Sample records for nez perce tribe

  1. Idaho: Nez Perce Tribe Energy-Efficient Facilities Upgrade |...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Idaho: Nez Perce Tribe Energy-Efficient Facilities Upgrade Idaho: Nez Perce Tribe Energy-Efficient Facilities Upgrade November 8, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Utilizing 67,000 of EERE's...

  2. Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Productivity Nez Perce Tribe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Productivity Jay Hesse Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries salmon abundance and productivity have been and continue to be influenced by construction and operation related to productivity; (1) adult abundance, (2) hatchery programs, (3) management actions, and (4

  3. Council of Energy Resources Tribes 1993 summer internship report: Nez Perce Tribe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crow, J.S.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is designed to be a working part of a larger project which would deal with the topic of Tribal interests affected by the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management program and the approaches by which those Tribal interests can be advanced. Topics discussed in this paper include: background history of the Nez Perce Tribe`s relations with the US government; a Nez Perce view of tribal interests affected by DOE activities at Hanford; and a Nez Perce framework for private/governmental/tribal interest.

  4. Nez Perce Tribe Energy Efficient Facilities Installation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry Kinder

    2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Although Idaho's electrical rates are among the lowest in the country, the Nez Perce Tribe's electrical bills take a large bite out of the operating budget every year. Tribal programs are located in forty some buildings, in six counties, in two states. Ninety-five percent, or more, are heated electrically. The age of the Tribal office buildings located in Lapwai, Idaho vary from forty to over a hundred years old. Only sporadic updates, in the buildings themselves, have been made over the years. Working with the Tribe's electrical provider (Avista Corporation), it was determine that a minimum financial commitment could reap large rewards in the form of lower operating costs.

  5. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (Idaho).

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonneville Power Administration, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Nez Perce Tribe propose a supplementation program to restore chinook salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin in Idaho. The Clearwater River is a tributary to the Snake River, which empties into the Columbia River. The Nez Perce Tribe would build and operate two central incubation and rearing hatcheries and six satellite facilities. Spring, summer and fall chinook salmon would be reared and acclimated to different areas in the Subbasin and released at the hatchery and satellite sites or in other watercourses throughout the Subbasin. The supplementation program differs from other hatchery programs because the fish would be released at different sizes and would return to reproduce naturally in the areas where they are released. Several environmental issues were identified during scoping: the possibility that the project would fail if mainstem Columbia River juvenile and adult passage problems are not solved; genetic risks to fish listed as endangered or threatened; potential impacts to wild and resident fish stocks because of increase competition for food and space; and water quality. The Proposed Action would affect several important aspects of Nez Perce tribal life, primarily salmon harvest, employment, and fisheries management.

  6. Nez Perce County, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,NextEra Energy PowerNextGenNez

  7. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project; Operations and Maintenance and Planning and Design, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.; Penney, Aaron K. (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report fulfills the contract obligations based on the Statement of Work (SOW) for the project as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2002 annual report combines information from two contracts with a combined value of $3,036,014. Bonneville Power Administration identifies them as follows; (1) Part I--Operations and Maintenance--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4504, and $2,682,635 which includes--Equipment costs of $1,807,105. (2) Part II--Planning and Design--Project No. 1983-35-04, Contract No. 4035, $352,379 for Clearwater Coho Restoration Master Plan development Based on NPPC authorization for construction and operation of NPTH, the annual contracts were negotiated for the amounts shown above under (1) and (2). Construction contracts were handled by BPA until all facilities are completed and accepted.

  8. Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    but would not open. It is unfortunate that the link given did not work properly, as the original comments to the ftp site containing the original comments and a map for the Maines Estate Land Parcel. 1. Open Windows portions of the American and Crooked #12;2 River watersheds. This EIS was a multi-faceted project

  9. Nez Perce Tribe Formaldehyde Study 2011 Kayla Warden and Etta Axtell-Northwest Indian College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    volatile organic compounds (VOC) were measured using a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR Acknowledgements: This research was funded by EPA/FaST DOE and NSF Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU). I

  10. Idaho: Nez Perce Tribe Energy-Efficient Facilities Upgrade | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov.Energy02.pdf7 OPAM Flash2011-37EnergySubmitRoad | Department ofEnergy

  11. Red River Stream Improvement Final Design Nez Perce National Forest.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watershed Consulting, LLC

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the final stream improvement design along the reach of Red River between the bridge below Dawson Creek, upstream for approximately 2 miles, Idaho County, Idaho. Geomorphic mapping, hydrologic profiles and cross-sections were presented along with existing fish habitat maps in the conceptual design report. This information is used to develop a stream improvement design intended to improve aquatic habitat and restore riparian health in the reach. The area was placer mined using large bucket dredges between 1938 and 1957. This activity removed most of the riparian vegetation in the stream corridor and obliterated the channel bed and banks. The reach was also cut-off from most valley margin tributaries. In the 50 years since large-scale dredging ceased, the channel has been re-established and parts of the riparian zone have grown in. However, the recruitment of large woody debris to the stream has been extremely low and overhead cover is poor. Pool habitat makes up more than 37% of the reach, and habitat diversity is much better than the project reach on Crooked River. There is little large woody debris in the stream to provide cover for spawning and juvenile rearing, because the majority of the woody debris does not span a significant part of the channel, but is mainly on the side slopes of the stream. Most of the riparian zone has very little soil or subsoil left after the mining and so now consists primarily of unconsolidated cobble tailings or heavily compacted gravel tailings. Knapweed and lodgepole pine are the most successful colonizers of these post mining landforms. Tributary fans which add complexity to many other streams in the region, have been isolated from the main reach due to placer mining and road building.

  12. NEZ PERCE SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION DISTRICT CULDESAC, IDAHO 83524

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Culdesac, McGregor Company, and the Idaho Soil Conservation Commission. In addition, the District has of the wetland and sod bio-logs that are installed our projects. This results in more on-the-ground projects

  13. Imnaha Subbasin Inventory Subbasin Lead Entity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imnaha Subbasin Inventory May 2004 Written by Ecovista Subbasin Lead Entity: Nez Perce Tribe.......................................................................... 15 List of Tables TABLE 1. ACRONYMS USED IN THE IMNAHA SUBBASIN INVENTORY

  14. Fall Chinook Salmon Survival and Supplementation Studies in the Snake River and Lower Snake River Reservoirs, 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, William D.; Connor, William P.; Arnsberg, Billy D.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1997, the National Marine Fisheries Service, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Nez Perce Tribe completed the third year of research to investigate migrational characteristics of subyearling fall chinook salmon in the Snake River Basin.

  15. EA-1160: Northeast Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Project, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to enter into an agreement with the Nez Perce Tribe to acquire and manage...

  16. Imnaha Subbasin Management Plan Subbasin Lead Entity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imnaha Subbasin Management Plan May 2004 Written by Ecovista Subbasin Lead Entity: Nez Perce Tribe....................................................................................... 6 1.2.4 Ecovista Website Information.......................................................................... 59 4.3 Terrestrial Data and Information Gaps

  17. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercLaundry | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV JumpInformationSPElectrtyUsePercFansSPElectrtyUsePercLaundry

  18. Coordinating and promoting effective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 I Coordinating and promoting effective protection and restoration of fish, wildlife Nation Idaho Department of Fish and Game Kootenai Tribe of Idaho Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks National Marine Fisheries Service Nez Perce Tribe Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Shoshone

  19. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercCirculationFans | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV JumpInformation SPElectrtyUsePercCirculationFans Jump to:

  20. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercFans | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV JumpInformationSPElectrtyUsePercFans Jump to: navigation,

  1. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercPrinters | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BVSPElectrtyUsePercPrinters Jump to: navigation, search This is a

  2. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercPumps | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BVSPElectrtyUsePercPrinters Jump to: navigation, search This is

  3. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercRefrigeration | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BVSPElectrtyUsePercPrinters Jump to: navigation, search This

  4. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercTotal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BVSPElectrtyUsePercPrinters Jump to: navigation, search

  5. Ute Tribe Energy Conference & Expo

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    An international gathering of energy producing Tribes, governments and companies envisioning a path forward towards a more sustainable future.

  6. Rhonda Whiting Bill Bradbury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    30, 2012 MEMORANDUM TO: Council Members FROM: Tony Grover, Fish and Wildlife Division Director SUBJECT: Agency and Tribal comments on Bonneville's fish and wildlife budget and project management practices Dave Johnson, Nez Perce Tribe; Dan Rawding, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Tom Rien

  7. Oneida Tribe Energy Audits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Ray [Energy Controls Manager; Schubert, Eugene [Policy Analyst

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Project funding energy audits of 44 Tribally owned buildings operated by the Oneida Tribe of Indians of WI. Buildings were selected for their size, age, or known energy concerns and total over 1 million square feet. Audits include feasibility studies, lists of energy improvement opportunities, and a strategic energy plan to address cost effective ways to save energy via energy efficiency upgrades over the short and long term.

  8. Rehabilitate Newsome Creek Watershed, 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bransford, Stephanie [Nez Perce Tribe Fisheries/Watershed Program

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridgetop approach. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) and the Nez Perce National Forest (NPNF) have formed a partnership in completing watershed restoration activities, and through this partnership more work is accomplished by sharing funding and resources in our effort. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Newsome Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 1997. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed through road decommissioning and culvert replacement. Starting in FY 2001 and continuing into the present, a major stream restoration effort on the mainstem of Newsome Creek has been pursued. From completing a watershed assessment to a feasibility study of 4 miles of mainstem rehabilitation to carrying that forward into NEPA and a final design, we will begin the effort of restoring the mainstem channel of Newsome Creek to provide spawning and rearing habitat for anadromous and resident fish species. Roads have been surveyed and prioritized for removal or improvement as well as culverts being prioritized for replacement to accommodate fish passage throughout the watershed.

  9. MODELLING OF THE PERC STRUCTURE WITH STRIPE AND DOT BACK K.R. Catchpole and A.W. Blakers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELLING OF THE PERC STRUCTURE WITH STRIPE AND DOT BACK CONTACTS K.R. Catchpole and A.W. Blakers Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems Engineering Department, FEIT, The Australian National University commercial cell designs with only a small increase in process complexity. Optimisation of the PERC structure

  10. Confidence Intervals for OD Demand Estimation Yingying Chen, Fernando Ordo~nez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ordóñez, Fernando

    Confidence Intervals for OD Demand Estimation Yingying Chen, Fernando Ord´o~nez , and Kurt Palmer Representative origin-destination (OD) demand tables are a crucial part of making many transportation models relevant to practice. However estimating these OD tables is a challenging problem, even more so determining

  11. Three Affliated Tribes Renewable Energy Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belvin Pete; Kent Good; Krista Gordon; Ed McCarthy,

    2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Three Affliated Tribes on the Fort Berthold Reservation studied the feasibility of a commercial wind facility on land selected and owned by the Tribes and examined the potential for the development of renewable energy resources on Tribal Lands.

  12. Yerington Paiute Tribe Energy Plan Version 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Consulting, BB9 [BB9 Consulting; Director, Environmental

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yerington Paiute Tribe has made energy management and planning a priority. The Tribal Council has recognized that energy is an important component of their goal of self-sufficiency. Recognizing energy development as a component of the Tribes natural resources provides for needed economic development.A number of priorities have been identified for energy development. These range from immediate housing needs such as weatherization and solar to interest in energy as economic development.

  13. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercElctrcEngineHeaters | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV JumpInformation SPElectrtyUsePercCirculationFans Jump

  14. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercElctrcHeating | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV JumpInformation SPElectrtyUsePercCirculationFans

  15. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercHeatPumps | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV JumpInformationSPElectrtyUsePercFans Jump to:

  16. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercHeatPumpsUsedForColg | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  17. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercLargeComputersServers | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  18. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercLargeKitchens | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV JumpInformationSPElectrtyUsePercFans

  19. Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Emissions, Promotes Green Growth Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth February 23, 2012 - 6:29pm Addthis The Forest County Potawatomi Tribe's solar...

  20. Energy Department to Help Tribes Advance Clean Energy Projects...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Department to Help Tribes Advance Clean Energy Projects and Increase Resiliency Energy Department to Help Tribes Advance Clean Energy Projects and Increase Resiliency...

  1. ant tribe camponotini: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    including government tourism units, travel agencies, bus operators, local culture and tourism industry associations, as well as tribe B & B industry. 5. The tourists for tribe...

  2. Workshop Helps Empower Tribes to Make Renewable Energy Project...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Helps Empower Tribes to Make Renewable Energy Project Development Decisions Workshop Helps Empower Tribes to Make Renewable Energy Project Development Decisions July 16, 2013 -...

  3. Clean Energy Projects Helping Wisconsin Tribe Achieve Sustainability...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    which ultimately aims to eliminate the tribe's carbon footprint and provide carbon-free energy to others in the region. With Energy Department funds, the tribe recently...

  4. Symmetric coverage of dynamic mapping error for mobile sensor networks Carlos H. Caicedo-Nu~nez and Naomi Ehrich Leonard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Naomi

    -N´u~nez and Naomi Ehrich Leonard Abstract-- We present an approach to control design for a mobile sensor network.H. Caicedo-N. and N.E. Leonard are with the Department of Mechani- cal and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton

  5. Renewable Energy Opportunities Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe Planning Department; Smiley, Steve; Bennett, Keith, DOE Project Officer

    2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe has a vision to become self-sufficient in its energy needs and to maintain its culture and protect Mother Earth with respect and honor for the next seven generations. To achieve this vision, green energy sources such as solar, wind and biomass energy are the best energy paths to travel. In this feasibility study the Tribe has analyzed and provided data on the nature of the renewable resources available to the Tribe and the costs of implementing these technologies.

  6. State Government Websites With Indian Tribe Information

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This list was compiled by the federal government's Interagency Working Group on Indian Affairs (IWGIA) as an aid to federal agency consultation with federally recognized Indian tribes. It is not...

  7. Coho Salmon Master Plan, Clearwater River Basin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nez Perce Tribe; FishPro

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe has a desire and a goal to reintroduce and restore coho salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin at levels of abundance and productivity sufficient to support sustainable runs and annual harvest. Consistent with the Clearwater Subbasin Plan (EcoVista 2003), the Nez Perce Tribe envisions developing an annual escapement of 14,000 coho salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin. In 1994, the Nez Perce Tribe began coho reintroduction by securing eggs through U.S. v. Oregon; by 1998 this agreement provided an annual transfer of 550,000 coho salmon smolts from lower Columbia River hatchery facilities for release in the Clearwater River Subbasin. In 1998, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council authorized the Bonneville Power Administration to fund the development of a Master Plan to guide this reintroduction effort. This Master Plan describes the results of experimental releases of coho salmon in the Clearwater River Subbasin, which have been ongoing since 1995. These data are combined with results of recent coho reintroduction efforts by the Yakama Nation, general coho life history information, and historical information regarding the distribution and life history of Snake River coho salmon. This information is used to assess a number of alternative strategies aimed at restoring coho salmon to historical habitats in the Clearwater River subbasin. These data suggest that there is a high probability that coho salmon can be restored to the Clearwater River subbasin. In addition, the data also suggest that the re-establishment of coho salmon could be substantially aided by: (1) the construction of low-tech acclimation facilities; (2) the establishment of a 'localized' stock of coho salmon; and (3) the construction of hatchery facilities to provide a source of juvenile coho salmon for future supplementation activities. The Nez Perce Tribe recognizes that there are factors which may limit the success of coho reintroduction. As a result of these uncertainties, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes to utilize a phased approach for coho reintroductions. This Master Plan seeks authorization and funding to move forward to Step 2 in the Northwest Power and Conservation Council 3-Step review process to further evaluate Phase I of the coho reintroduction program, which would focus on the establishment of a localized coho salmon stock capable of enduring the migration to the Clearwater River subbasin. To achieve this goal, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes to utilize space at existing Clearwater River subbasin hatchery facilities in concert with the construction of two low-tech acclimation facilities, to capitalize on the higher survival observed for acclimated versus direct stream released coho. In addition, Phase I would document the natural productivity of localized coho salmon released in two targeted tributaries within the Clearwater River subbasin. If Phase I is successful at establishing a localized coho salmon stock in an abundance capable of filling existing hatchery space, the rates of natural productivity are promising, and the interspecific interactions between coho and sympatric resident and anadromous salmonids are deemed acceptable, then Phase II would be triggered. Phase II of the coho reintroduction plan would focus on establishing natural production in a number of Clearwater River subbasin tributaries. To accomplish this goal, Phase II would utilize existing Clearwater River subbasin hatchery facilities, and expand facilities at the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Site 1705 facility to rear approximately 687,700 smolts annually for use in a rotating supplementation schedule. In short, this document identifies a proposed alternative (Phase I), complete with estimates of capital, operations and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, and permitting that is anticipated to raise average smolt replacement rates from 0.73 (current) to 1.14 using primarily existing facilities, with a limited capital investment for low-tech acclimation facilities. This increase in survival is expected to provide the opportunity for the establishm

  8. Federally-Recognized Tribes of the Columbia-Snake Basin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an omnibus publication about the federally-recognized Indian tribes of the Columbia-Snake river basin, as presented by themselves. It showcases several figurative and literal snapshots of each tribe, bits and pieces of each tribe`s story. Each individual tribe or tribal confederation either submitted its own section to this publication, or developed its own section with the assistance of the writer-editor. A federally-recognized tribe is an individual Indian group, or confederation of Indian groups, officially acknowledged by the US government for purposes of legislation, consultation and benefits. This publication is designed to be used both as a resource and as an introduction to the tribes. Taken together, the sections present a rich picture of regional indian culture and history, as told by the tribes.

  9. Karuk Tribe Strategic Energy Plan and Energy Options Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramona Taylor, Karuk Tribe; David Carter, Winzler and Kelly

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy planning document to assist the Karuk Tribe in making educated decisions about future energy priorities and implementation.

  10. BIA Request for Proposals for Climate Adaptation Grants for Tribes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Download the Bureau of Indian Affairs Request for Proposals for Climate Adaptation Grants for Tribes, due November 29.

  11. Mescalero Apache Tribe Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peso, F.

    1992-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended, authorizes the siting, construction and operation of a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. The MRS is intended to be used for the temporary storage of spent nuclear fuel from the nation's nuclear power plants beginning as early as 1998. Pursuant to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the Office of the Nuclear Waste Negotiator was created. On October 7, 1991, the Nuclear Waste Negotiator invited the governors of states and the Presidents of Indian tribes to apply for government grants in order to conduct a study to assess under what conditions, if any, they might consider hosting an MRS facility. Pursuant to this invitation, on October 11, 1991 the Mescalero Apache Indian Tribe of Mescalero, NM applied for a grant to conduct a phased, preliminary study of the safety, technical, political, environmental, social and economic feasibility of hosting an MRS. The preliminary study included: (1) An investigative education process to facilitate the Tribe's comprehensive understanding of the safety, environmental, technical, social, political, and economic aspects of hosting an MRS, and; (2) The development of an extensive program that is enabling the Tribe, in collaboration with the Negotiator, to reach an informed and carefully researched decision regarding the conditions, (if any), under which further pursuit of the MRS would be considered. The Phase 1 grant application enabled the Tribe to begin the initial activities necessary to determine whether further consideration is warranted for hosting the MRS facility. The Tribe intends to pursue continued study of the MRS in order to meet the following objectives: (1) Continuing the education process towards a comprehensive understanding of the safety, environmental, technical, social and economic aspects of the MRS; (2) Conducting an effective public participation and information program; (3) Participating in MRS meetings.

  12. District Date(s) Tribe(s) State(s) Program/Project Tribal Issues/Concerns Status Lakes & Rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ) Seneca Nation of Indians (NY) Louisville Jun-12 Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa KY Paducah

  13. Sault Tribe Building Efficiency Energy Audits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holt, Jeffrey W.

    2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians is working to reduce energy consumption and expense in Tribally-owned governmental buildings. The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians will conduct energy audits of nine Tribally-owned governmental buildings in three counties in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to provide a basis for evaluating and selecting the technical and economic viability of energy efficiency improvement options. The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians will follow established Tribal procurement policies and procedures to secure the services of a qualified provider to conduct energy audits of nine designated buildings. The contracted provider will be required to provide a progress schedule to the Tribe prior to commencing the project and submit an updated schedule with their monthly billings. Findings and analysis reports will be required for buildings as completed, and a complete Energy Audit Summary Report will be required to be submitted with the provider?s final billing. Conducting energy audits of the nine governmental buildings will disclose building inefficiencies to prioritize and address, resulting in reduced energy consumption and expense. These savings will allow Tribal resources to be reallocated to direct services, which will benefit Tribal members and families.

  14. The Kootenai Tribe's Kootenai River Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Kootenai Tribe's Kootenai River Ecosystem Restoration Project 1994-2012 Project # 199404900 PURPOSE: TO ADDRESS FISHERIES RELATED PROBLEMS AT AN ECOSYSTEM LEVEL AND PROVIDE RESTORATION SOLUTIONS Kootenai River OBJ-2: Restore Ecosystem Productivity OBJ-3: Restore Ecosystem Productivity to Kootenay Lake

  15. Sault Tribe Wind Energy Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toni Osterhout; Global Energy Concepts

    2005-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sault Tribe conducted a feasibility study on tribal lands in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to determine the technical and economic feasibility of both small and large-scale wind power development on tribal lands. The study included a wind resource assessment, transmission system analysis, engineering and regulatory analyzes and assessments.

  16. Northeast Oregon Hatchery Spring Chinook Master Plan, Technical Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashe, Becky L.; Concannon, Kathleen; Johnson, David B.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spring chinook salmon populations in the Imnaha and Grande Ronde rivers are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and are at high risk of extirpation. The Nez Perce Tribe, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, are co-managers of conservation/restoration programs for Imnaha and Grande Ronde spring chinook salmon that use hatchery supplementation and conventional and captive broodstock techniques. The immediate goal of these programs is to prevent extirpation and provide the potential for restoration once factors limiting production are addressed. These programs redirect production occurring under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) from mitigation to conservation and restoration. Both the Imnaha and Grande Ronde conservation/restoration programs are described in ESA Section 10 permit applications and the co-managers refer to the fish production from these programs as the Currently Permitted Program (CPP). Recently, co-managers have determined that it is impossible to produce the CPP at Lookingglass Hatchery, the LSRCP facility intended for production, and that without additional facilities, production must be cut from these conservation programs. Development of new facilities for these programs through the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program is considered a new production initiative by the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) and requires a master plan. The master plan provides the NPPC, program proponents and others with the information they need to make sound decisions about whether the proposed facilities to restore salmon populations should move forward to design. This master plan describes alternatives considered to meet the facility needs of the CPP so the conservation program can be fully implemented. Co-managers considered three alternatives: modify Lookingglass Hatchery; use existing facilities elsewhere in the Basin; and use new facilities in conjunct ion with a modified Lookingglass Hatchery. Each alternative was evaluated based on criteria developed for rearing fish for a conservation program. After this review, the Nez Perce Tribe determined the only alternative that meets the needs of the program is the alternative to use new facilities in conjunction with a modified Lookingglass Hatchery. This is the Proposed Alternative. The Proposed Alternative would require: Construction of a new incubation and rearing facility in the Imnaha River and modifications of the existing Gumboot facility to accommodate the Imnaha component of the Lookingglass Hatchery production; Construction of a new incubation and rearing facility in the Lostine River to accommodate the Lostine component of the Lookingglass Hatchery production; and Modifications at Lookingglass Hatchery to accommodate the Upper Grande Ronde and Catherine Creek components of the Lookingglass Hatchery production. After an extensive screening process of potential sites, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes the Marks Ranch site on the Imnaha River and the Lundquist site on the Lostine River for new facilities. Conceptual design and cost estimates of the proposed facilities are contained in this master plan. The proposed facilities on the Imnaha and Lostine rivers would be managed in conjunction with the existing adult collection and juvenile acclimation/release facilities. Because this master plan has evolved into an endeavor undertaken primarily by the Nez Perce Tribe, the focus of the document is on actions within the Imnaha and Lostine watersheds where the Nez Perce Tribe have specific co-management responsibilities. Nevertheless, modifications at Lookingglass Hatchery could make it possible to provide a quality rearing environment for the remainder of the CPP. The Nez Perce Tribe will assist co-managers in further evaluating facility needs and providing other components of the NPPC master planning process to develop a solution for the entire CPP. Although the fish production for the conservation programs is already authorized and not at issue in this master pla

  17. The PERC{trademark} process: Existing and potential applications for induction coupled plasma technology in hazardous and radioactive waste treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blutke, A.S.; Vavruska, J.S.; Serino, J.F. [Plasma Technology, Inc., Santa Fe, NM (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma Technology, Inc. (PTI), a Santa Fe, New Mexico corporation has developed the Plasma Energy Recycle and Conversion (PERC){trademark} treatment process as a safe and environmentally clean alternative to conventional thermal destruction technologies. The PERC{trademark} treatment process uses as its heat source an advanced Induction Coupled Plasma (ICP) torch connected to a reaction chamber system with an additional emission control system. For example, organic-based gas, liquid, slurry, and/or solid waste streams can be converted into usable or even salable products while residual emissions are reduced to an absolute minimum. In applications for treatment of hazardous and radioactive waste streams, the PERC system could be used for destruction of the hazardous organic constituents and/or significant waste volume reduction while capturing the radioactive fraction in a non-leachable form. Like Direct Current (DC) and Alternating Current (AC) arc plasma systems, ICP torches offer sufficient energy to decompose, melt and/or vitrify any waste stream. The decision for an arc plasma or an IC plasma system has to be made on a case by case evaluation and is highly dependent on the specific waste stream`s form and composition. Induction coupled plasma technology offers one simple, but significant difference compared to DC or AC arc plasma systems: the ICP torch is electrodeless. To date, enormous research effort has been spent to improve the lifetime of electrodes and the effectiveness of related cooling systems. Arc plasma systems are established in research laboratories worldwide and are approaching a broad use in commercial applications. ICP technology has been improved relatively recently, but nowadays offers complete new and beneficial approaches in the field of waste conversion and treatment.

  18. 27th European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, Frankfurt, Germany, 24-28 September 2012, 2AO.1.5 IMPACT OF THE REAR SURFACE ROUGHNESS ON INDUSTRIAL-TYPE PERC SOLAR CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -generation industrial solar cells as stated in the International Technology Roadmap [3]. An industrial PERC process flow27th European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, Frankfurt, Germany, 24-28 September 2012, 2AO.1.5 IMPACT OF THE REAR SURFACE ROUGHNESS ON INDUSTRIAL-TYPE PERC SOLAR CELLS C.Kranz1 , S. Wyczanowski1 , S

  19. BUILDING TRIBAL CAPABILITIES IN ENERGY RESOURCE TRIBES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mary Lopez

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CERT Tribal Internship Program is part of the education and training opportunities provided by CERT to accelerate the development of American Indian technical professionals available to serve Tribes and expand the pool of these professionals. Tribes are severely impacted by the inadequate number of Indian professionals available to serve and facilitate Tribal participation and support of the energy future of Tribes,and subsequently the energy future of the nation. By providing interns with hands-on work experience in their field of study two goals are accomplished: (1) the intern is provided opportunities for professional enhancement; and (2) The pool of Indian professionals available to meet the needs of Tribal government and Tribal communities in general is increased. As of January 17, 2003, Lance M Wyatt successfully completed his internship with the Interagency Working Group on Environmental Justice on the Task Force that specifically focuses their work on Tribal nations. While working as an intern with the National Transportation Program, Albuquerque operations, Jacqueline Agnew received an offer to work for the Alaska Native Health Board in Anchorage, Alaska. This was an opportunity that Ms. Agnew did not feel she could afford to forego and she left her internship position in February 2003. At present, CERT is in the process of finding another qualified individual to replace the internship position vacated by Ms. Agnew. Mr. Wyatt's and Ms. Agnew's final comments are given.

  20. Comparative cytotaxonomy in the tribe Bovini studied by banding techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rich, Donna Carol

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Committee: Dr. James E. Womack Chromosomes of eight species of the tribe Bovini were studied by G ? banding, C ? banding and silver staining techniques. The results of this comparative cytogenetic study support the theory that Robertsonian fusion... in the tribe Bovini whose species appear to differ by a series of centromeric fusions. The phylogenetic tree derived from the cytogenetic data of this study is not consistent with morphological and behavioral trees previously described for the tribe Bovini...

  1. ICEIWG Participating Tribes | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov.Energy02.pdf7 OPAM Flash2011-37EnergySubmit ait's LEDParticipating Tribes

  2. Shoshone-Bannock Tribes | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium Transfer toSensor Technologies for aShoshone-Bannock Tribes

  3. FACEBOOK GAMES: THE POINT WHERE TRIBES AND CASUAL GAMES MEET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    FACEBOOK GAMES: THE POINT WHERE TRIBES AND CASUAL GAMES MEET Di Loreto Ines Universit degli Studi in Facebook. Our assumption is that the success of games in the Facebook context is linked to the blending and will then describe some practical examples from the Facebook context. KEYWORDS Social games, casual games, tribes

  4. Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe then used data collected from the District's stream assessment and inventory, utilizing the Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP), to determine treatment necessary to bring 90% of reaches ranked Poor or Fair through the SVAP up to good or excellent. In 10 year's time, all reaches that were previously evaluated with SVAP will be reevaluated to determine progress and to adapt methods for continued success. Over 400 miles of stream need treatment in order to meet identified restoration goals. Treatments include practices which result in riparian habitat improvements, nutrient reductions, channel condition improvements, fish habitat improvements, invasive species control, water withdrawal reductions, improved hydrologic alterations, upland sediment reductions, and passage barrier removal. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management Watershed Division (Tribe) developed this document to guide restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed for the period of 2008-2018. This plan was created to demonstrate the ongoing need and potential for anadromous fish habitat restoration within the watershed and to ensure continued implementation of restoration actions and activities. It was developed not only to guide the District and the Tribe, but also to encourage cooperation among all stakeholders, including landowners, government agencies, private organizations, tribal governments, and elected officials. Through sharing information, skills, and resources in an active, cooperative relationships, all concerned parties will have the opportunity to join together to strengthen and maintain a sustainable natural resource base for present and future generations within the watershed. The primary goal of the strategy is to address aquatic habitat restoration needs on a watershed level for resident and anadromous fish species, promoting quality habitat within a self-sustaining watershed. Seven objectives have been developed to support this goal: (1) Identify factors limiting quality

  5. San Carlos Apache Tribe - Energy Organizational Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, James; Albert, Steve

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The San Carlos Apache Tribe (SCAT) was awarded $164,000 in late-2011 by the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Tribal Energy Program's "First Steps Toward Developing Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency on Tribal Lands" Grant Program. This grant funded: ? The analysis and selection of preferred form(s) of tribal energy organization (this Energy Organization Analysis, hereinafter referred to as "EOA"). ? Start-up staffing and other costs associated with the Phase 1 SCAT energy organization. ? An intern program. ? Staff training. ? Tribal outreach and workshops regarding the new organization and SCAT energy programs and projects, including two annual tribal energy summits (2011 and 2012). This report documents the analysis and selection of preferred form(s) of a tribal energy organization.

  6. Washoe Tribe Alternative Energy Feasibility Study Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Jennifer [Washoe Tribe of NV and CA

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California was awarded funding to complete the Washoe Tribe Alternative Energy Feasibility Study project. The main goal of the project was to complete an alternative energy feasibility study. This study was completed to evaluate the potential for development of a variety of renewable energy projects and to conduct an alternative energy feasibility study that determines which alternative energy resources have the greatest economic opportunity for the Tribe, while respecting cultural and environmental values (Baker-Tilly, 2014). The study concluded that distributed generation solar projects are the best option for renewable energy development and asset ownership for the Washoe Tribe. Concentrating solar projects, utility scale wind projects, geothermal, and biomass resource projects were also evaluated during the study and it was determined that these alternatives would not be feasible at this time.

  7. Microsoft Word - ProvisionsFundsColvilleConfederatedTribesPurchaseLoup...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Confederated Tribes for purchase of the Loup Loup Creek and Aeneas Creek properties. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2008-104-00 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10...

  8. ACHP - Consultation with Indian Tribes in the Section 106 Review...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ACHP - Consultation with Indian Tribes in the Section 106 Review Process: a Handbook Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory...

  9. CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report: D`Lisa Penney, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this intern`s project was to: education the Nez Perce people of the Hanford situation; begin researching into past and present health effects from the Hanford site; and inform and educate the Nez Perce people of the Hanford site and past exposures. The specific objectives were to begin researching the history of Nez Perce people and Hanford; create an understanding for the importance of this research; define the radiation and risks and how they occur; inform the Nez Perce people of the issue; and write the paper so it is easy to understand. This intern report contains a copy of the final paper written for the Nez Perce people. Because the dose reconstruction for Hanford is not complete, the health effects section is informative, but not definitive.

  10. American Indian tribes and electric industry restructuring: Issues and opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howarth, D. [Morse, Richard, and Weisenmiller, and Associates Inc., Oakland, CA (United States); Busch, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Starrs, T. [Kelso, Starrs, and Associates LLC, Vashon, WA (United States)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US electric utility industry is undergoing a period of fundamental change that has significant implications for Native American tribes. Although many details remain to be determined, the future electric power industry will be very different from that of the present. It is anticipated that the new competitive electric industry will be more efficient, which some believe will benefit all participants by lowering electricity costs. Recent developments in the industry, however, indicate that the restructuring process will likely benefit some parties at the expense of others. Given the historical experience and current situation of Native American tribes in the US, there is good reason to pay attention to electric industry changes to ensure that the situation of tribes is improved and not worsened as a result of electric restructuring. This paper provides a review of electricity restructuring in the US and identifies ways in which tribes may be affected and how tribes may seek to protect and serve their interests. Chapter 2 describes the current status of energy production and service on reservations. Chapter 3 provides an overview of the evolution of the electric industry to its present form and introduces the regulatory and structural changes presently taking place. Chapter 4 provides a more detailed discussion of changes in the US electric industry with a specific focus on the implications of these changes for tribes. Chapter 5 presents a summary of the conclusions reached in this paper.

  11. A Step Towards Conservation for Interior Alaska Tribes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimberly Carlo

    2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This project includes a consortium of tribes. The tribes include Hughes (representing the consortium) Birch Creek, Huslia, and Allakaket. The project proposed by Interior Regional Housing Authority (IRHA) on behalf of the villages of Hughes, Birch Creek, Huslia and Allakaket is to develop an energy conservation program relevant to each specific community, educate tribe members and provide the tools to implement the conservation plan. The program seeks to achieve both energy savings and provide optimum energy requirements to support each tribe's mission. The energy management program will be a comprehensive program that considers all avenues for achieving energy savings, from replacing obsolete equipment, to the design and construction of energy conservation measures, the implementation of energy saving operation and maintenance procedures, the utilization of a community-wide building energy management system, and a commitment to educating the tribes on how to decrease energy consumption. With the implementation of this program and the development of an Energy Management Plan, these communities can then work to reduce the high cost of living in rural Alaska.

  12. USDA Agricultural Conservation Easement Program Webinar for Tribes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the American Indian Higher Education Consortium, this webinar will cover details on the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) new Agricultural Conservation Easement Program (ACEP) established in the 2014 Farm Bill. It will specifically discuss the implications of ACEP for Tribes and tribal owners.

  13. Solar Feasibility Study May 2013 - San Carlos Apache Tribe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, Jim [Parametrix] [Parametrix; Duncan, Ken [San Carlos Apache Tribe] [San Carlos Apache Tribe; Albert, Steve [Parametrix] [Parametrix

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The San Carlos Apache Tribe (Tribe) in the interests of strengthening tribal sovereignty, becoming more energy self-sufficient, and providing improved services and economic opportunities to tribal members and San Carlos Apache Reservation (Reservation) residents and businesses, has explored a variety of options for renewable energy development. The development of renewable energy technologies and generation is consistent with the Tribes 2011 Strategic Plan. This Study assessed the possibilities for both commercial-scale and community-scale solar development within the southwestern portions of the Reservation around the communities of San Carlos, Peridot, and Cutter, and in the southeastern Reservation around the community of Bylas. Based on the lack of any commercial-scale electric power transmission between the Reservation and the regional transmission grid, Phase 2 of this Study greatly expanded consideration of community-scale options. Three smaller sites (Point of Pines, Dudleyville/Winkleman, and Seneca Lake) were also evaluated for community-scale solar potential. Three building complexes were identified within the Reservation where the development of site-specific facility-scale solar power would be the most beneficial and cost-effective: Apache Gold Casino/Resort, Tribal College/Skill Center, and the Dudleyville (Winkleman) Casino.

  14. Fossil Energy Oil and Natural Gas Capabilities for Tribes Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attend this webinar to hear from U.S. Department of Energy Fossil Energy Program staff about the Programs oil and gas portfolio, technologies, and research capabilities that may be of interest to Tribes and tribal energy resource development organizations.

  15. The tribe Acanthocinini (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) of America north of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dillon, Lawrence S.

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , p. 6,9; Syst. Ceramb., l861j., p. 3!?!?. Lacordaire, Gen. Col., IX, 1872, p. 7!?9, 762. Leng and Hamilton, Trans. Amer. Ent. Soc., XXIII, 1896, p. ll?. Lagochirus Erichson. LeConte, Smiths. Misc. Coll., XI (265) 1873, p. 337. Horn, Trans. Amer..., ....................... ....... .......................It Characteristics of the Tribe................ .............. .....? Morphological Features.......... ........................... . . . . 6 Phraseology.................................................... 9 Summary...

  16. SEC. 203. TRIBAL PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM. (a) DEFINITION OF INDIAN TRIBE.--In this section, the term ``Indian tribe'' has the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ``Indian tribe'' has the meaning given the term in section 4 of the Indian Self-Determination and Education and the heads of other Federal agencies, the Secretary may study and determine the feasibility of carrying out) are located primarily within Indian country (as defined in section 1151 of title 18, United States Code

  17. Ute Mountain Ute Tribe Community-Scale Solar Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, Jim [Parametrix; Knight, Tawnie [Ute Mountain Ute Tribe

    2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Parametrix Inc. conducted a feasibility study for the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe to determine whether or not a community-scale solar farm would be feasible for the community. The important part of the study was to find where the best fit for the solar farm could be. In the end, a 3MW community-scale solar farm was found best fit with the location of two hayfield sites.

  18. Interior Department Awards $3.7 Million to 13 Tribes for Renewable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Economic Development (IEED) has awarded 3.7 million to 13 tribes that are developing renewable energy resources for their communities. IEED selected six geothermal, four...

  19. Oct. 29 Webinar to Spotlight DOE Energy Programs for Tribes and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tribal Energy Program, and State Energy Program to help Tribes tap into their abundant renewable energy resources. Webinar attendees will also hear about Montana's Confederated...

  20. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix D: Exhibits.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Columbia River and its tributaries are the primary water system in the Pacific Northwest, draining some 219,000 square miles in seven states and another 39,500 square miles in British Columbia. Beginning in the 1930`s, the Columbia River has been significantly modified by construction of 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries, along with dozens of non-Federal projects. Construction and subsequent operation of these water development projects have contributed to eight primary uses of the river system, including navigation, flood control, irrigation, electric power generation, fish migration, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation, and water supply and quality considerations. Increasing stress on the water development of the Columbia River and its tributaries has led primary Federal agencies to undertake intensive analysis and evaluation of the operation of these projects. These agencies are the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation, who operate the large Federal dams on the river, and the Bonneville Power Administration who sells the power generated at the dams. This review, termed the System Operation Review (SOR), has as its ultimate goal to define a strategy for future operation of the major Columbia River projects which effectively considers the needs of all river uses. This volume, Appendix D: Cultural resources appendix, Technical imput includes the following: Development of geomorphology based framework for cultural resources management, Dworshak Reservoir, Idaho; Impact profiles for SOR reservoirs; comments from the following Native American tribes: Burns Paiute Tribe; Coville Confederated Tribes; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation; Confederated Tribes and bands of the Yakama Indian Nation (comments); Nez Perce Tribe; Coeur D`Alene Tribe; Spokane Tribe of Indians; The confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

  1. Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin Energy Optimization Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troge, Michael [Project Manager

    2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Oneida Nation is located in Northeast Wisconsin. The reservation is approximately 96 square miles (8 miles x 12 miles), or 65,000 acres. The greater Green Bay area is east and adjacent to the reservation. A county line roughly splits the reservation in half; the west half is in Outagamie County and the east half is in Brown County. Land use is predominantly agriculture on the west 2/3 and suburban on the east 1/3 of the reservation. Nearly 5,000 tribally enrolled members live in the reservation with a total population of about 21,000. Tribal ownership is scattered across the reservation and is about 23,000 acres. Currently, the Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin (OTIW) community members and facilities receive the vast majority of electrical and natural gas services from two of the largest investor-owned utilities in the state, WE Energies and Wisconsin Public Service. All urban and suburban buildings have access to natural gas. About 15% of the population and five Tribal facilities are in rural locations and therefore use propane as a primary heating fuel. Wood and oil are also used as primary or supplemental heat sources for a small percent of the population. Very few renewable energy systems, used to generate electricity and heat, have been installed on the Oneida Reservation. This project was an effort to develop a reasonable renewable energy portfolio that will help Oneida to provide a leadership role in developing a clean energy economy. The Energy Optimization Model (EOM) is an exploration of energy opportunities available to the Tribe and it is intended to provide a decision framework to allow the Tribe to make the wisest choices in energy investment with an organizational desire to establish a renewable portfolio standard (RPS).

  2. United States Government Department of Energy Bonneville Power...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and in Nez Perce County in Idaho (see map). The fiber would be strung on seven transmission lines and run through five substations. Section 1 would extend from Franklin...

  3. Clearwater Subbasin Inventory November 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draft Clearwater Subbasin Inventory November 2003 Compiled by Ecovista Contracted by Nez Perce Subbasin Inventory i November 2003 PREAMBLE In early 2001, the excitement began. Over 147,000 adult spring Inventory 2 November 2003 Table of Contents 1 Introduction

  4. Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet B O N N E V I L L E P O W E

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Red River Meadow conservation easement will protect fish, elk habitat In the heart of the Nez Perce National Forest in north central Idaho, prime meadow habitat serves as early...

  5. Tribes and the New Energy Economy Conference | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartmentTest forTechnologiesTribal Utility Formation ForumRegion |Tribes

  6. HollyMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Native resident fish persisted after

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HollyMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Native resident fish persistedMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Surveys document increase in walleye and decrease in native fish abundance Native fish populations affected Sanpoil: wildkokanee and redband trout populations depressed Columbia

  7. Eleven Tribes Jump START Clean Energy Projects, Summer 2012 (Newsletter)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This newsletter describes key activities of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs for Summer 2012. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE-IE) has selected 11 Tribes - five in Alaska and six in the contiguous United States - to receive on-the-ground technical support for community-based energy efficiency and renewable energy projects as part of DOE-IE's Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program. START finalists were selected based on the clarity of their requests for technical assistance and the ability of START to successfully work with their projects or community. Technical experts from DOE and its National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will work directly with community-based project teams to analyze local energy issues and assist the Tribes in moving their projects forward. In Alaska, the effort will be bolstered by DOE-IE's partnership with the Denali Commission, which will provide additional assistance and expertise, as well as funding to fuel the Alaska START initiative.

  8. South Fork Salmon River Watershed Restoration, 2008-2009 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaney, Mark D. [Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The watershed restoration work elements within the project area, the South Fork Salmon River Watershed, follow the watershed restoration approach adopted by the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management (DFRM) - Watershed Division. The vision of the Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division focuses on protecting, restoring, and enhancing watersheds and treaty resources within the ceded territory of the Nez Perce Tribe under the Treaty of 1855 with the United States Federal Government. The program uses a holistic approach, which encompasses entire watersheds, ridge top to ridge top, emphasizing all cultural aspects and strategies that rely on natural fish production and healthy river ecosystems. The Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division strives towards maximizing historic ecosystem productivity and health for the restoration of anadromous and resident fish populations and the habitat on which all depend on for future generations Originally, this project was funded to create a step/pool stream channel that was appropriate to restore fish passage where the 'Glory Hole Cascade' is currently located at the Stibnite Mine. Due to unforeseen circumstances at the time, the project is unable to move forward as planned and a request for a change in scope of the project and an expansion of the geographic area in which to complete project work was submitted. No additional funds were being requested. The ultimate goal of this project is to work with the holistic, ridge top to ridge top approach to protect and restore the ecological and biological functions of the South Fork Salmon River Watershed to assist in the recovery of threatened and endangered anadromous and resident fish species. FY 2008 Work Elements included two aquatic organism passage (AOP) projects to restore habitat connectivity to two fish-bearing tributaries to the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, Salt and Profile Creeks. The Work Elements also included road survey and assessment activities that move toward road decommissioning to reduce sediment delivery to spawning gravels and rearing habitats by reducing sedimentation from road related, man-made sources. For FY08, the project included the design and implementation of two fish barrier replacement structures mentioned above, the Salt and Profile Creek Bridges. These work elements were to be implemented on Valley County easements within the Payette National Forest. The existing culverts are full or partial barriers to most aquatic life species and all juvenile anadromous and resident fish species. Implementation will reconnect 9.34 miles of habitat, and provide natural stream channels to facilitate complete passage for all aquatic life forms. All designs were completed and a construction subcontract was awarded to construct free span, pre-cast concrete bridges. For 2008, the project statement of work also included all the necessary work elements to manage, coordinate, plan, and develop continuing strategies for restoration and protection activities.

  9. Dworshak Dam Impact Assessment and Fishery Investigation and Trout, Bass and Forage Species: Combined Project Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maiolie, Melo; Statler, David P.; Elam, Steve

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) entered into separate intergovernmental agreements with the Bonneville Power Administration in a cooperative four-year effort to study impacts of Dworshak Dam operation on resident fisheries. The NPT Department of Fisheries Management focused on rainbow trout, smallmouth bass and forage fish. The IDFG's segment of the project was to document kokanee population dynamics, relate it to the changing nutrient status of the reservoir, evaluate kokanee losses through Dworshak Dam, and make kokanee management recommendations. This final report includes findings for 1990 and 1991 and relates these data to information previously presented in annual reports for 1987, 1988 and 1989.

  10. Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S.; Arnsberg, B.D.; Rocklage, S.J.; Groves, P.A.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Redd counts are routinely used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2005; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2005 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and Idaho Power Company.

  11. Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Arnsberg, B.D. [Nez Perce Tribe; Groves, P.A. [Idaho Power Company

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Redd counts are routinely used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2007; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches counted upstream of Lower Granite Dam into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2007 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and Idaho Power Company.

  12. Exploration 3-D Seismic Field Test/Native Tribes Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Herbert B.; Chen, K.C.; Guo, Genliang; Johnson, W.I.; Reeves,T.K.; Sharma,Bijon

    1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    To determine current acquisition procedures and costs and to further the goals of the President's Initiative for Native Tribes, a seismic-survey project is to be conducted on Osage tribal lands. The goals of the program are to demonstrate the capabilities, costs, and effectiveness of 3-D seismic work in a small-operator setting and to determine the economics of such a survey. For these purposes, typical small-scale independent-operator practices are being followed and a shallow target chose in an area with a high concentration of independent operators. The results will be analyzed in detail to determine if there are improvements and/or innovations which can be easily introduced in field-acquisition procedures, in processing, or in data manipulation and interpretation to further reduce operating costs and to make the system still more active to the small-scale operator.

  13. Working in Indian Country: Building Successful Business Relationships with American Indian Tribes Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sponsored by the Association on American Indian Affairs, this one-day conference is for federal, state, and local government officials and business leaders who have a need to develop working relationships with tribes and organizations.

  14. A Phylogenetic Analysis of the Bee Tribe Epeolini, with a Review of the Genus Triepeolus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rightmyer, Molly Greer

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A generic-level cladistic analysis of the cleptoparasitic bee tribe Epeolini (Apinae: Nomadinae) is presented. One hundred and two characters of adult external morphology are identified and coded for 32 species representing ...

  15. Leading the Charge: Native Leaders Give Tribes a Voice on White...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Vision of the Future? That each Tribe can move toward energy reduction andor energy production that respects its own traditions. -Chwmn. Karen Diver, Fond du Lac Band of Lake...

  16. Washoe Tribe Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Jennifer [Washoe Tribe of NV and Ca

    2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California was awarded funding from the Department of Energy to complete the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project. The main goal of the project was to enhance the capacity of the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium (NITEC) to effectively assist tribes within Nevada to technically manage tribal energy resources and implement tribal energy projects.

  17. Chinook Salmon Adult Abundance Monitoring; Hydroacoustic Assessment of Chinook Salmon Escapement to the Secesh River, Idaho, 2002-2004 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Mueller, R.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate determination of adult salmon spawner abundance is key to the assessment of recovery actions for wild Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Onchorynchus tshawytscha), a species listed as 'threatened' under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). As part of the Bonneville Power Administration Fish and Wildlife Program, the Nez Perce Tribe operates an experimental project in the South Fork of the Salmon River subbasin. The project has involved noninvasive monitoring of Chinook salmon escapement on the Secesh River between 1997 and 2000 and on Lake Creek since 1998. The overall goal of this project is to accurately estimate adult Chinook salmon spawning escapement numbers to the Secesh River and Lake Creek. Using time-lapse underwater video technology in conjunction with their fish counting stations, Nez Perce researchers have successfully collected information on adult Chinook salmon spawner abundance, run timing, and fish-per-redd numbers on Lake Creek since 1998. However, the larger stream environment in the Secesh River prevented successful implementation of the underwater video technique to enumerate adult Chinook salmon abundance. High stream discharge and debris loads in the Secesh caused failure of the temporary fish counting station, preventing coverage of the early migrating portion of the spawning run. Accurate adult abundance information could not be obtained on the Secesh with the underwater video method. Consequently, the Nez Perce Tribe now is evaluating advanced technologies and methodologies for measuring adult Chinook salmon abundance in the Secesh River. In 2003, the use of an acoustic camera for assessing spawner escapement was examined. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in a collaborative arrangement with the Nez Perce Tribe, provided the technical expertise to implement the acoustic camera component of the counting station on the Secesh River. This report documents the first year of a proposed three-year study to determine the efficacy of using an acoustic camera to count adult migrant Chinook salmon as they make their way to the spawning grounds on the Secesh River and Lake Creek. A phased approach to applying the acoustic camera was proposed, starting with testing and evaluation in spring 2003, followed by a full implementation in 2004 and 2005. The goal of this effort is to better assess the early run components when water clarity and night visibility preclude the use of optical techniques. A single acoustic camera was used to test the technology for enumerating adult salmon passage at the Secesh River. The acoustic camera was deployed on the Secesh at a site engineered with an artificial substrate to control the river bottom morphometry and the passage channel. The primary goal of the analysis for this first year of deployment was to validate counts of migrant salmon. The validation plan involved covering the area with optical video cameras so that both optical and acoustic camera images of the same viewing region could be acquired simultaneously. A secondary test was contrived after the fish passage was complete using a controlled setting at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington, in which we tested the detectability as a function of turbidity levels. Optical and acoustic camera multiplexed video recordings of adult Chinook salmon were made at the Secesh River fish counting station from August 20 through August 29, 2003. The acoustic camera performed as well as or better than the optical camera at detecting adult Chinook salmon over the 10-day test period. However, the acoustic camera was not perfect; the data reflected adult Chinook salmon detections made by the optical camera that were missed by the acoustic camera. The conditions for counting using the optical camera were near ideal, with shallow clear water and good light penetration. The relative performance of the acoustic camera is expected to be even better than the optical camera in early spring when water clarity and light penetration are limited. Results of the laboratory tests at the Pacific North

  18. Renewable Energy Development in Indian Country: A Handbook for Tribes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacCourt, D. C.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This handbook is designed to be an accessible reference for those who are new to tribal energy project development or seek a refresher on key development issues as they navigate the project development process. It builds upon the wealth of feedback and experiences shared by tribal and other participants in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's tribal energy training sessions to provide tribal leaders, tribal economic and energy enterprises, and those supporting them with a general overview of the renewable energy project development process as well as detailed guidance on the following: how to structure a renewable energy project transaction to protect tribal interests, with an emphasis on joint project development efforts undertaken with nontribal parties; key energy development agreements, including power sale agreements, transmission and interconnection agreements, and land leases; and ways tribes can finance renewable energy projects, including the sources of funding or financing that may be available, the types of investors that may be available, and federal tax incentives for renewable energy projects.

  19. Mescalero Apache Tribe Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS). Phase 1 feasibility study report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peso, F.

    1992-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended, authorizes the siting, construction and operation of a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. The MRS is intended to be used for the temporary storage of spent nuclear fuel from the nation`s nuclear power plants beginning as early as 1998. Pursuant to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the Office of the Nuclear Waste Negotiator was created. On October 7, 1991, the Nuclear Waste Negotiator invited the governors of states and the Presidents of Indian tribes to apply for government grants in order to conduct a study to assess under what conditions, if any, they might consider hosting an MRS facility. Pursuant to this invitation, on October 11, 1991 the Mescalero Apache Indian Tribe of Mescalero, NM applied for a grant to conduct a phased, preliminary study of the safety, technical, political, environmental, social and economic feasibility of hosting an MRS. The preliminary study included: (1) An investigative education process to facilitate the Tribe`s comprehensive understanding of the safety, environmental, technical, social, political, and economic aspects of hosting an MRS, and; (2) The development of an extensive program that is enabling the Tribe, in collaboration with the Negotiator, to reach an informed and carefully researched decision regarding the conditions, (if any), under which further pursuit of the MRS would be considered. The Phase 1 grant application enabled the Tribe to begin the initial activities necessary to determine whether further consideration is warranted for hosting the MRS facility. The Tribe intends to pursue continued study of the MRS in order to meet the following objectives: (1) Continuing the education process towards a comprehensive understanding of the safety, environmental, technical, social and economic aspects of the MRS; (2) Conducting an effective public participation and information program; (3) Participating in MRS meetings.

  20. Tribal Wind Assessment by the Eastern Shoshone Tribe of the Wind River Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pete, Belvin; Perry, Jeremy W.; Stump, Raphaella Q.

    2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tribes, through its consultant and advisor, Distributed Generation Systems (Disgen) -Native American Program and Resources Division, of Lakewood CO, assessed and qualified, from a resource and economic perspective, a wind energy generation facility on tribal lands. The goal of this feasibility project is to provide wind monitoring and to engage in preproject planning activities designed to provide a preliminary evaluation of the technical, economic, social and environmental feasibility of developing a sustainable, integrated wind energy plan for the Eastern Shoshone and the Northern Arapahoe Tribes, who resides on the Wind River Indian Reservation. The specific deliverables of the feasibility study are: 1) Assessments of the wind resources on the Wind River Indian Reservation 2) Assessments of the potential environmental impacts of renewable development 3) Assessments of the transmission capacity and capability of a renewable energy project 4) Established an economic models for tribal considerations 5) Define economic, cultural and societal impacts on the Tribe

  1. Human Capacity Building in Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy System Maintenance for the Yurok Tribe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, R. A.' Zoellick, J J.

    2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    From July 2005 to July 2007, the Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in the implementation of a program designed to build the Tribes own capacity to improve energy efficiency and maintain and repair renewable energy systems in Tribal homes on the Yurok Reservation. Funding for this effort was provided by the U.S. Department of Energys Tribal Program under First Steps grant award #DE-FG36-05GO15166. The programs centerpiece was a house-by-house needs assessment, in which Tribal staff visited and conducted energy audits at over fifty homes. The visits included assessment of household energy efficiency and condition of existing renewable energy systems. Staff also provided energy education to residents, evaluated potential sites for new household renewable energy systems, and performed minor repairs as needed on renewable energy systems.

  2. Comprehensive Renewable Energy Feasibility Study for the Makah Indian Tribe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RobertLynette; John Wade; Larry Coupe

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to determine the technical feasibility, economic viability, and potential impacts of installing and operating a wind power station and/or small hydroelectric generation plants on the Makah reservation. The long-term objective is to supply all or a portion of Tribe's electricity from local, renewable energy sources in order to reduce costs, provide local employment, and reduce power outages. An additional objective was for the Tribe to gain an understanding of the requirements, costs, and benefits of developing and operating such plants on the reservation. The Makah Indian Reservation, with a total land area of forty-seven square miles, is located on the northwestern tip of the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State. Four major watersheds drain the main Reservation areas and the average rainfall is over one hundred inches per year. The reservation's west side borders the Pacific Ocean, but mostly consists of rugged mountainous terrain between 500 and 1,900 feet in elevation. Approximately 1,200 tribal members live on the Reservation and there is an additional non-Indian residential population of about 300. Electric power is provided by the Clallam County PUD. The annual usage on the reservation is approximately 16,700 mWh. Project Work Wind Energy--Two anemometer suites of equipment were installed on the reservation and operated for a more than a year. An off-site reference station was identified and used to project long-term wind resource characteristics at the two stations. Transmission resources were identified and analyzed. A preliminary financial analysis of a hypothetical wind power station was prepared and used to gauge the economic viability of installation of a multi-megawatt wind power station. Small Hydroelectric--Two potential sites for micro/small-hydro were identified by analysis of previous water resource studies, topographical maps, and conversations with knowledgeable Makah personnel. Field trips were conducted to collect preliminary site data. A report was prepared by Alaska Power & Telephone (Larry Coupe) including preliminary layouts, capacities, potential environmental issues, and projected costs. Findings and Conclusions Wind Energy The average wind resources measured at both sites were marginal, with annual average wind speeds of 13.6-14.0 mph at a 65-meter hub height, and wind shears of 0.08-0.13. Using GE 1.5 MW wind turbines with a hub height of 65 meters, yields a net capacity factor of approximately 0.19. The cost-of-energy for a commercial project is estimated at approximately 9.6 cents per kWh using current costs for capital and equipment prices. Economic viability for a commercial wind power station would require a subsidy of 40-50% of the project capital cost, loans provided at approximately 2% rate of interest, or a combination of grants and loans at substantially below market rates. Recommendations: Because the cost-of-energy from wind power is decreasing, and because there may be small pockets of higher winds on the reservation, our recommendation is to: (1) Leave one of the two anemometer towers, preferably the 50-meter southern unit MCC, in place and continue to collect data from this site. This site would serve as an excellent reference anemometer for the Olympic Peninsula, and, (2) If funds permit, relocate the northern tower (MCB) to a promising small site closer to the transmission line with the hope of finding a more energetic site that is easier to develop. Small Hydroelectric There are a very limited number of sites on the reservation that have potential for economical hydroelectric development, even in conjunction with water supply development. Two sites emerged as the most promising and were evaluated: (1) One utilizing four creeks draining the north side of the Cape Flattery peninsula (Cape Creeks), and (2) One on the Waatch River to the south of Neah Bay. The Cape Creeks site would be a combination water supply and 512 kW power generation facility and would cost a approximately $11,100,000. Annual power generation would be approximately 1,300,0

  3. Developing Clean Energy Projects on Tribal Lands: Data and Resources for Tribes (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a outreach brochure (booklet) for the DOE Office of Indian Energy summarizing the renewable energy technology potential on tribal lands. The booklet features tech potential maps for various technologies, information about the activities of DOE-IE, and resources for Tribes.

  4. Tribal Energy Program, Assisting Tribes to Realize Their Energy Visions (Brochure), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This 12-page brochure provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Tribal Energy Program and describes the financial, technical, and educational assistance it provides to help tribes develop their renewable energy resources and reduce their energy consumption.

  5. Video Highlights How Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe is Cutting Energy Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the help of a U.S. Department of Energy grant and in partnership with the Clallam County Public Utility District, the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe is saving money on their utility bills after installing ductless heat pumps in 42 tribal members homes.

  6. FY 2007 Progress Report for Upper Columbia United Tribes' Regional Coordination.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, D.R.

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of activities conducted over the fiscal year 2007 contract period to fulfill requirements to coordinate Upper Columbia United Tribes (UCUT) interests within the Columbia River Basin. This coordination was specific to the implementation of portions of the Integrated Fish and Wildlife Program within the purview of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council and Bonneville Power Administration.

  7. Former Tribal Energy Program Intern Guides Tribes Toward a More Sustainable Path

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Suzanne Singer is working at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as an Energy and Thermal Fluids Analyst where she has an ongoing project to produce Sankey diagrams to analyze energy data and life cycle flows on tribal lands. Applying the knowledge and insights she gained from her work at LLNL, her internship, and her science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education, Singer is educating Tribes on how to use their own resources and land to live a more sustainable lifestyle.

  8. Lower Brule Sioux Tribe Wind-Pump Storage Feasibility Study Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shawn A. LaRoche; Tracey LeBeau; Innovation Investments, LLC

    2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lower Brule Sioux Tribe is a federally recognized Indian tribe organized pursuant to the 1934 Wheeler-Howard Act (Indian Reorganization Act). The Lower Brule Sioux Indian Reservation lies along the west bank of Lake Francis Case and Lake Sharpe, which were created by the Fort Randall and Big Bend dams of the Missouri River pursuant to the Pick Sloan Act. The grid accessible at the Big Bend Dam facility operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is less than one mile of the wind farm contemplated by the Tribe in this response. The low-head hydroelectric turbines further being studied would be placed below the dam and would be turned by the water released from the dam itself. The riverbed at this place is within the exterior boundaries of the reservation. The low-head turbines in the tailrace would be evaluated to determine if enough renewable energy could be developed to pump water to a reservoir 500 feet above the river.

  9. MHK Projects/Colorado River Indian Tribes IRR DI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma: EnergyMAREC Jump34.3719°,Convent,Tribes IRR DI

  10. Umatilla Tribes to Grow Native Plants for Hanford | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015 -Helicopter AccidentSeptemberDepartmentUmatilla Tribes to Grow

  11. SBT 2012 Response to ISRP 2012-5 Page 1 Detailed responses to the latest ISRP review comments are provided in the Tribes Response to ISRP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SBT 2012 Response to ISRP 2012-5 Page 1 Detailed responses to the latest ISRP review comments are provided in the Tribes Response to ISRP 2012-5 Review Memorandum (00). The response and referenced-059-00 be subject to the Three-Step Review Process. The 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accord Agreement with the Tribes

  12. Wind Generation Feasibility Study for Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa (Meskwaki Nation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasley, Larry C. [Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    1.2 Overview The Meskwaki Nation will obtain an anemometer tower. Install the tower at the site that has been pre-qualified as the site most likely to produce maximum electric power from the wind. It will collect meteorological data from the towerâ??s sensors for a one year period, as required for due diligence to identify the site as appropriate for the installation of a wind turbine to provide electric power for the community. Have the collected data analyzed by a meteorologist and a professionally certified wind engineer to produce the reports of expected power generation at the site, for the specific wind turbine(s) under consideration for installation. 1.2.1 Goals of the Tribe The feasibility study reports, including technical and business analyses will be used to obtain contracts and financing required to develop and implement a wind turbine project on the Meskwaki Settlement. Our goal is to produce two (2) mega watts of power and to reduce the cost for electricity currently being paid by the Meskwaki Casino. 1.2.2 Project Objectives Meet the energy needs of the community with clean energy. Bring renewable energy to the settlement in a responsible, affordable manner. Maximize both the economic and the spiritual benefits to the tribe from energy independence. Integrate the Tribeâ??s energy policies with its economic development goals. Contribute to achieving the Tribeâ??s long-term goals of self-determination and sovereignty. 1.2.3 Project Location The precise location proposed for the tower is at the following coordinates: 92 Degrees, 38 Minutes, 46.008 Seconds West Longitude 41 Degrees, 59 Minutes, 45.311 Seconds North Latitude. A circle of radius 50.64 meters, enclosing and area of 1.98 acres in PLSS Township T83N, Range R15W, in Iowa. In relative directions, the site is 1,650 feet due west of the intersection of Highway 30 and 305th Street in Tama, Iowa, as approached from the direction of Toledo, Iowa. It is bounded on the north by Highway 30 and on the south by 305th Street, a street which runs along a meandering west-south-west heading from this intersection with Highway 30. In relation to Settlement landmarks, it is 300 meters west of the Meskwaki water tower found in front of the Meskwaki Public Works Department, and is due north of the athletic playing fields of the Meskwaki Settlement School. The accompanying maps (in the Site Resource Maps File) use a red pushpin marker to indicate the exact location, both in the overview frames and in the close-up frame. 1.2.4 Long Term Energy Vision The Meskwaki Tribe is committed to becoming energy self-sufficient, improving the economic condition of the tribe, and maintaining Tribal Values of closeness with Grandmother Earth. The details of the Tribeâ??s long-term vision continues to evolve. A long term vision exists of: 1) a successful assessment program; 2) a successful first wind turbine project reducing the Tribeâ??s cost of electricity; 3) creation of a Meskwaki Tribal Power Utility/Coop under the auspices of the new tribal Corporation, as we implement a master plan for economic and business development; 4), and opening the doors for additional wind turbines/renewable energy sources on the community. The additional turbines could lead directly to energy self-sufficiency, or might be the one leg of a multi-leg approach using multiple forms of renewable energy to achieve self-sufficiency. We envision current and future assessment projects providing the data needed to qualify enough renewable energy projects to provide complete coverage for the entire Meskwaki Settlement, including meeting future economic development projectsâ?? energy needs. While choosing not to engage in excessive optimism, we can imagine that in the future the Iowa rate-setting bodies will mandate that grid operators pay fair rates (tariffs) to renewable suppliers. We will be ready to expand renewable production of electricity for export, when that time comes. The final report includes the Wind

  13. Peru: Illegal Mahogany Logging Continues in Reserve for Uncontacted Tribes Widespread illegal mahogany logging continues inside Peru's Muruanahua Territorial Reserve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peru: Illegal Mahogany Logging Continues in Reserve for Uncontacted Tribes Widespread illegal, indicating the settlement continues to be used as a transport center for mahogany illegally removed from and Park, loggers cut the trees into large boards with chainsaws. Because chainsawing mahogany is illegal

  14. Sharp-tailed Grouse Restoration; Colville Tribes Restore Habitat for Sharp-tailed Grouse, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, Richard

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Columbian Sharp-Tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus) (CSTG) are an important traditional and cultural species to the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STOI), and other Tribes in the Region. They were once the most abundant upland bird in the Region. Currently, the largest remaining population in Washington State occurs on the CCT Reservation in Okanogan County. Increasing agricultural practices and other land uses has contributed to the decline of sharp-tail habitat and populations putting this species at risk. The decline of this species is not new (Yokum, 1952, Buss and Dziedzic, 1955, Zeigler, 1979, Meints 1991, and Crawford and Snyder 1994). The Tribes (CCT and STOI) are determined to protect, enhance and restore habitat for this species continued existence. When Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Hydro-projects were constructed, inundated habitat used by this species was lost forever adding to overall decline. To compensate and prevent further habitat loss, the CCT proposed a project with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funding to address this species and their habitat requirements. The projects main focus is to address habitat utilized by the current CSTG population and determine ways to protect, restore, and enhance habitats for the conservation of this species over time. The project went through the NPPC Review Process and was funded through FY03 by BPA. This report addresses part of the current CCT effort to address the conservation of this species on the Colville Reservation.

  15. Strategic Energy Planning (Area 1) Consultants Reports to Citizen Potawatomi Nation Federally Recognized Indian Tribe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Marvin; Bose, James; Beier, Richard; Chang, Young Bae

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The assets that Citizen Potawatomi Nation holds were evaluated to help define the strengths and weaknesses to be used in pursuing economic prosperity. With this baseline assessment, a Planning Team will create a vision for the tribe to integrate into long-term energy and business strategies. Identification of energy efficiency devices, systems and technologies was made, and an estimation of cost benefits of the more promising ideas is submitted for possible inclusion into the final energy plan. Multiple energy resources and sources were identified and their attributes were assessed to determine the appropriateness of each. Methods of saving energy were evaluated and reported on and potential revenue-generating sources that specifically fit the tribe were identified and reported. A primary goal is to create long-term energy strategies to explore development of tribal utility options and analyze renewable energy and energy efficiency options. Associated goals are to consider exploring energy efficiency and renewable economic development projects involving the following topics: (1) Home-scale projects may include construction of a home with energy efficiency or renewable energy features and retrofitting an existing home to add energy efficiency or renewable energy features. (2) Community-scale projects may include medium to large scale energy efficiency building construction, retrofit project, or installation of community renewable energy systems. (3) Small business development may include the creation of a tribal enterprise that would manufacture and distribute solar and wind powered equipment for ranches and farms or create a contracting business to include energy efficiency and renewable retrofits such as geothermal heat pumps. (4) Commercial-scale energy projects may include at a larger scale, the formation of a tribal utility formed to sell power to the commercial grid, or to transmit and distribute power throughout the tribal community, or hydrogen production, and propane and natural-gas distribution systems.

  16. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -033-00 Yakima Phase II Fish Screens Operations and Maintenance (O&M) with Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) BOR $107 Withdrawn 2003-114-00 Pacific Ocean Survey Tracking Kintama Research $2,091,528 $94,663 BOG Management ODFW $2,000,0005 $5,000,0006 August Decision 5 1983-350-00 Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Operations

  17. Improving Communications with Tribes along U.S. Department of Energy Shipping Routes: Preparing for Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, J. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Office of National Transportation, 1000 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); Portner, W. E. [Science Applications International Corporation, 2109 Air Park Drive, SE, Albuquerque, NM 87106 (United States); Patric, J. [Booz Allen Hamilton, 955 L'Enfant Plaza North, SW, Washington, DC 20024 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes efforts by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) to initiate, coordinate, and improve communications with Native American Tribes along potential shipping routes to the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The Office of National Transportation (ONT) within OCRWM is taking a collaborative approach that builds upon past working relationships between DOE and Tribal Nations. This paper focuses on those relationships, vehicles such as the Tribal Topic Group of the DOE Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC), and other recent interactions that ONT has been pursuing to strengthen existing partnerships and build new ones. It also offers lessons learned and goals for the future as ONT looks ahead to ensure appropriate coordination with Tribes on future shipments to Yucca Mountain. (authors)

  18. FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR A PETROLEUM REFINERY FOR THE JICARILLA APACHE TRIBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Jones

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A feasibility study for a proposed petroleum refinery for the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation was performed. The available crude oil production was identified and characterized. There is 6,000 barrels per day of crude oil production available for processing in the proposed refinery. The proposed refinery will utilize a lower temperature, smaller crude fractionation unit. It will have a Naphtha Hydrodesulfurizer and Reformer to produce high octane gasoline. The surplus hydrogen from the reformer will be used in a specialized hydrocracker to convert the heavier crude oil fractions to ultra low sulfur gasoline and diesel fuel products. The proposed refinery will produce gasoline, jet fuel, diesel fuel, and a minimal amount of lube oil. The refinery will require about $86,700,000 to construct. It will have net annual pre-tax profit of about $17,000,000. The estimated return on investment is 20%. The feasibility is positive subject to confirmation of long term crude supply. The study also identified procedures for evaluating processing options as a means for American Indian Tribes and Native American Corporations to maximize the value of their crude oil production.

  19. DOE Partnerships with States, Tribes and Other Federal Programs Help Responders Prepare for Challenges Involving Transport of Radioactive Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsha Keister

    2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE Partnerships with States, Tribes and Other Federal Programs Help Responders Prepare for Challenges Involving Transport of Radioactive Materials Implementing adequate institutional programs and validating preparedness for emergency response to radiological transportation incidents along or near U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) shipping corridors poses unique challenges to transportation operations management. Delayed or insufficient attention to State and Tribal preparedness needs may significantly impact the transportation operations schedule and budget. The DOE Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) has successfully used a cooperative planning process to develop strong partnerships with States, Tribes, Federal agencies and other national programs to support responder preparedness across the United States. DOE TEPP has found that building solid partnerships with key emergency response agencies ensures responders have access to the planning, training, technical expertise and assistance necessary to safely, efficiently and effectively respond to a radiological transportation accident. Through the efforts of TEPP over the past fifteen years, partnerships have resulted in States and Tribal Nations either using significant portions of the TEPP planning resources in their programs and/or adopting the Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) program into their hazardous material training curriculums to prepare their fire departments, law enforcement, hazardous materials response teams, emergency management officials, public information officers and emergency medical technicians for responding to transportation incidents involving radioactive materials. In addition, through strong partnerships with Federal Agencies and other national programs TEPP provided technical expertise to support a variety of radiological response initiatives and assisted several programs with integration of the nationally recognized MERRTT program into other training venues, thus ensuring consistency of radiological response curriculums delivered to responders. This presentation will provide an overview of the steps to achieve coordination, to avoid redundancy, and to highlight several of the successful partnerships TEPP has formed with States, Tribes, Federal agencies and other national programs. Events, accident scenarios, and training where TEPP was proven to be integral in building the radiological response capabilities for first responders to actual radiological incidents are also highlighted. Participants will gain an appreciation for the collaborative efforts States and Tribes are engaging in with the DOE to ensure that responders all along the DOE transportation corridors are adequately prepared to respond to shipments of radioactive materials through their communities.

  20. WA-TRIBE-STILLAGUAMISH TRIBE OF INDIANS

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to and from the tribal medical, dental, behavioral health and massage clinics. Often the demand-response requests that come to STTS are for one to three passengers at a time;...

  1. Couse/Tenmile Creeks Watershed Project Implementation : 2007 Conservtion Projects. [2007 Habitat Projects Completed].

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asotin County Conservation District

    2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on private lands within Asotin County watersheds. The Tenmile Creek watershed is a 42 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Asotin Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Couse Creek watershed is a 24 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Tenmile Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Both watersheds are almost exclusively under private ownership. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has documented wild steelhead and rainbow/redband trout spawning and rearing in Tenmile Creek and Couse Creek. The project also provides Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation throughout Asotin County, but the primary focus is for the Couse and Tenmile Creek watersheds. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Farm Service Agency (FSA), Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRFB), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. The Asotin Subbasin Plan identified priority areas and actions for ESA listed streams within Asotin County. Couse Creek and Tenmile Creek are identified as protection areas in the plan. The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) has been successful in working with landowners to protect riparian areas throughout Asotin County. Funding from BPA and other agencies has also been instrumental in protecting streams throughout Asotin County by utilizing the ridge top to ridge top approach.

  2. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office: FY 1999 Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Shawn W.

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day River is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and one of the few major subbasins in the Columbia River basin containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, the fourth largest drainage area in Oregon. With its beginning in the Strawberry Mountains near the town of Prairie City, the John Day flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly one of national significance. The entire John Day basin was granted to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) initiated contracting the majority of its construction implementation actions with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of the projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 1999, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional eleven (11) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects implemented included installation of infiltration galleries, permanent diversions, pumping stations, and irrigation efficiency upgrades. Project costs in 1999 totaled $284,514.00 with a total amount of $141,628.00 (50%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, and individual landowners.

  3. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercElevators | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV JumpInformation

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  6. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional twelve (12) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects include off channel water developments, juniper control, permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Due to funding issues and delays, permitting delays, fire closures and landowner contracting problems, 2 projects were canceled and 7 projects were rescheduled to the 2004 construction season. Project costs in 2003 totaled $115,554.00 with a total amount of $64,981.00 (56%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Partners in Wildlife Program and individual landowners.

  7. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day River is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States, which is entirely unsupplemented for it's runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the John Day Basin drains over 8,000 square miles, is Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and the basin incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the mainstem John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon, summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The Majority of the John Day Basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in John Day to coordinate basin restoration projects, monitoring, planning, and other watershed restoration activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in John Day, who subcontracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these restoration projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2001, the JDBO and GSWCD continued their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional ten (10) watershed conservation projects. The project types include permanent lay flat diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2001 totaled $572,766.00 with $361,966.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources, such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board (OWEB), and individual landowners.

  8. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles--Oregon's third largest drainage basin--and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. Most all of the entire John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the Basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Using funding from the Bonneville Power Administration, Bureau of Reclamation, and others, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) subcontracts the majority of its construction implementation activities with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/review, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2000, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional six watershed conservation projects funded by the BPA. The types of projects include permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2000 totaled $533,196.00 with a total amount of $354,932.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration and the remainder coming from other sources such as the BOR, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, and individual landowners.

  9. FINAL REPORT WIND POWER WARM SPRINGS RESERVATION TRIBAL LANDS DOE GRANT NUMBER DE-FG36-07GO17077 SUBMITTED BY WARM SPRINGS POWER & WATER ENTERPRISES A CORPORATE ENTITY OF THE CONFEDERATED TRIBES OF WARM SPRINGS WARM SPRINGS, OREGON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jim Manion; Michael Lofting; Wil Sando; Emily Leslie; Randy Goff

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Generation Feasibility Warm Springs Power and Water Enterprises (WSPWE) is a corporate entity owned by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation, located in central Oregon. The organization is responsible for managing electrical power generation facilities on tribal lands and, as part of its charter, has the responsibility to evaluate and develop renewable energy resources for the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs. WSPWE recently completed a multi-year-year wind resource assessment of tribal lands, beginning with the installation of wind monitoring towers on the Mutton Mountains site in 2003, and collection of on-site wind data is ongoing. The study identified the Mutton Mountain site on the northeastern edge of the reservation as a site with sufficient wind resources to support a commercial power project estimated to generate over 226,000 MWh per year. Initial estimates indicate that the first phase of the project would be approximately 79.5 MW of installed capacity. This Phase 2 study expands and builds on the previously conducted Phase 1 Wind Resource Assessment, dated June 30, 2007. In order to fully assess the economic benefits that may accrue to the Tribes through wind energy development at Mutton Mountain, a planning-level opinion of probable cost was performed to define the costs associated with key design and construction aspects of the proposed project. This report defines the Mutton Mountain project costs and economics in sufficient detail to allow the Tribes to either build the project themselves or contract with a developer under the most favorable terms possible for the Tribes.

  10. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. Efforts are underway to showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies.

  11. SUSANA MARTiNEZ Governor JOHN A. SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A. SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor November 9, 2011 NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT Hazardous Waste Bureau 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303...

  12. SUSANA MARTfNEZ Governor JOHN A SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor November 1,2012 NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT Hazardous Waste Bureau 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Phone...

  13. SUSANA MARTfNEZ Governor JOHN A. SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as testing positive for low level amounts of internal contamination. See AlB Phase 1 Report. 61. The AlB Phase 1 Report provided the following examples of maintenance procedures...

  14. Kelly M. Nez Ocasio Puerto Rico WeatherCamp 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Kelly M. Nez Ocasio Puerto Rico WeatherCamp 2009 My name is Kelly M. Nez Ocasio, I am 19 years old and in 2009 I had the gratifying opportunity to participate in the NCAS "Puerto Rico Weather Camp-1340 Certification at the University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus. The Puerto Rico Weather Camp

  15. Rogelio Omar Corona Nez M. en C. Biolgicas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ambiental y gestión de recursos han facilitado su desarrollo en el campo de la evaluación de impactos, and interpretation. XIX Reunión Nacional SELPER-México; Octubre 3 y 4 del 2011. La evaluación de Impacto Ambiental yRogelio Omar Corona Núñez M. en C. Biológicas Especialidad en Biología Ambiental Rogelio Corona es

  16. Rogelio Omar Corona Nez M. Sc Biological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corona holds a Master degree in Environmental Sciences from Universidad Nacional Autnoma de Mxico" International Institute for Geo-Information Science and Earth Observation (ITC), Netherlands; June July 2009

  17. SUSANA MARTfNEZ Governor JOHN A SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome ton n uSTEM-A SANCHEZ Lieutenant

  18. SUSANA MARTfNEZ Governor JOHN A. SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome ton n uSTEM-A SANCHEZ LieutenantA.

  19. SUSANA MARTiNEZ Governor JOHN A. SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome ton n uSTEM-A SANCHEZ

  20. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish and Wildlife Program Habitat Protection Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, Angelo; Roberts, Frank; Peters, Ronald

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout the last century, the cumulative effects of anthropogenic disturbances have caused drastic watershed level landscape changes throughout the Reservation and surrounding areas (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Changes include stream channelization, wetland draining, forest and palouse prairie conversion for agricultural use, high road density, elimination of old growth timber stands, and denuding riparian communities. The significance of these changes is manifested in the degradation of habitats supporting native flora and fauna. Consequently, populations of native fish, wildlife, and plants, which the Tribe relies on as subsistence resources, have declined or in some instances been extirpated (Apperson et al. 1988; Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998; Lillengreen et al. 1996; Lillengreen et al. 1993; Gerry Green Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife Biologist, personal communication 2002). For example, bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are not present at detectable levels in Reservation tributaries, westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) are not present in numbers commensurate with maintaining harvestable fisheries (Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996), and the Sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) are not present at detectable levels on the Reservation (Gerry Green, Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife biologist, personal communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe added Fisheries and Wildlife Programs to their Natural Resources Department to address these losses and protect important cultural, and subsistence resources for future generations. The Tribal Council adopted by Resolution 89(94), the following mission statement for the Fisheries Program: 'restore, protect, expand and re-establish fish populations to sustainable levels to provide harvest opportunities'. This mission statement, focused on fisheries restoration and rehabilitation, is a response to native fish population declines throughout the Tribe's aboriginal territory, including the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Implicit in this statement is a commitment to provide native subsistence resources in the present and near future as well as the long-term by employing all the mitigation and conservation measures available to them. The development of this Habitat Protection Plan is intended to provide additional planning level guidance as the implementation of conservation measures moves forward. The purpose of this plan is to develop a systematic approach to habitat restoration that will ultimately lead to self-perpetuating, harvestable populations of native fish, wildlife and botanical species. Specifically, it is our intention to apply the principles and analyses presented in this plan to prioritize future restoration efforts that receive funding under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Resident Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Programs. Using an ecosystem restoration approach based on landscape ecology concepts (Primack 1993), the basic premise of the plan is to (1) protect functioning habitat conditions and (2) restore degraded habitat conditions. This plan focuses on habitat conditions at the watershed scale (macrohabitat) rather than on the needs of single species and/or species guilds. By focusing restoration efforts at a macrohabitat level, restoration efforts target all native species inhabiting that area. This approach marks a paradigm shift that emphasizes ecological based restoration rather than species-specific restoration. Traditionally, fish managers and wildlife managers have approached restoration independently, often dedicating resources to a single species by focusing on specific habitat types on a small spatial scale (microhabitat) (Robinson and Bolen 1989, Marcot et al. 2002). This management technique has done little to curb declines despite large budgets (Pianka 1994). Restoration on a landscape level has shown promising results (Holling 1992) and many riparian and wetland restoration projects throughout the northwest have inadvertently improved habitats for non-targeted species. Landscape level restoration addresses

  1. Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) - Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs : Annual Report For Fiscal Year, October 2007 September 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerstenberger, Ryan [Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation

    2009-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report describes work performed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs (CTWSRO) portion of the Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation Project (HRPP) during the 2008 fiscal year. A total of 64,736 hatchery winter steelhead, 12,108 hatchery summer steelhead, and 68,426 hatchery spring Chinook salmon smolts were acclimated and released in the Hood River basin during the spring. The HRPP exceeded program goals for a release of and 50,000 winter steelhead but fell short of the steelhead release goals of 30,000 summer steelhead and 75,000 spring Chinook in 2008. Passive Integrated Transponders (PIT) tags were implanted in 6,652 hatchery winter steelhead, and 1,196 hatchery summer steelhead, to compare migratory attributes and survival rates of hatchery fish released into the Hood River. Water temperatures were recorded at six locations within the Hood River subbasin to monitor for compliance with Oregon Department of Environmental Quality water quality standards. A preseason spring Chinook salmon adult run forecast was generated, which predicted an abundant return adequate to meet escapement goal and brood stock needs. As a result the tribal and sport fisheries were opened. A tribal creel was conducted from May 22 to July 18 during which an estimated 172 spring Chinook were harvested. One hundred sixteen Spring Chinook salmon redds were observed and 72 carcasses were inspected on 19.4 miles of spawning grounds throughout the Hood River Basin during 2008. Annual salvage operations were completed in two irrigation canals resulting in the liberation of 1,641 fish back to the Hood River.

  2. Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation and Enhancement Project Operations and Maintenance Program; Brood Year 2000: Johnson Creek Chinook Salmon Supplementation, Biennial Report 2000-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, Mitch; Gebhards, John; Hill, Robert

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration, has implemented a small scale chinook salmon supplementation program on Johnson Creek, a tributary in the South Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. The Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement project was established to enhance the number of threatened Snake River summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to Johnson Creek through artificial propagation. Adult chinook salmon trapping, broodstock selection, and spawning was first implemented in 1998, did not occur in 1999, and was resumed in 2000. A total of 152 salmon were trapped in Johnson Creek in 2000, of which 73 (25 males, 16 females, and 32 jacks) fish were transported to Idaho Fish and Game=s South Fork Salmon River adult holding and spawning facility for artificial propagation purposes. The remaining 79 (29 males, 16 females, and 24 jacks) fish were released above the weir to spawn naturally. A total of 65,060 green eggs were taken from 16 female salmon and transported to the McCall Fish Hatchery for incubation and rearing. Egg counts indicated an average eye-up rate of 86.0% for 55,971 eyed eggs. Average fecundity for Johnson Creek females was 4,066 eggs per female. Juvenile fish were reared indoors at the McCall Fish Hatchery through November 2001. These fish were transferred to outdoor rearing facilities in December 2001 where they remained until release in March 2002. All of these fish were marked with Coded Wire Tags and Visual Implant Elastomer tags. In addition 9,987 were also PIT tagged. Hand counts provided by marking crews were used to amend the number of juvenile salmon released from the original egg count. A total of 57,392 smolts were released into a temporary acclimation channel in Johnson Creek on March 18, 19, 20, 2002. These fish were held in this facility until a fish screen was removed on March 22, 2002 and the fish were allowed to emigrate.

  3. Brood Year 2004: Johnson Creek Chinook Salmon Supplementation Report, June 2004 through March 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gebhards, John S.; Hill, Robert; Daniel, Mitch [Nez Perce Tribe

    2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration, has implemented a small scale chinook salmon supplementation program on Johnson Creek, a tributary in the South Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. The Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement project was established to enhance the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to Johnson Creek to spawn through artificial propagation. This was the sixth season of adult chinook broodstock collection in Johnson Creek following collections in 1998, 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2003. Weir installation was completed on June 21, 2004 with the first chinook captured on June 22, 2004 and the last fish captured on September 6, 2004. The weir was removed on September 18, 2004. A total of 338 adult chinook, including jacks, were captured during the season. Of these, 211 were of natural origin, 111 were hatchery origin Johnson Creek supplementation fish, and 16 were adipose fin clipped fish from other hatchery operations and therefore strays into Johnson Creek. Over the course of the run, 57 natural origin Johnson Creek adult chinook were retained for broodstock, transported to the South Fork Salmon River adult holding and spawning facility and held until spawned. The remaining natural origin Johnson Creek fish along with all the Johnson Creek supplementation fish were released upstream of the weir to spawn naturally. Twenty-seven Johnson Creek females were artificially spawned with 25 Johnson Creek males. Four females were diagnosed with high bacterial kidney disease levels resulting in their eggs being culled. The 27 females produced 116,598 green eggs, 16,531 green eggs were culled, with an average eye-up rate of 90.6% resulting in 90,647 eyed eggs. Juvenile fish were reared indoors at the McCall Fish Hatchery until November 2005 and then transferred to the outdoor rearing facilities during the Visual Implant Elastomer tagging operation. These fish continued rearing in the outdoor collection basin until release in March 2006. All of these fish were marked with Coded Wire Tags and Visual Implant Elastomer tags. In addition 12,056 of the smolts released were also tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder tags. Hand counts provided by marking crews were used to amend the number of juvenile salmon released from the original egg count. A total of 90,450 smolts were released directly into Johnson Creek on March 13 through 15, 2006.

  4. Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoefs, Nancy (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1997 the first phase of the Nez Perce Tribe White Sturgeon Project was completed and the second phase was initiated. During Phase I the ''Upper Snake River White Sturgeon Biological Assessment'' was completed, successfully: (1) compiling regional white sturgeon management objectives, and (2) identifying potential mitigation actions needed to rebuild the white sturgeon population in the Snake River between Hells Canyon and Lower Granite dams. Risks and uncertainties associated with implementation of these potential mitigative actions could not be fully assessed because critical information concerning the status of the population and their habitat requirements were unknown. The biological risk assessment identified the fundamental information concerning the white sturgeon population that is needed to fully evaluate the effectiveness of alternative mitigative strategies. Accordingly, a multi-year research plan was developed to collect specific biological and environmental data needed to assess the health and status of the population and characterize habitat used for spawning and rearing. In addition, in 1997 Phase II of the project was initiated. White sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River. During 1997, 316 white sturgeon were captured in the Snake River. Of these, 298 were marked. Differences in the fork length frequency distributions of the white sturgeon were not affected by collection method. No significant differences in length frequency distributions of sturgeon captured in Lower Granite Reservoir and the mid- and upper free-flowing reaches of the Snake River were detected. The length frequency distribution indicated that white sturgeon between 92 and 183 cm are prevalent in the reaches of the Snake River that were sampled. However, white sturgeon >183 have not changed markedly since 1970. I would speculate that some factor other than past over-fishing practices is limiting the recruitment of white sturgeon into larger size classes (>183 cm). Habitat, food resources, and migration have been severely altered by the impoundment of the Snake River and it appears that the recruitment of young may not be severely affected as recruitment of fish into size classes > 183 cm.

  5. Fall Chinook Acclimation Project; Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids, and Big Canyon, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLeod, Bruce

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fisheries co-managers of U.S. v Oregon supported and directed the construction and operation of acclimation and release facilities for Snake River fall Chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery at three sites above Lower Granite Dam. In 1996, Congress instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) to construct, under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP), final rearing and acclimation facilities for fall Chinook in the Snake River basin to complement their activities and efforts in compensating for fish lost due to construction of the lower Snake River dams. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) played a key role in securing funding and selecting acclimation sites, then assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of the facilities. In 1997, Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) was directed to fund operations and maintenance (O&M) for the facilities. Two acclimation facilities, Captain John Rapids and Pittsburg Landing, were located on the Snake River between Asotin, WA and Hells Canyon Dam and one facility, Big Canyon, was located on the Clearwater River at Peck. The Capt. John Rapids facility is a single pond while the Pittsburg Landing and Big Canyon sites consist of portable fish rearing tanks assembled and disassembled each year. Acclimation of 450,000 yearling smolts (150,000 each facility) begins in March and ends 6 weeks later. When available, an additional 2,400,000 fall Chinook sub-yearlings may be acclimated for 6 weeks, following the smolt release. The project goal is to increase the naturally spawning population of Snake River fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. This is a supplementation project; in that hatchery produced fish are acclimated and released into the natural spawning habitat for the purpose of returning a greater number of spawners to increase natural production. Only Snake River stock is used and production of juveniles occurs at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. This is a long-term project, targeted to work towards achieving delisting goals established by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS or NOAA Fisheries) and ultimately to provide fall Chinook adults through the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan program as mitigation for construction and operation of the four lower Snake River dams. Complete adult returns (all age classes) for all three acclimation facilities occurred in the year 2002. Progeny (which would then be natural origin fish) would be counted towards achieving Endangered Species Act delisting criteria. In 2003, a total of 2,138,391 fish weighing 66,201 pounds were released from the three acclimation facilities. The total includes 437,633 yearling fish weighing 44,330 pounds and 1,700,758 sub-yearling fish weighing 21,871 pounds.

  6. Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation; Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water, and Wildlife Program, Progress Report 1996-1998.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, Angelo; Bailey, Dee; Peters, Ron

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of an ongoing project to restore fisheries resources in tributaries located on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, this report details the activities of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's Fisheries Program for FY 1997 and 1998. This report (1) analyses the effect introduced species and water quality have on the abundance of native trout in Coeur d'Alene Lake and selected target tributaries; (2) details results from an ongoing mark-recapture study on predatory game fish; (3) characterizes spawning habitats in target tributaries and evaluates the effects of fine sediment on substrate composition and estimated emergence success; and (4) provides population estimates for westslope cutthroat trout in target tributaries. Low dissolved oxygen values in the hypolimnion of Coeur d'Alene Lake continue to be a cause for concern with regard to available fisheries habitat. Four sample sites in 1997 and eight sample sites in 1998 had measured levels of dissolved oxygen below what is considered optimum (6.0 mg/L) for cutthroat trout. As well, two sample points located north of the Coeur d'Alene River showed hypolimnetic dissolved oxygen deficits. This could lead to a more serious problem associated with the high concentration of heavy metals bound up in the sediment north of the Coeur d'Alene River. Most likely these oxygen deficits are a result of allochthonous input of organic matter and subsequent decomposition. Sediment loading from tributaries continues to be a problem in the lake. The build up of sediments at the mouths of all incoming tributaries results in the modification of existing wetlands and provides ideal habitat for predators of cutthroat trout, such as northern pike and largemouth bass. Furthermore, increased sediment deposition provides additional substrate for colonization by aquatic macrophytes, which serve as forage and habitat for other non-native species. There was no significant difference in the relative abundance of fishes in Coeur d'Alene Lake from 1997 to 1998. Four out of the six most commonly sampled species are non-native. Northern pikeminnow and largescale suckers are the only native species among the six most commonly sampled. Northern pikeminnow comprise 8-9% of the electroshocking catch and 18-20% of the gillnet catch. Largescale suckers comprise 24-28% of the electroshocking catch and 9-21% of the gillnet catch. Cutthroat trout and mountain whitefish, on the other hand, comprise less than 1% of the catch when using electroshocking methods and about 1.4% of the gillnet catch. Since 1994, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water and Wildlife Program has conducted an extensive mark-recapture study (Peters et al. 1999). To date, 636 fish have been tagged and 23 fish have been recaptured. We are finding that northern pike have a tendency to migrate from the original sampling site, while largemouth bass appear very territorial, rarely moving from the site where they were tagged. Both species are most commonly associated with shallow, near-shore habitats, where the potential for encountering seasonal migrations of cutthroat trout is maximized. Low-order tributaries provide the most important spawning habitat for cutthroat trout on the Reservation. The mapped distribution of potentially suitable spawning gravel was patchy and did not vary considerably within reaches or between watersheds. Furthermore, the quantity of spawning gravel was low, averaging just 4.1% of measured stream area. The lack of a strong association between spawning gravel abundance and several reach characteristics (gradient, proportion of gravel and pea gravel) corroborates the findings of other authors who suggest that local hydrologic features influence spawning gravel availability. Although the distribution of spawning substrate was patchy within the target watersheds, there is probably adequate habitat to support resident and adfluvial spawners because of currently depressed numbers. Spawning gravels in target tributaries of the Reservation contained proportions of fine sediments comparable to those in egg pockets of salmonid redds in th

  7. 3-D RESERVOIR AND STOCHASTIC FRACTURE NETWORK MODELING FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY, CIRCLE RIDGE PHOSPHORIA/TENSLEEP RESERVOIR, WIND RIVER RESERVATION, ARAPAHO AND SHOSHONE TRIBES, WYOMING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul La Pointe; Jan Hermanson; Robert Parney; Thorsten Eiben; Mike Dunleavy; Ken Steele; John Whitney; Darrell Eubanks; Roger Straub

    2002-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results made in fulfillment of contract DE-FG26-00BC15190, ''3-D Reservoir and Stochastic Fracture Network Modeling for Enhanced Oil Recovery, Circle Ridge Phosphoria/Tensleep Reservoir, Wind River Reservation, Arapaho and Shoshone Tribes, Wyoming''. The goal of this project is to improve the recovery of oil from the Tensleep and Phosphoria Formations in Circle Ridge Oilfield, located on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming, through an innovative integration of matrix characterization, structural reconstruction, and the characterization of the fracturing in the reservoir through the use of discrete fracture network models. Fields in which natural fractures dominate reservoir permeability, such as the Circle Ridge Field, often experience sub-optimal recovery when recovery processes are designed and implemented that do not take advantage of the fracture systems. For example, a conventional waterflood in a main structural block of the Field was implemented and later suspended due to unattractive results. It is estimated that somewhere less than 20% of the OOIP in the Circle Ridge Field have been recovered after more than 50 years' production. Marathon Oil Company identified the Circle Ridge Field as an attractive candidate for several advanced IOR processes that explicitly take advantage of the natural fracture system. These processes require knowledge of the distribution of matrix porosity, permeability and oil saturations; and understanding of where fracturing is likely to be well-developed or poorly developed; how the fracturing may compartmentalize the reservoir; and how smaller, relatively untested subthrust fault blocks may be connected to the main overthrust block. For this reason, the project focused on improving knowledge of the matrix properties, the fault block architecture and to develop a model that could be used to predict fracture intensity, orientation and fluid flow/connectivity properties. Knowledge of matrix properties was greatly extended by calibrating wireline logs from 113 wells with incomplete or older-vintage logging suites to wells with a full suite of modern logs. The model for the fault block architecture was derived by 3D palinspastic reconstruction. This involved field work to construct three new cross-sections at key areas in the Field; creation of horizon and fault surface maps from well penetrations and tops; and numerical modeling to derive the geometry, chronology, fault movement and folding history of the Field through a 3D restoration of the reservoir units to their original undeformed state. The methodology for predicting fracture intensity and orientation variations throughout the Field was accomplished by gathering outcrop and subsurface image log fracture data, and comparing it to the strain field produced by the various folding and faulting events determined through the 3D palinspastic reconstruction. It was found that the strains produced during the initial folding of the Tensleep and Phosphoria Formations corresponded well without both the orientations and relative fracture intensity measured in outcrop and in the subsurface. The results have led to a 15% to 20% increase in estimated matrix pore volume, and to the plan to drill two horizontal drain holes located and oriented based on the modeling results. Marathon Oil is also evaluating alternative tertiary recovery processes based on the quantitative 3D integrated reservoir model.

  8. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Snake River stock) yearling fall chinook salmon that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 1998. The three fall chinook acclimation facilities are operated by the Nez Perce Tribe and located at Pittsburg Landing and Captain John Rapids on the Snake River and at Big Canyon Creek on the Clearwater River. Yearlings at the Big Canyon facility consisted of two size classes that are referred to in this report as 9.5 fish per pound (fpp) and 30 fpp. The Big Canyon 9.5 fpp were comparable to the yearlings at Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. A total of 9,942 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Pittsburg Landing. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 159.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.19. Of the 9,942 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 6,836 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary). A total of 4,926 9.5 fpp and 2,532 30 fpp yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Big Canyon. PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 156.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.13. PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 113.1 mm and mean condition factor of 1.18. Of the 4,926 PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings released, a total of 3,042 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. Of the 2,532 PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings released, a total of 1,130 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. A total of 1,253 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Captain John Rapids. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 147.5 mm and mean condition factor of 1.09. Of the 1,253 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 719 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. A total of 2,420 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 159.0 mm and mean condition factor of 1.10. Of the 2,420 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 979 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams (Lower Monumental and McNary). Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged fish released from Pittsburg Landing were 10.5 days to Lower Granite Dam, 21.7 days to McNary Dam and 29.8 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 16.4 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 18.3 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 18.9 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were April 25 at Lower Granite Dam, May 6 at McNary Dam and May 14 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 5 at Lower Granite Dam, May 20 at McNary Dam and May 25 at Bonneville Dam. Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings released from Big Canyon were 13.3 days to Lower Granite Dam, 26.0 days to McNary Dam and 30.8 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 13.0 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 15.3 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 18.3 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were April 27 at Lower Granite Dam, May 11 at McNary Dam and May 15 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 9 at Lower Granite Dam, May 24 at McNary Dam and May 25 at Bonneville Dam. Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings released from Big Canyon were 20.8 days to Lower Granite Dam, 37.6 days to McNary Dam and 43.5 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 8.3 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 10.6 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 12.9 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were May 5 at Lower Granite Dam, May 23 at McNary Dam and May 28 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 22 at Lower Granite Dam, May 31 at McNary Dam and June 5 at Bonneville Dam. Median arrival dates, based on all detections, of PIT tagge

  9. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO2 utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other DOE regional partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Deliverables for the 7th Quarter reporting period include (1) for the geological efforts: Reports on Technology Needs and Action Plan on the Evaluation of Geological Sinks and Pilot Project Deployment (Deliverables 2 and 3), and Report on the Feasibility of Mineralization Trapping in the Snake River Plain Basin (Deliverable 14); (2) for the terrestrial efforts: Report on the Evaluation of Terrestrial Sinks and a Report of the Best Production Practices for Soil C Sequestration (Deliverables 8 and 15). In addition, the 7th Quarter activities for the Partnership included further development of the proposed activities for the deployment and demonstration phase of the carbon sequestration pilots including geological and terrestrial pilots, expansion of the Partnership to encompass regions and institutions that are complimentary to the steps we have identified, building greater collaborations with industry and stakeholders in the region, contributed to outreach efforts that spanned all partnerships, co-authorship on the Carbon Capture and Separation report, and developed a regional basis to address future energy opportunities in the region. The deliverables and activities are discussed in the following sections and appended to this report. The education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The public website has been expanded and integrated with the GIS carbon atlas. We have made presentations to stakeholders and policy makers including two tribal sequestration workshops, and made connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmental

  10. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the second performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed this quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. To date, there has been little research on soil carbon on rangelands, and since rangeland constitutes a major land use in the Big Sky region, this is important in achieving a better understanding of terrestrial sinks. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO{sub 2} concentrations. Progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations. A series of meetings held during the second quarter have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. Finally, the education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan and process which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. While we are still working on the public website, we have made many presentations to stakeholders and policy makers, connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmentally-friendly energy production. In addition, we have laid plans for integration of our outreach efforts with the students, especially at the tribal colleges and at the universities involved in our partnership. This includes collaboration with the film and media arts departments at MSU, with outreach effort

  11. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed in the second quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO{sub 2} concentrations. While no key deliverables were due during the third quarter, progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations and in this report. A series of meetings held during the second and third quarters have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding carbon sequestration in this region, the need for a holistic approach to meeting energy demands and economic development potential, and the implementation of government programs or a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. In the fourth quarter, three deliverables have been completed, some in draft form to be revised and updated to include Wyoming. This is due primarily to some delays in funding to LANL and INEEL and the approval of a supplemental proposal to include Wyoming in much of the GIS data sets, analysis, and related materials. The de

  12. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop (see attached agenda). The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed in the second quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO2 concentrations. While no key deliverables were due during the third quarter, progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations and in this report. A series of meetings held during the second and third quarters have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding carbon sequestration in this region, the need for a holistic approach to meeting energy demands and economic development potential, and the implementation of government programs or a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. A third Partnership meeting has been planned for August 04 in Idaho Falls; a preliminary agenda is attached.

  13. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the first performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first Partnership meeting the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Complementary to the efforts on evaluation of sources and sinks is the development of the Big Sky Partnership Carbon Cyberinfrastructure (BSP-CC) and a GIS Road Map for the Partnership. These efforts will put in place a map-based integrated information management system for our Partnership, with transferability to the national carbon sequestration effort. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but other policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. A series of meetings held in November and December, 2003, have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These include the impact of existing local, state, and federal permitting issues for terrestrial based carbon sequestration projects, consistency of final protocols and planning standards with national requirements, and alignments of carbon sequestration projects with existing federal and state cost-share programs. Finally, the education and outreach efforts during this performance period have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The primary goal of this plan is to increase awareness, understanding, and public acceptance of sequestration efforts and build support for a constituent based network which includes the initial Big Sky Partnership and other local and regional businesses and entities.

  14. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercAirCompressors | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump

  15. Random Sets and Histograms Javier Nu~nez-Garcia and Olaf Wolkenhauer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rostock, Universitt

    of a small sam- ple of data than a probability density function regardless of its asymptotic properties- ferent stochastic processes. Some people have already exploited the connection between proba- bility not differ much from that of a random variable. While random variables deal with stochastic point processes

  16. Holding Dissapearance in RTD-based Juan Nez, Jos M. Quintana and Mara J. Avedillo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    -to-Multistable transition Logic (MML), and they are on the basis of advanced circuits for communications. The operation topologies. This paper analyses the case of an MML ternary inverter used as a quantizer, and determines increase the functionality implemented by a single gate in comparison to MOS and bipolar technologies [1

  17. CA-TRIBE-SUSANVILLE INDIAN RANCHERIA, CALIFORNIA

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    lighting fixtures and lighting upgrades; conversion of exit signs to light- emitting diode; replacement of T-12 lamps and ballasts; heating, ventilating, and air...

  18. Northern Cheyenne Tribe Wind Energy Development Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belvin Pete; Distributed Generation Systems Inc; WEST, Inc; Michael S. Burney; Chris Bergen; Electrical Consultants, Inc; Terracon

    2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Specific development objectives focused on the completion of all actions required to qualify a specfic project for financing and construction of a 30MW wind facility.

  19. The Tribe of Jen-Wae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Meg

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -ky. There is still time. With the next birthing the:L'G may be one to stretch your powers to the full." Har-lGJ shook his head, his eyes bitter. "It is many birthings since I hoped 10 for such a thing?" he said sadly. ilSl eGr noVl') old? man. I1hero is much...

  20. Colville Confederated Tribes Fish and Wildlife Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and greatly appreciate their input regarding this proposed project. We would like to take this chance of decreased internal nutrient loading, may take a number of years to realize. But a single season is enough is annually stocked into Twin Lakes and it is the pri

  1. To Customers, Constituents, Tribes and Stakeholders:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    prices, the cost of maintaining aging federal assets, and significant ongoing energy industry changes, BPA continues to increase its total outstanding debt and related...

  2. To Customers, Constituents, Tribes and Stakeholders:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2, 2003 (NextTime-Resolved Study91Title:8To Customers,

  3. Key Renewable Energy Opportunities for Oklahoma Tribes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report: I11IG002RTC3WASTE-TO-ENERGY:KenKeriKey IssuesKEY

  4. ICEIWG Participating Tribes | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department ofOral TestimonyEnergy Hydrogen5October 30, 2011,21,List

  5. Shoshone-Bannock Tribes Officials Visit WIPP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9 SeptemberSettingUncertainties in the3Arie Shoshani!

  6. NREL: Technology Deployment - Technical Assistance for Tribes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid Integration NRELCostBuildingModelsTechnical Assistance for

  7. Fall Chinook Acclimation Project; Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids, and Big Canyon, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLeod, Bruce

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fisheries co-managers of U.S. v Oregon supported and directed the construction and operation of acclimation and release facilities for Snake River fall Chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery at three sites above Lower Granite Dam. In 1996, Congress instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) to construct, under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP), final rearing and acclimation facilities for fall Chinook in the Snake River basin to complement their activities and efforts in compensating for fish lost due to construction of the lower Snake River dams. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) played a key role in securing funding and selecting acclimation sites, then assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of the facilities. In 1997, Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) was directed to fund operations and maintenance (O&M) for the facilities. Two acclimation facilities, Captain John Rapids and Pittsburg Landing, are located on the Snake River between Asotin, WA and Hells Canyon Dam and one facility, Big Canyon, is located on the Clearwater River at Peck. The Capt. John Rapids facility is a single pond while the Pittsburg Landing and Big Canyon sites consist of portable fish rearing tanks assembled and disassembled each year. Acclimation of 450,000 yearling smolts (150,000 each facility) begins in March and ends 6 weeks later. When available, an additional 2,400,000 fall Chinook sub-yearlings may be acclimated for 6 weeks, following the smolt release. The project goal is to increase the naturally spawning population of Snake River fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. This is a supplementation project; in that hatchery produced fish are acclimated and released into the natural spawning habitat for the purpose of returning a greater number of spawners to increase natural production. Only Snake River stock is used and production of juveniles occurs at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. This is a long-term project, targeted to work towards achieving delisting goals established by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS or NOAA Fisheries) and ultimately to provide fall Chinook adults through the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan program as mitigation for construction and operation of the four lower Snake River dams. Complete adult returns (all age classes) for all three acclimation facilities occurred in the year 2002. Progeny (which would then be natural origin fish) would be counted towards achieving Endangered Species Act delisting criteria. In 2002, a total of 2,877,437 fish weighing 47,347 pounds were released from the three acclimation facilities. The total includes 479,358 yearling fish weighing 33,930 pounds and 2,398,079 sub-yearling fish weighing 19,115 pounds. This is the largest number of fish ever released in one year from the acclimation facilities.

  8. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2003. This was the eighth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 437,633 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,492 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,494 from Big Canyon and 2,497 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels at the acclimation facilities could be considered medium with 37-83% of the fish sampled rating medium to very high. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 153.7 mm (153.2-154.2 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 164.2 mm (163.9-164.5 mm) at Pittsburg Landing. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.22 at Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 83.1% (80.7-85.5%) for Big Canyon to 91.7% (87.7-95.7%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 59.9% (54.6-65.2%) for Big Canyon to 69.4% (60.5-78.4%) for Captain John Rapids. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 5.8 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 16.2 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 11.7 rkm/d for Captain John Rapids to 17.6 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 8-15 days to Lower Granite Dam and 22-27 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from the FCAP facilities, ranged from April 23-25. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups ranged from May 4-10.

  9. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 1999. This was the fourth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 453,117 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities not only slightly exceeded the 450,000 fish quota, but a second release of 76,386 yearlings (hereafter called Surplus) were acclimated at the Big Canyon facility and released about two weeks after the primary releases. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 9,941 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 9,583 from Big Canyon, 2,511 Big Canyon Surplus and 2,494 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 983 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low and did not appear to increase after transport to the acclimation facilities. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery and relatively high at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the release groups ranged from 147.4 mm (146.7-148.1 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 163.7 mm (163.3-164.1 mm) at Pittsburg Landing. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.04 at Pittsburg Landing to 1.23 at Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 87.8% (82.1-93.4%) for Big Canyon Surplus to 94.1% (90.1-98.1%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 58.7% (49.3-68.1%) for Big Canyon Surplus to 71.3% (60.1-82.5%) for Captain John Rapids. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 9.3 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 18.7 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 9.0 rkm/d for Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 17.3 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 7-10 days to Lower Granite Dam and 21-23 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from the FCAP facilities, were all from April 23-25. The median arrival date for Big Canyon Surplus was May 4. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups were all from May 7-8. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam were May 17 for Big Canyon Surplus and April 26 for Lyons Ferry Hatchery.

  10. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2002. This was the seventh year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 479,358 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities exceeded the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,545 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,482 from Big Canyon and 2,487 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels at the acclimation facilities could be considered medium to high with 43-62% of fish sampled rating medium to very high. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 146.7 mm (146.2-147.2 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 164.8 mm (163.5-166.1 mm) at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.14 at Pittsburg Landing and Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 88.6% (86.0-91.1%) for Pittsburg Landing to 97.0% (92.4-101.7%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 54.3% (50.2-58.3%) for Big Canyon to 70.5% (65.4-75.5%) for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 8.1 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 14.1 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 10.9 rkm/d for Big Canyon to 15.9 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 9-12 days to Lower Granite Dam and 25-30 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from the FCAP facilities, ranged from April 20-28. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for the FCAP groups were all May 11. The objectives of this project are to quantify and evaluate pre-release fish health, condition and mark retention as well as post-release survival, migration timing, migration rates, travel times and movement patterns of fall Chinook salmon from supplementation releases at the FCAP facilities, then provide feedback to co-managers for project specific and basin wide management decision-making.

  11. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J. Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapawi, ID)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2004. This was the ninth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 414,452 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 4,983 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 4,984 from Big Canyon and 4,982 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered low with 53-94% rating not detected to low. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 154.6 mm (154.0-155.2 mm) at Pittsburg Landing to 163.0 mm (162.6-163.4 mm) at Captain John Rapids. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.16 at Big Canyon. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 74.7% (72.9-76.5%) for Big Canyon to 88.1% (85.7-90.6%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 45.3% (39.2-51.5%) for Pittsburg Landing to 52.1% (42.9-61.2%) for Big Canyon. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 5.5 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 12.8 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 10.9 rkm/d for Captain John Rapids to 17.6 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 13-16 days to Lower Granite Dam and 23-29 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids, ranged from April 18-29. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups ranged from May 1-8.

  12. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 2001. This was the sixth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 318,932 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,503 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,499 from Big Canyon and 2,518 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 991 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids and about average at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 155.4 mm (154.7-156.1 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 171.6 mm (170.7-172.5 mm) at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.02 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.16 at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 74.4% (73.2-75.5%) for Big Canyon to 85.2% (83.5-87.0%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 37.9% (36.0-40.0%) for Pittsburg Landing to 57.9% (53.0-62.8%) for Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 6.3 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Big Canyon to 10.8 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 5.2 rkm/d for Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 10.9 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 13-17 days to Lower Granite Dam and 31-37 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids, were all from April 26-27. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups were all from May 14-18. The median arrival date at McNary Dam was May 13 for Lyons Ferry Hatchery yearlings.

  13. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 2000. This was the fifth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 397,339 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,477 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,421 from Big Canyon and 2,488 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 980 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids and about average at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 157.7 mm (157.3-158.1 mm) at Big Canyon to 172.9 mm (172.2-173.6 mm) at Captain John Rapids. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Captain John Rapids and Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.12 at Big Canyon. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 87.0% (84.7-89.4%) for Pittsburg Landing to 95.2% (91.5-98.9%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 65.8% (58.5-73.1%) for Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 84.0% (76.2-91.8%) for Captain John Rapids. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 10.1 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 19.1 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 6.0 rkm/d for Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 17.3 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 9-10 days to Lower Granite Dam and 22-25 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids, were all from April 21-22. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups were all from May 5-6. The median arrival date at McNary Dam was April 24 for Lyons Ferry Hatchery yearlings.

  14. A practical method for almond cultivar identification and parental analysis using simple sequence repeat markers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dangl, Gerald S.; Yang, Judy; Golino, Deborah A.; Gradziel, Thomas

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    005-9009-z Mart? nez-Go mez P, Arulsekar S, Potter D,1024028518263 Mart? nez-Go mez P, Sa nchez-Pe rez R, Rubioincluding almonds (Mart? nez-Go mez et al. 2003; Mnejja et

  15. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan Capalbo

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

  16. More Weatherized Homes for Minnesota Tribe | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    been busy replacing old furnaces, sealing air leaks, and weathering stripped doors for people who are at or below 200 percent of the federal poverty line, with priority given to...

  17. american indian tribes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    KEYWORDS: High-Performance Computing, Computer Software, Defense Applications, Government Policy on Science and Technology COUNTRY: India REPORT CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION EXECUTIVE...

  18. The tribe Acanthocinini (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) of America north of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dillon, Lawrence S.

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , "May 22, 193U and September 10, 1933 (S.E. Jones) pPg-a t Remarks: From the other species with biannulated basal antennal segments, this form is distinguished by the following combinations of characters: Pubescence above generally light brownish... as they are found to be entirely extraterritorial. 10 Key to Genera 1. Prosternal process one-half or more than half as wide as a pro- coxal cavity............................................. 2 Prosternal process less than half as wide as a procoxal cavity...10...

  19. EECBG Success Story: Tribe's Headquarters Gets Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Success Story: North Lauderdale Gets 'Smart' on Cars Before and after shots of a new boiler system | courtesy of the Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs EECBG...

  20. Kalispel Tribe of Indians joins federal agencies to protect bull...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in an unprecedented set of agreements designed to improve habitat and strengthen fish stocks in the upper Columbia River Basin over the next 10 years. The new agreement...

  1. DOE Announces Consultation Sessions with Alaska Native Tribes...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to provide input on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region 10-year plan to develop renewable energy resources in the Arctic region. DOE supports the goals and activities of...

  2. Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the laws applicable to rivers or river systems, including electric power facilities related thereto, other of the state and federal governments, which identifies specific actions the Parties agreed to take during government-to- government negotiations. The Yakama Nation believes the Accords are a long overdue step toward

  3. AK-TRIBE-ASSOCIATION OF VILLAGE COUNCIL PRESIDENTS, INC

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Project Title...

  4. United South and Eastern Tribes (USET) Annual Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mark your calendars for the the upcoming USET 2014 Annual Meeting! The USET Conference will begin with general assembly December 2, 2014 at 8:30 AM. Presentations for the Board of Directors will...

  5. ND-TRIBE-TURTLE MOUNTAIN BAND OF CHIPPEWA

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    if several sizeable public buildings have the potential to be sites for either district heating or a combined heat and power project, develop initial plans for installation of...

  6. Alaska Native Tribes Receive Technical Assistance for Local Clean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    asked to participate in the START program. Community improvements from energy to housing, health care, education, or any other community need must first come from an engaged...

  7. The Asacarsarmiut Tribe proposes to conduct energy efficient...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to purchase and install materials and equipment needed to replace three electrical transformers, including pedestals and pads, which are part of the power system which provides...

  8. Hanford Site, Tribes Raise Awareness of Culturally Significant...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    occurring volcanic glass, which is part of a simulated fire hearth at the cultural test beds site. Julie Longenecker, left, and Jill Conrad, center, watch Keith Mendez handle...

  9. Pascua Yaqui Tribe Renewable Energy Development and Deployment Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arvayo, Maria

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2012, PYT was awarded a grant from the Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program to conduct a Renewable Energy Development and Deployment Feasibility Study that would define the technical and economic viability of renewable energy on tribal lands. Red Mountain Energy Partners (RMEP) was hired by PYT to complete the study. Through this study, Red Mountain concluded that there are viable opportunities for solar at Tortuga Ranch, the Casino del Sol and a third site near the Justice Center on Camino de Oeste.

  10. DOE-Supported Education and Training Programs Help Crow Tribe...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    future generations and prepare its community for future jobs in energy fields. At the heart of the Work Readiness Program and the Cultivation and Characterization of Oil...

  11. Webinar for Tribes, States, Local Governments, and Territories...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    28, 2014, EPA issued an action related to the proposed Clean Power Plan to cut carbon pollution from power plants. EPA is following through on its commitment made in June to...

  12. Genetic distances in the tribe Bovini studied by gel electrophoresis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butts, Kelley Elaine McRae

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Figure 2b. Electrophoretic patterns of esterase d, 22 22 25 25 Figure 3a. Electrophoretic patterns of glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase I and glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase 2. . . . . . 27 Figure 3b. Electrophoretic patterns of glyoxalase I..., phosphoglucomutase 2, and phosphoglucomutase 3 40 Figure 9a. Electrophoretic patterns of peptidase a. Figure 9b. Electrophoretic patterns of peptidase a, second gel Figure 10a. Electrophoretic patterns of peptidase b. Figure 10b. Electrophoretic patterns...

  13. Two Tribes Recognized as Climate Action Champions During White...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    gas emissions 40% by 2018 using a range of approaches, including the use of biodiesel to power public buses and aggressive energy efficiency measures. The Sault Ste....

  14. Clean Energy Projects Helping Wisconsin Tribe Achieve Sustainability Goals

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1. FeedstockCLEAN AIR ACT § 309*Ministerial: Join the|

  15. DOE Announces Consultation Sessions with Alaska Native Tribes and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPM | DepartmentI Office of

  16. EM's Top Official Underscores Commitment to Meet with Tribes | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory Board Contributions EMEM Recovery ActSeriesof Energyof

  17. MHK Projects/Passamaquoddy Tribe Hydrokinetic Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma:Energy Information Basin

  18. EECBG Success Story: Tribe's Headquarters Gets Energy Efficiency Makeover |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJulySavannah RiverSustainability | DepartmentDepartment of

  19. Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy Chinaof EnergyImpactOnSTATEMENT8.pdf MoreRevisedProgramCost Savings |

  20. Climate Action Champions: Blue Lake Rancheria Tribe, CA | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuilding RemovalCSSDepartmentDepartment

  1. Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesville EnergyDepartment.Attachment FY2011-40(10 CFR PartsOil,Energy

  2. Interior Department Solicits Grant Proposals from Tribes | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment of EnergyIndustry15Among States in theWAPA1Interim2015

  3. Key Renewable Energy Opportunities for Oklahoma Tribes | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report: I11IG002RTC3WASTE-TO-ENERGY:KenKeriKey

  4. Oklahoma Tribe to Install Solar Roof | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferAprilOverviewEfficiencyof Energy informationOil Study Guide

  5. Hanford Site, Tribes Raise Awareness of Culturally Significant Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To: CongestionDevelopmentHEADQUARTERSOutreachAprilJohnDepartmentWith

  6. Head of EM Visits Northwest Tribes | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department of Energy Completing theWhiz! |Nearly six weeks HazleEM

  7. New Renewable Energy Development Resources for Tribes | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many DevilsForumEngines | Department ofUniversalDepartmentResearch

  8. Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAM Revised DOE AcquisitionActivitiesDates:Department of

  9. Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAM Revised DOEDepartmentaboutInformationFuel from Waste

  10. Alaska Native Tribes Receive Technical Assistance for Local Clean Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJune 17,Agenda Agenda Agenda Agenda AgendaAirEnergy

  11. Alaska Native Tribes Receive Technical Assistance for Local Clean Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'s Reply Comments AT&T,FACT S HEET FACTAgenda:MethaneEnergy

  12. Tribe's Headquarters Gets Energy Efficiency Makeover | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23,EnergyChicopeeTechnologyfact sheetTransferringInc.SOLAR ENERGYTribalStephen

  13. Community Renewable Energy Deployment: Forest County Potawatomi Tribe |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCityCoatedCommunity Electric Coop Jump to:|EnergyOpen

  14. Key Renewable Energy Opportunities for Oklahoma Tribes | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas » MethaneJohnson ControlsJoyceEnergy Key Renewable

  15. DOE, Tribes sign a renewal of the Agreement in Principle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOSTDOENuclear EnergyMeetingMetricDOE, State

  16. Workshop Helps Empower Tribes to Make Renewable Energy Project Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric VehicleCenters |-- 9:00 AM Opening PlenaryNatural Gas and

  17. DOI - Policy on Consultation with Indian Tribes | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility Database Data and Resources DOE Facility849 Jump to:Energywith

  18. USDA Agricultural Conservation Easement Program Webinar for Tribes |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartmentTestFeedEnergyUCShale_Gas.pdfUS-India EnergyUSDA -Department

  19. Head of EM Visits Northwest Tribes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEN TO THEHudson Hazle Spindle, LLC BeaconHead of

  20. File:Regs-tribes2008.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdf Jump to:Original Rule from

  1. Operation of the Lower Granite Dam Adult Trap, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, Jerrel R.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 2008 we operated the adult salmonid trap at Lower Granite Dam from 7 March through 25 November, except during a short summer period when water temperatures were too high to safely handle fish. We collected and handled a total of 20,463 steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss and radio-tagged 34 of the hatchery steelhead. We took scale samples from 3,724 spring/summer Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha for age and genetic analysis. We collected and handled a total of 8,254 fall Chinook salmon. Of those fish, 2,520 adults and 942 jacks were transported to Lyons Ferry Hatchery on the Snake River in Washington. In addition, 961 adults and 107 jacks were transported to the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery on the Clearwater River in Idaho. The remaining 3,724 fall Chinook salmon were passed upstream. Scales samples were taken from 780 fall Chinook salmon tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and collected by the sort-by-code system.

  2. Hill Air Force Base as a case study for linking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Contaminants of Concern: ­ Trichloroethylene (TCE) ­ Tetrachloroethylene (PERC) ­ Carbon Tetrachloride

  3. Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Life History Investigations, Annual Report 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiffan, Kenneth F. [U.S. Geological Survey; Connor, William P. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; McMichael, Geoffrey A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2007, we used radio and acoustic telemetry to evaluate the migratory behavior, survival, mortality, and delay of subyearling fall Chinook salmon in the Clearwater River and Lower Granite Reservoir. Monthly releases of radio-tagged fish ({approx}95/month) were made from May through October and releases of 122-149/month acoustic-tagged fish per month were made from August through October. We compared the size at release of our tagged fish to that which could have been obtained at the same time from in-river, beach seine collections made by the Nez Perce Tribe. Had we relied on in-river collections to obtain our fish, we would have obtained very few in June from the free-flowing river but by late July and August over 90% of collected fish in the transition zone were large enough for tagging. Detection probabilities of radio-tagged subyearlings were generally high ranging from 0.60 (SE=0.22) to 1.0 (SE=0) in the different study reaches and months. Lower detection probabilities were observed in the confluence and upper reservoir reaches where fewer fish were detected. Detection probabilities of acoustic-tagged subyearlings were also high and ranged from 0.86 (SE=0.09) to 1.0 (SE=0) in the confluence and upper reservoir reaches during August through October. Estimates of the joint probability of migration and survival generally declined in a downstream direction for fish released from June through August. Estimates were lowest in the transition zone (the lower 7 km of the Clearwater River) for the June release and lowest in the confluence area for July and August releases. The joint probability of migration and survival in these reaches was higher for the September and October releases, and were similar to those of fish released in May. Both fish weight and length at tagging were significantly correlated with the joint probability of migrating and surviving for both radio-tagged and acoustic-tagged fish. For both tag types, fish that were heavier at tagging had a higher probability of successfully passing through the confluence (P=0.0050 for radio-tagged fish; P=0.0038 for acoustic-tagged fish). Radio-tagged fish with greater weight at tagging also had a higher probability of migrating and surviving through both the lower free-flowing reach (P=0.0497) and the transition zone (P=0.0007). Downstream movement rates of radio-tagged subyearlings were highest in free-flowing reaches in every month and decreased considerably with impoundment. Movement rates were slowest in the transition zone for the June and August release groups, and in the confluence reach for the July release group. For acoustic-tagged subyearlings, the slowest movement rates through the confluence and upper reservoir reaches were observed for the September release group. Radio-tagged fish released in August showed the greatest delay in the transition zone, while acoustic-tagged fish released in September showed the greatest delay in the transition zone and confluence reaches. Across the monthly release groups from July through September, the probability of delaying in the transition zone and surviving there declined throughout the study. All monthly release groups of radio-tagged subyearlings showed evidence of mortality within the transition zone, with final estimates (across the full 45-d detection period) ranging from 0.12 (SE not available) for the May release group to 0.58 (SE = 0.06) for the June release group. The May and September release groups tended to have lower mortality in the transition zone than the June, July, and August release groups. Live fish were primarily detected away from shore in the channel, whereas all dead fish were located along shorelines with most being located in the vicinity of the Memorial Bridge and immediately upstream. During the May detection period, before the implementation of summer flow augmentation, temperatures in the Clearwater River and Snake River arms of Lower Granite Reservoir and the downstream boundary of the confluence ranged from 8 to 17 C. During the June-August detection periods, however, temperatures in

  4. Status and Monitoring of Natural and Supplemented Chinook Salmon in Johnson Creek, Idaho, 2006-2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabe, Craig D.; Nelson, Douglas D. [Nez Perce Tribe

    2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement Project (JCAPE) has conducted juvenile and adult monitoring and evaluation studies for its 10th consecutive year. Completion of adult and juvenile Chinook salmon studies were conducted for the purpose of evaluating a small-scale production initiative designed to increase the survival of a weak but recoverable spawning aggregate of summer Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. The JCAPE program evaluates the life cycle of natural origin (NOR) and hatchery origin (HOR) supplementation fish to quantify the key performance measures: abundance, survival-productivity, distribution, genetics, life history, habitat, and in-hatchery metrics. Operation of a picket style weir and intensive multiple spawning ground surveys were completed to monitor adult Chinook salmon and a rotary screw trap was used to monitor migrating juvenile Chinook salmon in Johnson Creek. In 2007, spawning ground surveys were conducted on all available spawning habitat in Johnson Creek and one of its tributaries. A total of 63 redds were observed in the index reach and 11 redds for all other reaches for a combined count of 74 redds. Utilization of carcass recovery surveys and adult captures at an adult picket weir yielded a total estimated adult escapement to Johnson Creek of 438 Chinook salmon. Upon deducting fish removed for broodstock (n=52), weir mortality/ known strays (n=12), and prespawning mortality (n=15), an estimated 359 summer Chinook salmon were available to spawn. Estimated total migration of brood year 2005 NOR juvenile Chinook salmon at the rotary screw trap was calculated for three seasons (summer, fall, and spring). The total estimated migration was 34,194 fish; 26,671 of the NOR migrants left in the summer (July 1 to August 31, 2005) as fry/parr, 5,852 left in the fall (September 1 to November 21, 2005) as presmolt, and only 1,671 NOR fish left in the spring (March 1 to June 30, 2006) as smolt. In addition, there were 120,415 HOR supplementation smolts released into Johnson Creek during the week of March 12, 2007. Life stage-specific juvenile survival from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was calculated for brood year 2005 NOR and HOR supplementation juvenile Chinook salmon. Survival of NOR parr Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 28.2% and 16.2%. Survival of NOR presmolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 28.2% and 22.3%. Survival of NOR smolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 44.7% and 32.9%. Survival of HOR smolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 31.9% and 26.2%. Multi-year analysis on smolt to adult return rate's (SAR's) and progeny to parent ratio's (P:P's) were calculated for NOR and HOR supplementation Brood Year 2002 Chinook salmon. SAR's were calculated from Johnson Creek to Johnson Creek (JC to JC), Lower Granite Dam to Lower Granite (LGD to LGD), and Lower Granite Dam to Johnson Creek (LGD to JC); for NOR fish SAR's were 0.16%, 1.16% and 1.12%, while HOR supplementation SAR's from JC to JC, LGD to LGD and LGD to JC were 0.04%, 0.19% and 0.13%. P:P's for all returning NOR and HOR supplemented adults were under replacement levels at 0.13 and 0.65, respectively. Recruit per spawner estimates (R/S) for Brood Year 2005 adult Chinook salmon were also calculated for NOR and HOR supplemented Chinook salmon at JC and LGD. R/S estimates for NOR and HOR supplemented fish at JC were 231 and 1,745, while R/S estimates at LGD were 67 and 557. Management recommendations address (1) effectiveness of data collection methods, (2) sufficiency of data quality (statistical power) to enable management recommendations, (3) removal of uncertainty and subsequent cessation of M&E activities, and (4) sufficiency of findings for program modifications prior to five-year review.

  5. Kernel Spectral Clustering for dynamic data using Multiple Kernel D. Peluffo-Ordo~nez S. Garcia-Vega R. Langone J. A. K. Suykens G. Castellanos-Dominguez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    purposes, some conventional spectral clustering techniques are also considered, namely, kernel k- means and min-cuts. Also, standard k-means. The normalized mutual information and adjusted random index metrics Mellon University, as well as to a synthetic example, namely three moving Gaussian clouds. For comparison

  6. Do all raindrops fall at terminal speed? Guillermo Montero-Martinez,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostinski, Alex

    Do all raindrops fall at terminal speed? Guillermo Montero-Martinez,1,2 Alexander B. Kostinski,3 periods of high rainfall rates). Citation: Montero-Martinez, G., A. B. Kostinski, R. A. Shaw, and F

  7. Alternative Fuel Trade Alliance Clean Cities Education

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Differences - Mixed Messages - Lack of Available, Objective, and Technically Accurate Information Partners: - Project Lead: Robert White - PERC - CVEF - NBB Objectives -...

  8. Seminole Tribe of Florida Native Learning Center Webinar: Grant Writing Essentials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Native Learning Center (NLC) offers tuition FREE courses and trainings to Native Americans and indigenous people with an emphasis on the educational needs of tribal members and their...

  9. The Ecophysiology and Evolution of Mycoheterotrophic Plants in the Tribe Pyroleae (Ericaceae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hynson, Nicole

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the case of 15 N enrichment - and the isotope signatures ofisotope signatures that were not significantly different between sites, while enrichmentisotope discrimination. There was, however, a slight trend toward 13 C enrichment

  10. Money & More: MATIC Tribal Resource Forum for Arizona Tribes and Tribal Organizations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the Multi-Agency Tribal Infrastructure Collaborative (MATIC), this free Multi-Agency Resource Forum will share funding, technical assistance, training, and other resources available to...

  11. Evaluation of the paraphyletic assemblages within Lonchophyllinae, with description of a new tribe and genus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parlos, Julie A.; Timm, Robert M.; Swier, Vicki J.; Zeballos, Horacio; Baker, Robert J.

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    of these karyotypes, previously not available for L. cadenai and L. concava, are shown in Fig. 1. Sequence divergence.All intraspecific se- quence divergence values were less than 2.5%, with the exception of those for Platalina as well as populations representing...UM of texas tech University Table 1. Karyotype data obtained from the literature or described herein. Locality data are provided when available. Abbreviations are: L. = Lonchophylla, H. = Hsunycteris, 2N = diploid number, FN = fundamental number, Suriname...

  12. Tribes Eligible to Apply for REDI Initiative Funding: Applications Due Mar. 4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability announced a new Climate Action Champions competition that will identify, showcase, and invest in local and tribal governments across the country that demonstrate an ongoing commitment to prepare for the impacts of a changing climate.

  13. St. Regis Mohawk Tribe Paves the Way to a Sustainable Future...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    efforts, including the expansion of AHA's Sunrise Acres in 2011 to include 20 new ultra-efficient homes for low-income seniors. For the strategic energy planning portion of...

  14. The Ecophysiology and Evolution of Mycoheterotrophic Plants in the Tribe Pyroleae (Ericaceae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hynson, Nicole

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    species. Fungal endophytes in the genus Phialocephala andfungus, Endo=fungal endophyte, ErM=ericoid mycorrhizalFlagelloscypha sp. OTU # Fungal endophyte Fungus sp.1 Fungus

  15. Webinar for Tribes, States, Local Governments, and Territories on the Clean Power Plan Supplemental Proposal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    On Tuesday, October 28, 2014, EPA issued an action related to the proposed Clean Power Plan to cut carbon pollution from power plants. EPA is following through on its commitment made in June to...

  16. Arizona Apache Tribe Set to Break Ground on New Solar Project, Spring / Summer 2014 (Newsletter)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This newsletter describes key activities of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs for Spring / Summer 2014.

  17. Seminole Tribe of Florida Native Learning Center Indian Housing Training Conference

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    To register for the conference and see a preliminary agenda, visit the Native Learning Center website.

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of tribe habrolepidini and revision of Homalopoda and Ceraptroceroideus (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez Velez, Beatriz

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    by the presence of a specialized ventral mandibular tooth that is formed through modification of a seta into a stout socketed spine and three more unambiguous characters, clava length from 2.57 to 3.28, small hexagonal sculpture of scutellum and sensilla in three...

  19. Phylogeny of the Asian spiny frog tribe Paini (Family Dicroglossidae) sensu Dubois Jing Che a,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Bob

    , tyrosinase) and mitochondrial (12S, 16S rRNA) DNA sequence data to infer the phylogenetic relationships

  20. Tribes Provide Input on 10-Year Plan for Renewable Energy in...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Renewable Energy in the Arctic Region June 2, 2015 - 1:56pm Addthis Utility-scale wind turbines in Kodiak, Alaska. Photo from Kodiak Electric Association, NREL 16795....

  1. Tribes and the Formation of Social Inequality : : a Case Study from Central Jordan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Matthew L.

    and Khirbat Dubab in the Wadi Hasa, Jordan: the Pottery.Moab extends north of the Wadi Mujib to somewhere around theCentral Moab extends from the Wadi Mujib south to the Wadi

  2. Energy Department Makes $2.5 Million Available for Native American Tribes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal RegisterHydrogen and Fuel Cellof Energy MobilePower for U.S.to

  3. Energy Department to Help Tribes Advance Clean Energy Projects and Increase

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal RegisterHydrogen andResiliency | Department of Energy Energy

  4. EM's New Project of the Month Focuses on Tribes' Work with Native

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory Board Contributions EMEM Recovery ActSeries |ofEnvironmentPlants

  5. Energy Department to Help Tribes Advance Clean Energy Projects and Increase

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJunetrackEllen| Department of EnergyCleanEnergy Economy

  6. Transfer of Excess Computer and IT Equipment to the Northern Arapaho Tribe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2, 2003Tool ofTopoCarbon| Department of Energy

  7. Energy Department Makes $2.5 Million Available for Native American Tribes

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010 SNF &Department ofDepartmentInfrastructure |Softwareto

  8. Interior Department Awards $3.7 Million to 13 Tribes for Renewable Energy |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment of EnergyIndustry15Among States in theWAPA1Interim2015 and

  9. Climate Action Champions: Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, MI |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO OverviewAttachments4 Chairs Meeting - AprilEvents Clean

  10. Oct. 29 Webinar to Spotlight DOE Energy Programs for Tribes and First

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of Order No.ofUseIowaWeatherization11

  11. San Carlos Apache Tribe Set to Break Ground on New Solar Project |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCO OverviewRepository | DepartmentSEA-04:Department ofQUÉFutureDepartment of

  12. St. Regis Mohawk Tribe Paves the Way to a Sustainable Future; Kicks Off

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCO OverviewRepositoryManagement |SolarSpecial Report:SpectrumEnergy

  13. NEW MEXICO TRIBAL LEADER FORUM AND COMMUNITY-SCALE WORKSHOP FOR TRIBES |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732onMake Your NextHow EMMinutes:Energy

  14. ANA Announces FY14 Funding Opportunities for Tribes | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of2 of 5) ALARA Training

  15. Solar Viewed as Triple Boon for Bishop Paiute Tribe | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmart Metersof EnergyRightsSolar

  16. New Mexico Tribal Leader Forum and Community-Scale Workshop for Tribes |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011R - 445 CU -StandardsNewtoDepartment of

  17. Kalispel Tribe of Indians joins federal agencies to protect bull trout and other species

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron beamJoin2015Just PlainKaitlyn Faries Kaitlyn

  18. 25 U.S.C. 477: Incorporation of Indian Tribes, Charter, Ratification by

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind ProjectsourceInformationColorado School of|

  19. 25 U.S.C. 81: Contracts and Agreements with Indian Tribes | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind ProjectsourceInformationColorado School

  20. ACHP - Consultation with Indian Tribes in the Section 106 Review Process: a

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 WindtheEnergySulfonate as aAAB AsiaABEEolica

  1. Microsoft Word - XX 13 Colville Tribe to celebrate opening of Chief Joseph Hatchery - EDITSES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625Data Show Filtration8, 2011HanfordWoody463 13

  2. Tribes Provide Input on 10-Year Plan for Renewable Energy in the Arctic

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystems Analysis Success| Department ofServicesPoints ofRegion | Department

  3. DOE-Supported Education and Training Programs Help Crow Tribe Promote

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No Significant6-2002 October5-99 FebruaryThreeCO2| Department

  4. DOE-Supported Education and Training Programs Help Crow Tribe Promote

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No Significant6-2002 October5-99 FebruaryThreeCO2|

  5. Two Tribes Recognized as Climate Action Champions During White House Tribal

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergyTransportation WorkDecember 28, 2004Energy

  6. Leading the Charge: Native Leaders Give Tribes a Voice on White House

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas »of Energy Laser-FiringDevelopmentHarold

  7. Workshop Provides Hands-On Project Development Training for 26 Tribes |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @Join the ChallengeSharingDepartment of

  8. Webinar for Tribes: Overview of U.S. Department of Energy Power Marketing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02ReportWaste-to-Energy|andWebinarDepartment of

  9. Title 25 USC 324 Consent of Certain Tribes; Consent of Individual Indians |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson EthanolTillson,Open EnergyTitle 18CFROpen EnergyOpen

  10. ITEP Webinar: Crafting a Remediation and Prevention Plan for Your Tribes or

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovemberInvestigationsCommittee onTechnology DevelopmentBlogofVillage |

  11. New Mexico Tribal Leader Forum and Community-Scale Workshop for Tribes |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEW HAMPSHIREof EnergyBulbs | Department ofof

  12. Keep in mind, that with formality, often comes more of a standing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Three Affiliated Tribes: Tex Hall, Chairman Yurok Tribe: Susan Masten, Vice Chairperson Blue Lake Rancheria: Jana Ganion, Energy Director Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Tribe: Robert...

  13. Le diagnostic ou La douleur rvlatrice Chez Ab Bakr al-Rz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    considrable de resserrement, surtout s'il y a toux, avec dmangeaison des oreilles et du nez. . Al-Rz, al

  14. 9824 Chem. Commun., 2013, 49, 9824--9826 This journal is c The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013 Cite this: Chem. Commun., 2013,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, Mike P.

    nez-Cardenas, N. Cabrera, R. Perez-Montfort and A. Hernandez- Arana, Proteins: Struct., Funct., Bioinf., 2008

  15. agudos estudio tomcor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Representante Estudiantil). Inasistente: Prof. Roger Corbacho (Coordinador de Arquitectura). 1 Zeppieri (Coordinadora de Ingenier-a Qu-mica), Roger Mart-nez...

  16. auricular estudio descriptivo: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Representante Estudiantil). Inasistente: Prof. Roger Corbacho (Coordinador de Arquitectura). 1 Zeppieri (Coordinadora de Ingenier-a Qu-mica), Roger Mart-nez...

  17. adolescentes cubanos estudio: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Representante Estudiantil). Inasistente: Prof. Roger Corbacho (Coordinador de Arquitectura). 1 Zeppieri (Coordinadora de Ingenier-a Qu-mica), Roger Mart-nez...

  18. arteriovenosas estudio retrospectivo: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Representante Estudiantil). Inasistente: Prof. Roger Corbacho (Coordinador de Arquitectura). 1 Zeppieri (Coordinadora de Ingenier-a Qu-mica), Roger Mart-nez...

  19. adolescentes estudio realizado: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Representante Estudiantil). Inasistente: Prof. Roger Corbacho (Coordinador de Arquitectura). 1 Zeppieri (Coordinadora de Ingenier-a Qu-mica), Roger Mart-nez...

  20. altamente capacitados estudios: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Representante Estudiantil). Inasistente: Prof. Roger Corbacho (Coordinador de Arquitectura). 1 Zeppieri (Coordinadora de Ingenier-a Qu-mica), Roger Mart-nez...

  1. artritis reactiva estudio: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Representante Estudiantil). Inasistente: Prof. Roger Corbacho (Coordinador de Arquitectura). 1 Zeppieri (Coordinadora de Ingenier-a Qu-mica), Roger Mart-nez...

  2. adultos estudio descriptivo: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Representante Estudiantil). Inasistente: Prof. Roger Corbacho (Coordinador de Arquitectura). 1 Zeppieri (Coordinadora de Ingenier-a Qu-mica), Roger Mart-nez...

  3. agudo estudio aleatorizado: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Representante Estudiantil). Inasistente: Prof. Roger Corbacho (Coordinador de Arquitectura). 1 Zeppieri (Coordinadora de Ingenier-a Qu-mica), Roger Mart-nez...

  4. actinomicosis cervicofacial estudio: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Representante Estudiantil). Inasistente: Prof. Roger Corbacho (Coordinador de Arquitectura). 1 Zeppieri (Coordinadora de Ingenier-a Qu-mica), Roger Mart-nez...

  5. avanzada estudio euronut-seneca: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Representante Estudiantil). Inasistente: Prof. Roger Corbacho (Coordinador de Arquitectura). 1 Zeppieri (Coordinadora de Ingenier-a Qu-mica), Roger Mart-nez...

  6. asma bronquial estudio: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Representante Estudiantil). Inasistente: Prof. Roger Corbacho (Coordinador de Arquitectura). 1 Zeppieri (Coordinadora de Ingenier-a Qu-mica), Roger Mart-nez...

  7. aluminio estudio agudo: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Representante Estudiantil). Inasistente: Prof. Roger Corbacho (Coordinador de Arquitectura). 1 Zeppieri (Coordinadora de Ingenier-a Qu-mica), Roger Mart-nez...

  8. adolescencia estudio etiologico: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Representante Estudiantil). Inasistente: Prof. Roger Corbacho (Coordinador de Arquitectura). 1 Zeppieri (Coordinadora de Ingenier-a Qu-mica), Roger Mart-nez...

  9. amarga estudio preliminar: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Representante Estudiantil). Inasistente: Prof. Roger Corbacho (Coordinador de Arquitectura). 1 Zeppieri (Coordinadora de Ingenier-a Qu-mica), Roger Mart-nez...

  10. aspergilosis broncopulmonar estudio: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Representante Estudiantil). Inasistente: Prof. Roger Corbacho (Coordinador de Arquitectura). 1 Zeppieri (Coordinadora de Ingenier-a Qu-mica), Roger Mart-nez...

  11. apendicitis estudio prospectivo: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Representante Estudiantil). Inasistente: Prof. Roger Corbacho (Coordinador de Arquitectura). 1 Zeppieri (Coordinadora de Ingenier-a Qu-mica), Roger Mart-nez...

  12. adenomatoide folicular estudio: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Representante Estudiantil). Inasistente: Prof. Roger Corbacho (Coordinador de Arquitectura). 1 Zeppieri (Coordinadora de Ingenier-a Qu-mica), Roger Mart-nez...

  13. ambulatoria estudio prospectivo: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Representante Estudiantil). Inasistente: Prof. Roger Corbacho (Coordinador de Arquitectura). 1 Zeppieri (Coordinadora de Ingenier-a Qu-mica), Roger Mart-nez...

  14. acidos nucleicos estudio: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Representante Estudiantil). Inasistente: Prof. Roger Corbacho (Coordinador de Arquitectura). 1 Zeppieri (Coordinadora de Ingenier-a Qu-mica), Roger Mart-nez...

  15. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 49, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2001 1659 On Optimal Call Admission Control in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .Altman@sophia.inria.fr). T. Jiménez is with CESIMO--Centro de Simulacion y Modelos, Fac- ultdad de Ingenieria, Universidad de

  16. Global convergence of trust-region algorithms for constrained ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 27, 2012 ... Acknowledgement. The authors are grateful to Jos Mario Mart?nez who encouraged them to pursue this investigation and to Luis Mauricio...

  17. BIOLOGICAL AND MICROBIAL CONTROL Bioecology of Stenoma catenifer (Lepidoptera: Elachistidae) and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoddle, Mark S.

    ), Venezuela (Bosca´n de Martõ´nez and Godoy 1984), Guyana (Cervantes Peredo et al. 1999), Peru (Wysoki et al

  18. ATNI Mid-year Convention

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Mid-year Convention will be hosted by the Chehalis Tribe.

  19. DOE Office of Indian Energy Provides Tribes with Hands-On Support to Advance Tribal Energy Projects, Fall 2012 (Newsletter)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This newsletter describes key activities of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs for Fall 2012.

  20. Hood River Fish Habitat Project; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaivoda, Alexis

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the project implementation and monitoring of all habitat activities in the Hood River basin that occurred over the October 1, 2002 to September 30, 2003 period (FY 03). Some of the objectives in the corresponding statement of work for this contract were not completed within FY 03. A description of the progress during FY 03 and reasoning for deviation from the original tasks and timeline are provided. OBJECTIVE 1 - Provide coordination of all activities, administrative oversight and assist in project implementation and monitoring activities. Administrative oversight and coordination of the habitat statement of work, budget, subcontracts, personnel, implementation, and monitoring was provided. OBJECTIVE 2 - Continue to coordinate, implement, and revise, as needed, the Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan. The Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan was completed in 2000 (Coccoli et al., 2000). This document was utilized for many purposes including: drafting the Watershed Action Plan (Coccoli, 2002), ranking projects for funding, and prioritizing projects to target in the future. This document has been reviewed by many, including stakeholders, agencies, and interested parties. The Hood River Watershed Group Coordinator and author of the Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan, Holly Coccoli, has updated and revised the plan. Changes will be reflected in the Hood River Subbasin Plan, and after submission of the Subbasin Plan, a formally revised version of the Monitoring Plan will be put out for review. This will more specifically address changes in the Hood River subbasin since 2000, and reflect changes to fish habitat and needs in the Hood River subbasin regarding monitoring. OBJECTIVE 3 - Evaluate and monitor the habitat, accessibility, and presence of winter steelhead, coho salmon, and resident trout upstream of the Middle Fork Irrigation District water sources on Evans Creek. Through this project, BPA funded the Middle Fork Irrigation District (MFID) a total of $194,000 in FY 03 for the Glacier Ditch- Evans Creek project. BPA funds accounted for approximately 30% of the project while the remaining 70% was cost-shared by the MFID, the US Forest Service, and the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board. The MFID operated irrigation diversions on Evans Creek (Hutson pond RM 4.0 and the Evans Creek diversion RM 5.5), a tributary to the East Fork Hood River. Both diversions had inadequate upstream fish passage, and utilized Evans Creek to transport Eliot Branch water to distribute irrigation water lower in the basin. This project consisted of: piping a portion of the Glacier ditch to create a pressurized irrigation pipeline system, piping the Hutson extension, removing the culvert on Evans Creek near the Glacier ditch, removing the culvert above the Hutson pond, revegetating the disturbed areas, and providing adequate and approved fish passage on Evans Creek. Prior to any work, Brian Connors with MFID completed a NEPA checklist. Some of the key regulatory points of this project included wetland delineations, a cultural resources survey, and consultations with NOAA Fisheries, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. This project will eliminate the overflow of silty water into Evans Creek and West Fork Evans Creek. Upon completion of this project, access to 2.5 miles of winter steelhead, coho salmon, and resident trout habitat will be restored. Elimination of the interbasin transfer of water will discontinue the conveyance of silty Eliot Branch water into clear East Fork tributaries. Additionally, less water taken from Coe Branch, Eliot Branch, and Laurance Lake which will benefit listed steelhead and bull trout. The Glacier Ditch provided irrigation water from the Eliot Branch to upper valley orchards and agriculture for more than 100 years. The Glacier Ditch served approximately 1,438 acres with 18 cfs of water. The Glacier Ditch portion of this project

  1. Developing Clean Energy Projects on Tribal Lands: Data and Resources for Tribes (Book), DOE Office of Indian Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The itemAIR57451 CleanFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE April

  2. 851 SW Sixth Avenue, Suite 300 | Pacific First Building | Portland, OR 97204-1339 Phone: 503-229-0191 | Fax: 503-229-0443 | Website: www.cbfwa.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and restoration of fish, wildlife, and their habitat in the Columbia River Basin. The Authority is comprised of the following tribes and fish and wildlife agencies: Burns Paiute Tribe Coeur d'Alene Tribe Confederated Salish Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation Idaho Department of Fish and Game Kootenai Tribe of Idaho

  3. factsheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Coeur d'Alene Tribe, Kootenai Tribes, Kalispell Tribe, and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game. Located in Bonner County, the property provides forested wetland and wetland...

  4. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NM-TRIBE-PUEBLO OF SANTA CLARA, NEW MEXICO Location: Tribe NM-TRIBE- PUEBLO OF SANTA CLARA, NEW MEXICO NM American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project...

  5. Applicant DOE Award Project Location Project Focus Feasibility...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tribe's acquisition and subsequent operation of the Kerr Hydroelectric project as a wholesale power generation facility. Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation 200,000...

  6. EIS-0183: Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Columbia Basin Fish Accord MOA with the Shoshone-Banock Tribes 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accord MOA with the Shoshone-Banock Tribes (November 2008) More Documents & Publications...

  7. aboriginal siberians reveals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    government tourism units, travel agencies, bus operators, local culture and tourism industry associations, as well as tribe B & B industry. 5. The tourists for tribe service...

  8. Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet B O N N E V I L L E P O W E

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accord acknowledges the Tribe's resource management expertise and its commitment to fish and wildlife and provides for the Tribe's greater participation in decisions that...

  9. Fact Sheet - Federal agencies announce agreements to benefit...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission 2) MOA with Confederated Tribes of the Colville Indian Reservation and...

  10. | ISE 536-Fall03: Linear Programming and Extensions September 24, 2003 * | Lecture 9: Simplex Method, Degeneracy *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ordez, Fernando

    * * | | * * | | * * | | * * | | Lecture 9: Simplex Method, Degeneracy * * | | * * | | * * | |__Lecturer:_Fernando_Ord'o"nez________________________________________________* *_ | 1 Full simplex k=1yk : Ax + Iy = b, x 0 from (0, b) as the in* *itial BFS using Simplex. o If u* > 0

  11. | ISE 536-Fall03: Linear Programming and Extensions October 15, 2003 * | Lecture 13: Dual Simplex, Farkas Lemma *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ordez, Fernando

    * * | | * * | | * * | | * * | | Lecture 13: Dual Simplex, Farkas Lemma * * | | * * | | * * | |__Lecturer:_Fernando_Ord'o"nez________________________________________________* *_ | 1 Dual Simplex o Usual Simplex Maintain a BFS and aim for optimality (i.e. dual feasibility 0 ct - ct

  12. Oryx Vol 36 No 4 October 2002 Predicting the implications of conservation management: a territorial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrete, Martina

    orHidrologia, Universidad de Murcia, Campus de Espinardo, 30100, Murcia, Spain. endangeredJose E. Martinez Departamento de Ecologia e Hidrologia, Universidad de Murcia, Campus de Espinardo

  13. al hombre como: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    urbana Mart-nez Puche, A. et alii La Escolano, Francisco 7 Palma, Rafael et Hoffmann Odile 2009. "La conformacin de una frontera interna en las riberas del Tesechoacn",...

  14. Analysis of Two Competing TCP IP Connections INRIA, 2004 route des Lucioles, 06902 Sophia Antipolis, France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Núñez-Queija, Rudesindo

    Antipolis, France CESIMO, Universidad de Los Andes, Facultad de Ingeneria, Merida, Venezuela T. Jim enez CESIMO, Universidad de Los Andes, Facultad de Ingeneria, Merida, Venezuela R. N u~nez-Queija CWI, P

  15. Analysis of Two Competing TCP/IP Connections INRIA, 2004 route des Lucioles, 06902 Sophia Antipolis, France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Núñez-Queija, Rudesindo

    Antipolis, France CESIMO, Universidad de Los Andes, Facultad de Ingeneria, Merida, Venezuela T. Jim'enez CESIMO, Universidad de Los Andes, Facultad de Ingeneria, Merida, Venezuela R. N'u~nez­Queija CWI, P

  16. High-end-Computer System Performance: Science and Engineering - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollingsworth, Jeffrey K.

    2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the research conducted as part of the UMD effort of the multi-site PERC project. This project developed and enhanced the Dyninst instrumentation system and the Active Harmony auto-tuning framework.

  17. Journeys within the Leucophoropterini: Revision of the Tribe, Genera and Species, and Description of New Genera and Species from Australia and the Indo-Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menard, Katrina Louise

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    in Phylinae can have even further modified hind-femora with the bases being approximately 1.5 times the width of medial portion, and the apex widened again apically to form knees where the hind-femur meets the metatibia [3] (e.g. Arafuramiris Schuh...) and the presence of setiform parempodia (Schuh 1974). Within Orthotylinae and Phylinae intertribal relationships remain ambiguous, making co-evolutionary studies of host-plant relationships and comparative phylogenetic studies of character systems difficult...

  18. SYSTEMATICS AND EVOLUTION IN THE TRIBE SCHIZOPETALAE (BRASSICACEAE): A MOLECULAR, MORPHOLOGICAL, AND ECOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE DIVERSIFICATION OF AN ENDEMIC LINEAGE FROM THE ATACAMA DESERT (CHILE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toro Nunez, Oscar Fernando

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    As aridity has been identified as an active promoter of diversification in deserts, attempts to test organismal differentiation in the Atacama Desert have resulted particularly challenging. Most limitations are related to ...

  19. Confederated Tribes Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project : Annual Report Fiscal Year 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2007 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2007-January 31, 2008) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Camp Creek, Greasewood Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying five fish passage barriers on four creeks, (2) planting 1,275 saplings and seeding 130 pounds of native grasses, (3) constructing two miles of riparian fencing for livestock exclusion, (4) coordinating activities related to the installation of two off-channel, solar-powered watering areas for livestock, and (5) developing eight water gap access sites to reduce impacts from livestock. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at all existing easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the life of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success.

  20. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program : Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation : 2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, Angelo J.; Hallock, Stephanie A.; Firehammer, Jon A.

    2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report summarizes previously unreported data collected to fulfill the contractual obligations for BPA project No.1990-044-00, 'Coeur d'Alene Subbasin Fisheries Habitat Enhancement', during the 2006 calendar year. Even though the contract performance period for this project crosses fiscal and calendar years, the timing of data collection and analysis, as well as implementation of restoration projects, lends itself to this reporting schedule. The 2006 performance period marked the first year that BPA implemented its Process Improvement Initiative with the Pisces system serving as the vehicle for developing statements of work and tracking project performance. This document attempts to provide some consistency between the project objectives, around which past reports have been structured, and the new work element format adopted for use in Pisces. The report is formatted into three primary sections that respectively provide results and discussion of: (1) monitoring and evaluation of biological and physical habitat indicators; (2) implementation of restoration and enhancement projects; and (3) education and outreach work performed during 2006. The relevant work elements and/or milestones found in the statement of work are listed under these section headings and described in the body of the report.

  1. 3-D Reservoir and Stochastic Fracture Network Modeling for Enhanced Oil Recovery, Circle Ridge Phosphoria/Tensleep Reservoir, and River Reservation, Arapaho and Shoshone Tribes, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    La Pointe, Paul R.; Hermanson, Jan

    2002-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to improve the recovery of oil from the Circle Ridge Oilfield, located on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming, through an innovative integration of matrix characterization, structural reconstruction, and the characterization of the fracturing in the reservoir through the use of discrete fracture network models.

  2. Arizona Apache Tribe Set to Break Ground on New Solar Project, Spring / Summer 2014 (Newsletter), Office of Indian Energy (OIE), Indian Energy Beat

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments from Tarasa U.S.LLC |Aquion EnergyEnergyDepartmentON THE

  3. Eleven Tribes Jump START Clean Energy Projects, Summer 2012 (Newsletter), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy (OIE), Indian Energy Beat

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy Chinaof EnergyImpactOn July 2, 2014 in theGroupJuneThis primerDepartment

  4. Women playing a man's game : reconstructing ceremonial and ritual history of the Mesoamerican ballgame

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramos, Maria Isabel

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mexicana de Antropologa. Kuehne Heyder, Nicola 1993tribes inhabited this area (Kuehne, 1993: The People, Dress,

  5. Assessment of Biomass Energy Opportunities for the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Haase (McNeil Technologies, Inc)

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment of biomass energy and biobased product manufacturing opportunities for the Red Lake Tribe.

  6. Contact: Brian Gorman FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 206-526-6613 May 18, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Portland General Electric Co. and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon

  7. Report to Congress on Server and Data Center Energy Efficiency: Public Law 109-431: Appendices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Richard; Alliance to Save Energy; ICF Incorporated; ERG Incorporated; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    federal agencies, public corporations, cooperatives, tribes and non-profits for energy conservation, renewable energy,

  8. EA-0405: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Innovative Sulfur Dioxide Scrubbing System for Coal Burning Cement Kilns, Passamaquoddy Tribe Thomaston, Maine

  9. A numerical simulation study of gallium-phosphide/silicon heterojunction passivated emitter and rear solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Hannes [Department of Solar Energy, Institute Solid-State Physics, Leibniz University of Hannover, Appelstr. 2, 30167 Hannover (Germany); ARC Photovoltaics Centre of Excellence, University of New South Wales (UNSW), Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Ohrdes, Tobias [Institute for Solar Energy Research Hamelin (ISFH), 31860 Emmerthal (Germany); Dastgheib-Shirazi, Amir [Div. Photovoltaics, Department of Physics, University of Konstanz, 78457 Konstanz (Germany); Puthen-Veettil, Binesh; Knig, Dirk [ARC Photovoltaics Centre of Excellence, University of New South Wales (UNSW), Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Altermatt, Pietro P. [Department of Solar Energy, Institute Solid-State Physics, Leibniz University of Hannover, Appelstr. 2, 30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of passivated emitter and rear (PERC) solar cells made of p-type Si wafers is often limited by recombination in the phosphorus-doped emitter. To overcome this limitation, a realistic PERC solar cell is simulated, whereby the conventional phosphorus-doped emitter is replaced by a thin, crystalline gallium phosphide (GaP) layer. The resulting GaP/Si PERC cell is compared to Si PERC cells, which have (i) a standard POCl{sub 3} diffused emitter, (ii) a solid-state diffused emitter, or (iii) a high efficiency ion-implanted emitter. The maximum efficiencies for these realistic PERC cells are between 20.5% and 21.2% for the phosphorus-doped emitters (i)(iii), and up to 21.6% for the GaP emitter. The major advantage of this GaP hetero-emitter is a significantly reduced recombination loss, resulting in a higher V{sub oc}. This is so because the high valence band offset between GaP and Si acts as a nearly ideal minority carrier blocker. This effect is comparable to amorphous Si. However, the GaP layer can be contacted with metal fingers like crystalline Si, so no conductive oxide is necessary. Compared to the conventional PERC structure, the GaP/Si PERC cell requires a lower Si base doping density, which reduces the impact of the boron-oxygen complexes. Despite the lower base doping, fewer rear local contacts are necessary. This is so because the GaP emitter shows reduced recombination, leading to a higher minority electron density in the base and, in turn, to a higher base conductivity.

  10. U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Summit with American Indian...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    12:00 - 12:30 Special Closing Remarks Salons V & VI Secretary Vilsack, Department of Agriculture 12:30 - 4:00 Tribe-to-Tribe Dialogue (No Planned DOE Events) 6:00 - 9:00 Reception...

  11. CX-004634: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nevada- Tribe- Walker River Paiute TribeCX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1Date: 11/30/2010Location(s): NevadaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  12. CX-007073: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nooksack Indian TribeCX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1Date: 09/15/2011Location(s): Nooksack Indian Tribe, WashingtonOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  13. Jana Ganion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As the Energy Director for the Blue Lake Rancheria, Jana has helped establish the Tribes energy strategy, and has implemented a wide array of renewable energy assets and energy efficiency...

  14. New Mexico Tribal Leader Forum and Community-Scale Workshop for...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    New Mexico Tribal Leader Forum and Community-Scale Workshop for Tribes New Mexico Tribal Leader Forum and Community-Scale Workshop for Tribes July 27, 2015 8:00AM MDT to July 29,...

  15. CX-000124: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Miami Tribe Energy Efficiency RetrofitsCX(s) Applied: B5.1, B2.5, A1Date: 12/10/2009Location(s): Miami Tribe, OklahomaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  16. Energy Department Makes $2.5 Million Available for Native American...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Makes 2.5 Million Available for Native American Tribes to Develop Renewable Energy Resources Energy Department Makes 2.5 Million Available for Native American Tribes to Develop...

  17. CX-003263: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Montana-Tribe-Blackfeet TribeCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 07/26/2010Location(s): MontanaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  18. CX-007042: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kickapoo Traditional Tribe of TexasCX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1Date: 03/30/2010Location(s): Kickapoo Tribe, TexasOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  19. CX-006111: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington-Tribe-Stillaguamish Tribe of IndiansCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B2.5, B5.1Date: 07/07/2011Location(s): WashingtonOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  20. CX-002565: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alaska-Tribe-Qagan Tayagungin TribeCX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1Date: 05/24/2010Location(s): AlaskaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  1. Brochosome influence on parasitisation efficiency of Homalodisca coagulata (Say) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoddle, Mark S.

    Brochosome influence on parasitisation efficiency of Homalodisca coagulata (Say) (Hemiptera, the Netherlands Abstract. 1. Many cicadellid females in the tribe Proconiini (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) cover. Introduction Many cicadellid females in the tribe Proconiini (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) cover their egg masses

  2. Florida Emergency Information Line (Only activated during disasters). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-800-342-3557 Florida Division of Emergency Management (www.FloridaDisaster.org) . . . . . . . . . . . Non-Emergencies 850-413-9900

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-800-874-7561 Seminole Tribe Police . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 863-983-2285 Seminole Tribe Fire.fpl.com) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Outage 1-800-4-OUTAGE (1-800-468-8243) Florida Keys Electric Cooperative (www

  3. Simulation of Flow and Sediment Mobility Using a Multidimensional Flow Model for the White Sturgeon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5230 Prepared in cooperation with the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho and Bonneville Power Administration U with the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho and Bonneville Power Administration Scientific Investigations Report 2005-5230 U

  4. People of the Sacred Language: Revival of the Hocak Language

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Tashina Marie

    2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    , carts, and services for a portage for thirty years. Other articles provided land to certain tribal members, likely to those families most influential in obtaining the tribes agreement to the treaty. 67 The fourth important treaty...

  5. CX-002321: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    California-Tribe-Yurok Tribe Energy Efficiency RetrofitsCX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1Date: 05/13/2010Location(s): Klamath, CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  6. Final Report - Wind and Hydro Energy Feasibility Study - June 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jim Zoellick; Richard Engel; Rubin Garcia; Colin Sheppard

    2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This feasibility examined two of the Yurok Tribe's most promising renewable energy resources, wind and hydro, to provide the Tribe detailed, site specific information that will result in a comprehensive business plan sufficient to implement a favorable renewable energy project.

  7. DOE Categorical Exclusion Determination Form

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tribe) proposes to install four small (approximately 1.0-1.5 kW) vertical wind turbines at designated locations on Tribal lands to offset energy costs for the Tribe. Due to...

  8. Inhabiting Indianness : US colonialism and indigenous geographies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnd, Natchee Blu

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1986. Renegade Tribe: The Palouse Indians and the Invasionthe Spokane, Yakima, Palouse, and Coeur dAlene peoples.

  9. American Journal of Botany 97(2): 337356. 2010. Puya, a large genus (ca. 200 spp.; Luther, 2004) of terrestrial,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sytsma, Kenneth J.

    /Deutero- cohnia/Dyckia (among others) apart from Pitcairnia (subtribe Puyinae: Mez, 1896; tribe Puyeae: Mez, 1934

  10. Staff summary of Issues and Recommendations The Willamette Subbasin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde also recommended adopting the ESA delisting goals and the broader goals

  11. Pueblo of Laguna Utility Authority Renewable Energy Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carolyn Stewart, Red Mountain Tribal Energy

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The project, Renewable Energy Feasibility Study was designed to expand upon previous work done by the Tribe in evaluating utility formation, generation development opportunities, examining options for creating self-sufficiency in energy matters, and integrating energy management with the Tribes economic development goals. The evaluation of project locations and economic analysis, led to a focus primarily on solar projects.

  12. Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Tribe) propose to stock triploid rainbow trout into Lake. In addition, the Colville Tribe proposes to evaluate stocking success with creel data collection. The proposal need to better structure and justify this proposed expansion of a put-and-take fishery using triploid

  13. 27TH STREET WEST 25TH STREET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    DOBIE MALL ADH PAC MRH CRH EAS BME FNT NEZ TMM GEA PHR ACEWEL JGB GAR MEZ PAR CAL GSB CBA SZB PCL UTC B2 Molecular Biology Building MEZ Mezes Hall B3 MHD Moore Hall Dormitory C3 MMS Mike A. Myers Track

  14. A 3D Porous Cobalt-Organic Framework Exhibiting Spin-Canted Antiferromagnetism and Field-Induced Spin-Flop Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    . 2007, 46, 272. (2) (a) Coronado, E.; Galan-Mascaros, J. R.; Gomez-Garcia, C. J.; Laukhin, V. Nature 2000, 408, 447. (b) Alberola, A.; Coronado, E.; Galan- Mascaros, J. R.; Gimenez-Saiz, C.; Gomez

  15. 27TH STREET WEST 25TH STREET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    DOBIE MALL ADH PAC MRH CRH EAS BME FNT NEZ TMM GEA PHR ACEWEL JGB GAR MEZ PAR CAL GSB CBA SZB PCL UTC MEZ Mezes Hall B3 MHD Moore Hall Dormitory C3 MMS Mike A. Myers Track and Soccer D4 Stadium MNC

  16. 27TH STREET WEST 25TH STREET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    PHD WAG HHD DOBIE MALL ADH PAC MRH SHD EAS BME NST NEZ TMM GEA PHR TAY ACEWEL JGB GAR MEZ PAR CAL GSB B2 Molecular Biology Building MEZ Mezes Hall B3 MHD Moore Hall Dormitory C3 MMS Mike A. Myers Track

  17. Investigacin Centro de Investigacin y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politcnico Nacional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    materiales inorgánicos y tejidos biológicos. Gerónimo Arámbula Villa Investigaciones científicas y Gerardo Trápaga Martínez Simulación y análisis de operaciones de procesamiento de materiales y algunos

  18. Vegetation and climate dynamics during the early Middle Miocene from Lake Sinj (Dinaride Lake System, SE Croatia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiménez-Moreno, Gonzalo

    System, SE Croatia) Gonzalo Jiménez-Moreno a, , Oleg Mandic b , Mathias Harzhauser b , Davor Paveli c of Zagreb, Pierottijeva 6, HR-10000 Zagreb, Croatia A B S T R A C TA R T I C L E I N F O Article history 2008 Keywords: pollen vegetation climate change Miocene Croatia Pollen data from sediments from

  19. ISE 536{Fall03: Linear Programming and Extensions September 24, 2003 Lecture 9: Simplex Method, Degeneracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ordez, Fernando

    ISE 536{Fall03: Linear Programming and Extensions September 24, 2003 Lecture 9: Simplex Method, Degeneracy Lecturer: Fernando Ord#19;o~nez 1 Full simplex algorithm To solve min c t x : Ax = b; x #21; 0 = b; x #21; 0 from (0; b) as the initial BFS using Simplex. #15; If u #3; > 0 original problem

  20. ISE 536{Fall03: Linear Programming and Extensions October 15, 2003 Lecture 13: Dual Simplex, Farkas Lemma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ordez, Fernando

    ISE 536{Fall03: Linear Programming and Extensions October 15, 2003 Lecture 13: Dual Simplex, Farkas Lemma Lecturer: Fernando Ord#19;o~nez 1 Dual Simplex #15; Usual Simplex Maintain a BFS and aim maintain all #22; c j #21; 0, but potentially some b i Simplex Algorithm 1. Select row r

  1. ISE 536Fall03: Linear Programming and Extensions September 24, 2003 Lecture 9: Simplex Method, Degeneracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ordez, Fernando

    ISE 536Fall03: Linear Programming and Extensions September 24, 2003 Lecture 9: Simplex Method, Degeneracy Lecturer: Fernando Ordo~nez 1 Full simplex algorithm To solve min ctx : Ax = b, x 0. To start Solve the problem u = min m k=1 yk : Ax + Iy = b, x 0 from (0, b) as the initial BFS using Simplex

  2. ISE 536Fall03: Linear Programming and Extensions October 15, 2003 Lecture 13: Dual Simplex, Farkas Lemma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ordez, Fernando

    ISE 536Fall03: Linear Programming and Extensions October 15, 2003 Lecture 13: Dual Simplex, Farkas Lemma Lecturer: Fernando Ordo~nez 1 Dual Simplex Usual Simplex Maintain a BFS and aim for optimality, but potentially some bi Simplex Algorithm 1. Select row r such that (xB)r = ur0

  3. Vicerrectorado de Profesorado, Titulaciones, Ordenacin Acadmica, Coordinacin y Campus.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

    Arquitectura de Comp. y CC. de la Comp. Arquitectura y Tecnología de Computadores Cabello Pardos, Enrique Si INTRODUCCION A LA INFORMATICA Arquitectura de Comp. y CC. de la Comp. Arquitectura y Tecnología de Computadores Informáticos Castro Martínez, María Valeria de Si ARQUITECTURA E INGENIERIA DE COMPUTADORES Arquitectura de

  4. Vicerrectorado de Profesorado, Titulaciones, Ordenacin Acadmica, Coordinacin y Campus.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

    Geología Ecología Maestre Gil, Fernando Tomás Si FUNDAMENTOS DE COMPUTADORES Arquitectura de Comp. y CC. de la Comp. Arquitectura y Tecnología de Computadores Cabello Pardos, Enrique Si FUNDAMENTOS DE COMPUTADORES Arquitectura de Comp. y CC. de la Comp. Arquitectura y Tecnología de Computadores Martínez Torre

  5. Librera secuencial de lgebra Lineal Densa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giménez, Domingo

    1 Librería secuencial de Álgebra Lineal Densa LAPACK Domingo Giménez Facultad de Informática Direccionamiento global Linear Algebra Package #12;3 LAPACK Conjunto de rutinas para resolver problemas de los más frecuentes en álgebra lineal densa: sistemas de ecuaciones y problemas de valores propios Documentos

  6. Architecture of an Automatic Tuned Linear Algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giménez, Domingo

    /01 and PI-34/00788/F5/01. #12;Hierarchical Architecture of a Self-Optimised Lineal Algebra LibraryArchitecture of an Automatic Tuned Linear Algebra Library* Javier Cuenca Domingo Giménez José .... SPt c,z Architecture of a Self-Optimised Linear Algebra Routine (SOLAR) Installation_information n1

  7. Librera secuencial de lgebra Lineal Densa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giménez, Domingo

    1 Librería secuencial de Álgebra Lineal Densa LAPACK Domingo Giménez Javier Cuenca Facultad de local Direccionamiento global Linear Algebra Package #12;3 LAPACK Conjunto de rutinas para resolver problemas de los más frecuentes en álgebra lineal densa: sistemas de ecuaciones y problemas de valores

  8. Librera secuencial de lgebra Lineal Densa LAPACK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giménez, Domingo

    1 Librería secuencial de Álgebra Lineal Densa LAPACK Domingo Giménez Javier Cuenca Facultad de local Direccionamiento global Linear Algebra Package #12;3 LAPACK Conjunto de rutinas para resolver problemas de los más frecuentes en álgebra lineal densa: sistemas de ecuaciones y problemas de valores

  9. MARTA GOMEZ-CHIARRI Curriculum vitae Department of Fisheries, Animal and Veterinary Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Yang

    Educación y Ciencia, Fundación Jiménez Díaz, Madrid, Spain APPOINTEMENTS 2013 Fellowship, Ministerio de Educacion y Ciencia (Spain). #12;2 1993-1994 Postdoctoral Ciencia (Spain). 1990 Cilag Award in Nephrology Research, Sociedad Española de

  10. Use of high-resolution ichnological and stable isotope data for assessing completeness of a KP boundary section, Agost, Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    ­P boundary section, Agost, Spain Francisco J. Rodri´guez-Tovar a,*, Francisca Marti´nez-Ruiz b , Stefano M. Bernasconi c a Departamento de Estratigrafi´a y Paleontologi´a, Universidad de Granada, 18002 Granada, Spain b Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra CSIC-Universidad de Granada, 18002 Granada, Spain c

  11. The Power of Mesoscale Modeling... Mul$physics mesoscale simula$on provides a powerful tool for designing materials to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Long-Qing

    , neutronics, geomechanics, reac+ve transport, microstructure modeling, computa+onal fluid in verba+m from Schwen, D., E. Mar/nez, and A. Caro, J. Nuclear Mater (cv) in UO2 fuel. Also shown are the switching func+on h, the order

  12. Effects of g Radiation on Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    Effects of g Radiation on Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Concrete Gonzalo Marti´nez-Barrera,1,2 Luis F% of nylon fibers. The fiber-containing polymer concretes (PCs) were subjected to 5, 10, 50, and 100 k Engineers INTRODUCTION AND SCOPE It is well known that polymer concrete (PC) is three to five times stronger

  13. Compressive Strength of Gamma-Irradiated Polymer Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    Compressive Strength of Gamma-Irradiated Polymer Concrete Gonzalo Marti´nez-Barrera,1,2 Uriel concrete (PC) was developed by using differ- ent concentrations of silica sand as aggregate of Plastics Engineers INTRODUCTION Polymer concrete (PC) is a particulate composite where thermoset resins

  14. COMIT CIENTFICO Presidente: Jos Siles Gonzlez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escolano, Francisco

    Latinoamericana: Taka Oguisso. Universidad de Sao Paulo. Brasil Vocales: Manuel Amezcua Martínez. Fundación Index Fernandes de Freitas. Grupo de Investigación Cultura de los Cuidados. Brasil. Alfredo Bermúdez. México. Fernando Porto Ramos. Brasil. Luziana Barichon Luchesi. Brasil. Paulo Souza-Campos. Brasil. Alessandra

  15. AN EXTENDED SPREADSHEET PARADIGM FOR DATA VISUALISATION SYSTEMS, AND ITS IMPLEMENTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blake, Edwin

    by Edwin H. Blake #12;c Copyright 2000 by Fabian Nu~nez ii #12;Abstract We describe a data visualisation-used dataflow methods. iii #12;Acknowledgements I would like to thank Prof. Edwin Blake, my supervisor, without like to thank Dr. Gary Marsden for his help and encouraging advice, Dennis Burford for the Kaap Vaal

  16. Cloud tracking with optical flow for short-term solar forecasting Philip Wood-Bradley, Jos Zapata, John Pye

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , photovoltaic systems, and grid regulation (Mathiesen & Kleissl, 2011; Martínez López, et al, 2002). A method apart with a size of 640 by 480 pixels, were processed to determine the time taken for clouds to reach irradiance is essential for the effective operation of many solar applications such as solar thermal systems

  17. Abstract--This paper describes the extensibility mechanism that has been incorporated to the CAIN Adaptation Engine, that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

    .molina@ uam.es). J. M. Martínez, Grupo de Tratamiento de Imágenes, EPS, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain. phone: 0034-91-497-22-60; e-mail: victor.valdes@ uam.es). F. López

  18. Eastern Band of Cherokee Strategic Energy Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souther Carolina Institute of energy Studies-Robert Leitner

    2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians was awarded a grant under the U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program (TEP) to develop a Tribal Strategic Energy Plan (SEP). The grant, awarded under the First Steps phase of the TEP, supported the development of a SEP that integrates with the Tribes plans for economic development, preservation of natural resources and the environment, and perpetuation of Tribal heritage and culture. The Tribe formed an Energy Committee consisting of members from various departments within the Tribal government. This committee, together with its consultant, the South Carolina Institute for Energy Studies, performed the following activities: Develop the Tribes energy goals and objectives Establish the Tribes current energy usage Identify available renewable energy and energy efficiency options Assess the available options versus the goals and objectives Create an action plan for the selected options

  19. The following contribution was presented at the 28. European PV Solar Energy Conference and Exhibition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The following contribution was presented at the 28. European PV Solar Energy Conference TECHNOLOGY FOR HIGH-EFFICIENCY PERC SOLAR CELLS H. Hannebauer1 , T. Dullweber1 , S. Wyczanowski1 , K. Weise2 , F. Delahaye2 , O. Doll3 , I. Khler3 and R. Brendel1,4 1 Institute for Solar Energy Research Hamelin

  20. N-PERT BACK JUNCTION SOLAR CELLS: AN OPTION FOR THE NEXT INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY GENERATION?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are introducing a new solar cell design: the Passivated Emitter and Rear Cell (PERC), which features a full-PERT (Passivated Emitter, Rear Totally Diffused) solar cells with a processing sequence based on an industrialN-PERT BACK JUNCTION SOLAR CELLS: AN OPTION FOR THE NEXT INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY GENERATION? Bianca

  1. 19.4% -EFFICIENT LARGE AREA REAR-PASSIVATED SCREEN-PRINTED SILICON SOLAR CELLS T. Dullweber*1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be reduced by applying the PERC (passivated emitter and rear cell) solar cell design [8]. The following19.4% -EFFICIENT LARGE AREA REAR-PASSIVATED SCREEN-PRINTED SILICON SOLAR CELLS T. Dullweber*1 , S% in the near future. Keywords: Silicon Solar Cell, Screen Printing, Rear Passivation 1 Introduction About 80

  2. Alfalfa Seed Testing.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ball, O. M. (Oscar Melville)

    1905-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .......................................... 7 Tumble Weed ......... ................... ........ 7 ..................................... Careless Weed 7 ........................................... Dodder 7 ...................................... Green Fox tail 9..., so much the better, but is not necessary, provided the operator has fairly good eyes. In cases where seed of dodder are suspected the use of a hand lens is advised since these seed are very small and might otherwise escape detection. : perce...

  3. 11th International Symposium on Unmanned Untethered Submersible Technology August 1999 Figure 1 SAUV Engineering Prototype

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    broken down into three distinct concerns:the effects of biofouling on the power output of the solar 100 BiofoulAreaCoverage(%) SolarPanelPowerOutput(%) 0 10 20 30 40 Time in Days Solar Panel Worst Case power out Figure 2: Solar Panel Bio-fouled Area and Power Output versus Time -30 -20 -10 0 10 20 30 Perc

  4. The Contemporary Revival and Diffusion of Indigenous Sovereignty Discourse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinman, Erich

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    arguably tribal nations' number one agenda, and sovereignty is a persistent focus of tribes' political, economic, legal, and social action. Sovereignty undergirds tribal gam ing, natural resource management, and a wide variety of jurisdictional and po... jurisdiction over tribes13 and a relocation program to depopulate reservations. Since 1970, as noted above, the federal government has denounced termination and for mally adopted a policy of supporting tribes to choose their own path, a policy known...

  5. Washoe Wisk'e'em Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tara Hess-McGeown

    2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Washoe Tribe Wiskem Project (Project) was a Congressionally Directed Project identified for funding in the Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010. The Project focused on installing up to four small vertical wind turbines at designated locations on Tribal lands to offset energy costs for the Tribe. The Washoe Tribe will use and analyze data collected from the wind turbines to better understand the wind resource.

  6. WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION COMMENTS/CHANGES TO DRAFT RMR...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION COMMENTSCHANGES TO DRAFT RMR PA FOR ROUTINE MAINTENANCE DATED 101613 (REQUESTED ON DEC 18, 2014; EXTENDED THROUGH MARCH 10, 2014) AgencyTribe...

  7. DOE Community-/Facility-Scale Tribal Renewable Energy Project Development and Finance Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This interactive workshop will walk participants through five steps to help tribes understand the process for and potential pitfalls of developing community- and facility-scale renewable energy...

  8. Green Bay TEC Meeting -- Tribal Group Summary 10-26-06

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Richard is the DOE representative on the White House Indian Affairs Executive Working Group. OCRWM Activities Update (Jay Jones) * Thirty nine Tribes have been identified along...

  9. L

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tribes to voluntarily participate in the preparation or administration of a Groundwater Sustainability Plan (Plan) through a "joint powers authority or other agreement with local...

  10. Empowering Indian Country to Energize Future Generations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Be sure to visit booths 2751 and 2752 to learn aboutresources for Tribes offered by the U.S. Department of Energy:

  11. Atlanta TEC Meeting -- Tribal Group Summary 3-6-07

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (Hopi Tribe), Neil Weber (Pueblo de San Ildefonso), Christopher Wells (Southern States Energy Board), Stephen White (National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians, NAEMT),...

  12. DOE Regional Tribal Energy Project Development and Finance Workshops...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    hands-on training on how to use technology resource assessment tools, and hear project case studies and lessons learned from other Tribes. Gerald Warrington of the Menominee...

  13. Appendix B -1 Appendix B: Acronym Index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries NPDES National Pollution Discharge Elimination System Tribe of Indians SWAPAH Soil, Water, Air, Plants, Animals, and Humans TAT Technical Advisory Team TDG

  14. KINSHIP, MARRIAGE AND AGE IN ABORIGINAL AUSTRALIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denham, Woodrow

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three tribes of Western Australia. Journal of the RoyalArnhem Land and Western Australia. Analytical methodsthe Kariera of Western Australia, the Wanindiljaugwa of

  15. Beyond Fictions of Closure in Australian Aboriginal Kinship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denham, Woodrow W

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three tribes of Western Australia. Journal of the Royalmost of the interior of Western Australia, the southwesterntwice in coastal Western Australia. They seem to have

  16. CX-005086: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants. Round Valley Indian Tribe would conduct pre-solar panel installation weatherization efforts that would consist of replacing windows...

  17. CX-000115: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Conservation Block Grant Program. Round Valley Indian Tribe would conduct pre-solar panel installation weatherization efforts that would consist of replacing windows...

  18. --No Title--

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    replacementupgrade of facility components Round Valley Indian Tribe would conduct pre-solar panel installation weatherization efforts that would consist of replacing windows...

  19. CX-000116: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. The Tribe proposes to install solar panel systems for the (1) to be constructed Tribal Convenience store, (2) Tribal...

  20. --No Title--

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    small-scale research and development and pilot projects The Tribe proposes to install solar panel systems for the (1) to be constructed Tribal Convenience store, (2) Tribal...

  1. Strategic Energy Planning | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Resources Energy Resource Library Strategic Energy Planning Strategic Energy Planning Below are resources for Tribes on strategic energy planning. Alaska Strategic Energy...

  2. TEC/WG Tribal Topic Group

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the States and Tribes to decide who should receive training. A funding allocation formula is being advocated similar to the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Hazardous...

  3. Keep in mind, that with formality, often comes more of a standing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    REMARKS Susan Masten, Vice Chairperson, Yurok Tribe Jana Ganion, Energy Director, Blue Lake Rancheria David Conrad, Acting Director, Office of Indian Energy Policy and...

  4. Approved Members of the Indian Country Energy And Infrastructure...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKING GROUP ICEIWG APPROVED MEMBERS Blue Lake Rancheria Jana Ganion, BLR Energy Director Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs...

  5. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    models, clean and seal the duct system, and install a small (9 tube) solar photovoltaic system on the Tribal Government Office Building. In addition, the tribe proposes to...

  6. PROJECTS FROM FEDERAL REGION IX DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PART II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Case, C.W.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    problems. ) The solar water heater is a small on-siteThe existing electric water heater system provides storagebreadbox solar hot water heaters. Originally the tribe

  7. Final Report, Wind Power Resource Assessment on the Warm Springs Reservation Tribal Lands, Report No. DOE/GO/12103

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jim Manion, Warm Springs Power & Water Enterprises; David McClain, McClain & Associates; HDR Engineering; Dr. Stel Walker, Oregon State University

    2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report concludes a five-year assessment of wind energy potential on the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon lands.

  8. Middle Snake Subbasins Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Middle Snake Subbasins Inventory May 2004 Compiled by Ecovista Contracted by Shoshone-Paiute Tribes #12;Middle Snake Subbasins Inventory i May 2004 Table of Contents 1 INTRODUCTION

  9. Tribal Communities | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Indian tribes. Read about realated Executive Orders here. Stay in Touch Get email updates from our office. Subscribe Office of Economic Impact and Diversity Blog Funding...

  10. Microsoft Word - Document1

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cost Share The Hopi Tribe Formation of Hopi Sustainable Energy Program 60,000 0 Smith River Rancheria Smith River Rancheria Energy Strategic Planning and Self-Sufficiency...

  11. EIS-0312: Notice of Availability of the Bonneville Power Administratio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Bonneville Power Administration Administrator's Record of Decision: Columbia Basin Fish Accords Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) with the Kalispel Tribe on Columbia Basin Fish...

  12. Working in Indian Country: Building Successful Business Relationships...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Working in Indian Country: Building Successful Business Relationships with American Indian Tribes Workshop Working in Indian Country: Building Successful Business Relationships...

  13. CX-000135: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    involve changing the Tribe's street lights from incandescent bulbs to LED (light-emitting diode) lighting fixtures. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-000135.pdf More...

  14. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Indian tribes . The Mille Lacs Band would hire a professional energy auditing finn (Sustainable Engineering Group LLC) to conduct energy audits of the main tribal government...

  15. Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brochure describes the Tribal Energy Program, which provides American Indian tribes with financial and technical assistance for developing renewable energy projects on tribal land.

  16. Fond du Lac Band Leads Climate Resilience Efforts on Lake Superior...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    journey gardens. Continue reading the blog on the White House Council on Environmental Quality website. Additional Reading Materials Native Leaders Give Tribes a Voice on White...

  17. EWONAP Environmental Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    HUD's Eastern Woodlands Office of Native American Programs in collaboration with the Seminole Tribe of Florida Native Learning Center invites you to attend the Environmental Review Training...

  18. INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKING GROUP ICEIWG

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ronald Suppah, Vice-Chairman, Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation Susan Weber, Representative, Ho-Chunk Nation Other Tribal Participants William Anderson, Chairman,...

  19. Keep in mind, that with formality, often comes more of a standing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Indians Ronald Suppah, Vice-Chairman, Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Susan Weber, Council Representative, Ho-Chunk Nation Richard J. Peterson, 4 th Vice President,...

  20. Helping STEM Education Take Root: Breaking Ground on a Field...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Director of the Department of Science and Engineering, Dave Huizenga, Senior Advisor for the Office of Environmental Management, and...

  1. John Day River celebration - Fact Sheet - July 2006

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    projects proposed and coordinated by the tribes. Other partners include: Bureau of Reclamation U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife Bureau of...

  2. January 29 Webinar to Highlight the Latest Developments in Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Solar Robi Robichaud - Wind and Small Hydro Randy Hunsberger - Biomass Kermit Witherbee - Geothermal Amy Hollander - Energy Efficiency "Helping Tribes understand the array of...

  3. President Obama Proclaims November National Native American Heritage...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    on behalf of tribes, stepped up support for Tribal Colleges and Universities, made tribal health care more accessible, and streamlined leasing regulations to put more power in...

  4. Intellectual Property Provisions (GNP-115) Grant and Cooperative...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Intellectual Property Provisions (GNP-115) Grant and Cooperative Agreement Research, Development, or Demonstration Non-Federal Entity (State, Local government, Indian tribe,...

  5. --No Title--

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The tribe proposes to utilize EECBG funds for the purchase and installation of an automation module and upgrade of the tribal Council's power plant control system for their...

  6. A fish stinks from the head: Ethnic diversity, segregation, and the collapse of Yugoslavia.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammel, Eugene A; Mason, Carl; Stevanovic, Mirjana

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    form for Serbia and Montenegro (who jointly formed the rumpterritory between Kosovo, Montenegro, and Hercegovina). Insome tribes of old Montenegro, such as the Klimenti, are

  7. Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (PSA) program provides expert technical assistance to states, tribes and regions on electricity policies, programs and market mechanisms that increase access to reliable,...

  8. EUCI Tribal and Indian Country Energy Development: Collaborating...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    provide practical tips for mutually beneficial collaboration between tribes and utility companies. The conference will focus on the fundamental concepts on how to network and...

  9. --No Title--

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Based on the results of the tribal energy audit (conducted under a separate EECBG-funded activity), the Tribe will produce an Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy (EECS)....

  10. --No Title--

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Actions to conserve energy The tribe proposes to hire an individual and provide energy audit training to create an Energy Auditor position. The project will perform energy...

  11. EUCI Tribal and Indian Country Energy Development: Collaborating for Successful Transactions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Hosted by the Electric Utility Consultants, Inc. (EUCI), this conference will provide practical tips for mutually beneficial collaboration between tribes and utility companies. The conference will...

  12. Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project Thanks in part to DOE funding and technical support, student interns from the Crow Tribe in Montana had the...

  13. Microsoft Word - CSKT_Lake_County_AcquisitionsCreek-CX.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) for purchase of Lake County properties. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2002-003-00, Contract 49933 Categorical Exclusion Applied...

  14. Microsoft Word - Ninemile_Creek_CX.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tribes of the Colville Reservation for purchase of the Ninemile Creek property Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2008-104-00, BPA-005670 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from...

  15. Microsoft Word - CSKT_CXMemo_12062010.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) for purchase of the Conrad Drive Land Acquisition. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2002-003-00, Contract BPA-44646 Categorical Exclusion...

  16. Microsoft Word - Trimble_Creek_Acquisition_CX.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    funds to the Kalispel Tribe (Kalispel) for purchase of Trimble Creek (Doramus) Property Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 1992-061-00, Contract BPA-004991 Categorical Exclusion...

  17. CX-003908: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-003908: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fiscal Year 2010 Columbia Basin Fish Accords with Colville Confederated Tribes CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 09082010...

  18. Microsoft Word - CX_ThorneCreek_Final.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes for purchase of the Thorne Creek Property. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2002-003-00, Contract CR-201269 Categorical Exclusion Applied...

  19. Microsoft Word - Post_Skidoo_CX.docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tribes (CSKT) for purchase of Skidoo Creek, Post Creek, and Bird's Eye View properties Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2002-003-00, contract 55869 Categorical Exclusion Applied...

  20. Microsoft Word - CX_Okanogan_County_Acquisitions.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tribes (CCT) for purchase of the Okanogan County (Peterson, Harlan, King) Properties Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2008-104-00, Contract BPA-004448 Categorical Exclusion...

  1. Microsoft Word - CX_Priest_River_Acquistiont.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Kalispel Tribe of Indians (Kalispell) for purchase of Priest River (Flesher) property. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 1992-061-00, Contract BPA-004991 Categorical Exclusion...

  2. Microsoft Word - LowerJocko_Acquisition_CX_final_081310.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) for purchase of the Lower Jocko River Property Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2002-003-00, Contract BPA-44646 Categorical Exclusion...

  3. Microsoft Word - Squeque-CX_Lane.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) for purchase of Squeque Lane property. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2002-003-00, Contract 49933 Categorical Exclusion Applied...

  4. Tribal Strategic Energy Planning Provides a Step in the Right...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tribes as part of the DOE Office of Indian Energy's 2012 Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program. The strategic energy planning workshops guide tribal...

  5. CAIED Tribal Economic Development Outlook Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Center for American Indian Economic Development (CAIED) is hosting a conference on the impact that business and the economy will have on the next year for Tribes.

  6. SPONAP Grant Writing Essentials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    HUD's Southern Plains Office of Native American Programs in collaboration with the Seminole Tribe of Florida Native Learning Center invites you to attend the Grant Writing Essentials training...

  7. Tommy Jones | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Laboratories Tommy Jones is both an Aleut and Cherokee Tribe member from Jones, Oklahoma. He attended Oklahoma City University and graduated with a bachelor's in biology and...

  8. Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proposal to purchase land along the Methow River would protect fish habitat in Okanogan County Location: Winthrop, Okanogan County, Wash. Acres: 1 Partners: The Confederated Tribes...

  9. Fact Sheet Fact Sheet B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    easements is among the commitments made in the historic 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords. BPA's Accord partners, the Colville Confederated Tribes, selected the Okanogan...

  10. B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Fact...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ninemile Creek land purchase would protect fish habitat Location: Oroville, Okanogan County, Wash. Acres: 6 Partners: Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation Purpose: The...

  11. Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    County, Mont. acres: 147 Partners: Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Purpose: The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund the...

  12. Energy Efficiency and COl15ervation Block Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Grant Program Apptication submitted by the Chippewa Tribe of MN on behalf of the White Earth Band Energy Efficiency Retrofits The American Rccovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009,...

  13. Microsoft Word - Tribal Topic Group Summary March 06 final _3...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Elzeftawy (Las Vegas Paiute Tribe), Greg Fasano (BSC), Robert Gisch (Naval Sea Systems Command), Ed Gonzales (ELG Engineering), Elizabeth Helvey (JK Research Associates, Inc....

  14. Workshop title: Transmission and Utility Scale Solar Opportunities...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Purpose: A stakeholder communication with transmission customers, Tribes, developers, state and federal agencies, and utilities about Western Area Power Administration's (Western)...

  15. Energy Department Announces Technical Assistance Opportunity...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    commitment to provide Tribes with the tools and resources they need to foster tribal energy self-sufficiency and sustainability, advancing economic competitiveness and job...

  16. Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians Strategic Energy Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan Hoover

    2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan discusses the current energy use on the Lac du Flambeau Reservation, the current status of the Tribe's energy program, as well as the issues and concerns with energy on the reservation. This plan also identifies and outlines energy opportunities, goals, and objectives for the Tribe to accomplish. The overall goal of this plan is to address the energy situation of the reservation in a holistic manner for the maximum benefit to the Tribe. This plan is an evolving document that will be re-evaluated as the Tribe's energy situation changes.

  17. Ms. Mary Hopkins

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vance, Tribal Historic Preservation Officer Comanche Nation Chairman Wallace Coffee Mr. Jimmy Arterberry, Tribal Historic Preservation Officer Crow Creek Sioux Tribe of the Crow...

  18. Tanana Chiefs Conference Annual Convention

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tanana Chiefs Conference is holding its annual convention to discuss issues in the region, hold elections, and adopt resolutions presented by Tribes.

  19. ORIGINAL PAPER Does the spatial variation in selective pressures explain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traveset, Anna

    phases of recruitment (Alcantara and Rey 2003; Gomez 2004). For instance, large seeds can be more prone (but see Alcantara and Rey 2003; Gomez 2004) and in a single population (e.g. Vander Wall 2003; Alcantara and Rey 2003; Gomez 2004; Martinez et al. 2007). However, the strength and sign of selective pres- sures

  20. UNIVERSIDAD SIMN BOLVAR VICE-RECTORADO ACADMICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vásquez, Carlos

    Jiménez RESPONSABLE DEL PPP: Prof. Régulo T. Finol R. OBJETIVO GENERAL DEL PPP EN COMERCIALIZACI?N Y. OBJETIVOS ESPECÍFICOS DEL PPP EN COMERCIALIZACI?N Y NEGOCIOS INTERNACIONALES: 1. Dotar a los estudiantes de estudios. Obtener opinión favorable en el Proceso de Selección por parte del Responsable del PPP y su

  1. Adaptacin de un driver WLAN Linux a una arquitectura NIOS-Avalon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Autònoma de Barcelona, Universitat

    Adaptación de un driver WLAN Linux a una arquitectura NIOS-Avalon B. Martínez , I. Tarruella, D de un driver Linux se realiza un mapeo sobre una arquitectura basada en un procesador integrado dentro de un SoC. La elección de la partición Hw/Sw y de ciertos parámetros de la arquitectura se

  2. Vicerrectorado de Profesorado, Titulaciones, Ordenacin Acadmica, Coordinacin y Campus.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

    Arquitectura de Comp. y CC. de la Comp. Arquitectura y Tecnología de Computadores García Lorenzo, Marcos José Si FUNDAMENTOS DE COMPUTADORES Arquitectura de Comp. y CC. de la Comp. Arquitectura y Tecnología de Computadores Martínez Torre, José Ignacio Si FUNDAMENTOS DE COMPUTADORES Arquitectura de Comp. y CC. de la Comp

  3. Vicerrectorado de Profesorado, Titulaciones, Ordenacin Acadmica, Coordinacin y Campus.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

    Profesorado - Curso Académico 2012-13 DOBLE GRADO FUNDAM.ARQUITECTURA-DISE?O INTEGRAL GESTION IMAGEN ARQUITECTURA I Ciencias Sociales Historia del Arte Río de la Hoz, Isabel del Si HISTORIA DEL ARTE Y DE LA ARQUITECTURA II CC. Educ., Lenguaje, Cultura y Artes Historia del Arte Martínez Peláez, Agustín Si MATEMATICAS

  4. Vicerrectorado de Profesorado, Titulaciones, Ordenacin Acadmica, Coordinacin y Campus.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

    González de Lena Alonso, María Teresa No FUNDAMENTOS DE COMPUTADORES Arquitectura de Comp. y CC. de la Comp. Arquitectura y Tecnología de Computadores Cabello Pardos, Enrique Si FUNDAMENTOS DE COMPUTADORES Arquitectura de Comp. y CC. de la Comp. Arquitectura y Tecnología de Computadores Martínez Torre, José Ignacio Si

  5. CONOCER EL CEREBRO, EN LA SALUD Y EN LA ENFERMEDAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

    el cerebro y cómo funciona? (II): · Dra. ML Soto-Montenegro: Imagen molecular: ¿qué nos ofrece? · Dr biomédica in vivo: juega con las imágenes (Dra ML Soto- Montenegro, Dr N Malpica) Taller III: Tests para Martínez-Villaluenga (CC. Salud, URJC) · Mª Luisa Soto-Montenegro (Laboratorio de Imagen Médica, Unidad de

  6. Planning Brings Vision Into Focus (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This case study/fact sheet highlights the strategic energy planning process for Tribes that was developed by the DOE Office of Indian Energy. This nine-step process, which is outlined in one of the foundational education courses offered by the Office, enables Tribes to pursue energy projects in a well-planned and strategic manner.

  7. Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 6. Participants and Affiliations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the Upper Snake Provincial Assessment Idaho Department of Fish and Game: Gregg Servheen Jon Beals Lance Chad Colter Shoshone-Bannock Tribes Larry Dickerson US Fish and Wildlife Service John Fred Shoshone-Bannock Tribes Jim Fredericks Idaho Fish and Game Dan Garren Idaho Fish and Game Lauri Hanauska-Brown Idaho Fish

  8. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Program amendment The Council develops the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program on the basis of the recommendations from state and federal fish and wildlife agencies and tribes and others, comments on those, Shoshone-Bannock Tribe, and tribal technical staff, will present a few of their priority Fish & Wildlife

  9. CX-007017: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Peoria Tribe of Indians of OklahomaCX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1Date: 09/23/2011Location(s): Peoria Tribe, OklahomaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. FEASIBILITY OF WIND TO SERVE UPPER SKAGIT'S BOW HILL TRIBAL LANDS AND FEASIBILITY UPDATE FOR RESIDENTIAL RENEWABLE ENERGY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RICH, LAUREN

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A two year wind resource assessment was conducted to determine the feasibility of developing a community scale wind generation system for the Upper Skagit Indian Tribe?s Bow Hill land base, and the project researched residential wind resource technologies to determine the feasibility of contributing renewable wind resource to the mix of energy options for our single and multi-family residential units.

  11. HUD Tribal Government to Government Consultation Policy Request for Comments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) request for comments is to enhance communication and coordination between HUD and federally recognized Indian Tribes, and to outline guiding principles and procedures under which all HUD employees are to operate with regard to federally recognized Indian or Alaska Native Tribes. Comments are due June 8, 2015.

  12. URL To Story: http://press.arrivenet.com/technology/article.php/993701.html RFID Innovation in Healthcare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    URL To Story: http://press.arrivenet.com/technology/article.php/993701.html RFID Innovation in Healthcare RFID Tribe's Dallas, Texas Chapter Meets to Discuss RFID Innovation in Healthcare Distribution, 2007) -- RFID Innovation in Healthcare is the theme for RFID Tribe's Dallas, Texas chapter meeting

  13. CX-006355: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oregon - Tribe - Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians of OregonCX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1Date: 03/26/2010Location(s): OregonOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  14. Columbia River Basin Accords -Narrative Proposal Form 1 200880000 ISRP FAN1B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : The Columbia Basin Fish Accords (Accords) are ten-year agreements between the federal action agencies and states and tribes. The Accords supplement the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program and are intended substantial biological benefits for Columbia Basin fish. The Accords also acknowledge the tribes' and states

  15. Kusunda: An Indo-Pacific language in Nepal Paul Whitehouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruhlen, Merritt

    Kusunda: An Indo-Pacific language in Nepal Paul Whitehouse , Timothy Usher , Merritt Ruhlen people of central Nepal have long been regarded as a relic tribe of South Asia. They are, or were until people of central Nepal are one of the few ``relic'' tribes found on the Indian subcontinent (the Nahali

  16. Augustine Band of Cahuilla Indians Energy Conservation and Options Analysis - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Turner

    2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Augustine Band of Cahuilla Indians was awarded a grant through the Department of Energy First Steps program in June of 2006. The primary purpose of the grant was to enable the Tribe to develop energy conservation policies and a strategy for alternative energy resource development. All of the work contemplated by the grant agreement has been completed and the Tribe has begun implementing the resource development strategy through the construction of a 1.0 MW grid-connected photovoltaic system designed to offset a portion of the energy demand generated by current and projected land uses on the Tribes Reservation. Implementation of proposed energy conservation policies will proceed more deliberately as the Tribe acquires economic development experience sufficient to evaluate more systematically the interrelationships between conservation and its economic development goals.

  17. Canoe* $16.00 $30.00 $44.00 Tent 4 person (Sierra Design, Kelty or ALPS) $6.00 $12.00 $19.00 Tandem kayak sit On top (Tribe 13.5)* $12.00 $20.00 $30.00 Tent 6 person (Sierra Design, Kelty or Eureka) $7.00 $14.00 $21.00

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    bag - 108L $5.00 $8.00 $13.00 Stove 2 burner (propane not included) $4.00 $8.00 $12.00 Dry storage bag and rack foams for transportation are also included on fees Cooler $2.00 $4.00 $6.00 Dry storage bag - Bill - XL (38L) & L (44L) $3.00 $5.00 $8.00 Stove 1 burner (propane not included) $3.00 $6.00 $9.00 Dry

  18. Native American Technical Assistance and Training for Renewable Energy Resource Development and Electrical Generation Facilities Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. David Lester

    2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) will facilitate technical expertise and training of Native Americans in renewable energy resource development for electrical generation facilities, and distributed generation options contributing to feasibility studies, strategic planning and visioning. CERT will also provide information to Tribes on energy efficiency and energy management techniques.This project will provide facilitation and coordination of expertise from government agencies and private industries to interact with Native Americans in ways that will result in renewable energy resource development, energy efficiency program development, and electrical generation facilities management by Tribal entities. The intent of this cooperative agreement is to help build capacity within the Tribes to manage these important resources.

  19. Independent Scientific Advisory Board for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    River Basin hydroelectric system. NOAA Fisheries is responsible for federal stewardship of the Nation of the hydroelectric system. The Tribes manage fish and wildlife resources on their respective reservations, are co

  20. Subsistence Halibut Special Permits Application Page 1 of 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ___________________________________ BLOCK B -- SUBSISTENCE HALIBUT COMMUNITY HARVEST (CHP) PERMIT NOTE: Attach any previously issued CHP harvest logs 1. Name of Alaska Native Tribe or Community 2. Name of CHP Coordinator (First, Middle, Last

  1. General Questions | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    District of Columbia, U.S. territories, and among Native American tribes. View the interactive U.S. map where you look up the contact information for state and local...

  2. DOE Announces Webinars on Sandia Modeling Tool, Hydrogen Fueling...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    models for the Sandia tool were created, and explore how they can be used. In addition, case studies focusing on potential applications for tribes will be presented. Register to...

  3. Climate Change Adaptation Planning

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This course provides an introduction to planning for climate change impacts, with examples of tribes that have been going through the adaptation planning process. The course is intended for tribal...

  4. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and tribes to conduct one more quality control check on this information. Now that this check has been. The maps depict the total number of each species by run, as released in calendar year 2012. The releases

  5. Scoping the Environmental Assessment Process for a MRS | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    tribe and preparing of the environmental assessment (EA) required by Section 404 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended (NWPAA), are the first steps in a process intended to...

  6. Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification: A Water...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification: A Water Quality Protection Tool for States and Tribes Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  7. CX-008414: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alaska-Tribe-Orutsararmuit Native Council (Also Known As Bethel) CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 06/26/2012 Location(s): Alaska Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  8. CX-004619: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Suquamish Indian Tribe of the Port Madison Reservation, Washington - Traffic Signals and Street LightingCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 09/30/2009Location(s): WashingtonOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  9. Tribal Energy NEPA Fundamentals Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Tribal Energy NEPA Fundamentals Workshop is a three-day workshop for tribes to understand how to manage the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process and implement the Council on...

  10. Environmental Science Student Encouraged to Pursue Personal and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tour November 21, 2013 - 3:06pm Addthis Reyna Banteah Reyna Banteah University of New Mexico Environmental Science Student and Member of the Zuni Pueblo Tribe Keshi (Hello),...

  11. CX-002322: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    California-Tribe-Paiute-Shoshone Indians of the Lone Pine CommunityCX(s) Applied: A9, A11Date: 05/13/2010Location(s): Lone Pine, CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  12. CX-003246: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Alaska-Tribe-Interior Regional Housing Authority Minto Village CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 07262010 Location(s): Minto, Alaska Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable...

  13. Bruneau Inventory May 28, 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draft Bruneau Inventory May 28, 2004 Compiled by Ecovista Contracted by Shoshone Paiute Tribes...........................................................................................................28 #12;Table 1 presents a list of acronyms used in the Bruneau subbasin inventory. Table 1. Acronyms

  14. Shaun Tsabetsaye

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Shaun Tsabetsaye is an electrical engineering consultant who is working to help his Tribe, the Zuni Pueblo, deploy a community-scale renewable energy project with technical assistance from the DOE...

  15. The Descent of Morgan in Australia: Kinship Representation from the Australian Colonies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McConvell, Patrick; Gardner, Helen

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    University Canberra, Australia Patrick.McConvell@anu.edu.auTribes of South-east Australia. Canberra: Aboriginal StudiesCanberra. Lorimer Fison annotated copy of Lewis Henry Morgan Australian Kinship, National Library of Australia,

  16. EIS-0312: Record of Decision for the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATOR'S RECORD OF DECISION 2008 COLUMBIA BASIN FISH ACCORDS MOA WITH THE SHOSHONE-BANNOCK TRIBES November 6, 2008 i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0...

  17. CX-004321: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Mexico-Tribe-Pueblo of ZiaCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 10/15/2010Location(s): Zia, New MexicoOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  18. 2013 Commercial-Scale Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    proximity to military bases, 54% are located in the West, 18% in the Pacific Northwest, and 12% in New England and New York. New Renewable Energy Development Resources for Tribes...

  19. Rhonda Whiting Bill Bradbury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Libby Dam operations on the Kootenai River white sturgeon. In August 2009 the Tribe submitted a Master natural recruitment failure and uncertain prospects for restoration of successful natural recruitment

  20. Obama Administration Announces Additional $27,777,600 for Local...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Chu today announced plans to invest 3.2 billion in energy efficiency and conservation projects in U.S. cities, counties, states, territories, and Native American tribes. This...