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1

Project Profile: Next-Generation Parabolic Trough Collectors...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Trough Collectors and Components for CSP Applications Project Profile: Next-Generation Parabolic Trough Collectors and Components for CSP Applications Abengoa logo Abengoa...

2

Parabolic Trough Solar Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Parabolic trough (solar) collectors (PTCs) are technical devices to collect the energy in form of solar radiation and convert it typically into thermal energy at temperature ranges of 150–500°C at industrial s...

Dr.-Ing. Eckhard Lüpfert

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Parabolic Trough Solar Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Parabolic trough (solar) collectors (PTCs) are technical devices to collect the energy in form of solar radiation and convert it typically into thermal energy at temperature ranges of 150–500°C at industrial s...

Dr.-Ing. Eckhard Lüpfert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

NREL: TroughNet - Parabolic Trough Workshops  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parabolic Trough Workshops Parabolic Trough Workshops Here you'll find information about workshops and forums concerning parabolic trough technology and concentrating solar power. Also, see upcoming events on concentrating solar power. Past Workshops and Forums 2007 Parabolic Trough Technology Workshop March 8-9, 2007 Golden, CO 2007 Solar Power Tower, Dish Stirling and Linear Fresnel Technologies Workshop March 7, 2007 Golden, CO 2006 Parabolic Trough Technology Workshop February 14-16, 2006 Incline Village, NV 2004 Solar Thermal Electric International Project Development Forum July 13, 2004 Portland, OR 2003 Parabolic Trough Thermal Energy Storage Workshop February 20-21, 2003 Golden, CO 2001 Solar Energy Forum: The Power to Choose April 21-25, 2001 Washington, D.C. 2000 Parabolic Trough Technology Workshop

5

NREL: TroughNet - Parabolic Trough FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parabolic Trough FAQs Parabolic Trough FAQs Find answers to frequently asked questions about parabolic trough solar technology. Question topics include: Central station solar benefits Economic and environmental benefits Electricity cost Installation and operation Land use Large-scale vs. distributed power Past construction decline Photovoltaics comparison Power plant cost Power plant siting Technology potential Water use Some of the following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. How much does a parabolic trough power plant cost? The cost of a parabolic trough power plant depends on many factors such as plant size, whether thermal energy storage is included, and whether the solar field has been enlarged to increase the annual plant capacity factor. Based on these considerations the current capital cost for large

6

Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Receivers for Parabolic Troughs Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs This fact sheet describes an advanced, low-cost receiver project for parabolic troughs, awarded...

7

NREL: TroughNet - Parabolic Trough Technology Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and its R&D history. R&D History Since Luz built the first commercial parabolic trough power plant in 1984 (SEGS I), parabolic trough technology has been constantly evolving and...

8

NREL: TroughNet - Parabolic Trough Power Plant System Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parabolic Trough Power Plant System Technology Parabolic Trough Power Plant System Technology A parabolic trough solar power plant uses a large field of collectors to supply thermal energy to a conventional power plant. Because they use conventional power cycles, parabolic trough power plants can be hybridized-other fuels can be used to back up the solar power. Like all power cycles, trough power plants also need a cooling system to transfer waste heat to the environment. Parabolic trough power plant technologies include: Direct steam generation Fossil-fired (hybrid) backup Operation and maintenance Power cycles Steam Rankine Organic Rankine Combined Wet and dry cooling Power Cycles A photo of an aerial view of a power plant in the middle of a solar field with rows and rows of parabolic troughs tracking. The cooling towers can be seen with the water plume rising into the air. The white water tanks can be seen in the background.

9

NREL: TroughNet - Parabolic Trough Power Plant Market, Economic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

factors for current parabolic trough systems under development range from 25% for solar only plants to greater than 40% for plants with thermal storage. Such plants provide...

10

A New Generation of Parabolic Trough Technology  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Trough Technology Innovat ive t echnology solut ions f or su st a in a b ilit y ABENGOA SOLAR Parabolic Trough Collector Technology Abengoa Solar Cont ent 2 Solana Solar Power...

11

NREL: TroughNet - Parabolic Trough Technology Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Overview Technology Overview Parabolic trough solar power technology offers an environmentally sound and increasingly cost-effective energy source. Here you'll find overviews about the following parabolic trough power plant technologies: Solar Field Collector balance of system Concentrator structure Mirrors Receivers Thermal Energy Storage Molten-salt heat transfer fluid Storage media Storage systems Power Plant Systems Direct steam generation Fossil-fired hybrid backup Power cycles Wet and dry cooling Operation and maintenance For more detailed, technical information, see our publications on parabolic trough power plant technology. Printable Version TroughNet Home Technologies Solar Field Thermal Energy Storage Power Plant Systems Market & Economic Assessment Research & Development

12

Development of an Advanced, Low-Cost parabolic Trough Collector...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Development of an Advanced, Low-Cost parabolic Trough Collector for Baseload Operation Development of an Advanced, Low-Cost parabolic Trough Collector for Baseload Operation This...

13

NREL: TroughNet - Parabolic Trough System and Component Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

System and Component Testing System and Component Testing Here you'll find information about parabolic trough system and components testing, as well facilities and laboratories used for testing. Tests include those for: Concentrator thermal efficiency Receiver thermal performance Mirror contour and collector alignment Mirror reflectivity and durability Some of the following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader. Concentrator Thermal Efficiency Testing Researchers and industry use the following facilities for testing parabolic trough collectors. AZTRAK Rotating Platform At Sandia National Laboratories' National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF), the AZTRAK rotating platform has been used to test several parabolic trough modules and receivers. Initially, researchers tested a

14

NREL: TroughNet - 2007 Parabolic Trough Technology Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2007 Parabolic Trough Technology Workshop 2007 Parabolic Trough Technology Workshop NREL hosted a parabolic trough technology workshop on March 8-9, 2007, in Golden, Colorado. It had three goals: Exchanging technical information Collaborating on SolarPaces projects: receiver testing and dry cooling Gathering industry input on laboratory R&D directions. The workshop featured presentations on the following parabolic trough power plant topics: Current and future market vision Project developments Solar resource assessment Technology trends Molten-salt heat transfer fluids Direct steam generation Advanced tools and testing capabilities Researchers also presented a poster session on laboratory capabilities. Note: if a presentation or poster isn't listed below, NREL hasn't yet received permission or approval to post it.

15

Definition: Parabolic trough | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Parabolic trough Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Parabolic trough A solar energy conversion device that uses a trough covered with a highly reflective surface to focus sunlight onto a linear absorber containing a working fluid that can be used to spin a turbine for electricity generation; with a single-axis sun-tracking system, the configuration of a parabolic trough can track the sun from east to west during the day.[1][2][3] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A parabolic trough is a type of solar thermal collector that is straight in one dimension and curved as a parabola in the other two, lined with a polished metal mirror. The energy of sunlight which enters the

16

Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP)...

17

Parabolic Trough Organic Rankine Cycle Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

Arizona Public Service (APS) is required to generate a portion of its electricity from solar resources in order to satisfy its obligation under the Arizona Environmental Portfolio Standard (EPS). In recent years, APS has installed and operates over 4.5 MWe of fixed, tracking, and concentrating photovoltaic systems to help meet the solar portion of this obligation and to develop an understanding of which solar technologies provide the best cost and performance to meet utility needs. During FY04, APS began construction of a 1-MWe parabolic trough concentrating solar power plant. This plant represents the first parabolic trough plant to begin construction since 1991. The plant will also be the first commercial deployment of the Solargenix parabolic trough collector technology developed under contract to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The plant will use an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) power plant, provided by Ormat. The ORC power plant is much simpler than a conventional steam Rankine cycle power plant and allows unattended operation of the facility.

Canada, S.; Cohen, G.; Cable, R.; Brosseau, D.; Price, H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Parabolic Trough Solar Thermal Electric Power Plants (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet provides an overview of the potential for parabolic trough solar thermal electric power plants, especially in the Southwestern U.S.

Not Available

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Advanced Low-Cost Recievers for Parabolic Troughs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PROJECT OBJECTIVES KEY RESULTS AND OUTCOMES NEXT MILESTONES 1. Burkholder F, Kutscher C. Heat Loss Testing of Schott's 2008 PTR70 Parabolic Trough Receiver (NRELTP-550-45633):...

20

Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PROJECT OBJECTIVES KEY RESULTS AND OUTCOMES NEXT MILESTONES 1. Burkholder F, Kutscher C. Heat Loss Testing of Schott's 2008 PTR70 Parabolic Trough Receiver (NRELTP-550-45633):...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "next-generation parabolic trough" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Parabolic-Trough Technology Roadmap | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Parabolic-Trough Technology Roadmap Parabolic-Trough Technology Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Parabolic-Trough Technology Roadmap Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, United States Department of Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar Topics: Technology characterizations Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.nrel.gov/csp/troughnet/pdfs/24748.pdf References: Parabolic-Trough Technology Roadmap[1] Overview "The working group reviewed the status of today's trough technologies, evaluated existing markets, identified potential future market opportunities, and developed a roadmap toward its vision of the industry's potential-including critical advancements needed over the long term to significantly reduce costs while further increasing

22

Guidelines for reporting parabolic trough solar electric system performance  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this activity is to develop a generic methodology which can be used to track and compare the performance of parabolic trough power plants. The approach needs to be general enough to work for all existing and future parabolic trough plant designs, provide meaningful comparisons of year to year performance, and allow for comparisons between dissimilar plant designs. The approach presented here uses the net annual system efficiency as the primary metric for evaluating the performance of parabolic trough power plants. However, given the complex nature of large parabolic trough plants, the net annual system efficiency by itself does not adequately characterize the performance of the plant. The approach taken here is to define a number of additional performance metrics which enable a more comprehensive understanding of overall plant performance.

Price, H.W.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Optimal Heat Collection Element Shapes for Parabolic Trough Concentrators  

SciTech Connect

For nearly 150 years, the cross section of the heat collection tubes used at the focus of parabolic trough solar concentrators has been circular. This type of tube is obviously simple and easily fabricated, but it is not optimal. It is shown in this article that the optimal shape, assuming a perfect parabolic figure for the concentrating mirror, is instead oblong, and is approximately given by a pair of facing parabolic segments.

Bennett, C

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Parabolic-Trough Solar Water Heating--FTA, 022798m FTA trough  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Parabolic-trough solar water heating is Parabolic-trough solar water heating is a well-proven technology that directly sub- stitutes renewable energy for conventional energy in water heating. Parabolic-trough collectors can also drive absorption cooling systems or other equipment that runs off a thermal load. There is considerable potential for using these technologies at Federal facil- ities in the Southwestern United States or other areas with high direct-beam solar radi- ation. Facilities such as jails, hospitals, and barracks that consistently use large volumes of hot water are particularly good candi- dates. Use of parabolic-trough systems helps Federal facilities comply with Executive Order 12902's directive to reduce energy use by 30% by 2005 and advance other efforts to get the Federal government to set a good

25

Status of APS 1-Mwe Parabolic Trough Project  

SciTech Connect

Arizona Public Service (APS) is currently installing new power facilities to generate a portion of its electricity from solar resources that will satisfy its obligation under the Arizona Environmental Portfolio Standard (EPS). During FY04, APS began construction on a 1-MWe parabolic trough concentrating solar power plant. This plant represents the first parabolic trough plant to begin construction since 1991. Site preparation and construction activities continued throughout much of FY05, and startup activities are planned for Fall 2005 (with completion early in FY06). The plant will be the first commercial deployment of the Solargenix parabolic trough collector technology developed under contract to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The plant will use an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) power plant, provided by Ormat. The ORC power plant is much simpler than the conventional steam Rankine cycle plant and allows unattended operation of the facility.

Canada, S.; Brosseau, D.; Kolb, G.; Moore, L.; Cable, R.; Price, H.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Federal technology alert. Parabolic-trough solar water heating  

SciTech Connect

Parabolic-trough solar water heating is a well-proven renewable energy technology with considerable potential for application at Federal facilities. For the US, parabolic-trough water-heating systems are most cost effective in the Southwest where direct solar radiation is high. Jails, hospitals, barracks, and other facilities that consistently use large volumes of hot water are particularly good candidates, as are facilities with central plants for district heating. As with any renewable energy or energy efficiency technology requiring significant initial capital investment, the primary condition that will make a parabolic-trough system economically viable is if it is replacing expensive conventional water heating. In combination with absorption cooling systems, parabolic-trough collectors can also be used for air-conditioning. Industrial Solar Technology (IST) of Golden, Colorado, is the sole current manufacturer of parabolic-trough solar water heating systems. IST has an Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) contract with the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to finance and install parabolic-trough solar water heating on an Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) basis for any Federal facility that requests it and for which it proves viable. For an ESPC project, the facility does not pay for design, capital equipment, or installation. Instead, it pays only for guaranteed energy savings. Preparing and implementing delivery or task orders against the IDIQ is much simpler than the standard procurement process. This Federal Technology Alert (FTA) of the New Technology Demonstration Program is one of a series of guides to renewable energy and new energy-efficient technologies.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs - FY13 Q2 ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs - FY13 Q2 Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs - FY13 Q2 This document summarizes the progress of this Norwich...

28

Parabolic trough solar power for competitive U.S. markets  

SciTech Connect

Nine parabolic trough power plants located in the California Mojave Desert represent the only commercial development of large-scale solar power plants to date. Although all nine plants continue to operate today, no new solar power plants have been completed since 190. Over the last several years, the parabolic trough industry has focused much of its efforts on international market opportunities. Although the power market in developing countries appears to offer a number of opportunities for parabolic trough technologies due to high growth and the availability of special financial incentives for renewables, these markets are also plagued with many difficulties for developers. In recent years, there has been some renewed interest in the U.S. domestic power market as a results of an emerging green market and green pricing incentives. Unfortunately, many of these market opportunities and incentives focus on smaller, more modular technologies (such as photovoltaics or wind power), and as a result they tend to exclude or are of minimum long-term benefit to large-scale concentrating solar power technologies. This paper looks at what is necessary for large-scale parabolic trough solar power plants to compete with state-of-the-art fossil power technology in a competitive US power market.

Price, H.W.; Kistner, R.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

NREL: TroughNet - Parabolic Trough Technology Models and Software Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Models and Software Tools Technology Models and Software Tools Here you'll find information about models and software tools used to analyze parabolic trough power plant technology. They include: Annual Simulation Solar Advisor Model TRNSYS Other Analysis SolTRACE Receiver Model DView JEDI Annual Simulation Software Because solar power plants rely on an intermittent fuel supply-the sun-it is necessary to model the plant's performance on an hourly (or finer resolution) basis to understand and predict its annual performance. A number of performance and economics models are available for evaluating parabolic trough solar technologies. Industry also has developed a number of proprietary models for evaluating parabolic trough plants. Solar Advisor Model NREL, partnering with the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar Energy

30

Absorber Alignment Measurement Tool for Solar Parabolic Trough Collectors: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

As we pursue efforts to lower the capital and installation costs of parabolic trough solar collectors, it is essential to maintain high optical performance. While there are many optical tools available to measure the reflector slope errors of parabolic trough solar collectors, there are few tools to measure the absorber alignment. A new method is presented here to measure the absorber alignment in two dimensions to within 0.5 cm. The absorber alignment is measured using a digital camera and four photogrammetric targets. Physical contact with the receiver absorber or glass is not necessary. The alignment of the absorber is measured along its full length so that sagging of the absorber can be quantified with this technique. The resulting absorber alignment measurement provides critical information required to accurately determine the intercept factor of a collector.

Stynes, J. K.; Ihas, B.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Performance contracting for parabolic trough solar thermal systems  

SciTech Connect

Several applications of solar energy have proven viable in the energy marketplace, due to competitive technology and economic performance. One example is the parabolic trough solar collectors, which use focused solar energy to maximize efficiency and reduce material use in construction. Technical improvements are complemented by new business practices to make parabolic trough solar thermal systems technically and economically viable in an ever widening range of applications. Technical developments in materials and fabrication techniques reduce production cost and expand applications from swimming pool heating and service hot water, to higher-temperature applications such as absorption cooling and process steam. Simultaneously, new financing mechanisms such as a recently awarded US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) indefinite quantity Energy Savings Performance Contract (Super ESPC) facilitate and streamline implementation of the technology in federal facilities such as prisons and military bases.

Brown, H.; Hewett, R.; Walker, A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Gee, R.; May, K. [Industrial Solar Technology, Golden, CO (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

32

Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plant Simulation Model: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

As interest for clean renewable electric power technologies grows, a number of parabolic trough power plants of various configurations are being considered for deployment around the globe. It is essential that plant designs be optimized for each specific application. The optimum design must consider the capital cost, operations and maintenance cost, annual generation, financial requirements, and time-of-use value of the power generated. Developers require the tools for evaluating tradeoffs between these various project elements. This paper provides an overview of a computer model that is being used by scientists and developers to evaluate the tradeoff between cost, performance, and economic parameters for parabolic trough solar power plant technologies. An example is included that shows how this model has been used for a thermal storage design optimization.

Price, H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

A Linear Parabolic Trough Solar Collector Performance Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: 1 bar (winter) Pressure in solar collection loop: 10 bar (Summer), 5 bar (winter) Pressure in main chilled water loop : 1 bar (summer) TIC TIC TIC TIC Space Thermostat May 18,06 Parabolic Solar Trough Collector: 52.44 m^2 / 4 modules... & winter) Chilled/Heat Water Storage Current Existing Future Installation Current Installation TIC TIC EIC Temperature indicator controller Energy indicator controller Fig. 1 IW solar heating and cooling system 1.3 EES Model In order to understand...

Qu, M.; Archer, D.; Masson, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

NREL: TroughNet - Parabolic Trough Technology Solar Resource Data and Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Resource Data and Tools Solar Resource Data and Tools Here you'll find resources on solar radiation data and tools for siting parabolic trough power plants. This includes solar radiation data for power plants in the United States and worldwide. You'll also find resources for direct solar radiation instrumentation. For an overview on solar resource terms and direct beam radiation used for concentrating solar power technologies, see NREL's Shining On Web site. U.S. Solar Radiation Resource Data The following resources include maps, and hourly metrological and solar resource data for parabolic trough power plants sites in the United States. NREL Concentrating Solar Power Resource Maps Features direct normal solar radiation maps of the southwestern United States, including state maps for Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico,

35

Video Scanning Hartmann Optical Testing of State-of-the-Art Parabolic Trough Concentrators: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the Video Scanning Hartmann Optical Test System (VSHOT) used to optically test parabolic trough designs by both Solargenix and Industrial Solar Technology.

Wendelin, T.; May, K.; Gee, R.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Two-tank indirect thermal storage designs for solar parabolic trough power plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The performance of a solar thermal parabolic trough plant with thermal storage is dependent upon the arrangement of the heat exchangers that ultimately transfer energy… (more)

Kopp, Joseph E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Test results, Industrial Solar Technology parabolic trough solar collector  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories and Industrial Solar Technology are cost-sharing development of advanced parabolic trough technology. As part of this effort, several configurations of an IST solar collector were tested to determine the collector efficiency and thermal losses with black chrome and black nickel receiver selective coatings, combined with aluminized film and silver film reflectors, using standard Pyrex{reg_sign} and anti-reflective coated Pyrex{reg_sign} glass receiver envelopes. The development effort has been successful, producing an advanced collector with 77% optical efficiency, using silver-film reflectors, a black nickel receiver coating, and a solgel anti-reflective glass receiver envelope. For each receiver configuration, performance equations were empirically derived relating collector efficiency and thermal losses to the operating temperature. Finally, equations were derived showing collector performance as a function of input insolation value, incident angle, and operating temperature.

Dudley, V.E. [EG and G MSI, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Evans, L.R.; Matthews, C.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Heat-Loss Testing of Solel's UVAC3 Parabolic Trough Receiver  

SciTech Connect

For heat-loss testing on two Solel UVAC3 parabolic trough receivers, a correlation developed predicts receiver heat loss as a function of the difference between avg absorber and ambient temperatures.

Burkholder, F.; Kutscher, C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Gases as Working Fluid in Parabolic Trough CSP Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The energetic dimension of actual economy is massively oriented towards the use of fossil fuels: they cover a share of 87% of the energy needs and the trend of this share is increasing, in spite of the commitments adopted by almost all the Countries in the World. Most crucial concern is CO2 levels in the atmosphere and the positive feedback between Earth's temperature increase and carbon. Actual technologies which make use of renewable sources seem to be not fully suitable to invert this continuous increase of fossil fuels. Concentrated Solar Power plants (CSP) have had, recently, a huge attention as a technology able to give, in the mean future, a strong contribution to the electrical energy generation. CSP technology has an intrinsic superiority with respect to the other renewable plants but actual plants suffer of many drawbacks which slow down a massive diffusion: these aspects increase costs and do not insure the reliability levels required to make the investments profitable. Gas as heat transfer fluid inside solar receiver in a CSP Parabolic Trough (PT) type plant is discussed in this paper: this would simplify actual technology in the conversion section, downstream the solar energy collecting phase. The use of gases calls for a new conversion section discussed in this paper based on a direct expansion in gas turbine plants. The success of this concept is related to the possibility to increase the fluid (gas) temperature above the actual operating maximum values. The paper discusses the performances of a new gas cycle, the performances of actual receivers when fed with gas and introduces and discusses an optimization design parameter which allows a cost decrease and industrial reliability improvement.

Roberto Cipollone; Andrea Cinocca; Angelo Gualtieri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Nexant Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plant Systems Analysis; Task 3: Multiple Plants at a Common Location, 20 January 2005 - 31 December 2005  

SciTech Connect

Subcontract report by Nexant, Inc., regarding a system analysis of multiple solar parabolic trough plants at a common location.

Kelly, B.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "next-generation parabolic trough" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Reducing the Cost of Energy from Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Parabolic trough solar technology is the most proven and lowest cost large-scale solar power technology available today, primarily because of the nine large commercial-scale solar power plants that are operating in the California Mojave Desert. However, no new plants have been built during the past ten years because the cost of power from these plants is more expensive than power from conventional fossil fuel power plants. This paper reviews the current cost of energy and the potential for reducing the cost of energy from parabolic trough solar power plant technology based on the latest technological advancements and projected improvements from industry and sponsored R&D. The paper also looks at the impact of project financing and incentives on the cost of energy.

Price, H.; Kearney, D.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Research on the compensation of the end loss effect for parabolic trough solar collectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, an optical analysis on the end loss effect of parabolic trough solar collector (PTC) with horizontal north–south axis (PTC-HNSA) is performed, and a method to compensate its end loss effect is presented. The calculation formulae for the optical end loss ratio and the increased optical efficiency (the optical collection efficiency increment of PTC system after this compensation method is used) are derived; the daily optical end loss ratio, yearly optical end loss ratio, daily increased optical efficiency and yearly increased optical efficiency in different latitudes are calculated; the variation of optical end loss ratio and increased optical efficiency with trough’s length and latitude angles are analyzed and discussed. It is indicated through the analyses that this compensation method is very applicable for regions with the latitude over 25° (especially over 30°) and short trough collectors. In order to verify the feasibility of the compensation method, a five-meter PTC-HNSA experimental system was built. The increased thermal efficiency of the experimental system is measured, and the result that the experimental value (increased thermal efficiency) substantially agreed with the theoretical value (increased optical efficiency) is gained. All these works can offer some valuable references to the further study on high-efficiency trough solar concentrating systems.

Chengmu Xu; Zhiping Chen; Ming Li; Peng Zhang; Xu Ji; Xi Luo; Jiangtao Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Nexant Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plant Systems Analysis; Task 2: Comparison of Wet and Dry Rankine Cycle Heat Rejection, 20 January 2005 - 31 December 2005  

SciTech Connect

Subcontract report by Nexant, Inc., regarding a system analysis comparing solar parabolic trough plants with wet and dry rankine cycle heat rejection.

Kelly, B.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Current and future costs for parabolic trough and power tower systems in the US market.  

SciTech Connect

NREL's Solar Advisor Model (SAM) is employed to estimate the current and future costs for parabolic trough and molten salt power towers in the US market. Future troughs are assumed to achieve higher field temperatures via the successful deployment of low melting-point, molten-salt heat transfer fluids by 2015-2020. Similarly, it is assumed that molten salt power towers are successfully deployed at 100MW scale over the same time period, increasing to 200MW by 2025. The levelized cost of electricity for both technologies is predicted to drop below 11 cents/kWh (assuming a 10% investment tax credit and other financial inputs outlined in the paper), making the technologies competitive in the marketplace as benchmarked by the California MPR. Both technologies can be deployed with large amounts of thermal energy storage, yielding capacity factors as high as 65% while maintaining an optimum LCOE.

Turchi, Craig (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); Kolb, Gregory J.; Mehos, Mark Steven (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); Ho, Clifford Kuofei

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Modeling and co-simulation of a parabolic trough solar plant for industrial process heat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present paper a tri-dimensional non-linear dynamic thermohydraulic model of a parabolic trough collector was developed in the high-level acausal object-oriented language Modelica and coupled to a solar industrial process heat plant modeled in TRNSYS. The integration is performed in an innovative co-simulation environment based on the TLK interconnect software connector middleware. A discrete Monte Carlo ray-tracing model was developed in SolTrace to compute the solar radiation heterogeneous local concentration ratio in the parabolic trough collector absorber outer surface. The obtained results show that the efficiency predicted by the model agrees well with experimental data with a root mean square error of 1.2%. The dynamic performance was validated with experimental data from the Acurex solar field, located at the Plataforma Solar de Almeria, South-East Spain, and presents a good agreement. An optimization of the IST collector mass flow rate was performed based on the minimization of an energy loss cost function showing an optimal mass flow rate of 0.22 kg/s m2. A parametric analysis showed the influence on collector efficiency of several design properties, such as the absorber emittance and absorptance. Different parabolic trough solar field model structures were compared showing that, from a thermal point of view, the one-dimensional model performs close to the bi-dimensional. Co-simulations conducted on a reference industrial process heat scenario on a South European climate show an annual solar fraction of 67% for a solar plant consisting on a solar field of 1000 m2, with thermal energy storage, coupled to a continuous industrial thermal demand of 100 kW.

R. Silva; M. Pérez; A. Fernández-Garcia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Studies on performance characteristics of a solar parabolic trough concentrator with a variable area absorber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The design of a suitable absorber that incorporates an efficient heat transfer augmentation technique is one of the vital parameters that affect the performance of a solar parabolic trough concentrator (PTC). The variable area absorber discussed in this paper provides appreciable augmentation in heat transfer without increasing the pressure drop materially and thus helps in enhancing the performance efficiency of PTC significantly. A computer aided parametric study of this phenomena has been dealt in this paper. The performance of PTC of proposed design has been analysed mathematically and a rigorous simulation model has been developed. The mathematical analysis has been substantiated by elaborate experimental data.

C.M. Narayanan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Efficiency of a parabolic trough collector as a water heater system in Yucatán, Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performance of a parabolic trough collector (PTC) manufactured in Merida Yucatán was evaluated under the ANSI/ASHRAE 93-1986 standard. The water heating system for testing with a constant flow limited to a maximum temperature of 55 °C was built; thus the tests were at low temperatures. Using water as working fluid it was found that the maximum efficiency of the collector was 5.43% with a flow rate of 0.022?kg/s at a direct solar irradiance with incidence angle 0°. The evaluation methodology and design of the system for testing the collector is reported in this paper.

N. Rosado Hau; M. A. Escalante Soberanis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Development of Molten-Salt Heat Trasfer Fluid Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"This PowerPoint presentation was originally given by Dylan Grogan, principal investigator at Abengoa Solar, during a SunShot Initiative Concentrating Solar Power program review on April 24, 2013. The project, Development of Molten-Salt Heat Transfer Fluid Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants, seeks to determine whether the inorganic fluids (molten salts) offer a sufficient reduction in levelized energy costs to pursue further development, and to develop the components required for their use. The presentation focuses on presenting conclusions from Phase 1 of the program and looks ahead to review Phase 2 activities."

49

Technical and Economical Performance of Parabolic Trough Collector Power Plant under Algerian Climate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Parabolic trough solar technology has been proven at nine commercial Solar Electric Generating System (SEGS) power plants that are operating in the California Mojave desert. Simulation using different models when planning this kind of projects and choose the best site for this technology minimizes the risks of these projects. For this purpose, a detailed performance model of the 30 MW SEGS VI parabolic trough power plant was created in the TRNSYS simulation environment using the Solar Thermal Electric Component model library. Both solar and power cycle performance were modeled, but natural gas-fired hybrid operation was not. Good agreement between model predictions and plant measurements was found, with errors usually less than 10%. Also, an economical study has been established to determine the best site, based on the cost of electricity generation. The result shows that Bechar's site is the best site for this technology because of its lowest levelzed electricity cost and its high irradiance level. While the model could be improved, it demonstrates the capability to perform detailed analysis for this technology.

Abdelkader Zaaraoui; Mohamed Lamine Yousfi; Noureddine Said

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

An optimized model and test of the China's first high temperature parabolic trough solar receiver  

SciTech Connect

The vacuum solar receiver is the key component of a parabolic trough solar plant, which plays a prominent role in the gross system efficiency. Recently, China's first high temperature vacuum receiver, Sanle-3 HCE, has been developed and produced by Southeast University and Sanle Electronic Group. Before being utilized in China's first parabolic trough solar plant, accurately estimating the thermal properties of this new receiver is important. This paper first establishes and optimizes a 1-D theoretical model at Matlab program to compute the receiver's major heat loss through glass envelope, and then systematically analyzes the major influence factors of heat loss. With the laboratorial steady state test stand, the heat losses of both good vacuum and non-vacuum Sanle-3 receivers were surveyed. Comparison shows the original 1-D model agrees with the ends covered test while remarkably deviating from end exposed test. For the purpose of identifying the influence of receiver's end to total heat loss, an additional 3-D model is built by CFD software to further investigate the different heat transfer processes of receiver's end components. The 3-D end model is verified by heating power and IR temperature distribution images in the test. Combining the optimized 1-D model with the new 3-D end model, the comparison with test data shows a good accordance. At the same time the heat loss curve and emittance curve of this new receiver are given and compared with those of several other existing receivers as references. (author)

Gong, Guangjie; Huang, Xinyan; Wang, Jun; Hao, Menglong [Southeast University, Nanjing (China)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

Cleaning strategies for parabolic-trough solar-collector fields; guidelines for decisions  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended to assist the owner or operator of a parabolic trough solar collector system to decide on a cleaning strategy (equipment, materials, procedures, and schedules). The guidelines are based on information obtained in past research studies, as well as interviews with vendors and users of cleaning and water treatment equipment. The basic procedure recommended utilizes high pressure portable washing equipment. However, since the cleaning problem is so site-specific, no single, detailed approach can be specified. A systematic procedure for evaluating the particular requirements of a site is therefore given. This will allow the solar energy system operator to develop a cleaning strategy which is cost-effective because it is suited to local conditions.

Bergeron, K.D.; Freese, J.M.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Effect of Angle of Incidence of Sun Rays on the Bending of Absorber Tube of Solar Parabolic Trough Concentrator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In a parabolic trough system, the solar flux distribution on the surface of absorber tube is non-uniform which results in circumferential temperature gradient. Thus, bending moment is induced and leads to the deflection in absorber tube from the focal line of trough. It is concluded that during zero angle of incidence of sun rays (angle made by sun rays with trough's aperture normal), absorber tube will not deflect from the focal line. However, during non-zero angle of incidence, the absorber tube will deflect. It is because of the fact that during non-zero angle of incidence, the absorber tube does not receive any concentrated flux near the end facing the sun. In the current work, an analytical expression is derived for finding the deflection in the central axis of absorber tube from the focal line of trough. Results for deflection are plotted for different values of angle of incidence taking the dimensions of LS3 parabolic trough with Schott 2008 PTR70 receiver.

Sourav Khanna; Suneet Singh; Shireesh B. Kedare

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Feasibility Study on the Use of a Solar Thermoelectric Cogenerator Comprising a Thermoelectric Module and Evacuated Tubular Collector with Parabolic Trough Concentrator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have designed a new solar thermoelectric cogeneration system consisting of an evacuated tubular solar collector (ETSC) with a parabolic trough concentrator (PTC) and thermoelectric modules (TEMs) to supply ...

L. Miao; M. Zhang; S. Tanemura; T. Tanaka; Y. P. Kang…

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Simulation of solar lithium bromide–water absorption cooling system with parabolic trough collector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ahwaz is one of the sweltering cities in Iran where an enormous amount of energy is being consumed to cool residential places in a year. The aim of this research is to simulate a solar single effect lithium bromide–water absorption cooling system in Ahwaz. The solar energy is absorbed by a horizontal N–S parabolic trough collector and stored in an insulated thermal storage tank. The system has been designed to supply the cooling load of a typical house where the cooling load peak is about 17.5 kW (5 tons of refrigeration), which occurs in July. A thermodynamic model has been used to simulate the absorption cycle. The working fluid is water, which is pumped directly to the collector. The results showed that the collector mass flow rate has a negligible effect on the minimum required collector area, but it has a significant effect on the optimum capacity of the storage tank. The minimum required collector area was about 57.6 m2, which could supply the cooling loads for the sunshine hours of the design day for July. The operation of the system has also been considered after sunset by saving solar energy.

M. Mazloumi; M. Naghashzadegan; K. Javaherdeh

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Heat transfer and thermodynamic performance of a parabolic trough receiver with centrally placed perforated plate inserts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, a numerical investigation of thermal and thermodynamic performance of a receiver for a parabolic trough solar collector with perforated plate inserts is presented. The analysis was carried out for different perforated plate geometrical parameters including dimensionless plate orientation angle, the dimensionless plate spacing, and the dimensionless plate diameter. The Reynolds number varies in the range 1.02 × 104 ? Re ? 7.38 × 105 depending on the heat transfer fluid temperature. The fluid temperatures used are 400 K, 500 K, 600 K and 650 K. The porosity of the plate was fixed at 0.65. The study shows that, for a given value of insert orientation, insert spacing and insert size, there is a range of Reynolds numbers for which the thermal performance of the receiver improves with the use of perforated plate inserts. In this range, the modified thermal efficiency increases between 1.2% and 8%. The thermodynamic performance of the receiver due to inclusion of perforated plate inserts is shown to improve for flow rates lower than 0.01205 m3/s. Receiver temperature gradients are shown to reduce with the use of inserts. Correlations for Nusselt number and friction factor were also derived and presented.

Aggrey Mwesigye; Tunde Bello-Ochende; Josua P. Meyer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Next-generation transcriptome assembly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technologies - the next generation. Nat Rev Genet 11, 31-algorithms for next-generation sequencing data. Genomicsassembly from next- generation sequencing data. Genome Res

Martin, Jeffrey A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

NREL Develops New Optical Evaluation Approach for Parabolic Trough Collectors (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

New analytical method makes it possible to carry out fast evaluation of trough collectors for design purposes.

Not Available

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Life Cycle Assessment of a Parabolic Trough Concentrating Solar Power Plant and the Impacts of Key Design Alternatives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To inform capacity expansion decisions, hybrid life cycle assessment is used to evaluate a reference design of a parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) facility located in Daggett, CA, along four sustainability metrics: life cycle (LC) greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, water consumption, cumulative energy demand (CED), and energy payback time (EPBT). ... Power plant system: components typically associated with the power block (e.g., turbine generator set), in addition to other balance-of-plant components, such as buildings, roads, and parking lots. ... The majority of the remaining water consumption is attributed to water consumed during the manufacturing phase (10% of LC or 0.47 L/kWh). ...

John J. Burkhardt; III; Garvin A. Heath; Craig S. Turchi

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

59

Development of Molten-Salt Heat Transfer Fluid Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants - Public Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary This Final Report for the "Development of Molten-Salt Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants” describes the overall project accomplishments, results and conclusions. Phase 1 analyzed the feasibility, cost and performance of a parabolic trough solar power plant with a molten salt heat transfer fluid (HTF); researched and/or developed feasible component options, detailed cost estimates and workable operating procedures; and developed hourly performance models. As a result, a molten salt plant with 6 hours of storage was shown to reduce Thermal Energy Storage (TES) cost by 43.2%, solar field cost by 14.8%, and levelized cost of energy (LCOE) by 9.8% - 14.5% relative to a similar state-of-the-art baseline plant. The LCOE savings range met the project’s Go/No Go criteria of 10% LCOE reduction. Another primary focus of Phase 1 and 2 was risk mitigation. The large risk areas associated with a molten salt parabolic trough plant were addressed in both Phases, such as; HTF freeze prevention and recovery, collector components and piping connections, and complex component interactions. Phase 2 analyzed in more detail the technical and economic feasibility of a 140 MWe,gross molten-salt CSP plant with 6 hours of TES. Phase 2 accomplishments included developing technical solutions to the above mentioned risk areas, such as freeze protection/recovery, corrosion effects of applicable molten salts, collector design improvements for molten salt, and developing plant operating strategies for maximized plant performance and freeze risk mitigation. Phase 2 accomplishments also included developing and thoroughly analyzing a molten salt, Parabolic Trough power plant performance model, in order to achieve the project cost and performance targets. The plant performance model and an extensive basic Engineering, Procurement, and Construction (EPC) quote were used to calculate a real levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of 11.50¢/kWhe , which achieved the Phase 2 Go/No Go target of less than 0.12¢/kWhe. Abengoa Solar has high confidence that the primary risk areas have been addressed in the project and a commercial plant utilizing molten salt is economically and technically feasible. The strong results from the Phase 1 and 2 research, testing, and analyses, summarized in this report, led Abengoa Solar to recommend that the project proceed to Phase 3. However, a commercially viable collector interconnection was not fully validated by the end of Phase 2, combined with the uncertainty in the federal budget, forced the DOE and Abengoa Solar to close the project. Thus the resources required to construct and operate a molten salt pilot plant will be solely supplied by Abengoa Solar.

Grogan, Dylan C. P.

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Analytical expression for circumferential and axial distribution of absorbed flux on a bent absorber tube of solar parabolic trough concentrator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A parabolic trough has a property to concentrate the incident rays at its focal line, when tracked appropriately. The flux distribution on the absorber tube is non-uniform. Part of the absorber’s periphery facing the sun receives direct incident rays where as part of the other side receives concentrated rays resulting in circumferential non-uniform flux distribution. The intensity of flux also varies along the length of the absorber tube, especially at the sun facing end, depending upon the incidence angle of the sun rays and rim angle of the parabolic cylinder. Such non-uniformity in the flux distribution on the absorber tube leads to non-uniform temperature distribution. Thus the absorber experiences thermal stresses which may lead to bending of the tube thereby creating risk of glass cover damage. In order to estimate the extent of bending, study of the flux distribution is needed. In the present work, expression for the absorbed flux on a bent absorber tube accounting circumferential and axial variations is analytically derived. Optical errors and Gaussian sun shape have also been incorporated. Results have been plotted to study the effect of bending, optical errors and rim angle of the trough on flux distribution.

Sourav Khanna; Shireesh B. Kedare; Suneet Singh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "next-generation parabolic trough" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Next Generation Rooftop Unit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Rooftop Unit - Next Generation Rooftop Unit - CRADA Bo Shen Oak Ridge National Laboratory shenb@ornl.gov; 865-574-5745 April 3, 2013 ET R&D project in support of DOE/BTO Goal of 50% Reduction in Building Energy Use by 2030. CRADA project with Trane TOP US Commercial HVAC Equipment OEM 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: half of all US commercial floor space cooled by packaged AC units, consumes more than 1.0 Quad source energy/year; highly efficient systems needed

62

Next Generation Rooftop Unit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Generation Rooftop Unit - Next Generation Rooftop Unit - CRADA Bo Shen Oak Ridge National Laboratory shenb@ornl.gov; 865-574-5745 April 3, 2013 ET R&D project in support of DOE/BTO Goal of 50% Reduction in Building Energy Use by 2030. CRADA project with Trane TOP US Commercial HVAC Equipment OEM 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: half of all US commercial floor space cooled by packaged AC units, consumes more than 1.0 Quad source energy/year; highly efficient systems needed

63

Design and analysis of hydraulically driven actuation system For a parabolic solar trough  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis documents Katarina Popovic's contribution to the design of hydraulic cylinder actuation system for day to day solar trough sun tracking, a semester long project within 2.752 Development of Mechanical Products ...

Popovi?, Katarina, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

New Optical Evaluation Approach for Parabolic Trough Collectors: First-Principle OPTical Intercept Calculation  

SciTech Connect

A new analytical method -- First-principle OPTical Intercept Calculation (FirstOPTIC) -- is presented here for optical evaluation of trough collectors. It employs first-principle optical treatment of collector optical error sources and derives analytical mathematical formulae to calculate the intercept factor of a trough collector. A suite of MATLAB code is developed for FirstOPTIC and validated against theoretical/numerical solutions and ray-tracing results. It is shown that FirstOPTIC can provide fast and accurate calculation of intercept factors of trough collectors. The method makes it possible to carry out fast evaluation of trough collectors for design purposes. The FirstOPTIC techniques and analysis may be naturally extended to other types of CSP technologies such as linear-Fresnel collectors and central-receiver towers.

Zhu, G.; Lewandowski, A.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Next Generation Photovoltaics 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

SunShot's next generation PV projects investigate transformational photovoltaic (PV) technologies with the potential to meet SunShot cost targets. The projects' goals are to: Increase efficiency Reduce costs Improve reliability Create more secure and sustainable supply chains. On October 22, 2014, SunShot awarded more than $14 million to 10 research institutions to meet or exceed SunShot targets by improving performance, efficiency, and durability of solar PV devices. The R&D projects will explore a spectrum of leading-edge solutions, from new high-performance materials like perovskites to novel techniques for creating solar cells with high efficiency and lower manufacturing cost. Learn more about the second round of SunShot's Next Generations Photolvoltaics funding program, or find other PV competitive award programs.

66

NREL: TroughNet - Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market and economic assessment Solar data Models and tools Also see presentations and posters from past parabolic trough technology workshops. For more publications on parabolic...

67

Experimental and numerical heat transfer analysis of a V-cavity absorber for linear parabolic trough solar collector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the present study, a V-cavity absorber with rectangular fins that can be used in the linear parabolic trough collector (PTC) system was proposed and investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The optical performance of the absorber was studied by means of Monte-Carlo ray-tracing (MCRT) method. An energy balance model and a more detailed three-dimensional numerical model were developed to analyze the flow and heat transfer characteristics. Moreover, an experimental setup was built to validate the theoretical analysis. A reasonable agreement between the theoretical and experimental results was achieved, which proves the feasibility and reliability of the models. The results show that the sunlight could be reflected repeatedly by the triangle shape and nearly no sunlight escapes. The absorber with rectangular fins has a better heat transfer performance with higher outlet temperature of heat transfer fluid (HTF), lower temperature of heating surface and lower heat loss than those of absorber without fins. The effects of heat flux distribution, mass flow rate and direct normal irradiance on the heat transfer performance were further discussed. In addition, the variations of the heat transfer coefficient along z axial direction with different mass flow rates were also calculated based on the numerical results.

X. Xiao; P. Zhang; D.D. Shao; M. Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Life Cycle Assessment of a Parabolic Trough Concentrating Solar Power Plant and Impacts of Key Design Alternatives: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Climate change and water scarcity are important issues for today's power sector. To inform capacity expansion decisions, hybrid life cycle assessment is used to evaluate a reference design of a parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) facility located in Daggett, California, along four sustainability metrics: life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, water consumption, cumulative energy demand (CED), and energy payback time (EPBT). This wet-cooled, 103 MW plant utilizes mined nitrate salts in its two-tank, thermal energy storage (TES) system. Design alternatives of dry-cooling, a thermocline TES, and synthetically-derived nitrate salt are evaluated. During its life cycle, the reference CSP plant is estimated to emit 26 g CO2eq per kWh, consume 4.7 L/kWh of water, and demand 0.40 MJeq/kWh of energy, resulting in an EPBT of approximately 1 year. The dry-cooled alternative is estimated to reduce life cycle water consumption by 77% but increase life cycle GHG emissions and CED by 8%. Synthetic nitrate salts may increase life cycle GHG emissions by 52% compared to mined. Switching from two-tank to thermocline TES configuration reduces life cycle GHG emissions, most significantly for plants using synthetically-derived nitrate salts. CSP can significantly reduce GHG emissions compared to fossil-fueled generation; however, dry-cooling may be required in many locations to minimize water consumption.

Heath, G. A.; Burkhardt, J. J.; Turchi, C. S.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Performance model and annual yield comparison of parabolic-trough solar thermal power plants with either nitrogen or synthetic oil as heat transfer fluid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The majority of commercial parabolic-trough plants in the world operate with synthetic oil as heat transfer fluid in the solar field. However, the synthetic oils that are available at affordable cost present some challenges such as their flammability, environmental toxicity and a temperature limitation of around 400 °C. As alternative, this work proposes the use of pressurized nitrogen as heat transfer fluid. In order to analyze the feasibility of this technology, a comparison between a plant with nitrogen and a conventional plant with synthetic oil has been carried out. In both cases, 50 MWe parabolic-trough plants with 6 h of thermal storage are used as reference. A performance model including the solar field, the thermal storage system and the power block has been developed for each plant in the TRNSYS simulation software. This paper also describes the specifications, design and sizing of the solar field and explains the basic operation strategy applied in each model. Both annual simulations have been performed considering the same location, Almería (Spain), and meteorological data. In summary, the results show that similar net annual electricity productions can be attained for parabolic-trough plants with the same collection area using either nitrogen or synthetic oil as heat transfer fluid.

Mario Biencinto; Lourdes González; Eduardo Zarza; Luis E. Díez; Javier Muñoz-Antón

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

3-D Numerical Simulation of Heat Transfer and Turbulent Flow in a Receiver Tube of Solar Parabolic Trough Concentrator with Louvered Twisted-tape Inserts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract High temperature and higher-thermal efficiency for CSP cycles are main goals to improve trough collector's technologies. For a parabolic trough collector the major factor for optimum heat transfer from sun to the heat transfer fluid passing in the absorber tube is to have high convection heat transfer coefficient. Literature shows that absorber tubes with various tape inserts are used and recommended to produce high convection coefficient. Typical twisted-tape (TT) enhances heat exchange between tube surface and working fluid by generating turbulent swirling flow. In this study, enhancement of convection coefficient in the receiver tube of a solar parabolic trough concentrator that the absorber tube is equipped with a new perforated louvered twisted- tape (LTT) is studied numerically. For numerical simulations three different twist ratios (TR), TR=y/W= 2.67, 4, 5.33 (y is the length required for one twist and W is the width of the tape) are used in an experimental laboratory trough collector. Flow is assumed turbulent due to louvered perforated surface and rotational shape of the tape. For thermal boundary condition, non- uniform wall solar heat flux is determined by Soltrace code on the outer surface of the absorber tube. Heat transfer rate and pressure drop are determined for fully developed condition for several Reynolds numbers based on the tube diameter and flow mean velocity. Results show that the heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop increase significantly in comparison with a typical plain twisted-tape in the tube and a plain tube.

Sh. Ghadirijafarbeigloo; A.H. Zamzamian; M. Yaghoubi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 ORNLTM-2007147, Vol. 5 Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research...

72

Next Generation Environmentally Friendly Driving Feedback Systems...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Next Generation Environmentally Friendly Driving Feedback Systems Research and Development Next Generation Environmentally Friendly Driving Feedback Systems Research and...

73

Next Generation Light Source Workshops  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Generation Light Source Workshops A series of workshops will be held in late August with the goal of refining the scientific drivers for the facility and translating the...

74

Nexant Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plant Systems Analysis; Task 1: Preferred Plant Size, 20 January 2005 - 31 December 2005  

SciTech Connect

The Rankine cycles for commercial parabolic trough solar projects range in capacity from 13.5 MWe at the Solar Electric Generating Station I (SEGS I) plant, to a maximum of 89 MWe at the SEGS VIII/IX plants. The series of SEGS projects showed a consistent reduction in the levelized energy cost due to a combination of improvements in collector field technology and economies of scale in both the Rankine cycle and the operation and maintenance costs. Nonetheless, the question of the optimum Rankine cycle capacity remains an open issue. The capacities of the SEGS VIII/IX plants were limited by Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and Public Utility Regulatory Policy Act requirements to a maximum net output of 80 MWe. Further improvements in the Rankine cycle efficiency, and economies of scale in both the capital and the operating cost, should be available at larger plant sizes. An analysis was conducted to determine the effect of Rankine cycle capacities greater than 80 MWe on the levelized energy cost. The study was conducted through the following steps: (1) Three gross cycle capacities of 88 MWe, 165 MWe, and 220 MWe were selected. (2) Three Rankine cycle models were developed using the GateCycle program. The models were based on single reheat turbine cycles, with main steam conditions of 1,450 lb{sub f}/in{sup 2} and 703 F, and reheat steam conditions of 239 lb{sub f}/in{sup 2} and 703 F. The feedwater heater system consisted of 5 closed heaters and 1 open deaerating heater. The design condenser pressure was 2.5 in. HgA. (3) The optimization function within Excelergy was used to determine the preferred solar multiple for each plant. Two cases were considered for each plant: (a) a solar-only project without thermal storage, and (b) a solar-fossil hybrid project, with 3 hours of thermal storage and a heat transport fluid heater fired by natural gas. (4) For each of the 6 cases, collector field geometries, heat transport fluid pressure losses, and heat transport pump power requirements were calculated with a field piping optimization model. (5) Annual electric energy outputs, capital costs, and annual operating costs were calculated for each case using the default methods within Excelergy, from which estimates of the levelized energy costs were developed. The plant with the lowest energy cost was considered the optimum.

Kelly, B.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Next Generation CANDU Performance Assurance  

SciTech Connect

AECL is developing a next generation CANDU design to meet market requirements for low cost, reliable energy supplies. The primary product development objective is to achieve a capital cost substantially lower than the current nuclear plant costs, such that the next generation plant will be competitive with alternative options for large-scale base-load electricity supply. However, other customer requirements, including safety, low-operating costs and reliable performance, are being addressed as equally important design requirements. The main focus of this paper is to address the development directions that will provide performance assurance. The next generation CANDU is an evolutionary extension of the proven CANDU 6 design. There are eight CANDU 6 units in operation in four countries around the world and further three units are under construction. These units provide a sound basis for projecting highly reliable performance for the next generation CANDU. In addition, the next generation CANDU program includes development and qualification activities that will address the new features and design extensions in the advanced plant. To limit product development risk and to enhance performance assurance, the next generation CANDU design features and performance parameters have been carefully reviewed during the concept development phase and have been deliberately selected so as to be well founded on the existing CANDU knowledge base. Planned research and development activities are required only to provide confirmation of the projected performance within a modest extension of the established database. Necessary qualification tests will be carried out within the time frame of the development program, to establish a proven design prior to the start of a construction project. This development support work coupled with ongoing AECL programs to support and enhance the performance and reliability of the existing CANDU plants will provide sound assurance that the next generation CANDU plants will meet customer expectations. (authors)

Wren, David J.; Allsop, P.J.; Hopwood, J.M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Ontario (Canada)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

3D Thermal-structural Analysis of an Absorber Tube of a Parabolic Trough Collector and the Effect of Tube Deflection on Optical Efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper deformation rate of an absorber tube of a parabolic trough collector due to a 3D solar flux density distribution is studied theoretically. Three dimensional temperature distribution and tube thermal expansion due to non-uniform solar flux over the tube are determined numerically. The local concentration ratio for the parabolic trough collectors, which is a key boundary condition in the thermal analysis is computed by Monte Carlo Ray Tracing method for different conditions. The governing equations of thermo-elastic constitutive are solved in three dimensions for steady state thermal and static structural analysis with appropriate boundary condition using Finite Volume and Finite Element numerical codes. Thermal stresses and strain are determined for two types of collectors; first one is a constructed collector and second one is under construction at Shiraz (Iran) solar thermal power plant. Results of the local concentration ratio, flux density, temperature distribution and thermal expansions are determined for the designed conditions. Appropriate flow rate and convection coefficient for each season are found in order to decrease tube bending, prevent optical efficiency drop of collectors, keep high factor of safety, and reduce cyclic daily amplitude motion which lead to longer life time of absorber tube.

S.M. Akbarimoosavi; M. Yaghoubi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Next-Generation Photovoltaic Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next-Generation Photovoltaic Next-Generation Photovoltaic Technologies Next-Generation Photovoltaic Technologies Print Monday, 06 February 2012 15:48 Organic solar cells based on the polymer/fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) model represent one of the most promising technologies for next-generation solar energy conversion due to their low cost and scalability. Traditional organic photovoltaics (OPVs) are thought to have interpenetrating networks of pure polymer and fullerene layers with discrete interfaces. Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory, working with collaborators from the University of Chicago, LBNL, and NIST, used ALS Beamline 11.0.1.2 to perform resonant soft x-ray scattering (RSoXS) on PTB7/fullerene BHJ solar cells to probe performance-related structures at different length scales. These solar cells set a historic record of conversion efficiency (7.4%). The RSoXS demonstrated that the superior performance of PTB7/fullerene solar cells is attributed to surprising hierarchical nanomorphologies ranging from several nanometers of crystallites to tens of nanometers of nanocrystallite aggregates in intermixed PTB7-rich and fullerene-rich domains, themselves hundreds of nanometers in size. This work will lead the research community to rethink ideal OPV morphologies, reconsider which structures should be targeted in OPVs, and enable the rational design of even higher-performance organic solar cells.

78

Next Generation Light Source Workshops  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Generation Light Source Workshops Next Generation Light Source Workshops A series of workshops will be held in late August with the goal of refining the scientific drivers for the facility and translating the scientific needs into the technical performance requirements. Feedback from these workshops will provide important input for advancing the design of the facility. Workshops are planned in the following areas Fundamental Atomic, Molecular, Optical Physics & Combustion Dynamics Mon. Aug. 20 - Tues. Aug 21, 2012 Physical Chemistry, Catalysis, & Photosynthesis Thurs. Aug. 23 - Fri. Aug 24, 2012 Quantum Materials, Magnetism & Spin Dynamics Mon. Aug. 27 - Tues. Aug 28, 2012 Materials & Bio-imaging at the Nanoscale Thurs. Aug. 30 - Fri. Aug 31, 2012 Further information is available on the workshop website:

79

Advancing Next-Generation Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead laboratory for researching advanced vehicle technologies, including hy- the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead laboratory for researching advanced vehicle technologies, including hy- brid, plug-in hybrid, battery electric, and alternative fuel vehicles, Argonne provides transportation research critical to advancing the development of next-generation vehicles. Central to this effort is the Lab's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility (APRF), an integrated four-wheel drive chassis dynamometer and component test facility.

80

Minimum entropy generation due to heat transfer and fluid friction in a parabolic trough receiver with non-uniform heat flux at different rim angles and concentration ratios  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, Monte Carlo ray-tracing and computational fluid dynamics are used to numerically investigate the minimum entropy generation due to heat transfer and fluid friction in a parabolic trough receiver. The analysis was carried out for rim angles in the range 40°–120°, concentration ratios in the range 57–143, Reynolds numbers in the range 1.02 × 104–1.36 × 106 and fluid temperatures in the range 350–650 K. Results show existence of an optimal Reynolds number at any given combination of fluid temperature, concentration ratio and rim angle for which the total entropy generation is a minimum. The total entropy generation was found to increase as the rim angle reduced, concentration ratio increased and fluid temperature reduced. The high entropy generation rates at low rim angles are mainly due to high peak temperatures in the absorber tube at these low rim angles.

Aggrey Mwesigye; Tunde Bello-Ochende; Josua P. Meyer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "next-generation parabolic trough" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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81

Solar aided power generation of a 300 MW lignite fired power plant combined with line-focus parabolic trough collectors field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Nowadays, conventional coal or gas fired power plants are the dominant way to generate electricity in the world. In recent years there is a growth in the field of renewable energy sources in order to avoid the threat of climate change from fossil fuel combustion. Solar energy, as an environmental friendly energy source, may be the answer to the reduction of global CO2 emissions. This paper presents the concept of Solar Aided Power Generation (SAPG), a combination of renewable and conventional energy sources technologies. The operation of the 300 MW lignite fired power plant of Ptolemais integrated with a solar field of parabolic trough collectors was simulated using TRNSYS software in both power boosting and fuel saving modes. The power plant performance, power output variation, fuel consumption and CO2 emissions were calculated. Furthermore, an economic analysis was carried out for both power boosting and fuel saving modes of operation and optimum solar contribution was estimated.

G.C. Bakos; Ch. Tsechelidou

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Articles about Next-Generation Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Stories about next-generation technologies featured by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program.

83

Next generation solar bimodal systems  

SciTech Connect

One of the principal advantages of a solar thermal propulsion system as compared to a conventional chemical propulsion one is high specific impulse which is proportional to the square root of a propellant temperature. Obviously, next generation solar propulsion and bimodal systems must take advantage of high and ultra-high temperatures. This requires use of an appropriate energy conversion system capable to take advantage of high temperature potentially achievable in a solar receiver. High efficiency and power density of a high temperature thermionic converter open new perspectives in the development of advanced bimodal power systems having performance significantly higher than that achievable by the state-of-the-art technology. The paper presents an innovative concept of a cascaded solar bimodal power system with a high temperature Cs-Ba thermionic converter. The paper shows that the use of high temperature Knudsen cesium-barium thermionic converter in a solar bimodal system allows to eliminate thermal insulation sleeve, generate electrical power in the propulsion mode, and precise control thermal state of the solar receiver. In the Cs-Ba thermionic converter an electron instability and high amplitude current oscillations develop. These effects can be used to obtain alternate current power directly in the converter. Possibility and potential advantage of such a generator are discussed.

Babanin, V.I.; Ender, A.Y.; Kolyshkin, I.N.; Kuznetsov, V.I.; Sitnov, V.I. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Paramonov, D.V. [Westinghouse Science and Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

84

Techno-economic assessment of substituting natural gas based heater with thermal energy storage system in parabolic trough concentrated solar power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Parabolic-trough (PT) concentrated solar power (CSP) plants are very vulnerable to daily fluctuations in solar radiation. This dependence can be mitigated through a hybridization of solar energy with natural gas based heaters that supply thermal energy during the night or whenever solar irradiance level is dimmed. However, there is more sustainable way for CSP plants to avoid power-generation-outages caused by transient weather conditions, i.e. installation of thermal energy storage (TES). Such a system stores surplus thermal energy provided by solar field during sunny hours and discharges it when the sun is not available. Shams-1 PT plant in Madinat-Zayed, United-Arab-Emirates (UAE) has two natural gas based components, i.e. steam-booster heater and heat transfer fluid (HTF) heater. In the current study, model of Shams-1 was developed and analyzed in the System Advisor Model (SAM) software. It has been attempted to replace the HTF heater with TES. A parametric study has been conducted to determine the size of the TES as well as the solar field such that the specified power target demand would be satisfied. The results of the parametric analysis showed that TES can't completely replace the HTF heater, within reasonable sizes. Nevertheless, consequent simulations depicts that TES increases the capacity factor on one hand and decreases fuel consumption on the other hand.

V. Poghosyan; Mohamed I. Hassan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

LCA (Life Cycle Assessment) of Parabolic Trough CSP: Materials Inventory and Embodied GHG Emissions from Two-Tank Indirect and Thermocline Thermal Storage (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

In the United States, concentrating solar power (CSP) is one of the most promising renewable energy (RE) technologies for reduction of electric sector greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and for rapid capacity expansion. It is also one of the most price-competitive RE technologies, thanks in large measure to decades of field experience and consistent improvements in design. One of the key design features that makes CSP more attractive than many other RE technologies, like solar photovoltaics and wind, is the potential for including relatively low-cost and efficient thermal energy storage (TES), which can smooth the daily fluctuation of electricity production and extend its duration into the evening peak hours or longer. Because operational environmental burdens are typically small for RE technologies, life cycle assessment (LCA) is recognized as the most appropriate analytical approach for determining their environmental impacts of these technologies, including CSP. An LCA accounts for impacts from all stages in the development, operation, and decommissioning of a CSP plant, including such upstream stages as the extraction of raw materials used in system components, manufacturing of those components, and construction of the plant. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is undertaking an LCA of modern CSP plants, starting with those of parabolic trough design.

Heath, G.; Burkhardt, J.; Turchi, C.; Decker, T.; Kutscher, C.

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

86

Testing thermocline filler materials and molten-salt heat transfer fluids for thermal energy storage systems used in parabolic trough solar power plants.  

SciTech Connect

Parabolic trough power systems that utilize concentrated solar energy to generate electricity are a proven technology. Industry and laboratory research efforts are now focusing on integration of thermal energy storage as a viable means to enhance dispatchability of concentrated solar energy. One option to significantly reduce costs is to use thermocline storage systems, low-cost filler materials as the primary thermal storage medium, and molten nitrate salts as the direct heat transfer fluid. Prior thermocline evaluations and thermal cycling tests at the Sandia National Laboratories' National Solar Thermal Test Facility identified quartzite rock and silica sand as potential filler materials. An expanded series of isothermal and thermal cycling experiments were planned and implemented to extend those studies in order to demonstrate the durability of these filler materials in molten nitrate salts over a range of operating temperatures for extended timeframes. Upon test completion, careful analyses of filler material samples, as well as the molten salt, were conducted to assess long-term durability and degradation mechanisms in these test conditions. Analysis results demonstrate that the quartzite rock and silica sand appear able to withstand the molten salt environment quite well. No significant deterioration that would impact the performance or operability of a thermocline thermal energy storage system was evident. Therefore, additional studies of the thermocline concept can continue armed with confidence that appropriate filler materials have been identified for the intended application.

Kelly, Michael James; Hlava, Paul Frank; Brosseau, Douglas A.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Next Generation National Security Leaders  

SciTech Connect

It is generally accepted that the international security community faces an impending challenge in its changing leadership demographics. The workforce that currently addresses nonproliferation, arms control, and verification is moving toward retirement and there is a perceived need for programs to train a new set of experts for both technical- and policy-related functions to replace the retiring generation. Despite the perceived need, there are also indicators that there are not sufficient jobs for individuals we are currently training. If we had “right-sized” the training programs, there would not be a shortage of jobs. The extent and scope of the human resource crisis is unclear, and information about training programs and how they meet existing needs is minimal. This paper seeks to achieve two objectives: 1) Clarify the major human resource problem and potential consequences; and 2) Propose how to characterize the requirement with sufficient granularity to enable key stakeholders to link programs aimed at developing the next generations of experts with employment needs. In order to accomplish both these goals, this paper recommends establishing a forum comprised of key stakeholders of this issue (including universities, public and private sectors), and conducting a study of the human resources and resource needs of the global security community. If there is indeed a human resource crisis in the global security field, we cannot address the problem if we are uninformed. The solution may lie in training more (or fewer) young professions to work in this community – or it may lie in more effectively using our existing resources and training programs.

Mahy, Heidi A.; Fankhauser, Jana G.; Stein, Steven L.; Toomey, Christopher

2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

88

Sandia National Laboratories: economically competitive next generation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

economically competitive next generation biofuels JBEI Updates Techno-Economic Modeling Tools for Biofuels On September 18, 2013, in Biofuels, Biomass, Computational Modeling &...

89

Next Generation Calibration Models with Dimensional Modeling...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Documents & Publications Reduction of Transient Particulate Matter Spikes with Decision Tree Based Control Model-Based Transient Calibration Optimization for Next Generation Diesel...

90

Next Generation Inverter | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting ape040smith2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Next Generation Inverter Vehicle Technologies...

91

The cost of balancing a parabolic trough concentrated solar power plant in the Spanish electricity spot markets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study presents a new dispatch model (SCSP) for a CSP plant based on a dynamic programing algorithm. The purpose is to investigate the cost of balancing a CSP plant in the Spanish electricity market. Results are presented for a parabolic plant in the Spanish market for years 2009, 2010 and 2011 using solar availability data at the Plataforma Solar, Andalucia, Spain. The variation of balancing cost with solar multiple (SM) and number of storage hours (Nh) is analysed and results for two different optimisation cases presented. The first uses day-ahead forecasts for both solar availability and market prices. The second uses day-ahead solar availability and within-day market price forecasts. Both cases are settled in the balancing market. Key results include that the balancing cost decreases with increased SM and Nh and that balancing costs can be 2.2% to 9.5% of the plants gross income. For all SM and Nh, balancing costs are a function of season, being lower in summer than winter driven by increased load-factor in summer. During the year Quarter 3 has a lower balancing cost than Quarter 2 due to a closer match between forecast and actual solar availability. Optimising against within-day prices costs more than with day-ahead prices resulting from more balancing energy traded at a less favourable price than day-ahead. It is envisaged that the numbers presented in this study will provide an aid to policy makers when constructing tariffs to support future CSP development.

S.W. Channon; P.C. Eames

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Innovative Energy Technologies: The Next Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Innovative Energy Technologies: The Next Generation T E C H N O L O G Y G U I D E #12;Our lifestyle is sustained by energy. Technologies developed at Carnegie Mellon have the ability to enhance energy generation of entering, the marketplace. These next generation technologies have been developed by undergraduate

Andrews, Peter B.

93

Next Generation Rooftop Unit | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Rooftop Unit Next Generation Rooftop Unit Next Generation Rooftop Unit The U.S. Department of Energy is currently conducting research in a next generation rooftop unit (RTU). More than half of U.S. commercial building space is cooled by packaged heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment. Existing rooftop HVAC units consume more than 1.3% of the United States' annual energy usage annually. Project Description This project seeks to evaluate optimal design strategies for significantly improving the efficiency of rooftop units. The primary market for this project is commercial buildings, such as supermarkets and hotels. Project Partners Research is being undertaken through a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National

94

FACTSHEET: Next Generation Power Electronics Manufacturing Innovation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FACTSHEET: Next Generation Power Electronics Manufacturing FACTSHEET: Next Generation Power Electronics Manufacturing Innovation Institute FACTSHEET: Next Generation Power Electronics Manufacturing Innovation Institute January 15, 2014 - 9:20am Addthis The Obama Administration today announces the selection of North Carolina State University to lead a public-private manufacturing innovation institute for next generation power electronics. Supported by a $70 million Energy Department investment over five years as well as a matching $70 million in non-federal cost-share, the institute will bring together over 25 companies, universities and state and federal organizations to invent and manufacture wide bandgap (WBG) semiconductor-based power electronics that are cost-competitive and 10 times more powerful than current

95

Research & Development Roadmap: Next-Generation Appliances  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Research and Development (R&D) Roadmap for Next-Generation Appliances provides recommendations to the Building Technologies Office (BTO) on R&D activities to pursue that will aid in achieving BTO’s energy savings goals.

96

Next Generation Insulation Materials: Challenges and Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next-Generation Insulation Materials: Challenges and Opportunities Nov 14 2014 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM Kaushik Biswas, Building Technologies Research and Integration Center, Oak Ridge...

97

Next-generation information systems for genomics   

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The advent of next-generation sequencing technologies is transforming biology by enabling individual researchers to sequence the genomes of individual organisms or cells on a massive scale. In order to realize the ...

Mungall, Christopher

2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

98

Next-Generation Solar Collectors for CSP  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This fact sheet on Next-Generation Collectors for CSP highlights a solar energy program awarded through the 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D awards. The team is developing new solar collector base technologies for next-generation heliostats used in power tower systems. If successful, this project will result in a 50% reduction in solar field equipment cost and a 30% reduction in field installation cost compared to existing heliostat designs.

99

Basic Control of Parabolic Troughs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The chapter outlines the main features of the different modeling and basic control approaches used during the last 25 years to control the distributed collector systems (DCS). The DCS may be described by a dis...

Prof. Eduardo F. Camacho; Manuel Berenguel…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Next Generation Radioisotope Generators | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

» Next Generation Radioisotope Generators » Next Generation Radioisotope Generators Next Generation Radioisotope Generators Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) - The ASRG is currently being developed as a high-efficiency RPS technology to support future space missions on the Martian surface or in the vacuum of space. This system uses Stirling convertors, which have moving parts to mechanically convert heat to electricity. This power conversion system, if successfully deployed, will reduce the weight of each RPS and the amount of Pu-238 needed per mission. A HISTORY OF MISSION SUCCESSES For over fifty years, the Department of Energy has enabled space exploration on 27 missions by providing safe reliable radioistope power systems and radioisotope heater units for NASA, Navy and Air Force.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "next-generation parabolic trough" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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101

Report of the Task Force on Next Generation High Performance...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report of the Task Force on Next Generation High Performance Computing Report of the Task Force on Next Generation High Performance Computing The SEAB Task Force on Next Generation...

102

Sulfur Lamps-The Next Generation of Efficient Light?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Sulfur Lamps-The Next Generation of Efficient Light? The figure above is a schematic of the system installed at the National Air and Space Museum and the DOE headquarters in Washington, D.C., Light from the sulfur lamp is focused by a parabolic reflector so that it enters the light pipe within a small angular cone. Light travels down the pipe, reflecting off the prismatic film (A) that lines the outer acrylic tube. The prismatic film reflects the light through total internal reflection (C), an intrinsically efficient process. Some of the light striking the film (at A) is not reflected and "leaks out" of the pipe walls (B), giving the pipe a glowing appearance. A light ray that travels all the way down the pipe will strike the mirror at the end (D) and return back up the pipe.

103

Next Generation Attics and Roof Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Attics Next Generation Attics and Roof Systems William (Bill) Miller, Ph.D. ORNL WML@ORNL.GOV____ (865) 574-2013 April 4, 2013 Goals: Develop New Roof and Attic Designs  Reduce Space Conditioning Due to Attic  Convince Industry to Adopt Designs Building Envelope Program  Dr. William Miller  Dr. Som Shrestha  Kaushik Biswas, Ken Childs, Jerald Atchley, Phil Childs Andre Desjarlais (Group Leader) 32% Primary Energy 28% Primary Energy 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives

104

Silicon Nanostructure-based Technology for Next Generation Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Silicon Nanostructure-based Technology for Next Generation Energy Storage Silicon Nanostructure-based Technology for Next Generation Energy Storage 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

105

Michigan: Universities Train Next Generation of Automotive Engineers...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Michigan: Universities Train Next Generation of Automotive Engineers Michigan: Universities Train Next Generation of Automotive Engineers November 6, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis...

106

24 Universities Receiving Funding to Train Next Generation of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 Universities Receiving Funding to Train Next Generation of Energy Efficiency Experts 24 Universities Receiving Funding to Train Next Generation of Energy Efficiency Experts...

107

Proceedings of the Computational Needs for the Next Generation...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Proceedings of the Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Workshop, April 19-20, 2011 Proceedings of the Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric...

108

Energy Department Announces New Investments to Train Next Generation...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

to Train Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders, Advance University-Led Nuclear Innovation Energy Department Announces New Investments to Train Next Generation of Nuclear Energy...

109

Fostering the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Technology |...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Fostering the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Technology Fostering the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Technology September 29, 2014 - 11:06am Addthis Fostering the Next...

110

Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy Leaders, Pioneer Advanced Nuclear Technology Energy Department Invests 60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy...

111

Engaging the Next Generation of Automotive Engineers through...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Engaging the Next Generation of Automotive Engineers through Advanced Vehicle Technology Competition Engaging the Next Generation of Automotive Engineers through Advanced Vehicle...

112

NERSC Leads Next-Generation Code Optimization Effort  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leads Next-Generation Code Optimization Effort NERSC Launches Next-Generation Code Optimization Effort NERSC, Intel, Cray team up to prepare users for transition to exascale...

113

Next Generation Advanced Framing - Building America Top Innovation...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Next Generation Advanced Framing - Building America Top Innovation Next Generation Advanced Framing - Building America Top Innovation This photo shows advanced framing on a rim...

114

Demonstrating and Validating a Next Generation Model-Based Controller...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Validating a Next Generation Model-Based Controller for Fuel Efficient, Low Emissions Diesel Engines Demonstrating and Validating a Next Generation Model-Based Controller for...

115

NERSC, Cray, Intel Announce Next-Generation Supercomputer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC, Cray, Intel Announce Next-Generation Supercomputer NERSC, Cray, Intel to Collaborate on Next-Generation Supercomputer April 29, 2014 | Tags: NERSC Contact: Jon Bashor,...

116

Graduate Education at UNH Next Generation Leadership  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.gradschool.unh.edu #12;Graduate education at the University of New Hampshire prepares the next generation of leaders doctoral degrees, graduate study at UNH is the catalyst for maintaining the state of New Hampshire's highly Graduate education forges vital partnerships in many public health and human services initiatives statewide

New Hampshire, University of

117

Innovative EnergyTechnologies: The Next Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;ABOUT T H E C A R N EG IE MELLON UNIVERSITY Wilton E. Scott Institute for Energy Innovation OverInnovative EnergyTechnologies: The Next Generation T E C H N O L O G Y G U I D E #12;Our lifestyle is sustained by energy. Technologies developed at Carnegie Mellon have the ability to enhance energy generation

McGaughey, Alan

118

Next-generation tools for evolutionary invasion analyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REVIEW Next-generation tools for evolutionary invasion analyses Amy Hurford1,*, Daniel Cownden1 on so-called `next-generation' matrices. Although this next-generation matrix approach has sometimes to a wider evolutionary audience in two ways. First, we review the next-generation matrix approach

Day, Troy

119

Proposed Next Generation GRB Mission: EXIST  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A next generation Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) mission to follow the upcoming Swift mission is described. The proposed Energetic X?ray Imaging Survey Telescope EXIST would yield the limiting (practical) GRB trigger sensitivity broad?band spectral and temporal response and spatial resolution over a wide field. It would provide high resolution spectra and locations for GRBs detected at GeV energies with GLAST. Together with the next generation missions Constellation?X NGST and LISA and optical?survey (LSST) telescopes EXIST would enable GRBs to be used as probes of the early universe and the first generation of stars. EXIST alone would give ?10–50? positions (long or short GRBs) approximate redshifts from lags and constrain physics of jets orphan afterglows neutrinos and SGRs.

J. Grindlay; N. Gehrels; F. Harrison; R. Blandford; G. Fishman; C. Kouveliotou; D. H. Hartmann; S. Woosley; W. Craig; J. Hong

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Mesaba next-generation IGCC plant  

SciTech Connect

Through a US Department of Energy (DOE) cooperative agreement awarded in June 2006, MEP-I LLC plans to demonstrate a next generation integrated gasification-combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generating plant, the Mesaba Energy Project. The 606-MWe plant (the first of two similarly sized plants envisioned by project sponsors) will feature next-generation ConocoPhillips E-Gas{trademark} technology first tested on the DOE-funded Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering project. Mesaba will benefit from recommendations of an industry panel applying the Value Improving Practices process to Wabash cost and performance results. The project will be twice the size of Wabash, while demonstrating better efficient, reliability and pollutant control. The $2.16 billion project ($36 million federal cost share) will be located in the Iron Range region north of Duluth, Minnesota. Mesaba is one of four projects selected under Round II of the Clean Coal Power Initiative. 1 fig.

NONE

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "next-generation parabolic trough" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Synchronization System for Next Generation Light Sources  

SciTech Connect

An alternative synchronization technique – one that would allow explicit control of the pulse train including its repetition rate and delay is clearly desired. We propose such a scheme. Our method is based on optical interferometry and permits synchronization of the pulse trains generated by two independent mode-locked lasers. As the next generation x-ray sources will be driven by a clock signal derived from a mode-locked optical source, our technique will provide a way to synchronize x-ray probe with the optical pump pulses.

Zavriyev, Anton

2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

122

Next-Generation Thermionic Solar Energy Conversion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This fact sheet describes a next-generation thermionic solar energy conversion project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D award program. The team, led by Stanford University, seeks to demonstrate the feasibility of photon-enhanced, microfabricated thermionic energy converters as a high-efficiency topping cycle for CSP electricity generation. With the potential to double the electricity output efficiency of solar-thermal power stations, this topping cycle application can significantly reduce the cost of solar-thermal electricity below that of the lowest-cost, fossil-fuel generated electricity.

123

NEXT GENERATION GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS STUDY  

SciTech Connect

Under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has conducted a study of Next Generation Gas Turbine Systems that embraces the goals of the DOE's High Efficiency Engines and Turbines and Vision 21 programs. The Siemens Westinghouse Next Generation Gas Turbine (NGGT) Systems program was a 24-month study looking at the feasibility of a NGGT for the emerging deregulated distributed generation market. Initial efforts focused on a modular gas turbine using an innovative blend of proven technologies from the Siemens Westinghouse W501 series of gas turbines and new enabling technologies to serve a wide variety of applications. The flexibility to serve both 50-Hz and 60-Hz applications, use a wide range of fuels and be configured for peaking, intermediate and base load duty cycles was the ultimate goal. As the study progressed the emphasis shifted from a flexible gas turbine system of a specific size to a broader gas turbine technology focus. This shift in direction allowed for greater placement of technology among both the existing fleet and new engine designs, regardless of size, and will ultimately provide for greater public benefit. This report describes the study efforts and provides the resultant conclusions and recommendations for future technology development in collaboration with the DOE.

Benjamin C. Wiant; Ihor S. Diakunchak; Dennis A. Horazak; Harry T. Morehead

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

A New Cleanroom for a Next-Generation Semiconductor Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A New Cleanroom for a Next-Generation Semiconductor Research Tool A New Cleanroom for a Next-Generation Semiconductor Research Tool Print The new Sector 12 cleanroom under...

125

Breakout Session: Open Innovation: SunShot Catalyst & Next Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Open Innovation: SunShot Catalyst & Next Generation Government Prizes Breakout Session: Open Innovation: SunShot Catalyst & Next Generation Government Prizes May 21, 2014 2:45PM to...

126

Next Generation Bipolar Plates for Automotive PEM Fuel Cells...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Bipolar Plates for Automotive PEM Fuel Cells Next Generation Bipolar Plates for Automotive PEM Fuel Cells Part of a 100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE...

127

Workshops on Next Generation Energy Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Many building energy simulation programs Many building energy simulation programs developed around the world are reaching maturity. Many use simulation methods (and even code) that originated in the 1960s. Without substantial redesign and recoding, expanding their capabilities has become difficult, time-consuming, and expensive. However, recent advances in analysis and computational methods and power have increased the opportunity for significant improvements in these tools. To inform planning activities for next-generation simulation tools, the U.S. Department of Energy held workshops in August 1995 and June 1996. Energy simulation developers and expert users were invited to the first workshop (developers workshop), held following Building Simulation '95 in Madison, Wisconsin. Energy simulation users and other professionals attended the second workshop (users workshop), held in

128

Microstructural Characterization of Next Generation Nuclear Graphites  

SciTech Connect

This article reports the microstructural characteristics of various petroleum and pitch based nuclear graphites (IG-110, NBG-18, and PCEA) that are of interest to the next generation nuclear plant program. Bright-field transmission electron microscopy imaging was used to identify and understand the different features constituting the microstructure of nuclear graphite such as the filler particles, microcracks, binder phase, rosette-shaped quinoline insoluble (QI) particles, chaotic structures, and turbostratic graphite phase. The dimensions of microcracks were found to vary from a few nanometers to tens of microns. Furthermore, the microcracks were found to be filled with amorphous carbon of unknown origin. The pitch coke based graphite (NBG-18) was found to contain higher concentration of binder phase constituting QI particles as well as chaotic structures. The turbostratic graphite, present in all of the grades, was identified through their elliptical diffraction patterns. The difference in the microstructure has been analyzed in view of their processing conditions.

Karthik Chinnathambi; Joshua Kane; Darryl P. Butt; William E. Windes; Rick Ubic

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Next Generation CANDU Core Physics Innovations  

SciTech Connect

NG CANDU is the 'Next Generation' CANDU{sup R} reactor, aimed at producing electrical power at a capital cost significantly less than that of the current reactor designs. A key element of cost reduction is the use of H{sub 2}O as coolant and Slightly Enriched Uranium fuel in a tight D{sub 2}O-moderated lattice. The innovations in the CANDU core physics result in substantial improvements in economics as well as significant enhancements in reactor licensability, controllability, and waste reduction. The full-core coolant-void reactivity in NG CANDU is about -3 mk. Power coefficient is substantially negative. Fuel burnup is about three times the current natural-uranium burnup. (authors)

Chan, P.S.W.; Hopwood, J.M.; Love, J.W. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Ontario (Canada)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

NNSA Launches Next Generation Safeguards Initiative | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Generation Safeguards Initiative | National Nuclear Next Generation Safeguards Initiative | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > NNSA Launches Next Generation Safeguards Initiative NNSA Launches Next Generation Safeguards Initiative September 09, 2008 Washington, DC NNSA Launches Next Generation Safeguards Initiative

131

The next-generation BLASTPol experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) is a suborbital mapping experiment designed to study the role magnetic fields play in star formation. BLASTPol has had two science flights from McMurdo Station, Antarctica in 2010 and 2012. These flights have produced thousands of polarization vectors at 250, 350 and 500 microns in several molecular cloud targets. We present the design, specifications, and progress towards the next-generation BLASTPol experiment (BLAST-TNG). BLAST-TNG will fly a 40% larger diameter primary mirror, with almost 8 times the number of polarization-sensitive detectors resulting in a factor of 16 increase in mapping speed. With a spatial resolution of 22 arcseconds and four times the field of view of BLASTPol, BLAST-TNG will bridge the angular scales between Planck's low resolution all-sky maps and ALMA's ultra-high resolution narrow fields. The new receiver has a larger cryogenics volume, allowing for a 28 day hold time. BLAST-TNG employs three arr...

Dober, Bradley; Ashton, Peter; Angilè, Francesco E; Beall, James A; Becker, Dan; Bradford, Kristi J; Che, George; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Devlin, Mark J; Fissel, Laura M; Fukui, Yasuo; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gao, Jiansong; Groppi, Christopher E; Hillbrand, Seth; Hilton, Gene C; Hubmayr, Johannes; Irwin, Kent D; Klein, Jeffrey; Van Lanen, Jeff; Li, Dale; Li, Zhi-Yun; Lourie, Nathan P; Mani, Hamdi; Martin, Peter G; Mauskopf, Philip; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Novak, Giles; Pappas, David P; Pascale, Enzo; Santos, Fabio P; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Stanchfield, Sara; Ullom, Joel N; Underhill, Matthew; Vissers, Michael R; Ward-Thompson, Derek

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

NEXT GENERATION MELTER OPTIONEERING STUDY - INTERIM REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The next generation melter (NOM) development program includes a down selection process to aid in determining the recommended vitrification technology to implement into the WTP at the first melter change-out which is scheduled for 2025. This optioneering study presents a structured value engineering process to establish and assess evaluation criteria that will be incorporated into the down selection process. This process establishes an evaluation framework that will be used progressively throughout the NGM program, and as such this interim report will be updated on a regular basis. The workshop objectives were achieved. In particular: (1) Consensus was reached with stakeholders and technology providers represented at the workshop regarding the need for a decision making process and the application of the D{sub 2}0 process to NGM option evaluation. (2) A framework was established for applying the decision making process to technology development and evaluation between 2010 and 2013. (3) The criteria for the initial evaluation in 2011 were refined and agreed with stakeholders and technology providers. (4) The technology providers have the guidance required to produce data/information to support the next phase of the evaluation process. In some cases it may be necessary to reflect the data/information requirements and overall approach to the evaluation of technology options against specific criteria within updated Statements of Work for 2010-2011. Access to the WTP engineering data has been identified as being very important for option development and evaluation due to the interface issues for the NGM and surrounding plant. WRPS efforts are ongoing to establish precisely data that is required and how to resolve this Issue. It is intended to apply a similarly structured decision making process to the development and evaluation of LAW NGM options.

GRAY MF; CALMUS RB; RAMSEY G; LOMAX J; ALLEN H

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

133

Next Generation of Government Summit | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation of Government Summit Next Generation of Government Summit Next Generation of Government Summit July 25, 2013 9:15AM EDT to July 26, 2013 5:15PM EDT Washington DC GovLoop and Young Government Leaders will hold its 4th Annual Next Generation of Government Summit from July 25 to July 26, 2013, in Washington, DC. The theme for the conference is 2013 Next Generation of Government Training Summit: Developing the 21st Century Government Leader. Next Generation of Government Summit qualifies as training in compliance with 5 U.S.C. chapter 41. The training is open to all Federal employees and will provide training and workshops in such areas as Project Management, Innovation, Analytics and Decision-Making, and Career Development. Before participating, Federal employees and managers should review

134

Bush Administration Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Nuclear Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Nuclear Energy Systems Bush Administration Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation Nuclear Energy Systems February 28, 2005 - 10:33am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC-The Bush Administration today took a major step in advancing international efforts to develop the next generation of clean, safe nuclear energy systems. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman joined representatives from Canada, France, Japan, and the United Kingdom to sign the first multilateral agreement in history aimed at the development of next generation nuclear energy systems. The work of the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) is essential to advancing an important component of the Bush Administration's comprehensive energy strategy in the development of next generation nuclear energy technologies.

135

NNSA Administrator Addresses Next Generation of Computational Scientists |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addresses Next Generation of Computational Scientists | Addresses Next Generation of Computational Scientists | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Speeches > NNSA Administrator Addresses Next Generation of Computational ... Speech NNSA Administrator Addresses Next Generation of Computational Scientists Jun 22, 2010

136

Oak Ridge to acquire next generation supercomputer | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(865) 574-7308 Oak Ridge to acquire next generation supercomputer Supercomputer simulations enable researchers to address the most challenging problems in diverse scientific...

137

Next Generation Building Envelope Materials | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Envelope Materials Next Generation Building Envelope Materials Addthis 1 of 3 Vacuum insulation panels (left); Modified atmosphere panels (right) Image: Oak Ridge National...

138

Next Generation Rooftop Unit - 2013 Peer Review | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

emrgtech11shen040313.pdf More Documents & Publications A typical commercial rooftop air-conditioning unit (RTU) Credit: Oak Ridge National Lab Next Generation Rooftop Unit...

139

Secretary Chu Announces Nearly $15 Million for Next Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary Chu. "These next-generation lighting technologies have the potential to transform the way we light our homes and businesses and generate enormous energy and cost...

140

Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation  equipment,  substations,  distribution  lines, energy resources (DER),  substation and distribution.  the next generation of substation automation solutions.  It 

Birman, Kenneth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "next-generation parabolic trough" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Enabling the Next Generation of High Efficiency Engines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Discusses challenges and opportunities for next generation internal combustion engines, and developments for further pushing the limits of engine efficiency and vehicle fuel economy

142

Nx-TEC: Next-Generation Thermionic Solar Energy Conversion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(MSE), ZX Shen (SIMES), Roger Howe (EE) Nx-TEC: Next-Generation Thermionic Solar Energy Conversion SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Award Number:CPS 25659 Start date:...

143

Silicon Nanostructure-based Technology for Next Generation Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Storage Silicon Nanostructure-based Technology for Next Generation Energy Storage 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual...

144

High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production Award Number: DE-EE00025828 Report Date: March 15, 2013 PI: Stephen Obrey * Technical approach is focused on...

145

Next Generation Bio-Based & Sustainable Chemicals Summit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The 6th Annual Next Generation Bio-Based & Sustainable Chemicals Summit will be hosted in New Orleans, Louisiana, from February 3–5.

146

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Next Generation Inverter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given by General Motors at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about next generation inverter.

147

Next Generation Diesel Engine Control | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Diesel Engine Control Next Generation Diesel Engine Control Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007,...

148

NEXT GENERATION ENERGY EFFICIENT FLUORESCENT LIGHTING PRODUCT  

SciTech Connect

This is the Final Report of the Next-Generation Energy Efficient Fluorescent Lighting Products program, Department of Energy (DOE). The overall goal of this three-year program was to develop novel phosphors to improve the color rendition and efficiency of compact and linear fluorescent lamps. The prime technical approach was the development of quantum-splitting phosphor (QSP) to further increase the efficiency of conventional linear fluorescent lamps and the development of new high color rendering phosphor blends for compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) as potential replacements for the energy-hungry and short-lived incandescent lamps in market segments that demand high color rendering light sources. We determined early in the project that the previously developed oxide QSP, SrAl{sub 12}O{sub 19}:Pr{sup 3+}, did not exhibit an quantum efficiency higher than unity under excitation by 185 nm radiation, and we therefore worked to determine the physical reasons for this observation. From our investigations we concluded that the achievement of quantum efficiency exceeding unity in SrAl{sub 12}O{sub 19}:Pr{sup 3+} was not possible due to interaction of the Pr{sup 3+} 5d level with the conduction band of the solid. The interaction which gives rise to an additional nonradiative decay path for the excitation energy is responsible for the low quantum efficiency of the phosphor. Our work has led to the development of a novel spectroscopic method for determining photoionzation threshold of luminescent centers in solids. This has resulted in further quantification of the requirements for host phosphor lattice materials to optimize quantum efficiency. Because of the low quantum efficiency of the QSP, we were unable to demonstrate a linear fluorescent lamp with overall performance exceeding that of existing mercury-based fluorescent lamps. Our work on the high color rendering CFLs has been very successful. We have demonstrated CFLs that satisfies the EnergyStar requirement with color rendering index (CRI) greater than 90; the CRI of current commercial CFLs are in the low 80s. In this report we summarize the technical work completed under the Program, summarize our findings about the performance limits of the various technologies we investigated, and outline promising paths for future work.

Alok Srivastava; Anant Setlur

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project will demonstrate emissions-free nuclearassisted electricity and hydrogen production by 2015. The NGNP reactor will be a helium-cooled, graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor with a design goal outlet temperature of 1000 C or higher. The reactor thermal power and core configuration will be designed to assure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage during hypothetical accidents. The fuel cycle will be a once-through very high burnup low-enriched uranium fuel cycle. This paper provides a description of the project to build the NGNP at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The NGNP Project includes an overall reactor design activity and four major supporting activities: materials selection and qualification, NRC licensing and regulatory support, fuel development and qualification, and the hydrogen production plant. Each of these activities is discussed in the paper. All the reactor design and construction activities will be managed under the DOE’s project management system as outlined in DOE Order 413.3. The key elements of the overall project management system discussed in this paper include the client and project management organization relationship, critical decisions (CDs), acquisition strategy, and the project logic and timeline. The major activities associated with the materials program include development of a plan for managing the selection and qualification of all component materials required for the NGNP; identification of specific materials alternatives for each system component; evaluation of the needed testing, code work, and analysis required to qualify each identified material; preliminary selection of component materials; irradiation of needed sample materials; physical, mechanical, and chemical testing of unirradiated and irradiated materials; and documentation of final materials selections. The NGNP will be licensed by the NRC under 10 CFR 50 or 10 CFR 52, for the purpose of demonstrating the suitability of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors for commercial electric power and hydrogen production. Products that will support the licensing of the NGNP include the environmental impact statement, the preliminary safety analysis report, the NRC construction permit, the final safety analysis report, and the NRC operating license. The fuel development and qualification program consists of five elements: development of improved fuel manufacturing technologies, fuel and materials irradiations, safety testing and post-irradiation examinations, fuel performance modeling, and fission product transport and source term modeling. Two basic approaches will be explored for using the heat from the high-temperature helium coolant to produce hydrogen. The first technology of interest is the thermochemical splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen. The most promising processes for thermochemical splitting of water are sulfur-based and include the sulfur-iodine, hybrid sulfur-electrolysis, and sulfur-bromine processes. The second technology of interest is thermally assisted electrolysis of water. The efficiency of this process can be substantially improved by heating the water to high-temperature steam before applying electrolysis.

F. H. Southworth; P. E. MacDonald

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Student Competition Prepares the Next Generation of Wind Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Competition Prepares the Next Generation of Wind Energy Competition Prepares the Next Generation of Wind Energy Entrepreneurs Student Competition Prepares the Next Generation of Wind Energy Entrepreneurs April 11, 2013 - 11:32am Addthis The Collegiate Wind Competition is one of several Energy Department-supported programs aiming to inspire the next generation of clean energy leaders. Here, JMU student Greg Miller demonstrates how the blades of a wind turbine work as part the Wind for Schools project. | Photo courtesy of the Virginia Center for Wind Energy. The Collegiate Wind Competition is one of several Energy Department-supported programs aiming to inspire the next generation of clean energy leaders. Here, JMU student Greg Miller demonstrates how the

151

Technology Assessment for Next Generation PMU Mark A. Buckner  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment for Next Assessment for Next Generation PMU Mark A. Buckner Oak Ridge National Laboratory bucknerma@ornl.gov 27/28 June 2013 Washington, DC DOE/OE Transmission Reliability Program 2 Project objective  Identify PMU technology migration paths  Develop an understanding of possible next- generation phasor-measurement devices  Develop a plan for designing and building a prototype next-generation PMU 3 Major Technical Accomplishments  Requirements Assessment Phase - Review current PMU functionality during normal and off-normal system operating conditions. - Identify limitations and deficiencies of current technologies. - Identify requirements for next generation PMUs ("If we could make things better, what would we improve?"). - Brainstorm options for next generation PMU. Identify top three

152

Student Competition Prepares the Next Generation of Wind Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Student Competition Prepares the Next Generation of Wind Energy Student Competition Prepares the Next Generation of Wind Energy Entrepreneurs Student Competition Prepares the Next Generation of Wind Energy Entrepreneurs April 11, 2013 - 11:32am Addthis The Collegiate Wind Competition is one of several Energy Department-supported programs aiming to inspire the next generation of clean energy leaders. Here, JMU student Greg Miller demonstrates how the blades of a wind turbine work as part the Wind for Schools project. | Photo courtesy of the Virginia Center for Wind Energy. The Collegiate Wind Competition is one of several Energy Department-supported programs aiming to inspire the next generation of clean energy leaders. Here, JMU student Greg Miller demonstrates how the

153

Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

60 Million to Train Next Generation 60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy Leaders, Pioneer Advanced Nuclear Technology Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy Leaders, Pioneer Advanced Nuclear Technology September 20, 2013 - 1:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Building on President Obama's Climate Action Plan to continue America's leadership in clean energy innovation, the Energy Department announced today more than $60 million in nuclear energy research awards and improvements to university research reactors and infrastructure. The 91 awards announced today will help train and educate the next generation of leaders in America's nuclear industry as well as support new and advanced nuclear technologies from reactor materials to innovative

154

Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy Leaders, Pioneer Advanced Nuclear Technology Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation Nuclear Energy Leaders, Pioneer Advanced Nuclear Technology September 20, 2013 - 1:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Building on President Obama's Climate Action Plan to continue America's leadership in clean energy innovation, the Energy Department announced today more than $60 million in nuclear energy research awards and improvements to university research reactors and infrastructure. The 91 awards announced today will help train and educate the next generation of leaders in America's nuclear industry as well as support new and advanced nuclear technologies from reactor materials to innovative

155

Graphene, Hydrogen and Next-Generation Electronics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Graphene, Hydrogen and Next-Generation Electronics Graphene, Hydrogen and Next-Generation Electronics Graphene, Hydrogen and Next-Generation Electronics July 22, 2011 - 5:32pm Addthis Graphene grains in several different shapes, controlled by hydrogen. | Courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory Graphene grains in several different shapes, controlled by hydrogen. | Courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory A team of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and New Mexico State University researchers have developed a new approach to growing graphene (one-atom thick carbon sheets) that can help advance next-generation electronics including batteries, transistors and computer chips. Growing graphene usually involves a process called chemical vapor deposition method that produces irregularly shaped grains. Little was known

156

Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant June 29, 2006 - 2:41pm Addthis Gen IV Reactor Capable of Producing Electricity and/or Hydrogen WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking expressions of interest from prospective industry teams interested in participating in the development and conceptual design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), a very high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor prototype with the capability to produce process heat, electricity and/or hydrogen. The very high temperature reactor is based on research and development activities supported by DOE's Generation IV nuclear energy systems initiative.

157

New Investments to Accelerate Next Generation Biofuels | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Investments to Accelerate Next Generation Biofuels Investments to Accelerate Next Generation Biofuels New Investments to Accelerate Next Generation Biofuels July 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Image of a scientist studying one of three containers of biomass materials. Following last week's rollout of President Obama's plan to cut carbon pollution, the Energy Department today announced four research and development projects to bring next generation biofuels on line faster and drive down the cost of producing gasoline, diesel, and jet fuels from biomass. The projects-located in Oklahoma, Tennessee, Utah, and Wisconsin-represent a $13 million Energy Department investment. "By partnering with private industry, universities and our national labs, we can increase America's energy security, bolster rural economic

158

Building the Next Generation of Automotive Industry Leaders | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building the Next Generation of Automotive Industry Leaders Building the Next Generation of Automotive Industry Leaders Building the Next Generation of Automotive Industry Leaders December 7, 2010 - 4:23pm Addthis Zach Heir , a recent hire in the electric vehicle field Zach Heir , a recent hire in the electric vehicle field Dennis A. Smith Director, National Clean Cities It's no secret that when it comes to advanced vehicle technologies, the Department of Energy is kicking into high gear. We're investing more than $12 billion in grants and loans for research, development and deployment of advanced technology vehicles. These investments are helping to create a clean energy workforce. If we want to continue a leadership role in the global automotive industry, it is crucial that we take the long view and invest heavily in the next generation of innovators and critical thinkers

159

Graphene, Hydrogen and Next-Generation Electronics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Graphene, Hydrogen and Next-Generation Electronics Graphene, Hydrogen and Next-Generation Electronics Graphene, Hydrogen and Next-Generation Electronics July 22, 2011 - 5:32pm Addthis Graphene grains in several different shapes, controlled by hydrogen. | Courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory Graphene grains in several different shapes, controlled by hydrogen. | Courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory A team of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and New Mexico State University researchers have developed a new approach to growing graphene (one-atom thick carbon sheets) that can help advance next-generation electronics including batteries, transistors and computer chips. Growing graphene usually involves a process called chemical vapor deposition method that produces irregularly shaped grains. Little was known

160

Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle (NGNGV) Program Fact Sheet  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet describing U. S. DOE and NREL's development of next generation natural gas vehicles (NGVs) as a key element in its strategy to reduce oil import and vehicle pollutants.

Walkowicz, K.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "next-generation parabolic trough" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Department of Energy Awards $425 Million for Next Generation...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

WASHINGTON - U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz today announced two new High Performance Computing (HPC) awards to put the nation on a fast-track to next generation exascale...

162

Research & Development Roadmap for Next-Generation Low Global...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

on the key R&D needs that have the potential to reduce barriers to greater market penetration of next-generation low- GWP refrigerants. The output was a list of potential...

163

Inspiring and Building the Next Generation of Residential Energy Professionals  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Energy Department's Challenge Home Student Design Competition aims to inspire the next generation of architects, engineers, construction managers, and entrepreneurs to design homes that meet requirements for zero energy ready performance that are affordable and market-ready.

164

Risk Framework for the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant Construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sector projects, and recently elevated to Best Practice status. However, its current format is inadequate to address the unique challenges of constructing the next generation of nuclear power plants (NPP). To understand and determine the risks...

Yeon, Jaeheum 1981-

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

165

Next Generation Luminaires Design Competition Announces 2013 Outdoor Winners  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The 2013 winners in the outdoor category of the Next Generation Luminaires Solid-State Lighting Design Competition were announced at the Strategies in Light conference in Santa Clara, CA.

166

High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Q1 High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production - FY13 Q1 This document summarizes the progress of this Los Alamos National Laboratory...

167

Next-generation nuclear fuel withstands high-temperature accident...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

teri.ehresman@inl.gov Bill Cabage (ORNL), 865-574-4399, cabagewh@ornl.gov Next-generation nuclear fuel withstands high-temperature accident conditions IDAHO FALLS - A safer...

168

A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL Author: Corlett, J.N. Publication Date: 04-12-2011 Publication Info: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Permalink: http://escholarship.org/uc/item/81t3h97w Keywords: NGLS, FEL, 2 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, high-brightness, highrepetition- rate, high- repetition-rate (1 MHz) Local Identifier: LBNL Paper LBNL-4391E Preferred Citation:

169

The pervasive trust foundation for security in next generation networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose a new paradigm---named the Pervasive Trust Foundation (PTF) ---for computer security in Next Generation Networks, including the Future Internet. We start with a review of basic trust-related terms and concepts. We present motivation ... Keywords: future internet, iso 7498-2, next generation networks, pervasive trust foundation, privacy, security, security mechanisms, security services, trust, trust in the large, trust in the small

Leszek Lilien; Adawia Al-Alawneh; Lotfi Ben Othmane

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Crafting the next generation | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Crafting the next generation Crafting the next generation Crafting the next generation Posted: July 16, 2012 - 3:52pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 9, Issue 1 | 2012 I truly enjoyed the opportunity to work with such great people every day," said Brandy Ward, an ironworker/rigger graduate of Y-12's Apprentice Program. "It was a lot of work, but I'd do it again in a heartbeat." The Y-12 Apprentice Program is about a lot of things, including second chances. The program that offers workers an opportunity to become highly skilled craftspeople was given a second chance just four years ago. The program was reinstated in 2008 after a 26-year hiatus and recently celebrated its first graduation in 30 years. Beth Green, director for Resource Management, said each apprentice is trained to union

171

The Next Generation of Scientists | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Next Generation of Scientists The Next Generation of Scientists The Next Generation of Scientists August 5, 2010 - 11:23am Addthis Director Brinkman Director Brinkman Director of the Office of Science The DOE Office of Science Graduate Fellowship program, a $22.7 million program to support outstanding students pursing graduate training in the sciences, received an infusion of $12.5 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. As a result, 150 graduate students will receive a three-year graduate fellowship, which includes tuition, living expenses, and research support. The Graduate Fellowship program reflects the Office of Science's strong commitment to our nation and complements the President's mission to support math and science education, especially in areas of national need

172

Next Generation (NextGen) Geospatial Information System (GIS) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation (NextGen) Geospatial Information System (GIS) Next Generation (NextGen) Geospatial Information System (GIS) Next Generation (NextGen) Geospatial Information System (GIS) July 12, 2013 - 12:17pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) manages environmental records from Cold War legacy sites spanning nearly 40 years. These records are a key LM asset and must be managed and maintained efficiently and effectively. There are over 16 different applications that support the databases containing environmental and geospatial information. The current applications, respective systems, and processes require upgrades to effectively operate in the future. A multi-disciplined LM team collaborated to develop functional requirements and implement NextGen GIS; this system will replace the Geospatial

173

Saving Energy: The Next Generation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Saving Energy: The Next Generation Saving Energy: The Next Generation Saving Energy: The Next Generation November 28, 2011 - 4:05pm Addthis Sarah Jane Maxted Special Assistant, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Have you heard of America's Home Energy Education Challenge? It's a challenge-designed to get students in grades 3-8 to help their families and communities embrace home energy efficiency. Launched this year by both the Department of Energy and National Science Teachers Association, the Home Energy Challenge is generating a great response-over 390 schools across the United States have registered. View this map to see which schools are participating in your area. The concept behind the contest is simple: participating teachers and students will compete to reduce energy use in their homes. Teams will

174

Celebrating The Next Generation of Energy Entrepreneurs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Celebrating The Next Generation of Energy Entrepreneurs Celebrating The Next Generation of Energy Entrepreneurs Celebrating The Next Generation of Energy Entrepreneurs April 30, 2013 - 5:03pm Addthis Acting Energy Secretary Poneman (far left) stand with a team of young entrepreneurs from Brigham Young University -- the regional winners of the National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition. | Photo by Ilya Pupko, ILAsoft.net. Acting Energy Secretary Poneman (far left) stand with a team of young entrepreneurs from Brigham Young University -- the regional winners of the National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition. | Photo by Ilya Pupko, ILAsoft.net. Sean Sullivan Speechwriter, Office of Public Affairs. WANT MORE? Watch this video recap of the 2012 National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition finale. What makes America the world's leader in innovation and entrepreneurship?

175

Building a Diverse Workforce From the Next Generation of Leaders |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diverse Workforce From the Next Generation of Leaders Diverse Workforce From the Next Generation of Leaders Building a Diverse Workforce From the Next Generation of Leaders March 8, 2011 - 2:17pm Addthis Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Principal Deputy Director Tasked with advancing groundbreaking science, cleaning up our Cold War legacy and building a clean and efficient energy future for our Nation, each day at the Department of Energy is an exciting one - filled with new challenges and unique opportunities. Rising to these challenges not only requires hard work but a diverse range of experience and talents throughout our staff from the leadership team to the interns. One of the ways we're seeking to promote that diversity is through our Minority Educational Institutions Student Partnership Program, commonly known by its acronym, MEISSP. MEISPP offers talented undergraduate and

176

Meeting the Next Generation of Energy Entrepreneurs at MIT Showcase |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Meeting the Next Generation of Energy Entrepreneurs at MIT Showcase Meeting the Next Generation of Energy Entrepreneurs at MIT Showcase Meeting the Next Generation of Energy Entrepreneurs at MIT Showcase May 6, 2011 - 12:50pm Addthis David Moore Presidential Management Fellow, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Tuesday afternoon I had the honor of sharing the MIT Clean Energy Prize Showcase floor with 25 teams of America's most promising entrepreneurs. Representing the best in class from an initial field of 80, the finalists competing for this year's $200,000 grand prize exemplify the combination of technical prowess and passion for problem-solving that have consistently made the United States the world's innovation engine. Ever ready to rev that engine, the Department of Energy is a proud founding sponsor of this contest. A student-run, national business plan competition

177

Secretary Chu Announces Nearly $15 Million for Next Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nearly $15 Million for Next Generation Nearly $15 Million for Next Generation Energy-Efficient Lighting Secretary Chu Announces Nearly $15 Million for Next Generation Energy-Efficient Lighting June 7, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced nearly $15 million to support eight new research and development projects that will accelerate the development and deployment of high-efficiency solid-state lighting technologies like LEDs and OLEDs. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have the potential to be ten times more energy-efficient than conventional incandescent lighting and can last up to 25 times as long. The projects selected today are located in four states across the country and are focused on advancing core R&D goals,

178

The Next Generation of Hydropower Engineers and Scientists | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Next Generation of Hydropower Engineers and Scientists The Next Generation of Hydropower Engineers and Scientists The Next Generation of Hydropower Engineers and Scientists August 11, 2011 - 12:31pm Addthis Hydro Research Foundation Fellows. | Image courtesy of the Hydro Research Foundation Fellowship Program. Hydro Research Foundation Fellows. | Image courtesy of the Hydro Research Foundation Fellowship Program. Mike Reed Water Power Program Manager, Water Power Program As the nation continues to rely on hydropower to help meet its energy needs, a new generation of engineers and scientists is finding ways to make hydropower technologies more efficient, environmentally friendly and cost effective. The Energy Department's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), in cooperation with the Hydro Research

179

Simulating the Next Generation of Energy Technologies | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Simulating the Next Generation of Energy Technologies Simulating the Next Generation of Energy Technologies Simulating the Next Generation of Energy Technologies September 22, 2010 - 6:40pm Addthis Former Under Secretary Koonin Former Under Secretary Koonin Director - NYU's Center for Urban Science & Progress and Former Under Secretary for Science When aerospace engineers design a new aircraft, they don't start with a prototype, they start with a computer. Computer simulations have revolutionized that industry, allowing engineers to make complex calculations and fine tune designs well before the first physical model is ever produced. All of this amounts to a production process that costs less and produces a commercial product much faster. It's an approach that has changed the way the aerospace industry operates, and it's one that we

180

Nicole Lambiase: Aspiring Astronaut Turned Next-generation Car Designer |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nicole Lambiase: Aspiring Astronaut Turned Next-generation Car Nicole Lambiase: Aspiring Astronaut Turned Next-generation Car Designer Nicole Lambiase: Aspiring Astronaut Turned Next-generation Car Designer January 7, 2010 - 4:05pm Addthis Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Nicole Lambiase grew up near Cape Canaveral and the Kennedy Space Center where she attended space shuttle launches, dreamed of the stars and had hopes of becoming an astronaut. In 2004, Nicole's dreams advanced as she began the aeronautical engineering program at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, Florida. Even though Nicole thrived in the program, she quickly discovered this path would more likely lead her to driving a computer rather than a space module. So Nicole made a leap of faith and switched to the newly-formed mechanical

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Creating the Next Generation of Energy Efficient Technology | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Creating the Next Generation of Energy Efficient Technology Creating the Next Generation of Energy Efficient Technology Creating the Next Generation of Energy Efficient Technology Supporting Innovative Research to Help Reduce Energy Use and Advance Manufacturing Supporting Innovative Research to Help Reduce Energy Use and Advance Manufacturing The Emerging Technologies team partners with national laboratories, industry, and universities to advance research, development, and commercialization of energy efficient and cost effective building technologies. These partnerships help foster American ingenuity to develop cutting-edge technologies that have less than 5 years to market readiness, and contribute to the goal to reduce energy consumption by at least 50%. Research and Development Improve the energy efficiency of appliances, including

182

Opening Remarks At The Third International Meeting On Next Generation  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Remarks At The Third International Meeting On Next Generation Remarks At The Third International Meeting On Next Generation Safeguards | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Speeches > Opening Remarks At The Third International Meeting ... Speech Opening Remarks At The Third International Meeting On Next Generation

183

Energy Department Announces New Investment to Accelerate Next Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Accelerate Next to Accelerate Next Generation Biofuels Energy Department Announces New Investment to Accelerate Next Generation Biofuels July 1, 2013 - 1:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON -- Building on President Obama's plan to cut carbon pollution and announced this week, the Energy Department today announced four research and development projects to bring next generation biofuels on line faster and drive down the cost of producing gasoline, diesel and jet fuels from biomass. The projects - located in Oklahoma, Tennessee, Utah and Wisconsin - represent a $13 million Energy Department investment. "By partnering with private industry, universities and our national labs, we can increase America's energy security, bolster rural economic development and cut harmful carbon pollution from our cars, trucks and

184

EMSL: Capabilities: Mass Spectrometry: Next-Generation Mass Spectrometry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next-Generation Mass Spectrometry Next-Generation Mass Spectrometry Additional Information Meet the Mass Spectrometry Experts Related EMSL User Projects Mass Spectrometry Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Next-Generation Mass Spectrometry Proteomics Research Resource for Integrative Biology Biological and Environmental Research - PNNL Proteomics PNNL's Biological MS Data and Software Distribution Center Mass Spectrometry brochure EMSL is committed to offering state-of-the-art instruments to its users. At a workshop in January of 2008, EMSL mass spectrometry experts joined experts from many universities, private companies, and government institutions and laboratories at a conference held at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee Florida. Workshop participants reviewed the state of the art of high-performance mass spectrometers,

185

Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Inaugural Conference | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Inaugural Conference Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Inaugural Conference Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Inaugural Conference September 12, 2008 - 3:20pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman Thank you, Ken, and all of you for that generous welcome. It is good to see so many of you here today for this discussion of a topic I consider to be among the most important in the Energy Department's portfolio. The U.S. Department of Energy has the responsibility for maintaining the safety and security of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. It is a responsibility I want you to know I take very personally. Thanks to the good work of Sen. Richard Lugar and others, we have the responsibility, through our National Nuclear Security Administration, to help other nations - especially the independent states that were once part

186

Energy Department Announces Investment to Accelerate Next Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Investment to Accelerate Next Investment to Accelerate Next Generation Biofuels Energy Department Announces Investment to Accelerate Next Generation Biofuels July 1, 2013 - 4:37pm Addthis Following last week's rollout of President Obama's plan to cut carbon pollution, the Energy Department today announced four research and development projects to bring next generation biofuels on line faster and drive down the cost of producing gasoline, diesel, and jet fuels from biomass. The projects-located in Oklahoma, Tennessee, Utah, and Wisconsin-represent a $13 million Energy Department investment. "By partnering with private industry, universities and our national labs, we can increase America's energy security, bolster rural economic development, and cut harmful carbon pollution from our cars, trucks and

187

The Next Generation of Entrepreneurs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Next Generation of Entrepreneurs The Next Generation of Entrepreneurs The Next Generation of Entrepreneurs July 25, 2011 - 6:15pm Addthis Sarah Jane Maxted Special Assistant, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy How can I participate? Students can apply or get more information on FedConnect (link to right in story) by looking up the reference number "DE-FOA-0000570." Applications are due on August 22, 2011. Entrepreneurs. Venture Capitalists. Clean energy. Competitions and funds. Separately, these words only say so much, but together they describe the Energy Department's efforts to support the best and brightest clean energy entrepreneurs as they work to push emerging, innovative clean energy technologies into the marketplace. Now, let's add two words -- universities and students. Throw that into the mix, and the result?

188

Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders May 8, 2012 - 3:06pm Addthis University of Idaho professor Supathorn Phongikaroon works with a graduate student in the radiochemistry lab at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Phongikaroon has received $820,000 from DOE to study an applied technology to remotely analyze spent nuclear fuel. | Photo courtesy of the University of Idaho. University of Idaho professor Supathorn Phongikaroon works with a graduate student in the radiochemistry lab at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Phongikaroon has received $820,000 from DOE to study an applied technology to remotely analyze spent nuclear fuel. | Photo

189

Saving Energy: The Next Generation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Saving Energy: The Next Generation Saving Energy: The Next Generation Saving Energy: The Next Generation November 28, 2011 - 4:05pm Addthis Sarah Jane Maxted Special Assistant, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Have you heard of America's Home Energy Education Challenge? It's a challenge-designed to get students in grades 3-8 to help their families and communities embrace home energy efficiency. Launched this year by both the Department of Energy and National Science Teachers Association, the Home Energy Challenge is generating a great response-over 390 schools across the United States have registered. View this map to see which schools are participating in your area. The concept behind the contest is simple: participating teachers and students will compete to reduce energy use in their homes. Teams will

190

Next-Generation Distributed Power Management for Photovoltaic Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next-Generation Distributed Power Management for Photovoltaic Systems Next-Generation Distributed Power Management for Photovoltaic Systems Speaker(s): Jason Stauth Date: July 29, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Steven Lanzisera In recent years, the balance of systems (BOS) side of photovoltaic (PV) energy has become a major focus in the effort to drive solar energy towards grid parity. The power management architecture has expanded to include a range of distributed solutions, including microinverters and 'micro' DC-DC converters to solve problems with mismatch (shading), expand networking and control, and solve critical BOS issues such as fire safety. This talk will introduce traditional and distributed approaches for PV systems, and will propose a next-generation architecture based on a new

191

Simulating the Next Generation of Energy Technologies | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Simulating the Next Generation of Energy Technologies Simulating the Next Generation of Energy Technologies Simulating the Next Generation of Energy Technologies September 22, 2010 - 6:40pm Addthis Former Under Secretary Koonin Former Under Secretary Koonin Director - NYU's Center for Urban Science & Progress and Former Under Secretary for Science When aerospace engineers design a new aircraft, they don't start with a prototype, they start with a computer. Computer simulations have revolutionized that industry, allowing engineers to make complex calculations and fine tune designs well before the first physical model is ever produced. All of this amounts to a production process that costs less and produces a commercial product much faster. It's an approach that has changed the way the aerospace industry operates, and it's one that we

192

Fueling the Next Generation of Vehicle Technology | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fueling the Next Generation of Vehicle Technology Fueling the Next Generation of Vehicle Technology Fueling the Next Generation of Vehicle Technology February 6, 2013 - 11:20am Addthis Professor Jack Brouwer, Associate Director and Chief Technology Officer of the National Fuel Cell Research Center, points out the tri-generation facility that uses biogas from Orange County Sanitation District’s wastewater treatment plant to produce hydrogen, heat and power. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department. Professor Jack Brouwer, Associate Director and Chief Technology Officer of the National Fuel Cell Research Center, points out the tri-generation facility that uses biogas from Orange County Sanitation District's wastewater treatment plant to produce hydrogen, heat and power. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department.

193

Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders Training the Next Generation of Nuclear Energy Leaders May 8, 2012 - 3:06pm Addthis University of Idaho professor Supathorn Phongikaroon works with a graduate student in the radiochemistry lab at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Phongikaroon has received $820,000 from DOE to study an applied technology to remotely analyze spent nuclear fuel. | Photo courtesy of the University of Idaho. University of Idaho professor Supathorn Phongikaroon works with a graduate student in the radiochemistry lab at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Phongikaroon has received $820,000 from DOE to study an applied technology to remotely analyze spent nuclear fuel. | Photo

194

Next Generation CANDU Technology: Competitive Design for the Nuclear Renaissance  

SciTech Connect

AECL has developed the design for a next generation of CANDU{sup R} plants by marrying a set of enabling technologies to well-established successful CANDU features. The basis for the design is to replicate or adapt existing CANDU components for a new core design. By adopting slightly enriched uranium fuel, a core design with light water coolant, heavy water moderator and reflector has been defined, based on the existing CANDU fuel channel module. This paper summarizes the main features and characteristics of the reference next-generation CANDU design. The progress of the next generation of CANDU design program in meeting challenging cost, schedule and performance targets is described. AECL's cost reduction methodology is summarized as an integral part of the design optimization process. Examples are given of cost reduction features together with enhancement of design margins. (authors)

Hopwood, J.M.; Hedges, K.R.; Pakan, M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Ontario (Canada)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Cummins Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light Truck Diesel engine...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Publications Cummins' Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light Truck Diesel Engine ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation...

196

Presentation to the EAC - Next Generation EMS - Eugene Litvinov  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Eugene Litvinov Eugene Litvinov C H I E F T E C H N O L O G I S T DOE Electricity Advisory Committee Washington, DC, Oct 15-16, 2012 Next Generation EMS Next Generation EMS * Current architecture limits competition for efficient applications from smaller vendors * Future Power System requires different look at reliability and control - Centralized vs. decentralized control - Corrective vs. preventive - System survivability and resilience vs. reliability: early detection + fast recovery - New definition of contingency * Wide area situational awareness * Decision support system * New Applications 2 Architecture * Integration friendly * Platform Independence * Decentralized, distributed processing * Commercial DBMS vs. proprietary products * Seamless integration of PMU data

197

Trough to trough The Colorado River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trough to trough The Colorado River and the Salton Sea Robert E. Reynolds, editor Trough to trough....................................................................................5 Robert E. Reynolds The vegetation of the Mojave and Colorado deserts geological excursions and observations of the Colorado Desert region by William Phipps Blake, 1853 and 1906

de Lijser, Peter

198

NASA/FPL Renewable Project Case Study: Space Coast Next Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NASAFPL Renewable Project Case Study: Space Coast Next Generation Solar Energy Center NASAFPL Renewable Project Case Study: Space Coast Next Generation Solar Energy Center...

199

ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation...

200

Project Profile: High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next-Generation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermal Array for Next-Generation Solar Thermal Power Production Project Profile: High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next-Generation Solar Thermal Power Production Los Alamos...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "next-generation parabolic trough" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

NREL: TroughNet - Data and Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data and Resources Data and Resources This site features data and resources about parabolic trough power plant technology, including: Industry partners U.S. power plant data Solar data Models and tools System and component testing Also see our publications on parabolic trough power plants. Printable Version TroughNet Home Technologies Market & Economic Assessment Research & Development Data & Resources Industry Partners Power Plant Data Solar Data Models & Tools System & Component Testing FAQs Workshops Publications Email Updates Did you find what you needed? Yes 1 No 0 Thank you for your feedback. Would you like to take a moment to tell us how we can improve this page? Submit We value your feedback. Thanks! We've received your feedback. Something went wrong. Please try again later.

202

Name of Module: Next Generation Network Project 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) 30 Total 270 8. Module Examination and Grading Procedures The project will be examined at the beginning of the module. 11. Enrolment Procedures To participate to the lectures/seminars/projectsName of Module: Next Generation Network ­ Project 2 CP (ECTS): 9 Short Name: MINF-KS-AV/PJ2.W12

Wichmann, Felix

203

Name of Module: Next Generation Network Project 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) 30 Total 270 8. Module Examination and Grading Procedures The project will be examined at the beginning of the module. 11. Enrolment Procedures To participate to the lectures/seminars/projectsName of Module: Next Generation Network ­ Project 1 CP (ECTS): 9 Short Name: MINF-KS-AV/PJ1.W12

Wichmann, Felix

204

IP: The Next Generation Written by Scott Phillips.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

providers i.e. trusted providers. q Scalable multicast. Multicast in IP is only possible in subnetsIP: The Next Generation Written by Scott Phillips. This page is a general overview of the IPng, B, C and D (a fifth class, class E, is only for research purposes). These classes differ

Jain, Raj

205

Advancing Next-Generation Energy in Indian Country (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact provides information on the Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE-IE) initiative to provide technical expertise to support the development of next-generation energy projects in Indian Country.

Not Available

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Distributed Medium Access Control for Next Generation CDMA Wireless Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed Medium Access Control for Next Generation CDMA Wireless Networks Hai Jiang, Princeton wireless networks are expected to have a simple infrastructure with distributed control. In this article, we consider a generic distributed network model for future wireless multi- media communications

Zhuang, Weihua

207

Icon Scanning: Towards Next Generation QR Codes Itamar Friedman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Icon Scanning: Towards Next Generation QR Codes Itamar Friedman Technion Haifa, Israel itamarf-friendly way to obtain this particular applica- tion could be by taking a snapshot of its corresponding icon be thought of as icons with a binary pattern. In this paper we extend this to App-icons and propose

Zelnik-Manor, Lihi - Zelnik-Manor, Lihi

208

Strategies for Next Generation Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strategies for Next Generation Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay Experiments F. T. Avignone III A brief discussion of the connection between neutrino oscillation data and predictions of neutrinoless the necessary tools for comparative evaluation. 1. INTRODUCTION Neutrinoless double-beta (0)-decay has been

209

Lite Trough LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lite Trough LLC Lite Trough LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Lite Trough LLC Place Milford, Connecticut Zip 6460 Sector Solar Product Developing a parabolic trough system for Solar Thermal Electricity Generation (STEG). Coordinates 38.026545°, -77.371139° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.026545,"lon":-77.371139,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

210

NEXT GENERATION SURFACTANTS FOR IMPROVED CHEMICAL FLOODING TECHNOLOGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NEXT GENERATION SURFACTANTS NEXT GENERATION SURFACTANTS FOR IMPROVED CHEMICAL FLOODING TECHNOLOGY FINAL REPORT June 1, 2010 - May 31, 2012 Laura L Wesson, Prapas Lohateeraparp, Jeffrey H. Harwell, and Bor-Jier Shiau October 2012 DE-FE0003537 University of Oklahoma Norman, OK 73019-0430 ii DISCLAIMER This report is prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name,

211

Supercomputers help unravel twists in next-generation smart polymers |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supercomputers help unravel twists in next-generation smart polymers Supercomputers help unravel twists in next-generation smart polymers November 20, 2013 Printer-friendly version Chemists have been looking at polymers and gels for decades to see how these large chains of molecules respond to external stimuli such as heat, pH, temperature, electric fields, light and chemical influences. The scientists seek ways to control the polymers' actions and behaviors for a wide range of applications: drug delivery, medical diagnostics, tissue engineering, electrophoresis and enhanced oil recovery. Certain smart polymers, for instance, rely on heat, water and timing to execute their missions in controlled drug delivery systems. The key to employing a polymer is controlling its lower critical solution temperature (LCST). When reached, the LCST triggers a dramatic

212

Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 19-20, 2011 April 19-20, 2011 Editors: Joseph H. Eto Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Robert J. Thomas Cornell University Proceedings Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid LBNL-5105E Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings April 19-20, 2011 Editors: Joseph H. Eto, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Robert J. Thomas, Cornell University The work described in this report was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the

213

Batteries - Next-generation Li-ion batteries Breakout session  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next-generation Li-ion batteries Next-generation Li-ion batteries EV Everywhere Workshop July 26, 2012 Breakout Session #1 - Discussion of Performance Targets and Barriers Comments on the Achievability of the Targets * Overall, everything is achievable, but, clearly, the cost targets are dramatic, particularly for AEV 300. (I have discussed this with Yet-Ming Chiang, who has a good feel for cost reductions, both their importance and interesting approaches.) * AEV 100 achievable with a good silicon/graphite composite anode and LMRNMC (unsure timeline) * AEV 300 would require cycleable Li-metal anode and UHVHC cathode (can't get there with Li-ion intercalation on both electrodes) (unsure timeline) Barriers Interfering with Reaching the Targets * Pack - too high a fraction of inactive materials/inefficient engineering designs.

214

The next generation of oxy-fuel boiler systems  

SciTech Connect

Research in the area of oxy-fuel combustion which is being pioneered by Jupiter Oxygen Corporation combined with boiler research conducted by the USDOE/Albany Research Center has been applied to designing the next generation of oxy-fuel combustion systems. The new systems will enhance control of boiler systems during turn-down and improve response time while improving boiler efficiency. These next generation boiler systems produce a combustion product that has been shown to be well suited for integrated pollutant removal. These systems have the promise of reducing boiler foot-print and boiler construction costs. The modularity of the system opens the possibility of using this design for replacement of boilers for retrofit on existing systems.

Ochs, Thomas L.; Gross, Alex (Jupiter Oxygen Corp.); Patrick, Brian (Jupiter Oxygen Corp.); Oryshchyn, Danylo B.; Summers, Cathy A.; Turner, Paul C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

RESULTS OF ANALYSES OF THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT FOR PARSONS  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) prepared a nominal 150 gallon batch of Next Generation Solvent (NGS) for Parsons. This material was then analyzed and tested for cesium mass transfer efficiency. The bulk of the results indicate that the solvent is qualified as acceptable for use in the upcoming pilot-scale testing at Parsons Technology Center. This report describes the analysis and testing of a batch of Next Generation Solvent (NGS) prepared in support of pilot-scale testing in the Parsons Technology Center. A total of {approx}150 gallons of NGS solvent was prepared in late November of 2011. Details for the work are contained in a controlled laboratory notebook. Analysis of the Parsons NGS solvent indicates that the material is acceptable for use. SRNL is continuing to improve the analytical method for the guanidine.

Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Fink, S.

2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

216

NREL Next Generation Drivetrain: Mechanical Design and Test Plan (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy and industry partners are sponsoring a $3m project for design and testing of a 'Next Generation' wind turbine drivetrain at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). This poster focuses on innovative aspects of the gearbox design, completed as part of an end-to-end systems engineering approach incorporating innovations that increase drivetrain reliability, efficiency, torque density and minimize capital cost.

Keller, J.; Halse, C.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

The next generation of power reactors - safety characteristics  

SciTech Connect

The next generation of commercial nuclear power reactors is characterized by a new approach to achieving reliability of their safety systems. In contrast to current generation reactors, these designs apply passive safety features that rely on gravity-driven transfer processes or stored energy, such as gas-pressurized accumulators or electric batteries. This paper discusses the passive safety system of the AP600 and Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) designs.

Modro, S.M.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Next Generation Power Systems Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Next Generation Power Systems Inc Next Generation Power Systems Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Next Generation Power Systems Inc. Place Pipestone, Minnesota Zip 56164 Sector Services, Wind energy Product NextGen is a full-service company that provides site analysis, maintenance, and installation services for small-scale wind turbines and PV systems. Coordinates 43.99413°, -96.317104° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.99413,"lon":-96.317104,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

219

THE NEXT GENERATION SAFEGUARDS PROFESSIONAL NETWORK: PROGRESS AND NEXT STEPS  

SciTech Connect

President Obama has repeatedly stated that the United States must ensure that the international safeguards regime, as embodied by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), has 'the authority, information, people, and technology it needs to do its job.' The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) works to implement the President's vision through the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), a program to revitalize the U.S. DOE national laboratories safeguards technology and human capital base so that the United States can more effectively support the IAEA and ensure that it meets current and emerging challenges to the international safeguards system. In 2009, in response to the human capital development goals of NGSI, young safeguards professionals within the Global Nuclear Security Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory launched the Next Generation Safeguards Professional Network (NGSPN). The purpose of this initiative is to establish working relationships and to foster collaboration and communication among the next generation of safeguards leaders. The NGSPN is an organization for, and of, young professionals pursuing careers in nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation - as well as mid-career professionals new to the field - whether working within the U.S. DOE national laboratory complex, U.S. government agencies, academia, or industry or at the IAEA. The NGSPN is actively supported by the NNSA, boasts more than 70 members, maintains a website and newsletter, and has held two national meetings as well as an NGSPN session and panel at the July 2010 Institute of Nuclear Material Management Annual Meeting. This paper discusses the network; its significance, goals and objectives; developments and progress to date; and future plans.

Zhernosek, Alena V [ORNL] [ORNL; Lynch, Patrick D [ORNL] [ORNL; Scholz, Melissa A [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Energy Efficient Glass Melting - The Next Generation Melter  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate a high intensity glass melter, based on the submerged combustion melting technology. This melter will serve as the melting and homogenization section of a segmented, lower-capital cost, energy-efficient Next Generation Glass Melting System (NGMS). After this project, the melter will be ready to move toward commercial trials for some glasses needing little refining (fiberglass, etc.). For other glasses, a second project Phase or glass industry research is anticipated to develop the fining stage of the NGMS process.

David Rue

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "next-generation parabolic trough" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Next-generation dialyser design using sustainable design methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life-Cycle Analysis (LCA) is used to understand the holistic flow of energy and materials throughout a product's life. As part of a comprehensive approach to design next-generation dialysers, we performed a LCA of an Optiflux F180NR dialyser. Combining LCA insights with a functional analysis of each product component, we analysed which components could be improved most effectively. Determining that the polycarbonate housing was the optimal area of focus, we used SolidWorks and COSMOSWorks to test, in-silico, the strength of various reduced-weight housing designs. The final design weighed 17% less than the original without a significant loss in strength.

Jacob Hanson; Robert Hitchcock

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Next Generation Power Electronics National Manufacturing Innovation Institute  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Next Generation Power Electronics National Manufacturing Innovation Institute will focus on wide bandgap (WBG) semiconductors - the same materials used in LED light fixtures and many flat screen TVs. The Institute will use $70 million provided by the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Manufacturing Office to support and manage its programs over the next five years. This Institute is one of three new innovation hubs announced by President Obama in his 2013 State of the Union address and part of the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI).

223

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Selection and Qualification Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design is a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble bed thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an average reactor outlet temperature of at least 1000 C. The NGNP will use very high burn up, lowenriched uranium, TRISO-Coated fuel in a once-through fuel cycle. The design service life of the NGNP is 60 years.

R. Doug Hamelin; G. O. Hayner

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Elastic approximation for a solar parabolic February 29, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of these additional forces are computed for var- ious cases, that give a result in theoretical maximal concentration cost of the parabolic mirror is one of the fundamental factors in the production of a parabolic trough. Tra- ditionally, the support of the mirror is a rigid sheet precisely preformed to the shape

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

225

SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Thermionic Solar Energy Conversion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next-Generation Thermionic Solar Next-Generation Thermionic Solar Energy Conversion to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Thermionic Solar Energy Conversion on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Thermionic Solar Energy Conversion on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Thermionic Solar Energy Conversion on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Thermionic Solar Energy Conversion on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Thermionic Solar Energy Conversion on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Thermionic Solar Energy Conversion on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage CSP Recovery Act Baseload

226

SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Solar Collectors for CSP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next-Generation Solar Collectors Next-Generation Solar Collectors for CSP to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Solar Collectors for CSP on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Solar Collectors for CSP on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Solar Collectors for CSP on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Solar Collectors for CSP on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Solar Collectors for CSP on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Solar Collectors for CSP on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage CSP Recovery Act Baseload CSP SunShot Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative CSP Heat Integration for Baseload Renewable Energy Deployment

227

SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next-Generation Low-Cost Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage CSP Recovery Act Baseload CSP SunShot Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative CSP Heat Integration for Baseload Renewable Energy Deployment

228

Next-Generation Sensor Fish to Provide Data That Will Help Protect...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Next-Generation Sensor Fish to Provide Data That Will Help Protect Real, Live Fish Next-Generation Sensor Fish to Provide Data That Will Help Protect Real, Live Fish June 4, 2014 -...

229

ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

230

ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ace061ruth2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation...

231

Next Generation Solar Collectors for CSP - FY13 Q1 | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Next Generation Solar Collectors for CSP - FY13 Q1 Next Generation Solar Collectors for CSP - FY13 Q1 This document summarizes the progress of this 3M project, funded by SunShot,...

232

Towards Truly Ubiquitous and Opportunistic Trust Infrastructures: Position for Next Generation Cybersecurity Infrastructure Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Position for Next Generation Cybersecurity Infrastructure Workshop Stephen Nightingale Generation Cybersecurity Infrastructure workshop, we note that Federated Identities [1

Tennessee, University of

233

Developing a next generation community college curriculum for energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing a next generation community college curriculum for energy Developing a next generation community college curriculum for energy efficiency high performance building operators Title Developing a next generation community college curriculum for energy efficiency high performance building operators Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-56003 Year of Publication 2004 Authors Crabtree, Peter, Nick Kyriakopedi, Evan Mills, Philip Haves, Roland J. Otto, Mary Ann Piette, Peng Xu, Richard C. Diamond, Joseph J. Deringer, and Chuck Frost Conference Name 2004 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy Date Published 08/2004 Conference Location Washington DC Abstract The challenges of increased technological demands in today's workplace require virtually all workers to develop higher-order cognitive skills including problem solving and systems thinking in order to be productive. Such "habits of mind" are viewed as particularly critical for success in the information-based workplace, which values reduced hierarchy, greater worker independence, teamwork, communications skills, non-routine problem solving, and understanding of complex systems. The need is particularly compelling in the buildings arena. To scope the problem, this paper presents the results of interviews and focus groups-conducted by Oakland California's Peralta Community College District and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory- in which approximately 50 industry stakeholders discussed contemporary needs for building operator education at the community college level. Numerous gaps were identified between the education today received by building operators and technicians and current workplace needs. The participants concurred that many of the problems seen today in achieving and maintaining energy savings in buildings can be traced to inadequacies in building operation and lack of awareness and knowledge about how existing systems are to be used, monitored, and maintained. Participants and others we interviewed affirmed that while these issues are addressed in various graduate-level and continuing education programs, they are virtually absent at the community college level. Based on that assessment of industry needs, we present a new curriculum and innovative simulation-based learning tool to provide technicians with skills necessary to commission and operate high-performance buildings, with particular emphasis on energy efficiency and indoor environmental quality in the context of HVAC&R equipment and control systems.

234

Cost and schedule reduction for next-generation Candu  

SciTech Connect

AECL has developed a suite of technologies for Candu{sup R} reactors that enable the next step in the evolution of the Candu family of heavy-water-moderated fuel-channel reactors. These technologies have been combined in the design for the Advanced Candu Reactor TM1 (ACRTM), AECL's next generation Candu power plant. The ACR design builds extensively on the existing Candu experience base, but includes innovations, in design and in delivery technology, that provide very substantial reductions in capital cost and in project schedules. In this paper, main features of next generation design and delivery are summarized, to provide the background basis for the cost and schedule reductions that have been achieved. In particular the paper outlines the impact of the innovative design steps for ACR: - Selection of slightly enriched fuel bundle design; - Use of light water coolant in place of traditional Candu heavy water coolant; - Compact core design with unique reactor physics benefits; - Optimized coolant and turbine system conditions. In addition to the direct cost benefits arising from efficiency improvement, and from the reduction in heavy water, the next generation Candu configuration results in numerous additional indirect cost benefits, including: - Reduction in number and complexity of reactivity mechanisms; - Reduction in number of heavy water auxiliary systems; - Simplification in heat transport and its support systems; - Simplified human-machine interface. The paper also describes the ACR approach to design for constructability. The application of module assembly and open-top construction techniques, based on Candu and other worldwide experience, has been proven to generate savings in both schedule durations and overall project cost, by reducing premium on-site activities, and by improving efficiency of system and subsystem assembly. AECL's up-to-date experience in the use of 3-D CADDS and related engineering tools has also been proven to reduce both engineering and construction costs through more efficient work planning and use of materials, through reduced re-work and through more precise configuration management. Full-scale exploitation of AECL's electronic engineering and project management tools enables further reductions in cost. The Candu fuel-channel reactor type offers inherent manufacturing and construction advantages through the application of a simple, low-pressure low-temperature reactor vessel along with modular fuel channel technology. This leads to cost benefits and total project schedule benefits. As a result, the targets which AECL has set for replication units - overnight capital cost of $1000 US/kW and total project schedule (engineering/manufacturing/construction/commissioning) of 48 months, have been shown to be achievable for the reference NG Candu design. (authors)

Hopwood, J.M.; Yu, S.; Pakan, M.; Soulard, M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, L5K 1B2 (Canada)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Subsystem Interaction Analysis in Power Distribution Systems of Next Generation Airlifters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Subsystem Interaction Analysis in Power Distribution Systems of Next Generation Airlifters Sriram power distribution system of a next generation transport aircraft is addressed. Detailed analysis with the analysis of subsystem integration in power distribution systems of next generation transport aircraft

Lindner, Douglas K.

236

NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT LICENSING BASIS EVENT SELECTION WHITE PAPER  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a licensed commercial high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plant capable of producing the electricity and high temperature process heat for industrial markets supporting a range of end-user applications. The NGNP Project has adopted the 10 CFR 52 Combined License (COL) application process, as recommended in the Report to Congress, dated August 2008, as the foundation for the NGNP licensing strategy. NRC licensing of the NGNP plant utilizing this process will demonstrate the efficacy of licensing future HTGRs for commercial industrial applications. This white paper is one in a series of submittals that will address key generic issues of the COL priority licensing topics as part of the process for establishing HTGR regulatory requirements.

Mark Holbrook

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Metrology/viewing system for next generation fusion reactors  

SciTech Connect

Next generation fusion reactors require accurate measuring systems to verify sub-millimeter alignment of plasma-facing components in the reactor vessel. A metrology system capable of achieving such accuracy must be compatible with the vessel environment of high gamma radiation, high vacuum, elevated temperature, and magnetic field. This environment requires that the system must be remotely deployed. A coherent, frequency modulated laser radar system is being integrated with a remotely operated deployment system to meet these requirements. The metrology/viewing system consists of a compact laser transceiver optics module which is linked through fiber optics to the laser source and imaging units that are located outside of the harsh environment. The deployment mechanism is a telescopic-mast positioning system. This paper identifies the requirements for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor metrology and viewing system, and describes a remotely operated precision ranging and surface mapping system.

Spampinato, P.T.; Barry, R.E.; Chesser, J.B.; Menon, M.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dagher, M.A. [Boeing Rocketdyne Div., Canoga Park, CA (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Resilient Control System Functional Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Control Systems and their associated instrumentation must meet reliability, availability, maintainability, and resiliency criteria in order for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) to be economically competitive. Research, perhaps requiring several years, may be needed to develop control systems to support plant availability and resiliency. This report functionally analyzes the gaps between traditional and resilient control systems as applicable to HTGRs, which includes the Next Generation Nuclear Plant; defines resilient controls; assesses the current state of both traditional and resilient control systems; and documents the functional gaps existing between these two controls approaches as applicable to HTGRs. This report supports the development of an overall strategy for applying resilient controls to HTGRs by showing that control systems with adequate levels of resilience perform at higher levels, respond more quickly to disturbances, increase operational efficiency, and increase public protection.

Lynne M. Stevens

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Hydrogen Production from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a high temperature gas-cooled reactor that will be capable of producing hydrogen, electricity and/or high temperature process heat for industrial use. The project has initiated the conceptual design phase and when completed will demonstrate the viability of hydrogen generation using nuclear produced process heat. This paper explains how industry and the U.S. Government are cooperating to advance nuclear hydrogen technology. It also describes the issues being explored and the results of recent R&D including materials development and testing, thermal-fluids research, and systems analysis. The paper also describes the hydrogen production technologies being considered (including various thermochemical processes and high-temperature electrolysis).

M. Patterson; C. Park

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Next Generations Safeguards Initiative: The Life of a Cylinder  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Nonproliferation and International Security's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) has begun a program based on a five-year plan to investigate the concept of a global monitoring scheme that uniquely identifies uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinders and their locations throughout the life cycle. A key initial activity in the NGSI program is to understand and document the 'life of a UF6 cylinder' from cradle to grave. This document describes the life of a UF6 cylinder and includes cylinder manufacture and procurement processes as well as cylinder-handling and operational practices at conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, and depleted UF6 conversion facilities. The NGSI multiple-laboratory team is using this document as a building block for subsequent tasks in the five-year plan, including development of the functional requirements for cylinder-tagging and tracking devices.

Morgan, James B [ORNL; White-Horton, Jessica L [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "next-generation parabolic trough" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Final Report for "Analyzing and visualizing next generation climate data"  

SciTech Connect

The project "Analyzing and visualizing next generation climate data" adds block-structured (mosaic) grid support, parallel processing, and 2D/3D curvilinear interpolation to the open-source UV-CDAT climate data analysis tool. Block structured grid support complies to the Gridspec extension submitted to the Climate and Forecast metadata conventions. It contains two parts: aggregation of data spread over multiple mosaic tiles (M-SPEC) and aggregation of temporal data stored in different files (F-SPEC). Together, M-SPEC and F-SPEC allow users to interact with data stored in multiple files as if the data were in a single file. For computational expensive tasks, a flexible, multi-dimensional, multi-type distributed array class allows users to process data in parallel using remote memory access. Both nodal and cell based interpolation is supported; users can choose between different interpolation libraries including ESMF and LibCF depending on the their particular needs.

Pletzer, Alexander

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

242

Next Generation Strong Lensing Time Delay Estimation with Gaussian Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strong gravitational lensing forms multiple, time delayed images of cosmological sources, with the "focal length" of the lens serving as a cosmological distance probe. Robust estimation of the time delay distance can tightly constrain the Hubble constant as well as the matter density and dark energy. Current and next generation surveys will find hundreds to thousands of lensed systems but accurate time delay estimation from noisy, gappy lightcurves is potentially a limiting systematic. Using a large sample of blinded lightcurves from the Strong Lens Time Delay Challenge we develop and demonstrate a Gaussian Process crosscorrelation technique that delivers an average bias within 0.1% depending on the sampling, necessary for subpercent Hubble constant determination. The fits are accurate (80% of them within 1 day) for delays from 5-100 days and robust against cadence variations shorter than 6 days. We study the effects of survey characteristics such as cadence, season, and campaign length, and derive requiremen...

Hojjati, Alireza

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

SLAC Next-Generation High Availability Power Supply  

SciTech Connect

SLAC recently commissioned forty high availability (HA) magnet power supplies for Japan's ATF2 project. SLAC is now developing a next-generation N+1 modular power supply with even better availability and versatility. The goal is to have unipolar and bipolar output capability. It has novel topology and components to achieve very low output voltage to drive superconducting magnets. A redundant, embedded, digital controller in each module provides increased bandwidth for use in beam-based alignment, and orbit correction systems. The controllers have independent inputs for connection to two external control nodes. Under fault conditions, they sense failures and isolate the modules. Power supply speed mitigates the effects of fault transients and obviates subsequent magnet standardization. Hot swap capability promises higher availability and other exciting benefits for future, more complex, accelerators, and eventually the International Linear Collider project.

Bellomo, P.; MacNair, D.; /SLAC; ,

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

244

Rucio, the next-generation Data Management system in ATLAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rucio is the next-generation of Distributed Data Management (DDM) system benefiting from recent advances in cloud and "Big Data" computing to address HEP experiments scaling requirements. Rucio is an evolution of the ATLAS DDM system Don Quijote 2 (DQ2), which has demonstrated very large scale data management capabilities with more than 160 petabytes spread worldwide across 130 sites, and accesses from 1,000 active users. However, DQ2 is reaching its limits in terms of scalability, requiring a large number of support staff to operate and being hard to extend with new technologies. Rucio addresses these issues by relying on new technologies to ensure system scalability, cover new user requirements and employ new automation framework to reduce operational overheads. This paper shows the key concepts of Rucio, details the Rucio design, and the technology it employs, the tests that were conducted to validate it and finally describes the migration steps that were conducted to move from DQ2 to Rucio.

Serfon, C; The ATLAS collaboration; Beermann, T; Garonne, V; Goossens, L; Lassnig, M; Nairz, A; Vigne, R

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Planning the Next Generation of Arctic Ecosystem Experiments  

SciTech Connect

Climate Change Experiments in High-Latitude Ecosystems; Fairbanks, Alaska, 13-14 October 2010; A 2-day climate change workshop was held at the International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks. The workshop, sponsored by Biological and Environmental Research, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), was attended by 45 subject matter experts from universities, DOE national laboratories, and other federal and nongovernmental organizations. The workshop sought to engage the Arctic science community in planning for a proposed Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE-Arctic) project in Alaska (http:// ngee.ornl.gov/). The goal of this activity is to provide data, theory, and models to improve representations of high-latitude terrestrial processes in Earth system models. In particular, there is a need to better understand the processes by which warming may drive increased plant productivity and atmospheric carbon uptake and storage in biomass and soils, as well as those processes that may drive an increase in the release of methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) through microbial decomposition of soil carbon stored in thawing permafrost. This understanding is required to quantify the important feedback mechanisms that define the role of terrestrial processes in regional and global climate.

Hinzman, Larry D [International Arctic Research Center; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The series of workshops on New Partial-Wave Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments was initiated with the ATHOS 2012 meeting, which took place in Camogli, Italy, June 20-22, 2012. It was followed by ATHOS 2013 in Kloster Seeon near Munich, Germany, May 21-24, 2013. The third, ATHOS3, meeting is planned for April 13-17, 2015 at The George Washington University Virginia Science and Technology Campus, USA. The workshops focus on the development of amplitude analysis tools for meson and baryon spectroscopy, and complement other programs in hadron spectroscopy organized in the recent past including the INT-JLab Workshop on Hadron Spectroscopy in Seattle in 2009, the International Workshop on Amplitude Analysis in Hadron Spectroscopy at the ECT*-Trento in 2011, the School on Amplitude Analysis in Modern Physics in Bad Honnef in 2011, the Jefferson Lab Advanced Study Institute Summer School in 2012, and the School on Concepts of Modern Amplitude Analysis Techniques in Flecken-Zechlin near...

Battaglieri, M; Celentano, A; Chung, S -U; D'Angelo, A; De Vita, R; Döring, M; Dudek, J; Eidelman, S; Fegan, S; Ferretti, J; Fox, G; Galata, G; Garcia-Tecocoatzi, H; Glazier, D I; Grube, B; Hanhart, C; Hoferichter, M; Hughes, S M; Ireland, D G; Ketzer, B; Klein, F J; Kubis, B; Liu, B; Masjuan, P; Mathieu, V; McKinnon, B; Mitchell, R; Nerling, F; Paul, S; Pelaez, J R; Rademacker, J; Rizzo, A; Salgado, C; Santopinto, E; Sarantsev, A V; Sato, T; Schlüter, T; da Silva, M L L; Stankovic, I; Strakovsky, I; Szczepaniak, A; Vassallo, A; Walford, N K; Watts, D P; Zana, L

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Single Stage Contactor Testing Of The Next Generation Solvent Blend  

SciTech Connect

The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is actively pursuing the transition from the current BOBCalixC6 based solvent to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS)-MCU solvent to increase the cesium decontamination factor. To support this integration of NGS into the MCU facility the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed testing of a blend of the NGS (MaxCalix based solvent) with the current solvent (BOBCalixC6 based solvent) for the removal of cesium (Cs) from the liquid salt waste stream. This testing utilized a blend of BOBCalixC6 based solvent and the NGS with the new extractant, MaxCalix, as well as a new suppressor, tris(3,7dimethyloctyl) guanidine. Single stage tests were conducted using the full size V-05 and V-10 liquid-to-liquid centrifugal contactors installed at SRNL. These tests were designed to determine the mass transfer and hydraulic characteristics with the NGS solvent blended with the projected heel of the BOBCalixC6 based solvent that will exist in MCU at time of transition. The test program evaluated the amount of organic carryover and the droplet size of the organic carryover phases using several analytical methods. The results indicate that hydraulically, the NGS solvent performed hydraulically similar to the current solvent which was expected. For the organic carryover 93% of the solvent is predicted to be recovered from the stripping operation and 96% from the extraction operation. As for the mass transfer, the NGS solvent significantly improved the cesium DF by at least an order of magnitude when extrapolating the One-stage results to actual Seven-stage extraction operation with a stage efficiency of 95%.

Herman, D. T.; Peters, T. B.; Duignan, M. R.; Williams, M. R.; Poirier, M. R.; Brass, E. A.; Garrison, A. G.; Ketusky, E. T.

2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

248

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Next Generation Safeguards Initiative  

SciTech Connect

In 2007, the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NA-24) completed a comprehensive review of the current and potential future challenges facing the international safeguards system. The review examined trends and events impacting the mission of international safeguards and the implications of expanding and evolving mission requirements on the legal authorities and institutions that serve as the foundation of the international safeguards system, as well as the technological, financial, and human resources required for effective safeguards implementation. The review's findings and recommendations were summarized in the report, 'International Safeguards: Challenges and Opportunities for the 21st Century (October 2007)'. One of the report's key recommendations was for DOE/NNSA to launch a major new program to revitalize the international safeguards technology and human resource base. In 2007, at the International Atomic Energy Agency's General Conference, then Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman announced the newly created Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI). NGSI consists of five program elements: (1) Policy development and outreach; (2) Concepts and approaches; (3) Technology and analytical methodologies; (4) Human resource development; and (5) Infrastructure development. The ensuing report addresses the 'Human Resource Development (HRD)' component of NGSI. The goal of the HRD as defined in the NNSA Program Plan (November 2008) is 'to revitalize and expand the international safeguards human capital base by attracting and training a new generation of talent.' One of the major objectives listed in the HRD goal includes education and training, outreach to universities, professional societies, postdoctoral appointments, and summer internships at national laboratories. ORNL is a participant in the NGSI program, together with several DOE laboratories such as Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In particular, ORNL's participation encompasses student internships, postdoctoral appointments, collaboration with universities in safeguards curriculum development, workshops, and outreach to professional societies through career fairs.

Kirk, Bernadette Lugue [ORNL; Eipeldauer, Mary D [ORNL; Whitaker, J Michael [ORNL

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Next Generation CANDU: Conceptual Design for a Short Construction Schedule  

SciTech Connect

Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) has very successful experience in implementing new construction methods at the Qinshan (Phase III) twin unit CANDU 6 plant in China. This paper examines the construction method that must be implemented during the conceptual design phase of a project if short construction schedules are to be met. A project schedule of 48 months has been developed for the nth unit of NG (Next Generation) CANDU with a 42 month construction period from 1. Concrete to In-Service. An overall construction strategy has been developed involving paralleling project activities that are normally conducted in series. Many parts of the plant will be fabricated as modules and be installed using heavy lift cranes. The Reactor Building (RB), being on the critical path, has been the focus of considerable assessment, looking at alternative ways of applying the construction strategy to this building. A construction method has been chosen which will result in excess of 80% of internal work being completed as modules or as very streamlined traditional construction. This method is being further evaluated as the detailed layout proceeds. Other areas of the plant have been integrated into the schedule and new construction methods are being applied to these so that further modularization and even greater paralleling of activities will be achieved. It is concluded that the optimized construction method is a requirement, which must be implemented through all phases of design to make a 42 month construction schedule a reality. If the construction methods are appropriately chosen, the schedule reductions achieved will make nuclear more competitive. (authors)

Hopwood, Jerry M.; Love, Ian J.W.; Elgohary, Medhat; Fairclough, Neville [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Ontario (Canada)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Activity: Natural Gas Engine and Vehicle Research & Development (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the status of the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle (NGNGV) activity, including goals, R&D progress, NGV implementation, and the transition to hydrogen.

Not Available

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Energy-Efficient Next-Generation Networks (E2 Pulak Chowdhury  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy-Efficient Next-Generation Networks (E2 NGN) By Pulak Chowdhury B.S. (Bangladesh University Prototype . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 3.3.1 Resources Needed

California at Davis, University of

252

Demonstrating Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with Next Generation Model-Based Diesel Engine Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presents a next generation model-based engine controller that incorporates real-time fuel efficiency optimization and tested under fully transient engine and vehicle operating conditions.

253

Energy Consumption of Next-Generation Optical-Wireless Converged Networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We compare three different plausible architectures for next-generation optical-wireless convergence in energy conservation viewpoint. Our analysis provides insight into QoS rich...

Ranaweera, Chathurika; Lim, Christina; Wong, Elaine; Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai; Jayasundara, Chamil L

254

Cummins' Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light Truck Diesel Engine...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Light Duty Diesel Aftertreatment System Passive Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine...

255

Energy Department Announces Funding to Develop Improved Next Generation HVAC Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Energy Department today announced nearly $8 million to support research and development of the next generation of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning technologies.

256

Next Generation Hydrogen Station Composite Data Products: Data through Quarter 4 of 2013  

SciTech Connect

This report includes 25 composite data products (CDPs) produced for next generation hydrogen stations, with data through quarter 4 of 2013.

Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Peters, M.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Next Generation Lunch: Revealing the World’s First 3D Printed Car (text version)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Below is the text version for the Next Generation Lunch: Revealing the World’s First 3D Printed Car Video.

258

Energy Department Announces $4.4 Million to Support Next-Generation Advanced Hydropower Manufacturing  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Energy Department today announced $4.4 million to support the application of advanced materials and manufacturing techniques to the development of next-generation hydropower technologies.

259

Rinse trough with improved flow  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel rinse troughs accomplish thorough uniform rinsing. The troughs are suitable for one or more essentially planar objects having substantially the same shape. The troughs ensure that each surface is rinsed uniformly. The new troughs provide uniform rinse fluid flow over the objects` surfaces to accomplish a more thorough rinse than prior art troughs. 5 figs.

O`Hern, T.J.; Grasser, T.W.

1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

260

NREL: TroughNet - Email Updates - Subscribe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Email Updates - Subscribe Email Updates - Subscribe Subscribe to receive email updates about parabolic trough technology, including: Status on R&D and deployment projects Workshops and other events New publications New data and resources. Please provide and submit the following information. Name (first & last): Organization/Affiliation: Email Address: Submit Clear Form Unsubscribe Printable Version TroughNet Home Technologies Market & Economic Assessment Research & Development Data & Resources FAQs Workshops Publications Email Updates Did you find what you needed? Yes 1 No 0 Thank you for your feedback. Would you like to take a moment to tell us how we can improve this page? Submit We value your feedback. Thanks! We've received your feedback. Something went wrong. Please try again later.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "next-generation parabolic trough" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

Energy Reductions Using Next-Generation Remanufacturing Techniques  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project was to develop a radically new surface coating approach that greatly enhances the performance of thermal spray coatings. Rather than relying on a roughened grit blasted substrate surface for developing a mechanical bond between the coating and substrate, which is the normal practice with conventional thermal spraying, a hybrid approach of combining a focused laser beam to thermally treat the substrate surface in the vicinity of the rapidly approaching thermally-sprayed powder particles was developed. This new surface coating process is targeted primarily at enabling remanufacturing of components used in engines, drive trains and undercarriage systems; thereby providing a substantial global opportunity for increasing the magnitude and breadth of parts that are remanufactured through their life cycle, as opposed to simply being replaced by new components. The projected benefits of a new remanufacturing process that increases the quantity of components that are salvaged and reused compared to being fabricated from raw materials will clearly vary based on the specific industry and range of candidate components that are considered. At the outset of this project two different metal processing routes were considered, castings and forgings, and the prototypical components for each process were liners and crankshafts, respectively. The quantities of parts used in the analysis are based on our internal production of approximately 158,000 diesel engines in 2007. This leads to roughly 1,000,000 liners (assuming a mixture of 6- and 8-cylinder engines) and 158,000 crankshafts. Using energy intensity factors for casting and forgings, respectively, of 4450 and 5970 Btu-hr/lb along with the energy-induced CO2 generation factor of 0.00038 lbs CO2/Btu, energy savings of over 17 trillion BTUs and CO2 reductions of over 6.5 million lbs could potentially be realized by remanufacturing the above mentioned quantities of crankshafts and liners. This project supported the Industrial Technologies Program's initiative titled 'Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Challenge.' To contribute to this Grand Challenge, we. pursued an innovative processing approach for the next generation of thermal spray coatings to capture substantial energy savings and green house gas emission reductions through the remanufacturing of steel and aluminum-based components. The primary goal was to develop a new thermal spray coating process that yields significantly enhanced bond strength. To reach the goal of higher coating bond strength, a laser was coupled with a traditional twin-wire arc (TWA) spray gun to treat the component surface (i.e., heat or partially melt) during deposition. Both ferrous and aluminum-based substrates and coating alloys were examined to determine what materials are more suitable for the laser-assisted twin-wire arc coating technique. Coating adhesion was measured by static tensile and dynamic fatigue techniques, and the results helped to guide the identification of appropriate remanufacturing opportunities that will now be viable due to the increased bond strength of the laser-assisted twin-wire arc coatings. The feasibility of the laser-assisted TWA (LATWA) process was successfully demonstrated in this current effort. Critical processing parameters were identified, and when these were properly controlled, a strong, diffusion bond was developed between the substrate and the deposited coating. Consequently, bond strengths were nearly doubled over those typically obtained using conventional grit-blast TWA coatings. Note, however, that successful LATWA processing was limited to ferrous substrates coated with steel coatings (e.g., 1020 and 1080 steel). With Al-based substrates, it was not possible to avoid melting a thin layer of the substrate during spraying, and this layer re-solidified to form a band of intermetallic phases at the substrate/coating interface, which significantly diminished the coating adhesion. The capability to significantly increase the bond strength with ferrous substrates and coatings may open new reman

Sordelet, Daniel; Racek, Ondrej

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

262

A National Demonstration Project Building the Next Generation  

SciTech Connect

The U.S., and the world to a greater extent, needs more electrical power generating plants. In the U.S. alone some estimates say that over the next 20 years more than 400,000 MWe of new generation will be needed. This in a period when domestic oil and gas production decreases while consumption increases. Consequently, the U.S. grows more and more dependent on foreign energy sources today importing approximately 60% of our needs. Consider also that the U.S., once the world leader in all nuclear technology, no long leads the world in this technology and each day that goes by the U.S. nuclear infrastructure becomes less and less robust. Due to its improved safety, reliability/economics and emission free generation nuclear power is once more seen as an important energy source in many countries. In 2000, the number of operating nuclear power plants worldwide increased to 438, with 36 new plants under construction. Unfortunately, no new reactor orders have been placed in the US since 1979. When one considers national issues such as reducing environmental emissions, reallocation and conservation of limited natural resources and domestic energy security, the need for new nuclear generation is essential. While the hurdles facing the deployment of new nuclear generation in the U.S. are certainly formidable, the consequences of inaction in this regard are intolerable. In partnership with industry, the Department of Energy should move forward with an aggressive effort in support of deployment of an advanced nuclear power reactor incorporating state-of-the-art safety and proliferation resistant systems. This effort should be structured so as to significantly advance the timetable by which the systems would be available for commercial deployment by taking advantage of ongoing efforts currently underway at DOE and industry. The effort should be sequenced, to the extent possible, so that it can best reflect, both with respect to schedule and capability, the evolving national energy situation, and in a way which supports U.S. environmental objectives. A key element of this effort will be the reestablishment and maintenance of an industrial base, which can be accessed in response to changing national energy needs. Right now, in a cooperative program through the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. and Russian dollars are paying for over 700 Russian nuclear scientists and engineers to complete design work on the Gas Turbine - Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR), a next generation nuclear power plant that is melt-down proof, substantially more efficient that the existing generation of reactors, creates substantially less waste and is extremely proliferation resistant. To date, the Russians are providing world class engineering design work, resulting in the program being on track to begin construction of this first of a kind reactor by the end of 2005. Just as important in parallel with this effort, a number of key U.S. utilities are speaking with Congress and the Administration to 'piggy back' off this U.S./Russian effort to promote a joint private-public partnership to construct in parallel a similar first of a kind reactor in the U.S. (authors)

Keuter, Dan; Hughey, Kenneth; Melancon, Steve [Entergy Nuclear (United States); Quinn, Edward 'Ted' [Past President, American Nuclear Society, General Atomics, 3550 General Atomics Court, San Diego, CA 92186 (United States)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The April 2011 DOE workshop, 'Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid', was the culmination of a year-long process to bring together some of the Nation's leading researchers and experts to identify computational challenges associated with the operation and planning of the electric power system. The attached papers provide a journey into these experts' insights, highlighting a class of mathematical and computational problems relevant for potential power systems research. While each paper defines a specific problem area, there were several recurrent themes. First, the breadth and depth of power system data has expanded tremendously over the past decade. This provides the potential for new control approaches and operator tools that can enhance system efficiencies and improve reliability. However, the large volume of data poses its own challenges, and could benefit from application of advances in computer networking and architecture, as well as data base structures. Second, the computational complexity of the underlying system problems is growing. Transmitting electricity from clean, domestic energy resources in remote regions to urban consumers, for example, requires broader, regional planning over multi-decade time horizons. Yet, it may also mean operational focus on local solutions and shorter timescales, as reactive power and system dynamics (including fast switching and controls) play an increasingly critical role in achieving stability and ultimately reliability. The expected growth in reliance on variable renewable sources of electricity generation places an exclamation point on both of these observations, and highlights the need for new focus in areas such as stochastic optimization to accommodate the increased uncertainty that is occurring in both planning and operations. Application of research advances in algorithms (especially related to optimization techniques and uncertainty quantification) could accelerate power system software tool performance, i.e. speed to solution, and enhance applicability for new and existing real-time operation and control approaches, as well as large-scale planning analysis. Finally, models are becoming increasingly essential for improved decision-making across the electric system, from resource forecasting to adaptive real-time controls to online dynamics analysis. The importance of data is thus reinforced by their inescapable role in validating, high-fidelity models that lead to deeper system understanding. Traditional boundaries (reflecting geographic, institutional, and market differences) are becoming blurred, and thus, it is increasingly important to address these seams in model formulation and utilization to ensure accuracy in the results and achieve predictability necessary for reliable operations. Each paper also embodies the philosophy that our energy challenges require interdisciplinary solutions - drawing on the latest developments in fields such as mathematics, computation, economics, as well as power systems. In this vein, the workshop should be viewed not as the end product, but the beginning of what DOE seeks to establish as a vibrant, on-going dialogue among these various communities. Bridging communication gaps among these communities will yield opportunities for innovation and advancement. The papers and workshop discussion provide the opportunity to learn from experts on the current state-of-the-art on computational approaches for electric power systems, and where one may focus to accelerate progress. It has been extremely valuable to me as I better understand this space, and consider future programmatic activities. I am confident that you too will enjoy the discussion, and certainly learn from the many experts. I would like to thank the authors of the papers for sharing their perspectives, as well as the paper discussants, session recorders, and participants. The meeting would not have been as successful without your commitment and engagement. I also would like to thank Joe Eto and Bob Thomas for their vision and leadership in bringing together su

Birman, Kenneth; Ganesh, Lakshmi; Renessee, Robbert van; Ferris, Michael; Hofmann, Andreas; Williams, Brian; Sztipanovits, Janos; Hemingway, Graham; University, Vanderbilt; Bose, Anjan; Stivastava, Anurag; Grijalva, Santiago; Grijalva, Santiago; Ryan, Sarah M.; McCalley, James D.; Woodruff, David L.; Xiong, Jinjun; Acar, Emrah; Agrawal, Bhavna; Conn, Andrew R.; Ditlow, Gary; Feldmann, Peter; Finkler, Ulrich; Gaucher, Brian; Gupta, Anshul; Heng, Fook-Luen; Kalagnanam, Jayant R; Koc, Ali; Kung, David; Phan, Dung; Singhee, Amith; Smith, Basil

2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

264

Energy Department Announces $45 Million to Advance Next-Generation Vehicle  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

$45 Million to Advance Next-Generation $45 Million to Advance Next-Generation Vehicle Technologies Energy Department Announces $45 Million to Advance Next-Generation Vehicle Technologies September 4, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Energy Department Announces $45 Million to Advance Next-Generation Vehicle Technologies Thirty-eight projects will accelerate the research and development of technologies to improve vehicle fuel efficiency, lower transportation costs, and cut carbon pollution. Energy Department Announces $45 Million to Advance Next-Generation Vehicle Technologies Thirty-eight projects will accelerate the research and development of technologies to improve vehicle fuel efficiency, lower transportation costs, and cut carbon pollution. Building on President Obama's Climate Action Plan to build a 21st century

265

Next Generation Networking | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Next Generation Networking Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Applied Mathematics Computer Science Next Generation Networking 2012 Scientific Collaborations at Extreme-Scale Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Computational Science Graduate Fellowship (CSGF) ASCR SBIR-STTR Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) News & Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-7486 F: (301) 903-4846 E: sc.ascr@science.doe.gov More Information » Research Next Generation Networking Print Text Size: A A A

266

Directed flow fluid rinse trough  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel rinse troughs accomplish thorough uniform rinsing. The tanks are suitable for one or more essentially planar items having substantially the same shape. The troughs ensure that each surface is rinsed uniformly. The new troughs also require less rinse fluid to accomplish a thorough rinse than prior art troughs.

Kempka, Steven N. (9504 Lona La., Albuquerque, NM 87111); Walters, Robert N. (11872 LaGrange St., Boise, ID 83709)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Directed flow fluid rinse trough  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel rinse troughs accomplish thorough uniform rinsing. The tanks are suitable for one or more essentially planar items having substantially the same shape. The troughs ensure that each surface is rinsed uniformly. The new troughs also require less rinse fluid to accomplish a thorough rinse than prior art troughs. 9 figs.

Kempka, S.N.; Walters, R.N.

1996-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

268

DOE Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant DOE Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant April 17, 2008 - 10:49am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced it is seeking public and industry input on how to best achieve the goals and meet the requirements for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) demonstration project work at DOE's Idaho National Laboratory. DOE today issued a Request for Information and Expressions of Interest from prospective participants and interested parties on utilizing cutting-edge high temperature gas reactor technology in the effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by enabling nuclear energy to replace fossil fuels used by industry for process heat. "This is an opportunity to advance the development of safe, reliable, and

269

DOE Launches First Segment of its Next-Generation Nationwide Network to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

First Segment of its Next-Generation Nationwide First Segment of its Next-Generation Nationwide Network to Support Scientific Research Efforts DOE Launches First Segment of its Next-Generation Nationwide Network to Support Scientific Research Efforts May 30, 2007 - 1:24pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC- The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science and Internet2 announced today that the first segment of a next-generation, nationwide network has gone live, marking a key step in significantly upgrading networking services to thousands of scientific researchers across the country and around the world. The first complete national ring of DOE's Energy Sciences Network (ESnet4) will be rolled out segment by segment from the east coast to the west coast and is expected to be fully operational by September, 2007.

270

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant August 15, 2008 - 3:15pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) today delivered to Congress the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Licensing Strategy Report which describes the licensing approach, the analytical tools, the research and development activities and the estimated resources required to license an advanced reactor design by 2017 and begin operation by 2021. The NGNP represents a new concept for nuclear energy utilization, in which a gas-cooled reactor provides process heat for any number of industrial applications including electricity production, hydrogen production, coal-to-liquids, shale oil

271

Investing in the Next Generation of U.S. Nuclear Energy Leaders |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Next Generation of U.S. Nuclear Energy Leaders the Next Generation of U.S. Nuclear Energy Leaders Investing in the Next Generation of U.S. Nuclear Energy Leaders August 9, 2011 - 5:12pm Addthis Assistant Secretary Lyons Assistant Secretary Lyons Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy As part of the Energy Department's Nuclear Energy University Programs (NEUP) annual workshop, I met today with professors from across the country and announced awards of up to $39 million for research projects aimed at developing cutting-edge nuclear energy technologies. The awards will also help train and educate the next generation of nuclear industry leaders in the U.S. These projects, led by 31 universities in more than 20 states, will help to enable the safe, secure and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy in the United States.

272

Secretary Chu Announces $45 Million to Support Next Generation of Wind  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary Chu Announces $45 Million to Support Next Generation of Secretary Chu Announces $45 Million to Support Next Generation of Wind Turbine Designs Secretary Chu Announces $45 Million to Support Next Generation of Wind Turbine Designs November 23, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced the selection of Clemson University to receive up to $45 million under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act for a wind energy test facility that will enhance the performance, durability, and reliability of utility-scale wind turbines. This investment will support jobs and strengthen American leadership in wind energy technology by supporting the testing of next-generation wind turbine designs. "Wind power holds tremendous potential to help create new jobs and reduce

273

Letter to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Activities |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Activities Letter to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Activities The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project was established under the Energy Policy Act in August 2005 (EPACT-2005). EPACT-2005 defined an overall plan and timetable for NGNP research, design, licensing, construction and operation by the end of FY 2021. At the time that EPACT-2005 was passed, it was envisioned that key aspects of the project included: NGNP is based on R&D activities supported by the Gen-IV Nuclear Energy initiative;  NGNP is to be used to generate electricity, to produce hydrogen or (to do) both;  The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will be the lead national lab for the project;  NGNP will be sited at the INL in

274

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project helps address the President's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The NGNP project was formally established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), designated as Public Law 109-58, 42 USC 16021, to demonstrate the generation of electricity and/or hydrogen with a high-temperature nuclear energy source. The project is being executed in collaboration with industry, DOE national laboratories, and U.S. universities. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for licensing and regulatory oversight of the demonstration nuclear reactor.

275

Department of Energy to Invest More than $21 Million for Next Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More than $21 Million for Next More than $21 Million for Next Generation Solar Energy Projects Department of Energy to Invest More than $21 Million for Next Generation Solar Energy Projects November 8, 2007 - 4:31pm Addthis 25 Cutting Edge Projects Target Enhanced Solar Energy Efficiency WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department will invest $21.7 million in next generation photovoltaic (PV) technology to help accelerate the widespread use of advanced solar power. The 25 projects that DOE selected as part of this Funding Opportunity Announcement, Next Generation Photovoltaic Devices & Processes, are an integral part of the President's Solar America Initiative, which aims to make solar energy cost-competitive with

276

Department of Energy to Invest More than $21 Million for Next Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy to Invest More than $21 Million for Next Department of Energy to Invest More than $21 Million for Next Generation Solar Energy Projects Department of Energy to Invest More than $21 Million for Next Generation Solar Energy Projects November 8, 2007 - 4:31pm Addthis 25 Cutting Edge Projects Target Enhanced Solar Energy Efficiency WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department will invest $21.7 million in next generation photovoltaic (PV) technology to help accelerate the widespread use of advanced solar power. The 25 projects that DOE selected as part of this Funding Opportunity Announcement, Next Generation Photovoltaic Devices & Processes, are an integral part of the President's Solar America Initiative, which aims to make solar energy cost-competitive with

277

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Next-Generation Ultra Lean Burn Powertrain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given by MAHLE Powertrain, LLC at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about next-generation ultra...

278

Notice of Intent: Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Next Generation of Electric Machines Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Advanced Manufacturing Office intends to issue a new funding opportunity for work to develop Next Generation of Electric Machines (NGEM). NGEMs combine high power density, high RPM motors with integrated power electronics.

279

JCESR and NASA team up to conduct research for next generation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JCESR and NASA team up to conduct research for next generation batteries to be used in space adipex for sale News Release buy xanax online no prescription Media Contacts buy...

280

NASA Expert Discusses NextGen - the Next Generation Air Transportation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NASA Expert Discusses NextGen - the Next Generation Air Transportation System on Nov. 18 NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Nov. 7, 2008 -- The U.S. Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab invites...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "next-generation parabolic trough" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

EIS-0362: Colorado Springs Utilities' Next Generation CFB Coal Generating Unit, CO  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to approve Colorado Springs Utilities design, construction, and operation of their Next- Generation Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) Coal Generating Unit demonstration plant near Fountain, El Paso County, Colorado.

282

NASA/FPL Renewable Project Case Study: Space Coast Next Generation Solar Energy Center  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation covers the NASA/FPL Renewable Project Case Study: Space Coast Next Generation Solar Energy Center given at the Spring 2009 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in...

283

POSTDOCTORAL POSITION IN BIOINFORMATICS AND EVOLUTIONARY GENOMICS: Next generation sequencing and analysis of complex polyploid genomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

POSTDOCTORAL POSITION IN BIOINFORMATICS AND EVOLUTIONARY GENOMICS: Next generation sequencing and analysis of complex polyploid genomes The research group Genome Evolution and Speciation (Team) to work on the analysis of genome and transcriptome sequence data (generated using 454 Roche

Rennes, Université de

284

Energy Department Announces Outdoor Winners of Next Generation Luminaires™ Solid-State Lighting Design Competition  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The 2013 Next Generation LuminairesTM (NGL) Design Competition outdoor lighting category winners were announced Wednesday night at the Strategies in Light conference in Santa Clara, California. The...

285

Secretary Chu Announces $45 Million to Support Next Generation of Wind  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announces $45 Million to Support Next Generation of Announces $45 Million to Support Next Generation of Wind Turbine Designs Secretary Chu Announces $45 Million to Support Next Generation of Wind Turbine Designs November 23, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced the selection of Clemson University to receive up to $45 million under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act for a wind energy test facility that will enhance the performance, durability, and reliability of utility-scale wind turbines. This investment will support jobs and strengthen American leadership in wind energy technology by supporting the testing of next-generation wind turbine designs. "Wind power holds tremendous potential to help create new jobs and reduce carbon pollution," said Secretary Chu. "We are at the beginning of a new

286

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project helps address the President's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The NGNP project was formally established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), designated as Public Law 109-58, 42 USC 16021, to demonstrate the generation of electricity and/or hydrogen with a high-temperature nuclear energy source. The project is being executed in collaboration with industry, DOE national laboratories, and U.S. universities. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for licensing and regulatory oversight of the demonstration nuclear reactor.

287

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant August 15, 2008 - 3:15pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) today delivered to Congress the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Licensing Strategy Report which describes the licensing approach, the analytical tools, the research and development activities and the estimated resources required to license an advanced reactor design by 2017 and begin operation by 2021. The NGNP represents a new concept for nuclear energy utilization, in which a gas-cooled reactor provides process heat for any number of industrial applications including electricity production, hydrogen production, coal-to-liquids, shale oil

288

U.S. Department of Energy Partners with the Next Generation Lighting Industry Alliance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Next Generation Lighting Industry Alliance (NGLIA) signed a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) to support the development and commercialization of SSL...

289

Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

radiative losses. IMPACT This technology represents significant operational and cost advances in the most trusted and broadly implemented form of CSP. In addition, it...

290

Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Norwich Technologies is one of the 2012 SunShot CSP R&D awardees for their advanced receivers. This fact sheet explains the motivation, description, and impact of the project.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Project Profile: High-Concentration, Low-Cost Parabolic Trough...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

aperture, while incorporating additional advancements that substantially lower installed solar field costs. For example, the reflective film surfaces are being upgraded to improve...

292

Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

receiver designs were validated by comparing to published correlations and NREL data. Heat loss increases when vacuum fails due to convection within annulus Receiver model...

293

A new parabolic trough solar collector P. Kohlenbach1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil is circulated inside the absorber tube, and transfers the heat to a ORC FP6 unit sourced from of this facility, to develop efficient new methods of capturing and harnessing solar heat for combined heat) and remote power and energy. The array is designed to drive a small Organic Rankine Cycle unit with a power

294

Department of Energy Announces $40 Million to Develop the Next Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 Million to Develop the Next 0 Million to Develop the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Department of Energy Announces $40 Million to Develop the Next Generation Nuclear Plant March 8, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu today announced selections for the award of approximately $40 million in total to two teams led by Pittsburgh-based Westinghouse Electric Co. and San Diego-based General Atomics for conceptual design and planning work for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The results of this work will help the Administration determine whether to proceed with detailed efforts toward construction and demonstration of the NGNP. If successful, the NGNP Demonstration Project will demonstrate high-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology that will be capable of producing electricity as well as process

295

Geek-Up[7.8.2011]: Cyanobacteria, Biofuels and Next-Generation Batteries |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7.8.2011]: Cyanobacteria, Biofuels and Next-Generation 7.8.2011]: Cyanobacteria, Biofuels and Next-Generation Batteries Geek-Up[7.8.2011]: Cyanobacteria, Biofuels and Next-Generation Batteries July 8, 2011 - 5:02pm Addthis Chains of cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae | Photo Courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory Chains of cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae | Photo Courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs At Argonne National Laboratory's Structural Biology Center (SBC) scientists are investigating cyanobacteria in hopes of advancing alternative transportation fuels. For some background, cyanobacteria cells group themselves into long filaments that can contain dozens and even hundreds of cells -- and, like in humans, not all cyanobacteria cells are born the same. While most

296

DOE Announces Up to $5 Million to Support the Next Generation of Advanced  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Up to $5 Million to Support the Next Generation of Up to $5 Million to Support the Next Generation of Advanced Automotive Designers and Engineers DOE Announces Up to $5 Million to Support the Next Generation of Advanced Automotive Designers and Engineers February 16, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced up to $5 million in funding to support Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Centers of Excellence. The GATE Centers will focus on educating a future workforce of automotive engineering professionals who will gain experience in developing and commercializing advanced automotive technologies. Today's announcement supports the Administration's goal of increasing American economic competitiveness by focusing on science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education to support job growth

297

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects: Next Generation Surfactants for Improved  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology Last Reviewed 12/15/2012 Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology Last Reviewed 12/15/2012 DE-FE0003537 Goal The principle objective of the project is to characterize and test current and next generation high performance surfactants for improved chemical flooding technology, focusing on reservoirs in Pennsylvanian age (Penn) sands. Performer Oklahoma University Enhanced Oil Recovery Design Center, Norman, OK Background Primary and secondary methods have produced approximately one-third of the 401 billion barrels of original-oil-in-place in the United States. Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) methods have shown potential to recover a fraction of the remaining oil. Surfactant EOR has seen an increase in activity in recent years due to increased energy demand and higher oil prices. In

298

Department of Energy Announces $40 Million to Develop the Next Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

40 Million to Develop the Next 40 Million to Develop the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Department of Energy Announces $40 Million to Develop the Next Generation Nuclear Plant March 9, 2010 - 12:47pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu today announced selections for the award of approximately $40 million in total to two teams led by Pittsburgh-based Westinghouse Electric Co. and San Diego-based General Atomics for conceptual design and planning work for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The results of this work will help the Administration determine whether to proceed with detailed efforts toward construction and demonstration of the NGNP. If successful, the NGNP Demonstration Project will demonstrate high-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology that will be capable of producing electricity as well as process

299

DOE Makes Available $8 Million for Pre-Conceptual Design of Next Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Makes Available $8 Million for Pre-Conceptual Design of Next Makes Available $8 Million for Pre-Conceptual Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plants DOE Makes Available $8 Million for Pre-Conceptual Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plants September 28, 2006 - 9:01am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that DOE's Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will make awards valued at about $8 million to three companies to perform engineering studies and develop a pre-conceptual design to guide research on the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The INL will issue a contract later this week to Westinghouse Electric Company for the pre-conceptual design of the NGNP, and will later issue contracts to AREVA NP and General Atomics to perform complimentary engineering studies in the areas of technology and design

300

National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants January 25, 2013 - 11:10am Addthis AVESTAR provides high-quality, hands-on, simulator-based workforce training delivered by an experienced team of power industry training professionals for West Virginia students. | Photo courtesy of the Office of Fossil Energy. AVESTAR provides high-quality, hands-on, simulator-based workforce training delivered by an experienced team of power industry training professionals for West Virginia students. | Photo courtesy of the Office of Fossil Energy. Gayland Barksdale Technical Writer, Office of Fossil Energy What Does AVESTAR Provide? Advanced dynamic simulation, control and virtual plant technologies

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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301

Miles Below the Earth: The Next-Generation of Geothermal Energy |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Miles Below the Earth: The Next-Generation of Geothermal Energy Miles Below the Earth: The Next-Generation of Geothermal Energy Miles Below the Earth: The Next-Generation of Geothermal Energy February 7, 2011 - 12:34pm Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What will the project do? Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) essentially create man-made reservoirs that mimic naturally occurring pockets of steam- with the potential for use as a reliable, 24/7 source of renewable energy. For more than a century, traditional geothermal power plants have been generating electricity by extracting pockets of steam found miles below the Earth's surface. Until recently though, those plants could only be constructed in locations where pockets of steam had formed naturally. Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) have been crafted to solve that problem

302

Secretary Chu Announces More than $37 Million for Next Generation Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

than $37 Million for Next Generation than $37 Million for Next Generation Lighting Secretary Chu Announces More than $37 Million for Next Generation Lighting January 15, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced more than $37 million in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to support high-efficiency solid-state lighting projects. Solid-state lighting, which uses light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) instead of incandescent bulbs, has the potential to be ten times more energy-efficient than traditional incandescent lighting. Lighting accounts for approximately 24 percent of the total electricity generated in the United States today - by 2030, the development and widespread deployment of cost-effective solid-state

303

National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants January 25, 2013 - 11:10am Addthis AVESTAR provides high-quality, hands-on, simulator-based workforce training delivered by an experienced team of power industry training professionals for West Virginia students. | Photo courtesy of the Office of Fossil Energy. AVESTAR provides high-quality, hands-on, simulator-based workforce training delivered by an experienced team of power industry training professionals for West Virginia students. | Photo courtesy of the Office of Fossil Energy. Gayland Barksdale Technical Writer, Office of Fossil Energy What Does AVESTAR Provide? Advanced dynamic simulation, control and virtual plant technologies

304

Geek-Up[7.8.2011]: Cyanobacteria, Biofuels and Next-Generation Batteries |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geek-Up[7.8.2011]: Cyanobacteria, Biofuels and Next-Generation Geek-Up[7.8.2011]: Cyanobacteria, Biofuels and Next-Generation Batteries Geek-Up[7.8.2011]: Cyanobacteria, Biofuels and Next-Generation Batteries July 8, 2011 - 5:02pm Addthis Chains of cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae | Photo Courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory Chains of cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae | Photo Courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs At Argonne National Laboratory's Structural Biology Center (SBC) scientists are investigating cyanobacteria in hopes of advancing alternative transportation fuels. For some background, cyanobacteria cells group themselves into long filaments that can contain dozens and even hundreds of cells -- and, like

305

Department of Energy Announces $40 Million to Develop the Next Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Announces $40 Million to Develop the Next Department of Energy Announces $40 Million to Develop the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Department of Energy Announces $40 Million to Develop the Next Generation Nuclear Plant March 8, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu today announced selections for the award of approximately $40 million in total to two teams led by Pittsburgh-based Westinghouse Electric Co. and San Diego-based General Atomics for conceptual design and planning work for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The results of this work will help the Administration determine whether to proceed with detailed efforts toward construction and demonstration of the NGNP. If successful, the NGNP Demonstration Project will demonstrate high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

306

DOE to host workshop to explore use of WIPP as 'next generation' underground laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop to Explore Use of WIPP Workshop to Explore Use of WIPP As 'Next Generation' Underground Laboratory CARLSBAD, N.M., June 9, 2000 - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad Area Office is sponsoring the "Workshop on the Next Generation U.S. Underground Science Facility" June 12-14 at the Pecos River Village Conference Center, 711 Muscatel, in Carlsbad. The purpose of the workshop is to explore the potential use of the DOE's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) underground as a next generation laboratory for conducting nuclear and particle astrophysics and other basic science research, and how that might be accomplished. "WIPP's underground environment represents one of only a few choices open to the research community for siting experiments that require shielding from cosmic rays," said Dr.

307

Using Experience to Train the Next Generation of Workers | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Using Experience to Train the Next Generation of Workers Using Experience to Train the Next Generation of Workers Using Experience to Train the Next Generation of Workers July 5, 2011 - 1:46pm Addthis Bob Wilds working at a winding machine. | Photo Courtesy of Waukesha Electric Systems Bob Wilds working at a winding machine. | Photo Courtesy of Waukesha Electric Systems Lindsey Geisler Lindsey Geisler Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Bob Wilds has worked at Waukesha Electric Systems for the last 12 years as a coil winder. Waukesha Electric Systems makes transformers -- an essential part of the electric grid, transferring electrical current from one circuit to another. The coils that Bob works with are one of the most important components that make transformers work. The component involves winding insulated copper wire, but workers involved in transformer

308

Five Years of Building the Next Generation of Reactors | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Five Years of Building the Next Generation of Reactors Five Years of Building the Next Generation of Reactors Five Years of Building the Next Generation of Reactors August 15, 2012 - 5:17pm Addthis Simulated three-dimensional fission power distribution of a single 17x17 rod PWR fuel assembly. | Photo courtesy of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). Simulated three-dimensional fission power distribution of a single 17x17 rod PWR fuel assembly. | Photo courtesy of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). Doug Kothe Director, Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors What are the key facts? CASL has the virtual capability to look closely at reactor core models. These models operate with 193 fuel assemblies, nearly 51,000 fuel rods, and about 18 million fuel pellets.

309

Paving the path for next-generation nuclear energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paving the path for next-generation nuclear energy Paving the path for next-generation nuclear energy Paving the path for next-generation nuclear energy May 6, 2013 - 2:26pm Addthis Renewed energy and enhanced coordination are on the horizon for an international collaborative that is advancing new, safer nuclear energy systems. Renewed energy and enhanced coordination are on the horizon for an international collaborative that is advancing new, safer nuclear energy systems. Deputy Assistant Secretary Kelly Deputy Assistant Secretary Kelly Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Reactor Technologies Nuclear power reactors currently under construction worldwide boast modern safety and operational enhancements that were designed by the global nuclear energy industry and enhanced through research and development (R&D)

310

Proceedings of the April 2011 Computational Needs for the Next Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proceedings of the April 2011 Computational Needs for the Next Proceedings of the April 2011 Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Workshop Available Proceedings of the April 2011 Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Workshop Available January 9, 2012 - 5:34pm Addthis The proceedings from the DOE's April 2011 workshop, "Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid," are now available. The workshop brought together some of the Nation's leading researchers and experts to identify computational challenges associated with the operation and planning of the electric power system. The proceedings include seven white papers and their related responses and summaries, as well as the workshop agenda and comments collected after the workshop. Addthis Related Articles

311

107th Congress 1st session S.1166, Next generation Lighting Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II II 107TH CONGRESS 1ST SESSION S. 1166 To establish the Next Generation Lighting Initiative at the Department of Energy, and for other purposes. IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES JULY 11, 2001 Mr. BINGAMAN (for himself and Mr. DEWINE) introduced the following bill; which was read twice and referred to the Committee on Energy and Nat- ural Resources A BILL To establish the Next Generation Lighting Initiative at the Department of Energy, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representa- 1 tives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, 2 SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. 3 This Act may be cited as ''Next Generation Lighting 4 Initiative Act''. 5 SEC. 2. FINDING. 6 Congress finds that it is in the economic and energy 7 security interests of the United States to encourage the

312

Space Coast Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Coast Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant Space Coast Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Space Coast Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant Facility Space Coast Next Generation Solar Energy Center Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer FPL Energy Location Orlando, Florida Coordinates 28.5383355°, -81.3792365° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":28.5383355,"lon":-81.3792365,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

313

DeSoto Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name DeSoto Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant Facility DeSoto Next Generation Solar Energy Center Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer FPL Energy Location DeSoto County, Florida Coordinates 27.2142078°, -81.7787021° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.2142078,"lon":-81.7787021,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

314

Air-Cooled Condensers in Next-Generation Conversion Systems Geothermal Lab  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Air-Cooled Condensers in Next-Generation Conversion Systems Geothermal Lab Air-Cooled Condensers in Next-Generation Conversion Systems Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Air-Cooled Condensers in Next-Generation Conversion Systems Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 Air-Cooling Project Description As the geothermal industry moves to use geothermal resources that are more expensive to develop, there will be increased incentive to use more efficient power plants. Because of increasing demand on finite supplies of water, this next generation of more efficient plants will likely need to reject heat sensibly to the ambient (air-cooling). This will be especially true in western states having higher grade Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) resources, as well as most hydrothermal resources. If one had a choice, an evaporative heat rejection system would be selected because it would provide both cost and performance advantages. The evaporative system, however, consumes a significant amount of water during heat rejection that would require makeup. Though they use no water, air-cooling systems have higher capital costs, reduced power output (heat is rejected at a higher temperature), lower power sales due to higher parasitics (fan power), and greater variability in power output (because of large variation in the dry-bulb temperature).

315

GenomeView: a next-generation genome browser Thomas Abeel1,2,3,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GenomeView: a next-generation genome browser Thomas Abeel1,2,3, *, Thomas Van Parys1,2 , Yvan Saeys GenomeView, a stand-alone genome browser specifically designed to visualize and manipulate a multitude of genomics data. GenomeView enables users to dynamically browse high volumes of aligned short-read data

Gent, Universiteit

316

Next Generation Short-Term Forecasting of Wind Power Overview of the ANEMOS Project.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Next Generation Short-Term Forecasting of Wind Power ­ Overview of the ANEMOS Project. G outperform current state-of-the-art methods, for onshore and offshore wind power forecasting. Advanced forecasts for the power system management and market integration of wind power. Keywords: Wind power, short

Boyer, Edmond

317

Developing Next-Generation Multimodal Chemical Imaging Capability by Combining STEM/APT/STXM/HIM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developing Next-Generation Multimodal Chemical Imaging Capability by Combining STEM battery cathode materials at sub-nanometer spatial and chemical resolution and ppm-level mass sensitivity Develop a common analysis platform for integrating aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy

318

Fraud Detection for Voice over IP Services on Next-Generation Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fraud Detection for Voice over IP Services on Next-Generation Networks Igor Ruiz-Agundez, Yoseba K the security requirements of NGN and introduce a fraud management system based on misuse detection for Voice over IP services. Specifically, we address a fraud detection framework consisting of a rule engine

Boyer, Edmond

319

Research & Development Roadmap: Next-Generation Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This research and development (R&D) roadmap for next-generation low-GWP refrigerants provides recommendations to the Building Technologies Office (BTO) on R&D activities that will help accelerate the transition to low-GWP refrigerants across the entire HVAC&R industry.

320

Department of Energy Awards $425 Million for Next Generation Supercomputing Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

WASHINGTON — U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz today announced two new High Performance Computing (HPC) awards to put the nation on a fast-track to next generation exascale computing, which will help to advance U.S. leadership in scientific research and promote America’s economic and national security.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "next-generation parabolic trough" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

SPARTA: Stable and Efficient Spectrum Access in Next Generation Dynamic Spectrum Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and development require easy and reliable access to radio spectrum. However, exist- ing regulations allocateSPARTA: Stable and Efficient Spectrum Access in Next Generation Dynamic Spectrum Networks Lili Cao.S.A Abstract--Future wireless infrastructure networks will dynam- ically access spectrum for maximum

Almeroth, Kevin C.

322

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 The Next Generation Of Enterprise Class Linux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page 1 Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 The Next Generation Of Enterprise Class Linux Ken Crandall Engineer, Red Hat Version: 3.7ICCAD #12;Page 2 Agenda Why Red Hat Enterprise Linux Workstations High Performance Computing Summary Q & A #12;Page 3 Why Red Hat Enterprise Linux? Version: 3.7ICCAD #12;Page 4

323

Control Speculation for Energy-Efficient Next-Generation Superscalar Processors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and electro-migration diffusion [21]. To keep temperature under control, high performance processors requireControl Speculation for Energy-Efficient Next-Generation Superscalar Processors Juan L. Arago, or disabling the selection logic) depending on the branch prediction confidence level. Results show

Aragón Alcaraz, Juan Luis

324

SCIENCE HIGHLIGHTS 2008 ANNUAL REPORT ORNL NEUTRON SCIENCES The Next Generation of Materials Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and colleagues.They initially reported that an iron-based material can conduct electricity without resistance close to conducting electric- ity with zero resistance at room temperature. Such materials wouldSCIENCE HIGHLIGHTS 2008 ANNUAL REPORT ORNL NEUTRON SCIENCES The Next Generation of Materials

325

Internet 3.0: Ten Problems with Current Internet Architecture and Solutions for the Next Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Internet 3.0: Ten Problems with Current Internet Architecture and Solutions for the Next Generation Louis Saint Louis, MO 63130 jain@cse.wustl.edu Abstract-- The basic ideas of the Internet architecture switching. Is this the way we would design the Internet if we were to start it now? This paper is an attempt

Jain, Raj

326

NNSA Administrator Addresses the Next Generation of Nuclear Security Professionals: Part 1  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Administrator Thomas DAgostino of the National Nuclear Security Administration addressed the next generation of nuclear security professionals during the opening session of todays 2009 Department of Energy (DOE) Computational Science Graduate Fellowship Annual Conference. Administrator DAgostino discussed NNSAs role in implementing President Obamas nuclear security agenda and encouraged the computing science fellows to consider careers in nuclear security.

Thomas D'Agostino

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Deploying QoS for Cisco IP and Next Generation Networks: The Definitive Guide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Deploying QoS for IP Next Generation Networks: The Definitive Guide provides network architects and planners with insight into the various aspects that drive QoS deployment for the various network types. It serves as a single source of reference ... Keywords: Networking

Vinod Joseph; Brett Chapman

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Energy Department Announces Indoor Lighting Winners of Next Generation Luminaires™ Solid-State Lighting Design Competition  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As part of the Obama Administration’s efforts to reduce energy waste in U.S. buildings and help save Americans money by saving energy, the Energy Department today announced the winners of the sixth annual Next Generation LuminairesTM (NGL) design competition for indoor lighting at the LED Show in Los Angeles.

329

Abstract 4445: Defining a pipeline to use next generation sequencing for genetic testing in hereditary cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Chicago, IL Abstract 4445: Defining a pipeline to use next generation sequencing for...analysis combined the Variant Identification Pipeline software (VIP, De Shrijver, JM et...improvement of the kit and the analysis pipeline, the validation set of 14 samples demonstrated...

Conxi Lazaro; Adriana Lopez-Doriga; Ester Castellsague; Jesus del Valle; Eva Tornero; Victor Moreno; Marta Pineda; Sara Gonzalez; Lidia Feliubadalo; Gabriel Capella

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

330

Probing dark energy with the next generation X-ray surveys of galaxy clusters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Papers Probing dark energy with the next generation X-ray surveys of galaxy clusters...optical [e.g. Dark Energy Survey (DES),3 EUCLID...X-ray cluster surveys for the class of...called early dark energy (EDE; Wetterich......

B. Sartoris; S. Borgani; P. Rosati; J. Weller

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

High-Efficiency Operation of High-Frequency DCDC Conversion for Next-Generation Microprocessors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-Efficiency Operation of High-Frequency DCDC Conversion for Next-Generation Microprocessors current slew rate during load transients: all leading to faster energy transfer and better transient ZVS for majority-carrier power devices [3]. In this paper, the design of a ZVS quasi-square-wave (ZVS

Ng, Wai Tung

332

SIMBORGS AND SIMULATED TASK ENVIRONMENTS FOR ENGINEERING NEXT GENERATION WORKSTATIONS FOR INTELLIGENCE ANALYSTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SIMBORGS AND SIMULATED TASK ENVIRONMENTS FOR ENGINEERING NEXT GENERATION WORKSTATIONS an approach to the cognitive engineering of integrated task environments by the use of simulated cyborgs (sim to cognitively engineering task environments are discussed in sections two and three. Section two introduces

Gray, Wayne

333

Chip in a lab: Microfluidics for next generation life science Aaron M. Streets1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chip in a lab: Microfluidics for next generation life science research Aaron M. Streets1 January 2013; published online 31 January 2013) Microfluidic circuits are characterized by fluidic measurements. Microfluidic technology has thus become a powerful tool in the life science research laboratory

Huang, Yanyi

334

Laboratory Glass Columns "Next Generation" technology for high-performance preparative chromatography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SNAP ® Laboratory Glass Columns "Next Generation" technology for high-performance preparative lesiones graves o la muerte! WARNING Glass SNAP® columns are intended for use in a liquid environment disassembly or cleaning for scratches, chips or defects, particularly on the glass surfaces. DO NOT use column

Lebendiker, Mario

335

Extreme-Wind Observation Capability for the Next Generation Satellite Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extreme-Wind Observation Capability for the Next Generation Satellite Wind Scatterometer Instrument ­ 6 June 2013 RadarSAT-2 observation of extreme-winds VH HH Gradual saturation at higher wind Better ­ Matera, Italy, 3 ­ 6 June 2013 VH-GMF for extreme-winds (1) RadarSAT-2 dual-polarisation images of 12

Haak, Hein

336

Interface and Electrode Engineering for Next-Generation Organic Photovoltaic Cells: Final Technical Report, March 2005 - August 2008  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to enable next-generation, efficient, easily manufacturable, and durable organic photovoltaics through interface and electrode engineering.

Mason, T. O.; Chang, R. P. H.; Freeman, A. J.; Marks, T. J.; Poeppelmeier, K. R.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Microsoft PowerPoint - 6- 02 final - Next generation melter deploymet at WTP - Nov10.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ron Calmus, WRPS Ron Calmus, WRPS Ron Calmus, WRPS Terry Sams, WRPS Terry Sams, WRPS Deployment Plan Overview for Next Deployment Plan Overview for Next Generation Melter at WTP Generation Melter at WTP November 17, 2010 November 17, 2010 Print Close Tank Operations Contract 2 Presentation Outline  Introduction and Background  Project Goals and Objectives  Key Programmatic Decisions  New Generation Melters (NGM) Development and Deployment Planning (AJHCM & CCIM)  NGM Development and Deployment Activities and Interfaces  Near-Term NGM Development Costs  Summary - Focus Areas Next Generation Melters 2 Print Close Tank Operations Contract 3 Introduction and Background  National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Recommendations - In 2009 the NAS stated in it's report that:

338

Researchers tackle new challenge in pursuit of the next generation of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Did you know? Did you know? More than 10,000 publications are based on research at the Advanced Photon Source. The brightness and energy of X-ray beams are critical properties for research. The APS Upgrade will make our X-ray beams brighter, meaning more X-rays can be focused onto a smaller, laser-like spot, allowing researchers to gather more data in greater detail in less time. Researchers tackle new challenge in pursuit of the next generation of lithium batteries By Jared Sagoff * September 27, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - The creation of the next generation of batteries depends on finding materials that provide greater storage capacity. One variety, known as lithium-air (Li-air) batteries, is particularly appealing to researchers because they have a significantly higher theoretical capacity

339

Martin Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Center Solar Power Plant Center Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Martin Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant Facility Martin Next Generation Solar Energy Center Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Facility Status In Service Developer FPL Energy Location Martin County, Florida Coordinates 27.051214°, -80.553389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.051214,"lon":-80.553389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

340

DOE Selects Projects to Develop Sensors and Controls for Next-Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Selects Projects to Develop Sensors and Controls for Selects Projects to Develop Sensors and Controls for Next-Generation Power Plants DOE Selects Projects to Develop Sensors and Controls for Next-Generation Power Plants August 25, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy has selected seven projects to develop sensors and controls to support the full-scale implementation and operation of highly efficient power generation technologies with near-zero emissions. The total award value of the projects is nearly $7 million, which includes $1.4 million in cost-sharing from the recipients. The projects will be managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Future power generation facilities are expected to be very complex, requiring a high level of system integration for efficient operation. To

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "next-generation parabolic trough" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

NASA/FPL Renewable Project Case Study: Space Coast Next Generation Solar Energy Center  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NASA/FPL Renewable Project: NASA/FPL Renewable Project: Space Coast Next Generation Solar Energy Center Biloxi, MS - FUPWG April 5-6. 2009 Gene Beck Corporate Manager, Governmental Accounts Mark Hillman Executive Account Manger With over $9 billion already invested, FPL Group is the world leader in renewable energy FPL Group's renewable energy portfolio With over $9 billion already invested, FPL Group is the world leader in renewable energy FPL Group's renewable energy portfolio With over $9 billion already invested, FPL Group is the world leader in renewable energy FPL Group's renewable energy portfolio FPL has started construction on the world's first hybrid energy center in Martin County Martin Next Generation Solar Energy Project Total Facility = approx 11,300 acres Solar Field = approx 500 acres

342

Department of Energy Announces Funding to Support the Next Generation of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Support the Next to Support the Next Generation of American Scientists and Engineers Department of Energy Announces Funding to Support the Next Generation of American Scientists and Engineers March 10, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced the launch of two new fellowship programs designed to attract the country's best and brightest scientific minds to work on advanced clean energy technologies. The two fellowship programs - the Postdoctoral Fellowships Program and the SunShot Initiative Fellowships Program - will prepare budding scientists and engineers for careers in clean energy. These programs will increase American economic competitiveness and support job growth by promoting science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM)

343

A next generation emerging technologies roadmap for enabling collective computational intelligence in disaster management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Much work is underway within the broad next generation emerging technologies community on issues associated with the development of services to foster synergies and collaboration via the integration of distributed and heterogeneous resources, systems and technologies. In previous works, we have discussed how these could help coin and prompt future direction of their fit-to-purpose use in various real-world scenarios including but not limited to disaster management, healthcare, vehicular networking and knowledge cities. In this exploratory paper, we brief and then build upon our previous works and specifically, we present a roadmap highlighting the possible use of next generation emerging technologies for enabling collective computational intelligence in managing disaster situations. A relevant scenario is used to illustrate the model architecture, as well as to detail the proposed roadmap.

Nik Bessis; Eleana Asimakopoulou; Fatos Xhafa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

RESULTS OF CESIUM MASS TRANSFER TESTING FOR NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT WITH HANFORD WASTE SIMULANT AP-101  

SciTech Connect

SRNL has performed an Extraction, Scrub, Strip (ESS) test using the next generation solvent and AP-101 Hanford Waste simulant. The results indicate that the next generation solvent (MG solvent) has adequate extraction behavior even in the face of a massive excess of potassium. The stripping results indicate poorer behavior, but this may be due to inadequate method detection limits. SRNL recommends further testing using hot tank waste or spiked simulant to provide for better detection limits. Furthermore, strong consideration should be given to performing an actual waste, or spiked waste demonstration using the 2cm contactor bank. The Savannah River Site currently utilizes a solvent extraction technology to selectively remove cesium from tank waste at the Multi-Component Solvent Extraction unit (MCU). This solvent consists of four components: the extractant - BoBCalixC6, a modifier - Cs-7B, a suppressor - trioctylamine, and a diluent, Isopar L{trademark}. This solvent has been used to successfully decontaminate over 2 million gallons of tank waste. However, recent work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has provided a basis to implement an improved solvent blend. This new solvent blend - referred to as Next Generation Solvent (NGS) - is similar to the current solvent, and also contains four components: the extractant - MAXCalix, a modifier - Cs-7B, a suppressor - LIX-79{trademark} guanidine, and a diluent, Isopar L{trademark}. Testing to date has shown that this 'Next Generation' solvent promises to provide far superior cesium removal efficiencies, and furthermore, is theorized to perform adequately even in waste with high potassium concentrations such that it could be used for processing Hanford wastes. SRNL has performed a cesium mass transfer test in to confirm this behavior, using a simulant designed to simulate Hanford AP-101 waste.

Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Fink, S.

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

345

Beyond scientific research: tracing the contributions Ernest Rutherford made to the next generation of scientists  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BEYOND SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH: TRACING THE CONTRIBUTIONS ERNEST RUTHERFORD MADE TO THE NEXT GENERATION OF SCIENTISTS A Thesis by ANDREW A. ARMSTRONG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... GENERATION OF SCIENTISTS A Thesis by ANDREW A. ARMSTRONG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair...

Armstrong, Andrew A.

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

346

Composite Materials under Extreme Radiation and Temperature Environments of the Next Generation Nuclear Reactors  

SciTech Connect

In the nuclear energy renaissance, driven by fission reactor concepts utilizing very high temperatures and fast neutron spectra, materials with enhanced performance that exceeds are expected to play a central role. With the operating temperatures of the Generation III reactors bringing the classical reactor materials close to their performance limits there is an urgent need to develop and qualify new alloys and composites. Efforts have been focused on the intricate relations and the high demands placed on materials at the anticipated extreme states within the next generation fusion and fission reactors which combine high radiation fluxes, elevated temperatures and aggressive environments. While nuclear reactors have been in operation for several decades, the structural materials associated with the next generation options need to endure much higher temperatures (1200 C), higher neutron doses (tens of displacements per atom, dpa), and extremely corrosive environments, which are beyond the experience on materials accumulated to-date. The most important consideration is the performance and reliability of structural materials for both in-core and out-of-core functions. While there exists a great body of nuclear materials research and operating experience/performance from fission reactors where epithermal and thermal neutrons interact with materials and alter their physio-mechanical properties, a process that is well understood by now, there are no operating or even experimental facilities that will facilitate the extreme conditions of flux and temperature anticipated and thus provide insights into the behaviour of these well understood materials. Materials, however, still need to be developed and their interaction and damage potential or lifetime to be quantified for the next generation nuclear energy. Based on material development advances, composites, and in particular ceramic composites, seem to inherently possess properties suitable for key functions within the operating envelope of both fission and fusion reactors. In advanced fission reactors composite materials are being designed in an effort to extend the life and improve the reliability of fuel rod cladding as well as structural materials. Composites are being considered for use as core internals in the next generation of gas-cooled reactors. Further, next-generation plasma-fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) will rely on the capabilities of advanced composites to safely withstand extremely high neutron fluxes while providing superior thermal shock resistance.

Simos, N.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Evaluation Metrics for Intermediate Heat Exchangers for Next Generation Nuclear Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the United States with abundant, clean, and secure energy as initiated by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct; Public Law 109-58,2005). The NGNP Project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and/or high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications.

Piyush Sabharwall; Eung Soo Kim; Nolan Anderson

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Sample Results From The Next Generation Solvent Program Real Waste Extraction-Scrub-Strip Testing  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed multiple Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) testing using real waste solutions, and three Next Generation Solvent (NGS) variations, which included radiologically clean pure NGS, a blend of radiologically clean NGS and radiologically clean BOBCalixC6 (NGS-MCU), and a blend of radiologically clean NGS and radiologically contaminated BOBCalixC6 from the MCU Solvent system. The results from the tests indicate that both the NGS and the NGS-MCU blend exhibit adequate extraction, scrub and strip behavior.

Peters, T. B.; Washington, A. L. II

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

349

SAMPLE RESULTS FROM THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT PROGRAM REAL WASTE EXTRACTION-SCRUB-STRIP TESTING  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed multiple Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) testing using real waste solutions, and three Next Generation Solvent (NGS) variations, which included radiologically clean pure NGS, a blend of radiologically clean NGS and radiologically clean BOBCalixC6 (NGS-MCU), and a blend of radiologically clean NGS and radiologically contaminated BOBCalixC6 from the MCU Solvent system. The results from the tests indicate that both the NGS and the NGS-MCU blend exhibit adequate extraction, scrub and strip behavior.

Peters, T.; Washington, A.

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

350

RESULTS OF ANALYSIS OF NGS CONCENTRATE DRUM SAMPLES [Next Generation Solvent  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) prepared two drums (50 gallons each in ?Drum#2? and ?Drum#4?) of NGS-MCU (Next Generation Solvent-Modular CSSX Unit) concentrate for future use at MCU in downblending the BOBCalixC6 based solvent to produce NGS-MCU solvent. Samples of each drum were sent for analysis. The results of all the analyses indicate that the blend concentrate is of the correct composition and should produce a blended solvent at MCU of the desired formulation.

Peters, T.; Williams, M.

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

351

Concepts and performance for a next-generation storage ring hard x-ray source  

SciTech Connect

Among the possibilities for a next-generation hard x-ray source is a so-called 'ultimate storage ring'. This refers to a large, high-energy storage ring with very low emittance and high current. Such a ring has the potential to deliver significantly higher spectral brightness and transverse coherence than present third-generation rings. At the same time, it promises the stability and reliability that users have come to expect in a light source. In this paper, we present a design for a 7-GeV, 40-sector storage ring with a circumference of 3.1 km and an emittance of 15 pm in both planes.

Borland, M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, 60439 (United States)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

352

July 24, 2009, Visiting Speakers Program - The Next Generation of (Safety) Regulation for HRO's by Christopher Hart  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulating Regulating HRO's: Next Generation July 24, 2009 Federal Aviation Administration 1 Federal Aviation Administration The Next Generation of (Safety) Regulation for HRO's Presentation to: HSS Visiting Speakers Program Name: Christopher A. Hart Date: July 24, 2009 Aviation Safety Experience - Conventional Wisdom: More vigorous regulation and enforcement will result in improved safety - Lesson Learned from Experience: There is a mishap rate plateau beyond which further improvement necessitates a more collaborative approach 2 Regulating HRO's: Next Generation July 24, 2009 Federal Aviation Administration The Context: Increasing Complexity * More System Interdependencies - Large, complex, interactive system - Often tightly coupled - Hi-tech components - Continuous innovation AIRLINES

353

CHEMICAL STABILITY OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIDE IN THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT FOR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. For simplicity, this solvent is referred to as the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The initial deployment target envisioned for the technology was within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), the polymer used in the coalescers within MCU. This report provides the data from exposing PPS polymer to NGS. The test was conducted over a three month period. PPS is remarkably stable in the presence of the next generation solvent. Testing showed no indication of swelling or significant leaching. Preferential sorption of the Modifier on PPS was observed but the same behavior occurs with the baseline solvent. Therefore, PPS coalescers exposed to the NGS are expected to perform comparably to those in contact with the baseline solvent.

Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

2011-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

354

PERFORMANCE TESTING OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CSSX SOLVENT WITH ACTUAL SRS TANK WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Efforts are underway to qualify the Next-Generation Solvent for the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process. Researchers at multiple national laboratories have been involved in this effort. As part of the effort to qualify the solvent extraction system at the Savannah River Site (SRS), SRNL performed a number of tests at various scales. First, SRNL completed a series of batch equilibrium, or Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS), tests. These tests used {approx}30 mL of Next-Generation Solvent and either actual SRS tank waste, or waste simulant solutions. The results from these cesium mass transfer tests were used to predict solvent behavior under a number of conditions. At a larger scale, SRNL assembled 12 stages of 2-cm (diameter) centrifugal contactors. This rack of contactors is structurally similar to one tested in 2001 during the demonstration of the baseline CSSX process. Assembly and mechanical testing found no issues. SRNL performed a nonradiological test using 35 L of cesium-spiked caustic waste simulant and 39 L of actual tank waste. Test results are discussed; particularly those related to the effectiveness of extraction.

Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Fink, S.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Dependable Hydrogen and Industrial Heat Generation from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the US with abundant, clean and secure energy. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory, will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications. Substituting HTGR power for traditional fossil fuel resources reduces the cost and supply vulnerability of natural gas and oil, and reduces or eliminates greenhouse gas emissions. As authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, industry leaders are developing designs for the construction of a commercial prototype producing up to 600 MWt of power by 2021. This paper describes a variety of critical applications that are appropriate for the HTGR with an emphasis placed on applications requiring a clean and reliable source of hydrogen. An overview of the NGNP project status and its significant technology development efforts are also presented.

Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson; Vincent C. Maio; Piyush Sabharwall

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Recent results from DIII-D and their implications for next generation tokamaks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent results from the DIII-D tokamak have provided significant contributions to the understanding of many of the elements of tokamak physics and the application of this understanding to the design of next generation devices including ITER and CIT. The limitations of magnetohydrodynamic stability on the values of plasma beta (the ratio of kinetic pressure to the containing pressure of the magnetic field) that can be attained has been experimentally demonstrated and found to be described by existing theory. Values of beta (10.7%) well in excess of those required for proposed devices (ITER and CIT) have been demonstrated. Regimes of confinement (H-mode) have been established that scale favorably to proposed next generation devices, and experiments demonstrating the dependence of the energy confinement on plasma size have been completed. Understanding of confinement is rapidly developing especially in the areas of bulk transport and the role of turbulence in the plasma edge. Key experimental results in areas of plasma transport and edge plasma phenomena are in agreement with theories based on short wavelength turbulence. Control of the divertor heat loads and impurity influx has been demonstrated, and new progress has been made in the understanding of plasma edge phenomena. Experiments with ion Bernstein wave heating have not found regimes in which these waves can produce effective central ion heating. Electron cyclotron current drive experiments have demonstrated 70 kA of driven current in 400 kA discharges.

J L Luxon; G Bramson; K H Burrell; N H Brooks; D Buchenauer; R W Callis; T N Carlstrom; C Challis; M S Chu; S Coda; A P Colleraine; J C DeBoo; B De Gentile; J De Haas; E J Doyle; J R Ferron; R Freeman; T Fukuda; A Futch; A Fyaretdinov; G Giruzzi; P Gohil; Yu Gorelov; C M Greenfield; R J Groebner; W Heidbrink; D N Hill; R Hong; W Howl; C L Hsieh; G L Jackson; R A James; S Janz; T Jensen; R Jong; Y Kamada; A G Kellman; J Kim; H Kubo; T Kurki-Suonio; L L Lao; R La Haye; E A Lazarus; T Lehecka; S I Lippmann; B Lloyd; J Lohr; T C Luce; N C Luhmann Jr; M A Mahdavi; H Matsumoto; G Matthews; M Mayberry; B Mills; C P Moeller; T H Osborne; D O Overskei; W A Peebles; P I Petersen; T W Petrie; C Petty; R Philipona; J Phillips; R Pinsker; P A Politzer; M Porkolab; G D Porter; R Prater; M E Rensink; J Rodriguez; G Sager; M J Schaffer; D P Schissel; J T Scoville; R P Seraydarian; T C Simonen; R T Snider; B W Stallard; R D Stambaugh; H St John; R E Stockdale; E J Strait; P L Taylor; T S Taylor; P K Trost; V Trukhin; J Wight; J Winter; D Wroblewski

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Recent results from DIII-D and their implications for next generation tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

Recent results from the DIII-D tokamak have provided significant contributions to the understanding of many of the elements of tokamak physics and the application of this understanding to the design of next generation devices including ITER and CIT. The limitations of magnetohydrodynamics stability on the values of plasma beta (the ratio of kinetic pressure to the containing pressure of the magnetic field) that can be attained has been experimentally demonstrated and found to be described by existing theory. Values of beta (10.7%) well in excess of those required for proposed devices (ITER and CIT) have been demonstrated. Regimes of confinement (H-mode) have been established that scale favorably to proposed next generation devices, and experiments demonstrating the dependence of the energy confinement on plasma size have been completed. Understanding of confinement is rapidly developing especially in the areas of bulk transport and the role of turbulence in the plasma edge. Key experimental results in areas of plasma transport and edge plasma phenomena are found to be in agreement with theories based on short wavelength turbulence. Control of the divertor heat loads and impurity influx has been demonstrated, and new progress has been made in the understanding of plasma edge phenomena. Experiments with ion Bernstein wave heating have not found regimes in which these waves can produce effective central ion heating. Electron cyclotron current drive experiments have demonstrated 70 kA of driven current in 400 kA discharges.

Luxon, J.L.; Bramson, G.; Burrell, K.H.; Brooks, N.H.; Callis, R.W.; Carlstrom, T.N.; Chu, M.S.; Colleraine, A.P.; DeBoo, J.C.; Ferron, J.R.; Freeman, R.; Gohil, P.; Greenfield, C.M.; Groebner, R.J.; Hong, R.; Howl, W.; Hsieh, C.L.; Jackson, G.L.; Jensen, T.; Kellman, A.G.; Kim, J.; Lao, L.L.; La Haye, R.; Leikind, B.; Lippmann, S.I.; Lohr, J.; Luce, T.C.; Mahdavi, M.A.; Mayberry, M.; Moeller, C.P.; Osborne, T.H.; Overskei, D.O

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Next generation Higgs bosons: Theory, constraints, and discovery prospects at the Large Hadron Collider  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Particle physics model building within the context of string theory suggests that further copies of the Higgs boson sector may be expected. Concerns regarding tree-level flavor-changing neutral currents are easiest to allay if little or no couplings of next generation Higgs bosons to standard model fermions are allowed. We detail the resulting general Higgs potential and mass spectroscopy in both a standard model extension and a supersymmetric extension. We present the important experimental constraints from meson-meson mixing, loop-induced b?s? decays, and LEP2 direct production limits. We investigate the energy range of the valid perturbation theory of these ideas. In the supersymmetric context we present a class of examples that marginally aids the fine-tuning problem for parameter space where the lightest Higgs boson mass is greater than the standard model limit of 114 GeV. Finally, we study collider physics signatures generic to next generation Higgs bosons, with special emphasis on Ah?hhZ?4b+2l signal events, and describe the capability of discovery at the Large Hadron Collider.

Rick S. Gupta and James D. Wells

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

359

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given by Cummins Inc. at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about ATP-LD; Cummins next generation...

360

Next-Generation Algorithms for Navigation, Geodesy and~Earth Sciences Under Modernized Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The project on “Next-generation algorithms for navigation, geodesy and earth sciences under modernized Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS)” has been under development within the scope of the Geomatics f...

Marcelo C Santos; Richard B Langley; Rodrigo F Leandro…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "next-generation parabolic trough" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Proceedings of the Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Workshop, April 19-20, 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The April 2011 DOE workshop, “Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid,” brought together some of the Nation’s leading researchers and experts to identify computational challenges...

362

Scenario Analysis on the Impact of Diffusion of Next Generation Vehicles on Material Consumption and GHG Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, we developed an automobile cohort model to evaluate the effect of the diffusion of next generation vehicles such as hybrid electric vehicles and electric vehicles on material consumption and GHG em...

Yuta Higuchi; Naoki Wada; Toyohiko Nakakubo…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

The Genome Analysis Toolkit: A MapReduce framework for analyzing next-generation DNA sequencing data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) projects, such as the 1000 Genomes Project, are already revolutionizing our understanding of genetic variation among individuals. However, the massive data sets generated by NGS—the ...

McKenna, Aaron

364

Abstract 1892: Development of a clinical targeted next generation sequencing test for challenging formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) cancer samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Development of a clinical targeted next generation sequencing test for challenging formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE...Development of a clinical targeted next generation sequencing test for challenging formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE...

Wenge Shi; Christine Chin; Tingdong Tang; Loretta Hipolito; Preethi Srinivasan; Derek Chiang; David Peng; Emmanuelle D. Tomaso; Shabnam Tangri; Jelveh Lameh; Reinhold Pollner

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Thin Film Materials and Processing Techniques for a Next Generation Photovoltaic Device: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-470  

SciTech Connect

This research extends thin film materials and processes relevant to the development and production of a next generation photovoltaic device.

van Hest, M.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Letter of Intent: The Precision IceCube Next Generation Upgrade (PINGU)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Precision IceCube Next Generation Upgrade (PINGU) is a proposed low-energy in-fill extension to the IceCube Observatory. With detection technology modeled closely on the successful IceCube example, PINGU will feature the world's largest effective volume for neutrinos at an energy threshold of a few GeV, enabling it to reach its chief goal of determining the neutrino mass hierarchy (NMH) quickly and at modest cost. PINGU will be able to distinguish between the normal and inverted NMH at $3\\sigma$ significance with an estimated 3.5 years of data. With its unprecedented statistical sample of low energy atmospheric neutrinos, PINGU will also have highly competitive sensitivity to $\

,

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Letter of Intent: The Precision IceCube Next Generation Upgrade (PINGU)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Precision IceCube Next Generation Upgrade (PINGU) is a proposed low-energy in-fill extension to the IceCube Observatory. With detection technology modeled closely on the successful IceCube example, PINGU will feature the world's largest effective volume for neutrinos at an energy threshold of a few GeV, enabling it to reach its chief goal of determining the neutrino mass hierarchy (NMH) quickly and at modest cost. PINGU will be able to distinguish between the normal and inverted NMH at $3\\sigma$ significance with an estimated 3.5 years of data. With its unprecedented statistical sample of low energy atmospheric neutrinos, PINGU will also have highly competitive sensitivity to $\

The IceCube-PINGU Collaboration

2014-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

368

Next-Generation Photon Sources for Grand Challenges in Science and Energy  

SciTech Connect

The next generation of sustainable energy technologies will revolve around transformational new materials and chemical processes that convert energy efficiently among photons, electrons, and chemical bonds. New materials that tap sunlight, store electricity, or make fuel from splitting water or recycling carbon dioxide will need to be much smarter and more functional than today's commodity-based energy materials. To control and catalyze chemical reactions or to convert a solar photon to an electron requires coordination of multiple steps, each carried out by customized materials and interfaces with designed nanoscale structures. Such advanced materials are not found in nature the way we find fossil fuels; they must be designed and fabricated to exacting standards, using principles revealed by basic science. Success in this endeavor requires probing, and ultimately controlling, the interactions among photons, electrons, and chemical bonds on their natural length and time scales. Control science - the application of knowledge at the frontier of science to control phenomena and create new functionality - realized through the next generation of ultraviolet and X-ray photon sources, has the potential to be transformational for the life sciences and information technology, as well as for sustainable energy. Current synchrotron-based light sources have revolutionized macromolecular crystallography. The insights thus obtained are largely in the domain of static structure. The opportunity is for next generation light sources to extend these insights to the control of dynamic phenomena through ultrafast pump-probe experiments, time-resolved coherent imaging, and high-resolution spectroscopic imaging. Similarly, control of spin and charge degrees of freedom in complex functional materials has the potential not only to reveal the fundamental mechanisms of high-temperature superconductivity, but also to lay the foundation for future generations of information science. This report identifies two aspects of energy science in which next-generation ultraviolet and X-ray light sources will have the deepest and broadest impact: (1) The temporal evolution of electrons, spins, atoms, and chemical reactions, down to the femtosecond time scale. (2) Spectroscopic and structural imaging of nano objects (or nanoscale regions of inhomogeneous materials) with nanometer spatial resolution and ultimate spectral resolution. The dual advances of temporal and spatial resolution promised by fourth-generation light sources ideally match the challenges of control science. Femtosecond time resolution has opened completely new territory where atomic motion can be followed in real time and electronic excitations and decay processes can be followed over time. Coherent imaging with short-wavelength radiation will make it possible to access the nanometer length scale, where intrinsic quantum behavior becomes dominant. Performing spectroscopy on individual nanometer-scale objects rather than on conglomerates will eliminate the blurring of the energy levels induced by particle size and shape distributions and reveal the energetics of single functional units. Energy resolution limited only by the uncertainty relation is enabled by these advances. Current storage-ring-based light sources and their incremental enhancements cannot meet the need for femtosecond time resolution, nanometer spatial resolution, intrinsic energy resolution, full coherence over energy ranges up to hard X-rays, and peak brilliance required to enable the new science outlined in this report. In fact, the new, unexplored territory is so expansive that no single currently imagined light source technology can fulfill the whole potential. Both technological and economic challenges require resolution as we move forward. For example, femtosecond time resolution and high peak brilliance are required for following chemical reactions in real time, but lower peak brilliance and high repetition rate are needed to avoid radiation damage in high-resolution spatial imaging and to avoid space-charge broadenin

None

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants (NGGPP) process data for binary cycle plants  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants (NGGPP) study provides the firm estimates - in the public domain - of the cost and performance of U.S. geothermal systems and their main components in the early 1990s. The study was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Research Program, managed for DOE by Evan Hughes of the Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA, and conducted by John Brugman and others of the CE Holt Consulting Firm, Pasadena, CA. The printed NGGPP reports contain detailed data on the cost and performance for the flash steam cycles that were characterized, but not for the binary cycles. The nine Tables in this document are the detailed data sheets on cost and performance for the air cooled binary systems that were studied in the NGGPP.

Not Available

1996-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

370

Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project - Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

This report is the Final Technical Report for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project conducted by a team led by General Atomics under DOE Award DE-NE0000245. The primary overall objective of the project was to develop and document a conceptual design for the Steam Cycle Modular Helium Reactor (SC-MHR), which is the reactor concept proposed by General Atomics for the NGNP Demonstration Plant. The report summarizes the project activities over the entire funding period, compares the accomplishments with the goals and objectives of the project, and discusses the benefits of the work. The report provides complete listings of the products developed under the award and the key documents delivered to the DOE.

John Saurwein

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

The next generation of $? -> e ?$ and $? -> 3e$ CLFV search experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the possibilities for extending the sensitivity of current searches for the charged lepton flavor violating decays $\\mu\\ -> e \\gamma$ and $\\mu\\ -> eee$. A future facility such as Project X at Fermilab could provide a much more intense stopping $\\mu^+$ beam, facilitating more sensitive searches, but improved detectors will be required as well. Current searches are limited by accidental and physics backgrounds, as well as by the total number of stopped muons. One of the limiting factors in current detectors for $\\mu\\ -> e \\gamma$ searches is the photon energy resolution of the calorimeter. We present a new fast Monte Carlo simulation of a conceptual design of a new experimental concept that detects converted $e^+e^-$ pairs from signal photons, taking advantage of the improved energy resolution of a pair spectrometer based on a silicon charged particle tracker. We also study a related detector design for a next generation $\\mu\\to eee$ search experiment.

Chih-hsiang. Cheng; Bertrand Echenard; David G. Hitlin

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

372

The next generation of $\\mu\\ -> e \\gamma$ and $\\mu\\ -> 3e$ CLFV search experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the possibilities for extending the sensitivity of current searches for the charged lepton flavor violating decays $\\mu\\ -> e \\gamma$ and $\\mu\\ -> eee$. A future facility such as Project X at Fermilab could provide a much more intense stopping $\\mu^+$ beam, facilitating more sensitive searches, but improved detectors will be required as well. Current searches are limited by accidental and physics backgrounds, as well as by the total number of stopped muons. One of the limiting factors in current detectors for $\\mu\\ -> e \\gamma$ searches is the photon energy resolution of the calorimeter. We present a new fast Monte Carlo simulation of a conceptual design of a new experimental concept that detects converted $e^+e^-$ pairs from signal photons, taking advantage of the improved energy resolution of a pair spectrometer based on a silicon charged particle tracker. We also study a related detector design for a next generation $\\mu\\to eee$ search experiment.

Cheng, Chih-hsiang; Hitlin, David G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

System Modeling and Design Optimization for a Next-Generation Unattended Sensor  

SciTech Connect

We are developing a next-generation unattendedsensor that can detect and identify radiation sources while operating on battery power for several weeks. The system achieves smaller size and weight over systems that use NaI:Tl and 3He detectors by using a relatively new scintillator, Cs2LiYCl6:Ce:Ce (CLYC). This material can detect both gamma rays and thermal neutrons, has energy resolution of ~4% full width at half maximum at 662 keV, and allows for particle discrimination by pulse amplitude as well as pulse shape. The overall design features an array of sixteen CLYC detectors, each read out by a photomultiplier tube and custom pulse processing electronics. A field-programmable gate array analyzes the energy spectra using computationally efficient algorithms for anomaly detection.

McDonald, Benjamin S.; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Hensley, Walter K.; Smart, John E.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Promoting next generation vehicles in Japan: the smart communities and their experimentations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of smart grids opens up interesting perspectives in order to make better use of local renewable energy production, reduce CO2 emissions, giving therefore more emphasis on electrical vehicles. After having briefly described mobility characteristics in Japan and introduced the Japanese context that led to the wide range of new policies implementation aiming at building a low carbon society and at promoting next generation vehicles, the paper concentrates on an extensive programme launched by the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) in 2010 to promote the development of 'smart communities'. Taking the case of Toyota city Smart Melit experimentation as a concrete illustration, it discusses the main actions undertaken before examining some preliminary results in terms of users' behaviour and the consequences that present and expected future changes might have on the mobility ecosystem and on car maker business model.

Bruno Faivre d'Arcier; Yveline Lecler

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

BioPig: Developing Cloud Computing Applications for Next-Generation Sequence Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Next Generation sequencing is producing ever larger data sizes with a growth rate outpacing Moore's Law. The data deluge has made many of the current sequenceanalysis tools obsolete because they do not scale with data. Here we present BioPig, a collection of cloud computing tools to scale data analysis and management. Pig is aflexible data scripting language that uses Apache's Hadoop data structure and map reduce framework to process very large data files in parallel and combine the results.BioPig extends Pig with capability with sequence analysis. We will show the performance of BioPig on a variety of bioinformatics tasks, including screeningsequence contaminants, Illumina QA/QC, and gene discovery from metagenome data sets using the Rumen metagenome as an example.

Bhatia, Karan; Wang, Zhong

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

376

Development of a thyristor valve for next generation 500kV HVDC transmission systems  

SciTech Connect

A high voltage thyristor valve is the basic component of an HVDC transmission system. Development of a 500kV valve for next generation HVDC transmission systems is described. First, the power loss of the valve is analyzed to decide a reasonable wafer size for the light triggered thyristor. From these results, a six inch diameter wafer size is selected. The light triggered thyristor, with ratings of 8kV and 3.5kA, is developed using the six inch wafer. The designing of the valve employing the thyristor and test results with the prototype valve prove that a 500kV valve can be realized by the design method.

Hasegawa, T. [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan)] [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan); Yamaji, K. [Shikoku Electric Power Co., Inc., Takamatsu (Japan)] [Shikoku Electric Power Co., Inc., Takamatsu (Japan); Irokawa, H. [Electric Power Development Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)] [Electric Power Development Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Shirahama, H.; Tanaka, C.; Akabane, K.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

HAWC: A Next Generation All-Sky VHE Gamma-Ray Telescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study of the universe at energies above 100 GeV is a relatively new and exciting field. The current generation of pointed instruments have detected TeV gamma rays from at least 10 sources and the next generation of detectors promises a large increase in sensitivity. We have also seen the development of a new type of all-sky monitor in this energy regime based on water Cherenkov technology (Milagro). To fully understand the universe at these extreme energies requires a highly sensitive detector capable of continuously monitoring the entire overhead sky. Such an instrument could observe prompt emission from gamma-ray bursts and probe the limits of Lorentz invariance at high energies. With sufficient sensitivity it could detect short transients ($\\sim$15 minutes) from active galaxies and study the time structure of flares at energies unattainable to space-based instruments. Unlike pointed instruments a wide-field instrument can make an unbiased study of all active galaxies and enable many multi-wavelength campaigns to study these objects. This paper describes the design and performance of a next generation water Cherenkov detector. To attain a low energy threshold and have high sensitivity the detector should be located at high altitude ($>$ 4km) and have a large area ($\\sim$40,000 m$^2$). Such an instrument could detect gamma ray bursts out to a redshift of 1, observe flares from active galaxies as short as 15 minutes in duration, and survey the overhead sky at a level of 50 mCrab in one year.

G. Sinnis; A. Smith; J. E. McEnery

2004-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

378

Modeling and Analysis of Stress in High Temperature Molten Salt Trough Receivers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract SkyFuel has investigated the stresses and deformations occurring in parabolic trough receivers operating at temperatures above 425 °C. Operating at these temperatures allows for direct molten salt storage and higher efficiency conversion from thermal to electric energy. However, at these temperatures, the typical stainless steels used in receiver construction are susceptible to chromium carbide precipitation. After the precipitation has occurred, the steel is vulnerable to intergranular corrosion, and the fatigue strength of the steel is reduced. Corrosion increases the stresses in the receiver walls, and the reduced fatigue strength lowers the stress limit where failure will occur. This paper presents the results of an analysis of these stresses and an evaluation of the receiver material at these operating temperatures. It is shown that parabolic trough receivers can be designed to mitigate the negative effects of chromium carbide precipitation and operate above 425 °C without risk of premature failure.

Nolan Viljoen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Sensitivity of Concentrating Solar Power Trough Performance, Cost and Financing with Solar Advisor Model  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive solar technology systems analysis model, the Solar Advisor Model (SAM) was developed to support the federal R&D community and the solar industry. This model, developed by staff at NREL and Sandia National Laboratory, is able to model the costs, finances, and performance of concentrating solar power and photovoltaics (PV). Currently, parabolic troughs and concentrating PV are the two concentrating technologies modeled within the SAM environment.

Blair, N.; Mehos, M.; Christensen, C.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Freeze-thaw tests of trough receivers employing a molten salt working fluid.  

SciTech Connect

Several studies predict an economic benefit of using nitrate-based salts instead of the current synthetic oil within a solar parabolic trough field. However, the expected economic benefit can only be realized if the reliability and optical performance of the salt trough system is comparable to today's oil trough. Of primary concern is whether a salt-freeze accident and subsequent thaw will lead to damage of the heat collection elements (HCEs). This topic was investigated by experiments and analytical analysis. Results to date suggest that damage will not occur if the HCEs are not completely filled with salt. However, if the HCE is completely filled at the time of the freeze, the subsequent thaw can lead to plastic deformation and significant bending of the absorber tube.

Moss, Timothy A.; Iverson, Brian D.; Siegel, Nathan Phillip; Kolb, Gregory J.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "next-generation parabolic trough" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

An evaluation of possible next-generation high temperature molten-salt power towers.  

SciTech Connect

Since completion of the Solar Two molten-salt power tower demonstration in 1999, the solar industry has been developing initial commercial-scale projects that are 3 to 14 times larger. Like Solar Two, these initial plants will power subcritical steam-Rankine cycles using molten salt with a temperature of 565 C. The main question explored in this study is whether there is significant economic benefit to develop future molten-salt plants that operate at a higher receiver outlet temperature. Higher temperatures would allow the use of supercritical steam cycles that achieve an improved efficiency relative to today's subcritical cycle ({approx}50% versus {approx}42%). The levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) of a 565 C subcritical baseline plant was compared with possible future-generation plants that operate at 600 or 650 C. The analysis suggests that {approx}8% reduction in LCOE can be expected by raising salt temperature to 650 C. However, most of that benefit can be achieved by raising the temperature to only 600 C. Several other important insights regarding possible next-generation power towers were also drawn: (1) the evaluation of receiver-tube materials that are capable of higher fluxes and temperatures, (2) suggested plant reliability improvements based on a detailed evaluation of the Solar Two experience, and (3) a thorough evaluation of analysis uncertainties.

Kolb, Gregory J.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

INVESTIGATION OF PLUTONIUM AND URANIUM UPTAKE INTO MCU SOLVENT AND NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) customer, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) examined the plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) uptake into the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) that will be used at the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). SRNL examined archived samples of solvent used in Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests, as well as samples from new tests designed explicitly to examine the Pu and U uptake. Direct radiocounting for Pu and U provided the best results. Using the radiocounting results, we found that in all cases there were <3.41E-12 g Pu/g of NGS and <1.17E-05 g U/g of NGS in multiple samples, even after extended contact times and high aqueous:organic volume phase ratios. These values are conservative as they do not allow for release or removal of the actinides by scrub, strip, or solvent wash processes. The values do not account for extended use or any increase that may occur due to radiolytic damage of the solvent.

Peters, T.; Fink, S.

2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

383

Technical Cross-Cutting Issues for the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative's Spent Fuel Nondestructive Assay Project  

SciTech Connect

Ever since there has been spent fuel (SF), researchers have made nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of that fuel to learn about its content. In general these measurements have focused on the simplest signatures (passive photon and total neutron emission) and the analysis has often focused on diversion detection and on determining properties such as burnup (BU) and cooling time (CT). Because of shortcomings in current analysis methods, inspectorates and policy makers are interested in improving the state-of-the-art in SF NDA. For this reason the U.S. Department of Energy, through the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), targeted the determination of elemental Pu mass in SF as a technical goal. As part of this research effort, 14 nondestructive assay techniques were studied . This wide range of techniques was selected to allow flexibility for the various needs of the safeguards inspectorates and to prepare for the likely integration of one or more techniques having complementary features. In the course of researching this broad range of NDA techniques, several cross-cutting issues were. This paper will describe some common issues and insights. In particular we will describe the following: (1) the role of neutron absorbers with emphasis on how these absorbers vary in SF as a function of initial enrichment, BU and CT; (2) the need to partition the measured signal among different isotopic sources; and (3) the importance of the “first generation” concept which indicates the spatial location from which the signal originates as well as the isotopic origins.

Tobin, S. J.; Menlove, H. O.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Blanc, P.; Burr, T.; Evans, L. G.; Favalli, A.; Fensin, M. L.; Freeman, C. R.; Galloway, J.; Gerhart, J.; Rajasingam, A.; Rauch, E.; Sandoval, N. P.; Trellue, H.; Ulrich, T. J.; Conlin, J. L.; Croft, S.; Hendricks, John; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Eigenbrodt, J. M.; Koehler, W. E.; Lee, D. W.; Lee, T. H.; Lafleur, A. M.; Schear, M. A.; Humphrey, M. A.; Smith, Leon E.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Campbell, Luke W.; Casella, Andrew M.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Shaver, Mark W.; Misner, Alex C.; Amber, S. D.; Ludewigt, Bernhard A.; Quiter, B.; Solodov, Alexander; Charlton, W.; Stafford, A.; Romano, C.; Cheatham, J.; Ehinger, Michael; Thompson, S. J.; Chichester, David; Sterbentz, James; Hu, Jianwei; Hunt, A.; Mozin, Vladimir V.; Richard, J. G.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Considerations Associated with Reactor Technology Selection for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project  

SciTech Connect

At the inception of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and during predecessor activities, alternative reactor technologies have been evaluated to determine the technology that best fulfills the functional and performance requirements of the targeted energy applications and market. Unlike the case of electric power generation where the reactor performance is primarily expressed in terms of economics, the targeted energy applications involve industrial applications that have specific needs in terms of acceptable heat transport fluids and the associated thermodynamic conditions. Hence, to be of interest to these industrial energy applications, the alternative reactor technologies are weighed in terms of the reactor coolant/heat transport fluid, achievable reactor outlet temperature, and practicality of operations to achieve the very high reliability demands associated with the petrochemical, petroleum, metals and related industries. These evaluations have concluded that the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) can uniquely provide the required ranges of energy needs for these target applications, do so with promising economics, and can be commercialized with reasonable development risk in the time frames of current industry interest – i.e., within the next 10-15 years.

L.E. Demick

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Next Generation Climate Change Experiments Needed to Advance Knowledge and for Assessment of CMIP6  

SciTech Connect

The Aspen Global Change Institute hosted a technical science workshop entitled, “Next generation climate change experiments needed to advance knowledge and for assessment of CMIP6,” on August 4-9, 2013 in Aspen, CO. Jerry Meehl (NCAR), Richard Moss (PNNL), and Karl Taylor (LLNL) served as co-chairs for the workshop which included the participation of 32 scientists representing most of the major climate modeling centers for a total of 160 participant days. In August 2013, AGCI gathered a high level meeting of representatives from major climate modeling centers around the world to assess achievements and lessons learned from the most recent generation of coordinated modeling experiments known as the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project – 5 (CMIP5) as well as to scope out the science questions and coordination structure desired for the next anticipated phase of modeling experiments called CMIP6. The workshop allowed for reflection on the coordination of the CMIP5 process as well as intercomparison of model results, such as were assessed in the most recent IPCC 5th Assessment Report, Working Group 1. For example, this slide from Masahiro Watanabe examines performance on a range of models capturing Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC).

Katzenberger, John [AGCI; Arnott, James [AGCI; Wright, Alyson [AGCI

2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

386

The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative s High-Purity Uranium-233 Preservation Effort  

SciTech Connect

High-purity 233U serves as a crucial reference material for accurately quantifying and characterizing uranium. The most accurate analytical results which can be obtained only with high-purity 233U certified reference material (CRM) are required when used to confirm compliance with international safeguards obligations and international nonproliferation agreements. The U.S. supply of 233U CRM is almost depleted, and existing domestic stocks of this synthetic isotope are scheduled to be down-blended for disposition with depleted uranium beginning in 2015. Down blending batches of high-purity 233U will permanently eliminate the value of this material as a CRM. Furthermore, no replacement 233U stocks are expected to be produced in the future due to a lack of operating production capability and the high cost of replacing such capability. Therefore, preserving select batches of high-purity 233U is of great value and will assist in retaining current analytical capabilities for uranium-bearing samples. Any organization placing a priority on accurate results of uranium analyses, or on the confirmation of trace uranium in environmental samples, has a vested interest in preserving this material. This paper describes the need for high-purity 233U, the consequences organizations and agencies face if this material is not preserved, and the progress and future plans for preserving select batches of the purest 233U materials from disposition. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nonproliferation and International Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

Krichinsky, Alan M [ORNL] [ORNL; Bostick, Debra A [ORNL] [ORNL; Giaquinto, Joseph [ORNL] [ORNL; Bayne, Charles [Hazelwood Services and Manufacturing] [Hazelwood Services and Manufacturing; Goldberg, Dr. Steven A. [DOE SC - Chicago Office] [DOE SC - Chicago Office; Humphrey, Dr. Marc [U.S. Department of Energy, NNSA] [U.S. Department of Energy, NNSA; Hutcheon, Dr. Ian D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Sobolev, Taissa [U.S. Department of Energy, NNSA] [U.S. Department of Energy, NNSA

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Recommended Guanidine Suppressor for the Next-Generation Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process  

SciTech Connect

The guanidine recommended for the Next-Generation Caustic-Side is N,N ,N -tris(3,7-dimethyloctyl)guanidine (TiDG). Systematic testing has shown that it is significantly more lipophilic than the previously recommended guanidine DCiTG, the active extractant in the commercial guanidine product LIX -79, while not otherwise changing the solvent performance. Previous testing indicated that the extent of partitioning of the DCiTG suppressor to the aqueous strip solution is significantly greater than expected, potentially leading to rapid depletion of the suppressor from the solvent and unwanted organic concentrations in process effluents. Five candidate guanidines were tested as potential replacements for DCiTG. The tests included batch extraction with simulated waste and flowsheet solutions, third-phase formation, emulsion formation, and partition ratios of the guanidine between the solvent and aqueous strip solution. Preliminary results of a thermal stability test of the TiDG solvent at one month duration indicated performance approximately equivalent to DCiTG. Two of the guanidines proved adequate in all respects, and the choice of TiDG was deemed slightly preferable vs the next best guanidine BiTABG.

Moyer, Bruce A [ORNL; Delmau, Laetitia Helene [ORNL; Duncan, Nathan C [ORNL; Ensor, Dale [Tennessee Technological University; Hill, Talon G [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL; Roach, Benjamin D [ORNL; Sloop Jr, Frederick {Fred} V [ORNL; Williams, Neil J [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

cades is their size: A three-input sorter im-plemented in next-generation (CMOS 9S)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cades is their size: A three-input sorter im- plemented in next-generation (CMOS 9S) technology to the height and width of the energy barrier provides opportunities for probing the interactions between. References and Notes 1. B. G. Briner, M. Doering, H.-P. Rust, A. M. Bradshaw, Science 278, 257 (1997). 2. R

Yin, Y. Whitney

389

Foreword to the Handbook of Research on "Mobile Peer-to-Peer Computing for Next Generation Distributed Environments: Advancing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foreword to the Handbook of Research on "Mobile Peer-to-Peer Computing for Next Generation, namely mobile P2P systems, are in their infancy. This does not mean that research on the subject has physically. Thus, serious security and privacy concerns arise. Additionally, many mobile P2P systems cannot

Wolfson, Ouri E.

390

Building Airport Systems for the Next Generation Dealing with the uncertainties of airport development will require new strategies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Atlanta, Boston, Dallas/Fort Worth, Las Vegas, Miami International, New York/Kennedy, Orlando International, Philadelphia, Washington/Dulles, and elsewhere. Brand-new or thoroughly reworked airportsBuilding Airport Systems for the Next Generation Dealing with the uncertainties of airport

391

A collaboration opportunity for next step tokamaks: ITER and DEMO (specifically a next generation diagnostic: the pulsed polarimetry technique)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A collaboration opportunity for next step tokamaks: ITER and DEMO (specifically a next generation and developing diagnostic technique and propose it to the FESAC International Collaboration Panel as a topic for collaborative international research. The diagnostic is a remote sensing technique with potential for measuring

392

Parabolic-Dish Solar Concentrators of Film on Foam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parabolic and spherical mirrors are constructed of aluminized PET polyester film on urethane foam. During construction, the chosen shape of the mirror is created by manipulating the elastic/plastic behavior of the film with air pressure. Foam is then applied to the film and, once hardened, air pressure is removed. At an f-number of 0.68, preliminary models have an optical angular spread of less than 0.25 degrees, a factor of 3.3 smaller than that for a perfectly spherical mirror. The possibility exists for creating large-lightweight mirrors with excellent shape and stiffness. These "film-on-foam" construction techniques may also be applicable to parabolic-trough solar concentrators but do not appear to be suitable for optical imaging applications because of irregularities in the film.

Barton, Sean A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Next generation sequencing improves detection of drug resistance mutations in infants after PMTCT failure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractBackground Next generation sequencing (NGS) allows the detection of minor variant HIV drug resistance mutations (DRMs). However data from new NGS platforms after Prevention-of-Mother-to-Child-Transmission (PMTCT) regimen failure are limited. Objective To compare major and minor variant HIV \\{DRMs\\} with Illumina MiSeq and Life Technologies Ion Personal Genome Machine (PGM) in infants infected despite a PMTCT regimen. Study design We conducted a cross-sectional study of NGS for detecting \\{DRMs\\} in infants infected despite a zidovudine (AZT) and Nevirapine (NVP) regimen, before initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy. Sequencing was performed on PCR products from plasma samples on PGM and MiSeq platforms. Bioinformatic analyses were undertaken using a codon-aware version of the Smith–Waterman mapping algorithm and a mixture multinomial error filtering statistical model. Results Of 15 infants, tested at a median age of 3.4 months after birth, 2 (13%) had non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) \\{DRMs\\} (K103N and Y181C) by bulk sequencing, whereas PGM detected 4 (26%) and MiSeq 5 (30%). NGS enabled the detection of additional minor variant \\{DRMs\\} in the infant with K103N. Coverage and instrument quality scores were higher with MiSeq, increasing the confidence of minor variant calls. Conclusions NGS followed by bioinformatic analyses detected multiple minor variant \\{DRMs\\} in HIV-1 RT among infants where PMTCT failed. The high coverage of MiSeq and high read quality improved the confidence of identified \\{DRMs\\} and may make this platform ideal for minor variant detection.

Randall G. Fisher; Davey M. Smith; Ben Murrell; Ruhan Slabbert; Bronwyn M. Kirby; Clair Edson; Mark F. Cotton; Richard H. Haubrich; Sergei L. Kosakovsky Pond; Gert U. Van Zyl

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Potential application of LIBS to NNSA next generation safeguards initiative (NGSI)  

SciTech Connect

In a climate in which states and nations have been and perhaps currently are involved in the prol iferation of nuclear materials and technologies, advanced methodologies and improvements in current measurement techniques are needed to combat new threats and increased levels of sophistication. The Department of Energy through the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has undertaken a broad review of International Safeguards. The conclusion from that review was that a comprehensive initiative to revitalize international safeguards technology and the human resource base was urgently needed to keep pace with demands and increasingly sophisticated emerging safeguards challenges. To address these challenges, NNSA launched the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) to develop policies, concepts, technologies, expertise, and infrastructure necessary to sustain the international safeguards system as its mission evolves for the next 25 years. NGSI is designed to revitalize and strengthen the U.S. safeguards technical base, recognizing that without a robust program the United States of America will not be in a position to exercise leadership or provide the necessary support to the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency). International safeguards as administrated by the IAEA are the primary vehicle for verifying compliance with the peaceful use and nonproliferation of nuclear materials and technologies. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy or LIBS has the potential to support the goals of NGSI as follows: by providing (1) automated analysis in complex nuclear processing or reprocessing facilities in real-time or near real-time without sample preparation or removal, (2) isotopic and important elemental ratio (Cm/Pu, Cm/U, ... etc) analysis, and (3) centralized remote control, process monitoring, and analysis of nuclear materials in nuclear facilities at multiple locations within the facility. Potential application of LIBS to international safeguards as outlined in the NGSI will be discussed.

Barefield Ii, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clegg, Samuel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Veirs, Douglas K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Browne, Mike [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lopez, Leon [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Ron [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Le, Loan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lamontagne, Stephen A [DOE/NNSA/NA241; Veal, Kevin [NN/ADTR

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Assessment of the impact of the next generation solvent on DWPF melter off-gas flammability  

SciTech Connect

An assessment has been made to evaluate the impact on the DWPF melter off-gas flammability of replacing the current solvent used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process Unit (MCU) process with the Next Generation Solvent (NGS-MCU) and blended solvent. The results of this study showed that the concentrations of nonvolatile carbon and hydrogen of the current solvent in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product would both be about 29% higher than their counterparts of the NGS-MCU and blended solvent in the absence of guanidine partitioning. When 6 ppm of guanidine (TiDG) was added to the effluent transfer to DWPF to simulate partitioning for the NGS-MCU and blended solvent cases and the concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the effluent transfer was controlled below 87 ppm, the concentrations of nonvolatile carbon and hydrogen of the NGS-MCU and blended solvent were still about 12% and 4% lower, respectively, than those of the current solvent. It is, therefore, concluded that as long as the volume of MCU effluent transfer to DWPF is limited to 15,000 gallons per Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)/SME cycle and the concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the effluent transfer is controlled below 87 ppm, using the current solvent assumption of 105 ppm Isopar{reg_sign} L or 150 ppm solvent in lieu of NGS-MCU or blended solvent in the DWPF melter off-gas flammability assessment is conservative for up to an additional 6 ppm of TiDG in the effluent due to guanidine partitioning. This report documents the calculations performed to reach this conclusion.

Daniel, W. E.

2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

396

STARLIB: A NEXT-GENERATION REACTION-RATE LIBRARY FOR NUCLEAR ASTROPHYSICS  

SciTech Connect

STARLIB is a next-generation, all-purpose nuclear reaction-rate library. For the first time, this library provides the rate probability density at all temperature grid points for convenient implementation in models of stellar phenomena. The recommended rate and its associated uncertainties are also included. Currently, uncertainties are absent from all other rate libraries, and, although estimates have been attempted in previous evaluations and compilations, these are generally not based on rigorous statistical definitions. A common standard for deriving uncertainties is clearly warranted. STARLIB represents a first step in addressing this deficiency by providing a tabular, up-to-date database that supplies not only the rate and its uncertainty but also its distribution. Because a majority of rates are lognormally distributed, this allows the construction of rate probability densities from the columns of STARLIB. This structure is based on a recently suggested Monte Carlo method to calculate reaction rates, where uncertainties are rigorously defined. In STARLIB, experimental rates are supplemented with: (1) theoretical TALYS rates for reactions for which no experimental input is available, and (2) laboratory and theoretical weak rates. STARLIB includes all types of reactions of astrophysical interest to Z = 83, such as (p, {gamma}), (p, {alpha}), ({alpha}, n), and corresponding reverse rates. Strong rates account for thermal target excitations. Here, we summarize our Monte Carlo formalism, introduce the library, compare methods of correcting rates for stellar environments, and discuss how to implement our library in Monte Carlo nucleosynthesis studies. We also present a method for accessing STARLIB on the Internet and outline updated Monte Carlo-based rates.

Sallaska, A. L. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8462 (United States); Iliadis, C.; Champange, A. E. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3255 (United States); Goriely, S. [Institut d'Astronomie et d'Astrophysique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, C.P. 226, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Starrfield, S.; Timmes, F. X., E-mail: anne.sallaska@nist.gov [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Next Generation Safeguards Initiative: Overview and Policy Context of UF6 Cylinder Tracking Program  

SciTech Connect

Thousands of cylinders containing uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) move around the world from conversion plants to enrichment plants to fuel fabrication plants, and their contents could be very useful to a country intent on diverting uranium for clandestine use. Each of these large cylinders can contain close to a significant quantity of natural uranium (48Y cylinder) or low-enriched uranium (LEU) (30B cylinder) defined as 75 kg {sup 235}U which can be further clandestinely enriched to produce 1.5 to 2 significant quantities of high enriched uranium (HEU) within weeks or months depending on the scale of the clandestine facility. The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) kicked off a 5-year plan in April 2011 to investigate the concept of a unique identification system for UF{sub 6} cylinders and potentially to develop a cylinder tracking system that could be used by facility operators and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The goal is to design an integrated solution beneficial to both industry and inspectorates that would improve cylinder operations at the facilities and provide enhanced capabilities to deter and detect both diversion of low-enriched uranium and undeclared enriched uranium production. The 5-year plan consists of six separate incremental tasks: (1) define the problem and establish the requirements for a unique identification (UID) and monitoring system; (2) develop a concept of operations for the identification and monitoring system; (3) determine cylinder monitoring devices and technology; (4) develop a registry database to support proof-of-concept demonstration; (5) integrate that system for the demonstration; and (6) demonstrate proof-of-concept. Throughout NNSA's performance of the tasks outlined in this program, the multi-laboratory team emphasizes that extensive engagement with industry stakeholders, regulatory authorities and inspectorates is essential to its success.

Boyer, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitaker, J. Michael [ORNL; White-Horton, Jessica L. [ORNL; Durbin, Karyn R. [NNSA

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

398

Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Workshop on Enhanced Recruiting for International Safeguards  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) hosted a Workshop on Enhanced Recruiting for International Safeguards October 22 and 23, 2008. The workshop was sponsored by DOE/NA-243 under the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI). Placing well-qualified Americans in sufficient number and in key safeguards positions within the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA’s) Department of Safeguards is an important U.S. non-proliferation objective. The goal of the NGSI Workshop on Enhanced Recruiting for International Safeguards was to improve U.S. efforts to recruit U.S. citizens for IAEA positions in the Department of Safeguards. The participants considered the specific challenges of recruiting professional staff, safeguards inspectors, and managers. BNL’s International Safeguards Project Office invited participants from the U.S. Department of Energy, the IAEA, U.S. national laboratories, private industry, academia, and professional societies who are either experts in international safeguards or who understand the challenges of recruiting for technical positions. A final report for the workshop will be finalized and distributed in early 2009. The main finding of the workshop was the need for an integrated recruitment plan to take into account pools of potential candidates, various government and private agency stakeholders, the needs of the IAEA, and the NGSI human capital development plan. There were numerous findings related to and recommendations for maximizing the placement of U.S. experts in IAEA Safeguards positions. The workshop participants offered many ideas for increasing the pool of candidates and increasing the placement rate. This paper will provide details on these findings and recommendations

Pepper,S.E.; Rosenthal, M.D.; Fishbone, L.G.; Occhogrosso, D.M.; Lockwood, D.; Carroll, C.J.; Dreicer, M.; Wallace, R.; Fankhauser, J.

2009-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

399

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program is responsible for performing research and development on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. Studies of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels have been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual design studies. These design studies generally focus on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Three realistic candidate materials have been identified by this process: conventional light water reactor RPV steels A508/533, 2¼Cr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and modified 9Cr 1Mo ferritic martenistic steel. Based on superior strength and higher temperature limits, the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has been identified by the majority of design engineers as the preferred choice for the RPV. All of the vendors have concluded, however, that with adequate engineered cooling of the vessel, the A508/533 steels are also acceptable.

J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

ENDF/B-VII.0: Next Generation Evaluated Nuclear Data Library for Nuclear Science and Technology  

SciTech Connect

We describe the next generation general purpose Evaluated Nuclear Data File, ENDF/B-VII.0, of recommended nuclear data for advanced nuclear science and technology applications. The library, released by the U.S. Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) in December 2006, contains data primarily for reactions with incident neutrons, protons, and photons on almost 400 isotopes. The new evaluations are based on both experimental data and nuclear reaction theory predictions. The principal advances over the previous ENDF/B-VI library are the following: (1) New cross sections for U, Pu, Th, Np and Am actinide isotopes, with improved performance in integral validation criticality and neutron transmission benchmark tests; (2) More precise standard cross sections for neutron reactions on H, {sup 6}Li, {sup 10}B, Au and for {sup 235,238}U fission, developed by a collaboration with the IAEA and the OECD/NEA Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC); (3) Improved thermal neutron scattering; (4) An extensive set of neutron cross sections on fission products developed through a WPEC collaboration; (5) A large suite of photonuclear reactions; (6) Extension of many neutron- and proton-induced reactions up to an energy of 150 MeV; (7) Many new light nucleus neutron and proton reactions; (8) Post-fission beta-delayed photon decay spectra; (9) New radioactive decay data; and (10) New methods developed to provide uncertainties and covariances, together with covariance evaluations for some sample cases. The paper provides an overview of this library, consisting of 14 sublibraries in the same, ENDF-6 format, as the earlier ENDF/B-VI library. We describe each of the 14 sublibraries, focusing on neutron reactions. Extensive validation, using radiation transport codes to simulate measured critical assemblies, show major improvements: (a) The long-standing underprediction of low enriched U thermal assemblies is removed; (b) The {sup 238}U, {sup 208}Pb, and {sup 9}Be reflector biases in fast systems are largely removed; (c) ENDF/B-VI.8 good agreement for simulations of highly enriched uranium assemblies is preserved; (d) The underprediction of fast criticality of {sup 233,235}U and {sup 239}Pu assemblies is removed; and (e) The intermediate spectrum critical assemblies are predicted more accurately. We anticipate that the new library will play an important role in nuclear technology applications, including transport simulations supporting national security, nonproliferation, advanced reactor and fuel cycle concepts, criticality safety, medicine, space applications, nuclear astrophysics, and nuclear physics facility design. The ENDF/B-VII.0 library is archived at the National Nuclear Data Center, BNL. The complete library, or any part of it, may be retrieved from www.nndc.bnl.gov.

Chadwick, M B; Oblozinsky, P; Herman, M; Greene, N M; McKnight, R D; Smith, D L; Young, P G; MacFarlane, R E; Hale, G M; Haight, R C; Frankle, S; Kahler, A C; Kawano, T; Little, R C; Madland, D G; Moller, P; Mosteller, R; Page, P; Talou, P; Trellue, H; White, M; Wilson, W B; Arcilla, R; Dunford, C L; Mughabghab, S F; Pritychenko, B; Rochman, D; Sonzogni, A A; Lubitz, C; Trumbull, T H; Weinman, J; Brown, D; Cullen, D E; Heinrichs, D; McNabb, D; Derrien, H; Dunn, M; Larson, N M; Leal, L C; Carlson, A D; Block, R C; Briggs, B; Cheng, E; Huria, H; Kozier, K; Courcelle, A; Pronyaev, V; der Marck, S

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "next-generation parabolic trough" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Results From The Salt Disposition Project Next Generation Solvent Demonstration Plan  

SciTech Connect

Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples were taken throughout the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) Demonstration Plan. These samples were analyzed and the results are reported. SHT: The solvent behaved as expected, with no bulk changes in the composition over time, with the exception of the TOA and TiDG. The TiDG depletion is higher than expected, and consideration must be taken on the required rate of replenishment. Monthly sampling of the SHT is warranted. If possible, additional SHT samples for TiDG analysis (only) would help SRNL refine the TiDG degradation model. CWT: The CWT samples show the expected behavior in terms of bulk chemistry. The 137Cs deposited into the CWT varies somewhat, but generally appears to be lower than during operations with the BOBCalix solvent. While a few minor organic components were noted to be present in the Preliminary sample, at this time these are thought to be artifacts of the sample preparation or may be due to the preceding solvent superwash. DSSHT: The DSSHT samples show the predicted bulk chemistry, although they point towards significant dilution at the front end of the Demonstration. The 137Cs levels in the DSSHT are much lower than during the BOBCalix operations, which is the expected observation. SEHT: The SEHT samples represent the most different output of all four of the outputs from MCU. While the bulk chemistry is as expected, something is causing the pH of the SEHT to be higher than what would be predicted from a pure stream of 0.01 M boric acid. There are several possible different reasons for this, and SRNL is in the process of investigating. Other than the pH issue, the SEHT is as predicted. In summary, the NGS Demonstration Plan samples indicate that the MCU system, with the Blend Solvent, is operating as expected. The only issue of concern regards the pH of the SEHT, and SRNL is in the process of investigating this. SRNL results support the transition to routine operations.

Peters, T. B.; Fondeur, F. F.; Taylor-Pashow, K. M.L.

2014-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

402

NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY WITH POLYMER COMPONENTS WITHIN MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The first deployment target for the technology is within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the facility. This report provides the data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The test was conducted over six months. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers present in MCU (i.e., PEEK, Grafoil{reg_sign}, Tefzel{reg_sign} and Isolast{reg_sign}) in the modified NGS (where the concentration of the guanidine suppressor and MaxCalix was varied systematically) showed that guanidine (LIX{reg_sign}79) selectively affected Tefzel{reg_sign} (by an increase in size and lowering its density). The copolymer structure of Tefzel{reg_sign} and possibly its porosity allows for the easier diffusion of guanidine. Tefzel{reg_sign} is used as the seat material in some of the valves at MCU. Long term exposure to guanidine, may make the valves hard to operate over time due to the seat material (Tefzel{reg_sign}) increasing in size. However, since the physical changes of Tefzel{reg_sign} in the improved solvent are comparable to the changes in the CSSX baseline solvent, no design changes are needed with respect to the Tefzel{reg_sign} seating material. PEEK, Grafoil{reg_sign} and Isolast{reg_sign} were not affected by guanidine and MaxCalix within six months of exposure. The initial rapid weight gain observed in every polymer is assigned to the finite and limited uptake of Isopar{reg_sign} L/Modifier by the polymers probably due to the polymers porosity and rough surfaces. Spectroscopic data on the organic liquid and the polymer surfaces showed no preferential adsorption of any component in the NGS to the polymers and no leachate was observed in the NGS from any of the polymers studied.

Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.; Fink, S.

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

403

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs  

SciTech Connect

Here we report the outcome of the application of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) process to the issue of nuclear-grade graphite for the moderator and structural components of a next generation nuclear plant (NGNP), considering both routine (normal operation) and postulated accident conditions for the NGNP. The NGNP is assumed to be a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), either a gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GTMHR) version [a prismatic-core modular reactor (PMR)] or a pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) version [a pebble bed reactor (PBR)] design, with either a direct- or indirect-cycle gas turbine (Brayton cycle) system for electric power production, and an indirect-cycle component for hydrogen production. NGNP design options with a high-pressure steam generator (Rankine cycle) in the primary loop are not considered in this PIRT. This graphite PIRT was conducted in parallel with four other NRC PIRT activities, taking advantage of the relationships and overlaps in subject matter. The graphite PIRT panel identified numerous phenomena, five of which were ranked high importance-low knowledge. A further nine were ranked with high importance and medium knowledge rank. Two phenomena were ranked with medium importance and low knowledge, and a further 14 were ranked medium importance and medium knowledge rank. The last 12 phenomena were ranked with low importance and high knowledge rank (or similar combinations suggesting they have low priority). The ranking/scoring rationale for the reported graphite phenomena is discussed. Much has been learned about the behavior of graphite in reactor environments in the 60-plus years since the first graphite rectors went into service. The extensive list of references in the Bibliography is plainly testament to this fact. Our current knowledge base is well developed. Although data are lacking for the specific grades being considered for Generation IV (Gen IV) concepts, such as the NGNP, it is fully expected that the behavior of these graphites will conform to the recognized trends for near isotropic nuclear graphite. Thus, much of the data needed is confirmatory in nature. Theories that can explain graphite behavior have been postulated and, in many cases, shown to represent experimental data well. However, these theories need to be tested against data for the new graphites and extended to higher neutron doses and temperatures pertinent to the new Gen IV reactor concepts. It is anticipated that current and planned future graphite irradiation experiments will provide the data needed to validate many of the currently accepted models, as well as providing the needed data for design confirmation.

Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Bratton, Rob [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Marsden, Barry [University of Manchester, UK; Srinivasan, Makuteswara [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Penfield, Scott [Technology Insights; Mitchell, Mark [PBMR (Pty) Ltd.; Windes, Will [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Workshop on Enhanced Recruiting for International Safeguards  

SciTech Connect

In 2007, the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NA-24) completed a yearlong review of the challenges facing the international safeguards system today and over the next 25 years. The study found that without new investment in international safeguards, the U.S. safeguards technology base, and our ability to support International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards, will continue to erode and soon may be at risk. To reverse this trend, the then U.S. Secretary of Energy, Samuel Bodman, announced at the 2007 IAEA General Conference that the Department of Energy (DOE) would launch the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI). He stated 'IAEA safeguards must be robust and capable of addressing proliferation threats. Full confidence in IAEA safeguards is essential for nuclear power to grow safely and securely. To this end, the U.S. Department of Energy will seek to ensure that modern technology, the best scientific expertise, and adequate resources are available to keep pace with expanding IAEA responsibilities.' To meet this goal, the NGSI objectives include the recruitment of international safeguards experts to work at the U.S. national laboratories and to serve at the IAEA's headquarters. Part of the latter effort will involve enhancing our existing efforts to place well-qualified Americans in a sufficient number of key safeguards positions within the IAEA's Department of Safeguards. Accordingly, the International Safeguards Project Office (ISPO) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) hosted a Workshop on Enhanced Recruiting for International Safeguards (ERIS) on October 22 and 23, 2008. The ISPO used a workshop format developed earlier with Sonalysts, Inc., that was followed at the U.S. Support Program's (USSP's) technology road-mapping sessions. ISPO invited participants from the U.S. DOE, the IAEA, the U.S. national laboratories, private industry, academia, and professional societies who either are experts in international safeguards, or understand the challenges of recruiting for technical positions. The 44 participants represented eight national laboratories, four universities, three government organizations, two international organizations, two professional organizations, and three small companies. The goal of the ERIS workshop was to improve efforts to engage U.S. citizens for IAEA positions in the Department of Safeguards. The participants considered the specific challenges of recruiting professional staff, safeguards inspectors, and managers. At the workshop's conclusion, participants presented their findings to the NNSA Office of International Regimes and Agreements (NA-243). The report's major findings are summarized.

Pepper,S.; Rosenthal, M.; Fishbone, L.; Occhiogrosso, D.; Carroll, C.; Dreicer, M.; Wallace, R.; Rankhauser, J.

2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

405

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Next Generation Processes for Carbonate Electrolytes for Battery Applications - Kris Rangan, Materials Modification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Processes for Carbonate Electrolytes for Battery Applications Next Generation Processes for Carbonate Electrolytes for Battery Applications Dr. Kausik Mukhopadhyay & Dr. Krishnaswamy K. Rangan Materials Modification, Inc. 2809-K Merrilee Drive, Fairfax. VA 22031 ABSTRACT  Dimethyl Carbonate (DMC) is a promising electrolyte solvent for lithium battery applications due to its inherent safety and robustness. Despite the enormous promise of its industrial use, this chemical is currently entirely imported from China. The global battery market is about US$ 50 billion, of which approximately $ 5.5 billion is captured by the rechargeable batteries for use in electric vehicles, laptops, consumer electronics, rechargeable batteries etc.  Indigenous manufacture of DMC will enormously benefit not only the American lithium battery industry

406

July 24, 2009, Visiting Speakers Program - The Next Generation of Regulation for High-Reliability Organizations by HON. John Bresland  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation of Regulation for Next Generation of Regulation for High-Reliability Organizations National Academy of Public Administration Washington, DC July 24, 2009 John Bresland Chairman United States Chemical Safety Board www.csb.gov What is a High Reliability Organization? * Management commitment * The right equipment * The right people * Standard procedures and training * Accountability * Employee feedback * Emergency response preparation * Leadership - must "walk the walk" www.csb.gov 2 * 3 www.csb.gov Are these HROs? www.csb.gov WEST PHARMACEUTICAL INVESTIGATION - 1/29/2003 www.csb.gov www.csb.gov 7 www.csb.gov Imperial Sugar Company Refinery, Port Wentworth, Georgia February 7, 2008 www.csb.gov 8 T2 Laboratories Jacksonville, Florida December 19, 2007 www.csb.gov www.csb.gov

407

Sandia National Laboratories: Parabolic Dishes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test Facility * NSTTF * parabolic dishes * Renewable Energy * SAND 2011-4654W * solar * Solar Energy * solar power * Solar Research * TBC * Test Bed Concentrators Comments are...

408

OASIS4: A Coupling Software for Next Generation Earth System Modelling Ren Redler (1), Sophie Valcke (2) and Hubert Ritzdorf (3)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OASIS4: A Coupling Software for Next Generation Earth System Modelling René Redler (1), Sophie system modelling, Geosci. Model. Dev., 3, 87 ­ 104 Link ­ https://oasistrac.cerfacs.fr Financial support ­ R. Redler, S. Valcke and H. Ritzdorf, 2010: OASIS4 ­ a coupling software for next generation earth

409

Transformation of Resources to Reserves: Next Generation Heavy-Oil Recovery Techniques  

SciTech Connect

This final report and technical progress report describes work performed from October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2007 for the project 'Transformation of Resources to Reserves: Next Generation Heavy Oil Recovery Techniques', DE-FC26-04NT15526. Critical year 3 activities of this project were not undertaken because of reduced funding to the DOE Oil Program despite timely submission of a continuation package and progress on year 1 and 2 subtasks. A small amount of carried-over funds were used during June-August 2007 to complete some work in the area of foamed-gas mobility control. Completion of Year 3 activities and tasks would have led to a more thorough completion of the project and attainment of project goals. This progress report serves as a summary of activities and accomplishments for years 1 and 2. Experiments, theory development, and numerical modeling were employed to elucidate heavy-oil production mechanisms that provide the technical foundations for producing efficiently the abundant, discovered heavy-oil resources of the U.S. that are not accessible with current technology and recovery techniques. Work fell into two task areas: cold production of heavy oils and thermal recovery. Despite the emerging critical importance of the waterflooding of viscous oil in cold environments, work in this area was never sanctioned under this project. It is envisioned that heavy oil production is impacted by development of an understanding of the reservoir and reservoir fluid conditions leading to so-called foamy oil behavior, i.e, heavy-oil solution gas drive. This understanding should allow primary, cold production of heavy and viscous oils to be optimized. Accordingly, we evaluated the oil-phase chemistry of crude oil samples from Venezuela that give effective production by the heavy-oil solution gas drive mechanism. Laboratory-scale experiments show that recovery correlates with asphaltene contents as well as the so-called acid number (AN) and base number (BN) of the crude oil. A significant number of laboratory-scale tests were made to evaluate the solution gas drive potential of West Sak (AK) viscous oil. The West Sak sample has a low acid number, low asphaltene content, and does not appear foamy under laboratory conditions. Tests show primary recovery of about 22% of the original oil in place under a variety of conditions. The acid number of other Alaskan North Slope samples tests is greater, indicating a greater potential for recovery by heavy-oil solution gas drive. Effective cold production leads to reservoir pressure depletion that eases the implementation of thermal recovery processes. When viewed from a reservoir perspective, thermal recovery is the enhanced recovery method of choice for viscous and heavy oils because of the significant viscosity reduction that accompanies the heating of oil. One significant issue accompanying thermal recovery in cold environments is wellbore heat losses. Initial work on thermal recovery found that a technology base for delivering steam, other hot fluids, and electrical heat through cold subsurface environments, such as permafrost, was in place. No commercially available technologies are available, however. Nevertheless, the enabling technology of superinsulated wells appears to be realized. Thermal subtasks focused on a suite of enhanced recovery options tailored to various reservoir conditions. Generally, electrothermal, conventional steam-based, and thermal gravity drainage enhanced oil recovery techniques appear to be applicable to 'prime' Ugnu reservoir conditions to the extent that reservoir architecture and fluid conditions are modeled faithfully here. The extent of reservoir layering, vertical communication, and subsurface steam distribution are important factors affecting recovery. Distribution of steam throughout reservoir volume is a significant issue facing thermal recovery. Various activities addressed aspects of steam emplacement. Notably, hydraulic fracturing of horizontal steam injection wells and implementation of steam trap control that limits steam entry into hor

Stanford University; Department of Energy Resources Engineering Green Earth Sciences

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

410

FY 2008 Next Generation Safeguards Initiative International Safeguards Education and Training Pilot Progerams Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

Key component of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) launched by the National Nuclear Security Administration is the development of human capital to meet present and future challenges to the safeguards regime. An effective university-level education in safeguards and related disciplines is an essential element in a layered strategy to rebuild the safeguards human resource capacity. Two pilot programs at university level, involving 44 students, were initiated and implemented in spring-summer 2008 and linked to hands-on internships at LANL or LLNL. During the internships, students worked on specific safeguards-related projects with a designated Laboratory Mentor to provide broader exposure to nuclear materials management and information analytical techniques. The Safeguards and Nuclear Material Management pilot program was a collaboration between the Texas A&M University (TAMU), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). It included a 16-lecture course held during a summer internship program. The instructors for the course were from LANL together with TAMU faculty and LLNL experts. The LANL-based course was shared with the students spending their internship at LLNL via video conference. A week-long table-top (or hands-on) exercise on was also conducted at LANL. The student population was a mix of 28 students from a 12 universities participating in a variety of summer internship programs held at LANL and LLNL. A large portion of the students were TAMU students participating in the NGSI pilot. The International Nuclear Safeguards Policy and Information Analysis pilot program was implemented at the Monterey Institute for International Studies (MIIS) in cooperation with LLNL. It included a two-week intensive course consisting of 20 lectures and two exercises. MIIS, LLNL, and speakers from other U.S. national laboratories (LANL, BNL) delivered lectures for the audience of 16 students. The majority of students were senior classmen or new master's degree graduates from MIIS specializing in nonproliferation policy studies. Other university/organizations represented: University of California in LA, Stanford University, and the IAEA. Four of the students that completed this intensive course participated in a 2-month internship at LLNL. The conclusions of the two pilot courses and internships was a NGSI Summer Student Symposium, held at LLNL, where 20 students participated in LLNL facility tours and poster sessions. The Poster sessions were designed to provide a forum for sharing the results of their summer projects and providing experience in presenting their work to a varied audience of students, faculty and laboratory staff. The success of bringing together the students from the technical and policy pilots was notable and will factor into the planning for the continued refinement of their two pilot efforts in the coming years.

Dreicer, M; Anzelon, G; Essner, J; Dougan, A; Doyle, J; Boyer, B; Hypes, P; Sokova, E; Wehling, F

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

411

Advanced photovoltaic-trough development  

SciTech Connect

The scope of the work on photvoltaic troughs includes analytical studies, hardware development, and component testing. Various aspects of the system have been optimized and improvements have been realized, particularly in the receiver and reflecting surface designs. An empirical system performance model has been developed that closely agrees with measured system performance. This in-depth study of single-axis reflecting linear focus photovoltaic concentrators will be very beneficial in the development of improved models for similar systems as well as other phtovoltaic concentrator designs.

Spencer, R.; Yasuda, K.; Merson, B.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

241-AZ-101 pump removal trough analysis  

SciTech Connect

As part of the current Hanford mission of environmental cleanup, various long length equipment must be removed from highly radioactive waste tanks. The removal of equipment will utilize portions of the Equipment Removal System for Project W320 (ERS-W320), specifically the 50 ton hydraulic trailer system. Because the ERS-W320 system was designed to accommodate much heavier equipment it is adequate to support the dead weight of the trough, carriage and related equipment for 241AZ101 pump removal project. However, the ERS-W320 components when combined with the trough and its` related components must also be analyzed for overturning due to wind loads. Two troughs were designed, one for the 20 in. diameter carriage and one for the 36 in. diameter carriage. A proposed 52 in. trough was not designed and, therefore is not included in this document. In order to fit in the ERS-W320 strongback the troughs were design with the same widths. Structurally, the only difference between the two troughs is that more material was removed from the stiffener plates on the 36 in trough. The reduction in stiffener plate material reduces the allowable load. Therefore, only the 36 in. trough was analyzed.

Coverdell, B.L.

1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

413

Finishing and Special Motifs: Lessons Learned from CRISPR Analysis Using Next-Generation Draft Sequences ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Catherine Campbell on "Finishing and Special Motifs: Lessons learned from CRISPR analysis using next-generation draft sequences" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Campbell, Catherine [Noblis

2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

414

Energetics of Winter Troughs Entering South America  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energetics and behavior of midtropospheric troughs over the Southern Hemisphere and their relationship with South America surface cyclogenesis were studied during the winters of 1999–2003. All surface cyclogenesis situations over Uruguay and ...

Everson Dal Piva; Manoel A. Gan; V. Brahmananda Rao

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Mobile trough genesis over the Mongolian Plateau  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

method developed by Lefevre and Nielsen-Gammon (1995) was used to track the mobile troughs-a quasigeostrophic potential vorticity (QGPV) and associated piecewise tendency diagnosis (PTD) technique developed by Lefevre (1995) was used to analyze...

McEver, Gregory David

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

416

Integration of Advanced Emissions Controls to Produce Next-Generation Circulating Fluid Bed Coal Generating Unit (withdrawn prior to award)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

contacts contacts Brad tomer Director Office of Major Demonstrations National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4692 brad.tomer@netl.doe.gov PaRtIcIPant Colorado Springs Utilities Colorado Springs, CO aDDItIonaL tEaM MEMBERs Foster Wheeler Power Group, Inc. Clinton, NJ IntegratIon of advanced emIssIons controls to Produce next-generatIon cIrculatIng fluId Bed coal generatIng unIt (wIthdrawn PrIor to award) Project Description Colorado Springs Utilities (Springs Utilities) and Foster Wheeler are planning a joint demonstration of an advanced coal-fired electric power plant using advanced, low-cost emission control systems to produce exceedingly low emissions. Multi- layered emission controls will be

417

Building upon Historical Competencies: Next-generation Clean-up Technologies for World-Wide Application - 13368  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's Savannah River Site has a 60-year history of successfully operating nuclear facilities and cleaning up the nuclear legacy of the Cold War era through the processing of radioactive and otherwise hazardous wastes, remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater, management of nuclear materials, and deactivation and decommissioning of excess facilities. SRS recently unveiled its Enterprise.SRS (E.SRS) strategic vision to identify and facilitate application of the historical competencies of the site to current and future national and global challenges. E.SRS initiatives such as the initiative to Develop and Demonstrate Next generation Clean-up Technologies seek timely and mutually beneficial engagements with entities around the country and the world. One such ongoing engagement is with government and industry in Japan in the recovery from the devastation of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. (authors)

Guevara, K.C. [DOE Savannah River Operations Office, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)] [DOE Savannah River Operations Office, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States); Fellinger, A.P.; Aylward, R.S.; Griffin, J.C.; Hyatt, J.E.; Bush, S.R. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Shut-down margin study for the next generation VVER-1000 reactor including 13 × 13 hexagonal annular assemblies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Shut-Down Margin (SDM) for the next generation annular fuel core of typical VVER-1000, 13 × 13 assemblies are calculated as the main aim of the present research. We have applied the MCNP-5 code for many cases with different values of core burn up at various core temperatures, and therefore their corresponding coolant densities and boric acid concentrations. There is a substantial drop in SDM in the case of annular fuel for the same power level. Specifically, SDM for our proposed VVER-1000 annular pins is calculated when the average fuel burn up values at the BOC, MOC, and EOC are 0.531, 11.5, and 43 MW-days/kg-U, respectively.

Farshad Faghihi; S. Mohammad Mirvakili

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

A review of integrated solar combined cycle system (ISCCS) with a parabolic trough technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The huge amount of solar energy available on Earth?s surface has heightened awareness in Concentrating Solar Power, and more particularly in hybrid concepts. The integrated solar combined cycle system (ISCCS) is one of the more promising hybrid configurations for converting solar energy into electricity and it might become the technology of choice in the near future. This article reviews the R&D activities and published studies since the introduction of such a concept in the 1990s. The review includes the current status and describes different hybridizations of solar energy with natural gas, coal and other renewable energy sources. Furthermore, it provides in-depth analysis of real and expected R&D finding.

Omar Behar; Abdallah Khellaf; Kamal Mohammedi; Sabrina Ait-Kaci

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

High thermal energy storage density molten salts for parabolic trough solar power generation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??New alkali nitrate-nitrite systems were developed by using thermodynamic modeling and the eutectic points were predicted based on the change of Gibbs energy of fusion.… (more)

Wang, Tao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "next-generation parabolic trough" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Development of an Advanced, Low-Cost parabolic Trough Collector for Baseload Operation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

422

Analysis of Parabolic Trough Solar Energy Integration into Different Geothermal Power Generation Concepts.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The change in climate as a consequence of anthropogenic activities is a subject ofmajor concerns. In order to reduce the amount of greenhouse gas… (more)

Vahland, Sören

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Engineering, Financial and Net Energy Performance, and Risk Analysis for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concentrating solar power plant. A set of engineering performance, financial and net energy models were developed as tools to predict a plant’s engineering performance, cost and energy payback. The models were validated by comparing the predicted results...

Luo, Jun

2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

424

Next Generation Materials:  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

of 2 to 1 for additive manufacturing by 2020; Composite materials Fiber processing costs reduce by one-half by 2026; 6x improvement in tooling cycles for composite matrix...

425

Next Generation Living  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The idea and attempts of sustainable design in architecture is common today. Sustainability as it relates to architecture ranges from small modifications or minute enhancements all the way to full projects. There is no term to differentiate...

Vaughn, Caroline Elizabeth

2013-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

426

Next Generation Inverter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

427

Shenandoah parabolic dish solar collector  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the Shenandoah, Georgia, Solar Total Energy System are to design, construct, test, and operate a solar energy system to obtain experience with large-scale hardware systems for future applications. This report describes the initial design and testing activities conducted to select and develop a collector that would serve the need of such a solar total energy system. The parabolic dish was selected as the collector most likely to maximize energy collection as required by this specific site. The fabrication, testing, and installation of the parabolic dish collector incorporating improvements identified during the development testing phase are described.

Kinoshita, G.S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

PARABOLIC OBSTACLE PROBLEMS APPLIED TO FINANCE A ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. Introduction. 1.1. Background. The parabolic obstacle problem refers to finding the smallest supper-solution (for a given parabolic ... H. Shahgholian is supported by Swedish Research Council. 1 ...... MR MR2052937 (2005d:35276). [BD97].

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

429

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Trough and Tower Concentrating Solar Power Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect

In reviewing life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, this analysis focuses on reducing variability and clarifying the central tendency of published estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a meta-analytical process called harmonization. From 125 references reviewed, 10 produced 36 independent GHG emissions estimates passing screens for quality and relevance: 19 for parabolic trough (trough) technology and 17 for power tower (tower) technology. The interquartile range (IQR) of published estimates for troughs and towers were 83 and 20 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO2-eq/kWh),1 respectively; median estimates were 26 and 38 g CO2-eq/kWh for trough and tower, respectively. Two levels of harmonization were applied. Light harmonization reduced variability in published estimates by using consistent values for key parameters pertaining to plant design and performance. The IQR and median were reduced by 87% and 17%, respectively, for troughs. For towers, the IQR and median decreased by 33% and 38%, respectively. Next, five trough LCAs reporting detailed life cycle inventories were identified. The variability and central tendency of their estimates are reduced by 91% and 81%, respectively, after light harmonization. By harmonizing these five estimates to consistent values for global warming intensities of materials and expanding system boundaries to consistently include electricity and auxiliary natural gas combustion, variability is reduced by an additional 32% while central tendency increases by 8%. These harmonized values provide useful starting points for policy makers in evaluating life cycle GHG emissions from CSP projects without the requirement to conduct a full LCA for each new project.

Burkhardt, J. J.; Heath, G.; Cohen, E.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Plane and parabolic solar panels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a plane and parabolic collector that absorbs radiant energy and transforms it in heat. Therefore we have a panel to heat water. We study how to increment this capture of solar beams onto the panel in order to increase its efficiency in heating water.

Sales, J H O

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Plane and parabolic solar panels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a plane and parabolic collector that absorbs radiant energy and transforms it in heat. Therefore we have a panel to heat water. We study how to increment this capture of solar beams onto the panel in order to increase its efficiency in heating water.

J. H. O. Sales; A. T. Suzuki

2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

432

Next generation sequencing to determine HLA class II genotypes in a cohort of hematopoietic cell transplant patients and donors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Current high-resolution HLA typing technologies frequently produce ambiguous results that mandate extended testing prior to reporting. Through multiplex sequencing of individual amplicons from many individuals at multiple loci, next generation sequencing (NGS) promises to eliminate heterozygote ambiguities and extend the breadth of genetic data acquired with little additional effort. We report here on assessment of a novel NGS HLA genotyping system for resequencing exons 2 and 3 of DRB1/B3/B4/B5, DQA1 and DQB1 and exon 2 of DPA1 and DPB1 on the MiSeq platform. In a cohort of 2605 hematopoietic cell transplant recipients and donors, NGS achieved 99.6% accuracy for DRB1 allele assignments and 99.5% for DQB1, compared to legacy genotypes generated pretransplant. NGS provided at least single 4-digit allele resolution for 97% of genotypes at DRB1 and 100% at DQB1. Overall, NGS typing identified 166 class II alleles, including 9 novel sequences with greater than 99% accuracy for DRB1 and DQB1 genotypes and elimination of diploid ambiguities through in-phase sequencing demonstrated the robust reliability of the NGS HLA genotyping reagents and analysis software employed in this study.

Anajane G. Smith; Chul-Woo Pyo; Wyatt Nelson; Edward Gow; Ruihan Wang; Shu Shen; Maggie Sprague; Shalini E. Pereira; Daniel E. Geraghty; John A. Hansen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

DISCOVERY OF A NEW MEMBER OF THE INNER OORT CLOUD FROM THE NEXT GENERATION VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

We report the discovery of 2010 GB{sub 174}, a likely new member of the Inner Oort Cloud (IOC). 2010 GB{sub 174} is 1 of 91 trans-Neptunian objects and Centaurs discovered in a 76 deg{sup 2} contiguous region imaged as part of the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS)—a moderate ecliptic latitude survey reaching a mean limiting magnitude of g' ? 25.5—using MegaPrime on the 3.6 m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. 2010 GB{sub 174} is found to have an orbit with a semi-major axis of a ? 350.8 AU, an inclination of i ? 21.°6, and a pericenter of q ? 48.5 AU. This is the second largest perihelion distance among known solar system objects. Based on the sky coverage and depth of the NGVS, we estimate the number of IOC members with sizes larger than 300 km (H{sub V} ? 6.2 mag) to be ? 11, 000. A comparison of the detection rate from the NGVS and the PDSSS (a characterized survey that 'rediscovered' the IOC object Sedna) gives, for an assumed a power-law luminosity function for IOC objects, a slope of ? ? 0.7 ± 0.2. With only two detections in this region this slope estimate is highly uncertain.

Chen, Ying-Tung; Ip, Wing-Huen [Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, No. 300, Jhongda Road, Jhongli City, Taoyuan County 32001, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, No. 300, Jhongda Road, Jhongli City, Taoyuan County 32001, Taiwan (China); Kavelaars, J. J.; Gwyn, Stephen; Ferrarese, Laura; Côté, Patrick [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)] [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Jordán, Andrés; Suc, Vincent [Instituto de Astrofísica, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, Macul 7820436, Santiago (Chile)] [Instituto de Astrofísica, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, Macul 7820436, Santiago (Chile); Cuillandre, Jean-Charles, E-mail: charles@astro.ncu.edu.tw [Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Corporation, 65-1238 Mamalahoa Hwy., Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States)] [Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Corporation, 65-1238 Mamalahoa Hwy., Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States)

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

434

A Non-Pyramidal Rectangular-to-Trough Waveguide Transition and Pattern Reconfigurable Trough Waveguide Antenna  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, rods, dielectrics, and other structures can create reconfigurable periodic line sources. These trough waveguide antennas (TWA) are then capable of providing both fixedfrequency and frequency-dependent beam steering. This was originally performed using...

Loizou, Loizos

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

435

Abstract A23: Comprehensive next-generation sequencing-based genomic profiling identifies actionable genomic alterations in diverse pediatric tumor types: The Foundation Medicine (FMI) experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based diagnostic test, optimized for routine clinical FFPE specimens...rearranged in cancer (previous version of the test) or 3,769 exons from 236 cancer-related...rearranged in cancer (current version of the test) was applied to 50ng of DNA extracted...

Matthew J. Hawryluk; Kai Wang; Juliann Chmielecki; Siraj M. Ali; Gary Palmer; Lazaro Garcia; Emily White; Roman Yelensky; Philip J. Stephens; Jeffrey S. Ross; Vincent A. Miller

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

Novel Approaches to High-Efficiency III-V Nitride Heterostructure Emitters for Next-Generation Lighting Applications  

SciTech Connect

We report research activities and technical progress on the development of high-efficiency long wavelength ({lambda} {approx} 540nm) green light emitting diodes which covers whole years of the three-year program 'Novel approaches to high-efficiency III-V nitride heterostructure emitters for next-generation lighting applications'. The research activities were focused on the development of p-type layer that has less/no detrimental thermal annealing effect on as well as excellent structural and electrical properties and the development of green LED active region that has superior luminescence quality for {lambda}{approx}540nm green LEDs. We have also studied (1) the thermal annealing effect on blue and green LED active region during the p-type layer growth; (2) the effect of growth parameters and structural factors for LED active region on electroluminescence properties; (3) the effect of substrates and orientation on electrical and electro-optical properties of green LEDs. As a progress highlight, we obtained green-LED-active-region-friendly In{sub 0.04}Ga{sub 0.96}N:Mg exhibiting low resistivity with higher hole concentration (p=2.0 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and a low resistivity of 0.5 {omega}-cm) and improved optical quality green LED active region emitting at {approx}540nm by electroluminescence. The LEDs with p-InGaN layer can act as a quantum-confined Stark effect mitigation layer by reducing strain in the QW. We also have achieved (projected) peak IQE of {approx}25% at {lambda}{approx}530 nm and of {approx}13% at {lambda}{approx}545 nm. Visible LEDs on a non-polar substrate using (11-20) {alpha}-plane bulk substrates. The absence of quantum-confined Stark effect was confirmed but further improvement in electrical and optical properties is required.

Russell Dupuis

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

437

Solar Trough Power Plants: Office of Power Technologies (OPT) Success Stories Series Fact Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Concentrating Solar Power Program Concentrating Solar Power Program Office of Solar Energy Technologies operate for 80% of the summer mid-peak hours and 66% of the winter mid-peak hours. A natural gas backup system supplements the solar capacity and contributes 25% of the plants' annual output. The SEGS plants use parabolic-trough solar collectors to capture the sun's energy and convert it to heat. In the SEGS design, the curved solar collectors focus sunlight onto a receiver pipe. Mechanical controls slowly rotate the collectors during the day, keeping them aimed at the sun as it travels across the sky. Synthetic oil flowing through the receiver pipe serves as the heat transfer medium. The collectors concentrate sunlight 30 to 60 times the normal intensity on the receiver, heating the oil as high as 735°F (390°C).

438

Reactor Physics Parametric and Depletion Studies in Support of TRISO Particle Fuel Specification for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect

Reactor physics calculations were initiated to answer several major questions related to the proposed TRISO-coated particle fuel that is to be used in the prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) or the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). These preliminary design evaluation calculations help ensure that the upcoming fuel irradiation tests will test appropriate size and type of fuel particles for a future NGNP reactor design. Conclusions from these calculations are expected to confirm and suggest possible modifications to the current particle fuel parameters specified in the evolving Fuel Specification. Calculated results dispel the need for a binary fuel particle system, which is proposed in the General Atomics GT-MHR concept. The GT-MHR binary system is composed of both a fissile and fertile particle with 350- and 500- micron kernel diameters, respectively. For the NGNP reactor, a single fissile particle system (single UCO kernel size) can meet the reactivity and power cycle length requirements demanded of the NGNP. At the same time, it will provide substantial programmatic cost savings by eliminating the need for dual particle fabrication process lines and dual fuel particle irradiation tests required of a binary system. Use of a larger 425-micron kernel diameter single fissile particle (proposed here), as opposed to the 350-micron GT-MHR fissile particle size, helps alleviate current compact particle packing fractions fabrication limitations (<35%), improves fuel block loading for higher n-batch reload options, and tracks the historical correlation between particle size and enrichment (10 and 14 wt% U-235 particle enrichments are proposed for the NGNP). Overall, the use of the slightly larger kernel significantly broadens the NGNP reactor core design envelope and provides increased design margin to accommodate the (as yet) unknown final NGNP reactor design. Maximum power-peaking factors are calculated for both the initial and equilibrium NGNP cores. Radial power-peaking can be fully controlled with particle packing fraction zoning (no enrichment zoning required) and discrete burnable poison rods. Optimally loaded NGNP cores can expect radial powerpeaking factors as low as 1.14 at beginning of cycle (BOC), increasing slowly to a value of 1.25 by end of cycle (EOC), an axial power-peaking value of 1.30 (BOC), and for individual fuel particles in the maximum compact <1.05 (BOC) and an approximate value of 1.20 (EOC) due to Pu-239 buildup in particles on the compact periphery. The NGNP peak particle powers, using a conservative total power-peaking factor (~2.1 factor), are expected to be <150 mW/particle (well below the 250 mW/particle limit, even with the larger 425-micron kernel size).

James W. Sterbentz; Bren Phillips; Robert L. Sant; Gray S. Chang; Paul D. Bayless

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Maintaining a Technology-Neutral Approach to Hydrogen Production Process Development through Conceptual Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project was authorized in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), tasking the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with demonstrating High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology. The demonstration is to include the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of HTGR technology for the production of electricity and hydrogen. The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI), a component of the DOE Hydrogen Program managed by the Office of Nuclear Energy, is also investigating multiple approaches to cost effective hydrogen production from nuclear energy. The objective of NHI is development of the technology and information basis for a future decision on commercial viability. The initiatives are clearly intertwined. While the objectives of NGNP and NHI are generally consistent, NGNP has progressed to the project definition phase and the project plan has matured. Multiple process applications for the NGNP require process heat, electricity and hydrogen in varied combinations and sizes. Coupling these processes to the reactor in multiple configurations adds complexity to the design, licensing and demonstration of both the reactor and the hydrogen production process. Commercial viability of hydrogen production may depend on the specific application and heat transport configuration. A component test facility (CTF) is planned by the NGNP to support testing and demonstration of NGNP systems, including those for hydrogen production, in multiple configurations. Engineering-scale demonstrations in the CTF are expected to start in 2012 to support scheduled design and licensing activities leading to subsequent construction and operation. Engineering-scale demonstrations planned by NHI are expected to start at least two years later. Reconciliation of these schedules is recommended to successfully complete both initiatives. Hence, closer and earlier integration of hydrogen process development and heat transport systems is sensible. For integration purposes, an analysis comparing the design, cost and schedule impact of maintaining a technology neutral approach through conceptual design or making an early hydrogen process technology selection was performed. Early selection does not specifically eliminate a technology, but rather selects the first hydrogen technology for demonstration. A systems-engineering approach was taken to define decision-making criteria for selecting a hydrogen technology. The relative technical, cost and schedule risks of each approach were analyzed and risk mitigation strategies were recommended, including provisions to maintain close collaboration with the NHI. The results of these analyses are presented here.

Michael W. Patterson

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Modeling Photovoltaic and Concentrating Solar Power Trough Performance, Cost, and Financing with Solar Advisor Model  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive solar technology systems analysis model, the Solar Advisor Model (SAM), has been developed to support the federal R&D community and the solar industry by staff at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Sandia National Laboratory. This model is able to model the finances, incentives, and performance of flat-plate photovoltaic (PV), concentrating PV, and concentrating solar power (specifically, parabolic troughs). The primary function of the model is to allow users to investigate the impact of variations in performance, cost, and financial parameters to better understand their impact on key figures of merit. Figures of merit related to the cost and performance of these systems include, but aren't limited to, system output, system efficiencies, levelized cost of energy, return on investment, and system capital and O&M costs. SAM allows users to do complex system modeling with an intuitive graphical user interface (GUI). In fact, all tables and graphics for this paper are taken directly from the model GUI. This model has the capability to compare different solar technologies within the same interface, making use of similar cost and finance assumptions. Additionally, the ability to do parametric and sensitivity analysis is central to this model. There are several models within SAM to model the performance of photovoltaic modules and inverters. This paper presents an overview of each PV and inverter model, introduces a new generic model, and briefly discusses the concentrating solar power (CSP) parabolic trough model. A comparison of results using the different PV and inverter models is also presented.

Blair, N.; Mehos, M.; Christensen, C.; Cameron, C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "next-generation parabolic trough" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Modeling Photovoltaic and Concentrating Solar Power Trough Performance, Cost, and Financing with the Solar Advisor Model: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive solar technology systems analysis model, the Solar Advisor Model (SAM), has been developed to support the federal R&D community and the solar industry by staff at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Sandia National Laboratory. This model is able to model the finances, incentives, and performance of flat-plate photovoltaic (PV), concentrating PV, and concentrating solar power (specifically, parabolic troughs). The primary function of the model is to allow users to investigate the impact of variations in performance, cost, and financial parameters to better understand their impact on key figures of merit. Figures of merit related to the cost and performance of these systems include, but aren't limited to, system output, system efficiencies, levelized cost of energy, return on investment, and system capital and O&M costs. There are several models within SAM to model the performance of photovoltaic modules and inverters. This paper presents an overview of each PV and inverter model, introduces a new generic model, and briefly discusses the concentrating solar power (CSP) parabolic trough model. A comparison of results using the different PV and inverter models is also presented.

Blair, N.; Mehos, M.; Christensen, C.; Cameron, C.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

The Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic) project is supported by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research in the DOE Office of Science.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic) project is supported by the Office 600 800 1000 1200 1400 m/z 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 8x10 Intensity Degradation products/Organic acids ­ Chemical Characteristics Summary and Implications In order to predict rates of carbon release from tundra

443

NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT-MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY WITH POLYMER COMPONENTS WITHIN MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT (FINAL REPORT)  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The first deployment target for the technology is within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the facility. This report provides the data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The test was conducted over six months. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers present in MCU (i.e., PEEK, Grafoil, Tefzel and Isolast) in the modified NGS (where the concentration of LIX{reg_sign}79 and MaxCalix was varied systematically) showed that LIX{reg_sign}79 selectively affected Tefzel and its different grades (by an increase in size and lowering its density). The copolymer structure of Tefzel and possibly its porosity allows for the easier diffusion of LIX{reg_sign}79. Tefzel is used as the seat material in some of the valves at MCU. Long term exposure to LIX{reg_sign}79, may make the valves hard to operate over time due to the seat material (Tefzel) increasing in size. However, since the physical changes of Tefzel in the improved solvent are comparable to the changes in the CSSX baseline solvent, no design changes are needed with respect to the Tefzel seating material. PEEK, Grafoil and Isolast were not affected by LIX{reg_sign}79 and MaxCalix within six months of exposure. The initial rapid weight gain observed in every polymer is assigned to the finite and limited uptake of Isopar{reg_sign} L/Modifier by the polymers probably due to the polymers porosity and rough surfaces. Spectroscopic data on the organic liquid and the polymer surfaces showed no preferential adsorption of any component in the NGS to the polymers and with the exception of CPVC, no leachate was observed in the NGS from any of the polymers studied. The testing shows no major concerns for compatibility over the short duration of these tests but does indicate that longer duration exposure studies are warranted, especially for Tefzel. However, the physical changes experienced by Tefzel in the improved solvent were comparable to the physical changes obtained when Tefzel is placed in CSSX baseline solvent. Therefore, there is no effect of the improved solvent beyond those observed in CSSX baseline solvent.

Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.; Fink, S.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

444

Geothermal Literature Review At Salton Trough Geothermal Area (1984) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trough Geothermal Area (1984) Trough Geothermal Area (1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Salton Trough Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Salton Trough Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date 1984 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The melt zones of volcanic clusters was analyzed with recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. References Goldstein, N. E.; Flexser, S. (1 December 1984) Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences

445

Parabolic cylinder functions implemented in Matlab  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Routines for computation of Weber's parabolic cylinder functions and their derivatives are implemented in Matlab for both moderate and great values of the argument. Standard, real solutions are considered. Tables of values are included.

E. Cojocaru

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

Filamentation Time Diagnosis of Thinning Troughs and Cutoff Lows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper analyzes synoptic-scale trough-thinning processes using a filamentation time diagnostic. The filamentation time diagnostic is derived from the potential vorticity equation expressed in spherical coordinates in the horizontal plane and ...

Yu-Ming Tsai; Hung-Chi Kuo; Wayne H. Schubert

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

The Next Generation Nuclear The Next Generation Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use VHTR technology to: Use VHTR technology to: Produce electricity, and Produce electricity, and Process heat for hydrogen production and other Process heat for...

448

NGLS: Next Generation Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab masthead Berkeley Lab A-Z Index Phone Book Careers Search DOE logo Lab masthead Berkeley Lab A-Z Index Phone Book Careers Search DOE logo NGLS logo NGLS Science NGLS Technology Seminars Workshop/Reports Related Links Further Info NGLS Facility Combustion Photosynthesis Photosynthesis Photosynthesis Today is a golden age for light sources. Storage ring-based synchrotrons routinely provide X-ray beams exploited by thousands of scientists annually to answer fundamental questions in diverse fields including human health, energy, and electronics and information processing. MORE > NGLS Science Science section chart NGLS CD-0 Proposal NGLS Technology Technology section chart Seminars Science section chart Workshops Science section chart Last updated 06/21/2013 Top A U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratory Operated by the University

449

Cleveland Clinic Next Generation Neuroimaging  

SciTech Connect

This was an award to purchase equipment for state-of-the-art MRI radiofrequency coils. There was no personnel effort or construction as a part of this project. This report details the final status of the approved budget items for this project. All approved budget items were successfully delivered and installed. The equipment provided to Cleveland Clinic under this project will allow Cleveland Clinic researchers to build imaging equipment with improved capability to investigate brain disorders.

Lowe, Mark

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

450

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High- importance phenomena related to the RPV include crack initiation and subcritical crack growth; field fabrication process control; property control in heavy...

451

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of enhanced heat transfer in the primary heat exchanger. After blowdown, there will be a loss of the heat sink. < Leak into reactor primary system. The total gas inventory in the...

452

Multicast Audio: The Next Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Perkins,C.S. Hardman,V. Kouvelas,I. Sasse,M.A. Proceedings of INET'97, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, June 1997 Internet Society

Perkins, C.S.; Hardman, V.; Kouvelas, I.; Sasse, M.A.; Proceedings of INET'97, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, June 1997 Internet Society [More Details

453

Design and synthesis of the next generation of crown ethers for waste separations: An inter-laboratory comprehensive proposal. 1998 annual progress report  

SciTech Connect

'The purpose of this task is to undertake the design, synthesis, and characterization of the next generation of crown ethers for metal-ion separations applicable to USDOE''s environmental needs. Target problems include: Li{sup +} ions leaching from burial sites at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant; fission products 90 Sr and {sup 137}Cs contaminating high-level tank wastes at Hanford, INEEL, and Savannah River; and radium in wastes at the Niagara Falls Storage Site. Unfortunately, the technologies needed to address these problems either do not exist or exhibit substantial deficiencies. Separation techniques such as solvent extraction and ion exchange promise to play a strong role, especially as enhanced with highly selective crown ethers and calixarenes. This project is midway through year 2 of a 3-year effort. Below is given a summary of progress in the approximate period September, 1997, to May, 1998, for each of the four co-investigators at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the University of Tennessee (UTK). The overall approach entails utilization of theory and molecular modeling (PNNL), organic synthesis of novel crown compounds (ORNL), solvent extraction studies (ORNL and ANL), and studies of polymer-immobilized crown ethers (UTK).'

Moyer, B.A.; Hay, B.P.; Dietz, M.L.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Sachleben, R.A.; Chiarizia, R.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Aeolian sediment transport pathways and aerodynamics at troughs Mary C. Bourke1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aeolian sediment transport pathways and aerodynamics at troughs on Mars Mary C. Bourke1 School pathways and aerodynamics at troughs on Mars, J. Geophys. Res., 109, E07005, doi:10.1029/2003JE002155. 1

Bourke, Mary C.

455

Study Of a Solar Trough Concentrating System for Application of Solar Energy Refrigeration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A solar concentrating trough device has been constructed for further application of solar heating and power system or solar refrigeration. A model for both evacuated tube and copper tube heated by solar trough co...

Li Ming; Wang Liuling; Zhou Xizheng…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

A study of mobile trough genesis over the Yellow Sea - East China Sea region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analyzed. The troughs were selected from the objective climatology of mobile troughs by Lefevre and Nielsen-Gammon (1995). A quasigeostrophic potential vorticity (QGPV) and associated piecewise tendency diagnosis (PTD) technique developed by Nielsen...

Komar, Keith Nickolas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

457

A Review of Cold Fronts with Prefrontal Troughs and Wind Shifts DAVID M. SCHULTZ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Review of Cold Fronts with Prefrontal Troughs and Wind Shifts DAVID M. SCHULTZ Cooperative with a pressure trough and a distinct wind shift at the surface. Many cold fronts, however, do not conform to this model--time series at a single surface station may possess a pressure trough and wind shift in the warm

Schultz, David

458

Seasonal variation of upper-level mobile trough development upstream of the Pacific storm track  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of upper-level mobile troughs as they enter and exit the DZ as well as over the western Pacific, using Lefevre and Nielsen-Gammon's trough tracking data (1995). The relationship between deformation and trough intensification upstream of the Pacific storm...

Myoung, Boksoon

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

459

Developments in the NAG library software for parabolic equations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The NAG Library parabolic partial differential equation (p.d.e ... Software and so offers a range of different space discretization methods that can be applied to...

M. Berzins

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Effects of environmental factors on the conversion efficiency of solar thermoelectric co-generators comprising parabola trough collectors and thermoelectric modules without evacuated tubular collector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Solar thermoelectric co-generators (STECGs) are an attractive means of supplying electric power and heat simultaneously and economically. Here we examine the effects of environmental factors on the conversion efficiencies of a new type of STECG comprising parabolic trough concentrators and thermoelectric modules (TEMs). Each TEM array was bonded with a solar selective absorber plate and directly positioned on the focal axis of the parabolic concentrator. Glass tubular collectors were not used to encase the TEMs. Although this makes the overall system simpler, the environmental effects become significant. Simulations show that the performance of such a system strongly depends on ambient conditions such as solar insolation, atmospheric temperature and wind velocity. As each of these factors increases, the thermal losses of the STECG system also increase, resulting in reduced solar conversion efficiency, despite the increased radiation absorption. However, the impact of these factors is relatively complicated. Although the electrical efficiency of the system increases with increasing solar insolation, it decreases with increasing ambient temperature and wind velocity. These results serve as a useful guide to the selection and installation of STECGs, particularly in Guangzhou or similar climate region.

Chao Li; Ming Zhang; Lei Miao; Jianhua Zhou; Yi Pu Kang; C.A.J. Fisher; Kaoru Ohno; Yang Shen; Hong Lin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Parabolic refined invariants and Macdonald polynomials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A string theoretic derivation is given for the conjecture of Hausel, Letellier, and Rodriguez-Villegas on the cohomology of character varieties with marked points. Their formula is identified with a refined BPS expansion in the stable pair theory of a local root stack, generalizing previous work of the first two authors in collaboration with G. Pan. Haiman's geometric construction for Macdonald polynomials is shown to emerge naturally in this context via geometric engineering. In particular this yields a new conjectural relation between Macdonald polynomials and refined local orbifold curve counting invariants. The string theoretic approach also leads to a new spectral cover construction for parabolic Higgs bundles in terms of holomorphic symplectic orbifolds.

Chuang, Wu-yen; Donagi, Ron; Pantev, Tony

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Thermal Analysis of Compound—Parabolic Concentrating Solar Energy Collectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Despite the vast attention devoted recently to the design and development of effective collectors for harnessing solar energy at medium and high temperatures (>100° ... in the design of the compound parabolic con...

B. Norton; D. E. Prapas

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Bubble stabilized discontinuous Galerkin method for parabolic and elliptic problems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we give an analysis of a bubble stabilized discontinuous Galerkin method for elliptic and parabolic problems. The method consists of stabilizing the numerical scheme by enriching the discontinuou...

Erik Burman; Benjamin Stamm

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Baseload Solar Power for California? Ammonia-based Solar Energy Storage Using Trough Concentrators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Baseload Solar Power for California? Ammonia-based Solar Energy Storage Using Trough Concentrators to eventually optimise the reactor geometry for ammonia-based solar energy storage with troughs, which.1. Storing Solar Energy with Ammonia H2 / N2 gas liquid NH3 Heat Exchangers Power Generation (Steam Cycle

465

Evolution and preservation of closed linear troughs in the Hueco bolson of west Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, have been and are now taking place along the length of the troughs. Those adjustments act to offset the effects of aeolian processes, preserving the troughs over time as areas of depression. Several minable sand and gavel deposits have been located...

Burrell, Jonathan K

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

466

Seismic reflection data analysis of the Oriente and Swan Fracture Zones bounding the Cayman Trough  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dredgings within the trough and recovered serpentinite, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, spinel and probably psuedomorphs after olivine. This indicated to them that the serpentinite samples were serpentinized spinel Iherzolite. This original mineral... dredgings within the trough and recovered serpentinite, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, spinel and probably psuedomorphs after olivine. This indicated to them that the serpentinite samples were serpentinized spinel Iherzolite. This original mineral...

Tinker, Mary Norris

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

467

3X compound parabolic concentrating (CPC) solar energy collector. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

Chamberlain engineers designed a 3X compound parabolic concentrating (CPC) collector for the subject contract. The collector is a completely housed, 105.75 x 44.75 x 10.23-inch, 240-pound unit with six each evacuated receiver assemblies, a center manifold and a one-piece glass cover. A truncated version of a CPC trough reflector system and the General Electric Company tubular evacuated receiver have been integrated with a mass producible collector design suitable for operation at 250 to 450/sup 0/F. The key criterion for optimization of the design was minimization of the cost per Btu collected annually at an operating temperature of 400/sup 0/F. The reflector is a 4.1X design truncated to a total height of 8.0 inches with a resulting actual concentration ratio of 2.6 to 1. The manifold is an insulated area housing the fluid lines which connect the six receivers in series with inlet and outlet tubes extending from one side of the collector at the center. The reflectors are polished, anodized aluminum which are shaped by the roll form process. The housing is painted, galvanized steel, and the cover glass is 3/16-inch thick tempered, low iron glass. The collector requires four slope adjustments per year for optimum effectiveness. Chamberlain produced ten 3X CPC collectors for the subject contract. Two collectors were used to evaluate assembly procedures, six were sent to the project officer in Albuquerque, New Mexico, one was sent to Argonne National Laboratory for performance testing and one remained with the Company. A manufacturing cost study was conducted to estimate limited mass production costs, explore cost reduction ideas and define tooling requirements. The final effort discussed shows the preliminary design for application of a 3X CPC solar collector system for use in the Iowa State Capitol complex.

Ballheim, R.W.

1980-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

468

Effects of Monsoon Trough Intraseasonal Oscillation on Tropical Cyclogenesis over the Western North Pacific  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of intraseasonal oscillation (ISO) of the western North Pacific (WNP) monsoon trough on tropical cyclone (TC) formation were investigated using the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (ARW) Model. A weak vortex was ...

Xi Cao; Tim Li; Melinda Peng; Wen Chen; Guanghua Chen

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Analytic, axisymmetric MHD spheromak type equilibria in parabolic coordinates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analytic equilibria of a spheromak type plasma are obtained for finite pressure and poloidal current profiles as solutions of the Grad-Shafranov equation in parabolic coordinates. Simple force-free configurations are determined which ensure plasma confinement within two intersecting paraboloids (parabolomak). Plasma elongation as a function of plasma pressure as well as the minimum value of the safety factor are also estimated.

G.N. Throumoulopoulos; G. Pantis

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

IR Spectrometer Using 90-degree Off-axis Parabolic Mirrors  

SciTech Connect

A gated spectrometer has been designed for real-time, pulsed infrared (IR) studies at the National Synchrotron Light ource at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. A pair of 90-degree, off-axis parabolic mirrors are used to relay the light from an entrance slit to an output IR recording camera. With an initial wavelength range of 1500–4500 nm required, gratings could not be used in the spectrometer because grating orders would overlap. A magnesium oxide prism, placed between these parabolic mirrors, serves as the dispersion element. The spectrometer is doubly telecentric. With proper choice of the air spacing between the prism and the second parabolic mirror, any spectral region of interest within the InSb camera array’s sensitivity region can be recorded. The wavelengths leaving the second parabolic mirror are collimated, thereby relaxing the camera positioning tolerance. To set up the instrument, two different wavelength (visible) lasers are introduced at the entrance slit and made collinear with the optical axis via flip mirrors. After dispersion by the prism, these two laser beams are directed to tick marks located on the outside housing of the gated IR camera. This provides first-order wavelength calibration for the instrument. Light that is reflected off the front prism face is coupled into a high-speed detector to verify steady radiance during the gated spectral imaging. Alignment features include tick marks on the prism and parabolic mirrors. This instrument was designed to complement singlepoint pyrometry, which provides continuous time histories of a small collection of spots from shock-heated targets.

Robert M. Malone, Richard, G. Hacking, Ian J. McKenna, and Daniel H. Dolan

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

471

Defining the next generation munitions handler  

SciTech Connect

RHIC 8 cm aperture dipole magnets and quadrupole cold masses are being built for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) by Northrop-Grumman Corporation at a production rate of one dipole magnet and two quadrupole cold masses per day. This work was preceded by a lengthy Technology Transfer effort which is described elsewhere. This paper describes the tooling which is being used for the construction effort, the production operations at each workstation, and also the use of trend plots of critical construction parameters as a tool for monitoring performance in production. A report on the improvements to production labor since the start of the programs is also provided. The magnet and cold mass designs, and magnetic test results are described in more detail in a separate paper.

Cassiday, B.K.; Koury, G.J. [San Antonio Air Logistics Center, Kelly AFB, TX (United States); Pin, F.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Next-Generation Thermionic Solar Energy Conversion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermionic Solar Energy Conversion SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Award Number: CPS 25659 | April 15, 2013 | Melosh * Fabricate heterostructure semiconductor cathodes based...

473

Next Generation Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. A. ; MacRenaris, K. W. ; Parigi, G. ; Luchinat, C. ; Ho,R. ; Eckermann, A. L. ; Parigi, G. ; Luchinat, C. ; Meade,E. A. ; MacRenaris, K. W. ; Parigi, G. ; Luchinat, C. ; Ho,

Klemm, Piper Julia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Developing next generation ADLs through MDE techniques  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Despite the flourishing of languages to describe software architectures, existing Architecture Description Languages (ADLs) are still far away from what it is actually needed. In fact, while they support a traditional perception of a Software Architecture ... Keywords: ADL, metamodeling, model driven, modeling, software architecture

Davide Di Ruscio; Ivano Malavolta; Henry Muccini; Patrizio Pelliccione; Alfonso Pierantonio

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z