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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "newnan wtr sewer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Virgin Islands Wtr&Pwr Auth | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,Save EnergyGlouster,Winside, Nebraska (Utility Company)Wtr&Pwr

2

Sanitary Sewer System Management Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contract Number DE- AC02-05CH11231 #12;#12;LBNL SSMP TABLE OF CONTENTS SSMP Section Tab / Page # Section 0 0-1: LBNL CIWQS Sewer System Questionnaire Attachment 0-2: LBNL Facility Sanitary Sewer Collection System Overview Map Section i: Goals None Section ii: Organization Attachment ii-1: LBNL Notice of Intent

3

The Impact of Emerging Technologies: Proteins' Baby Pictures -Techno... http://www.technologyreview.com/BioTech-Genomics/wtr_16635,312,p... 1 of 2 3/30/2006 9:06 AM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Impact of Emerging Technologies: Proteins' Baby Pictures - Techno... http://www.technologyreview.com/BioTech-Genomics in looking at low-activity genes. Much of the genome, however, is not highly active. In his experiments, Xie Technologies: Proteins' Baby Pictures - Techno... http://www.technologyreview.com/BioTech-Genomics/wtr_16635

Heller, Eric

4

anaerobic sewer biofilms: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Matter in the Sewers of Chicago Presenter: Juan Collar Time & Date: 7 for Cosmic Dark Matter in the Sewers of Chicago Presenter: Juan Collar Time & Date: 7-9 PM Monday September...

5

Microsoft Word - Longview_SewerMainProject_CX_2012.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

sewer line would be a 20-inch-diameter pipe (forcemain) made of high-density polyethylene (HDPE). It would be buried at a depth of 4-5 feet within BPA's Longview-Cowlitz No....

6

Santa Clara Water and Sewer- Solar Water Heating Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In 1975, the City of Santa Clara established the nation's first municipal solar utility. Under the Solar Water Heating Program, the Santa Clara Water and Sewer Utilities Department supplies,...

7

Project L-070, ``300 Area process sewer piping system upgrade`` Project Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the project management plan for Project L-070, 300 Area process sewer system upgrades.

Wellsfry, H.E.

1994-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

8

Challenges of Handling Storm Water Runoff Through Municipal Sewer Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cleaned and retained as a Best Management Practice (BMP). Receives only non-industrial storm water on storm water are leading municipalities to change permitting practices. As a result, facilitiesChallenges of Handling Storm Water Runoff Through Municipal Sewer Systems A South Carolina Case

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

9

Flooding in urban drainage systems: Coupling hyperbolic conservation laws for sewer systems and surface flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we propose a model for a sewer network coupled to surface flow and investigate it numerically. In particular, we present a new model for the manholes in storm sewer systems. It is derived using the balance of the total energy in the complete network. The resulting system of equations contains, aside from hyperbolic conservation laws for the sewer network and algebraic relations for the coupling conditions, a system of ODEs governing the flow in the manholes. The manholes provide natural points for the interaction of the sewer system and the run off on the urban surface modelled by shallow water equations. Finally, a numerical method for the coupled system is presented. In several numerical tests we study the influence of the manhole model on the sewer system and the coupling with 2D surface flow.

Borsche, Raul

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

EA-0907: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Sewer System Upgrade Project, Idaho Falls, Idaho  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to upgrade the Sewer System at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) near Idaho Falls, Idaho. The...

11

Guide to Laboratory Sink/Sewer Disposal of Wastes EPA Compliance Fact Sheet: Revision 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to collect and manage hazardous wastes, contact VEHS. WASTES FORBIDDEN FROM SINK/SEWER DISPOSAL The following be collected and managed as hazardous waste. 1. Raw Chemical Waste. Unused, pure, or concentrated chemicals. 2 it is part of a written protocol for the laboratory process generating the waste and the neutralization

Wikswo, John

12

A review of the Y-12 Plant discharge of enriched uranium to the sanitary sewer (DEUSS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant is situated adjacent to the Oak Ridge city limits and is operated by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The Y-12 Plant is located on 4,860 acres, which is collectively referred to as the Y-12 Plant site. Among the missions for which the facility is in existence are producing nuclear weapons components, supporting weapon design laboratories, and processing special nuclear materials (SNM). The Y-12 Plant is under the regulatory guidance of DOE Order 5400.5 and has complied with the technical requirements governing SNM since its issue. However, an in-depth review with appropriate documentation had not been performed, prior to the effect presented herein, to substantiate this claim. As a result of the solid waste issue, it was determined that other types of waste should be formally reviewed for content with respect to SNM. Therefore, a project was formed to investigate the conveyance of SNM through the sanitary sewer system. It is emphasized that this project addresses only effluent from the sanitary sewer system and not the storm sewer system. The project reviewed sanitary sewer data both for the Y-12 Plant and the Y-12 Plant site.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Physical and chemical parameters in wastewater and at the water-sediment interface in sewer network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physical and chemical parameters in wastewater and at the water- sediment interface in sewer parameters and concentrations of major ions, trace metals and sulphur species in wastewater but also, to the biogeochemical transformation of inorganic and organic compounds present in the wastewater (Ashley et al., 2004

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

14

An investigation of leaky sewers as a source of fecal contamination in the stormwater drainage system in Singapore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A preliminary investigation was conducted into possible pathways for fecal contamination to enter stormwater drains from leaky underground sewer lines in Singapore. The island's drainage channels flow into catchment ...

Doshi, Janhvi (Janhvi Manoj)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Evaluation of exposure pathways to man from disposal of radioactive materials into sanitary sewer systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In accordance with 10 CFR 20, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulates licensees` discharges of small quantities of radioactive materials into sanitary sewer systems. This generic study was initiated to examine the potential radiological hazard to the public resulting from exposure to radionuclides in sewage sludge during its treatment and disposal. Eleven scenarios were developed to characterize potential exposures to radioactive materials during sewer system operations and sewage sludge treatment and disposal activities and during the extended time frame following sewage sludge disposal. Two sets of deterministic dose calculations were performed; one to evaluate potential doses based on the radionuclides and quantities associated with documented case histories of sewer system contamination and a second, somewhat more conservative set, based on theoretical discharges at the maximum allowable levels for a more comprehensive list of 63 radionuclides. The results of the stochastic uncertainty and sensitivity analysis were also used to develop a collective dose estimate. The collective doses for the various radionuclides and scenarios range from 0.4 person-rem for {sup 137}Cs in Scenario No. 5 (sludge incinerator effluent) to 420 person-rem for {sup 137}Cs in Scenario No. 3 (sewage treatment plant liquid effluent). None of the 22 scenario/radionuclide combinations considered have collective doses greater than 1000 person-rem/yr. However, the total collective dose from these 22 combinations was found to be about 2100 person-rem.

Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Parkhurst, M.A.; Aaberg, R.L.; Rhoads, K.C.; Hill, R.L.; Martin, J.B. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Numerical solution of a two-scale system for concrete corrosion in sewer pipes Vladimir Chalupecky (chalupecky@math.kyushu-u.ac.jp) Faculty of Mathematics, Kyushu University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of aggressive compounds like sulfuric acid. Concrete is a material with porous structure ­ it can be viewedNumerical solution of a two-scale system for concrete corrosion in sewer pipes Vladim´ir Chalupeck-diffusion (RD) systems mod- eling sulfate attack in concrete structures (here: sewer pipes). The systems

Ishii, Hitoshi

17

Remediation of Mercury-Contaminated Storm Sewer Sediments from the West End Mercury Area at the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tennessee - 12061  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, TN has faced an ongoing challenge from mercury entrapped in soils beneath and adjacent to buildings, storm sewers, and process pipelines. Previous actions to reduce the quantity and/or mobilization of mercury-contaminated media have included plugging of building floor drains, cleaning of sediment and sludge from sumps, manholes, drain lines, and storm sewers, lining/relining of storm sewers and replacement of a portion of the storm sewer trunk line, re-routing and removal of process piping, and installation of the Central Mercury Treatment System to capture and treat contaminated sump water. Despite the success of these actions, mercury flux in the storm sewer out-falls that discharge to Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) continues to pose a threat to long-term water quality. A video camera survey of the storm sewer network revealed several sections of storm sewer that had large cracks, separations, swells, and accumulations of sediment/sludge and debris. The selected remedy was to clean and line the sections of storm sewer pipe that were determined to be primary contributors to the mercury flux in the storm sewer out-falls. The project, referred to as the West End Mercury Area (WEMA) Storm Sewer Remediation Project, included cleaning sediment and debris from over 2,460 meters of storm sewer pipe followed by the installation of nearly 366 meters of cure-in-place pipe (CIPP) liner. One of the greatest challenges to the success of this project was the high cost of disposal associated with the mercury-contaminated sludge and wastewater generated from the storm sewer cleaning process. A contractor designed and operated an on-site wastewater pre-treatment system that successfully reduced mercury levels in 191 cubic meters of sludge to levels that allowed it to be disposed at Nevada Nuclear Security Site (NNSS) disposal cell as a non-hazardous, low-level waste. The system was also effective at pre-treating over 1,514,000 liters of wastewater to levels that met the waste acceptance criteria for the on-site West End [wastewater] Treatment Facility (WETF). This paper describes the storm sewer cleaning and lining process and the methods used to process the mercury-contaminated sludge and wastewater, as well as several 'lessons learned' that would be relevant to any future projects involving storm sewer cleaning and debris remediation. (authors)

Tremaine, Diana [Science and Ecology Corporation, Knoxville, Tennessee, 37931 (United States); Douglas, Steven G. [B and W Y-12, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

An analysis of the Cured-in-Place Pipe (CIPP) subproject of the sanitary sewer rehabilitation project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The comprehensive rehabilitation of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Sanitary Sewer System centers around a Cured-in-Place Pipe project. Driven by regulatory requirements to eliminate the potential for exfiltration, a careful condition assessment of the existing infrastructure was conducted. Under programmatic constraints to maintain continuous operations, the INLINER USA cured-in-place pipe system was selected as the appropriate technology, and the project is currently under contract.

Morrow, W.; Siemiatkoski, S.

1994-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

19

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-26:10, 1607-F3 Sanitary Sewer Pipelines (182-F, 183-F, and 151-F Sanitary Sewer Lines), Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-028  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 100-F-26:10 waste site includes sanitary sewer lines that serviced the former 182-F, 183-F, and 151-F Buildings. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

20

Isolation of heavy metal influx to the Cookeville sanitary sewer system and impact on municipal sludge management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The city of Cookeville, Tennessee, has been experiencing problems with municipal sludge management. Of particular concern was the high concentration of regulated trace metals in the sludge. Primarily, cadmium limited the amount of sludge which was spread on the available cropland in 1985. The purpose of this project was to determine the major sources of heavy metal influx to the city's sanitary sewer system and the potential effects of heavy metals on sludge management. In general, the findings of the study indicate that city enforcement of existing State of Tennessee and city industrial pretreatment requirements will most likely extend the useful life of the currently available 388 ha land application sites to as much as ten years for certain sites. Cadmium governed the annual sludge application rates to the agricultural land. One plating industry discharged over 90% of the cadmium, copper, nickel, and zinc mass to the sanitary sewer. In addition, during 1986, the average concentration of most of the trace metals monitored in the municipal sludge deceased from levels reported in 1985.

George, D.B.; Borup, M.B.; Adams, V.D.; Prehn, M.P. (Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville (USA))

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "newnan wtr sewer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Solar energy system performance evaluation: final report for Honeywell OTS 41, Shenandoah (Newnan), Georgia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operation and technical performance of the Solar Operational Test Site (OTS 41) located at Shenandoah, Georgia, are described, based on the analysis of data collected between January and August 1981. The following topics are discussed: system description, performance assessment, operating energy, energy savings, system maintenance, and conclusions. The solar energy system at OTS 41 is a hydronic heating and cooling system consisting of 702 square feet of liquid-cooled flat-plate collectors; a 1000-gallon thermal storage tank; a 3-ton capacity organic Rankine-cycle-engine-assisted air conditioner; a water-to-air heat exchanger for solar space heating; a finned-tube coil immersed in the storage tank to preheat water for a gas-fired hot water heater; and associated piping, pumps, valves, and controls. The solar system has six basic modes of operation and several combination modes. The system operation is controlled automatically by a Honeywell-designed microprocessor-based control system, which also provides diagnostics. Based on the instrumented test data monitored and collected during the 7 months of the Operational Test Period, the solar system collected 53 MMBtu of thermal energy of the total incident solar energy of 219 MMBtu and provided 11.4 MMBtu for cooling, 8.6 MMBtu for heating, and 8.1 MMBtu for domestic hot water. The projected net annual energy savings due to the solar system were approximately 50 MMBtu of fossil energy (49,300 cubic feet of natural gas) and a loss of 280 kWh(e) of electrical energy.

Mathur, A K; Pederson, S

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

LETTER REPORT. INDEPENDENT CONFIRMATORY SURVEY RESULTS OF SOILS ASSOCIATED WITH THE ARGYLE STREET SEWER LINE AT THE UNITED NUCLEAR CORPORATION NAVAL PRODUCTS SITE, NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) personnel visited the United Nuclear Corporation (UNC) Naval Products site on three separate occasions during the months of October and November 2011. The purpose of these visits was to conduct confirmatory surveys of soils associated with the Argyle Street sewer line that was being removed. Soil samples were collected from six different, judgmentally determined locations in the Argyle Street sewer trench. In addition to the six soil samples collected by ORISE, four replicate soil samples were collected by Cabrera Services, Inc. (CSI) for analysis by the ORISE laboratory. Replicate samples S0010 and S0011 were final status survey (FSS) bias samples; S0012 was an FSS systematic sample; and S0015 was a waste characterization sample. Six soil samples were also collected for background determination. Uranium-235 and uranium-238 concentrations were determined via gamma spectroscopy; the spectra were also reviewed for other identifiable photopeaks. Radionuclide concentrations for these soil samples are provided. In addition to the replicate samples and the samples collected by ORISE, CSI submitted three soil samples for inter-laboratory comparison analyses. One sample was from the background reference area, one was from waste characterization efforts (material inside the sewer line), and one was a FSS sample. The inter-laboratory comparison analyses results between ORISE and CSI were in agreement, except for one sample collected in the reference area. Smear results For Argyle Street sewer pipes are tabulated.

Adams, Wade C.

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

23

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 1607-F1 Sanitary Sewer System (124-F-1) and the 100-F-26:8 (1607-F1) Sanitary Sewer Pipelines Waste Sites, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2004-130  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1607-F1 Sanitary Sewer System (124-F-1), consisted of a septic tank, drain field, and associated pipelines that received sanitary waste water from the 1701-F Gatehouse, 1709-F Fire Station, and the 1720-F Administrative Office via the 100-F-26:8 pipelines. The septic tank required remedial action based on confirmatory sampling. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

24

Macroscopic corrosion front computations of sulfate attack in sewer pipes based on a micro-macro reaction-diffusion model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a two-scale reaction diffusion system able to capture the corrosion of concrete with sulfates. Our aim here is to define and compute two macroscopic corrosion indicators: typical pH drop and gypsum profiles. Mathematically, the system is coupled, endowed with micro-macro transmission conditions, and posed on two different spatially-separated scales: one microscopic (pore scale) and one macroscopic (sewer pipe scale). We use a logarithmic expression to compute values of pH from the volume averaged concentration of sulfuric acid which is obtained by resolving numerically the two-scale system (microscopic equations with direct feedback with the macroscopic diffusion of one of the reactants). Furthermore, we also evaluate the content of the main sulfatation reaction (corrosion) product---the gypsum---and point out numerically a persistent kink in gypsum's concentration profile. Finally, we illustrate numerically the position of the free boundary separating corroded from not-yet-corroded regions.

Chalupeck, Vladimr; Kruschwitz, Jens; Muntean, Adrian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-B-14:1 Process Sewer, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2004-005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 100-B-14:1 subsite encompasses the former process sewer main associated with the 105-B Reactor Building, 108-B Chemical Pumphouse and Tritium Separation Facility, 184-B Boiler House and the 100-B water treatment facilities, as well as the feeder lines associated with the 108-B facility, formerly discharging to the 116-B-7 Outfall Structure. The subsite has been remediated to achieve the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

26

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-C-9:1 Main Process Sewer Collection Line, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2004-012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 100-C-9:1 main process sewer pipeline, also known as the twin box culvert, was a dual reinforced process sewer that collected process effluent from the 183-C and 190-C water treatment facilities, discharging at the 132-C-2 Outfall. For remedial action purposes, the 100-C-9:1 waste site was subdivided into northern and southern sections. The 100-C-9:1 subsite has been remediated to achieve the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2007-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

27

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-D-50:5 Process Sewers (183-DR Sedimentation Basin Drains), Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-025  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 100-D-50:5 subsite encompasses the southern process sewers formerly servicing the 183-DR coagulation and sedimentation basins and proximate surface runoff collection drains. The results of confirmatory sampling of pipeline sediments and underlying soils at the 100-D-50:5 subsite demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

28

Vadose Zone Remediation Assessment: M-Area Process Sewer Soil Vapor Extraction Units 782-5M, 782-7M, and 782-8M  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study focuses on the status of the vadose zone remediation along 1600 ft of the process sewer line between the M-Area security fence and the M-Area settling basin. Three soil vapor extraction (SVE) units 782-5M, 782-7M, and 782-8M, connected to 4 vertical wells and 3 horizontal wells have been addressing the vadose zone volatile organic contamination (VOC) since 1995. The specific objectives of this study were to obtain soil gas and sediment samples, evaluate SVE units and vadose zone remediation, and make recommendations to address further remediation needs.

Riha, B.D.

2001-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

29

UNIT NAME : Plant Sanitary Sewer System REGULATORY STATUS, AOg  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OPERATED : Early 50's - Present . ,'SITEPROCESS DESCRIPTION : Underground s y stem of piping that flows to the sewage treatment plant. WASTE DESCRIPTION: Unknown WASTE QUANTITY :...

30

EM, County Install Sewer Line for Development | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005Department ofDOEDisabilityContractorsRecoveryOperations |Plants

31

Fermilab | Tritium at Fermilab | Tritium in Sanitary Sewers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:EpitaxialtransatlanticUnified Forces | DoTravel

32

A study of the effect of sewer air on concrete  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"uyorfor tu hrfa" in Otrenpth md duruhf aft, yruVided tl~. t V% Oes, ~ dOOO swA hove cgr deleterious uetfon ou tW oe~wretef it does not ":est~ t:-:4 tide cila)ufd bo tBs a~so to ever i"renwr oWont th. w upon hydr nlfo @art~-r? fn hsserfo" 'urir~ ", e...!m wastes of aa!! oosrun Lty w* ether Lt bo ~u~ Lsol, ted h~~~~ or . o&!! ~ 'he o?~. ? net!ed th 4 octa t'e repairs~ nts fur a safe urA, evavenieck Ewthvcl af c. . La/os:i4 ia '!. oeQN5Ffq'e Qy'ot64 4w 6 8OI'q' 6 d:o~ po~al plant ~ 'he eeone. Lo L...

Ortolani, Walter Albert

1929-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Water/Wastewater Engineering Report (Storm Sewer/Infiltration Sanitary Sewage Separation-M1 Model)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consumption Due to Rain......................... 21 Table 10. Annual and OSD Period Electricity Savings.................................................... 22 Table 11. Calculation of Growth Factor from 1999 to 2007.../2010. .................................. 22 Table 12. Electricity Savings in 2007 and 2010 Using Base Year 1999.......................... 22 Table 13. Calculation of Growth Factor from 2002 to 2007/2010. .................................. 22 Table 14. Electricity Savings in 2007 and 2010...

Liu, Z.; Brumbelow, K.; Haberl, J. S.

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

34

Puerto Rico Aqueduct and Sewer Authority General Consulting Services and Technical Support  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environmental management systems; supervision of environmental contractors; water and asbestos sampling management of environmental engineering compliance activities, and professor of general, civil on the use of remote sensing technology for water quality monitoring and management in the San José Lagoon

Gilbes, Fernando

35

Radioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction (NOC) for the 300 Area Process Sewer Cleanout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document serves as a NOC pursuant to the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247-060, and as a request for approval to construct pursuant to 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61.07, for the cleanout of sections of the 300 Area PS. Approval of the NOC will allow the pressure washing of certain pipe sections, the sump in the TEDF lift station, and the cleaning of PS 16 of the 300 Area PS that contains low levels of radioactivity. Section 15.0 of this NOC discusses the estimated total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) to the offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI) resulting from the unabated emissions from these cleaning activities. Using the currently approved unit dose conversion factors in HNF-3602, the estimated potential TEDE to the MEI resulting from the unabated, fugitive emissions from cleanout of the 300 Area PS is 4.70 E-05 millirem (mrem) per year. This dose was derived by conservatively estimating the doses from both the pressure washing and the use of the Guzzler{trademark} for removal of the liquid/soil mixture, as described in Section 5.0. and adding these doses together.

MENARD, N.M.

2000-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

36

Evaluation of sewer leakage into the stormwater drainage system in Singapore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Singapore's Public Utilities Board (PUB) aspires to bring Singaporeans closer to their water bodies through recreational activities so that they may cherish them and be more conscious of water scarcity. However, there have ...

Diagne, Ndeye Awa

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Plutonium discharges to the sanitary sewer: Health impacts at the Livermore Water Reclamation Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the largest discharger of sewage treated by the Livermore Water Reclamation (LWRP), contributing approximately 7% by volume of the LWRP influent LILNL operations, as potential sources both of industrial pollutants and radioactivity, are therefore of particular concern to the LWRP. For this reason, LLNL has maintained vigorous wastewater discharge control and monitoring programs. In particular, the monitoring program has demonstrated that, except in a few rare instances, the concentration of contaminants in LLNL effluent have always remained below the appropriate regulatory standards. The exceptions have generally been due to inadvertent discharges of metals-bearing solutions produced by metal plating or cleaning operations.

Balke, B.K.

1993-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

38

A Cavity-backed Slot Antenna with High Upper Hemisphere Efficiency for Sewer Sensor Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the sensor network, an antenna needs to be robust, low-cost, low-profile, and easy to be integrated, a woven fiberglass composite was designed and fabricated as a RF transparent material for a manhole cover can be advantageous to improve the antenna efficiency toward upper hemisphere since it reflects

Tentzeris, Manos

39

Site Environmental Report for 2008, Volume II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air; Soil Creeks; Rainwater; Stormwater; Sewer Sewer AmbientAir Ambient Air Rainwater Creeks Stormwater Sewer FixedII section Stormwater Ambient Air; Rainwater Ambient Air

Lackner, Regina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Site Environmental Report for 2007 Volume II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Treatment Units; Rainwater; Stormwater; Sewer Sewer AmbientAir Ambient Air Rainwater Creeks Stormwater Sewer Fixedsection Creeks Stormwater Ambient Air; Rainwater Ambient Air

Lackner, Regina E

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "newnan wtr sewer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Contents · iv Rainwater ................................................................................. A Stormwater ............................................................................... A-87 Sewer ..................

42

Task Cover  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and repairing sanitary sewers, storm sewers, and underground, contaminated wastewater removal distribution systems. e. Maintaining painted surfaces associated with facility...

43

USF Graduate Catalog 20142015 607www.patel.usf.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA New Concentration Sustainable Energy 3/3/14 Updated courses 5/19/14 #12;USF fosters sustainable urban communities and environments through collaborative research, education Energy (SUSE) Sustainable Tourism (SUT) Water (WTR) #12;USF Graduate Catalog 20142015

Meyers, Steven D.

44

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 1607-F1 Sanitary Sewer System (124-F-1) and the 100-F-26:8 (1607-F1) Sanitary Sewer Pipelines Waste Sites, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 100-F-26:8 waste site consisted of the underground pipelines that conveyed sanitary waste water from the 1701-F Gatehouse, 1709-F Fire Station, and the 1720-F Administrative Office to the 1607-F1 septic tank. The site has been remediated and presently exists as an open excavation. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

45

Removal of nutrients from combined sewer overflows and lake water in a vertical-flow constructed wetland system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and is planted with common reed (Phragmites australis). The constructed wetland is intermittently loaded

Brix, Hans

46

Determining risk for severe leptospirosis by molecular analysis of environmental surface waters for pathogenic Leptospira.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

open sewers, gutters, rainwater collections, and river-waterpiles, sewers, and rainwater collection puddles are common (of leptospires than did rainwater collection and underground

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Treatment Units; Rainwater; Stormwater; Sewer Sewer Creeksresults for rainwater, creeks, stormwater, and wastewater.4-3 Creek, Rainwater, and Stormwater Sampling Locations in

Ruggieri, Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Site Environmental Report for 2009, Volume 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air Ambient Air Rainwater Creeks Stormwater Sewer FixedUnits; Rainwater; Sewer; Stack Air; Stormwater SedimentRainwater .. RW-1 Creeks .. CR-1 Stormwater

Xu, Suying

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AA-1 Rainwater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . RW-1 Creeks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CR-1 Stormwater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SW-1 Sewer

50

Retrofitting Existing Buildings for Demand Response & Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

partnership) · Plug loads, data centers ­ remainder (solution: WTR, WBM) Source: US Energy Information, higher "critical peak" energy charges will be assessed for usage between noon and 6pm. - CustomersRetrofitting Existing Buildings for Demand Response & Energy Efficiency www

California at Los Angeles, University of

51

Water Research 39 (2005) 316 Non-agricultural sources of groundwater nitrate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and leaky sewers), solid waste disposal (landfills and waste tips). The major sources of nitrogen.g. landfills and coal gasification works), multipoint sources (e.g. soakaways and leaky sewers) and diffuse

Sheffield, University of

52

E-Print Network 3.0 - apparent paradoxical vault Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: , vaults, manholes, boilers, tunnels, sewer and sump pits, large HVAC equipment, the Physics Department... -required confined spaces. Underground Electrical...

53

450 IEEETRANSACTIONSONSYSTEMS,MAN,ANDCYBERNETICS,VOL.SMC-3,NO.5, SEPTEMBER1973 The Application of Optimal Linear Regulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The model considered in this paper is representative of the combined storm­ sewer systems in cities A MAJOR PROBLEM presently existing in many urban areas is that of water pollution caused by direct over- flow from combined storm­sewer systems to natural re- ceiving waters. Combined storm­sewer systems

Moore, John Barratt

54

E-Print Network 3.0 - air filter condition Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fans... , water treatment equipment, elevators (electric and hydraulic), sewer lift pumps, filter servicing in air... : Use of mechanical equipment such as refrigeration, air...

55

E-Print Network 3.0 - air filters Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: , water treatment equipment, elevators (electric and hydraulic), sewer lift pumps, filter servicing in air... lift pumps, filter servicing in air-handling units and...

56

Microsoft Word - START-Alaska Application_FINAL.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

including diesel powerhouses, power distribution infrastructure, utility management, bulk fuel storage, energy efficiency and renewable energy projects, sewer and water energy...

57

Waste not Discharged to Surface Waters (North Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The rules in this Subchapter apply to all persons proposing to construct, alter, extend, or operate any sewer system, treatment works, disposal system, contaminates soil treatment system, animal...

58

Mobile sensor network to monitor wastewater collection pipelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

17 Mobile robot localization in23 WCS monitoring using mobile floatingDesign of mobile pipeline floating sensor SewerSnort

Lim, Jungsoo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric metallic pollution Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

priority pollutants, stormwater, sewer systems, atmospheric deposition... campaigns of rainwater. 8 organic pollutants in the dissolved phase and almost all metals in both...

60

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric deposition flux Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sewer systems, atmospheric deposition... samples of both dry atmospheric deposits and rainwater. All sampling devices comply with requirements... campaigns have been carried at...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "newnan wtr sewer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Water Pollution (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article states regulations for water quality standards, effluent standards, monitoring and reporting methods, sewer discharge criteria and information about permits. It is the purpose of...

62

Public Service Companies, General Provisions (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Public Service Companies includes gas, pipeline, electric light, heat, power and water supply companies, sewer companies, telephone companies, and all persons authorized to transport passengers or...

63

Plastic, the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, and International Misfires at a Cure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

domestic water quality and solid waste disposal laws inquantity generator waste, and industrial solid waste. 197sewer overflows, lit- tering, solid waste disposal sites and

Harse, Grant A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

University of Oxford Environmental Sustainability Policy 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water) drains and sewers. SUSTAINABLE BUILDINGS ­ The University of Oxford Sustainable Buildings Policy is to build environmentally sustainable buildings, and embed sustainable building best practice

Melham, Tom

65

Chapter_11_Socioeconomics_DEIS_September_2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is provided by private wells and well systems, sometimes serving multiple users. Wastewater control in areas without sewer districts is provided by septic tanks, drain fields,...

66

Industrial Discharge Permits (District of Columbia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

All businesses and government agencies discharging process wastewater to the public sewer system must report their activities to DC Water's Pretreatment Center. Wastewater discharge permits are...

67

UNIT NAME: C-710 Acid Interceptor Pit REGULATORY STA'l'US  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to flowing to the sanitary sewer system. WASTE DESCRIPTION: PCB (Aroclor 1248), 470 ppm; Carbon Tetrachloride (TCLP extract), 6.3 ppm; Trichloroethylene (TCLP extract), 200 ppm;...

68

FRPC User Guidance -for FY2006  

Energy Savers [EERE]

systems' cost in the cost of the building. Includes heating plants and related steam and gas lines, sewage disposal plants, storm and sanitary sewer lines, water treatment plants,...

69

CY08 SNL_NM ASER_8_10_09.indb  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

quality of surface waters in the state. ABCWUA Sewer Discharge Regulations There are six wastewater monitoring stations, or outfalls, operating under the ABCWUA permits at SNLNM....

70

PROJECTS FROM FEDERAL REGION IX DOE APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PILOT PROGRAM - PART I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

welded together like sewer pipe. Biogas production from theintends to convert the biogas into electricity. The wasteproduce 7.6 million Btu of biogas annually. This estimate

Case, C.W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 3/11)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, obliterate all radioactive material labels and transfer the container to the appropriate radioactive waste container. · If there is remaining RAM that will be transferred to radioactive waste or sewer disposed (e was transferred to radioactive waste or sewer disposed, as appropriate. · Fax (472-9650) or mail (EHS 0824) a copy

Farritor, Shane

72

Toxic Inhalation Fatalities of US Construction Workers, 1990 to 1999  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

space standard could save lives, particularly among water, sewer, and utility line industry workers. (J numbers of fatalities. The majority of these deaths occurred in confined spaces. Water, sewer, and utility line workers are at increased risk for poisoning fatality. Toxic inhalation fatalities

Illinois at Chicago, University of

73

[Minor revisionposted 5/9/14 (replaces 1/28/11 edition)] Operating Policy and Procedure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-owned utilities such as water, gas, sewer, telephone, TV, cable, and electric): Texas Excavation Safety System (Dig TESS) 1-800-344-8377 b. Texas Tech University-owned utilities (water, gas, sewer, electric markings, e.g., chalk (see Attachment A for suggested manufacturer) shall be used to indicate the location

Rock, Chris

74

September 26, 2008 Michael Lemmon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering University of Notre Dame Combined Sewer Overflow Events Dry Weather South Bend Wastewater to Manhole B allows us to increase inflow through Manhole A #12;September 26, 2008 Michael Lemmon Dept Structure Interceptor Sewer to Wastewater Treatment Plant Monitoring and Control over SCADA network City

Lemmon, Michael

75

For Immediate Release Contact: Islamorada, Village of Islands Anita Muxo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-664-6426 anita.muxo@islamorada.fl.us RELEASE ISLAMORADA, VILLAGE OF ISLANDS SEWER CONNECTION SUBSIDY PROGRAM-restricted affordable housing with the costs of connecting to the Village's wastewater collection system. Through to the Village wastewater collection system but have not yet connected to the system. The Sewer Connection

Florida, University of

76

Reproductive behavior of addax antelope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 S 8 0 1 'all 0 l Z LIB C( u CL I-I 0 cd 0 Ul '0 0 Ql oo Id Ql OO 0, al 0 \\d dd cd (4 W Ql 0 4J 0 Ql OO 0 Qi 0 Qi co 0 hJ cd al a 0 38 respectively) . A large percentage of addax were feeding in early morn- ing... from observer to the subject varied from 10 to greater than 200 m. fftH- FENCE eea ROAD "" TRAIL EARN L MINERAL RLOCK D BERMUDA GRASS ~ ~ ~ R ~ 'eeit' ~ ~ ~ ~ WOODS BRUSH SCALE ICM = SOM ~ TREE 0+ W~T~R TROUGH FEED TROUGH Fig. 3...

Manski, David Allen

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

PROJECTS FROM FEDERAL REGION IX DOE APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PILOT PROGRAM - PART I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

like sewer pipe. Biogas production from the digester will behomestead digester will produce 7.6 million Btu of biogasbiogas into electricity. The waste heat from the electric generator will be used to maintain the digester

Case, C.W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

APPLICATION OF A CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to the existing X-6619 waste water treatment facility and executing an agreement to treat the sewage transported by this four inch pressurized sewer line at a permitted waste...

79

CX-008626: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06202012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office The existing 607-6A sanitary sewer lift station has reached the end...

80

Sustainable Cities Joel E. Cohen, Daniel L. Doctoroff, and Martin Filler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be achieved by taking 174 cars off the street. Addition- ally, we collect rainwater on the roof, which besides serving us inside the building keeps that rainwater from flooding into the city's sewers during heavy

Cohen, Joel E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "newnan wtr sewer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

By By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

229 1994)." CLSM is primarily used for nonstructural applications such as a backfill material foundations, or as a fill for abandoned tunnels, sewers, storage tanks, etc. Water permeation through CLSM can

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

82

Coordinated Fee Structure for Developed Recreation Sites on the Ashley, Uinta, and Wasatch-Cache  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Federal and State agencies and private campgrounds in geographical areas of concern to determine fee, such as water, sewer, electricity and recreational equipment/infrastructure. 1 An abbreviated version

Standiford, Richard B.

83

Project: UAF Utilities Waste Line Repairs Ch6 to Ch13 Project No: 2013101 UTWH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project: UAF Utilities Waste Line Repairs Ch6 to Ch13 Project No: 2013101 UTWH Subject: Project Schedule Project Duration: May 27 to August 10, 2014 The sewer line will be constructed in phases

Ickert-Bond, Steffi

84

Estimating Nonpoint Source Pollution Loadings in the Great Lakes Watersheds Chansheng He  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contaminated sediments, urban runoff, storm sewers, and agriculture impairs Great Lakes shoreline waters will be used as the input to the water quality model for simulating pollutant transport through surface-scale water quality model to estimat

85

ROOMMATE AGREEMENT This agreement is made between the joint tenants of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the lease, sanitary and sewer taxes, recycling tax (if any), as well as all of his/her own long distance. This includes any charges related to pets, such as carpet cleaning or extermination. 4. Each of us agrees

Kravets, Robin

86

CX-000529: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sanitary Sewer Manhole Drain Line Isolation for Building 261-H Consolidated Incineration Facility CX(s) Applied: B1.27 Date: 09092009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina...

87

Environmental Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University, 1989 Selected Recent Publications "Reverse Osmosis Biofilm Dispersal by Osmotic Back Retarded Osmosis Energy Production from Natural Salinity Gradients." Environmental Science & Technology, 2013. "A Forward Osmosis-Membrane Distillation Hybrid Process for Direct Sewer Mining: System

Elimelech, Menachem

88

United States Department of Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regulatory Research Judy Kosovich, DOE/Office of General Counsel Tom Lenhart, Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer (POTWs), (2) performed dose modeling to help with the interpretation of the results of the survey, and (3

89

The Mobile Test and Demonstration Unit, A Cooperative Project Between EPRI, Utilities and Industry to Demonstrate New Water Treatment Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and has demonstrated that membrane processes like MF, UF, NF and RO can successfully be applied to remove BOD and TSS from process streams, often recovering valuable solids, reducing sewer charges and meeting environmental regulations....

Strasser, J.; Mannapperuma, J.

90

Page 1 of 1 Center for Underground Infrastructure Research & Education  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Attending CUIRE Schools A complimentary copy of new book, Trenchless Technology: Planning, Equipment Drilling School (HDD) Planning and Design Advanced Horizontal Directional Drilling School (HDD, topics will include: Design Concepts Water, Sewer, Gas & Cable Applications Evaluation Technologies, Site

Huang, Haiying

91

CX-009604: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

704-56H Sanitary Sewer Upgrade CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 12/07/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

92

SCHOLARLY PAPERS Is Construction Blasting Still Abnormally Dangerous?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and quarries 15% Dowding 1996 .7 The mining, quarrying, and construction industries use over 4 billion pounds 1 quarry operations,13 mining,14 removing boulders from a stream bed to prevent flooding,15 sewer

93

300 area TEDF permit compliance monitoring plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the permit compliance monitoring plan for the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). It addresses the compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit and Department of Natural Resources Aquatic Lands Sewer Outfall Lease.

BERNESKI, L.D.

1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

94

CY09 SNL Cover.indd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

state. Co m p l ian c e Su m m ar y 2 -7 ABCWUA Sewer Discharge Regulations There are six wastewater monitoring stations, or outfalls, operating under the ABCWUA permits at SNLNM....

95

APPLICATION OF A CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

operation and maintenance of a four inch pressurized sanitary sewer line on PORTS land along the existing roadway right-of-way to the existing X-6619 waste water...

96

Managing infrastructure systems: who's heard in the decision making process?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

applied to the various data sets provided by the City of Houston. The results of the analysis supports the following: Citizen contacts have been significant in determining the allocation of water and sewer CIP projects; however, that has not been...........................................................................11 1.3 Summary of Houston?s CIP Process .................................................................12 4.1 Water and Sewer Related Complaints...............................................................61 ix LIST OF TABLES...

Smith, Sheri LaShel

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

97

Children's School February 2013 Family Social Organization (FSO)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: · February ­ Water Treatment Plant Tour In connection with the whole-school WATER unit, the FSO is touring the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority's drinking water treatment plant near Aspinwall. We'll learn how PWSA takes the water from the Allegheny River and turns it into clean water suitable for your tap! The tour

98

Water protection in coke-plant design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wastewater generation, water consumption, and water management at coke plants are considered. Measures to create runoff-free water-supply and sewer systems are discussed. Filters for water purification, corrosion inhibitors, and biocides are described. An integrated single-phase technology for the removal of phenols, thiocyanides, and ammoniacal nitrogen is outlined.

G.I. Alekseev [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Materialization TradeOffs in Hierarchical Shortest Path Algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materialization Trade­Offs in Hierarchical Shortest Path Algorithms Shashi Shekhar, Andrew Fetterer] form the kernel of many important applica­ tions including transportation; water, electric, and gas utilities; telephone networks; urban management; sewer maintenance, and irrigation canal man­ agement

Shekhar, Shashi

100

DIME Workshop :Environmental innovation in Infrastructure sectors 30/9 -1/10/2009 Karlsruhe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for rehabilitation. We worked out criteria such as time loss due to traffic deviation, economic loss for trades due to accessibility problems during works but also criteria concerning ground water or surface water pollution damages material goods ( Werey & al., 2005) A second project INDIGAU " Performance Indicators for urban sewer

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "newnan wtr sewer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Determining areas appropriate to indigenous plant communities and those appropriate to a more traditional collegiate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management, "best management practices," which call for infiltration rather than conveyance of stormwater facilities into either the sanitary sewer or the storm water management system. Because greater than 10 as infiltration basins. · Furthering a holistic view of water resource management considering the entire "water

Kamat, Vineet R.

102

Tidal Stage Variability of Fecal Coliform and Chlorophyll a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

leachates, leaking sewer mains, wild and do- mestic animal wastes, and runo. However, the inter- action environmental hazards, to enter an estuarine environment characterized by high variability regarding temperature to understanding both the basic ecology of tidal creeks and the applied aspects of sampling protocols and pollutant

Mallin, Michael

103

REGISTRATION & ADDITIONAL INFORMATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Gravel Road Maintenance · Culvert and Storm Sewer Installation and Maintenance · Preventive Maintenance Maintenance and Preservation · Traffic Engineering Fundamentals · Work Zone Traffic Control Seminar · Design & Maintenance Considerations for Erosion Control on Low­Volume Roads · Traffic Signing and Control Spring

Minnesota, University of

104

awareness and pollution prevention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hazard awareness and pollution prevention for contractors and visitors at UCSD #12;Hazard Awareness and Pollution Prevention For Contractors and Visitors at UC San Diego This booklet was developed by UC San Diego ..............................................5 Storm Water Pollution Prevention.....................5 Sanitary Sewer System Management

Tsien, Roger Y.

105

Minimize environmental impacts when replacing underground pipe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A US refiner urgently needed to repair a 40-year-old oily-water sewer system without disrupting processing operations. Equally important, the refiner wanted to minimize soil and groundwater contamination. In this case history, the refiner elected to use an alternative method--trenchless rehabilitation--to make required underground repairs.

Miller, L.R. [Ashland Petroleum Co., Catlettsburg, KY (United States); Kroll, T.R. [Insituform Technologies, Inc., Memphis, TN (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK Classified Civil Service Position Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or in the construction, maintenance or repair of sewers, streets, highways or water supply systems, one year of which and placing of concrete and other work of a heavy nature. - Supervises snow removal, brush cutting and other for the delivery of tools, supplies, materials and equipment to job locations. - Lays out work; instructs workers

Rosen, Jay

107

DDE in Sediments of the Palos Verdes Shelf, California: In Situ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of DDT discharged process wastes into the sewers of Los Angeles County. Roughly 870­1450 t of DDT were on the continental shelf and slope. The most abundant DDT compound in the sediments, p,p-DDE, is degrading. Introduction In 1947 the world's largest producer of technical DDT, Montrose Chemical Corporation, began

108

Physics Building Awning Catchment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and sus- tainable means of collecting and distribut- ing rainwater to irrigate the Quantum Rela- tivity Services #12;Executive Summary The main goal of the Rainwater Catchment System is to provide an efficient the volume of rainwater entering the Combined Sewer Sys- tem. With this project, UWM envisions prac- ticing

Saldin, Dilano

109

Operating Policy for Facilities This policy establishes responsibility for the actual repair, maintenance, renovation, remodeling,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by various state or federal agencies (including the State Division of Capital Asset Management - DCAM), union agreements, state or federal statues, local ordinances, and requirements imposed by other regulatory agencies, fabrication, installation, or alteration of utility service systems including electrical, gas, water, sewer

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

110

ARTICLE IN PRESS The Science of the Total Environment xx (2003) xxxxxx  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Industrialization; Algal blooms; Pollution; Phytoplankton; Benthic algae53 54 1232 1233 *Corresponding author. Tel cleared, port development occurred and much of the coastal property became industrialized. The combined 36 of a new 44 sewer outfall near the core site and changes in estuarine hydrography due to construction

Chmura, Gail L.

111

Michael Cooney, a researcher with the UH Manoa Hawaii Natural Energy Institute, in his lab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

King Founder & Owner Pacific Biodiesel Technologies, LLC. 808.877.3144 info@biodiesel.com Renewable at Manoa are working with Maui based company Pacific Biodiesel to develop a way to make water from Biodiesel Technologies, LLC. Wastewater from dishwashing and cleaning kitchens would clog sewer lines

112

PDEs for multiphase advanced materials ADMAT2012 Palazzone Cortona (AR) September 1721, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a semilinear reaction-diffusion system is a two-scale model of concrete corrosion in sewer concrete pipes ordinary differential equation tracking the damage-by- corrosion. The system is semilinear, partially) The lecture addresses interface problems in the context of Lithium-ion batteries. We choose two different

Colli, Pierluigi

113

Siemens AG, Corporate Technology Innovations in Urban Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water/ Sewer Re- cycling Public authority/ Green governance Trans- port/Mobility Waste management · landfill needed to manage demand · congestion · high CO2 emission Electricity: strong focus on renewables of energy consumption · energy scarcity/energy costs · CO2 emissions Efficiency · energy scarcity/ energy

Ge, Zigang

114

Kansas City, Kansas Robert Roseen, PhD, PE, D.WRE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, bridges, sewers) #12;(CWP, 2006) Economic based incentives for early adoption: Many Communities;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;Economic Context A solid economic plan is necessary for the successful implementation of new stormwater economic conditions. It is important to understand the economic benefits of combining Gray and Green

115

CX-012384: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Eleven Soil Bores Along the M-Area Abandoned Process Sewer Line for Vadose Zone Characterization CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 05/19/2014 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

116

P LY M O U T H R a c h e l  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Michigan property City of Ann Arbor property University of Michigan road City of Ann Arbor road UNIVERSITY PLANNER'S OFFICE 1.20.12 Bicycling Guide: East Medical Campus Legend Bike parking spaces Covered out for sewer grates, slippery manhole covers, oily pavement, snow and ice. Cross railroad tracks

Daly, Samantha

117

COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES RESEARCH INSTITUTE (CSMRI) SITE FLOOD PLAIN AREA CLEANUP FACT SHEET & PROJECT SUMMARY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S. Environmental Protection Agency excavated and stockpiled soil from the tailings pond and surrounding area, demolished several buildings, and cleaned an industrial sewer system. The School subsequently shipped use in 1997. During the later 1990's several thousand drums of materials were characterized

118

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS, VOL. 28, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2012 223 On Optimizing Autonomous Pipeline Inspection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

health. As the most economical way to transport gas, oil, bio fuels, water resource, sewer, and so forth. For example, the leak of petroleum pipeline causes ocean pollution and ecocatastrophe. Regular inspections Editor T. Murphey and Editor J.-P. Laumond upon evaluation of the reviewers' comments. This work

Li, Xin "Shane"

119

EINDHOVEN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Department of Mathematics and Computer Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

corroded and undamaged concrete. Concrete is a material with porous structure ­ it can be viewed in concrete structures (here: sewer pipes). The systems are posed on two different spatially separated scales, sulfate corrosion, acid attack, modeling of concrete, method of lines, finite difference scheme

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

120

Blackouts Are Inevitable Coping, Not Prevention, Should Be the Primary Goal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a blackout large enough to darken a half-million homes. Now the pressure is on Congress to enact an energy. Elevators were stuck between floors, trains stopped between stations, traffic lights went dark, cell phones quieted, and, in Cleveland, water ceased to flow and sewers overflowed. Water treatment and pumping

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "newnan wtr sewer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Stormwater and Urban Water Systems Modeling Conference. In: Models and Applications to Urban Water Systems, Vol. 12 (edited by W. James). CHI. Guelph, Ontario, pp. 257 294. 2004.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stormwater and Urban Water Systems Modeling Conference. In: Models and Applications to Urban Water AND EXAMINATION OF A MUNICIPAL SEPARATE STORM SEWER SYSTEM DATABASE Robert Pitt, Alex Maestre, Renee Morquecho of Water 104(b)3 grant in 2001 to collect and evaluate stormwater data from a representative number

Pitt, Robert E.

122

22 Wisconsin Natural Resources These are all good ways to con-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

time you thought about how we affect the water cycle with our choices about water use? On the urban/flush model. More than just turning off the faucet! #12;June 2011 23 ROBERTQUEEN · Use alternate water. This reduces water needs in those areas of the gardens and re- duces water "lost" to storm sewers. Creating

Saldin, Dilano

123

Great Lakes Spatially Distributed Watershed Model of Water and Materials Runoff Thomas E. Croley II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Great Lakes Spatially Distributed Watershed Model of Water and Materials Runoff Thomas E. Croley II.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has identified contaminated sediments, urban runoff and storm sewers there are no integrated spatially distributed physically based watershed-scale hydrological/water quality models available

124

D.C. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

projects that address the three components of integrated urban water system: storm water runoff and sewer developing and maintaining new environmental quality testing and modeling tools to advance water researchD.C. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 D.C. Water Resources

125

Distributed in furtherance of the Acts of Congress of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

guidance for bioretention (also termed rain gardens) was provided in 2001 in Designing Rain Gardens (Bio Hill, Louisburg, and Charlotte. Findings from this re- search reveal that bioretention cells the amount of total nitrogen (TN) entering the storm sewer by 33 percent, 40 per- cent, and 43 percent

Hunt, William F.

126

ALCOJET MSDS -ALCOJET MSDS -ALCOJET MSDS -ALCOJET MSDS MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

remainder to sewer. Material is biodegradable. Wear dust mask to prevent inhalation. Waste Disposal Method% at ambient conditions Appearance: White powder and grandules - slight acrid odor. IV. FIRE AND EXPLOSION DATA Fire and Explosion Hazards: None V. REACTIVITY DATA Stability: Stable- loses available chlorine at high

Dickerson, Russell R.

127

POLLUTANT ASSOCIATIONS WITH PARTICULATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

husband and my family. Without your love and support during all the years of my academic endeavors I would ii #12;LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS AND SYMBOLS Zn Zinc Cu Copper Cd Cadmium Pb Lead Mg Magnesium Mn CSO Combined Sewer Overflow USEPA United States Environmental Protection Agency ORP Ortho

Pitt, Robert E.

128

FEBRUARY 2013 WATER technical features  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

produced and distributed drinking water while sewers collected wastewater for treatment at remote plants, solutions to wastewater infrastructure need to be effective in protecting public health and preserving water the potential to achieve these goals in rural areas, peri- urban developments, small towns and urban centres

129

www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the extent of public sewers, developing them requires a means for on-site wastewater treatment and dispersal in establish- ing on-site wastewater treatment and disposal systems on nonideal soils, as described in On online through the Vir- ginia Cooperative Extension website (www.ext.vt.edu). Wastewater Treatment

Liskiewicz, Maciej

130

1. Introduction The use of radar rainfall data for hydrological model-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

feed an interceptor sewer (up to 2.35 m box sec- tion) that conveys flows to a wastewater treatment for the supply of potable water and the treatment of wastewater in the north- west of England. The primary radar rainfall data was as an input to rainfall­runoff models of rural river systems. Building

Fox, Neil I.

131

Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University Title: Clinical Operations During Utility Outages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, medical gases, natural gas, sewer stoppage or telephone and computer systems. B. Emergency Generator Power generator power outlets, identified in red, should utilize emergency generator power outlets to maintain includes electrical power failure, water, heating or air conditioning, but may include fire alarm systems

132

Material Safety Data Sheet HMIS FLAMMABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.0 Extinguishing Media - Use water fog, foam, dry chemical or CO2. Use water spray to cool fire-exposed containers spray. Prevent spill from entering drains, sewers, streams or other bodies of water. If run-off occurs shield, bunker coats, gloves and rubber boots), including a positive pressure NIOSH approved self

Rollins, Andrew M.

133

International Conference on Urban Drainage, Copenhagen/Denmark, 21-26 August 2005 Pitt and Maestre 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pollutant Discharge Elimination System) MS4 (municipal separate storm sewer system) stormwater permit as part of the existing stormwater permit program, providing a scientific analysis of the data (National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System) stormwater permit program. There have been some local

Pitt, Robert E.

134

Raymond A. Bowers Program Distinguished Lecture Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wind turbine in the city of Chicago. Luke is actively involved with numerous professional organizations, Owings and Merrill LLP. His work included several tallest buildings in the world, Nanjing Greenland Tower with building integrated vertical wind tur- bines and sewer heat for heating and cooling, Beijing Finance Street

Maroncelli, Mark

135

ORIGINAL PAPER Managing climate change risks in New York City's water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and wastewater treatment systems, has developed a climate risk management framework through its Climate Change to the effects of climate change must become a regular part of planning for water supply, sewer, wastewaterORIGINAL PAPER Managing climate change risks in New York City's water system: assessment

136

Aluminum Removal from Photographic Waste Submitted to Dr. Tony Bi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aluminum Removal from Photographic Waste Submitted to Dr. Tony Bi By: Kristen Favel, Tiffany Jung, and Kenny Tam CHBE 484 University of British Columbia April 15, 2009 #12;ii "Aluminum Removal from photographic waste has shown elevated levels of aluminum in the fixer, which exceed sewer discharge standards

137

WASTEWATER SYSTEMS Henrik Bechmann  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELLING OF WASTEWATER SYSTEMS Henrik Bechmann Lyngby 1999 ATV Erhvervsforskerprojekt EF 623 IMM, N. K. (1998). Control of sewer systems and wastewater treatment plants using pollutant concentration., and Nielsen, M. K. (1999). Grey box modelling of first flush and incoming wastewater at a wastewater treatment

138

WASTEWATER SYSTEMS Henrik Bechmann  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELLING OF WASTEWATER SYSTEMS Henrik Bechmann Lyngby 1999 ATV Erhvervsforskerprojekt EF 623 IMM., and Poulsen, N. K. (1998). Control of sewer systems and wastewater treatment plants using pollutant, N. K., and Nielsen, M. K. (1999). Grey box modelling of first flush and incoming wastewater

139

This article was originally published in a journal published by Elsevier, and the attached copy is provided by Elsevier for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

28403, USA Abstract A sewer main serving a large municipal wastewater system ruptured, discharging along the US East Coast. The biochemical oxygen demand caused severe hypoxia in the system, causing a; Estuary 1. Introduction Raw human wastewater contains a potent mixture of contaminants, including

Mallin, Michael

140

Corporate Overview Founded on Values  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Manufacturing Petroleum Maintenance Pipeline Design Sewer/Wastewater Design Sewerage and Solid Waste Site Assessment and Compliance Wastewater Treatment Plants Water Treatment and Desalination Plants Working participating in EWB-USA trips. To date we have awarded 92 grants totaling US$350,000 Created a CH2M HILL EWB

Subramanian, Venkat

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "newnan wtr sewer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

11/17/11 Treatment Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Wetlands Across the US But there is hope... Everything Is Connected Need Drives wastewater treatment faciliOes, combined sewer overflows, municipal stormwater, industry Annual cost of eutrophica1on in US freshwaters is es1mated to be $2.2B (Dodds

Gray, Matthew

142

Effectiveness of a Bioretention Cell Treating Stormwater Runoff in Northeastern Kansas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cell treating stormwater runoff from a 4-lane roadway. A sediment mesh trap was installed in the sewer entrance to filter large particles in the runoff. Samples were collected and analyzed after each storm event for suspended solids (TSS), heavy metals...

Chen, Xiaolu

2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

143

Sensors 2009, 9, 2647-2660; doi:10.3390/s90402647 ISSN 1424-8220  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

some green roof systems being monitored, describe the sensor selection employed to study energy balance for meteorological stations. Keywords: Urban heat island, green roofs, combined sewer overflows, energy balance.mdpi.com/journal/sensors Communication Development of a Green Roof Environmental Monitoring and Meteorological Network in New York City

144

ERDC TN-DOER-D13 September 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as subsample mass increases. A bench scale testing plan was designed to evaluate the variability associated sources, including navigation vessels, industrial and sewer outfalls, non-point source runoff and atmospheric deposition. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), poly-nuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs

US Army Corps of Engineers

145

PHYSICAL PLANT OPERATING POLICY AND PROCEDURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

&G and auxiliary facilities use electricity, gas, water, and sewer in raw form and Central Heating and Cooling ­ Natural gas is purchased from several vendors in two manners. The University's remote facilities.) (2) Electricity ­ Electricity is purchased from several vendors because of the University's remote

Gelfond, Michael

146

ECOSYSTEM COMPONENT CHARACTERIZATION 461 Failing or nearby septic tank systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECOSYSTEM COMPONENT CHARACTERIZATION 461 · Failing or nearby septic tank systems · Exfiltration from sanitary sewers in poor repair · Leaking underground storage tanks and pipes · Landfill seepage or natural environment Leaks from underground storage tanks and pipes are a common source of soil

Pitt, Robert E.

147

Freshwater flooding from rivers, overflowing sewage and septic systems and other sources can have a signifi-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

there is no hazardous flood debris such as pro- pane tanks, pressurized-gas cylinders, refrigerators, air conditioners/sewer lines and oil/ gas pipelines, but you will be told whether or not you will have to contact those will locate all electrical, natural gas, communications and telephone lines.It may or may not locate water

148

ELECTRICAL AND PLUMBING CHECKLIST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into walls, floors and ceilings. Digging in the garden. Conversion of under-roof spaces to storage lofts a batten holder with a new light fitting. Repairing an appliance such as a heater. Altering the location THAT: Any work that directly interacts with the installation of the drinking water system or the sewer

Peters, Richard

149

Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 11, EGU2009-11867, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, of rainwater and of stormwater discharges at the outlet of experimental catchments, ii) the EMC (Event Mean(s) 2009 Assessment of fluxes of priority pollutants in stormwater discharges in two urban catchments Vernaison, France Keywords: WFD, priority pollutants, stormwater, sewer systems, atmospheric deposition

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

150

Presented by Siri-Elizabeth McLean Plans & Training Manager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EMERGENCY SUPPLIES Bottled water or pouches High-protein, high-energy food First-aid kit Flashlight/light, Internet access, emergency services etc? #12;Agriculture #12;Water Supply Drinking, Waste/Sewer & Surface #12;Public Health & Emergency Services #12;Information & Telecommunications #12;Energy Electricity

Wilcock, William

151

Siri McLean Plans & Training Manager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water or pouches High-protein, high-energy food First-aid kit Flashlight/light sticks Sanitation, telephones, Internet access, emergency services etc? #12;#12;Drinking, Waste/Sewer & Surface #12 YOU NEED Water Food Light Communication Medical Supplies Sanitation Tools/Equipment Entertainment Min

Wilcock, William

152

Siri McLean Plans & Training Manager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;#12;Drinking, Waste/Sewer & Surface #12;#12;#12;Electricity Generation, Transmission and Distribution #12;#12;Moving People, Goods and Services #12;#12;WHAT YOU NEED Water Food Light Communication Warmth Medical: Grab-N-Go #12;BASIC EMERGENCY SUPPLIES Bottled water or pouches High-protein, high-energy food First

Wilcock, William

153

UC Santa Cruz Storm Water Fall 2010 Volume 5, Number 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, in an event a spill does occur, it must be cleaned up as soon as possible. -Use dry cleanup methods (such ­ California BMP Handbook) cleaning of equipment, grease handling and disposal, spills, surface cleaning sanitary sewer inlets ­ Pressure washing, steam cleaning, and hand scrubbing may be conducted

California at Santa Cruz, University of

154

REPLACE YOUR MERCURY THERMOMETERS BEFORE THEY BREAK!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REPLACE YOUR MERCURY THERMOMETERS BEFORE THEY BREAK! Did you know, mercury from broken thermometers to the local environment, if broken thermometers in sinks eventually end at the sanitary sewer plant. Broken mercury thermometers create hazardous waste that is costly to clean up and costly to dispose of. Other

155

MARINE BIOMASS SYSTEM: ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND PRODUCTION OF METHANE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lb process heat: 1. 23 X 10 4 BTU electricity 5500 BTUe CaC1scf sludge 18.61b water 161b Btu/scf WASTE PROCESSING sewer~l9ZZ X 10 DEELAIQB BTU/yr) I MATERIALS TRANSPORTATION 3.

Haven, Kendall F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Design criteria Drain Rerouting Project 93-OR-EW-2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the design criteria to be used by the architect-engineer (A--E) in the performance of Title I and II design for the Drain Rerouting Project. The Drain Rerouting project at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee will provide the Y-12 Plant with the capability to reroute particular drains within buildings 9202, 9203 and 9995. Process drains that are presently connected to the storm sewer shall be routed to the sanitary sewer to ensure that any objectionable material inadvertently discharged into process drains will not discharge to East Fork Popular Creek (EFPC) without treatment. The project will also facilitate compliance with the Y-12 Plant`s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) discharge permit and allow for future pretreatment of once-through coolant.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Sewerage service charges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEWER&.GE SERVICE CHARGES A Dissertation Submitted to the Faculty of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in Partial Fulfilment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy Major Subject* Municipal suid Sanitary... Engineering By Samuel Robert Wright May 1946 BA.GRV ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The writer wishes to express appreciation to the State Health Department and to Mr* E. E. McA-dams of the League of Texas Municipalities for their aid and assistance in the collection...

Wright, Samuel Robert

1946-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility. Fourth Quarter 1994, Groundwater Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The unlined settling basin operated from 1958 until 1985, receiving waste water that contained volatile organic solvents used for metal degreasing and chemical constituents and depleted uranium from fuel fabrication process in M Area. The underground process sewer line transported M-Area process waste waters to the basin. Water periodically overflowed from the basin through the ditch to the seepage area adjacent to the ditch and to Lost Lake.

Chase, J.A.

1995-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

159

Land disposal of water treatment plant sludge -- A feasibility analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the following alternative disposal methods for the Buffalo Pound Water Treatment Sludge were evaluated: landfilling, discharge into sanitary sewers, long-term lagooning, use in manufacturing, co-composting, alum recovery and land application. Land application was chosen at the best disposal alternative. Preliminary design resulted in a 1% dry alum sludge loading rate (25 tonnes/ha), requiring 35 ha over a nine-year period and a phosphorus fertilizer supplement of about 50kg/ha.

Viraraghavan, T.; Multon, L.M.; Wasylenchuk, E.J.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Unit hydrograph application to stormwater collection system design and analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

review of each model studied and its capabilities follows. Storm Water Management Model. ? The Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency for the analysis of urban stormwater runoff... backwater analysis option uses the Direct Step Method to compute the water surface profiles in the storm sewer system. Two case studies with complex stormwater collection systems were modeled to verify and validate the hydrologic and hydraulic methods...

Spinks, Melvin Gerald

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "newnan wtr sewer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Adaptation Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environment ? Natural Environment ? People FIVE STRATEGIES Copyright 2011, City of Chicago ADAPTATION ESL-KT-11-11-16 9 CCAP Adaptation Evolution 2007 2008 2009 2010 ? Understood the climate science: Assess climate impacts ? Assessed economic... E xi st in g Tr un k Existing on Rogers Rogers Ave CIP Stormwater management: Chicago?s comprehensive sewer model Climate impacts Example actions to prepare the built environment Copyright 2011, City of Chicago ESL-KT-11-11-16 13 CCAP...

Durnbaugh, A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Graywater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-6176 3-08 Figure 1: A diagram of separate blackwater and graywater plumbing systems. W ith water reuse gaining popularity, people increasingly consider graywater from their residences as a resource to be separated from the wastewater stream... and reused in their landscapes. Such reuse of graywater reduces the amount of wastewater entering sewers or onsite wastewater treatment systems, reduces demands to use potable water for other residential uses like irrigation and helps preserve limited...

Melton, Rebecca; Lesikar, Bruce J.; Smith, David; O'Neill, Courtney

2008-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

163

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Graywater Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

irrigation and decr,ease the amount of wastewater entering sewers or onsite wastewater treatment systems. Onsite wastewater treatment systems However, homeowners who irrigate their lawns with graywater need to understand the risks and safety issues.... Residential wastewater can be classified as either blackwater (sew- age containing fecal matter or food wastes) or graywater. If graywater is collected separately from blackwater, it can be dispersed as irrigation water with less treatment than...

Melton, Rebecca; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

164

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Graywater Use and Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their homes in their landscapes. This reuse of graywater can reduce the amount of wastewater entering sewers or treatment systems, reduce the amount of fresh water used on landscapes and help preserve limited fresh water supplies. Onsite wastewater...-washing machines ? The code excludes water that has washed materials soiled with human waste, such as diapers, and water that has been in contact with toilet waste. This water, known as blackwater, includes flush water from toilets and urinals and wastewater...

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin; Alexander, Rachel

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

165

Autogenous reproduction in Culex salinarius  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the winter. In northern areas of their range, this effectively 11mits them to urban locat1ons, where sewer systems and other sheltered breeding s1tes are available (Sp1elman 1971b, Spielman and Wong 1973a). Larval and Adult Nutrition In autogenous... Spielman and Wong (1973a) showed that autogenous Cx. ~i iens do not undergo diapause in the Boston, Massachusetts, area. Instead, the autogenous population breeds throughout the winter in sheltered locations. Yirtually all anautogenous females...

Tveten, Michael Scott

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Development of Algorithms to Estimate Post-Disaster Population Dislocation--A Research-Based Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of infrastructure such as electric power, water/sewer, fuel, transportation and telecommunications (Lindell et al., 2006). Alesch et al. (1993), Dahlhamer & D?Souza (1997), Lindell et al. (2006), and Tierney (1997) reported that small businesses are more... for business recovery. In addition, owners and employees of small businesses are more likely to be socially vulnerable groups such as ethnic minorities or members of low socioeconomic status. Job loss could compound the difficulty of the household recovery...

Lin, Yi-Sz

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

167

CHl 98 . 18-23 APRIL 1998 Delegation and Circumvention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University Pittsburgh PA 15213 USA Pittsburgh PA 15213 USA +1412 363 8308 +14122687182 su.Furthermore, several longitudinal and real- ~em-kion to make di&Jhrd copies ofail or part oft& mat&d for Personal or cl&t is by permission of the ACM, Inc. To copyo&n%&, to repubhh, 10post on sewers or to redistribute to lists, requ

Bhavnani, Suresh K.

168

Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites Remedial Action Program. Report of the decontamination of Jones Chemical Laboratory, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, and Eckhart Hall, the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has implemented a program to decontaminate radioactively contaminated sites that were formerly utilized by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and/or the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) for activities that included handling of radioactive material. This program is referred to as the ''Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program'' (FUSRAP). Among these sites are Jones Chemical Laboratory, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, Kent Chemical Laboratory, and Eckhart Hall of The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. Since 1977, the University of Chicago decontaminated Kent Chemical Laboratory as part of a facilities renovation program. All areas of Eckhart Hall, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, and Jones Chemical Laboratory that had been identified as contaminated in excess of current guidelines in the 1976-1977 surveys were decontaminated to levels where no contamination could be detected relative to natural backgrounds. All areas that required defacing to achieve this goal were restored to their original condition. The radiological evaluation of the sewer system, based primarily on the radiochemical analyses of sludge and water samples, indicated that the entire sewer system is potentially contaminated. While this evaluation was defined as part of this project, the decontamination of the sewer system was not included in the purview of this effort. The documentation included in this report substantiates the judgment that all contaminated areas identified in the earlier reports in the three structures included in the decontamination effort (Eckhart Hall, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, and Jones Chemical Laboratory) were cleaned to levels commensurate with release for unrestricted use.

Wynuveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Flynn, K.F.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

FORSCOM installation characterization and ranking for water efficiency improvement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On March 11, 1994, President Clinton signed Executive Order 12902-Energy Efficiency and Water Conservation at Federal Facilities. Section 302 of the Executive Order calls for energy and water prioritization surveys of federal facilities to be conducted. The surveys will be used to establish priorities for conducting comprehensive facility audits. In response to the requirements of the Executive Order, the U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to initiate a broad study of the water savings potential at each of its major installations. This report provides an assessment of the water, sewer, energy (for hot water production and pumping), and associated cost savings potential at ten of the major FORSCOM installations. This assessment is meant to be a {open_quotes}first pass{close_quotes} estimate of the water savings potential, to assist FORSCOM in prioritizing installations for detailed water audits and potential water efficient retrofits. In addition, the end uses (toilets, sinks, showerheads, irrigation, etc.) with the greatest water savings potential are identified at each installation. This report is organized in the following manner. Following this Introduction, Section 2 provides important background information pertaining to the water analysis. Section 3 describes the methodology employed in the analysis, and Section 4 summarizes the study results. Section 5 prioritizes the installations based on both water/sewer savings and cost associated with water, sewer, and energy savings. Section 6 provides recommendations on where to start detailed water audits, as well as other recommendations. References are listed in Section 7. The appendices provide specific information on the analysis results and methodology, along with a discussion of special issues.

Fitzpatrick, Q.K.; McMordie, K.L.; Di Massa, F.V. [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

pH Meter probe assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe.

Hale, Charles J. (San Jose, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

pH Meter probe assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe. 1 fig.

Hale, C.J.

1983-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Unfolding-based corrector estimates for a reaction-diffusion system predicting concrete corrosion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use the periodic unfolding technique to derive corrector estimates for a reaction-diffusion system describing concrete corrosion penetration in the sewer pipes. The system, defined in a periodically-perforated domain, is semi-linear, partially dissipative, and coupled via a non-linear ordinary differential equation posed on the solid-water interface at the pore level. After discussing the solvability of the pore scale model, we apply the periodic unfolding techniques (adapted to treat the presence of perforations) not only to get upscaled model equations, but also to prepare a proper framework for getting a convergence rate (corrector estimates) of the averaging procedure.

Fatima, Tasnim; Ptashnyk, Mariya

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1995 site environmental report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1995 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the 1995 calendar year. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the environmental management programs. The report also discusses significant highlights and plans of these programs. Topics discussed include: environmental monitoring, environmental compliance programs, air quality, water quality, ground water protection, sanitary sewer monitoring, soil and sediment quality, vegetation and foodstuffs monitoring, and special studies which include preoperational monitoring of building 85 and 1995 sampling results, radiological dose assessment, and quality assessment.

Balgobin, D.; Javandel, I.; Lackner, G.; Smith, C.; Thorson, P.; Tran, H.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Landlord project multi-year work plan fiscal year 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of Landlord Project is to preserve, upgrade, maintain, and forecast cost effective general infrastructure activities to facilitate the Hanford Site cleanup mission. Specific functions and services provided by Landlord Project include utilities (i.e. steam, water, sanitary sewer, solid waste disposal, electrical and telecommunication distribution), transportation, general purpose facilities (includes general support shops and laboratories), services, and energy and land use management. All Landlord Project activities will be performed in an environmentally sound, safe, economical, prudent, and reliable manner. The Hanford Site Landlord Project will be competitive with commercially provided services to offer the best price, quality, and service available.

Knollmeyer, P.M., Westinghouse Hanford, Richland, WA

1997-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

175

Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monitoring data obtained for the calendar year 1979 are described, and general trends are discussed. The following areas are covered: accelerator produced radiation; radionuclide measurements and release (atmospheric, water, and sewer sampling); population dose equivalent resulting from LBL operations; and nonradioactive pollutants. Over the past several years the atmospheric sampling program has, with the exception of occasional known releases, yielded data which are within the range of normal background. The surface water program always yields results within the range of normal background. As no substantial changes in the quantities of radionuclides used are anticipated, no changes are expected in these observations.

Schleimer, G.E. (ed.)

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Portable wastewater flow meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable wastewater flow meter particularly adapted for temporary use at a single location in measuring the rate of liquid flow in a circular entrance conduit of a sewer manhole both under free flow and submerged, open channel conditions and under fill pipe, surcharged conditions, comprising an apparatus having a cylindrical external surface and an inner surface that constricts the flow through the apparatus in such a manner that a relationship exists between (1) the difference between the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the entrance of the apparatus and the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the constriction, and (2) the rate of liquid flow through the apparatus.

Hunter, Robert M. (320 S. Wilson Ave., Bozeman, MT 59715)

1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

177

Portable wastewater flow meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable wastewater flow meter particularly adapted for temporary use at a single location in measuring the rate of liquid flow in a circular entrance conduit of a sewer manhole both under free flow and submerged, open channel conditions and under full pipe, surcharged conditions, comprising an apparatus having a cylindrical external surface and an inner surface that constricts the flow through the apparatus in such a manner that a relationship exists between (1) the difference between the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the entrance of the apparatus and the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the constriction, and (2) the rate of liquid flow through the apparatus.

Hunter, Robert M. (320 S. Wilson Ave., Bozeman, MT 59715)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. 1982 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental monitoring efforts spanned air, water, vegetation and foodstuffs, and radiation doses. Monitoring data collection, analysis, and evaluation are presented for air, soils, sewage, water, vegetation and foodstuffs, milk, and general environmental radioactivity. Non-radioactive monitoring addresses beryllium, chemical effluents in sewage, noise pollution, and storm runoff and liquid discharge site pollutants. Quality assurance efforts are addressed. Five appendices present tabulated data; environmental activity concentration; dose calculation method; discharge limits to sanitary sewer systems of Livermore; and sampling and analytical procedures for environmental monitoring. (PSB)

Griggs, K.S.; Gonzalez, M.A.; Buddemeier, R.W.

1983-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

179

Cockroaches ... Recognition and Control.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,500 species of cockroaches exist in the world today, with 55 species known to live in the U.S. In Texas, only five species are really trouble some in homes and other buildings. The other cock roach species are not found in Texas or they breed and live... , approach of cold weather, they move in masses into homes and other buildings. In buildings, these cock roaches inhabit high moisture areas such as sewers, drains and dark, damp basements. They somewhat restrict their activities to the ground or below...

Hamman, Philip J.; Turney H.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

EE/RE in the 83rd Texas Legislature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-conserving lawn ESL-KT-13-12-01 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Taxes ? Pollution Control Property Ad Valorem Tax Exemption (HB 1897 Eiland/Carona) ? Clarifies the application of the exemption from ad... is pollution control property ESL-KT-13-12-01 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Regulatory ? PUC Sunset HB 1600 (Cook/Nichols)? Changes to PUC Commissioner Qualifications? Transfers water and sewer...

Taylor, D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "newnan wtr sewer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Technical Basis for Radiological Emergency Plan Annex for WTD Emergency Response Plan: West Point Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document, Volume 3 of PNNL-15163 is the technical basis for the Annex to the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP) Emergency Response Plan related to responding to a radiological emergency at the WPTP. The plan primarily considers response to radioactive material that has been introduced in the other combined sanitary and storm sewer system from a radiological dispersion device, but is applicable to any accidental or deliberate introduction of materials into the system.

Hickey, Eva E.; Strom, Daniel J.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Co-combustion feasibility study. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report investigates the technical and economic feasibility of co-combusting municipal sewage sludge produced by the Saratoga County Sewer District No. 1 with paper mill sludge produced by the Cottrell Paper Company, Encore Paper Company, International Paper Company, Mohawk Paper Mills, and TAGSONS Papers at the Saratoga County Sewer District No. 1`s secondary wastewater treatment plant and recovering any available energy products. The co-combustion facility would consist of sludge and wood chip storage and conveying systems, belt filter presses, screw presses, fluidized-bed incinerators, venturi scrubbers and tray cooling systems, ash dewatering facilities, heat recovery steam generators, gas-fired steam superheaters, and a back-pressure steam turbine system. Clean waste wood chips would be used as an auxiliary fuel in the fluidized-bed incinerators. It is recommended that the ash produced by the proposed facility be beneficially used, potentially as a raw material in the manufacture of cement and/or as an interim barrier layer in landfills.

Handcock, D.J. [Clough, Harbour and Associates, Albany, NY (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

State waste discharge permit application, 200-E chemical drain field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations (Ecology et al. 1994), the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect ground would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. As a result of this decision, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office entered into Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177, (Ecology and DOE-RL 1991). The Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177 requires a series of permitting activities for liquid effluent discharges. This document presents the State Waste Discharge Permit (SWDP) application for the 200-E Chemical Drain Field. Waste water from the 272-E Building enters the process sewer line directly through a floor drain, while waste water from the 2703-E Building is collected in two floor drains, (north and south) that act as sumps and are discharged periodically. The 272-E and 2703-E Buildings constitute the only discharges to the process sewer line and the 200-E Chemical Drain Field.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

ENERGY EFFICIENCY UPGRADES FOR SANITATION FACILITIES IN SELAWIK, AK FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Native Village of Selawik is a federally recognized Alaskan tribe, located at the mouth of the Selawik River, about 90 miles east of Kotzebue in northwest Alaska. Due to the communitys rural location and cold climate, it is common for electric rates to be four times higher than the cost urban residents pay. These high energy costs were the driving factor for Selawik pursuing funding from the Department of Energy in order to achieve significant energy cost savings. The main objective of the project was to improve the overall energy efficiency of the water treatment/distribution and sewer collection systems in Selawik by implementing the retrofit measures identified in a previously conducted utility energy audit. One purpose for the proposed improvements was to enable the community to realize significant savings associated with the cost of energy. Another purpose of the upgrades was to repair the vacuum sewer system on the west side of Selawik to prevent future freeze-up problems during winter months.

POLLIS, REBECCA

2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

185

Radiological Risk Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document develops plausible and/or likely scenarios, including the identification of likely radioactive materials and quantities of those radioactive materials to be involved. These include 60Co, 90Sr, 137Cs, 192Ir, 226Ra, plutonium, and 241Am. Two broad categories of scenarios are considered. The first category includes events that may be suspected from the outset, such as an explosion of a "dirty bomb" in downtown Seattle. The explosion would most likely be heard, but the type of explosion (e.g., sewer methane gas or RDD) may not be immediately known. Emergency first responders must be able to quickly detect the radioisotopes previously listed, assess the situation, and deploy a response to contain and mitigate (if possible) detrimental effects resulting from the incident. In such scenarios, advance notice of about an hour or two might be available before any contaminated wastewater reaches a treatment plant. The second category includes events that could go initially undetected by emergency personnel. Examples of such a scenario would be the inadvertent or surreptitious introduction of radioactive material into the sewer system. Intact rogue radioactive sources from industrial radiography devices, well-logging apparatus, or moisture density gages may get into wastewater and be carried to a treatment plant. Other scenarios might include a terrorist deliberately putting a dispersible radioactive material into wastewater. Alternatively, a botched terrorism preparation of an RDD may result in radioactive material entering wastewater without anyone's knowledge. Drinking water supplies may also be contaminated, with the result that some or most of the radioactivity ends up in wastewater.

Strom, Daniel J.

2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

186

The Ashland tank collapse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The estimated 3.9-million-gallon diesel oil spill from a collapsed storage tank at the Floreffe, Pa., terminal of Ashland Oil Co. has received a lot of attention, and for good reason. On Jan. 2, 1988 a 40-year-old, 48-ft-high, 120-ft-in diameter, reassembled tank suddenly ruptured and emptied its contents in a massive inland-water way fuel spill. An EPA-estimated 750,000 gallons washed over the 10-foot-high dike (with a holding capacity 110 percent that of the tank) into a drainage system on adjacent property to storm sewers that eventually empty into the Monongahela River, which runs into the Ohio River. More than 180,000 gal were recovered by cleanup, while 2.5 to 3.1 MMgal were contained by the tank farm's dike system.

Prokop, J.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Bayesian analysis of computer code outputs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

real-world phenomena. They are typically used to predict the corresponding real-world phenomenon, as in the following examples. Modern weather forecasting is done using enormously complex models of the atmosphere (and its interactions with land and sea). The primary intention is to predict future weather, given information about current conditions. Manufacturers of motor car engines build models to predict their behaviour. They are used to explore possible variations in engine design, and thereby to avoid the time and expense of actually building many unsuccessful variants in the search for an improved design. Water engineers build network ow models of sewer systems, in order to predict where problems of surcharging and ooding will arise under rainstorm conditions. They are then used to explore changes to the network to solve those problems. Models of atmospheric dispersion are used to predict the spread and deposition

Marc C Kennedy; Anthony O& apos; Hagan; Neil Higgins

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 1607-B1 Septic System, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-015  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1607-B1 Septic System includes a septic tank, drain field, and associated connecting pipelines and influent sanitary sewer lines. This septic system serviced the former 1701-B Badgehouse, 1720-B Patrol Building/Change Room, and the 1709-B Fire Headquarters. The 1607-B1 waste site received unknown amounts of nonhazardous, nonradioactive sanitary sewage from these facilities during its operational history from 1944 to approximately 1970. In accordance with this evaluation, the confirmatory sampling results support a reclassification of this site to No Action. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of confirmatory sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2007-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

189

Local drainage analyses of the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants during an extreme storm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Local drainage analyses have been performed for the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants during an extreme storm having an approximate 10,000-yr recurrence interval. This review discusses the methods utilized to accomplish the analyses in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) design and evaluation guidelines, and summarizes trends, results, generalizations, and uncertainties applicable to other DOE facilities. Results indicate that some culverts may be undersized, and that the storm sewer system cannot drain the influx of precipitation from the base of buildings. Roofs have not been designed to sustain ponding when the primary drainage system is clogged. Some underground tunnels, building entrances, and ground level air intakes may require waterproofing.

Johnson, R.O.; Wang, J.C.; Lee, D.W.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-26:13, 108-F Drain Pipelines, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 100-F-26:13 waste site is the network of process sewer pipelines that received effluent from the 108-F Biological Laboratory and discharged it to the 188-F Ash Disposal Area (126-F-1 waste site). The pipelines included one 0.15-m (6-in.)-, two 0.2-m (8-in.)-, and one 0.31-m (12-in.)-diameter vitrified clay pipe segments encased in concrete. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

191

Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: Annual report, 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL) for 1987. To evaluate the effect of LLNL operations on the local environment, measurements were made of direct radiation and a variety of radionuclides and chemical pollutants in ambient air, soil, sewage effluents, surface water, groundwater, vegetation, foodstuff, and milk at both the Livermore site and nearby Site 300. Evaluations were made of LLNL's compliance with the applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological releases to the environment. The data indicates that the only releases in excess of applicable standards were four releases to the sanitary sewer. LLNL operations had no adverse impact on the environment during 1987. 65 refs., 24 figs.

Holland, R.C.; Brekke, D.D.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory environmental report for 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1990. To evaluate the effect of LLNL operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent surface water, groundwater, vegetation, and foodstuff were made at both the Livermore site and at Site 300 nearly. LLNL's compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions to the environment was evaluated. Aside from an August 13 observation of silver concentrations slightly above guidelines for discharges to the sanitary sewer, all the monitoring data demonstrated LLNL compliance with environmental laws and regulations governing emission and discharge of materials to the environment. In addition, the monitoring data demonstrated that the environmental impacts of LLNL are minimal and pose no threat to the public to or to the environment. 114 refs., 46 figs., 79 tabs.

Sims, J.M.; Surano, K.A.; Lamson, K.C.; Balke, B.K.; Steenhoven, J.C.; Schwoegler, D.R. (eds.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Subproject L-045H 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study focuses on the project schedule for Project L-045H, 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility. The 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility is a Department of Energy subproject of the Hanford Environmental Compliance Project. The study scope is limited to validation of the project schedule only. The primary purpose of the study is to find ways and means to accelerate the completion of the project, thereby hastening environmental compliance of the 300 Area of the Hanford site. The 300 Area'' has been utilized extensively as a laboratory area, with a diverse array of laboratory facilities installed and operational. The 300 Area Process Sewer, located in the 300 Area on the Hanford Site, collects waste water from approximately 62 sources. This waste water is discharged into two 1500 feet long percolation trenches. Current environmental statutes and policies dictate that this practice be discontinued at the earliest possible date in favor of treatment and disposal practices that satisfy applicable regulations.

Not Available

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

A Systems Framework for Assessing Plumbing Products-Related Water Conservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reducing the water use of plumbing productstoilets, urinals, faucets, and showerheads has been a popular conservation measure. Improved technologies have created opportunities for additional conservation in this area. However, plumbing products do not operate in a vacuum. This paper reviews the literature related to plumbing products to determine a systems framework for evaluating future conservation measures using these products. The main framework comprises the following categories: water use efficiency, product components, product performance, source water, energy, and plumbing/sewer infrastructure. This framework for analysis provides a starting point for professionals considering future water conservation measures to evaluate the need for additional research, collaboration with other standards or codes committees, and attachment of additional metrics to water use efficiency (such as performance).

Williams, Alison; Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Lutz, James

2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

195

Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) for Coal Storage Area Stabilization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of this project is to stabilize the abandoned coal storage area and redirect the storm water runoff from sanitary sewer system to the storm drain system. Currently, the existing storm water runoff is directed to a perimeter concrete drainage swale and collected in a containment basin. The collected water is then pumped to a treatment facility and after treatment, is discharged to the Y-12 sanitary sewer system. The existing drainage swale and collection basin along with silt fencing will be used during aggregate placement and grading to provide erosion and sediment control. Inlet protection will also be installed around existing structures during the storm water diversion construction. This project scope will include the installation of a non-woven geotextile fabric and compacted mineral aggregate base (paving optional) to stabilize the site. The geotextile specifications are provided on the vendor cut sheets in Appendix B. The installation of a storm water collection/retention area will also be installed on the southern side of the site in accordance with EPA Technical Guidance on Implementing the Stormwater Runoff Requirements for federal Projects under Section 438 of the Energy Independence and Security Act. The total area to be disturbed is approximately 2.5 acres. The order of activities for this Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) will be: (1) post notice of coverage (NOC) in a prominent display near entrance of the site; (2) install rain gauge on site or contact Y-12 Plant Shift Superintendent daily for Met tower rain gauge readings; (3) install stabilized construction exit on site; (4) install silt fencing along perimeter as indicated on the attached site plan; (5) regrade site; (6) install geotextile fabric and compacted mineral aggregate base; (7) install catch basin inlet protection where required; (8) excavate and lower existing catch basin tops, re-grade and asphalt to drain; and (9) when all disturbed areas are re-stabilized, remove silt fencing and any other temporary erosion control.

Project and Design Engineering

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Techno-economic analysis of renewable energy source options for a district heating project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the increased interest in exploiting renewable energy sources for district heating applications, the economic comparison of viable options has been considered as an important step in making a sound decision. In this paper, the economic performance of several energy options for a district heating system in Vancouver, British Columbia, is studied. The considered district heating system includes a 10 MW peaking/ backup natural gas boiler to provide about 40% of the annual energy requirement and a 2.5 MW base-load system. The energy options for the base-load system include: wood pellet, sewer heat, and geothermal heat. Present values of initial and operating costs of each system were calculated over 25-year service life of the systems, considering depreciation and salvage as a negative cost item. It was shown that the wood pellet heat producing technologies provided less expensive energy followed by the sewer heat recovery, geothermal and natural gas systems. Among wood pellet technologies, the grate burner was a less expensive option than powder and gasifier technologies. It was found that using natural gas as a fuel source for the peaking/backup system accounted for more than 40% of the heat production cost for the considered district heating center. This is mainly due to the high natural gas prices which cause high operating costs over the service life of the district heating system. Variations in several economic inputs did not change the ranking of the technology options in the sensitivity analysis. However, it was found that the results were more sensitive to changes in operating costs of the system than changes in initial investment. It is economical to utilize wood pellet boilers to provide the base-load energy requirement of district heating systems Moreover, the current business approach to use natural gas systems for peaking and backup in district heating systems could increase the cost of heat production significantly.

Ghafghazi, S. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sowlati, T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Melin, Staffan [University of British Columbia, Vancouver

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

State Waste Discharge Permit application, 100-N Sewage Lagoon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations (Ecology et al. 1994), the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173--216 (or 173--218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. As a result of this decision, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office entered into Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177, (Ecology and DOE-RL 1991). This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 100-N Sewage Lagoon. Since the influent to the sewer lagoon is domestic waste water, the State Waste Discharge Permit application for Public Owned Treatment Works Discharges to Land was used. Although the 100-N Sewage Lagoon is not a Public Owned Treatment Works, the Public Owned Treatment Works application is more applicable than the application for industrial waste water. The 100-N Sewage Lagoon serves the 100-N Area and other Hanford Site areas by receiving domestic waste from two sources. A network of sanitary sewer piping and lift stations transfers domestic waste water from the 100-N Area buildings directly to the 100-N Sewage Lagoon. Waste is also received by trucks that transport domestic waste pumped from on site septic tanks and holding tanks. Three ponds comprise the 100-N Sewage Lagoon treatment system. These include a lined aeration pond and stabilization pond, as well as an unlined infiltration pond. Both piped-in and trucked-in domestic waste is discharged directly into the aeration pond.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Anaerobic Digestion and Combined Heat and Power Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the underlying objectives of this study is to recover the untapped energy in wastewater biomass. Some national statistics worth considering include: (1) 5% of the electrical energy demand in the US is used to treat municipal wastewater; (2) This carbon rich wastewater is an untapped energy resource; (3) Only 10% of wastewater treatment plants (>5mgd) recover energy; (4) Wastewater treatment plants have the potential to produce > 575 MW of energy nationwide; and (5) Wastewater treatment plants have the potential to capture an additional 175 MW of energy from waste Fats, Oils and Grease. The WSSC conducted this study to determine the feasibility of utilizing anaerobic digestion and combined heat and power (AD/CHP) and/or biosolids gasification and drying facilities to produce and utilize renewable digester biogas. Digester gas is considered a renewable energy source and can be used in place of fossil fuels to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The project focus includes: (1) Converting wastewater Biomass to Electricity; (2) Using innovative technologies to Maximize Energy Recovery; and (3) Enhancing the Environment by reducing nutrient load to waterways (Chesapeake Bay), Sanitary Sewer Overflows (by reducing FOG in sewers) and Greenhouse Gas Emissions. The study consisted of these four tasks: (1) Technology screening and alternative shortlisting, answering the question 'what are the most viable and cost effective technical approaches by which to recover and reuse energy from biosolids while reducing disposal volume?'; (2) Energy recovery and disposal reduction potential verification, answering the question 'how much energy can be recovered from biosolids?'; (3) Economic environmental and community benefit analysis, answering the question 'what are the potential economic, environmental and community benefits/impacts of each approach?'; and (4) Recommend the best plan and develop a concept design.

Frank J. Hartz; Rob Taylor; Grant Davies

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

199

Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of Research & Development (R&D) facilities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on the Hanford Site. Facility effluent monitoring plans (FEMPs) have been developed to document the facility effluent monitoring portion of the Environmental Monitoring Plan (DOE 2000) for the Hanford Site. Three of PNNLs R&D facilities, the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling, and individual FEMPs were developed for these facilities in the past. In addition, a balance-of-plant (BOP) FEMP was developed for all other DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site. Recent changes, including shutdown of buildings and transition of PNNL facilities to the Office of Science, have resulted in retiring the 3720 FEMP and combining the 331 FEMP into the BOP FEMP. This version of the BOP FEMP addresses all DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site, excepting the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, which has its own FEMP because of the unique nature of the building and operations. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R&D. R&D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in Appendix A. Potential radioactive airborne emissions in the BOP facilities are estimated annually using a building inventory-based approach provided in federal regulations. Sampling at individual BOP facilities is based on a potential-to-emit assessment. Some of these facilities are considered minor emission points and thus are sampled routinely, but not continuously, to confirm the low emission potential. One facility, the 331 Life Sciences Laboratory, has a major emission point and is sampled continuously. Sampling systems are located downstream of control technologies and just before discharge to the atmosphere. The need for monitoring airborne emissions of hazardous chemicals is established in the Hanford Site Air Operating Permit and in notices of construction. Based on the current potential-to-emit, the Hanford Site Air Operating Permit does not contain general monitoring requirements for BOP facilities. However, the permit identifies monitoring requirements for specific projects and buildings. Needs for future monitoring will be established by future permits issued pursuant to the applicable state and federal regulations. A number of liquid-effluent discharge systems serve the BOP facilities: sanitary sewer, process sewer, retention process sewer, and aquaculture system. Only the latter system discharges to the environment; the rest either discharge to treatment plants or to long-term storage. Routine compliance sampling of liquid effluents is only required at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory. Liquid effluents from other BOP facilities may be sampled or monitored to characterize facility effluents or to investigate discharges of concern. Effluent sampling and monitoring for the BOP facilities depends on the inventories, activities, and environmental permits in place for each facility. A description of routine compliance monitoring for BOP facilities is described in the BOP FEMP.

Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 3): Lansdowne Radiation Site, Lansdowne, Pennsylvania (second remedial action), September 1986. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lansdowne Radiation site consists of two attached residences located at 105/107 East Stratford Avenue, Lansdowne, PA. The building is located in a residential area, approximately two miles from Philadelphia. The dwellings were contaminated with radium and other radionuclides between 1924 and 1944 as a result of refining radium and producing medical devices. A decontamination effort in 1964 consisted of removing as much radium as practical by sending, scraping, vacuuming, and washing the house walls, floors and ceilings. Some concrete floor and wooden floor boards were also removed. It is postulated that the acid fumes from the radium purification procedure used, as well as spills, carried the radium contamination deep into the wood and plaster of the home. The remedial action includes dismantling of the house. All radioactive materials above established permissible levels will be packed and sealed in approved containers, and disposed of at an approved offsite disposal facility; contaminated soil located in and around the house will be excavated and removed to established permissible levels. The sewer lateral leading from the contaminated house to Stratford Avenue will be removed and replaced. The capital cost has been estimated at $4,000,000-$4,500,000.

Not Available

1986-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "newnan wtr sewer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Energy management program: Prince William County Public Schools Manassas, Virginia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prince William County, Virginia, is located some 25 miles southwest of Washington, D.C. The Prince William County Public School (PWCPS) system includes sixty-four schools (46 elementary schools, 11 middle schools, 7 high schools). Nine schools were built prior to 1960, thirty-eight during the 60s and 70s, and the balance since 1980. Additionally, there are two administrative and support facilities. Total square footage is approximately 5.6 million square feet. Approximately 5,700 employees, including instructors, serve some 46,000 students. The school system`s Capital Improvements Plan (CIP) calls for the construction of eleven new schools over the next five years. Enrollment is expected to grow at a rate of 1,000 per year for the next several years. The school division is served by three (3) electric utilities, two (2) natural gas and one (1) LP gas supplier, one (1) heating oil supplier, three (3) water and three (3) sewer companies. Utility expenditures have risen steadily over the years. From fiscal year 1990 through fiscal year 1994 these expenditures rose from 6.7 million dollars to 8.4 million dollars, a 25% increase. Utility costs are projected to rise an additional 28% ($2.6M) through fiscal year 1999.

Colbert, G.T.; McTighe, S.F.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 3: Specifications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. Volume 3 is a compilation of the construction specifications that will constitute the Title II materials and performance specifications. This volume contains CSI specifications for non-equipment related construction material type items, performance type items, and facility mechanical equipment items. Data sheets are provided, as necessary, which specify the equipment overall design parameters.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Waste Minimization Plans and activities in the MFD Plating Shop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Plating Shop (Building 322), provides processes such as electroplating, electroless plating, anodizing, cleaning, etching, electroforming and chemical milling. We in MFD are committed to an active program on waste minimization, and the purpose of this document is to outline the plan of action. Our short range minimization goals are threefold: (1) Reduce our major waste stream by 90%, (2) Minimize discharge of rinse water to sewer system, and (3) Eliminate vapor degreasing in the shop. The intermediate goals consist of characterizing the waste streams and evaluating recovery processes. To do this, we first need to have the distillation unit operational and time to determine its effectiveness. If it proves to be as effective as we anticipate, we will perhaps purchase a second unit. Regardless, the streams that we can identify include: nickel, copper, rinses, acids, alkalies, electropolish and miscellaneous. Our goal is to utilize electrolytic processes to recover metals such as nickel and copper and processes such as ion exchange for some of the other streams. We intend to evaluate the full gamut of recycling processes available for these streams. We anticipate completing this phase of the minimization program by January 1993. The long range goal is zero discharge or since this could prove extremely difficult, development of processes that will allow us to produce a sludge cake that could be handled by our Hazardous Waste Management Group.

Dini, J.W.; Steffani, C.P.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 219: Septic Systems and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 219, Septic Systems and Injection Wells, has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. The purpose of the investigation is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technically viable corrective actions. Corrective Action Unit 219 is located in Areas 3, 16, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 219 is comprised of the six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-11-01, Steam Pipes and Asbestos Tiles; (2) 16-04-01, Septic Tanks (3); (3) 16-04-02, Distribution Box; (4) 16-04-03, Sewer Pipes; (5) 23-20-01, DNA Motor Pool Sewage and Waste System; and (6) 23-20-02, Injection Well. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

David A. Strand

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 2: Solid waste retrieval facilities -- Phase 1, detail design drawings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. Volume 2 provides the complete set of the Detail Design drawings along with a listing of the drawings. Once approved by WHC, these drawings will be issued and baselined for the Title 3 construction effort.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 5: Design validation assessments and lists  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. The following Code Evaluation analyzes the applicable sections of the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 101, Life Safety Code, 1994 Edition and the 1994 Edition of the Uniform Building Code (UBC) to the W113 Trench Enclosure. A Building Code Analysis generally establishes four primary design criteria: occupancy classification; separation requirements; egress requirements; and construction type. The UBC establishes requirements for all criteria. This analysis is limited to the Trench Enclosure Building. The General Office Building and the Retrieval Staff Change Building is not within the scope of this analysis.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 1: Title II design report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. Volume 1 provides a comprehensive narrative description of the proposed facility and systems, the basis for each of the systems design, and the engineering assessments that were performed to support the technical basis of the Title II design. The intent of the system description presented is to provide WHC an understanding of the facilities and equipment provided and the A/E`s perspective on how these systems will operate.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Biodiesel as an Alternative Energy Resource in Southwest Nigeria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Nigerian state faces unique issues that may provide an opportunity for rural economic growth. One of such is that major urban areas in the southwest of the country are beginning to have population increase and hence air quality problems that will require actions to reduce sources of pollution. One major pollution source is from exhaust emissions from cars and trucks. The use of alternative fuel sources such as biodiesel can make a significant reduction in certain exhaust emissions thus reducing pollution and improving air quality. The opportunity for economic growth in a single product economy like ours could lie in the processing of soybean oil and other suitable feedstocks produced within the country into biodiesel. The new fuel can be used by vehicles traversing the country thus reduce air pollution and providing another market for agricultural feedstocks while creating a value added market for animal fats and spent oils from industrial facilities. The benefits of biodiesel go far beyond the clean burning nature of the product. Bio diesel is a renewable resource helping to reduce the dependence of the economy on limited resources and imports, create a market for farmers and reduce the amount of waste oil, fat and grease being dumped into landfills and sewers.

Ajide O. O

209

Thermal sludge dryer demonstration: Bird Island Wastewater Treatment Plant, Buffalo, NY. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Buffalo Sewer Authority (BSA), in cooperation with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (Energy Authority), commissioned a demonstration of a full scale indirect disk-type sludge dryer at the Bird Island Wastewater Treatment Plant (BIWWTP). The purpose of the project was to determine the effects of the sludge dryer on the sludge incineration process at the facility. Sludge incineration is traditionally the most expensive, energy-intensive unit process involving solids handling at wastewater treatment plants; costs for incineration at the BIWWTP have averaged $2.4 million per year. In the conventional method of processing solids, a series of volume reduction measures, which usually includes thickening, digestion, and mechanical dewatering, is employed prior to incineration. Usually, a high level of moisture is still present within sewage sludge following mechanical dewatering. The sludge dryer system thermally dewaters wastewater sludge to approximately 26%, (and as high as 38%) dry solids content prior to incineration. The thermal dewatering system at the BIWWTP has demonstrated that it meets its design requirements. It has the potential to provide significant energy and other cost savings by allowing the BSA to change from an operation employing two incinerators to a single incinerator mode. While the long-term reliability of the thermal dewatering system has yet to be established, this project has demonstrated that installation of such a system in an existing treatment plant can provide the owner with significant operating cost savings.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Pollution prevention and water conservation in metals finishing operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Attleboro, Massachusetts is the headquarters of the Materials and Controls Group of Texas Instruments Incorporated (Texas Instruments). In support of their activities, Texas Instruments operates a number of metal finishing and electroplating processes. The water supply and the wastewater treatment requirements are supplied throughout the facility from a central location. Water supply quality requirements varies with each manufacturing operation. As a result, manufacturing operations are classified as either high level or a lower water quality. The facility has two methods of wastewater treatment and disposal. The first method involves hydroxide and sulfide metals precipitation prior to discharge to a surface water. The second method involves metals precipitation, filtration, and discharge via sewer to the Attleboro WTF. The facility is limited to a maximum wastewater discharge of 460,000 gallons per day to surface water under the existing National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit. There is also a hydraulic flow restriction on pretreated wastewater that is discharged to the Attleboro WTF. Both of these restrictions combined with increased production could cause the facility to reach the treatment capacity. The net effect is that wastewater discharge problems are becoming restrictive to the company`s growth. This paper reviews Texas Instruments efforts to overcome these restrictions through pollution prevention and reuse practices rather than expansion of end of pipe treatment methods.

O`Shaughnessy, J.; Clark, W. [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., MA (United States); Lizotte, R.P. Jr.; Mikutel, D. [Texas Instruments Inc., Attleboro, MA (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 4: Project cost estimate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. This volume represents the total estimated costs for the W113 facility. Operating Contractor Management costs have been incorporated as received from WHC. The W113 Facility TEC is $19.7 million. This includes an overall project contingency of 14.4% and escalation of 17.4%. A January 2001 construction contract procurement start date is assumed.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Characterization of shallow groundwater at TNX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS), located on 300 square miles along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina, is owned by the Department of Energy and operated by Westinghouse Savannah River Company. The site`s mission is to support the national security through the production of nuclear weapons material. With the recent reduction of the nation`s nuclear stockpile and the stronger focus on the cleanup of sites where nuclear operations activities have left behind soil and groundwater contamination, identifying and remediating all inactive wastes has become a primary goal.The TNX Area is located adjacent to the Savannah River in the western portion of SRS (Figure 1). The area is a pilot-scale test facility for the Savannah River Technology Center. Pilot-scale testing and evaluation of chemical processes at TNX have included support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), Separations Area, and fuel and target manufacturing areas. Wastewater generated during tests was discharged to unlined basins through a network of underground process sewers.A discussion of waste disposal activities for the TNX Area is included in this report to identify the major sources of contaminants that have impacted the groundwater.

Nichols, R.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Landlord Program multi-year program plan fiscal year 1995 WBS 7.5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Landlord Program mission is to maintain, preserve, or upgrade the strategic assets of the Hanford Site to meet the overall cleanup mission. This encompasses innovative, appropriate, and cost effective general purpose infrastructure support, services, and long range strategic site planning that is the foundation for seven major Hanford programs. These programs are (1) Environmental Restoration, (2) Tank Waste Remediation System, (3) Solid/Liquid Waste Decontamination, (4) Facility Transition, (5) Spent Fuel, (6) Technology Development, and (7) the Multi-Program Laboratory. General infrastructure support consists of facilities, systems, and equipment that by design or use are not essentially dedicated to a single program mission. Facilities include laboratories, shops, warehouses, and general work space. Systems include electrical, process sewers, rail, roads, telecommunications, water, fire and emergency response, and steam supply and distribution. Funding also supports capital equipment critical to maintaining, upgrading, or operating the general infrastructure. Paramount to these objectives is compliance with all applicable laws, orders, agreements, codes, standards, best management and safety practices. The objectives for general infrastructure support are reflected in five programmatic functions, (1) Program Integration, (2) Capital Equipment, (3) Expense Funded Projects, (4) General Plant Projects, and (5) Line Items.

Young, C.L.

1994-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

214

Evaluation of Residential Hot Water Distribution Ssytems by Numeric Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to evaluate the performance and economics of various domestic hot water distribution systems in representative California residences. While the greatest opportunities for improved efficiency occur in new construction, significant improvements can also be made in some existing distribution systems. Specific objectives of the project tasks were: (1) Simulate potential energy savings of, perform cost-benefit analyses of, and identify market barriers to alternative new systems. (2) Simulate potential energy savings of, perform cost-benefit analyses of, and identify market barriers to maintenance, repair, and retrofit modifications of existing systems. (3) Evaluate potential impact of adopting alternative hot water distribution systems and report project findings. The outcome of this project is to provide homeowners, homebuilders, systems suppliers, municipal code officials and utility providers (both electric and water/sewer) with a neutral, independent, third party, cost-benefit analysis of alternative hot water distribution systems for use in California. The results will enable these stakeholders to make informed decisions regarding which system is most appropriate for use.

Wendt, ROBERT

2005-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

215

Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste oils offer a tremendous recycling potential. An important, dwindling natural resource of great economic and industrial value, oil products are a cornerstone of our modern industrial society. Petroleum is processed into a wide variety of products: gasoline, fuel oil, diesel oil, synthetic rubber, solvents, pesticides, synthetic fibres, lubricating oil, drugs and many more ' (see Figure 1 1. The boilers of Amercian industries presently consume about 40 % of the used lubricating oils collected. In Ontario, the percentage varies from 20 to 30%. Road oiling is the other major use of collected waste oils. Five to seven million gallons (50-70 % of the waste oil col1ected)is spread on dusty Ontario roads each summer. The practice is both a wasteful use of a dwindling resource and an environmental hazard. The waste oil, with its load of heavy metals, particularly lead, additives including dangerous polynuclear aromatics and PCBs, is carried into the natural environment by runoff and dust to contaminate soils and water courses.2 The largest portion of used oils is never collected, but disappears into sewers, landfill sites and backyards. In Ontario alone, approximately 22 million gallons of potentially recyclable lube oil simply vanish each year. While oil recycling has ad-114 Oil

unknown authors

216

Radiological Instrumentation Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into its combined sanitary and storm sewer system. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material. Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. Volume 2 of PNNL-15163 assesses the radiological instrumentation needs for detection of radiological or nuclear terrorism, in support of decisions to treat contaminated wastewater or to bypass the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP), and in support of radiation protection of the workforce, the public, and the infrastructure of the WPTP. Fixed radiation detection instrumentation should be deployed in a defense-in-depth system that provides 1) early warning of significant radioactive material on the way to the WPTP, including identification of the radionuclide(s) and estimates of the soluble concentrations, with a floating detector located in the wet well at the Interbay Pump Station and telemetered via the internet to all authorized locations; 2) monitoring at strategic locations within the plant, including 2a) the pipe beyond the hydraulic ram in the bar screen room; 2b) above the collection funnels in the fine grit facility; 2c) in the sampling tank in the raw sewage pump room; and 2d) downstream of the concentration facilities that produce 6% blended and concentrated biosolids. Engineering challenges exist for these applications. It is necessary to deploy both ultra-sensitive detectors to provide early warning and identification and detectors capable of functioning in high-dose rate environments that are likely under some scenarios, capable of functioning from 10 microrems per hour (background) up to 1000 rems per hour. Software supporting fixed spectroscopic detectors is needed to provide prompt, reliable, and simple interpretations of spectroscopic outputs that are of use to operators and decision-makers. Software to provide scientists and homeland security personnel with sufficient technical detail for identification, quantification, waste management decisions, and for the inevitable forensic and attribution needs must be developed. Computational modeling using MCNP software has demonstrated that useful detection capabilities can be deployed. In particular, any of the isotopes examined can be detected at levels between 0.01 and 0.1 ?Ci per gallon. General purpose instruments that can be used to determine the nature and extent of radioactive contamination and measure radiation levels for purposes of protecting personnel and members of the public should be available. One or more portable radioisotope identifiers (RIIDs) should be available to WTD personnel. Small, portable battery-powered personal radiation monitors should be widely available WTD personnel. The personal monitors can be used for personal and group radiation protection decisions, and to alert management to the need to get expert backup. All considerations of radiological instrumentation require considerations of training and periodic retraining of personnel, as well as periodic calibration and maintenance of instruments. Routine innocent alarms will occur due to medical radionuclides that are legally discharged into sanitary sewers on a daily basis.

Strom, Daniel J.; McConn, Ronald J.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.

2005-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

217

Conceptual design report for site drainage control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mound Plant (Mound), located in Miamisburg, Ohio, is a Department of Energy (DOE) development and production facility performing support work for DOE`s weapons and energy-related programs. EG&G Mound Applied Technologies, Inc. (EG&G) is the Operating Contractor (OC) for this Government-Owned, Contractor-Operated (GOCO) facility. The work performed at Mound emphasizes nuclear energy and explosives technology. Mound is currently implementing an Environmental, Safety & Health (ES&H) Upgrades Program designed to protect its employees, the public, and the environment from adverse effects caused by facility activities. The first project of this multiphase program is now in the final stages of construction, and the second project is currently under design. Four additional projects, one of which is presented in this report, are in the conceptual design stage. At Mound, 22 soil zones have become contaminated with radioactive material. These zones cover approximately 20 percent of the total area of developed property at the site. During a storm event, the rainwater washes contaminated soil from these zones into the storm sewer system. These radioactive contaminants may then be discharged along with the stormwater into the Great Miami River via the Miami Erie Canal. This conceptual design report (CDR), Site Drainage Control, the fourth project in the ES&H program, describes a project that will provide improvements and much needed repairs to inadequate and deteriorating portions of the storm drainage system on the developed property. The project also will provide a stormwater retention facility capable of storing the stormwater runoff, from the developed property, resulting from a 100-year storm event. These improvements will permit the effective control and monitoring of stormwater to prevent the spread of radioactive contaminants from contaminated soil zones and will provide a means to collect and contain accidental spills of hazardous substances.

Hunter, M.R.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Southeast Water Pollution Control Plant Case Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details a study into the demand response potential of a large wastewater treatment facility in San Francisco. Previous research had identified wastewater treatment facilities as good candidates for demand response and automated demand response, and this study was conducted to investigate facility attributes that are conducive to demand response or which hinder its implementation. One years' worth of operational data were collected from the facility's control system, submetered process equipment, utility electricity demand records, and governmental weather stations. These data were analyzed to determine factors which affected facility power demand and demand response capabilities The average baseline demand at the Southeast facility was approximately 4 MW. During the rainy season (October-March) the facility treated 40% more wastewater than the dry season, but demand only increased by 4%. Submetering of the facility's lift pumps and centrifuges predicted load shifts capabilities of 154 kW and 86 kW, respectively, with large lift pump shifts in the rainy season. Analysis of demand data during maintenance events confirmed the magnitude of these possible load shifts, and indicated other areas of the facility with demand response potential. Load sheds were seen to be possible by shutting down a portion of the facility's aeration trains (average shed of 132 kW). Load shifts were seen to be possible by shifting operation of centrifuges, the gravity belt thickener, lift pumps, and external pump stations These load shifts were made possible by the storage capabilities of the facility and of the city's sewer system. Large load reductions (an average of 2,065 kW) were seen from operating the cogeneration unit, but normal practice is continuous operation, precluding its use for demand response. The study also identified potential demand response opportunities that warrant further study: modulating variable-demand aeration loads, shifting operation of sludge-processing equipment besides centrifuges, and utilizing schedulable self-generation.

Olsen, Daniel; Goli, Sasank; Faulkner, David; McKane, Aimee

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

219

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230, Area 22 Sewage Lagoons, and CAU 320, Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Referred to as CAU 230/320, both CAUs are located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and comprise two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), 22-03-01 (Sewage Lagoons) and 22-99-01 (Strainer Box). The Area 22 Sewage Lagoons site also includes a buried Imhoff Tank, sludge bed, and associated sewer piping. A September 1999 corrective action investigation identified the only contaminant of concern above preliminary action levels at this CAU (i.e., total petroleum hydrocarbons as diesel-range organics). During this same investigation, three Corrective Action Objectives (CAOs) were identified to prevent or mitigate exposure to subsurface debris and contaminated soil. Based on these CAOs, a review of existing data, future use, and current operations in Area 22 of the NTS, three CAAs were developed for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action, Alternative 2 - Closure in Place with Administrative Controls, and Alternative 3 - Excavation and Removal. These alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors. Alternative 3 was chosen on technical merit as the preferred alternative for CAU 230/320. This alternative was judged to meet all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the buried debris and contaminated soils at both of the CASs within Area 22.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

2000-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

220

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Air port Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operation Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230/320 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 230 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 22-03-01, Sewage Lagoon; while CAU 320 consists of CAS 22-99-01, Strainer Box. These CAUs are referred to as CAU 230/320 or the Sewage Lagoons Site. The Sewage Lagoons Site also includes an Imhoff tank, sludge bed, and associated buried sewer piping. Located in Area 22, the site was used between 1951 to 1958 for disposal of sanitary sewage effluent from the historic Camp Desert Rock Facility at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada. Based on site history, the contaminants of potential concern include volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), and radionuclides. Vertical migration is estimated to be less than 12 feet below ground surface, and lateral migration is limited to the soil immediately adjacent to or within areas of concern. The proposed investigation will involve a combination of field screening for VOCs and TPH using the direct-push method and excavation using a backhoe to gather soil samples for analysis. Gamma spectroscopy will also be conducted for waste management purposes. Sampling locations will be biased to suspected worst-case areas including the nearby sludge bed, sewage lagoon inlet(s) and outlet(s), disturbed soil surrounding the lagoons, surface drainage channel south of the lagoons, and the area near the Imhoff tank. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

1999-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "newnan wtr sewer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The long-term and the short-term at a cropping municipal sewage sludge disposal facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The City of Raleigh, NC, chose land application of municipal sewage sludge as a means of reducing pollution to the Neuse River. The Neuse River Waste Water Treatment Plant (NRWWTP) is located in the Piedmont Province of North Carolina. The soils at the facility are derived largely from the Rolesville Granite. Sewage sludge is applied to over 640 acres of cropland, owned in fee or leased. In making the policy decision for use of the sludge land application method 20 or so years ago, the City had to evaluate the potential for heavy metal accumulation in the soils and plants as well as the potential for ground-water contamination from the nitrate-nitrogen. The city also had to make a policy decision about limiting the discharge of heavy metals to the sewer system. Study of data from monitoring wells demonstrate that well position is a key in determining whether or not nitrate-nitrogen contamination is detected. Data from a three-year study suggest that nitrate-nitrogen moves fairly rapidly t the water table, although significant buildup in nitrogen-nitrogen may take a number of years. Evidence exists suggesting that the time between application of sewage sludge and an increase of nitrate-nitrogen at the water table may be on the order of nine months to a year. It is apparent that in the case of municipal sewage sludge application one can anticipate some nitrate-nitrogen buildup and that the public policy on drinking water standards must recognize this fact.

Welby, C.W. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operation Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230/320 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 230 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 22-03-01, Sewage Lagoon; while CAU 320 consists of CAS 22-99-01, Strainer Box. These CAUs are referred to as CAU 230/320 or the Sewage Lagoons Site. The Sewage Lagoons Site also includes an Imhoff tank, sludge bed, and associated buried sewer piping. Located in Area 22, the site was used between 1951 to 1958 for disposal of sanitary sewage effluent from the historic Camp Desert Rock Facility at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada. Based on site history, the contaminants of potential concern include volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), and radionuclides. Vertical migration is estimated to be less than 12 feet below ground surface, and lateral migration is limited to the soil immediately adjacent to or within areas of concern. The proposed investigation will involve a combination of field screening for VOCs and TPH using the direct-push method and excavation using a backhoe to gather soil samples for analysis. Gamma spectroscopy will also be conducted for waste management purposes. Sampling locations will be biased to suspected worst-case areas including the nearby sludge bed, sewage lagoon inlet(s) and outlet(s), disturbed soil surrounding the lagoons, surface drainage channel south of the lagoons, and the area near the Imhoff tank. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

US DOE/Nevada Operations Office

1999-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

223

In-plant demonstration of energy optimization in beck dyeing of carpet. Final report, June 1, 1979-January 1, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several energy-conservative technologies have been successfully combined and transferred to a commercial carpet finishing plant to optimize beck dyeing. The technology of bump-and-run, in which the dyebath temperature was allowed to drift for the last 85% of the hold time instead of being maintained by active steam sparging, reduced the energy consumption by 38% with negligible capital investment required. Merging of dyebath reuse with bump-and-run only marginally increased the energy consumption (to 39%), but substantially lowered the plant's finishing costs further by directly recycling dyes, auxiliary chemicals, and water. Final optimization, which merged a technique whereby the carpet was pulled directly from the hot bath with bump-and-run and dyebath reuse, further improved the economics by drastically reducing water/sewer requirements by 90% and eliminating the holding tank/pumping assembly as a reuse requirement. From a carpet industry viewpoint, the demonstrated modifications have a direct energy conservation potential of 2.4 x 10/sup 5/ barrels of oil equivalent per year assuming the technology is directly transferable to similar atmospheric dyeing processes, e.g., beck dyeing of nylon and polyester fabrics, the potential to the entire textile industry is 2.6 x 10/sup 6/ BOE/year. Economically, total potential savings for the carpet industry on reuse incorporation was $1.2 x 10/sup 7//year, based on a 2.3 cents/lb. savings figure. When the allied fabric industry was included, the national potential was raised to $1.0 x 10/sup 8//year. These figures include cost savings due to materials recycled (water, auxiliary chemicals and dyes) as well as energy conservation.

Tincher, W.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Selective leaching of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils: Progress report 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three soils and a sediment contaminated with uranium were used to determine the effectiveness of sodium carbonate and citric acid leaching to decontaminated or remove uranium to acceptable regulatory levels. Two of the soils were surface soils from the DOE facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. This facility is presently called the Femald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Carbonate extractions generally removed from 70 to 90% of the uranium from the Fernald storage pad soil. Uranium was slightly more difficult to extract from the Fernald incinerator and the Y-12 landfarm soils. Very small amounts of uranium could be extracted from the storm sewer sediment. Extraction with carbonate at high solution-to-soil ratios were as effective as extractions at low solution-to-soil ratios, indicating attrition by the paddle mixer was not significantly different than that provided in a rotary extractor. Also, pretreatments such as milling or pulverizing the soil sample did not appear to increase extraction efficiency when carbonate extractions were carried out at elevated temperatures (60[degree]C) or long extraction times (23 h). Adding KMnO[sub 4] in the carbonate extraction appeared to increase extraction efficiency from the Fernald incinerator soil but not the Fernald storage pad soil. The most effective leaching rates (> 90 % from both Fernald soils) were obtained using a citrate/dithionite extraction procedure designed to remove amorphous (noncrystalline) iron/aluminum sesquioxides from surfaces of clay minerals. Citric acid also proved to be a very good extractant for uranium.

Francis, C.W.; Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.; Elless, M.P.; Lee, S.Y.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Selective leaching of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils: Progress report 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three soils and a sediment contaminated with uranium were used to determine the effectiveness of sodium carbonate and citric acid leaching to decontaminated or remove uranium to acceptable regulatory levels. Two of the soils were surface soils from the DOE facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. This facility is presently called the Femald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Carbonate extractions generally removed from 70 to 90% of the uranium from the Fernald storage pad soil. Uranium was slightly more difficult to extract from the Fernald incinerator and the Y-12 landfarm soils. Very small amounts of uranium could be extracted from the storm sewer sediment. Extraction with carbonate at high solution-to-soil ratios were as effective as extractions at low solution-to-soil ratios, indicating attrition by the paddle mixer was not significantly different than that provided in a rotary extractor. Also, pretreatments such as milling or pulverizing the soil sample did not appear to increase extraction efficiency when carbonate extractions were carried out at elevated temperatures (60{degree}C) or long extraction times (23 h). Adding KMnO{sub 4} in the carbonate extraction appeared to increase extraction efficiency from the Fernald incinerator soil but not the Fernald storage pad soil. The most effective leaching rates (> 90 % from both Fernald soils) were obtained using a citrate/dithionite extraction procedure designed to remove amorphous (noncrystalline) iron/aluminum sesquioxides from surfaces of clay minerals. Citric acid also proved to be a very good extractant for uranium.

Francis, C.W.; Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.; Elless, M.P.; Lee, S.Y.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 151: Septic Systems and Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 151 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as Septic Systems and Discharge Area. CAU 151 consists of the following eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Areas 2, 12, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada: (1) CAS 02-05-01, UE-2ce Pond; (2) CAS 12-03-01, Sewage Lagoons (6); (3) CAS 12-04-01, Septic Tanks; (4) CAS 12-04-02, Septic Tanks; (5) CAS 12-04-03, Septic Tank; (6) CAS 12-47-01, Wastewater Pond; (7) CAS 18-03-01, Sewage Lagoon; and (8) CAS 18-99-09, Sewer Line (Exposed). CAU 151 closure activities were conducted according to the FFACO (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008) and the Corrective Action Plan for CAU 151 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, 2007) from October 2007 to January 2008. The corrective action alternatives included no further action, clean closure, and closure in place with administrative controls. CAU 151 closure activities are summarized in Table 1. Closure activities generated liquid remediation waste, sanitary waste, hydrocarbon waste, and mixed waste. Waste generated was appropriately managed and disposed. Waste that is currently staged onsite is being appropriately managed and will be disposed under approved waste profiles in permitted landfills. Waste minimization activities included waste characterization sampling and segregation of waste streams. Some waste exceeded land disposal restriction limits and required offsite treatment prior to disposal. Other waste meeting land disposal restrictions was disposed of in appropriate onsite or offsite landfills. Waste disposition documentation is included as Appendix C.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Advances in technology for the construction of deep-underground facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The workshop was organized in order to address technological issues important to decisions regarding the feasibility of strategic options. The objectives of the workshop were to establish the current technological capabilities for deep-underground construction, to project those capabilities through the compressed schedule proposed for construction, and to identify promising directions for timely allocation of existing research and development resources. The earth has been used as a means of protection and safekeeping for many centuries. Recently, the thickness of the earth cover required for this purpose has been extended to the 2,000- to 3,000-ft range in structures contemplated for nuclear-waste disposal, energy storage, and strategic systems. For defensive missile basing, it is now perceived that the magnitude of the threat has increased through better delivery systems, larger payloads, and variable tactics of attack. Thus, depths of 3,000 to 8,000 ft are being considered seriously for such facilities. Moreover, it appears desirable that the facilities be operational (if not totally complete) for defensive purposes within a five-year construction schedule. Deep excavations such as mines are similar in many respects to nearsurface tunnels and caverns for transit, rail, sewer, water, hydroelectric, and highway projects. But the differences that do exist are significant. Major distinctions between shallow and deep construction derive from the stress fields and behavior of earth materials around the openings. Different methodologies are required to accommodate other variations resulting from increased depth, such as elevated temperatures, reduced capability for site exploration, and limited access during project execution. This report addresses these and other questions devoted to geotechnical characterization, design, construction, and excavation equipment.

Not Available

1987-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

Development of a combined soil-wash/in-furnace vitrification system for soil remediation at DOE sites. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses research and development of technologies for treatment of radioactive and hazardous waste streams at DOE sites. Weldon Spring raffinate sludges were used in a direct vitrification study to investigate their use as fluxing agents in glass formulations when blended with site soil. Storm sewer sediments from the Oak Ridge, TN, Y-12 facility were used for soil washing followed by vitrification of the concentrates. Both waste streams were extensively characterized. Testing showed that both mercury and uranium could be removed from the Y-12 soil by chemical extraction resulting in an 80% volume reduction. Thermal desorption was used on the contaminant-enriched minority fraction to separate the mercury from the uranium. Vitrification tests demonstrated that high waste loading glasses could be produced from the radioactive stream and from the Weldon Spring wastes which showed very good leach resistance, and viscosities and electrical conductivities in the range suitable for joule-heated ceramic melter (JHCM) processing. The conceptual process described combines soil washing, thermal desorption, and vitrification to produce clean soil (about 90% of the input waste stream), non-radioactive mercury, and a glass wasteform; the estimated processing costs for that system are about $260--$400/yd{sup 3}. Results from continuous melter tests performed using Duratek`s advanced JHCM (Duramelter) system are also presented. Since life cycle cost estimates are driven largely by volume reduction considerations, the large volume reductions possible with these multi-technology, blended waste stream approaches can produce a more leach resistant wasteform at a lower overall cost than alternative technologies such as cementation.

Pegg, I.L.; Guo, Y.; Lahoda, E.J.; Lai, Shan-Tao; Muller, I.S.; Ruller, J. [GTS Duratek, Columbia, MD (United States); Grant, D.C. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Center

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Seismic reflection imaging of a geothermal aquifer in an urban setting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A seismic reflection survey that was conducted in downtown Boise, Idaho, to help city planners site a new well for injection of spent geothermal water illustrates some methods to safely and successfully employ a seismic reflection survey in an urban setting. The objective of the seismic survey was to estimate the depth and continuity of a basalt and rhyolite volcanic sequence. Well siting was based on geothermal aquifer depth, location of interpreted faults, projected thermal impact of injection on existing wells, surface pipe extension costs, and public land availability. Seismic acquisition tests and careful processing were used to ensure high-quality data while minimizing the potential for damage along city streets. A video camera placed in a sewer and a blast vibration monitor were used to confirm that energy from the seismic source (a 75-in{sup 3} land air gun) did not damage nearby buildings, street surfaces, or buried utilities along the survey lines. Walkaway seismic tests were also used to compare signal quality of the air-gun source to an explosive source for imaging targets up to 800 m depth. These tests show less signal bandwidth from the air-gun source compared to the buried explosive source, but the air-gun signal quality was adequate to meet imaging objectives. Seismic reflection results show that the top of this rhyolite/basalt sequence dips ({approximately}8--1{degree}) southwest away from the Boise foothills at depths of 200 to 800 m. Seismic methods enabled interpretation of aquifer depths along the profiles and located fault zones where injected water may encounter fracture permeability and optimally benefit the existing producing system. The acquisition and processing techniques used to locate the Boise injection well may succeed for other hydrogeologic and environmental studies in urban settings.

Liberty, L. [Boise State Univ., ID (United States). Center for Geophysical Investigation of the Shallow Subsurface] [Boise State Univ., ID (United States). Center for Geophysical Investigation of the Shallow Subsurface

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

The removal of mercury from solid mixed waste using chemical leaching processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this research was to evaluate chemical leaching as a technique to treat soils, sediments, and glass contaminated with either elemental mercury or a combination of several mercury species. Potassium iodide/iodine solutions were investigated as chemical leaching agents for contaminated soils and sediments. Clean, synthetic soil material and surrogate storm sewer sediments contaminated with mercury were treated with KI/I{sub 2} solutions. It was observed that these leaching solutions could reduce the mercury concentration in soil and sediments by 99.8%. Evaluation of selected posttreatment sediment samples revealed that leachable mercury levels in the treated solids exceeded RCRA requirements. The results of these studies suggest that KI/I{sub 2} leaching is a treatment process that can be used to remove large quantities of mercury from contaminated soils and sediments and may be the only treatment required if treatment goals are established on Hg residual concentrations in solid matrices. Fluorescent bulbs were used to simulate mercury contaminated glass mixed waste. To achieve mercury contamination levels similar to those found in larger bulbs such as those used in DOE facilities a small amount of Hg was added to the crushed bulbs. The most effective agents for leaching mercury from the crushed fluorescent bulbs were KI/I{sub 2}, NaOCl, and NaBr + acid. Radionuclide surrogates were added to both the EPA synthetic soil material and the crushed fluorescent bulbs to determine the fate of radionuclides following chemical leaching with the leaching agents determined to be the most promising. These experiments revealed that although over 98% of the dosed mercury solubilized and was found in the leaching solution, no Cerium was measured in the posttreatment leaching solution. This finding suggest that Uranium, for which Ce was used as a surrogate, would not solubilize during leaching of mercury contaminated soil or glass.

Gates, D.D.; Chao, K.K.; Cameron, P.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 261: Area 25 Test Cell A Leachfield System, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Closure Report (CR) is to provide documentation of the completed corrective action at the Test Cell A Leachfield System and to provide data confirming the corrective action. The Test Cell A Leachfield System is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 261. Remediation of CAU 261 is required under the FFACO (1996). CAU 261 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) which is approximately 140 kilometers (87 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). CAU 261 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASS): CAS 25-05-01, Leachfield; and CAS 25-05-07, Acid Waste Leach Pit (AWLP) (Figures 2 and 3). Test Cell A was operated during the 1960s and 1970s to support the Nuclear Rocket Development Station. Various operations within Building 3124 at Test Cell A resulted in liquid waste releases to the Leachfield and the AWLP. The following existing site conditions were reported in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 1999): Soil in the leachfield was found to exceed the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) Action Level for petroleum hydrocarbons, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) preliminary remediation goals for semi volatile organic compounds, and background concentrations for strontium-90; Soil below the sewer pipe and approximately 4.5 meters (m) (15 feet [ft]) downstream of the initial outfall was found to exceed background concentrations for cesium-137 and strontium-90; Sludge in the leachfield septic tank was found to exceed the NDEP Action Level for petroleum hydrocarbons and to contain americium-241, cesium-137, uranium-234, uranium-238, potassium-40, and strontium-90; No constituents of concern (COC) were identified at the AWLP. The NDEP-approved CADD (DOWNV, 1999) recommended Corrective Action Alternative 2, ''Closure of the Septic Tank and Distribution Box, Partial Excavation, and Administrative Controls.'' The corrective action was performed following the NDEP-approved Corrective Action Plan (CAP) (DOE/NV, 2000).

T. M. Fitzmaurice

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Third Annual Report: 2006 Pre-Construction Eelgrass Monitoring and Propagation for King County Outfall Mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

King County proposes to build a new sewer outfall discharging to Puget Sound near Point Wells, Washington. Construction is scheduled for 2008. The Point Wells site was selected to minimize effects on the nearshore marine environment, but unavoidable impacts to eelgrass (Zostera marina) beds are anticipated during construction. To mitigate for these impacts and prepare for post-construction restoration, King County began implementation of a multi-year eelgrass monitoring and restoration program in 2004, with the primary goal of returning intertidal and shallow subtidal habitat and eelgrass to pre-construction conditions. Major program elements are a) pre-construction monitoring, i.e., documenting initial eelgrass conditions and degree of fluctuation over 5 years prior to construction, b) eelgrass transplanting, including harvesting, offsite propagating and stockpiling of local plantstock, and post-construction planting, and c) post-construction monitoring. The program is detailed in the Eelgrass Restoration and Biological Resources Implementation Workplan (King County 2006). This report describes calendar year 2006 pre-construction activities conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of King County. Activities included continued propagation of eelgrass shoots and monitoring of the experimental harvest plots in the marine outfall corridor area to evaluate recovery rates relative to harvest rates. Approximately 1500 additional shoots were harvested from the marine outfall corridor in August 2006 to supplement the plants in the propagation tank at the PNNL Marine Sciences Laboratory in Sequim, Washington, bringing the total number of shoots to 4732. Eelgrass densities were monitored in the five experimental harvest plots established in the marine outfall corridor. Changes in eelgrass density were evaluated in year-to-year comparisons with initial harvest rates. Net eelgrass density decreased from 2004 post-harvest to 2006 in all plots, despite density increases observed in 2005 in some plots and at some harvest rates. Eelgrass densities within individual subplots were highly variable from year to year, and the change in density in any interannual period did not correlate to the initial 2004 harvest rate. Continued monitoring should help project managers determine an optimum harvest rate that supports rapid recovery of donor eelgrass beds.

Woodruff, Dana L.; Southard, Susan S.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Kohn, Nancy P.; Anderson, Michael G.; Vavrinec, John

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Achieving Accelerated Cleanup of Cesium Contaminated Stream at the Savannah River Site; Collaboration between Stakeholders, Regulators, and the Federal Government - 13182  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy (US DOE) nuclear facility located along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina that contains six primary stream/river systems. The Lower Three Runs Stream (LTR) is one of the primary streams within the site that is located in the southeast portion of the Savannah River Site and is a large black water stream system that originates in the northeast portion of SRS and follows a southerly direction before it enters the Savannah River. During reactor operations, secondary reactor cooling water, storm sewer discharges, and miscellaneous wastewater was discharged and contaminated a 36 kilometer stretch of Lower Three Runs Stream that narrows providing a limited buffer of US DOE property along the stream and flood plain. Based on data collected during 2009 and 2010 under Recover Act Funding, the stream was determined to be contaminated with cesium-137 at levels that exceeded acceptable risk based limits. As efficiencies were realized within the SRS Recovery Act Program, funding was made available to design, permit and execute remediation of the LTR. This accelerated Project allowed for the remediation of 36 kilometers of LTR in only nine months from inception to completion, contributing significantly to the Foot Print Reduction of SRS. The scope consisted of excavation and disposal of more than 2064 cubic meters of contaminated soil, and installing 11 kilometers of fence and 2,000 signs at 1000 locations. Confirmatory sampling and analysis, and radiological surveying were performed demonstrating that soil concentrations met the cleanup goals. The project completed with a very good safety record considering the harsh conditions including, excessive rain in the early stages of the project, high summer temperatures, swampy terrain, snakes, wild boar, insects and dense vegetation. The regulatory approval process was compressed by over 75% and required significant efforts from SRS's stakeholders including the regulators, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), and the public including local property owners and the SRS Citizens Advisory Board. Stakeholder buy-in was critical in the up-front planning in order to achieve this challenging cleanup. (authors)

Bergren, Chris; Flora, Mary; Socha, Ron; Burch, Joseph [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Freeman, Candice; Hennessey, Brian [United States Department of Energy, Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [United States Department of Energy, Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Oak Ridge Cleanup Vision: Moving to the Future by Cleaning Up the Past - 13291  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM) strives to be the leader in the Department of Energy's (DOE's) EM Complex regarding successful and safe project execution and stakeholder interactions that yield positive results. EM's goal has been to become 'Investment Worthy' and, in order to accomplish that important objective, has also had to improve communications both within and outside of the Department. One of our most important missions is to assist the Department in achieving the sustainability goals set forth in Executive Order 13514. In this regard, EM's primary role is to return land to beneficial use and reduce energy impacts and maintenance costs by demolishing unneeded and deteriorating structures and remediating environmental contamination. Recent accomplishments toward meeting these goals include significant progress in the decontamination and demolition of the country's largest facility, the former K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Building, constructed in 1942 to enrich uranium to help end World War II; the disposition of the first phase of Uranium-233 material from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) which involved the transfer of Zero Power Reactor Plates to the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); and a host of other project successes associated with transuranic (TRU) waste processing, hot cell decontamination and demolition, remediation of highly contaminated soils and burial grounds, and removal of mercury from storm sewers and surface waters. With regard to successful stakeholder interactions, recent accomplishments include a new method for collaboration that has renewed EM's working relationship with the regulators, and success in completing an extensive consultation process with over a dozen parties on the historic preservation of the former Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, which is now called the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). Regarding improved communications, EM has successfully revised Program priorities and has received buy-in from the leadership in Headquarters, the regulators, and the community. Issues EM was facing in 2009 are presented. Resulting lessons learned and subsequent changes that the Office has gone through in the past several years in order to improve performance in the safe execution of work, relationships with external stakeholders, and communications both internally and externally are discussed. Results of these efforts are provided as a summary of Program accomplishments, including a strong focus on the future. EM's motto, Moving to the Future by Cleaning up the Past, will be demonstrated through the Program's mission, which includes protecting the region's health and environment; ensuring the continuation of ongoing vital missions being conducted by DOE on the Oak Ridge Reservation; and making clean land available for future use at all three sites, with a near-term focus on Re-industrialization of ETTP. (authors)

Cange, Susan M. [DOE Oak Ridge, P.O. Box 2001, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)] [DOE Oak Ridge, P.O. Box 2001, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Wieland, Christopher C.; DePaoli, Susan M. [Pro2Serve, 1100 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)] [Pro2Serve, 1100 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 151: Septic Systems and Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 151: Septic Systems and Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental corrective action alternatives. Corrective Action Unit 151 is located in Areas 2, 12, 18, and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 151 is comprised of the nine Corrective Action Sites (CAS) listed below: (1) 02-05-01, UE-2ce Pond; (2) 12-03-01, Sewage Lagoons (6); (3) 12-04-01, Septic Tanks; (4) 12-04-02, Septic Tanks; (5) 12-04-03, Septic Tank; (6) 12-47-01, Wastewater Pond; (7) 18-03-01, Sewage Lagoon; (8) 18-99-09, Sewer Line (Exposed); and (9) 20-19-02, Photochemical Drain. The CASs within CAU 151 are discharge and collection systems. Corrective Action Site 02-05-01 is located in Area 2 and is a well-water collection pond used as a part of the Nash test. Corrective Action Sites 12-03-01, 12-04-01, 12-04-02, 12-04-03, and 12-47-01 are located in Area 12 and are comprised of sewage lagoons, septic tanks, associated piping, and two sumps. The features are a part of the Area 12 Camp housing and administrative septic systems. Corrective Action Sites 18-03-01 and 18-99-09 are located in the Area 17 Camp in Area 18. These sites are sewage lagoons and associated piping. The origin and terminus of CAS 18-99-09 are unknown; however, the type and configuration of the pipe indicates that it may be a part of the septic systems in Area 18. Corrective Action Site 20-19-02 is located in the Area 20 Camp. This site is comprised of a surface discharge of photoprocessing chemicals.

David A. Strand

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Lower Three Runs Remediation Safety Preparation Strategy - 13318  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy (US DOE) nuclear facility located along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina that contains six primary stream/river systems. The Lower Three Runs Stream (LTR) is one of the primary streams within the site that is located in the southeast portion of the Savannah River Site. It is a large blackwater stream system that originates in the northeast portion of SRS and follows a southerly direction before it enters the Savannah River. During reactor operations, secondary reactor cooling water, storm sewer discharges, and miscellaneous wastewater was discharged and contaminated a 20 mile stretch of Lower Three Runs Stream that narrows and provides a limited buffer of US DOE property along the stream and flood-plain. Based on data collected during the years 2009 and 2010 under American Recovery and Re-investment Act funding, the stream was determined to be contaminated with cesium-137 at levels that exceeded acceptable risk based limits. In agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, three areas were identified for remediation [1] (SRNS April 2012). A comprehensive safety preparation strategy was developed for safe execution of the LTR remediation project. Contract incentives for safety encouraged the contractor to perform a complete evaluation of the work and develop an implementation plan to perform the work. The safety coverage was controlled to ensure all work was observed and assessed by one person per work area within the project. This was necessary due to the distances between the fence work and three transects being worked, approximately 20 miles. Contractor Management field observations were performed along with DOE assessments to ensure contractor focus on safe performance of the work. Dedicated ambulance coverage for remote worker work activities was provided. This effort was augmented with access to medical evacuation services. The areas where the work was performed were remote and difficult to get emergency vehicles to in a timely manner in case of an accident. Satellite phones were utilized due to intermittent phone coverage. High visibility vests were utilized to enable any hunters in the area to see the workers; due to the limited buffer areas along the stream route. An innovative approach to providing the necessary protection for workers during periods of extreme heat and humidity was also employed, which included the use of 'heat islands' with fans and crew trailers and ice vests for workers. (authors)

Mackay, Alexander; Fryar, Scotty; Doane, Alan [United States Department of Energy, Building 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [United States Department of Energy, Building 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Remedial Investigation Report on the Abandoned Nitric Acid Pipeline at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Energy Systems Environmental Restoration Program; Y-12 Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit 2 consists of the Abandoned Nitric Acid pipeline (ANAP). This pipeline was installed in 1951 to transport liquid wastes {approximately}4800 ft from Buildings 9212, 9215, and 9206 to the S-3 Ponds. Materials known to have been discharged through the pipeline include nitric acid, depleted and enriched uranium, various metal nitrates, salts, and lead skimmings. During the mid-1980s, sections of the pipeline were removed during various construction projects. A total of 19 locations were chosen to be investigated along the pipeline for the first phase of this Remedial Investigation. Sampling consisted of drilling down to obtain a soil sample at a depth immediately below the pipeline. Additional samples were obtained deeper in the subsurface depending upon the depth of the pipeline, the depth of the water table, and the point of auger refusal. The 19 samples collected below the pipeline were analyzed by the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant`s laboratory for metals, nitrate/nitrite, and isotopic uranium. Samples collected from three boreholes were also analyzed for volatile organic compounds because these samples produced a response with organic vapor monitoring equipment. Uranium activities in the soil samples ranged from 0.53 to 13.0 pCi/g for {sup 238}U, from 0.075 to 0.75 pCi/g for {sup 235}U, and from 0.71 to 5.0 pCi/g for {sup 238}U. Maximum total values for lead, chromium, and nickel were 75.1 mg/kg, 56.3 mg/kg, and 53.0 mg/kg, respectively. The maximum nitrate/nitrite value detected was 32.0 mg-N/kg. One sample obtained adjacent to a sewer line contained various organic compounds, at least some of which were tentatively identified as fragrance chemicals commonly associated with soaps and cleaning solutions. The results of the baseline human health risk assessment for the ANAP contaminants of potential concern show no unacceptable risks to human health.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Life cycle assessment of base-load heat sources for district heating system options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose There has been an increased interest in utilizing renewable energy sources in district heating systems. District heating systems are centralized systems that provide heat for residential and commercial buildings in a community. While various renewable and conventional energy sources can be used in such systems, many stakeholders are interested in choosing the feasible option with the least environmental impacts. This paper evaluates and compares environmental burdens of alternative energy source options for the base load of a district heating center in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC) using the life cycle assessment method. The considered energy sources include natural gas, wood pellet, sewer heat, and ground heat. Methods The life cycle stages considered in the LCA model cover all stages from fuel production, fuel transmission/transportation, construction, operation, and finally demolition of the district heating system. The impact categories were analyzed based on the IMPACT 2002+ method. Results and discussion On a life-cycle basis, the global warming effect of renewable energy options were at least 200 kgeqCO2 less than that of the natural gas option per MWh of heat produced by the base load system. It was concluded that less than 25% of the upstream global warming impact associated with the wood pellet energy source option was due to transportation activities and about 50% of that was resulted from wood pellet production processes. In comparison with other energy options, the wood pellets option has higher impacts on respiratory of inorganics, terrestrial ecotoxicity, acidification, and nutrification categories. Among renewable options, the global warming impact of heat pump options in the studied case in Vancouver, BC, were lower than the wood pellet option due to BC's low carbon electricity generation profile. Ozone layer depletion and mineral extraction were the highest for the heat pump options due to extensive construction required for these options. Conclusions Natural gas utilization as the primary heat source for district heat production implies environmental complications beyond just the global warming impacts. Diffusing renewable energy sources for generating the base load district heat would reduce human toxicity, ecosystem quality degradation, global warming, and resource depletion compared to the case of natural gas. Reducing fossil fuel dependency in various stages of wood pellet production can remarkably reduce the upstream global warming impact of using wood pellets for district heat generation.

Ghafghazi, Saeed [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sowlati, T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Melin, Staffan [Delta Research Corporation

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Fourth Annual Report: 2007 Pre-Construction Eelgrass Monitoring and Propagation for King County Outfall Mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

King County proposes to build a new sewer outfall discharging to Puget Sound near Point Wells, Washington. Construction is scheduled for 2008. The Point Wells site was selected to minimize effects on the nearshore marine environment, but unavoidable impacts to eelgrass (Zostera marina) beds are anticipated during construction. To mitigate these impacts and prepare for post-construction restoration, King County began implementing a multiyear eelgrass monitoring and restoration program in 2004, with the primary goal of returning intertidal and shallow subtidal habitat and eelgrass to pre-construction conditions. Major program elements related to eelgrass are (a) pre-construction monitoring, i.e., documenting initial eelgrass conditions and degree of fluctuation over 5 years prior to construction, (b) eelgrass transplanting, including harvesting, offsite propagating, and stockpiling of local plants for post-construction planting, and (c) post-construction planting and subsequent monitoring. The program is detailed in the Eelgrass Restoration and Biological Resources Implementation Workplan (King County 2006). This report describes calendar year 2007 pre-construction activities conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for King County. Activities included continued propagation of eelgrass shoots at the PNNL Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) in Sequim, Washington, and monitoring of the experimental harvest plots in the marine outfall corridor area to evaluate recovery rates relative to harvest rates. In addition, 490 eelgrass shoots were also harvested from the Marine Outfall Corridor in July 2007 to supplement the plants in the propagation tank at the MSL, bringing the total number of shoots to 1464. Eelgrass densities were monitored in four of five experimental harvest plots established in the Marine Outfall Corridor. Changes in eelgrass density were evaluated in year-to-year comparisons with initial harvest rates. A net increase in eelgrass density from 2004 post-harvest to 2007 was observed in all plots, despite density decreases observed in 2006 in all plots and at most harvest rates. Eelgrass densities within individual subplots were highly variable from year to year, and the change in density in any interannual period was not related to initial 2004 harvest rate. Harvest rates of neighboring subplots did not appear to affect subplot eelgrass density (Woodruff et al. 2007). Three years post-harvest, eelgrass shoot densities were not significantly different from pre-harvest shoot densities at any harvest level. Additional plans are being discussed with King County to harvest all eelgrass from the construction corridor and hold in the propagation tanks at the MSL for post-construction planting. Under this plan, plants that would have been lost to construction will be held offsite until construction is completed. This strategy reduces and possibly eliminates the need to harvest eelgrass from donor beds located south of the construction area, allowing them to remain undisturbed. However, if eelgrass is harvested from donor beds, the monitoring of eelgrass growth at different harvest rates should help determine an optimum harvest rate that supports rapid recovery of donor eelgrass beds.

Woodruff, Dana L.; Kohn, Nancy P.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Southard, Susan S.; Vavrinec, John

2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

240

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 219: Septic Systems and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 219, Septic Systems and Injection Wells, in Areas 3, 16, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 219 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 03-11-01, Steam Pipes and Asbestos Tiles; (2) 16-04-01, Septic Tanks (3); (3) 16-04-02, Distribution Box; (4) 16-04-03, Sewer Pipes; (5) 23-20-01, DNA Motor Pool Sewage and Waste System; and (6) 23-20-02, Injection Well. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 219 with no further corrective action beyond the application of a use restriction at CASs 16-04-01, 16-04-02, and 16-04-03. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from June 20 through October 12, 2005, as set forth in the CAU 219 Corrective Action Investigation Plan and Record of Technical Change No. 1. A best management practice was implemented at CASs 16-04-01, 16-04-02, and 16-04-03, and corrective action was performed at CAS 23-20-01 between January and April 2006. In addition, a use restriction will be applied to CASs 16-04-01, 16-04-02, and 16-04-03 to provide additional protection to Nevada Test Site personnel. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: (1) Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. (3) Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 219 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. A Tier 2 evaluation was conducted, and a FAL of 185,000 micrograms per kilogram was calculated for chlordane at CASs 16-04-01, 16-04-02, and 16-04-03 based on an occasional use area exposure scenario. This evaluation of chlordane based on the Tier 2 FAL determined that no FALs were exceeded. Therefore, the DQO data needs were met, and it was determined that no corrective action (based on risk to human receptors) is necessary for the site. The following contaminants were determined to be present at concentrations exceeding their corresponding FALs: (1) The surface soil surrounding the main concrete pad at CAS 23-20-01 contained Aroclor-1254, Aroclor-1260, and chlordane above the FALs. This soil, along with the COCs, was subsequently removed at CAS 23-20-01. (2) The sludge in the concrete box of the catch basin at the large concrete pad at CAS 23-20-01 contained lead and benzo(a)pyrene above the FALs. This contamination was limited to the sludge in the concrete box of the catch basin and did not migrate to the subsurface features beneath it. The contaminated and the concrete box of the catch basin were subsequently recovered at CAS 23-20-01.

David Strand

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "newnan wtr sewer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Annual Site Environmental Report: 2008 (ASER)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information about environmental programs during the calendar year of 2008 at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, California. Activities that span the calendar year, i.e., stormwater monitoring covering the winter season of 2008/2009 (October 2008 through May 2009), are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. Under Executive Order (EO) 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, and DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program, SLAC effectively implements and integrates the key elements of an Environmental Management System (EMS) to achieve the site's integrated safety and environmental management system goals. For normal daily activities, SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that policies and procedures are understood and followed so that: (1) Worker safety and health are protected; (2) The environment is protected; and (3) Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2008, SLAC continued to improve its management systems. These systems provided a structured framework for SLAC to implement 'greening of the government' initiatives such as EO 13423 and DOE Orders 450.1A and 430.2B. Overall, management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. SLAC continues to demonstrate significant progress in implementing and integrating EMS into day-to-day operations and construction activities at SLAC. The annual management review and ranking of environmental aspects were completed this year by SLAC's EMS Steering Committee, the Environmental Safety Committee (ESC), and twelve objectives and targets were established for 2008. For each objective and target, a work plan, or Environmental Management Program (EMP) was completed and progress reports were routinely provided to SLAC senior management and the DOE SLAC Site Office (SSO). During 2008, there were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations. In addition, many improvements in waste minimization, recycling, stormwater management, groundwater restoration, and SLAC's chemical management system (CMS) were continued during the year. The following are amongst SLAC's environmental accomplishments for 2008: a composting program at SLAC's onsite cafeteria was initiated, greater than 800 cubic feet of legacy radioactive waste were packaged and shipped from SLAC, a chemical redistribution program was developed, SLAC reduced the number of General Services Administration leased vehicles from 221 to 164, recycling of municipal waste was increased by approximately 140 tons during 2008, and site-wide releases of sulfur hexafluoride were reduced by 50 percent. In 2008, no radiological incidents occurred that increased radiation levels or released radioactivity to the environment. In addition to managing its radioactive wastes safely and responsibly, SLAC worked to reduce the amount of waste generated. SLAC has implemented programs and systems to ensure compliance with all radiological requirements related to the environment. Specifically, the Radiation Protection Radiological Waste Management Group developed a training course to certify Radioactive Waste Generators, conducted a training pilot, and developed a list of potential radioactive waste generators to train. Twenty eight generators were trained in 2008. As a best management practice, SLAC also reduced its tritium inventory by at least 95 percent by draining one of its accelerator cooling water systems; with the cooperation of the South Bayside System Authority, the West Bay Sanitary District and the DOE, SLAC discharged the cooling water to the sanitary sewer according to federal regulations and replenished the system with clean water. In 2008, the SLAC Envi

Sabba, D.

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

242

Annual Site Environmental Report: 2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information about environmental programs during 2003 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Seasonal activities that span calendar years are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the DOE for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. This summary demonstrates the effective application of SLAC environmental management to meet the site's integrated safety management system (ISMS) goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring proper procedures are followed so that worker safety and health are protected; the environment is protected; and compliance is ensured. Throughout 2003, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems (described in Chapter 3). These systems were utilized by SLAC to implement such ''greening of the government'' initiatives like Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. There were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations during 2003. In addition, many improvements were continued during 2003 in waste minimization, recycling, decreasing air emission rates, stormwater drain system, groundwater restoration, and planning for a system to better manage chemical use. Program-specific details discussed are: (1) Air Quality--SLAC operates its air quality management program in compliance with established permit conditions; 2003 was the sixth consecutive year the air quality management program operated without any NOVs issued by regulators. Nevertheless, SLAC has an active program to improve its environmental performance in air quality. (2) Hazardous Waste--The Environmental Health Division of the San Mateo County Health Services Agency is the California certified unified permitting agency (CUPA) responsible for overseeing hazardous materials and waste management at SLAC. The CUPA made facility enforcement inspections of SLAC in August and September of 2003. These inspections covered SLAC's hazardous materials and waste management, business plan, California Accidental Release Prevention Program (CalARP), and tiered permitting/permit-by-rule programs. No notices of violation were issued as a result of either inspection. (3) Stormwater and Industrial Wastewater--SLAC operates its industrial and sanitary wastewater management program in compliance with established permit conditions; 2003 was the seventh consecutive year the program operated without any NOVs issued by regulators. SLAC actively pursues projects to reduce flow to the wastewater system, and through a variety of measures, has managed to keep its facility-wide wastewater discharge constant during a period in which many new connections were made to the system. SLAC continues to make the transition to a new facility-wide sanitary sewer flow-monitoring scheme, and made substantial progress towards completing the project during 2003. SLAC discharges stormwater with the potential to come into contact with industrial activities. SLAC has an extensive monitoring program in place at the eight discharge locations where the greatest potential for contact exists. During the 2002-2003 wet season, SLAC met all the requirements of its monitoring plan, with the exception of consistent sample collection within the first hour of discharge. For the eleventh consecutive year, the surface water program operated in 2003 without receiving any NOVs from program regulators. After expenditures of more than $1 million, SLAC was nearly complete with its Unauthorized Stormwater Connection Project at year-end; only 32 connections (less than 10 percent of the original total) remained to be replumed. SLAC actively pursued several other BMP-related performance improvements during the year. (4) Hazardous Materials Program--Although SLAC has been successful in meeting regulatory requirements for managing hazardous materials, it has decided to pursue a more activ

Nuckolls, H.; /SLAC

2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

243

Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification Treatability Study of Mercury Contaminated Soil from the Y-12 Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of past operations, the Department of Energys (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Plant) has extensive mercury-contamination in building structures, soils, storm sewer sediments, and stream sediments, which are a source of pollution to the local ecosystem. Because of mercurys toxicity and potential impacts on human health and the environment, DOE continues to investigate and implement projects to support the remediation of the Y-12 site.URS and #9122;CH2M Oak Ridge LLC (UCOR) under its prime contract with DOE has cleanup responsibilities on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation and is investigating potential mercury-contaminated soil treatment technologies through an agreement with Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) Y-12, the Y-12 operating contractor to DOE. As part of its investigations, UCOR has subcontracted with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to conduct laboratory-scale studies evaluating the applicability of the Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) process using surrogate and actual mixed waste Y-12 soils containing mercury (Hg) at 135, 2,000, and 10,000 ppm.SPSS uses a thermoplastic sulfur binder to convert Hg to stable mercury sulfide (HgS) and solidifies the chemically stable product in a monolithic solid final waste form to reduce dispersion and permeability. Formulations containing 40 60 dry wt% Y-12 soil were fabricated and samples were prepared in triplicate for Environmental Protection Agency Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing by an independent laboratory. Those containing 50 and 60 wt% soil easily met the study criteria for maximum allowable Hg concentrations (47 and 1 ppb, respectively compared with the TCLP limit of 200 ppb Hg). The lowest waste loading of 40 wt% yielded TCLP Hg concentrations slightly higher (240 ppb) than the allowable limit. Since the Y-12 soil tended to form clumps, the improved leaching at higher waste loadings was probably due to reduction in particle size from friction of the soil mixing, which creates more surface area for chemical conversion. This was corroborated by the fact that the same waste loading pre-treated by ball milling to reduce particle size prior to SPSS processing yielded TCLP concentrations almost 30 times lower, and at 8.5 ppb Hg was well below EPA limits. Pre-treatment by ball milling also allowed a reduction in the time required for stabilization, thus potentially reducing total process times by 30%.Additional performance testing was conducted including measurement of compressive strength to confirm mechanical integrity and immersion testing to determine the potential impacts of storage or disposal under saturated conditions. For both surrogate and actual Y-12 treated soils, waste form compressive strengths ranged between 2,300 and 6,500 psi, indicating very strong mechanical integrity (a minimum of greater than 40 times greater than the NRC guidance for low-level radioactive waste). In general, compressive strength increases with waste loading as the soil acts as an aggregate in the sulfur concrete waste forms. No statistically significant loss in strength was recorded for the 30 and 40 wt% surrogate waste samples and only a minor reduction in strength was measured for the 43 wt% waste forms. The 30 wt% Y-12 soil did not show a significant loss in strength but the 50 wt% samples were severely degraded in immersion due to swelling of the clay soil. The impact on Hg leaching, if any, was not determined.

Kalb P.; Milian, L.; Yim, S. P.

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

244

Tritium in the World Trade Center September 11, 2001 Terrorist Attack: It's Possible Sources and Fate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traces of tritiated water (HTO) were determined at World Trade Center (WTC) ground zero after the 9/11/01 terrorist attack. A method of ultralow-background liquid scintillation counting was used after distilling HTO from the samples. A water sample from the WTC sewer, collected on 9/13/01, contained 0.174{plus_minus}0.074 (2{sigma}) nCi/L of HTO. A split water sample, collected on 9/21/01 from the basement of WTC Building 6, contained 3.53{plus_minus}0.17 and 2.83{plus_minus}0.15 nCi/L, respectively. Several water and vegetation samples were analyzed from areas outside the ground zero, located in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, and Kensico Reservoir. No HTO above the background was found in those samples. All these results are well below the levels of concern to human exposure. Several tritium radioluminescent (RL) devices were investigated as possible sources of the traces of tritium at ground zero. Tritium is used in self-luminescent emergency EXIT signs. No such signs were present inside the WTC buildings. However, it was determined that Boeing 767-222 aircraft operated by the United Airlines that hit WTC Tower 2 as well as Boeing 767-223ER operated by the American Airlines, that hit WTC Tower 1, had a combined 34.3 Ci of tritium at the time of impact. Other possible sources of tritium include dials and lights of fire and emergency equipment, sights and scopes in weaponry, as well as time devices equipped with tritium dials. It was determined that emergency equipment was not a likely source. However, WTC hosted several law-enforcement agencies such as ATF, CIA, US Secret Service and US Customs. The ATF office had two weapon vaults in WTC Building 6. Also 63 Police Officers, possibly carrying handguns with tritium sights, died in the attack. The weaponry containing tritium was therefore a likely and significant source of tritium. It is possible that some of the 2830 victims carried tritium watches, however this source appears to be less significant that the other two. The fate of tritium in the attack depended on its chemistry. Any tritium present in the vicinity of jet-fuel explosion or fire would convert to HTO. The molecular tritium is also known to quickly exchange with water adsorbed on surfaces at ambient temperatures. Therefore, the end product of reacted tritium was HTO. A part of it would disperse into the atmosphere and a part would remain on site. The dynamic aspect of HTO removal was investigated taking into a consideration water flow at ground zero. Most of ground zero is encircled by the Slurry Wall, 70 ft deep underground, called a Bathtub. Approximately three million gallons of water were hosed on site in the fire-fighting efforts, and 1 million gallons fell as rainwater, between 9/11 and 9/21 (the day of the reported measurement). The combined water percolated through the debris down to the bottom of the Bathtub dissolving and removing HTO with it. That water would meet and combine with the estimated 26 million gallons of water that leaked from the Hudson River as well as broken mains, during the same period of 10 days after the attack. The combined water was collecting in the PATH train tunnel and continuously being pumped out to prevent flooding. A %Box model of water flow was developed to describe the above scenario. Considering the uncertainty in the amount of tritium present from sources other than the aircraft, as well as the dynamic character of tritium removal from the site, it is feasible to provide only a qualitative picture of the fate and behavior of tritium at WTC with the limited experimental data available. If the time history of tritium concentration at WTC had been measured, this study could have been a tracer study of water flow at WTC possibly useful to civil engineering.

Parekh, P; Semkow, T; Husain, L; Haines, D; Woznial, G; Williams, P; Hafner, R; Rabun, R

2002-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

245

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 151: Septic Systems and Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 151, Septic Systems and Discharge Area, at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, according to the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). Corrective Action Unit 151 is comprised of eight corrective action sites (CASs): (1) CAS 02-05-01, UE-2ce Pond; (2) CAS 12-03-01, Sewage Lagoons (6); (3) CAS 12-04-01, Septic Tanks; (4) CAS 12-04-02, Septic Tanks; (5) CAS 12-04-03, Septic Tank; (6) CAS 12-47-01, Wastewater Pond; (7) CAS 18-03-01, Sewage Lagoon; and (8) CAS 18-99-09, Sewer Line (Exposed). The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of corrective action alternatives (CAAs) for each of the eight CASs within CAU 151. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from September 12 through November 18, 2005, as set forth in the CAU 151 Corrective Action Investigation Plan and Record of Technical Change No. 1. Additional confirmation sampling was performed on December 9, 2005; January 10, 2006; and February 13, 2006. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against appropriate final action levels (FALs) to identify the contaminants of concern for each CAS. The results of the CAI identified contaminants of concern at two of the eight CASs in CAU 151 and required the evaluation of CAAs. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities conducted at CAU 151 revealed the following: (1) Soils at CASs 02-05-01, 12-04-01, 12-04-02, 12-04-03, 12-47-01, 18-03-01, 18-99-09, and Lagoons B through G of CAS 12-03-01 do not contain contamination at concentrations exceeding the FALs. (2) Lagoon A of CAS 12-03-01 has arsenic above FALs in shallow subsurface soils. (3) One of the two tanks of CAS 12-04-01, System No.1, has polychlorinated biphenyls (aroclor-1254), trichloroethane, and cesium-137 above FALs in the sludge. Both CAS 12-04-01, System No.1 tanks contain trichloroethane and 1,4-dichlorobenzene above ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' toxicity characteristic limits. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the CAI, review of future and current operations at the eight CASs, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential CAAs, the following corrective actions are recommended for CAU 151. No Further Action is the recommended corrective action for soils at CASs 02-05-01, 12-04-01, 12-04-02, 12-04-03, 18-03-01, and 18-99-09; and Lagoons C, D, F, and G of CAS 12-03-01. No Further Action with implementation of a best management practice (BMP) is recommended for soils at CAS 12-47-01 and Lagoons B and E of CAS 12-03-01. To be protective of future workers should the present scenario used to calculate FALs change, an administrative use restriction will be recorded per the FFACO agreement as a BMP. Close in Place with Administrative Controls is the recommended corrective action for Lagoon A of CAS 12-03-01. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the CAI; review of future and current operations at CASs 12-04-01, 12-04-02, and 12-04-03; and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential CAAs, the following corrective actions are recommended for the septic tanks at these CASs. No Further Action with implementation of BMPs is the recommended corrective action for septic tanks that do not contain potential source material from CAS 12-04-01, System No.4 (four tanks); CAS 12-04-02, System No.5 (six tanks); and CAS 12-04-03, System No.3 (four tanks). Clean Closure with implementation of BMPs is the recommended corrective action for the septic tanks from CAS 12-04-01, System No.1 (two tanks). The preferred CAAs were evaluated on technical merit focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, safety, and cost. The alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. The alternatives meet all applicable federal and state regulations for closure of the site and will reduce potential exposure pathways to the contaminated media to an acceptable level at CA

Grant Evenson

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z