20 males and 34 females) were retained for Broodstock. All broodstock were transported to Lower Snake River Compensation Plan's South Fork Salmon River adult holding and spawning facility, operated by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game. The remaining 60 fish were released to spawn naturally. An estimated 155,870 eggs from Johnson Creek chinook spawned at the South Fork Salmon River facility were transported to the McCall Fish Hatchery for rearing. Average fecundity for Johnson Creek females was 4,871. Approximately 20,500 eggs from females with high levels of Bacterial Kidney Disease were culled. This, combined with green-egg to eyed-egg survival of 62%, resulted in about 84,000 eyed eggs produced in 1998. Resulting juveniles were reared indoors at the McCall Fish Hatchery in 1999. All of these fish were marked with Coded Wire Tags and Visual Implant Elastomer tags and 8,043 were also PIT tagged. A total of 78,950 smolts were transported from the McCall Fish Hatchery and released directly into Johnson Creek on March 27, 28, 29, and 30, 2000.

  20. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area, Technical Report 2000-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozusko, Shana

    2003-12-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) currently manages a 15,325 acre parcel of land known as the Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area that was purchased as mitigation for losses incurred by construction of the four lower Snake River dams. The Management Area is located in northern Wallowa County, Oregon and southern Asotin County, Washington (Figure 1). It is divided into three management parcels--the Buford parcel is located on Buford Creek and straddles the WA-OR state line, and the Tamarack and Basin parcels are contiguous to each other and located between the Joseph Creek and Cottonwood Creek drainages in Wallowa County, OR. The project was developed under the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L. 96-501), with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The acreage protected under this contract will be credited to BPA as habitat permanently dedicated to wildlife and wildlife mitigation. A modeling strategy known as Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and adopted by BPA as a habitat equivalency accounting system. Nine wildlife species models were used to evaluate distinct cover type features and provide a measure of habitat quality. Models measure a wide range of life requisite variables for each species and monitor overall trends in vegetation community health and diversity. One product of HEP is an evaluation of habitat quality expressed in Habitat Units (HUs). This HU accounting system is used to determine the amount of credit BPA receives for mitigation lands. After construction of the four lower Snake River dams, a HEP loss assessment was conducted to determine how many Habitat Units were inundated behind the dams. Twelve target species were used in that evaluation: Canada goose, mallard, river otter, downy woodpecker, song sparrow, yellow warbler, marsh wren, western meadowlark, chukar, ring-necked pheasant, California quail, and mule deer. The U.S. Army Corp of

  1. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercElctrcEngineHeaters | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    rcElctrcEngineHeaters" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0...

  2. Property:Incentive/WindResPercMax | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    I Independence Light & Power - Renewable Energy Rebates (Iowa) + 25% + L Local Small Wind Rebate Programs (Colorado) + 50% + M Maquoketa Municipal Electric Utility - Renewable...

  3. Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation North Fork John Day River Basin Anadromous Fish Enhancement Project, Annual Report for FY 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macy, Tom L.; James, Gary A.

    2003-03-01

    The CTUIR North Fork John Day River Basin Anadromous Enhancement Project (NFJDAFEP) identified and prioritized stream reaches in The North Fork John day River basin for habitat improvements during the 2000 project period. Public outreach was emphasized during this first year of the project. During the past year we concentrated on satisfying landowner needs, providing cost share alternatives, providing joint projects and starting implementation. We presented multiple funding and enhancement options to landowners. We concentrated on natural recovery methods, riparian fencing and offstream livestock water developments. Under this BPA contract four riparian easements have been signed protecting almost 5 miles of tributary streams. There are nine offstream water developments associated with these easements. Some landowners chose to participate in other programs based on Tribal outreach efforts. Some landowners chose NRCS programs for enhancement and others chose OWEB as a funding source. The exact amount of stream protection due to other funding sources probably exceeds that by BPA, however most would not have entered any program without initial Tribal outreach. Cooperation between the NRCS/FSA/SWCDs and the Tribe to create joint projects and develop alternative funding scenarios for riparian enhancement was a major effort. The Tribe also worked with the North Fork John Day Watershed Council, USFS and ODFW to coordinate projects and support similar projects throughout the John Day Basin.

  4. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program : Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur dAlene Reservation : 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firehammer, Jon A.; Vitale, Angelo J.; Hallock, Stephanie A.

    2009-09-08

    Historically, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe depended on runs of anadromous salmon and steelhead along the Spokane River and Hangman Creek, as well as resident and adfluvial forms of trout and char in Coeur d'Alene Lake, for survival. Dams constructed in the early 1900s on the Spokane River in the City of Spokane and at Little Falls (further downstream) were the first dams that initially cut-off the anadromous fish runs from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These fisheries were further removed following the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams on the Columbia River. Together, these actions forced the Tribe to rely solely on the resident fish resources of Coeur d'Alene Lake for their subsistence needs. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe is estimated to have historically harvested around 42,000 westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) per year (Scholz et al. 1985). In 1967, Mallet (1969) reported that 3,329 cutthroat trout were harvested from the St. Joe River, and a catch of 887 was reported from Coeur d'Alene Lake. This catch is far less than the 42,000 fish per year the tribe harvested historically. Today, only limited opportunities exist to harvest cutthroat trout in the Coeur d'Alene Basin. It appears that a suite of factors have contributed to the decline of cutthroat trout stocks within Coeur d'Alene Lake and its tributaries (Mallet 1969; Scholz et al. 1985; Lillengreen et al. 1993). These factors included the construction of Post Falls Dam in 1906, major changes in land cover types, impacts from agricultural activities, and introduction of exotic fish species. The decline in native cutthroat trout populations in the Coeur d'Alene basin has been a primary focus of study by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's Fisheries and Water Resources programs since 1990. The overarching goals for recovery have been to restore the cutthroat trout populations to levels that allow for subsistence harvest, maintain genetic diversity, and increase the probability of persistence

  5. CONSULTATION WITH INDIAN TRIBES

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Handbook Page 1 II. Federal Government Consultation with Page ... Off-and-On Tribal Lands VI. Consultation Tools ... agency, that use federal funds, or that require federal ...

  6. Blackfeet Tribe- 1995 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    On May 19, 1996, a utility-scale wind turbine generating facility was put "on-line" on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation in Browning, Mont. The United States Department of Energy (DOE), the Blackfeet Tribal Business Council, the Blackfeet Community College (BCC), Glacier Electric Cooperative (GEC), Zond Systems, Inc., and educators from Montana State University teamed up to make possible this meaningful step in the development of renewable energy on Indian lands. The wind turbine facility provides power to offset the college's electric costs, through an arrangement with Glacier Electric Cooperative of Cut Bank, Mont.

  7. Penobscot Tribe- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With this award, the Penobscot Indian Nation will advance the preconstruction activities required to secure funding for the proposed 227-megawatt (MW) Alder Stream wind project.

  8. Hopi Tribe- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Establishment of a Sustainable Energy Program to foster the development of business enterprises that provide energy systems or services based on sustainable energy technologies. Through these efforts, the Hopi Energy Team will develop a Sustainable Energy Plan to develop sustainable energy resources, such as solar and wind, and diversify away from its coal-dominated economy.

  9. Upper Skagit Indian Tribe

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Clarian Power Wins GE Ecomagination Consumer Innovation Award Renewable energy system ... Plan Year 2 6 Residential Wind Technology Assessment End of Year 1 7 Load Assessment ...

  10. Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation; Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water, and Wildlife Program, REVISED 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, Angelo; Lamb, Dave; Scott, Jason

    2004-04-01

    Historically, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe depended on runs of anadromous salmon and steelhead along the Spokane River and Hangman Creek, as well as resident and adfluvial forms of trout and char in Coeur d'Alene Lake, for survival. Dams constructed in the early 1900s on the Spokane River in the City of Spokane and at Little Falls (further downstream) were the first dams that initially cut-off the anadromous fish runs from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These fisheries were further removed by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams on the Columbia River. Together, these actions forced the Tribe to rely solely on the resident fish resources of Coeur d'Alene Lake (Staff Communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe is estimated to have historically harvested around 42,000 westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki) per year (Scholz et al. 1985). In 1967, Mallet (1969) reported that 3,329 cutthroat were harvested from the St. Joe River, and a catch of 887 was reported from Coeur d'Alene Lake. This catch is far less than the 42,000 fish per year the tribe harvested historically. Today, only limited opportunities exist to harvest cutthroat trout in the Coeur d'Alene Basin. The declines in native salmonid fish populations, particularly cutthroat and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), in the Coeur d'Alene basin have been the focus of study by the Coeur d' Alene Tribe's Fisheries and Water Resources programs since 1990. It appears that there are a number of factors contributing to the decline of resident salmonid stocks within Coeur d'Alene Lake and its tributaries (Ellis 1932; Oien 1957; Mallet 1969; Scholz et. al. 1985, Lillengreen et. al. 1993). These factors include: construction of Post Falls Dam in 1906; major changes in land cover types, agricultural activities and introduction of exotic fish species. Over 100 years of mining activities in the Coeur d'Alene River drainage have had devastating effects on the quality of the water in the Coeur d'Alene River

  11. SUSANA MARTfNEZ Governor JOHN A SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor November 1,2012 NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT Hazardous Waste Bureau 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Phone (505) 476-6000 Fax (505) 476-6030 www.nmenv.state.nm.as DAVE MARTfN Secretary BUTCH TONGATE Deputy Secretary JAl\lIES H. DAVIS, Ph.D. Director Resource Protection Division RE: FINAL PERMIT DECISION AND RESPONSE TO COMMENTS, CLASS 2 MODIFICATION REQUEST -WIPP HAzARDOUS WASTE FACILITY PERMIT EPA I.D. NUMBER NM4890139088

  12. SUSANA MARTfNEZ Governor JOHN A. SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A. SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor December 6, 2014 Jose Franco, Manager Carlsbad Field Office Department of Energy P.O. Box 3090 State of New Mexico ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT Harold Runnels Building 1190 Saint Francis Drive, PO Box 5469 Santa Fe, NM 87502-5469 Telephone (505) 827-2855 Fax (505) 827-2836 www.nmenv.state.nm.us CERTIFIED MAIL- RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED Robert L. McQuinn, Project Manager Nuclear Waste Partnership, LLC P.O. Box 2078 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221-2078 Carlsbad, New Mexico

  13. SUSANA MARTfNEZ Governor JOHN A. SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P.O. Box 3090 State of New Mexico ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT Harold Runnels Building 1190 ... throughout the state to guarantee the protection of human health and the environment. ...

  14. SUSANA MARTfNEZ Governor JOHN A SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lieutenant Governor November 1,2012 NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT Hazardous Waste Bureau 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Phone (505)...

  15. SUSANA MARTiNEZ Governor JOHN A. SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lieutenant Governor November 9, 2011 NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT Hazardous Waste Bureau 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Phone (505)...

  16. FINAL REPORT WIND POWER WARM SPRINGS RESERVATION TRIBAL LANDS DOE GRANT NUMBER DE-FG36-07GO17077 SUBMITTED BY WARM SPRINGS POWER & WATER ENTERPRISES A CORPORATE ENTITY OF THE CONFEDERATED TRIBES OF WARM SPRINGS WARM SPRINGS, OREGON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jim Manion; Michael Lofting; Wil Sando; Emily Leslie; Randy Goff

    2009-03-30

    Wind Generation Feasibility Warm Springs Power and Water Enterprises (WSPWE) is a corporate entity owned by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation, located in central Oregon. The organization is responsible for managing electrical power generation facilities on tribal lands and, as part of its charter, has the responsibility to evaluate and develop renewable energy resources for the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs. WSPWE recently completed a multi-year-year wind resource assessment of tribal lands, beginning with the installation of wind monitoring towers on the Mutton Mountains site in 2003, and collection of on-site wind data is ongoing. The study identified the Mutton Mountain site on the northeastern edge of the reservation as a site with sufficient wind resources to support a commercial power project estimated to generate over 226,000 MWh per year. Initial estimates indicate that the first phase of the project would be approximately 79.5 MW of installed capacity. This Phase 2 study expands and builds on the previously conducted Phase 1 Wind Resource Assessment, dated June 30, 2007. In order to fully assess the economic benefits that may accrue to the Tribes through wind energy development at Mutton Mountain, a planning-level opinion of probable cost was performed to define the costs associated with key design and construction aspects of the proposed project. This report defines the Mutton Mountain project costs and economics in sufficient detail to allow the Tribes to either build the project themselves or contract with a developer under the most favorable terms possible for the Tribes.

  17. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-01-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. Efforts are underway to showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is

  18. Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in Big Canyon Creek Watershed; Anadromous Fish Habitat Restoration in the Nichols Canyon Subwatershed, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koziol, Deb

    2001-02-01

    Nez Perce Soil & Water Conservation District (NPSWCD) undertook the Nichols Canyon Subwatershed Steelhead Trout Habitat Improvement Project in the spring of 1999 with funding from a grant through the Bonneville Power Administration. The Project's purpose is to install and implement agricultural best management practices (MBPS) and riparian restorations with the goal of improving steelhead trout spawning and rearing habitat in the subwatershed. Improvements to fish habitat in the Big Canyon Creek tributaries enhances natural production of the species in Big Canyon Creek and ultimately the Clearwater River. This report is a summation of the progress made by the NPSWCD in the Project's second year.

  19. Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoefs, Nancy

    2004-02-01

    During 1997 the first phase of the Nez Perce Tribe White Sturgeon Project was completed and the second phase was initiated. During Phase I the ''Upper Snake River White Sturgeon Biological Assessment'' was completed, successfully: (1) compiling regional white sturgeon management objectives, and (2) identifying potential mitigation actions needed to rebuild the white sturgeon population in the Snake River between Hells Canyon and Lower Granite dams. Risks and uncertainties associated with implementation of these potential mitigative actions could not be fully assessed because critical information concerning the status of the population and their habitat requirements were unknown. The biological risk assessment identified the fundamental information concerning the white sturgeon population that is needed to fully evaluate the effectiveness of alternative mitigative strategies. Accordingly, a multi-year research plan was developed to collect specific biological and environmental data needed to assess the health and status of the population and characterize habitat used for spawning and rearing. In addition, in 1997 Phase II of the project was initiated. White sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River. During 1997, 316 white sturgeon were captured in the Snake River. Of these, 298 were marked. Differences in the fork length frequency distributions of the white sturgeon were not affected by collection method. No significant differences in length frequency distributions of sturgeon captured in Lower Granite Reservoir and the mid- and upper free-flowing reaches of the Snake River were detected. The length frequency distribution indicated that white sturgeon between 92 and 183 cm are prevalent in the reaches of the Snake River that were sampled. However, white sturgeon >183 have not changed markedly since 1970. I would speculate that some factor other than past over-fishing practices is

  20. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish and Wildlife Program Habitat Protection Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, Angelo; Roberts, Frank; Peters, Ronald

    2002-06-01

    Throughout the last century, the cumulative effects of anthropogenic disturbances have caused drastic watershed level landscape changes throughout the Reservation and surrounding areas (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Changes include stream channelization, wetland draining, forest and palouse prairie conversion for agricultural use, high road density, elimination of old growth timber stands, and denuding riparian communities. The significance of these changes is manifested in the degradation of habitats supporting native flora and fauna. Consequently, populations of native fish, wildlife, and plants, which the Tribe relies on as subsistence resources, have declined or in some instances been extirpated (Apperson et al. 1988; Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998; Lillengreen et al. 1996; Lillengreen et al. 1993; Gerry Green Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife Biologist, personal communication 2002). For example, bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are not present at detectable levels in Reservation tributaries, westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) are not present in numbers commensurate with maintaining harvestable fisheries (Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996), and the Sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) are not present at detectable levels on the Reservation (Gerry Green, Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife biologist, personal communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe added Fisheries and Wildlife Programs to their Natural Resources Department to address these losses and protect important cultural, and subsistence resources for future generations. The Tribal Council adopted by Resolution 89(94), the following mission statement for the Fisheries Program: 'restore, protect, expand and re-establish fish populations to sustainable levels to provide harvest opportunities'. This mission statement, focused on fisheries restoration and rehabilitation, is a response to native fish population declines throughout the Tribe's aboriginal territory, including the Coeur d'Alene Indian

  1. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program Research, Monitoring and Evaluation Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, Angelo; Lamb, Dave; Peters, Ronald

    2002-11-01

    Westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are currently of special concern regionally and are important to the culture and subsistence needs of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. The mission of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program is to restore and maintain these native trout and the habitats that sustain them in order to provide subsistence harvest and recreational fishing opportunities for the Reservation community. The adfluvial life history strategy exhibited by westslope cutthroat and bull trout in the Lake Coeur d'Alene subbasin makes these fish susceptible to habitat degradation and competition in both lake and stream environments. Degraded habitat in Lake Coeur d'Alene and its associated streams and the introduction of exotic species has lead to the decline of westslope cutthroat and listing of bull trout under the endangered species act (Peters et al. 1998). Despite the effects of habitat degradation, several streams on the Reservation still maintain populations of westslope cutthroat trout, albeit in a suppressed condition (Table 1). The results of several early studies looking at fish population status and habitat condition on the Reservation (Graves et al. 1990; Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996) lead the Tribe to aggressively pursue funding for habitat restoration under the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) resident fish substitution program. Through these efforts, habitat restoration needs were identified and projects were initiated. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program is currently involved in implementing stream habitat restoration projects, reducing the transport of sediment from upland sources, and monitoring fish populations in four watersheds on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation (Figure 1). Restoration projects have included riparian plantings, addition of large woody debris to streams, and complete channel reconstruction to restore historical natural channel forms. In addition, ponds have

  2. Fort Mojave Tribe - Feasibility Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Russell Gum ERCC Analytics QuickTime(tm) and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. Bottom Line * Biodigester for Dairy * 10 MW wind farm * Concentrated ...

  3. Crow Indian Tribe- 1995 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this feasibility study is to set forth the basis for the economic, technical, environmental, and legal feasibility of a 260 mW coal-fired cogeneration facility on the Crow Reservation in Montana. This study is the first stage in the development of the Crow Energy Project, and its goal is to identify any factors that could prevent or obstruct development of the facility.

  4. Fort Peck Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    West along US 2 12 mi. from high temp well to Trans. Line 1979 Hottest Temp according to Well Logs is Number 42 at 243F @ 6K feet. Scope of Work Phase I - Geothermal ...

  5. Samish Indian Tribe- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Planning phases of an energy efficient community on 80 acres of tribally owned land. The Samish Nation aboriginal area stretches across a wide seven-county region of Northwest Washington. The development of a 10-year action plan will help to develop tribal energy projects, identify existing energy sources, and develop construction techniques for energy efficiency.

  6. Makah Indian Tribe- 2002 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Makah Indian Reservation is conducting a comprehensive feasibility study to demonstrate the potential sustainability of renewable energy development on tribal lands. The feasibility study will include an assessment of wind and micro-hydroelectric potential, and will conclude with a business plan to obtain financing for the implementation of a sustainable renewable energy project.

  7. 3-D RESERVOIR AND STOCHASTIC FRACTURE NETWORK MODELING FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY, CIRCLE RIDGE PHOSPHORIA/TENSLEEP RESERVOIR, WIND RIVER RESERVATION, ARAPAHO AND SHOSHONE TRIBES, WYOMING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul La Pointe; Jan Hermanson; Robert Parney; Thorsten Eiben; Mike Dunleavy; Ken Steele; John Whitney; Darrell Eubanks; Roger Straub

    2002-11-18

    This report describes the results made in fulfillment of contract DE-FG26-00BC15190, ''3-D Reservoir and Stochastic Fracture Network Modeling for Enhanced Oil Recovery, Circle Ridge Phosphoria/Tensleep Reservoir, Wind River Reservation, Arapaho and Shoshone Tribes, Wyoming''. The goal of this project is to improve the recovery of oil from the Tensleep and Phosphoria Formations in Circle Ridge Oilfield, located on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming, through an innovative integration of matrix characterization, structural reconstruction, and the characterization of the fracturing in the reservoir through the use of discrete fracture network models. Fields in which natural fractures dominate reservoir permeability, such as the Circle Ridge Field, often experience sub-optimal recovery when recovery processes are designed and implemented that do not take advantage of the fracture systems. For example, a conventional waterflood in a main structural block of the Field was implemented and later suspended due to unattractive results. It is estimated that somewhere less than 20% of the OOIP in the Circle Ridge Field have been recovered after more than 50 years' production. Marathon Oil Company identified the Circle Ridge Field as an attractive candidate for several advanced IOR processes that explicitly take advantage of the natural fracture system. These processes require knowledge of the distribution of matrix porosity, permeability and oil saturations; and understanding of where fracturing is likely to be well-developed or poorly developed; how the fracturing may compartmentalize the reservoir; and how smaller, relatively untested subthrust fault blocks may be connected to the main overthrust block. For this reason, the project focused on improving knowledge of the matrix properties, the fault block architecture and to develop a model that could be used to predict fracture intensity, orientation and fluid flow/connectivity properties. Knowledge of matrix properties was

  8. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-06-30

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop (see attached agenda). The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement

  9. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-01-04

    The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the first performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first Partnership meeting the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Complementary to the efforts on evaluation of sources and sinks is the development of the Big Sky Partnership Carbon Cyberinfrastructure (BSP-CC) and a GIS Road Map for the Partnership. These efforts will put in place a map-based integrated information management system for our Partnership, with transferability to the national carbon sequestration effort. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but other policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best

  10. Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program : Facility Operation and Maintenance Facilities, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLean, Michael L.; Seeger, Ryan; Hewitt, Laurie

    2004-01-01

    in future artificial propagation programs. The GRESCSSP was implemented in three Grande Ronde River basin tributaries; the Lostine and upper Grande Ronde rivers and Catherine Creek. The GRESCSSP employs two broodstock strategies utilizing captive and conventional brood sources. The captive brood program began in 1995, with the collection of parr from the three tributary areas. The conventional broodstock component of the program began in 1997 with the collection of natural adults returning to these tributary areas. Although LGH was available as the primary production facility for spring chinook programs in the Grande Ronde Basin, there were never any adult or juvenile satellite facilities developed in the tributary areas that were to be supplemented. An essential part of the GRESCSSP was the construction of adult traps and juvenile acclimation facilities in these tributary areas. Weirs were installed in 1997 for the collection of adult broodstock for the conventional component of the program. Juvenile facilities were built in 2000 for acclimation of the smolts produced by the captive and conventional broodstock programs and as release sites within the natural production areas of their natal streams. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) operate both the juvenile acclimation and adult trapping facilities located on Catherine Creek and the upper Grande Ronde River under this project. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) operate the facilities on the Lostine River under a sister project. Hatcheries were also built in Oregon, Washington and Idaho under the LSRCP to compensate for losses of summer steelhead due to the construction and operation of the lowest four Snake River dams. Despite these harvest-driven hatchery programs, natural summer steelhead populations continued to decline as evidenced by declining counts at Lower Granite Dam since 1995 (Columbia River Data Access in Real Time, DART) and low steelhead redd counts on index streams in the

  11. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercHeatPumps | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0 + Sweden Building...

  12. Lower Brule Sioux Tribe- 1994 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Located in the center of South Dakota, the Lower Brule Sioux reservation has significant natural resources, including a 250,000-acre land base, a lake with surface area of 80 square miles, artesian wells of geothermal water, average wind speeds of 10-15 mph, and hydropower potential.

  13. Standing Rock Sioux Tribe- 1995 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The primary objective of this study is to provide the Standing Rock Sioux Nation with a strategic overview of the electric energy issues and opportunities they will be facing beginning in the year 2001.

  14. San Carlos Apache Tribe- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The core purpose of this project is to provide for the analysis and implementation of a Tribal Energy Organization that can effectively provide for coordination, leadership, and energy expertise to the rest of the tribal government in understanding and pursuing energy programs and plans.

  15. Fort Mojave Tribe - Renewable Energy Feasibility Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a cost efficient power plant that competes economically with conventional fuels. ... PG&E Ausra The lowest cost from "photon to electron" ever achieved in a solar power plant ...

  16. Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska Solar Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... of 13 Accomplishments Micro Inverter Info Needed 6 micro inverters to complete ... that you have to follow. Patience and constant contact will get the project done. ...

  17. Shoshone-Bannock Tribes | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Shirley Ann Jackson About Us Shirley Ann Jackson, Ph.D. - President, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Former Chairman, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Shirley Ann Jackson The Honorable Shirley Ann Jackson, Ph.D., is the 18th president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute of Troy, New York, and Hartford, Connecticut, the oldest technological research university in the United States. She was elected to the Brookings Board of Trustees in 2000. Described by Time Magazine as "perhaps the

  18. Yerington Paiute Tribe: Building Organizational Capacity for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    West. pbs.org Political Relations Development Grants Tribal Council Tribal Chairman Enterprises Water Operator Testing Administration O&M Construction Planning Deputy ...

  19. Fort Sill Apache Tribe- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Creation of an energy component within the tribal structure to serve as a focal point for energy related issues, assess efficiency of tribal facilities, and conduct long range energy planning. These efforts are intended to provide the information necessary to make informed decisions on energy development; plan for present and future tribal energy needs; and increase community comprehension of energy issues. Tribal lands, including both individual allotments and tribal trust land, are spread across a five-county area in southwestern Oklahoma.

  20. Coeur d'Alene Tribe- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this proposed project is to assess and determine the technical and economic feasibility of energy efficiency improvements to existing tribally owned buildings.

  1. GSA Solutions for Federally Recognized Tribes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 13 Office, Special Use, Household and Quarters Furniture Wall Coverings, Drapes, and Lighting Packaged Furniture Programs Office, Imaging, and Document Solutions ...

  2. White Mountain Apache Tribe- 1994 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Fort Apache Timber Company (FATCO) has the opportunity to cogenerate electricity and thermal energy for the provision of its internal energy requirements. The proposed fuel supply for the...

  3. Interior Department Solicits Grant Proposals from Tribes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOI Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development's request for proposals for projects to promote and build tribal capacity for energy resource development on Indian lands closes February 18, 2014.

  4. Fort Mojave Tribe - Renewable Energy Feasibility Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    E t h a n o l B i o d i e s e l Solar Thermal Biodiesel Module Drawing courtesy of Energea ... -- 5 cent power but need cows biodiesel -- no proven oil crop except for cotton seed. ...

  5. Washoe Tribe - Alternative Energy Feasibility Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    From NCDC at NOAA. Map from NREL. Wind Geothermal Inside the firebox of the Hurst Boiler Woody Biomass Carson Correctional Center Steam Generator Inside the Incinerator Biofuel ...

  6. Mescalero Apache Tribe - Biomass Opportunity Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    USFS Stewardship contract * Escalating energy costs - Limited natural gas, mostly propane - Electricity from coop and IOU Project Tasks * Resource assessment * Energy loads ...

  7. Yurok Tribe - Tribal Utility Feasibility Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Survey Results 77.33% of the households utilize Propane fueled refrigerators. 54.67% use a ... Fuel costs whether wood, propane, diesel, or kerosene currently average 132.67 monthly. ...

  8. The Rosebud Sioux Tribe Strategic Energy Plan

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    And as I looked and wept, I saw that there stood on the north side of the starving camp a sacred man who was painted red all over his body, and he held a spear as he walked into the center of the people, and there he lay down and rolled. And when he got up, it was a fat bison standing there, and where the bison stood, a sacred herb sprang up right where the tree had been in the center of the nation's hoop. The herb grew and bore four blossoms on a single stem while I was looking - a blue, a

  9. More Weatherized Homes for Minnesota Tribe

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Weatherization crews across Minnesota are busy replacing old furnaces, sealing air leaks, and weathering stripped doors for people who are at or below 200 percent of the federal poverty line, with priority given to households with elderly or disabled people.

  10. Northern Cheyenne Tribe Wind Energy Development Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belvin Pete; Distributed Generation Systems Inc; WEST, Inc; Michael S. Burney; Chris Bergen; Electrical Consultants, Inc; Terracon

    2007-06-27

    Specific development objectives focused on the completion of all actions required to qualify a specfic project for financing and construction of a 30MW wind facility.

  11. Project Reports for Hopi Tribe- 2003 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Establishment of a Sustainable Energy Program to foster the development of business enterprises that provide energy systems or services based on sustainable energy technologies. Through these efforts, the Hopi Energy Team will develop a Sustainable Energy Plan to develop sustainable energy resources, such as solar and wind, and diversify away from its coal-dominated economy.

  12. Bishop Paiute Tribe 2015 Residential Solar Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on Tribal-member owner-occupied, single-family homes of low- income families on the ... , 501(c)(3) non-profit solar installer; Business Contact: A. Bambi Tran, Inland Empire ...

  13. San Carlos Apache Tribe Solar Feasibility Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Mesa off-setting electrical demand in the SCIP ... and Sale Closest feasible transmission connection is 18 miles away. ... connect to the SCIP distribution system at the base of ...

  14. Hualapai Tribe - Hualapai Renewable Energy Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hualapai Renewable Energy Development DOE-Tribal Energy Program Peer Review Meeting 2012 The Hualapai Reservation Hualapai Project Description l Wind Farm Development - 200MW Grand Canyon West l Solar Power Plant Development - 50MW - Clay Springs - 30-40MW - Nelson l Community Solar - 1MW - GCW Hualapai Status l Completing the Final Feasibility Report - For Tribal Council - For Wind Developers - For Solar Developers l Wrap Up Activities - Critical Issues Analysis - Avian Studies -

  15. To Customers, Constituents, Tribes and Stakeholders:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    start taking actions now to maintain BPA's long-term cost competitiveness and financial sustainability. Moving the EE capital program to expense is a step toward achieving these...

  16. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S.

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 1999. This was the fourth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 453,117 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities not only slightly exceeded the 450,000 fish quota, but a second release of 76,386 yearlings (hereafter called Surplus) were acclimated at the Big Canyon facility and released about two weeks after the primary releases. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 9,941 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 9,583 from Big Canyon, 2,511 Big Canyon Surplus and 2,494 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 983 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low and did not appear to increase after transport to the acclimation facilities. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery and relatively high at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the release groups ranged from 147.4 mm (146.7-148.1 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 163.7 mm (163.3-164.1 mm) at Pittsburg Landing. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.04 at

  17. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2003. This was the eighth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 437,633 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,492 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,494 from Big Canyon and 2,497 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels at the acclimation facilities could be considered medium with 37-83% of the fish sampled rating medium to very high. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 153.7 mm (153.2-154.2 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 164.2 mm (163.9-164.5 mm) at Pittsburg Landing. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.22 at Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 83.1% (80.7-85.5%) for Big Canyon to 91.7% (87.7-95.7%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 59.9% (54.6-65.2%) for Big Canyon to 69.4% (60.5-78.4%) for Captain John Rapids. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 5.8 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain

  18. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S.

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2002. This was the seventh year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 479,358 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities exceeded the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,545 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,482 from Big Canyon and 2,487 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels at the acclimation facilities could be considered medium to high with 43-62% of fish sampled rating medium to very high. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 146.7 mm (146.2-147.2 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 164.8 mm (163.5-166.1 mm) at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.14 at Pittsburg Landing and Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 88.6% (86.0-91.1%) for Pittsburg Landing to 97.0% (92.4-101.7%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 54.3% (50.2-58.3%) for Big Canyon to 70.5% (65.4-75.5%) for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 8.1 river kilometers per

  19. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J. Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapawi, ID)

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2004. This was the ninth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 414,452 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 4,983 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 4,984 from Big Canyon and 4,982 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered low with 53-94% rating not detected to low. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 154.6 mm (154.0-155.2 mm) at Pittsburg Landing to 163.0 mm (162.6-163.4 mm) at Captain John Rapids. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.16 at Big Canyon. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 74.7% (72.9-76.5%) for Big Canyon to 88.1% (85.7-90.6%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 45.3% (39.2-51.5%) for Pittsburg Landing to 52.1% (42.9-61.2%) for Big Canyon. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 5.5 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 12.8 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration

  20. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S.

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 2000. This was the fifth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 397,339 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,477 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,421 from Big Canyon and 2,488 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 980 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids and about average at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 157.7 mm (157.3-158.1 mm) at Big Canyon to 172.9 mm (172.2-173.6 mm) at Captain John Rapids. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Captain John Rapids and Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.12 at Big Canyon. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 87.0% (84.7-89.4%) for Pittsburg Landing to 95.2% (91.5-98.9%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to

  1. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S.

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 2001. This was the sixth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 318,932 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,503 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,499 from Big Canyon and 2,518 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 991 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids and about average at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 155.4 mm (154.7-156.1 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 171.6 mm (170.7-172.5 mm) at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.02 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.16 at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 74.4% (73.2-75.5%) for Big Canyon to 85.2% (83.5-87.0%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release

  2. Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Confederated Tribes of the Flathead Reservation- 2007 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The intent of this project is to evaluate the potential to utilize the abundant biomass resources at select facilities on the Flathead Reservation.

  3. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2006-01-01

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts); and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated

  4. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-10-01

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts); and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated

  5. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-11-01

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO2 utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other DOE regional partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the

  6. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-10-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification

  7. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-06-01

    The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the second performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for

  8. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan Capalbo

    2005-12-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated

  9. Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians: Governmental Building...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    training at local sites increases participation n Employees want certification credentials n Employees want to upgrade their technology skills Future Plans n Develop energy ...

  10. Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar: EPA Clean Power Plan: What Tribes...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    November 18, 2015 11:00AM to 12:30PM MST The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will present on the final rule for the Clean Power Plan and the proposed Federal Plan and...

  11. Several Tribes: Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute- 2000 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute's (SIPI) renewable energy program seeks to establish renewable energy technology hardware on and around the campus, which will supplement and create the educational resources to teach renewable energy courses at its campus.

  12. Southern Ute Indian Tribe to Begin Construction on Solar Project |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Southern Company - Kemper County, Mississippi Southern Company - Kemper County, Mississippi Southern Company - Kemper County, Mississippi KEMPER COUNTY ENERGY FACILITY In February 2006, the U.S. Department of Energy awarded a Cooperative Agreement to Southern Company Services under the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) Round 2 Program to provide financial support for the development and deployment of the Transport Integrated Gasification (TRIGTM) technology that is being utilized by the

  13. DOE Announces Consultation Sessions with Alaska Native Tribes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. security interests, pursue responsible Arctic region stewardship, and strengthen international cooperation. A key principle of the National Strategy is to consult and...

  14. Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians - Next Step for STEP

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    members to learn how to install and maintain solar panels and solar hot water While not usually this cold ANA SEDS Goals l Form Siletz Tribal Energy Program (STEP) l ...

  15. Rosebud Sioux Tribe - Owl Feather War Bonnet Wind Farm

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Anticipated Time Lines * Nov. 2005, Complete NEPA and Submit to BIA * Dec. 2005 Obtain Power Purchase Agreement * Jan 2006, BIA issues FONSI * Nov. 05- Jan 2006, Dev. financial structure, LLC and secure RST Tribal approval * Dec.05- Feb 2006, Engage Investors/Rural Utilities Service, USDA, Secure Loan, Est. Proj. Costs 46 million * July 2006 Construction underway * Dec 2006 Wind farm on line Old Bristow Ranch Met tower Tribal lands North Antelope Met Tower Tribal lands

  16. Rosebud Sioux Tribe - Owl Feather War Bonnet Wind Farm

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Artist

  17. Rosebud Sioux Tribes - Next Steps Toward Wind Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Montileaux Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation MET Tower Oct '03 At 50 meter height Ave. wind 19.25 mph MET Tower Oct '03 At 50 meter height Ave. wind 16.9 mph MET Tower May 2001 Rosebud Indian Reservation May, 2001 Owl Feather War Bonnet Wind F Little Soldier Turbine Farm Little Soldier Turbine  Commissioned in March '03  Neg Micon, Vestas, 750 Kw Turbine  Cost was $1,226,804.00  DOE grant of $566,000.00  RUS Loan of $660,804.00  Initial PPA with Basin Electric for 2.5 years 

  18. Rosebud Sioux Tribes - Wind Development on the Rosebud

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 th , 2012, Denver, Colorado 20 communities with an elected council person representing each community, they serve 3 year terms, along with the Tribal Chairman, Vice Chair, Secretary and Treasurer Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation Met tower installed in1999 Akicita Cikala 750 Kw turbine, commissioned March 2003 Met tower installed in 2001 Proposed Owl Feather War Bonnet Wind Farm, 30Mw Met towers installed in 2003 Met Met Met Met towers installed in 2009 Met towers installed installed in 2009 in

  19. ACHP - Consultation with Indian Tribes in the Section 106 Review...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    requirements under the National Historic Preservation Act. Author Advisory Council on Historic Preservation Published Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, 2012...

  20. Kalispel Tribe of Indians joins federal agencies to protect bull...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in an unprecedented set of agreements designed to improve habitat and strengthen fish stocks in the upper Columbia River Basin over the next 10 years. The new agreement...

  1. The Tonto Apache Tribe Presents: The Department of Energy (DOE...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges & Goals * Financial Stability * Water & Resource Protection * Develop ... Program SunRenu Solar - Companies with "Core Values" * Turn-Key EPC Company with a ...

  2. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    for the final deliverable McKinstry's energy audits were generally at ASHRAE Level 1 (ASHRAE: American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air- Conditioning ...

  3. EECBG Success Story: Tribe's Headquarters Gets Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Programs EECBG Success Story: San Francisco Turns Up The Heat In Push To Eliminate Old Boilers EECBG Success Story: Shining Energy-Saving LEDs on Utah Starry Nights...

  4. Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin- 1994 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project will increase the energy efficiency within new home construction on the reservation through such items as the following: optimizing solar heat gain with south facing windows equaling 8% - 10% of the floor area; earth berming (up to eight feet on the north wall); planting wind breaking trees and plants; super-insulation such that homes require only 3 BTUs/sf/degree-day (with only one BTU coming from purchased heat); using energy efficient windows, doors, and construction (air/vapor barriers, sealants, etc.); using air-to-air heat exchangers; energy efficient lighting; low-flow shower heads and faucets; and active solar water heating systems.

  5. Project Reports for Samish Indian Tribe- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Planning phases of an energy efficient community on 80 acres of tribally owned land. The Samish Nation aboriginal area stretches across a wide seven-county region of Northwest Washington. The development of a 10-year action plan will help to develop tribal energy projects, identify existing energy sources, and develop construction techniques for energy efficiency.

  6. Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes Feasibility Study to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tribal Health and Human Services Clinic in St. Ignatius, Montana Rooftop Heating Unit Siding Community & Fitness Center in St. Ignatius, MT Ronan Indian Senior Citizen Center ...

  7. Project Reports for Makah Indian Tribe- 2002 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Makah Indian Reservation is conducting a comprehensive feasibility study to demonstrate the potential sustainability of renewable energy development on tribal lands. The feasibility study will include an assessment of wind and micro-hydroelectric potential, and will conclude with a business plan to obtain financing for the implementation of a sustainable renewable energy project.

  8. Finance and Performance Model Training Helps Tribes with Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... If you weren't able to attend the SAM Training but want to learn more, we've posted the presentations online. You can also download the free SAM tool on NREL's website, where there ...

  9. Project Reports for Fort Sill Apache Tribe- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Creation of an energy component within the tribal structure to serve as a focal point for energy related issues, assess efficiency of tribal facilities, and conduct long range energy planning. These efforts are intended to provide the information necessary to make informed decisions on energy development; plan for present and future tribal energy needs; and increase community comprehension of energy issues. Tribal lands, including both individual allotments and tribal trust land, are spread across a five-county area in southwestern Oklahoma.

  10. Project Reports for Southern Ute Indian Tribe- 2014 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The proposed project is a roughly 800-kilowatt (kW) photovoltaic (PV) system that will interconnect to the grid and provide solar energy to 10 tribal buildings on the Southern Ute Indian Reservation through an agreement with the local electric cooperative, La Plata Electric Association.

  11. Yurok Tribe - Tribal Utility Project and Human Capacity-Building...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Tribal Utility Feasibility Study GIS energy database under development Biomass Microhydro ... resource inventory * Collect data for GIS database * Develop plan for making ...

  12. Hanford Site, Tribes Raise Awareness of Culturally Significant...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    volcanic glass, which is part of a simulated fire hearth at the cultural test beds site. ... volcanic glass, which is part of a simulated fire hearth at the cultural test beds site. ...

  13. Sault Ste. Mari Tribe of Chippewa Indians - Building Audit Training...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1,600 Acres Held in Trust n Upper Peninsula - 16,452 Square Miles n Tribal Service Area - 8,573 Square Miles k eLa Project Objectives Governmental Building Energy Audits n ...

  14. Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians: Governmental Building...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chippewa Indians Governmental Building Energy Audits & Training in Building Energy Audit ... * Approximately 1,600 Acres Held in Trust * Upper Peninsula - 16,452 Square Miles * ...

  15. Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In pursuit of its long-term energy goal of reducing its carbon footprint to zero, the Forest County Potawatomi Community has adopted an integrated renewable energy deployment plan that includes the installation of solar, biogas, and biomass energy systems to heat, cool, and power its tribal facilities.

  16. ANA Announces FY14 Funding Opportunities for Tribes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Administration for Children and Families, Administration for Native Americans (ANA) has announced the availability of Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 funding opportunities. Applications are due April 15,...

  17. Project Reports for Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Confederated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nation, whose tribal lands are located in western Montana, will assess the feasibility of a commercial wind facility, possibly linked to a pumped storage hydropower project. ...

  18. Former Tribal Energy Program Intern Guides Tribes Toward a More...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    renewable energy systems during her 2002 internship. Photo courtesy from Sandra Begay-Campbell, Sandia National Laboratories. Indian Energy Summer Internship Program Now Accepting ...

  19. Workshop Helps Empower Tribes to Make Renewable Energy Project...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    farm, which is the first industrial-scale solar photovoltaic project in Indian Country. ... farm, which is the first industrial-scale solar photovoltaic project in Indian Country. ...

  20. USDA Agricultural Conservation Easement Program Webinar for Tribes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the American Indian Higher Education Consortium, this webinar will cover details on the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) new Agricultural Conservation Easement Program (ACEP)...