Sample records for nevada geothermal reservoir

  1. Geothermal reservoir assessment case study: Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denton, J.M.; Bell, E.J.; Jodry, R.L.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two 1500 foot temperature gradient holes and two deep exploratory wells were drilled and tested. Hydrologic-hydrochemical, shallow temperature survey, structural-tectonic, petrologic alteration, and solid-sample geochemistry studies were completed. Eighteen miles of high resolution reflection seismic data were gathered over the area. The study indicates that a geothermal regime with temperatures greater than 400/sup 0/F may exist at a depth of approximately 7500' to 10,000' over an area more than ten miles in length.

  2. Geothermal reservoir assessment: Northern Basin and Range Province, Stillwater prospect, Churchill County, Nevada. Final report, April 1979-July 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ash, D.L.; Dondanville, R.F.; Gulati, M.S.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Union Oil Company of California drilled two exploratory geothermal wells in the Stillwater geothermal prospect area in northwestern Nevada to obtain new subsurface data for inclusion in the geothermal reservoir assessment program. Existing data from prior investigations, which included the drilling of four earlier deep temperature gradient wells in the Stillwater area, was also provided. The two wells were drilled to total depths of 6946 ft and 10,014 ft with no significant drilling problems. A maximum reservoir temperature of 353 F was measured at 9950 ft. The most productive well flow tested at a rate of 152,000 lbs/hr with a wellhead temperature of 252 F and pressure of 20 psig. Based upon current economics, the Stillwater geothermal prospect is considered to be subcommercial for the generation of electrical power. This synopsis of the exploratory drilling activities and results contains summary drilling, geologic, and reservoir information from two exploratory geothermal wells.

  3. Geothermal energy in Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of goethermal resources in Nevada and resource applications are discussed. The social and economic advantages of utilizing geothermal energy are outlined. Federal and State programs established to foster the development of geothermal energy are discussed. The names, addresses, and phone numbers of various organizations actively involved in research, regulation, and the development of geothermal energy are included. (MHR)

  4. Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada, Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley,...

  5. Nevada Geothermal Power Company, Inc. (Blue Mountain) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nevada Geothermal Power Company, Inc. (Blue Mountain) Nevada Geothermal Power Company, Inc. (Blue Mountain) Nevada Geothermal Power Company, Inc. (Blue Mountain) Nevada Geothermal...

  6. -Reservoir Technology -Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    SGP-TR-91 - Reservoir Technology - Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Research at Stanford Principal in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford, California #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ...PREFACE................................................................................ 20 3.4 Thermal Stress Effects on Thermal Conductivity .................................... 27 #12

  7. NORTHERN NEVADA GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION STRATEGY ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, N.E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    School of Mines Nevada Geothermal Study: Report No. 4, Feb.J. , 1976, Assessing the geothermal resource base of the1977, Microseisms in geothermal Studies in Grass Valley,

  8. GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR SIMULATIONS WITH SHAFT79

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that well blocks must geothermal reservoir s·tudies, paperof Califomia. LBL-10066 GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR SIMULATIONSbe presented at the Fifth Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

  9. Selecting The Optimal Logging Suite For Geothermal Reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Selecting The Optimal Logging Suite For Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation- Results From The Alum 25-29 Well, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  10. National Geothermal Academy Underway at University of Nevada...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Academy Underway at University of Nevada, Reno National Geothermal Academy Underway at University of Nevada, Reno July 11, 2012 - 2:13pm Addthis The National Geothermal...

  11. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    o f Energy from Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs. Dal las:well behavior, fractured matrix reservoir behavior, wellEnergy from Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs." Society of ~

  12. Reinjection into geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Stefansson, V.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reinjection of geothermal wastewater is practiced as a means of disposal and for reservoir pressure support. Various aspects of reinjection are discussed, both in terms of theoretical studies as well as specific field examples. The discussion focuses on the major effects of reinjection, including pressure maintenance and chemical and thermal effects. (ACR)

  13. Environmental overview of geothermal development: northern Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slemmons, D.B.; Stroh, J.M.; Whitney, R.A. (eds.) [eds.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional environmental problems and issues associated with geothermal development in northern Nevada are studied to facilitate environmental assessment of potential geothermal resources. The various issues discussed are: environmental geology, seismicity of northern Nevada, hydrology and water quality, air quality, Nevada ecosystems, noise effects, socio-economic impacts, and cultural resources and archeological values. (MHR)

  14. EA-1849: Ormat Nevada Geothermal Projects in Northern NV | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    9: Ormat Nevada Geothermal Projects in Northern NV EA-1849: Ormat Nevada Geothermal Projects in Northern NV August 22, 2011 EA-1849: Final Environmental Assessment Tuscarora...

  15. Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth to Generate Sustainable Power Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth to Generate Sustainable...

  16. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Geothermal Resource Assessment and Reservoir EngineeriWorkshop on Geothermal Resources Assessment and ReserooirWorkshop on Geothermal Resources Assessment an ervoi r Engi

  17. Geothermal heating for Caliente, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallis, F.; Schaper, J.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilization of geothermal resources in the town of Caliente, Nevada (population 600) has been the objective of two grants. The first grant was awarded to Ferg Wallis, part-owner and operator of the Agua Caliente Trailer Park, to assess the potential of hot geothermal water for heating the 53 trailers in his park. The results from test wells indicate sustainable temperatures of 140/sup 0/ to 160/sup 0/F. Three wells were drilled to supply all 53 trailers with domestic hot water heating, 11 trailers with space heating and hot water for the laundry from the geothermal resource. System payback in terms of energy cost-savings is estimated at less than two years. The second grant was awarded to Grover C. Dils Medical Center in Caliente to drill a geothermal well and pipe the hot water through a heat exchanger to preheat air for space heating. This geothermal preheater served to convert the existing forced air electric furnace to a booster system. It is estimated that the hospital will save an average of $5300 in electric bills per year, at the current rate of $.0275/KWH. This represents a payback of approximately two years. Subsequent studies on the geothermal resource base in Caliente and on the economics of district heating indicate that geothermal may represent the most effective supply of energy for Caliente. Two of these studies are included as appendices.

  18. HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, R.C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the Cerro P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Mexicali,e C e r r o P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Baja C a l i1979 HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING R.

  19. Sierra Geothermal's Key Find in Southern Nevada | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal's Key Find in Southern Nevada July 13, 2010 - 5:17pm Addthis Sierra Geothermal discovered temperatures hot enough for large-scale geothermal energy production at...

  20. ANALYSIS OF PRODUCTION DECLINE IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zais, E.J.; Bodvarsson, G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Garg, 1978, Reservoir Engineering Data: Wai.akei Geothermalof the reservoir engineer because production data are alwaysGeothermal Reservoirs IV. DATA PROCESSING • • • . • Data

  1. Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal Reservoir at Previously Explored Sites at McGee Mountain, Nevada

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project Objectives: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of two innovative technologies in early-stage geothermal exploration:a) shallow (2m) survey; b) hydroprobe; and Identify a geothermal resource at the project site.

  2. STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM ("GREMP") -DECEMBER, 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, J. H.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the characteristics of a geothermal reservoir: Items 2, 6,new data important to geothermal reservoir engineering prac-forecast performance of the geothermal reservoir and bore

  3. -Injection Technology -Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    For the Period October 1, 1985 through September 30, 1986 DE-ASO7-84ID12529 Stanford Geothermal Program was initiated in fiscal year 1981. The report covers the period from October 1, 1985 through September 30, 1986SGP-TR-107 - Injection Technology - Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Research at Stanford Principal

  4. Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave splitting Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Characterization of geothermal reservoir...

  5. DOE Offers Loan Guarantees to Geothermal Projects in Nevada and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a geothermal power plant. DOE recently offered loan guarantees for geothermal power projects located in northwestern Nevada and southeastern Oregon, drawing on funds from the...

  6. STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES Paul Kruger and Henry J . Ramey, Jr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Mass Transfer i n Porous and Fractured Media . . . . . . . . . 61 Heat Transfer i n Fractun3d Rock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Geothermal Reservoir Phy.Sica1 PIodels . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 RAD3N I N GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

  7. STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM ("GREMP") -DECEMBER, 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, J. H.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary of reservoir engineering data: Wairakei Geothermaland new data important to geothermal reservoir engineeringdata and other information related to geothermal reservoir

  8. SUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEW ZEALAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchett, J.W.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W. , L. F. Rice "Reservoir Engineering Data: thermal Field,Summary of Reservoir Engineering Data: Wairakei GeothermalSUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL

  9. SUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEW ZEALAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchett, J.W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W. , L. F. Rice "Reservoir Engineering Data: thermal Field,Summary of Reservoir Engineering Data: Wairakei GeothermalSUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL

  10. Fifteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fifteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 23--25, 1990. Major topics included: DOE's geothermal research and development program, well testing, field studies, geosciences, geysers, reinjection, tracers, geochemistry, and modeling.

  11. Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    using Geomechanics-Based Stochastic Analysis of Injection-Induced Seismicity Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics-Based Stochastic Analysis of...

  12. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Methodologies for Reservoir...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About...

  13. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    -northeast of Reno, Nevada. It has an estimated reservoir temperature of 175-205°C at 1- 2 km depth and supports understanding permeability anisotropy in the geothermal reservoir but also for estimating the fault reactivation studies, stress modeling, and 3D structural modeling may be valuable for geothermal development where cost

  14. Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation Considering Fluid Adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    SGP-"R- 68 Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation Considering Fluid Adsorption and Composition Michael J, California #12;GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR EVALUATION CONSIDERING FLUID ADSORPTION AND COMPOSITION A DISSERTATIONFtion phenomena is described. Then, t h e implications of adsorption on material balance calculations and on vel1

  15. Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- Preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  16. An investigation of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    analysis of tracer tests Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: An investigation of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada,...

  17. Improved energy recovery from geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Lippmann, M.J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of a liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir in response to production from different horizons is studied using numerical simulation methods. The Olkaria geothermal field in Kenya is used as an example where a two-phase vapor-dominated zone overlies the main liquid-dominated reservoir. The possibility of improving energy recovery from vapor-dominated reservoirs by tapping deeper horizons is considered.

  18. EA-1849: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Ormat Nevada, Inc. for a Geothermal Power Facility in Nevada

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ormat Nevada Inc. (ORMAT), through its subsidiaries, proposes to construct and operate three geothermal power production facilities and associated power transmission lines in northern Nevada. The...

  19. Nevada low-temperaure geothermal resource assessment: 1994. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garside, L.J.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Data compilation for the low-temperature program is being done by State Teams in two western states. Final products of the study include: a geothermal database, in hardcopy and as digital data (diskette) listing information on all known low- and moderate- temperature springs and wells in Nevada; a 1:1,000,000-scale map displaying these geothermal localities, and a bibliography of references on Nevada geothermal resources.

  20. STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING RESEARCH PROJECTS SUPPORTED BY USDOE/DIVISION OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, J.H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary of reservoir engineering data: from the authors.of new data important to geo- thermal reservoir engineeringdata and other information related to geothermal reservoir

  1. Nevada Geothermal Area | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement ofConverDynNet-Zero Campus at University ofNevada Geothermal

  2. STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCXS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCXS Henry J. Ramey, Jr., and A. Louis C a p i l l a r i t y . . . . . . . . . . 28 RADON I N GEOTHEENAL RESERVOIRS . . . . . . . 33 HEAT AND MASS TRANSPORT I N FRACTURED ROCKS . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Mathematical Models

  3. Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Beowawe Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Use Of Electrical Surveys...

  4. HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, R.C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    upon the available reservoir data. If the latter data a r eThe use of measured data in reservoir engineering simulationdata on the condition of the well and the static reservoir

  5. Two-dimensional simulation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the Raft River geothermal reservoir and wells. (SINDA-3G program) Abstract Computer models describing both the transient reservoir pressure behavior and the time...

  6. Elevated carbon dioxide flux at the Dixie Valley geothermal field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Elevated carbon dioxide flux at the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- relations between surface phenomena and the geothermal reservoir Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  7. EFFECTS OF WATER INJECTION INTO FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    SGP-TR-57 SGP-TR-57 EFFECTS OF WATER INJECTION INTO FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS: A SUMMARY INTO FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS A SUMMARY OP EXPERImCE WORtDWIDE Roland N. Horne Stanford University ABSTRACT Reinjection of water i n t o fractured geothermal reservoirs holds potential both f o r

  8. STATEMENT OF BRIAN D. FAIRBANK Nevada Geothermal Power Inc.'s...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to library General: STATEMENT OF BRIAN D. FAIRBANK Nevada Geothermal Power Inc.'s Blue Mountain Geothermal Power Facility Author BRIAN D. FAIRBANK Published Publisher Not...

  9. STATEMENT OF BRIAN D. FAIRBANK Nevada Geothermal Power Inc.'s...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Personal Communication: STATEMENT OF BRIAN D. FAIRBANK Nevada Geothermal Power Inc.'s Blue Mountain Geothermal Power Facility Abstract Not available. Author Brian D. Fairbank...

  10. Nevada: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM. Part A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bliss, J.D.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All chemical data for geothermal fluids in Nevada available as of December 1981 are maintained on GEOTHERM, a computerized information system. This report presents summaries and sources of records for Nevada. 7 refs. (ACR)

  11. Nevada: Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Nevada: Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential Nevada: Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential August 21, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Utilizing a 1...

  12. Non-Darcy flow in geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zyvoloski, G.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of non-Darcy flow laws are investigated for two geothermal reservoir types: multiphase and Hot Dry Rock (HDR). Long-term thermal behavior is emphasized as short-term pressure transient behavior is addressed in the oil field literature. Comparisons of Darcy and non-Darcy flow laws are made.

  13. Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  14. Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  15. STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING RESEARCH PROJECTS SUPPORTED BY USDOE/DIVISION OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, J.H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the authors. Wairakei geothermal field: Lawrence BerkeleyR. C. , Evaluation of potential geothermal well-head and17, "S"r78" for use in geothermal reservoir 25 p. (LBL-

  16. Seventeenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

    1992-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    PREFACE The Seventeenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 29-31, 1992. There were one hundred sixteen registered participants which equaled the attendance last year. Participants were from seven foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, France, Belgium, Mexico and New Zealand. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in the papers. The Workshop Banquet Speaker was Dr. Raffaele Cataldi. Dr. Cataldi gave a talk on the highlights of his geothermal career. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Cataldi. Dr. Frank Miller presented the award at the banquet. Thirty-eight papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Dr. Roland Horne opened the meeting and the key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who discussed the DOE Geothermal R. & D. Program. The talk focused on aiding long-term, cost effective private resource development. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: geochemistry, hot dry rock, injection, geysers, modeling, and reservoir mechanics. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: Sabodh Garg., Jim Lovekin, Jim Combs, Ben Barker, Marcel Lippmann, Glenn Horton, Steve Enedy, and John Counsil. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to Francois Groff who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook -vii

  17. -Injection Technology -Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Investigator: Roland N. Home September 1985 First Annual Report Department of Energy Contract Number, and the forecasting of field behavior with time. Injection I I Tec hnology is a research area receiving special on geothermal energy. The Program publishes technical reports on all of its research projects. Research findings

  18. Sixth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P. (eds.)

    1980-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    INTRODUCTION TO THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE SIXTH GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING WORKSHOP, STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM Henry J. Ramey, Jr., and Paul Kruger Co-Principal Investigators Ian G. Donaldson Program Manager Stanford Geothermal Program The Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford University on December 16, 1980. As with previous Workshops the attendance was around 100 with a significant participation from countries other than the United States (18 attendees from 6 countries). In addition, there were a number of papers from foreign contributors not able to attend. Because of the success of all the earlier workshops there was only one format change, a new scheduling of Tuesday to Thursday rather than the earlier Wednesday through Friday. This change was in general considered for the better and will be retained for the Seventh Workshop. Papers were presented on two and a half of the three days, the panel session, this year on the numerical modeling intercomparison study sponsored by the Department of Energy, being held on the second afternoon. This panel discussion is described in a separate Stanford Geothermal Program Report (SGP-TR42). This year there was a shift in subject of the papers. There was a reduction in the number of papers offered on pressure transients and well testing and an introduction of several new subjects. After overviews by Bob Gray of the Department of Energy and Jack Howard of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, we had papers on field development, geopressured systems, production engineering, well testing, modeling, reservoir physics, reservoir chemistry, and risk analysis. A total of 51 papers were contributed and are printed in these Proceedings. It was, however, necessary to restrict the presentations and not all papers printed were presented. Although the content of the Workshop has changed over the years, the format to date has proved to be satisfactory. The objectives of the Workshop, the bringing together of researchers, engineers and managers involved in geothermal reservoir study and development and the provision of a forum for the prompt and open reporting of progress and for the exchange of ideas, continue to be met . Active discussion by the majority of the participants is apparent both in and outside the workshop arena. The Workshop Proceedings now contain some of the most highly cited geothermal literature. Unfortunately, the popularity of the Workshop for the presentation and exchange of ideas does have some less welcome side effects. The major one is the developing necessity for a limitation of the number of papers that are actually presented. We will continue to include all offered papers in the Summaries and Proceedings. As in the recent past, this sixth Workshop was supported by a grant from the Department of Energy. This grant is now made directly to Stanford as part of the support for the Stanford Geothermal Program (Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459). We are certain that all participants join us in our appreciation of this continuing support. Thanks are also due to all those individuals who helped in so many ways: The members of the program committee who had to work so hard to keep the program to a manageable size - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Paul G. Atkinson (Union Oil Company). Michael L. Sorey (U.S.G.S.), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program), and Roland N. Horne (Stanford Geothermal Program). The session chairmen who contributed so much to the organization and operation of the technical sessions - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Phillip H. Messer (Union Oil Company), Leland L. Mink (Department of Energy), Manuel Nathenson (U.S.G.S.), Gunnar Bodvarsson (Oregon State University), Mohindar S. Gulati (Union Oil Company), George F. Pinder (Princeton University), Paul A. Witherspoon (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program) and Michael J. O'Sullivan (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory). The many people who assisted behind the scenes, making sure that everything was prepared and organized - in particular we would like to t

  19. Sixteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program) [Stanford Geothermal Program

    1991-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sixteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 23-25, 1991. The Workshop Banquet Speaker was Dr. Mohinder Gulati of UNOCAL Geothermal. Dr. Gulati gave an inspiring talk on the impact of numerical simulation on development of geothermal energy both in The Geysers and the Philippines. Dr. Gulati was the first recipient of The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy. Dr. Frank Miller presented the award. The registered attendance figure of one hundred fifteen participants was up slightly from last year. There were seven foreign countries represented: Iceland, Italy, Philippines, Kenya, the United Kingdom, Mexico, and Japan. As last year, papers on about a dozen geothermal fields outside the United States were presented. There were thirty-six papers presented at the Workshop, and two papers were submitted for publication only. Attendees were welcomed by Dr. Khalid Aziz, Chairman of the Petroleum Engineering Department at Stanford. Opening remarks were presented by Dr. Roland Horne, followed by a discussion of the California Energy Commission's Geothermal Activities by Barbara Crowley, Vice Chairman; and J.E. ''Ted'' Mock's presentation of the DOE Geothermal Program: New Emphasis on Industrial Participation. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: hot dry rock, geochemistry, tracer injection, field performance, modeling, and chemistry/gas. As in previous workshops, session chairpersons made major contributions to the program. Special thanks are due to Joel Renner, Jeff Tester, Jim Combs, Kathy Enedy, Elwood Baldwin, Sabodh Garg, Marcel0 Lippman, John Counsil, and Eduardo Iglesias. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Angharad Jones, Rosalee Benelli, Jeanne Mankinen, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate the audiovisual equipment and to Michael Riley who coordinated the meeting arrangements for a second year. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

  20. Reservoir Investigations on the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal System...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mexico- Tracer Test Results Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Reservoir Investigations on the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal System,...

  1. Application of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PROCEEDINGS, Second workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering, Stanford, CA, USA, 1 Dec 1976, 111977 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org...

  2. Eighteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.J.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

    1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    PREFACE The Eighteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 26-28, 1993. There were one hundred and seventeen registered participants which was greater than the attendance last year. Participants were from eight foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, Guatemala, and Iceland. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Dean Gary Ernst opened the meeting and welcomed the visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Mock who also spoke at the banquet. Thirty-nine papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: field operations, The Geysers, geoscience, hot-dry-rock, injection, modeling, slim hole wells, geochemistry, well test and wellbore. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: John Counsil, Kathleen Enedy, Harry Olson, Eduardo Iglesias, Marcelo Lippmann, Paul Atkinson, Jim Lovekin, Marshall Reed, Antonio Correa, and David Faulder. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to John Hornbrook who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

  3. Twentieth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    PREFACE The Twentieth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, dedicated to the memory of Professor Hank Ramey, was held at Stanford University on January 24-26, 1995. There were ninety-five registered participants. Participants came from six foreign countries: Japan, Mexico, England, Italy, New Zealand and Iceland. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Thirty-two papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into eleven sessions concerning: field development, modeling, well tesubore, injection, geoscience, geochemistry and field operations. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bob Fournier, Mark Walters, John Counsil, Marcelo Lippmann, Keshav Goyal, Joel Renner and Mike Shook. In addition to the technical sessions, a panel discussion was held on ''What have we learned in 20 years?'' Panel speakers included Patrick Muffler, George Frye, Alfred Truesdell and John Pritchett. The subject was further discussed by Subir Sanyal, who gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager

  4. Twelfth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Rivera, J. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

    1987-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Preface The Twelfth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 20-22, 1987. The year ending December 1986 was very difficult for the domestic geothermal industry. Low oil prices caused a sharp drop in geothermal steam prices. We expected to see some effect upon attendance at the Twelfth Workshop. To our surprise, the attendance was up by thirteen from previous years, with one hundred and fifty-seven registered participants. Eight foreign countries were represented: England, France, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, and Turkey. Despite a worldwide surplus of oil, international geothermal interest and development is growing at a remarkable pace. There were forty-one technical presentations at the Workshop. All of these are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Seven technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published; they concern geothermal developments and research in Iceland, Italy, and New Zealand. In addition to these forty-eight technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by Henry J. Ramey, Jr. from the Stanford Geothermal Program. The Workshop Banquet speaker was John R. Berg from the Department of Energy. We thank him for sharing with the Workshop participants his thoughts on the expectations of this agency in the role of alternative energy resources, specifically geothermal, within the country???s energy framework. His talk is represented as a paper in the back of this volume. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: M. Gulati, K. Goyal, G.S. Bodvarsson, A.S. Batchelor, H. Dykstra, M.J. Reed, A. Truesdell, J.S. Gudmundsson, and J.R. Counsil. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Marilyn King, Amy Osugi, Terri Ramey, and Rosalee Benelli for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment, specially Jim Lovekin. The Twelfth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U. S. Department of Energy through Contract Nos. DE-AS03-80SF11459 and DE-AS07- 84ID12529. We deeply appreciate this continued support. January 1987 Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Roland N. Horne William E. Brigham Frank G. Miller Jesus Rivera

  5. Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    For Calculating Reservoir Temperatures At Nevada Geothermal Power Plants Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Evaluation Of Chemical...

  6. Nineteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.J.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

    1994-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    PREFACE The Nineteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 18-20, 1994. This workshop opened on a sad note because of the death of Prof. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. on November 19, 1993. Hank had been fighting leukemia for a long time and finally lost the battle. Many of the workshop participants were present for the celebration of his life on January 21 at Stanford's Memorial Church. Hank was one of the founders of the Stanford Geothermal Program and the Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Workshop. His energy, kindness, quick wit, and knowledge will long be missed at future workshops. Following the Preface we have included a copy of the Memorial Resolution passed by the Stanford University Senate. There were one hundred and four registered participants. Participants were from ten foreign countries: Costa Rica, England, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines and Turkey. Workshop papers described the performance of fourteen geothermal fields outside the United States. Roland N. Home opened the meeting and welcomed the visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who gave a presentation about the future of geothermal development. The banquet speaker was Jesus Rivera and he spoke about Energy Sources of Central American Countries. Forty two papers were presented at the Workshop. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: sciences, injection, production, modeling, and adsorption. Session chairmen are an important part of the workshop and our thanks go to: John Counsil, Mark Walters, Dave Duchane, David Faulder, Gudmundur Bodvarsson, Jim Lovekin, Joel Renner, and Iraj Ershaghi. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to Xianfa Deng who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Roland N. Home Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

  7. Eleventh workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Counsil, J.R. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

    1986-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Eleventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 21-23, 1986. The attendance was up compared to previous years, with 144 registered participants. Ten foreign countries were represented: Canada, England, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand and Turkey. There were 38 technical presentations at the Workshop which are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Six technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published and one presentation is not published. In addition to these 45 technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by J. E. Mock from the Department of Energy. The Workshop Banquet speaker was Jim Combs of Geothermal Resources International, Inc. We thank him for his presentation on GEO geothermal developments at The Geysers. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the Workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: M. Gulati, E. Iglesias, A. Moench, S. Prestwich, and K. Pruess. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and students. We would like to thank J.W. Cook, J.R. Hartford, M.C. King, A.E. Osugi, P. Pettit, J. Arroyo, J. Thorne, and T.A. Ramey for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Eleventh Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy through Contract DE-AS03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. January 1986 H.J. Ramey, Jr. P. Kruger R.N. Horne W.E. Brigham F.G. Miller J.R. Counsil

  8. Thirteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

    1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    PREFACE The Thirteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 19-21, 1988. Although 1987 continued to be difficult for the domestic geothermal industry, world-wide activities continued to expand. Two invited presentations on mature geothermal systems were a keynote of the meeting. Malcolm Grant presented a detailed review of Wairakei, New Zealand and highlighted plans for new development. G. Neri summarized experience on flow rate decline and well test analysis in Larderello, Italy. Attendance continued to be high with 128 registered participants. Eight foreign countries were represented: England, France, Iceland, Italy, New Zealand, Japan, Mexico and The Philippines. A discussion of future workshops produced a strong recommendation that the Stanford Workshop program continue for the future. There were forty-one technical presentations at the Workshop. All of these are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Four technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published. In addition to these forty five technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by Henry J. Ramey, Jr. from the Stanford Geothermal Program. The Workshop Banquet speaker was Gustavo Calderon from the Inter-American Development Bank. We thank him for sharing with the Workshop participants a description of the Bank???s operations in Costa Rica developing alternative energy resources, specifically Geothermal, to improve the country???s economic basis. His talk appears as a paper in the back of this volume. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: J. Combs, G. T. Cole, J. Counsil, A. Drenick, H. Dykstra, K. Goyal, P. Muffler, K. Pruess, and S. K. Sanyal. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Marilyn King, Pat Oto, Terri Ramey, Bronwyn Jones, Yasmin Gulamani, and Rosalee Benelli for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment, especially Jeralyn Luetkehans. The Thirteenth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy through Contract No. DE-AS07-84ID12529. We deeply appreciate this continued support. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Roland N. Horne William E. Brigham Frank G. Miller Jean W. Cook

  9. RAPID/Geothermal/Land Access/Nevada | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethod JumpGeorgia:ColoradoNevada <WashingtonHawaiiNevada <

  10. Use of TOUGHREACT to Simulate Effects of Fluid Chemistry on Injectivity in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs with High Ionic Strength Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tianfu; Zhang, Guoxiang; Pruess, Karsten

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    swelling in a fractured geothermal reservoir, Proceedings ofon Injectivity in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs with Highdry rock and hot fractured rock reservoirs in a sustainable

  11. Effects of non-condensible gases on fluid recovery in fractured geothermal reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Gaulke, Scott

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simu- lations in Fractured Reservoirs,” Lawrence Berkeleyfrom a twctphase fractured reservoir. T h e results obtainedRecovery in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs Gudmundur S.

  12. Geothermal reservoir simulation to enhance confidence in predictions for nuclear waste disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2002-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulation of geothermal reservoirs is useful and necessary in understanding and evaluating reservoir structure and behavior, designing field development, and predicting performance. Models vary in complexity depending on processes considered, heterogeneity, data availability, and study objectives. They are evaluated using computer codes written and tested to study single and multiphase flow and transport under nonisothermal conditions. Many flow and heat transfer processes modeled in geothermal reservoirs are expected to occur in anthropogenic thermal (AT) systems created by geologic disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste. We examine and compare geothermal systems and the AT system expected at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and their modeling. Time frames and spatial scales are similar in both systems, but increased precision is necessary for modeling the AT system, because flow through specific repository locations will affect long-term ability radionuclide retention. Geothermal modeling experience has generated a methodology, used in the AT modeling for Yucca Mountain, yielding good predictive results if sufficient reliable data are available and an experienced modeler is involved. Codes used in geothermal and AT modeling have been tested extensively and successfully on a variety of analytical and laboratory problems.

  13. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    KALMAN FILTER (ENKF) FOR HISTORY MATCHING PRESSURE DATA FROM GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS Omer Inanc TureyenPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University performance predictions of reservoir models for liquid dominated geothermal reservoirs. Specifically we

  14. Ninth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Gudmundsson, J.S. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

    1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The attendance at the Workshop was similar to last year's with 123 registered participants of which 22 represented 8 foreign countries. A record number of technical papers (about 60) were submitted for presentation at the Workshop. The Program Committee, therefore, decided to have several parallel sessions to accommodate most of the papers. This format proved unpopular and will not be repeated. Many of the participants felt that the Workshop lost some of its unique qualities by having parallel sessions. The Workshop has always been held near the middle of December during examination week at Stanford. This timing was reviewed in an open discussion at the Workshop. The Program Committee subsequently decided to move the Workshop to January. The Tenth Workshop will be held on January 22-24, 1985. The theme of the Workshop this year was ''field developments worldwide''. The Program Committee addressed this theme by encouraging participants to submit field development papers, and by inviting several international authorities to give presentations at the Workshop. Field developments in at least twelve countries were reported: China, El Salvador, France, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, and the United States. There were 58 technical presentations at the Workshop, of which 4 were not made available for publication. Several authors submitted papers not presented at the Workshop. However, these are included in the 60 papers of these Proceedings. The introductory address was given by Ron Toms of the U.S. Department of Energy, and the banquet speaker was A1 Cooper of Chevron Resources Company. An important contribution was made to the Workshop by the chairmen of the technical sessions. Other than Stanford Geothermal Program faculty members, they included: Don White (Field Developments), Bill D'Olier (Hydrothermal Systems), Herman Dykstra (Well Testing), Karsten Pruess (Well Testing), John Counsil (Reservoir Chemistry), Malcolm Mossman (Reservoir Chemistry), Greg Raasch (Production), Manny Nathenson (Injection), Susan Petty (Injection), Subir Sanyal (Simulation), Marty Molloy (Petrothermal), and Allen Moench (Reservoir Physics). The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Joanne Hartford, Terri Ramey, Amy Osugi, and Marilyn King for their valued help with the Workshop arrangements and the Proceedings. We also owe thanks to the program students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Ninth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies Division of the U . S . Department of Energy through contract DE-AT03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. H. J. Ramey, Jr., R. N. Horne, P. Kruger, W. E. Brigham, F. G. Miller, J. S . Gudmundsson -vii

  15. Three-dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in Geothermal Reservoirs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: to develop a 3-D numerical model for simulating mode I; II; and III (tensile; shear; and tearing propagation of multiple fractures using the virtual multi-dimensional internal bond (VMIB); to predict geothermal reservoir stimulation.

  16. Exploration model for possible geothermal reservoir, Coso Hot...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Co. , California Abstract The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a steam-filled fracture geothermal reservoir exists at Coso Hot Springs KGRA, as proposed by...

  17. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    F i r s t Geopressured Geothermal Energy Conference. Austin,Experiment t o Extract Geothermal Energy From Hot Dry Rock."I 2nd Geopressured Geothermal Energy Conference. University

  18. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    F i r s t Geopressured Geothermal Energy Conference. Austin,I 2nd Geopressured Geothermal Energy Conference. UniversityExperiment t o Extract Geothermal Energy From Hot Dry Rock."

  19. Nevada/Geothermal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: EnergyEnergyPPCR) JumpAirWorkInformation 3rd

  20. Advanced seismic imaging for geothermal development John N. Louie*, Nevada Seismological Laboratory, University of Nevada, Reno; Satish K. Pullammanappallil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    advanced seismic attribute analyses, model testing, and verification of tectonic hypotheses. We the development of the region's full geothermal-power potential. The development of advanced seismic imaging of eastern California, Nevada, and Utah, magmatic geothermal systems are found at the edges of the province

  1. Geothermal Reservoir Technology Research Program: Abstracts of selected research projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, M.J. (ed.)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research projects are described in the following areas: geothermal exploration, mapping reservoir properties and reservoir monitoring, and well testing, simulation, and predicting reservoir performance. The objectives, technical approach, and project status of each project are presented. The background, research results, and future plans for each project are discussed. The names, addresses, and telephone and telefax numbers are given for the DOE program manager and the principal investigators. (MHR)

  2. RAPID/Geothermal/Environment/Nevada | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethod JumpGeorgia:Colorado < RAPID‎ |Hawaii <Nevada <

  3. RAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Nevada | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethod JumpGeorgia:ColoradoNevada < RAPID‎ | Geothermal‎ |

  4. RAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Nevada | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethod JumpGeorgia:ColoradoNevada < RAPID‎ | Geothermal‎

  5. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    results w i t h other reservoir data. Ramey [1974] definesone-dimen- sional data on reservoir drainage which has beenC. R. , Goodwill D. Data t o Reservoir Engine H. Application

  6. GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIR INVESTIGATIONS OF U.S. BUREAU OF RECLAMATION LEASEHOLDS AT EAST MESA, IMPERIAL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    document. LBL-7094 UC-66~1 GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIRInc. , 1976. Study of the geothermal reservoir underlyingtest, 1976, East Mesa geothermal field in California.

  7. Geothermal reservoir at Tatapani Geothermal field, Surguja district, Madhya Pradesh, IN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitale, U.L.; Sarolkar, P.B.; Rawat, H.S.; Shukia, S.N.

    1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tatapani Geothermal field, located on the Son-Narmada mega lineament is one of the most intense geothermal manifestation, with hot spring temperature of 98°c. in Central India. 21 Exploratory and thermal gradient boreholes followed by 5 production wells for proposed 300 KWe binary cycle power plant, have revealed specific reservoir parameters of shallow geothermal reservoir of 110°c in upper 350 m of geothermal system and their possible continuation to deeper reservoir of anticipated temperature of 160 ± 10°c. Testing of five production wells done by Oil and Natural Gas Corporation concurrently with drilling at different depths and also on completion of drilling, have established feeder zones of thermal water at depth of 175-200 m, 280-300 m, maximum temperature of 112.5°c and bottom hole pressure of 42 kg/cm˛. Further interpretation of temperature and pressure profiles, injection test, well head discharges and chemical analysis data has revealed thermal characteristics of individual production wells and overall configuration of .thermal production zones with their permeability, temperature, and discharge characteristics in the shallow thermal reservoir area. Well testing data and interpretation of reservoir parameters therefrom, for upper 350 m part of geothermal system and possible model of deeper geothermal reservoir at Tatapani have been presented in the paper.

  8. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reservoir engineering research program a t the University of Colorado is described. Physical characterization

  9. THE ROLE OF CAPILLARY FORCES IN THE NATURAL STATE OF FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    THE ROLE OF CAPILLARY FORCES IN THE NATURAL STATE OF FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS A REPORT model is adequate in describing the natural state of a fractured geothermal reservoir. Because of this a fractured geothermal reservoir. The numerical simulations were carried to steady state with the use

  10. Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation Using Geomechanics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Microseismic Study with LBNL - Monitoring the Effect of Injection of Fluids from the Lake County Pipeline on...

  11. Tenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The workshop contains presentations in the following areas: (1) reservoir engineering research; (2) field development; (3) vapor-dominated systems; (4) the Geysers thermal area; (5) well test analysis; (6) production engineering; (7) reservoir evaluation; (8) geochemistry and injection; (9) numerical simulation; and (10) reservoir physics. (ACR)

  12. ANALYSIS O F HEAT TRANSFER AND ENERGY RECOVERY I N FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    SGP-TR-31 ANALYSIS O F HEAT TRANSFER AND ENERGY RECOVERY I N FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS by R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 iii #12;3.6 Energy Balance of a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir . . . 3.6.1 Reservoir Rock Energy of Experimental Apparatus . . . . . . . . . 6 2.1.1 The Reservoir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2

  13. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    of Enhanced Geothermal Sys- tems. As cold water is circulated through a reservoir, rock contract, creating

  14. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal Potential o f Cerro Prieto, 2nd U.N. Symposium onEast Mesa, California; Cerro Prieto, e Mexico; Matsukawa,i n E l Tatio, Chile, and Cerro Prieto, Mexico, are used t o

  15. Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer Simulation and Field Applications Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Modeling of...

  16. Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Seismicity This project will develop a model for seismicity-based reservoir characterization (SBRC) by combining rock mechanics; finite element modeling;...

  17. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    i s maintain reservoir pressu found t o be f a i r l yPrieto. , Correlation of pressu temperature trends w i t h

  18. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University The Triassic sandstone reservoirs of the Paris Basin (France) have attractive geothermal potential for district heating. However, previous exploitations of these reservoirs have revealed re-injection problems

  19. Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Each of the following types of well stimulation techniques are summarized and explained: hydraulic fracturing; thermal; mechanical, jetting, and drainhole drilling; explosive and implosive; and injection methods. Current stimulation techniques, stimulation techniques for geothermal wells, areas of needed investigation, and engineering calculations for various techniques. (MHR)

  20. Chelated Indium Activable Tracers for Geothermal Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Center (SLAC), for providing the califclmiurh-252 neutron source. Appreciation is extended to Lew, rock size, and temperature on the tracer adsoqjtion and ther- mal degradation. The rock employed for these measurements was gragwacke, a prek valent rock type at The Geysers, California geothermal field. The re

  1. ADVANCING REACTIVE TRACER METHODS FOR MONITORING THERMAL DRAWDOWN IN GEOTHERMAL ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; George D. Redden; Laurence C. Hull

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactive tracers have long been considered a possible means of measuring thermal drawdown in a geothermal system, before significant cooling occurs at the extraction well. Here, we examine the sensitivity of the proposed method to evaluate reservoir cooling and demonstrate that while the sensitivity of the method as generally proposed is low, it may be practical under certain conditions.

  2. Modeling Multi-Reservoir Hydropower Systems in the Sierra Nevada with Environmental Requirements and Climate Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, Jay R.

    i Modeling Multi-Reservoir Hydropower Systems in the Sierra Nevada with Environmental Requirements and the Sierra Nevada, their majestic backyard. #12;iii Abstract Hydropower systems and other river regulation that ecosystems have historically depended on. These effects are compounded at regional scales. As hydropower

  3. A Thermoelastic Hydraulic Fracture Design Tool for Geothermal Reservoir Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmad Ghassemi

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal energy is recovered by circulating water through heat exchange areas within a hot rock mass. Geothermal reservoir rock masses generally consist of igneous and metamorphic rocks that have low matrix permeability. Therefore, cracks and fractures play a significant role in extraction of geothermal energy by providing the major pathways for fluid flow and heat exchange. Thus, knowledge of conditions leading to formation of fractures and fracture networks is of paramount importance. Furthermore, in the absence of natural fractures or adequate connectivity, artificial fracture are created in the reservoir using hydraulic fracturing. At times, the practice aims to create a number of parallel fractures connecting a pair of wells. Multiple fractures are preferred because of the large size necessary when using only a single fracture. Although the basic idea is rather simple, hydraulic fracturing is a complex process involving interactions of high pressure fluid injections with a stressed hot rock mass, mechanical interaction of induced fractures with existing natural fractures, and the spatial and temporal variations of in-situ stress. As a result it is necessary to develop tools that can be used to study these interactions as an integral part of a comprehensive approach to geothermal reservoir development, particularly enhanced geothermal systems. In response to this need we have set out to develop advanced thermo-mechanical models for design of artificial fractures and rock fracture research in geothermal reservoirs. These models consider the significant hydraulic and thermo-mechanical processes and their interaction with the in-situ stress state. Wellbore failure and fracture initiation is studied using a model that fully couples poro-mechanical and thermo-mechanical effects. The fracture propagation model is based on a complex variable and regular displacement discontinuity formulations. In the complex variable approach the displacement discontinuities are defined from the numerical solution of a complex hypersingular integral equation written for a given fracture configuration and loading. The fracture propagation studies include modeling interaction of induced fractures with existing discontinuities such as faults and joints. In addition to the fracture propagation studies, two- and three-dimensional heat extraction solution algorithms have been developed and used to estimate heat extraction and the variations of the reservoir stress with cooling. The numerical models have been developed in a user-friendly environment to create a tool for improving fracture design and investigating single or multiple fracture propagation in rock.

  4. Reservoir technology - geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford. Fifth annual report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to carry out research on geothermal reservoir engineering techniques useful to the geothermal industry. A parallel objective is the training of geothermal engineers and scientists. The research is focused toward accelerated development of hydrothermal resources through the evaluation of fluid reserves, and the forecasting of field behavior with time. Injection technology is a research area receiving special attention. The program is divided into reservoir definition research, modeling of heat extraction from fractured reservoirs, application and testing of new and proven reservoir engineering technology, and technology transfer. (ACR)

  5. Environmental assessment for a geothermal direct utilization project in Reno, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perino, J.V.; McCloskey, M.H.; Wolterink, T.J.; Wallace, R.C.; Baker, D.W.; Harper, D.L.; Anderson, D.T.; Siteman, J.V.; Sherrill, K.T.

    1980-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed action involves the development of geothermal wells to provide hot water and heat for five users in Reno, Nevada. Data from nearby wells indicate the sufficient hot water is available from the Moana Known Geothermal Resource Area for this action. Construction activities have been planned to minimize or eliminate problems with noise, runoff, and disturbance of biota as well as other potential environmental effects. Disposal of the geothermal fluids via surface water or injection will be determined based on water quality of the geothermal fluids and geologic effects of injection. The affected environment is described by this document and needed mitigation procedures discussed.

  6. Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis of Energy Demand (MAED-2)Simulation

  7. MICROSEISMS IN GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION: STUDIES IN GRASS VALLEY, NEVADA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liaw, A.L.C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    period seismic noise (T>30 sec) . . . 2.5 Geothermal ground226. Clacy, G.R.T. ? 1968, Geothermal ground noise amplitudestudies at the Cos0 geothermal area, China Lake, California:

  8. Reservoir evaluation tests on RRGE 1 and RRGE 2, Raft River Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to providing estimates on the permeability and storage parameters of the geothermal reservoir, the tests also indicated the possible existence of barrier boundaries. The data...

  9. GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANGEMENT PROGRAM PLAN (GREMP PLAN)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloomster, C.H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 Mission of Division of Geothermal Energy . . . . .Coordination with Other Geothermal Programs . . . . . . 6the Behavior of Geothermal Systems . . . . . . . . . 1 6

  10. Artificial Geothermal Energy Potential of Steam-flooded Heavy Oil Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limpasurat, Akkharachai

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents an investigation of the concept of harvesting geothermal energy that remains in heavy oil reservoirs after abandonment when steamflooding is no longer economics. Substantial heat that has accumulated within reservoir rock and its...

  11. Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher HomesLyonsBirch CreekWarrior,Blackfoot Reservoir

  12. Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouthby 2022 | OpenEIBixby, Oklahoma:BlackBlackfoot Reservoir

  13. Twenty-first workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1996-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    PREFACE The Twenty-First Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at the Holiday Inn, Palo Alto on January 22-24, 1996. There were one-hundred fifty-five registered participants. Participants came from twenty foreign countries: Argentina, Austria, Canada, Costa Rica, El Salvador, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, the Philippines, Romania, Russia, Switzerland, Turkey and the UK. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Sixty-six papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into twenty sessions concerning: reservoir assessment, modeling, geology/geochemistry, fracture modeling hot dry rock, geoscience, low enthalpy, injection, well testing, drilling, adsorption and stimulation. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bobbie Bishop-Gollan, Tom Box, Jim Combs, John Counsil, Sabodh Garg, Malcolm Grant, Marcel0 Lippmann, Jim Lovekin, John Pritchett, Marshall Reed, Joel Renner, Subir Sanyal, Mike Shook, Alfred Truesdell and Ken Williamson. Jim Lovekin gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet and highlighted the exciting developments in the geothermal field which are taking place worldwide. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager.

  14. Fluid and heat flow in gas-rich geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Sullivan, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Blakeley, M.R.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical-simulation techniques are used to study the effects of noncondensible gases (CO/sub 2/) on geothermal reservoir behavior in the natural state and during exploitation. It is shown that the presence of CO/sub 2/ has large effects on the thermodynamic conditions of a reservoir in the natural state, especially on temperature distributions and phase compositions. The gas will expand two-phase zones and increase gas saturations to enable flow of CO/sub 2/ through the system. During exploitation, the early pressure drop is primarily due to degassing of the system. This process can cause a very rapid initial pressure drop, on the order of tens of bars, depending upon the initial partial pressure of CO/sub 2/. The following gas content from wells can provide information on in-place gas saturations and relative permeability curves that apply at a given geothermal resource. Site-specific studies are made for the gas-rich two-phase reservoir at the Ohaki geothermal field in New Zealand. A simple lumped-parameter model and a vertical column model are applied to the field data. The results obtained agree well with the natural thermodynamic state of the Ohaki field (pressure and temperature profiles) and a partial pressure of 15 to 25 bars is calculated in the primary reservoirs. The models also agree reasonably well with field data obtained during exploitation of the field. The treatment of thermophysical properties of H/sub 2/O-CO/sub 2/ mixtures for different phase compositions is summarized.

  15. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    short circuiting in fractured geothermal reservoirs. INTRODUCTION Hydraulic connectivity amongPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University were conducted in a fractured sandstone to establish the value of these tests for establishing inter

  16. STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM ("GREMP") -DECEMBER, 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, J. H.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE), Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) proposed thatof Energy, Division of Geothermal Energy, through Lawrence

  17. GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIR INVESTIGATIONS OF U.S. BUREAU OF RECLAMATION LEASEHOLDS AT EAST MESA, IMPERIAL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in first symposium on the Cerro Prieto geothermal field,simulation studies of the Cerro Prieto reservoir, - Proc.

  18. CALCULATION AND USE OF STEAM/WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITIES IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    c c c i i c I CALCULATION AND USE OF STEAM/WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITIES IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS to calculate the steam/water relative permeabilities in geothermal reservoirs was developed and applied. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 PRZVIOUS PIETHODS OF CALCLXATING STEAM/TtJATER RELATIVE PERPlEX3ILITIES IN GEOTHE?XAL XZSERVOIFG

  19. Deep geothermal reservoirs evolution: from a modeling perspective BRGM, 3 Avenue Claude Guillemin, BP 36009 -45060 Orlans Cedex 2, France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Deep geothermal reservoirs evolution: from a modeling perspective S. Lopez1 1 BRGM, 3 Avenue Claude deep geothermal reservoirs evolution and management based on examples ranging from direct use of geothermal heat to geothermal electricity production. We will try to focus on French experiences

  20. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    FOR TRACER TRANSPORT IN A FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Aniko Toth, Peter Szucs and Elemer Bobok University in a fractured limestone geothermal reservoir the flow was investigated by two different methods in order and thermodynamic performance of the fractured geothermal reservoir was modeled for this purpose. The flow pattern

  1. Nevada's Beowawe Geothermal Plant Begins Generating Clean Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    years." The new low-temperature, binary cycle plant uses waste heat from the geothermal brine of an existing geothermal plant at the facility. The new plant will add approximately...

  2. Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA, Including Warm Ground, Borate Deposits, and Siliceous Alteration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference...

  3. INJECTION AND THERMAL BREAKTHROUGH IN FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applications & Operations, Geothermal Energy Division of theP. , and Otte, C. , Geothermal energy: Stanford, California,Applications & Operations, Geothermal Energy Division of the

  4. GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANGEMENT PROGRAM PLAN (GREMP PLAN)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloomster, C.H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 Mission of Division of Geothermal Energy . . . . .of Energy, Division of Geothermal Energy effort is theMission of Division of Geothermal Energy The mission of the

  5. GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANGEMENT PROGRAM PLAN (GREMP PLAN)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloomster, C.H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 Mission of Division of Geothermal Energy . . . . .of the Division of Geothermal Energy and these directoratesof Energy, Division of Geothermal Energy effort is the

  6. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    -WATER INJECTION INTO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMBINED WITH CO2 STORAGE Hamidreza Salimi of the geothermal system. In this way, synergy is established between geothermal energy production and subsurface CO) with geothermal energy. A further reduction could be achieved by capturing the remaining emitted CO2

  7. STRUCTURE OF THE LOW PERMEABLE NATURALLY FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Chrystel Dezayes*, Albert Genter** & Benot Valley ***

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 STRUCTURE OF THE LOW PERMEABLE NATURALLY FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR AT SOULTZ Chrystel cluster appears as a fractured reservoir developed within a low permeable matrix. Fracture zones represent) where reservoir development involved the reactivation of the pre- existing fractures in the granite [16

  8. Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jump to:Neppel Wind PowerNevada State ClearinghouseNevada

  9. Nevada's Beowawe Geothermal Plant Begins Generating Clean Energy |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many DevilsForum |Energy NovemberCto theNevadaNevada

  10. Geothermal systems of the Mono Basin-Long Valley region, eastern California and western Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higgins, C.T.; Flynn, T.; Chapman, R.H.; Trexler, D.T.; Chase, G.R.; Bacon, C.F.; Ghusn, G. Jr.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The region that includes Mono Basin, Long Valley, the Bridgeport-Bodie Hills area, and Aurora, in eastern California and western Nevada was studied to determine the possible causes and interactions of the geothermal anomalies in the Mono Basin-Long Valley region as a whole. A special goal of the study was to locate possible shallow bodies of magma and to determine their influence on the hydrothermal systems in the region. (ACR)

  11. HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER IN A FAULT-CONTROLLED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR CHARGED AT CONSTANT PRESSURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, K.P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modelling Studies of the Cerro Prieto Reservoir, LawrenceBerkeley, LBL-9590, Cerro Prieto-14, 11, February 1980. 15.L. , "Geology of the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field," in the

  12. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF RESERVOIR COMPACTION IN LIQUID DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lippmann, M.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    13. modeling of liquid geothermal systems: Ph.D. thesis,of water dominated geothermal fields with large temper~of land subsidence in geothermal areas: Proc. 2nd Int. Symp.

  13. Integrated Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia,IDGWPIndiantown,Innoferm GmbHCaltechOpen Energy

  14. GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANGEMENT PROGRAM PLAN (GREMP PLAN)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloomster, C.H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in data interpretation, and reservoir performance as relatedgeothermal reservoir, the acquisition of data on the v i s cfield data and for modeling reservoir performance. such

  15. INJECTION AND THERMAL BREAKTHROUGH IN FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulation of reinjection at Cerro Prieto using an idealizedSecond Symposium on the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, Bajareinjection schemes for the Cerro Prieto geothermal field,

  16. PROCEEDINGS, Twenty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 24-26, 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    sea water were injected into the fractured BO-4 reservoir. A chemical inhibitor was used to preventPROCEEDINGS, Twenty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University; it is rapidly mixed with the reservoir geothermal fluid. This can be explained by a relatively large

  17. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    SYSTEMS: A CASE STUDY OF HEAT EXTRACTION AND THERMAL RECOVERY IN A MODEL EGS FRACTURED RESERVOIR DanielPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) a conduction-dominated, model EGS reservoir was evaluated

  18. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    The optimal design of production in fractured geothermal reservoirs requires knowledge of the resource Resistivity Tomography (ERT) to characterize fractures in geothermal reservoirs. ERT is a technique to their surroundings. Electrical current moving through the reservoir passes mainly through fluid-filled fractures

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    in fractured media is complex due to the fact that the access to the reservoirs is restricted to the boreholes development of deep geothermal energy (Petty et al., 2009). Especially in the case of fractured reservoirsPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

  20. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    a decrease of velocity of approximately 13% within the most fractured portion of the stimulated reservoirPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 IMAGING OF THE SOULTZ ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR

  1. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    MEASUREMENT IN FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS Mohammed Alaskar1 , Morgan Ames1 , Chong Liu2 , Steve Connor2PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University as tracers to infer reservoir properties in-situ is addressed. INTRODUCTION There is currently no practical

  2. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    be able to be maintained for more than 30 years with small decreases in reservoir pressure and temperaturePROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University RESERVOIR MODEL OF THE TAKIGAMI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, OITA, JAPAN Saeid Jalilinasrabady1 , Ryuichi Itoi1

  3. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    for more than 30 years with small decreases in reservoir pressure and temperature in the production zonePROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR, OITA, JAPAN Saeid Jalilinasrabady1 , Ryuichi Itoi1 , Hiroki Gotoh2 , Toshiaki Tanaka1 1

  4. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    a geothermal or EGS reservoir. Fracture surface area, however, is among the most crucial data requiredPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University AND EGS RESERVOIRS Peter Rose1 , David Riasetto2 , Jacqueline Siy2 , Michael Bartl2 , Paul Reimus3

  5. Imaging hydraulic fractures in a geothermal reservoir Bruce R. Julian,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    .5 ± 0.7 mm/year of dextral shear [Monastero et al., 2005]. The geothermal area has been exploited sinceClick Here for Full Article Imaging hydraulic fractures in a geothermal reservoir Bruce R. Julian,1,2 Gillian R. Foulger,3 Francis C. Monastero,4 and Steven Bjornstad5 Received 30 September 2009; revised 11

  6. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    study sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), The Future of Geothermal Energy (MIT, 2006 level geothermal systems model to enable the US Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies ProgramPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

  7. INJECTION AND THERMAL BREAKTHROUGH IN FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    injection into a fractured reservoir system. A reservoirIn the case of fractured reservoirs, Equations (25) and (26)c ww q a >> For fractured reservoirs, the former expression

  8. STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM ("GREMP") -DECEMBER, 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, J. H.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    geothermal wellhead enthalpies were reviewed. A mixing tee condenser was recom- mended for use when cooling ,

  9. EXPERIMENTAL VERIFICATION OF THE LOAD-FOLLOWING POTENTIAL OF A HOT DRY ROCK GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EXPERIMENTAL VERIFICATION OF THE LOAD-FOLLOWING POTENTIAL OF A HOT DRY ROCK GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR. The objective of this cyclic load-following experiment was to investigate the performance of the reservoir, this series of cyclic flow tests is referred to as the Load-Following Experiment, with the objective

  10. Geothermal Resource Analysis and Structure of Basin and Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Blackwell; Kenneth Wisian; Maria Richards; Mark Leidig; Richard Smith; Jason McKenna

    2003-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Publish new thermal and drill data from the Dizie Valley Geothermal Field that affect evaluation of Basin and Range Geothermal Resources in a very major and positive way. Completed new geophysical surveys of Dizie Valley including gravity and aeromagnetics and integrated the geophysical, seismic, geological and drilling data at Dizie Valley into local and regional geologic models. Developed natural state mass and energy transport fluid flow models of generic Basin and Range systems based on Dizie Valley data that help to understand the nature of large scale constraints on the location and characteristics of the geothermal systems. Documented a relation between natural heat loss for geothermal and electrical power production potential and determined heat flow for 27 different geothermal systems. Prepared data set for generation of a new geothermal map of North American including industry data totaling over 25,000 points in the US alone.

  11. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University along a borehole at the site was consistent with results from FMI and PTS logging. INTRODUCTION

  12. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University and maximum allowable gradients. Included in the tool is site selection for separators and pipeline gathering

  13. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University extent of the Doughnut Hole, to image concurrent changes in the local velocity structure, and to describe

  14. Exploration ofr geothermal resources in Dixie Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parchman, W.L.; Knox, J.W.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A case history of SUNEDCO's exploratory efforts, which ultimately led to the drilling and discovery of the Dixie Valley goethermal field, is presented. The geochemistry from three active lot springs in the area: Dixie Hot Springs, South Hot Springs, and Hyder Hot Springs, was examined. Two heat flow drilling programs were conducted at Dixie Hot Springs consisting of 45 temperature gradient holes ranging in depth from 30 to 1500 ft. From this program a heat-flow anomaly was mapped extending along the Stillwater Range front in which temperature gradients are greater than 100/sup 0/c/Km. in 1978, the number 1 SW Lamb well was drilled on a 152 acre farmout from Chevron. The well was completed as a geothermal producer in a zone of fractured volcanic rocks. Since then, five additional geothermal producing wells were completed within the anomalous area. (MJF)

  15. World Geothermal Congress, Melbourne, Australia, 19-25 April, 2015 TOMO4D: Temporal Changes in Reservoir Structure at Geothermal Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    World Geothermal Congress, Melbourne, Australia, 19-25 April, 2015 TOMO4D: Temporal Changes in Reservoir Structure at Geothermal Areas Bruce Julian, Gillian Foulger, Andrew Sabin, Najwa Mhana Temporal geothermal areas, California, using three-dimensional local-earthquake tomography repeated on a year

  16. Nevada manufacturer installing geothermal power plant | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferAprilOverview | Department of1-93 JulyDepartment ofNevadaAn

  17. Exploration for Geothermal Resources in Dixie Valley, Nevada- Case History

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 NoEurope BV Jump to: navigation, searchCleanExcessNevada || Open

  18. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 3, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    change and permeability variations caused by rock failure is much interest in geothermal reservoir. Cold of numerical experiments have been carried out to study the impact of cold water injection on the reservoir

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University--heat source, thermal/hydraulic insulation, reservoir potential, and working fluid. These four factors. Combining these data with precision surface heat flow measurements allows the prediction of temperature

  20. STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING RESEARCH PROJECTS SUPPORTED BY USDOE/DIVISION OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, J.H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BY USDOE/DIVISION OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY J J. H. Howard and W.BY USWE/DIVISION O GEOTHERMAL ENERGY F Berkeley, CaliforniaWE), Division of Geothermal Energy (mS) proposed that

  1. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    TO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING: CHARACTERIZATION OF FRACTURED RESERVOIRS Tsuneo Ishido1 , Yuji Nishi2 the possibility of characterizing fractured reservoirs using a combination of pressure and self the so-called EKP-postprocessor (Ishido and Pritchett, 1996) to apply it to fractured reservoirs

  2. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 HYDRAULIC FRACTURING OF NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS reservoirs, especially hot fractured rock or enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) reservoirs, has usually relied-induced dilation, the conductivity of the natural fractures is enhanced and a higher-permeability reservoir

  3. Our Evolving Knowledge Of Nevada's Geothermal Resource Potential | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York: EnergyOuachita Electric Coop Corp JumpEnergy

  4. Nevada Geothermal Operating Company LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jump to:Neppel Wind Power ProjectNeutronGeothermal Operating

  5. Northern Nevada Geothermal Exploration Strategy Analysis | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellence Seed LLC Jump to: navigation, search

  6. Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: EnergyEnergyPPCR) JumpAirWork (WaterStormwater General

  7. RAPID/Geothermal/Water Use/Nevada | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation Texas < RAPID‎ |UseHawaii

  8. RAPID/Geothermal/Well Field/Nevada | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation Texas <Field <

  9. RAPID/Overview/Geothermal/Exploration/Nevada | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation Texas <FieldSiting/ColoradoMontana

  10. Active Management of Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Buscheck, Thomas A.

    The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. Based on a range of well schemes, techno-economic analyses of the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) are conducted to determine the economic benefits of integrating GCS with geothermal energy production. In addition to considering CO2 injection, reservoir analyses are conducted for nitrogen (N2) injection to investigate the potential benefits of incorporating N2 injection with integrated geothermal-GCS, as well as the use of N2 injection as a potential pressure-support and working-fluid option. Phase 1 includes preliminary environmental risk assessments of integrated geothermal-GCS, with the focus on managing reservoir overpressure. Phase 1 also includes an economic survey of pipeline costs, which will be applied in Phase 2 to the analysis of CO2 conveyance costs for techno-economics analyses of integrated geothermal-GCS reservoir sites. Phase 1 also includes a geospatial GIS survey of potential integrated geothermal-GCS reservoir sites, which will be used in Phase 2 to conduct sweet-spot analyses that determine where promising geothermal resources are co-located in sedimentary settings conducive to safe CO2 storage, as well as being in adequate proximity to large stationary CO2 sources.

  11. Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2010 Bali, Indonesia, 25-29 April 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2010 Bali, Indonesia, 25-29 April 2010 1 Characterizing Structural Controls of Geothermal Reservoirs in the Great Basin, USA, and Western Turkey: Developing 89557, USA 2 Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557, USA 3 BRGM

  12. RAPID/Geothermal/Transmission Siting & Interconnection/Nevada | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethod JumpGeorgia:ColoradoNevadaTexasInformation

  13. GEOTHERMAL PILOT STUDY FINAL REPORT: CREATING AN INTERNATIONAL GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMMUNITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bresee, J. C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B. Direct Application of Geothermal Energy . . . . . . . . .Reservoir Assessment: Geothermal Fluid Injection, ReservoirD. E. Appendix Small Geothermal Power Plants . . . . . . .

  14. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University been selected as an EGS demonstration site by the U. S. Department of Energy. This paper summarizes/University of Utah, U.S. Geothermal Inc. and Apex HiPoint Reservoir Engineering. The primary objective

  15. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    and extraction operations in a fractured geothermal reservoir. PORO-THERMOELASTIC DISPLACEMENT DISCONTINUITYPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 SIMULATION OF FLUID FLOW IN FRACTURED PORO

  16. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 30 -February 1, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    derived from natural brines circulating within a deep fractured granite reservoir. Such scalingPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University as a self-cleaning of the fracture network during geothermal production. In parallel, many research works

  17. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University RESERVOIR: THE STUDY CASE OF CALCITE IN THE SOULTZ-SOUS-FORĘTS ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM Ronan L. Hébert1 available data (petrography, mineralogy, fracture zones, flow pathways, etc...). The relationship between

  18. Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | RoadmapRenewableGeothermal Field | Open Energy

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 DISTRIBUTION OF ARSENIC IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS.com ABSTRACT Distribution of Arsenic in geothermal waters in Sabalan area has been studied. In all samples on the distribution of As in the main hot springs and deep reservoir wells of Sabalan geothermal field

  20. Proceedings of the technical review on advances in geothermal reservoir technology---Research in progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lippmann, M.J. (ed.)

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This proceedings contains 20 technical papers and abstracts describing most of the research activities funded by the Department of Energy (DOE's) Geothermal Reservoir Technology Program, which is under the management of Marshall Reed. The meeting was organized in response to several requests made by geothermal industry representatives who wanted to learn more about technical details of the projects supported by the DOE program. Also, this gives them an opportunity to personally discuss research topics with colleagues in the national laboratories and universities.

  1. GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANGEMENT PROGRAM PLAN (GREMP PLAN)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloomster, C.H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assess existing economic evaluation methods from othermerits of existing economic evaluation methods and developVI: ECONOMICS Background Economic evaluation of, geothermal

  2. FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL...

  3. Geothermal Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    numerical models are used to establish basic qualitative relationships between structure, heat input, and permeability distribution, and the resulting geothermal system. A series...

  4. Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore and Reservoir Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roland N. Horne, Kewen Li, Mohammed Alaskar, Morgan Ames, Carla Co, Egill Juliusson, Lilja Magnusdottir

    2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report highlights the work that was done to characterize fractured geothermal reservoirs using production data. That includes methods that were developed to infer characteristic functions from production data and models that were designed to optimize reinjection scheduling into geothermal reservoirs, based on these characteristic functions. The characterization method provides a robust way of interpreting tracer and flow rate data from fractured reservoirs. The flow-rate data are used to infer the interwell connectivity, which describes how injected fluids are divided between producers in the reservoir. The tracer data are used to find the tracer kernel for each injector-producer connection. The tracer kernel describes the volume and dispersive properties of the interwell flow path. A combination of parametric and nonparametric regression methods were developed to estimate the tracer kernels for situations where data is collected at variable flow-rate or variable injected concentration conditions. The characteristic functions can be used to calibrate thermal transport models, which can in turn be used to predict the productivity of geothermal systems. This predictive model can be used to optimize injection scheduling in a geothermal reservoir, as is illustrated in this report.

  5. Geological control on the reservoir characteristics of Olkaria West Geothermal Field, Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omenda, Peter A.

    1994-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The reservoir of the West Olkaria Geothermal Field is hosted within tuffs and the reservoir fluid is characterized by higher concentrations of reservoir CO{sub 2} (10,000-100,000 mg/kg) but lower chloride concentrations of about 200 mg/kg than the East and North East Fields. The West Field is in the outflow and main recharge area of the Olkaria geothermal system. Permeability is generally low in the West Field and its distribution is strongly controlled by the structures. Fault zones show higher permeability with wells drilled within the structures havin larger total mass outputs. However, N-S and NW-SE faults are mainly channels for cold water downflow into the reservoir. Well feeder zones occur mostly at lava-tuff contacts; within fractured lava flows and at the contacts of intrusives and host rocks.

  6. Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Research. Fourth annual report, October 1, 1983-September 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reservoir definition research consisted of well test analysis and bench-scale experiments. Well testing included both single-well pressure drawdown and buildup testing, and multiple-well interference testing. The development of new well testing methods continued to receive major emphasis during the year. Work included a project on multiphase compressibility, including the thermal content of the rock. Several projects on double-porosity systems were completed, and work was done on relative-permeability. Heat extraction from rock will determine the long-term response of geothermal reservoirs to development. The work in this task area involved a combination of physical and mathematical modeling of heat extraction from fractured geothermal reservoirs. International cooperative research dealt with adsorption of water on reservoir cores, the planning of tracer surveys, and an injection and tracer test in the Los Azufres fields. 32 refs.

  7. Active Management of Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Buscheck, Thomas A.

    The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. This submittal contains input and output files of the reservoir model analyses. A reservoir-model "index-html" file was sent in a previous submittal to organize the reservoir-model input and output files according to sections of the FY1 Final Report to which they pertain. The recipient should save the file: Reservoir-models-inputs-outputs-index.html in the same directory that the files: Section2.1.*.tar.gz files are saved in.

  8. Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs: FY1 Final Report

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Buscheck, Thomas A.

    The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. This submittal contains input and output files of the reservoir model analyses. A reservoir-model "index-html" file was sent in a previous submittal to organize the reservoir-model input and output files according to sections of the FY1 Final Report to which they pertain. The recipient should save the file: Reservoir-models-inputs-outputs-index.html in the same directory that the files: Section2.1.*.tar.gz files are saved in.

  9. Application of (U-Th)/He thermochronometry as a geothermal exploration tool in extensional tectonic settings: the Wassuk Range, Hawthorne, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorynski, Kyle; Stockli, Daniel F.; Walker, J. Douglas; Sabin, Andrew

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with hot geothermal fluids. Apatite cooling ages from the footwall of the Wassuk Range, Hawthorne, Nevada have identified the presence of a known geothermal anomaly and associated struc- tural complexities. The most recent pulse of exhumation along... helium ages from the central Wassuk Range front clearly identify the presence of a geothermal cell (Figure 3.). Range front apatite cooling ages range between 15.5 and 1.9 Ma where the youngest ages correspond to those samples flanking the geothermal...

  10. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-First Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 30-February 1, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -well system and to create an enhanced permeability fractured rock reservoir by hydraulic stimulations. DuePROCEEDINGS, Thirty-First Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 30-February 1, 2006 SGP-TR-179 CREATION OF AN HDR RESERVOIR AT 5000 M DEPTH

  11. APPLICATIONS OF GEOTHERMALLY- PRODUCED COLLOIDAL SILICA IN RESERVOIR...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Acknowledgment This work was sponsored by the Geothermal Technologies Office in the Department of Energy. 4 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. Project...

  12. Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS; HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; USA Authors Applegate, J.K.; Donaldson, P.R.; Hinkley, D.L.; Wallace and T.L. Published...

  13. An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Los Humeros Geothermal Reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Both reservoirs seem to be separated by a vitreous tuff lithological unit, but hydraulic connectivity occurs through faults and fractures of the system, allowing deep steam...

  14. Geothermal reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  15. Analysis of Injection-Induced Micro-Earthquakes in a Geothermal Steam Reservoir, The Geysers Geothermal Field, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal Field, Monograph on The Geysers GeothermalField, Geothermal Resources Council, Special Report no. 17,Subsidence at The Geysers geothermal field, N. California

  16. Nanosensors as Reservoir Engineering Tools to Map Insitu Temperature Distributions in Geothermal Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan Ames

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility of using nanosensors to measure temperature distribution and predict thermal breakthrough in geothermal reservoirs is addressed in this report. Four candidate sensors were identified: melting tin-bismuth alloy nanoparticles, silica nanoparticles with covalently-attached dye, hollow silica nanoparticles with encapsulated dye and impermeable melting shells, and dye-polymer composite time-temperature indicators. Four main challenges associated with the successful implementation of temperature nanosensors were identified: nanoparticle mobility in porous and fractured media, the collection and detection of nanoparticles at the production well, engineering temperature sensing mechanisms that are both detectable and irreversible, and inferring the spatial geolocation of temperature measurements in order to map temperature distribution. Initial experiments were carried out to investigate each of these challenges. It was demonstrated in a slim-tube injection experiment that it is possible to transport silica nanoparticles over large distances through porous media. The feasibility of magnetic collection of nanoparticles from produced fluid was evaluated experimentally, and it was estimated that 3% of the injected nanoparticles were recovered in a prototype magnetic collection device. An analysis technique was tailored to nanosensors with a dye-release mechanism to estimate temperature measurement geolocation by analyzing the return curve of the released dye. This technique was used in a hypothetical example problem, and good estimates of geolocation were achieved. Tin-bismuth alloy nanoparticles were synthesized using a sonochemical method, and a bench heating experiment was performed using these nanoparticles. Particle growth due to melting was observed, indicating that tin-bismuth nanoparticles have potential as temperature nanosensors

  17. Analysis of Injection-Induced Micro-Earthquakes in a Geothermal Steam Reservoir, The Geysers Geothermal Field, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Renewable Energy, Geothermal Technologies Program, ofwith energy extraction at The Geysers geothermal field. We

  18. GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANGEMENT PROGRAM PLAN (GREMP PLAN)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloomster, C.H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    r i b u t i o n i n the Cerro Prieto geothermal f i e l d ,used a t The Geysers, Cerro Prieto, and Wairakei t o i n c ri.e. , Larderello, Cerro Prieto and various Japanese fields.

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    to strong temperature gradients (Bundschuh and Suárez, 2010), as happens during the injection of cold fluids. This mechanism is of great importance in enhanced oil reservoirs and geothermal systems, when the injected cold

  20. Julian, B.R. and G.R. Foulger, Improved Methods for Mapping Permeability and Heat sources in Geothermal Areas using Microearthquake Data, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    Systems (EGS) experiments and other geothermal operations. With support from the Dept. of Energy, we in Geothermal Areas using Microearthquake Data, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering and Heat sources in Geothermal Areas using Microearthquake Data Bruce R. Julian§ U. S. Geological Survey

  1. Trace-element geochemistry of gradient hole cuttings: Beowawe geothermal area, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, O.D.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multielement geochemical analysis of drill cuttings from 26 shallow temperature-gradient drill holes and of surface rock samples reveals trace element distributions developed within these rocks as a consequence of chemical interaction with thermal fluid within the Beowawe geothermal area. The presently discharging thermal fluids are dilute in all components except silica, suggesting that the residence time of these fluids within the thermal reservoir has been short and that chemical interaction with the reservoir rock minimal. Interaction between these dilute fluids and rocks within the system has resulted in the development of weak chemical signatures. The absence of stronger signatures in rocks associated with the present system suggests that fluids have had a similar dilute chemistry for some time. The spatial distribution of elements commonly associated with geothermal systems, such as As, Hg and Li, and neither laterally nor vertically continuous. This suggests that there is not now, nor has there been in the past, pervasive movement of thermal fluid throughout the sampled rock but, instead, that isolated chemical anomalies represent distinct fluid-flow chanels. Discontinuous As, Li and Hg concentrations near White Canyon to the east of the presently active surface features record the effects of chemical interaction of rocks with fluids chemically unlike the presently discharging fluids. The observed trace element distributions suggest that historically the Beowawe area has been the center of more than one hydrothermal event and that the near-surface portion of the present hot-water geothermal system is controlled by a single source fracture, the Malpais Fault, or an intersection of faults at the sinter terrace.

  2. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 THERMAL ENERGY RECOVERY FROM ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL is quantifying Rg, the geothermal recovery factor, which is defined as the ratio of produced thermal energy to the thermal energy contained in the fractured volume comprising the reservoir. One approach to EGS resource

  3. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    plants, a pipe system is used to gather fluids from production wells and transport them to a power plant there are several geothermal power plants operational and there is potential for more. Because of the nature of the geothermal reservoirs involved, the steam supply systems for these power plants are normally designed for two

  4. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University Geothermal wells producing acidic fluid have been abandoned because of high corrosion potential on casing, they have been abandoned or converted to injection wells in spite of their sufficient productivity

  5. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    is not an active volcanic region or plate boundary .Geothermal source might be from different source. The source of hot dry rock and geothermal reservoir and flow regimes have not be extensively explored. The Vijayan to geology of the study area with special emphasize on the dolerite dike which may have been the source

  6. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    a possible means of measuring thermal drawdown in a geothermal system before significant cooling occursPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University cooling. Results indicate that while the sensitivity of the method as generally proposed is low, it may

  7. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    for lifetimes between 30-100 years, with a 90% confidence interval of 98-1200 MWth. Lumped parameter modeling the past 20 years. INTRODUCTION The OBGA comprises the regions of low temperature geothermal activityPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

  8. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and the resource has been cooled by the 30 years of reinjection. The thermal breakthrough (Tb) is expected to occurPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University AT THE SCALE OF THE GEOTHERMAL HEATING DOUBLET IN THE PARIS BASIN, FRANCE. M.Le Brun1* , V.Hamm1 , S.Lopez1 , P

  9. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    transferred to Zorlu Energy Group for 30 years. After this transfer, the Group has started to work on bothPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University OF KIZILDERE GEOTHERMAL FIELD IN TURKEY Füsun S. Tut Haklidir, Taylan Akin, Aygün Güney, Aye Alpagut Bükülmez

  10. PROCEEDINGS, Twenty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 28-30, 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . INTRODUCTION During on a previous geothermal exploration phase done 30 years ago in the Lamentin areaPROCEEDINGS, Twenty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 28-30, 2002 SGP-TR-171 PRELIMINARY GEOLOGICAL RESULTS OF RECENT EXPLORATORY

  11. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    of the flowing fluid at the 9 newly drilled deep wells in Kizildere Geothermal Field. Figure 1 Location map as the dynamic properties of the fluid flowing both through the wellbore and the reservoir. It is known that Petroleum and Geothermal fluids have similar properties in terms of well testing. In this regard, almost

  12. Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Alan E.; Copp, John F.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas concentrations and ratios in 110 analyses of geothermal fluids from 47 wells in the Coso geothermal system illustrate the complexity of this two-phase reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions. Relationships in soluble and insoluble gases preclude derivation of these waters from a common parent by boiling or condensation alone. These two regions may represent two limbs of fluid migration away from an area of two-phase upwelling. During migration, the upwelling fluids mix with chemically evolved waters of moderately dissimilar composition. CO{sub 2} rich fluids found in the limb in the southeastern portion of the Coso field are chemically distinct from liquids in the northern limb of the field. Steam-rich portions of the reservoir also indicate distinctive gas compositions. Steam sampled from wells in the central and southwestern Coso reservoir is unusually enriched in both H{sub 2}S and H{sub 2}. Such a large enrichment in both a soluble and insoluble gas cannot be produced by boiling of any liquid yet observed in single-phase portions of the field. In accord with an upflow-lateral mixing model for the Coso field, at least three end-member thermal fluids having distinct gas and liquid compositions appear to have interacted (through mixing, boiling and steam migration) to produce the observed natural state of the reservoir.

  13. Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measurement of Thermal Evolution in Geothermal Reservoirs: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; Laurence C. Hull; George D. Redden

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The injection of cold fluids into engineered geothermal system (EGS) and conventional geothermal reservoirs may be done to help extract heat from the subsurface or to maintain pressures within the reservoir (e.g., Rose et al., 2001). As these injected fluids move along fractures, they acquire heat from the rock matrix and remove it from the reservoir as they are extracted to the surface. A consequence of such injection is the migration of a cold-fluid front through the reservoir (Figure 1) that could eventually reach the production well and result in the lowering of the temperature of the produced fluids (thermal breakthrough). Efficient operation of an EGS as well as conventional geothermal systems involving cold-fluid injection requires accurate and timely information about thermal depletion of the reservoir in response to operation. In particular, accurate predictions of the time to thermal breakthrough and subsequent rate of thermal drawdown are necessary for reservoir management, design of fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting of economic return. A potential method for estimating migration of a cold front between an injection well and a production well is through application of reactive tracer tests, using chemical whose rate of degradation is dependent on the reservoir temperature between the two wells (e.g., Robinson 1985). With repeated tests, the rate of migration of the thermal front can be determined, and the time to thermal breakthrough calculated. While the basic theory behind the concept of thermal tracers has been understood for some time, effective application of the method has yet to be demonstrated. This report describes results of a study that used several methods to investigate application of reactive tracers to monitoring the thermal evolution of a geothermal reservoir. These methods included (1) mathematical investigation of the sensitivity of known and hypothetical reactive tracers, (2) laboratory testing of novel tracers that would improve method sensitivity, (3) development of a software tool for design and interpretation of reactive tracer tests and (4) field testing of the reactive tracer temperature monitoring concept.

  14. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Company, Salt Lake City, UT 84104 3 ORMAT Nevada Inc., Reno NV 89511 4 Schlumberger, Data and Consulting mineral grains, drilling induced fractures, and natural fractures. This paper describes selected geologic was drilled and then logged and analyzed using a multi-disciplinary approach to help evaluate the geothermal

  15. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    FOR PLANNING OF AN EGS STIMULATION IN THE DESERT PEAK GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEVADA Stephen H. Hickman1 and Nicholas C. Davatzes2 1 U.S. Geological Survey 345 Middlefield Road, MS977 Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA e of silicified rhyolite tuffs and metamorphosed mudstones at ambient temperatures of ~180 to 195° C. Our previous

  16. Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization-

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLCEnergy) Redirect pageonBeowawe Geothermal Field | Open

  17. Geothermal reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005)EnergyAmatitlan Geothermal Areagreenhousecompositions

  18. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 30 -February1, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University was performed during one year on one site but injection pump failure and well damage lead to abandonment of the reservoir to the injected fluid paths. MODEL DESCRIPTION In this study we carried out numerical simulations

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    an abandoned oil or gas well could be used in which case no wells need to be drilled). The disadvantagePROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University reservoir volume, a downhole heat exchanger will rapidly deplete the heat near the wellbore and cannot

  20. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    .edu ABSTRACT Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are engineered reservoirs created to economically extract heat and retention of water, gas and hydrocarbons, sequestration of wastes, the formation of ore deposits that influence heat- and mass-transfer in evolving geological reservoirs. As suggested schematically in Figure 1

  1. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    /cm2 sec up to 10-7 g/cm2 sec. The thermal evolution was calculated for up to 30,000 years. The deep and the performance of reservoir was predicted for 30 years production. Depths of the reservoir are assumed from 0 province about 30 Km southwest of Semarang, Indonesia as shown in Figure 1, is still undeveloped geothermal

  2. Geothermal low-temperature reservoir assessment in Dona Ana County, New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Icerman, L.; Lohse, R.L.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sixty-four shallow temperature gradient holes were drilled on the Mesilla Valley East Mesa (east of Interstate Highways 10 and 25), stretching from US Highway 70 north of Las Cruces to NM Highway 404 adjacent to Anthony, New Mexico. Using these data as part of the site selection process, Chaffee Geothermal, Ltd. of Denver, Colorado, drilled two low-temperature geothermal production wells to the immediate north and south of Tortugas Mountain and encountered a significant low-temperature reservoir, with a temperature of about 150{sup 0}F and flow rates of 750 to 1500 gallons per minute at depths from 650 to 1250 feet. These joint exploration activities resulted in the discovery and confirmation of a 30-square-mile low-temperature geothermal anomaly just a few miles to the east of Las Cruces that has been newly named as the Las Cruces east Mesa Geothermal Field. Elevated temperature and heat flow data suggest that the thermal anomaly is fault controlled and extends southward to the Texas border covering a 100-square-mile area. With the exception of some localized perturbations, the anomaly appears to decrease in temperature from the north to the south. Deeper drilling is required in the southern part of the anomaly to confirm the existence of commercially-exploitable geothermal waters.

  3. Deep Geothermal Reservoir Temperatures in the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho using Multicomponent Geothermometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghanashyam Neupane; Earl D. Mattson; Travis L. McLing; Carl D. Palmer; Robert W. Smith; Thomas R. Wood

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Geological survey has estimated that there are up to 4,900 MWe of undiscovered geothermal resources and 92,000 MWe of enhanced geothermal potential within the state of Idaho. Of particular interest are the resources of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) which was formed by volcanic activity associated with the relative movement of the Yellowstone Hot Spot across the state of Idaho. This region is characterized by a high geothermal gradient and thermal springs occurring along the margins of the ESRP. Masking much of the deep thermal potential of the ESRP is a regionally extensive and productive cold-water aquifer. We have undertaken a study to infer the temperature of the geothermal system hidden beneath the cold-water aquifer of the ESRP. Our approach is to estimate reservoir temperatures from measured water compositions using an inverse modeling technique (RTEst) that calculates the temperature at which multiple minerals are simultaneously at equilibrium while explicitly accounting for the possible loss of volatile constituents (e.g., CO2), boiling and/or water mixing. In the initial stages of this study, we apply the RTEst model to water compositions measured from a limited number of wells and thermal springs to estimate the regionally extensive geothermal system in the ESRP.

  4. Double Difference Earthquake Locations at the Salton Sea Geothermal Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, K L; Hutchings, L J; Bonner, B P; Foxall, W; Kasameyer, P W

    2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to report on processing of raw waveform data from 4547 events recorded at 12 stations between 2001 and 2005 by the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF) seismic network. We identified a central region of the network where vertically elongated distributions of hypocenters have previously been located from regional network analysis. We process the data from the local network by first autopicking first P and S arrivals; second, improving these with hand picks when necessary; then, using cross-correlation to provide very precise P and S relative arrival times. We used the HypoDD earthquake location algorithm to locate the events. We found that the originally elongated distributions of hypocenters became more tightly clustered and extend down the extent of the study volume at 10 Km. However, we found the shapes to depend on choices of location parameters. We speculate that these narrow elongated zones of seismicity may be due to stress release caused by fluid flow.

  5. Development of an analytical solution for thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tests in horizontally fractured reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Y.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I. (2005), Geothermal Reservoir Characterization via Thermalfor characterization of fractured geothermal reservoirs. For

  6. Julian, B.R. and G.R. Foulger, Monitoring Geothermal Processes with Microearthquake Mechanisms, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    Julian, B.R. and G.R. Foulger, Monitoring Geothermal Processes with Microearthquake Mechanisms, Thirty- Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9- 11, 2009. Monitoring Geothermal Processes with Microearthquake Mechanisms Bruce R. Julian, U. S

  7. Energy Department Finalizes Loan Guarantee for Ormat Geothermal...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Loan Guarantee for Ormat Geothermal Project in Nevada Energy Department Finalizes Loan Guarantee for Ormat Geothermal Project in Nevada September 23, 2011 - 3:37pm Addthis...

  8. 3-D Seismic Methods for Geothermal Reservoir Exploration and Assessment--Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majer, E.L.

    2003-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide variety of seismic methods covering the spectrum from DC to kilohertz have been employed at one time or the other in geothermal environments. The reasons have varied from exploration for a heat source to attempting to find individual fractures producing hot fluids. For the purposes here we will assume that overall objective of seismic imaging is for siting wells for successful location of permeable pathways (often fracture permeability) that are controlling flow and transport in naturally fractured reservoirs. The application could be for exploration of new resources or for in-fill/step-out drilling in existing fields. In most geothermal environments the challenge has been to separate the ''background'' natural complexity and heterogeneity of the matrix from the fracture/fault heterogeneity controlling the fluid flow. Ideally one not only wants to find the fractures, but the fractures that are controlling the flow of the fluids. Evaluated in this work is current state-of-the-art surface (seismic reflection) and borehole seismic methods (Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP), Crosswell and Single Well) to locate and quantify geothermal reservoir characteristics. The focus is on active methods; the assumption being that accuracy is needed for successful well siting. Passive methods are useful for exploration and detailed monitoring for in-fill drilling, but in general the passive methods lack the precision and accuracy for well siting in new or step out areas. In addition, MEQ activity is usually associated with production, after the field has been taken to a mature state, thus in most cases it is assumed that there is not enough MEQ activity in unproduced areas to accurately find the permeable pathways. The premise of this review is that there may new developments in theory and modeling, as well as in data acquisition and processing, which could make it possible to image the subsurface in much more detail than 15 years ago. New understanding of the effect of fractures on seismic wave propagation are now being applied to image fractures in gas and oil environments. It now may be appropriate to apply these methods, with modifications, to geothermal applications. It is assumed that to implement the appropriate methods an industry coupled program tightly linked to actual field cases, iterating between development and application will be pursued. The goal of this work is to evaluate the most promising methods and approaches that may be used for improved geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment. It is not a comprehensive review of all seismic methods used to date in geothermal environments. This work was motivated by a need to assess current and developing seismic technology that if applied in geothermal cases may greatly improve the chances for locating new geothermal resources and/or improve assessment of current ones.

  9. Effects of Water Injection into Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs: A Summary of Experience Worldwide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horne, Roland N.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reinjection of water into fractured geothermal reservoirs holds potential both for improvement and degradation of total energy recovery. The replacement of reservoir fluid can mean support of placement of reservoir pressures and also more efficient thermal energy recovery, but at the same time the premature invasion of reinjected water back into production wells through high permeability fractures can reduce discharge enthalpy and hence deliverability and useful energy output. Increases in reservoir pressure and maintenance of field output have been observed in operating fields, but unfortunately so too have premature thermal breakthroughs. The design of reinjection schemes, therefore, requires careful investigation into the likely effects, using field experimentation. This paper summarizes field experience with reinjection around the world, with the intention of elucidating characteristics of possible problems. The results summarized in this paper fall into three categories of interest: permeability changes dye to injection (both increases and decreases); the path followed by injected water (as indicated by tracer tests); and the thermal and hydraulic influences of injection on the reinjection well itself and on surrounding producers. [DJE-2005

  10. Pressure analysis of the hydromechanical fracture behaviour in stimulated tight sedimentary geothermal reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wessling, S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The future of Geothermal Energy. Massachusetts Institute ofthe exploitation of geothermal energy from such rocks. Wemethod to extract geothermal energy from tight sedimentary

  11. Effects of capillarity and vapor adsorption in the depletion of vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs in natural (undisturbed) conditions contain water as both vapor and liquid phases. The most compelling evidence for the presence of distributed liquid water is the observation that vapor pressures in these systems are close to saturated vapor pressure for measured reservoir temperatures (White et al., 1971; Truesdell and White, 1973). Analysis of natural heat flow conditions provides additional, indirect evidence for the ubiquitous presence of liquid. From an analysis of the heat pipe process (vapor-liquid counterflow) Preuss (1985) inferred that effective vertical permeability to liquid phase in vapor-dominated reservoirs is approximately 10{sup 17} m{sup 2}, for a heat flux of 1 W/m{sup 2}. This value appears to be at the high end of matrix permeabilities of unfractured rocks at The Geysers, suggesting that at least the smaller fractures contribute to liquid permeability. For liquid to be mobile in fractures, the rock matrix must be essentially completely liquid-saturated, because otherwise liquid phase would be sucked from the fractures into the matrix by capillary force. Large water saturation in the matrix, well above the irreducible saturation of perhaps 30%, has been shown to be compatible with production of superheated steam (Pruess and Narasimhan, 1982). In response to fluid production the liquid phase will boil, with heat of vaporization supplied by the reservoir rocks. As reservoir temperatures decline reservoir pressures will decline also. For depletion of ''bulk'' liquid, the pressure would decline along the saturated vapor pressure curve, while for liquid held by capillary and adsorptive forces inside porous media, an additional decline will arise from ''vapor pressure lowering''. Capillary pressure and vapor adsorption effects, and associated vapor pressure lowering phenomena, have received considerable attention in the geothermal literature, and also in studies related to geologic disposal of heat generating nuclear wastes, and in the drying of porous materials. Geothermally oriented studies were presented by Chicoine et al. (1977), Hsieh and Ramey (1978, 1981), Herkelrath et al. (1983), and Nghiem and Ramey (1991). Nuclear waste-related work includes papers by Herkelrath and O'Neal (1985), Pollock (1986), Eaton and Bixler (1987), Pruess et al. (1990), Nitao (1990), and Doughty and E'ruess (1991). Applications to industrial drying of porous materials have been discussed by Hamiathy (1969) arid Whitaker (1977). This paper is primarily concerned with evaluating the impact of vapor pressure lowering (VPL) effects on the depletion behavior of vapor-dominated reservoirs. We have examined experimental data on vapor adsorption and capillary pressures in an effort to identify constitutive relationships that would be applicable to the tight matrix rocks of vapor-dominated systems. Numerical simulations have been performed to evaluate the impact of these effects on the depletion of vapor-dominated reservoirs.

  12. Water injection as a means for reducing non-condensible and corrosive gases in steam produced from vapor-dominated reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten; Spycher, Nicolas; Kneafsey, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    studies for a fractured reservoir description using theTransport in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs, Geothermics,

  13. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Sustaining the National Geothermal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sustaining the National Geothermal Data System: Considerations for a System Wide Approach and Node Maintenance, Geothermal Resources Council 37th Annual Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada,...

  14. Equation Chapter 1 Section 1PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    AND THERMAL TRANSPORT IN FRACTURED RESERVOIRS Egill Juliusson and Roland N. Horne Stanford University 367 a simulation study of tracer and thermal transport in fractured geothermal reservoirs. The motivation that in vertically fractured reservoirs the tracer signal will not suffice to fully characterize the thermal

  15. Applications of Geothermally-Produced Colloidal Silica in Reservoir Management - Smart Gels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, Jonathan

    2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) the reservoir permeability is often enhanced or created using hydraulic fracturing. In hydraulic fracturing, high fluid pressures are applied to confined zones in the subsurface usually using packers to fracture the host rock. This enhances rock permeability and therefore conductive heat transfer to the circulating geothermal fluid (e.g. water or supercritical carbon dioxide). The ultimate goal is to increase or improve the thermal energy production from the subsurface by either optimal designs of injection and production wells or by altering the fracture permeability to create different zones of circulation that can be exploited in geothermal heat extraction. Moreover, hydraulic fracturing can lead to the creation of undesirable short-circuits or fast flow-paths between the injection and extraction wells leading to a short thermal residence time, low heat recovery, and thus a short-life of the EGS. A potential remedy to these problems is to deploy a cementing (blocking, diverting) agent to minimize short-cuts and/or create new circulation cells for heat extraction. A potential diverting agent is the colloidal silica by-product that can be co-produced from geothermal fluids. Silica gels are abundant in various surface and subsurface applications, yet they have not been evaluated for EGS applications. In this study we are investigating the benefits of silica gel deployment on thermal response of an EGS, either by blocking short-circuiting undesirable pathways as a result of diverting the geofluid to other fractures; or creating, within fractures, new circulation cells for harvesting heat through newly active surface area contact. A significant advantage of colloidal silica is that it can be co-produced from geothermal fluids using an inexpensive membrane-based separation technology that was developed previously using DOE-GTP funding. This co-produced silica has properties that potentially make it useful as a fluid diversion agent for subsurface applications. Colloidal silica solutions exist as low-viscosity fluids during their “induction period” but then undergo a rapid increase in viscosity (gelation) to form a solid gel. The length of the induction period can be manipulated by varying the properties of the solution, such as silica concentration and colloid size. We believe it is possible to produce colloidal silica gels suitable for use as diverting agents for blocking undesirable fast-paths which result in short-circuiting the EGS once hydraulic fracturing has been deployed. In addition, the gels could be used in conventional geothermal fields to increase overall energy recovery by modifying flow.

  16. Applications of Geothermally-Produced Colloidal Silica in Reservoir Management - Smart Gels

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hunt, Jonathan

    In enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) the reservoir permeability is often enhanced or created using hydraulic fracturing. In hydraulic fracturing, high fluid pressures are applied to confined zones in the subsurface usually using packers to fracture the host rock. This enhances rock permeability and therefore conductive heat transfer to the circulating geothermal fluid (e.g. water or supercritical carbon dioxide). The ultimate goal is to increase or improve the thermal energy production from the subsurface by either optimal designs of injection and production wells or by altering the fracture permeability to create different zones of circulation that can be exploited in geothermal heat extraction. Moreover, hydraulic fracturing can lead to the creation of undesirable short-circuits or fast flow-paths between the injection and extraction wells leading to a short thermal residence time, low heat recovery, and thus a short-life of the EGS. A potential remedy to these problems is to deploy a cementing (blocking, diverting) agent to minimize short-cuts and/or create new circulation cells for heat extraction. A potential diverting agent is the colloidal silica by-product that can be co-produced from geothermal fluids. Silica gels are abundant in various surface and subsurface applications, yet they have not been evaluated for EGS applications. In this study we are investigating the benefits of silica gel deployment on thermal response of an EGS, either by blocking short-circuiting undesirable pathways as a result of diverting the geofluid to other fractures; or creating, within fractures, new circulation cells for harvesting heat through newly active surface area contact. A significant advantage of colloidal silica is that it can be co-produced from geothermal fluids using an inexpensive membrane-based separation technology that was developed previously using DOE-GTP funding. This co-produced silica has properties that potentially make it useful as a fluid diversion agent for subsurface applications. Colloidal silica solutions exist as low-viscosity fluids during their “induction period” but then undergo a rapid increase in viscosity (gelation) to form a solid gel. The length of the induction period can be manipulated by varying the properties of the solution, such as silica concentration and colloid size. We believe it is possible to produce colloidal silica gels suitable for use as diverting agents for blocking undesirable fast-paths which result in short-circuiting the EGS once hydraulic fracturing has been deployed. In addition, the gels could be used in conventional geothermal fields to increase overall energy recovery by modifying flow.

  17. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    or direct use applications after drilling and well testing. INTRODUCTION The Pueblo of Jemez is located, approximately one mile south of the main village of Jemez Pueblo. A 240-foot deep well was drilled in 1991 at the Indian Springs fault zone to test for the geothermal reservoir (Figure 2). The well is located right next

  18. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    energy resources such as geopressured geothermal brine (GGB) reservoirs and hot saline aquifers (HSA) can be potential clean energy resources provided the heat extraction from the subsurface is done in an economic equation for the thermal energy transport is given as follows (Eq. 4). · · here, (4) w 1 (5) 1 1 (6) (7

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    SAND PROPPANTS UNDER GEOTHERMAL CONDITIONS Daniel Brinton, Kristie McLin, Joseph Moore Energy surfaces. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was employed to determine the composition energy produced worldwide. Central to the process of creating an EGS reservoir is hydraulic fracturing

  20. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    AND RECOVERABLE THERMAL ENERGY IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS BY VOLUMETRIC METHODS Hülya Sarak, Ö. nanç Türeyen) on to stored and recoverable thermal energy estimates calculated from volumetric methods. Effects distribution function, respectively) thermal energy "reserves" from individual wells (or fields) to get "proved

  1. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    efficiently through the reservoir and to extract thermal energy at a higher rate. We present a modeling and transport calculations, consistent transfer of mass and energy between the continuum and the discrete and the resulting pressure and temperature evaluations are discussed. INTRODUCTION Geothermal Energy is one

  2. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Energy Restoration Energy Heat Engine Energy in waste Figure 1: Geothermal heat engine converting raw involves four energy streams (Figure 1): 1) the heat extracted from the reservoir, 1 Sandia National, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04- 94AL85000. i.e. the earth, 2) the heat

  3. PROCEEDINGS, Twenty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 28-30, 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and with magmatic CO2 emanations (minimum CO2 partial pressure estimated to 1 bar). Relative to a diluted sea water laterally from NW to SE at relatively low depths. No major evidence of a high temperature geothermal, 1984 and 1985 showed no major shallow evidences of the occurrence of an high temperature reservoir

  4. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    % capacity factor over a typical project life of 30 years; and (b) innovations in field management have led1 PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 FIFTY YEARS OF POWER GENERATION

  5. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    and the resource has been cooled by the 30 years of reinjection. The thermal breakthrough (Tb) is expected to occur are next to 30 years old. They would need to be restored or shut down for scaling and/or corrosion problemsPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

  6. Geothermal assessment of the MX deployment area in Nevada. Final report, April 1, 1981-April 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trexler, D.T.; Bruce, J.L.; Cates, D.; Dolan, H.H.; Covington, C.H.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary geothermal resource assessment of the MX deployment area in Nevada focused on Coyote Spring Valley in southeastern Nevada. Initially, an extensive literature search was conducted and a bibliography consisting of 750 entries was compiled covering all aspects of geology pertaining to the study area. A structural study indicates that Coyote Spring Valley lies in a tectonically active area which is favorable for the discovery of geothermal resources. Hot water may be funneled to the near-surface along an extensive fracture and fault system which appears to underlie the valley, according to information gathered during the literature search and aerial photo survey. A total of 101 shallow temperature probes were emplanted in Coyote Spring Valley. Three anomalous temperature points all lying within the same vicinity were identified in the north-central portion of the valley near a fault. A soil-mercury study also identified one zone of anomalous mercury concentrations around the north end of the Arrow Canyon Range. A literature search covering regional fluid geochemistry indicated that the three fluid samples taken from Coyote Spring Valley have a higher concentration of Na + K. During field work, seven fluid samples were collected in Coyote Spring Valley which also appear to be derived from volcanic units due to the presence of Ca-Mg or Na-K carbonate-bicarbonate. A temperature gradient study of six test water wells indicates that only one geothermal well with a temperature of 35.5/sup 0/C (96/sup 0/F) exists in the central portion of the valley at the north end of Arrow Canyon Range near the zone of anomalous soil-mercury points. A cultural assessment of Coyote Spring Valley was performed prior to field work.

  7. Geothermal resources of the western arm of the Black Rock Desert, northwestern Nevada. Part I. Geology and geophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaefer, D.H.; Welch, A.H.; Maurer, D.K.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of the geothermal potential of the western arm of the Black Rock Desert in northwestern Nevada included a compilation of existing geologic data on a detailed map, a temperature survey at 1-meter depth, a thermal-scanner survey, and gravity and seismic surveys to determine basin geometry. The temperature survey showed the effects of heating at shallow depths due to rising geothermal fluids near the known hot spring areas. Lower temperatures were noted in areas of probable near-surface ground-water movement. The thermal-scanner survey verified the known geothermal areas and showed relatively high-temperature areas of standing water and ground-water discharge. The upland areas of the desert were found to be distinctly warmer than the playa area, probably due to the low thermal diffusivity of upland areas caused by low moisture content. Surface geophysical surveys indicated that the maximum thickness of valley-fill deposits in the desert is about 3200 meters. Gravity data further showed that changes in the trend of the desert axis occurred near thermal areas. 53 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Inverse modeling and forecasting for the exploitation of the Pauzhetsky geothermal field, Kamchatka, Russia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiryukhin, A.V.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of natural-state data - Geothermal reservoir (mid-layer)of exploitation data - Geothermal reservoir (mid-layer)field data shows the Pauzhetsky geothermal reservoir has the

  9. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells: Detailed completion prognosis for geopressured-geothermal well of opportunity, prospect #2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A geopressured-geothermal test of Martin Exploration Company's Crown Zellerbach Well No. 2 will be conducted in the Tuscaloosa Trend. The Crown Zellerbach Well No. 1 will be converted to a saltwater disposal well for disposal of produced brine. The well is located in the Satsuma Area, Livingston parish, Louisiana. Eaton proposes to test the Tuscaloosa by perforating the 7 inch casing from 16,718 feet to 16,754 feet. The reservoir pressure at an intermediate formation depth of 16,736 feet is anticipated to be 12,010 psi and the temperature is anticipated to be 297 F. Calculated water salinity is 16,000 ppm. The well is expected to produce a maximum of 16,000 barrels of water a day with a gas content of 51 SCF/bbl. Eaton will re-enter the test well, clean out to 17,000 feet, run production casing and complete the well. The disposal well will be re-entered and completed in the 9-5/8 inch casing for disposal of produced brine. Testing will be conducted similar to previous Eaton annular flow WOO tests. An optional test from 16,462 feet to 16,490 feet may be performed after the original test and will require a workover with a rig on location to perform the plugback. The surface production equipment utilized on previous tests will be utilized on this test. The equipment has worked satisfactorily and all parties involved in the testing are familiar with its operation. Weatherly Engineering will operate the test equipment. The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) and Mr. Don Clark will handle sampling, testing and reservoir engineering evaluation, respectively. wireline work required will be awarded on basis of bid evaluation. At the conclusion of the test period, the D.O.E. owned test equipment will be removed from the test site, the test and disposal wells plugged and abandoned and the sites restored to the satisfaction of all parties.

  10. Expanding Geothermal Resource Utilization in Nevada through Directed Research and Public Outreach

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project entails finding and assessing geothermal systems to: Increase geothermal development through research and outreach; Reduce risk in drill target selection, thus reducing project development costs; and Recent research includes development of shallow temperature surveys, seismic methods, aerial photography, field structural geology.

  11. Mining earth's heat: development of hot-dry-rock geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pettitt, R.A.; Becker, N.M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy-extraction concept of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Program, as initially developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, is to mine this heat by creating a man-made reservoir in low-permeability, hot basement rock. This concept has been successfully proven at Fenton Hill in northern New Mexico by drilling two holes to a depth of approximately 3 km (10,000 ft) and a bottom temperature of 200/sup 0/C (392/sup 0/F), then connecting the boreholes with a large-diametervertical hydraulic fracture. Water is circulated down one borehole, heated by the hot rock, and rises up the second borehole to the surface where the heat is extracted and the cooled water is reinjected into the underground circulation loop. This system has operated for a cumulative 416 days during engineering and reservoir testing. An energy equivalent of 3 to 5 MW(t) was produced without adverse environmental problems. During one test, a generator was installed in the circulation loop and produced 60 kW of electricity. A second-generation system, recently drilled to 4.5 km (15,000 ft) and temperatures of 320/sup 0/C (608/sup 0/F), entails creating multiple, parallel fractures between a pair of inclined boreholes. This system should produce 5 to 10 MW(e) for 20 years. Significant contributions to underground technology have been made through the development of the program.

  12. Numerical modeling of water injection into vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in heterogeneous fractured reservoirs in three dimensions,others employed a fractured reservoir description, using theused for the fractured reservoir problem are given in Table

  13. Microhole arrays for improved heat mining from enhanced geothermal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finsterle, S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lowers reservoir explo- ration, characterization costs. Oilthe characterization of the geothermal reservoir properties.

  14. Geothermal reservoir simulation to enhance confidence in predictions for nuclear waste disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal System: the Cerro Prieto Field, Baja California,Numerical modeling of the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field,personal communication). Cerro Prieto, Mexico The Cerro

  15. Geothermal resource assessment of the Yucca Mountain Area, Nye County, Nevada. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, T.; Buchanan, P.; Trexler, D. [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Harry Reid Center for Environmental Studies, Division of Earth Sciences; Shevenell, L., Garside, L. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Mackay School of Mines, Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment of the geothermal resources within a fifty-mile radius of the Yucca Mountain Project area was conducted to determine the potential for commercial development. The assessment includes collection, evaluation, and quantification of existing geological, geochemical, hydrological, and geophysical data within the Yucca Mountain area as they pertain to geothermal phenomena. Selected geologic, geochemical, and geophysical data were reduced to a set of common-scale digital maps using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for systematic analysis and evaluation. Available data from the Yucca Mountain area were compared to similar data from developed and undeveloped geothermal areas in other parts of the Great Basin to assess the resource potential for future geothermal development at Yucca Mountain. This information will be used in the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project to determine the potential suitability of the site as a permanent underground repository for high-level nuclear waste.

  16. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region...

  17. Energy Department Offers Conditional Commitment to Support Nevada...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Department Offers Conditional Commitment to Support Nevada Geothermal Development with Recovery Act Funds Energy Department Offers Conditional Commitment to Support Nevada...

  18. Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And...

  19. Geothermometry At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Nevada Test And...

  20. Geographic Information System At Nevada Test And Training Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Nevada...

  1. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental...

  2. Analysis of Injection-Backflow Tracer Tests in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kocabas, I.; Horne, R.N.

    1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Tracer tests have been an important technique for determining the flow and reservoir characteristics in various rock matrix systems. While the interwell tracer tests are aimed at the characterization of the regions between the wells, single-well injection-backflow tracer tests may be useful tools of preliminary evaluation, before implementing long term interwell tracer tests. This work is concerned with the quantitative evaluation of the tracer return profiles obtained from single well injection-backflow tracer tests. First, two mathematical models of tracer transport through fractures, have been reviewed. These two models are based on two different principles: Taylor Dispersion along the fracture and simultaneous diffusion in and out of the adjacent matrix. Then the governing equations for the transport during the injection-backflow tests have been solved. Finally the results were applied to field data obtained from Raft River and East Mesa geothermal fields. In order to determine the values of the parameters of the models that define the transport mechanisms through fractures a non-linear optimization technique was employed. 26 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Geothermal reservoir simulation to enhance confidence in predictions for nuclear waste disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California The Mammoth geothermal field is a single–phase, liquid–dominated field with a 40 MW power plant.

  4. 3-D Seismic Methods for Geothermal Reservoir Exploration and Assessment--Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Majer, E.L.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismological Studies at the Cerro Prieto Field: 1978-1982,Fourth Symposium on Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field,

  5. Pressure analysis of the hydromechanical fracture behaviour in stimulated tight sedimentary geothermal reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wessling, S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cooling of the fracture surfaces results in a significant opening of the fracture, which would influence the rate of geothermal

  6. Stanford Geothermal Program Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    1 Stanford Geothermal Program Final Report July 1990 - June 1996 Stanford Geothermal Program. THE EFFECTS OF ADSORPTION ON VAPOR-DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL FIELDS.1 1.1 SUMMARY? ..............................................................................................2 1.4 ADSORPTION IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS ........................................................3

  7. Exploring for hydrocarbons in geothermally and hydrothermally complex areas -- a southern Nevada example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, A.G.; Repetski, J.E. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States); Grow, J.A. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-based isograd maps using conodont color alteration indices (CAI) have been compiled and interpreted for a large area in southern Nevada that includes Yucca Mountain, the Nevada Test Site, and the Nellis Air Force Bombing and Gunnery Range. These maps were produced to evaluate the controversy about possible important mineral and (or) energy resources near Yucca Mountain, the potential burial site for high-level nuclear waste. The hydrocarbon potential of the Yucca Mountain area has been likened to that of the Railroad and Pine Valley areas, 200 km to the northeast where 35 million barrels of oil have been produced from Paleozoic and lower Tertiary strata. In 1991, two companies with no previous drilling experience in Nevada drilled three oil exploration wells within 20 km of Yucca Mountain and within or close to the Timber Mountain caldera system. No shows of oil or gas were found in these wells. The deepest well was drilled to 5,000 feet and penetrated 2,200 feet of upper Tertiary valley-fill deposits and volcanic rocks overlying an overturned sequence of Upper Cambrian and Lower Ordovician rocks having conodonts with CAI values of 5. Our new conodont sampling, however, has targeted some thermally favorable areas for hydrocarbons east of Yucca mountain, but their maturation history suggests that the potential for oil is substantially lower than in the Railroad and Pine Valley areas. Cambrian through Triassic rocks in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain have experienced temperatures too high for oil to be preserved, except for a narrow zone (20 x 100 km) northeast of Yucca Mountain, where Mississippian through Triassic rocks are just within the upper limit of the oil generating window. Most of this zone, however, lies on Federal lands that are, for now, inaccessible for a variety of security and environmental reasons.

  8. Geothermal Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geothermal energy is thermal energy generated and stored in the Earth. Geothermal energy can manifest on the surface of the Earth, or near the surface of the Earth, where humankind may harness it to serve our energy needs. Geothermal resources are reservoirs of hot water that exist at varying temperatures and depths below the Earth's surface. Wells can be drilled into these underground reservoirs to tap steam and very hot water that can be brought to the surface for a variety of uses.

  9. Geological Interpretation of Self-Potential Data from the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corwin, R.F.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    study of samples from geothermal reservoirs: Riverside,study of samples from geothermal reservoirs: petrology andat the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, in Proceedings, First

  10. The Impact of Injection on Seismicity at The Geyses, California Geothermal Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Majer, Ernest L.; Peterson, John E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Geysers, California, geothermal area, U.S. Geol. Surv.seismicity at The Geysers geothermal reservoir, Californiaseismic image of a geothermal reservoir: The Geysers,

  11. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) comparing water with CO2 as heat transmission fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Clay Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir,Transactions, Geothermal Resources Council, Vol. 28, pp.the 5-km Deep Enhanced Geothermal Reservoir at Soultz-sous-

  12. Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth to Generate

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexas Energyof 2005 atDepartmentEnhanced Geothermal

  13. Use of Geophysical Techniques to Characterize Fluid Flow in a Geothermal Reservoir

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Joint inversion of geophysical data for ground water flow imaging; Reduced the cost in geothermal exploration and monitoring; & Combined passive and active geophysical methods.

  14. Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Project Thermal Gradient Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Z. Adam Szybinski

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area is located near the eastern edge of the Sonoma Range and is positioned within the structurally complex Winnemucca fold and thrust belt of north-central Nevada. A series of approximately north-northeast-striking faults related to the Basin and Range tectonics are superimposed on the earlier structures within the project area, and are responsible for the final overall geometry and distribution of the pre-existing structural features on the property. Two of these faults, the Pumpernickel Valley fault and Edna Mountain fault, are range-bounding and display numerous characteristics typical of strike-slip fault systems. These characteristics, when combined with geophysical data from Shore (2005), indicate the presence of a pull-apart basin, formed within the releasing bend of the Pumpernickel Valley – Edna Mountain fault system. A substantial body of evidence exists, in the form of available geothermal, geological and geophysical information, to suggest that the property and the pull-apart basin host a structurally controlled, extensive geothermal field. The most evident manifestations of the geothermal activity in the valley are two areas with hot springs, seepages, and wet ground/vegetation anomalies near the Pumpernickel Valley fault, which indicate that the fault focuses the fluid up-flow. There has not been any geothermal production from the Pumpernickel Valley area, but it was the focus of a limited exploration effort by Magma Power Company. In 1974, the company drilled one exploration/temperature gradient borehole east of the Pumpernickel Valley fault and recorded a thermal gradient of 160oC/km. The 1982 temperature data from five unrelated mineral exploration holes to the north of the Magma well indicated geothermal gradients in a range from 66 to 249oC/km for wells west of the fault, and ~283oC/km in a well next to the fault. In 2005, Nevada Geothermal Power Company drilled four geothermal gradient wells, PVTG-1, -2, -3, and -4, and all four encountered geothermal fluids. The holes provided valuable water geochemistry, supporting the geothermometry results obtained from the hot springs and Magma well. The temperature data gathered from all the wells clearly indicates the presence of a major plume of thermal water centered on the Pumpernickel Valley fault, and suggests that the main plume is controlled, at least in part, by flow from this fault system. The temperature data also defines the geothermal resource with gradients >100oC/km, which covers an area a minimum of 8 km2. Structural blocks, down dropped with respect to the Pumpernickel Valley fault, may define an immediate reservoir. The geothermal system almost certainly continues beyond the recently drilled holes and might be open to the east and south, whereas the heat source responsible for the temperatures associated with this plume has not been intersected and must be at a depth greater than 920 meters (depth of the deepest well – Magma well). The geological and structural setting and other characteristics of the Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area are markedly similar to the portions of the nearby Dixie Valley geothermal field. These similarities include, among others, the numerous, unexposed en echelon faults and large-scale pull-apart structure, which in Dixie Valley may host part of the geothermal field. The Pumpernickel Valley project area, for the majority of which Nevada Geothermal Power Company has geothermal rights, represents a geothermal site with a potential for the discovery of a relatively high temperature reservoir suitable for electric power production. Among locations not previously identified as having high geothermal potential, Pumpernickel Valley has been ranked as one of four sites with the highest potential for electrical power production in Nevada (Shevenell and Garside, 2003). Richards and Blackwell (2002) estimated the total heat loss and the preliminary production capacity for the entire Pumpernickel Valley geothermal system to be at 35MW. A more conservative estimate, for

  15. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 911, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, February 9­11, 2009 SGP-TR-187 HOT DRY ROCK GEOTHERMAL ENERGY: IMPORTANT LESSONS FROM FENTON HILL Donald W. Brown Los Alamos National Laboratory P.O. Box 1663, MS-D443 Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 USA e-mail: dwb@lanl.gov ABSTRACT The concept of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy originated

  16. Exploration of the Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick Benoit; David Blackwell

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some exploration activity. Permitting activities began in Dec. 2004 for the temperature-gradient holes but took much longer than expected with all drilling permits finally being received in early August 2005. The drilling and geochemical sampling occurred in August 2005. Ten temperature gradient holes up to 500’ deep were initially planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300 to 400’ encountered temperatures close to the expected regional thermal background conditions. These four holes failed to find any evidence of a large thermal anomaly surrounding the UHCR hot springs. The fifth hole, located within a narrow part of Hot Creek Canyon, encountered a maximum temperature of 81 oF at a depth of 105’ but had cooler temperatures at greater depth. Temperature data from this hole can not be extrapolated to greater depths. Any thermal anomaly associated with the UHCR geothermal system is apparently confined to the immediate vicinity of Hot Creek Canyon where challenges such as topography, a wilderness study area, and wetlands issues will make further exploration time consuming and costly. Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all three thermometers closely agree gives the predictions added credibility. Unfortunately, the final result of this exploration is that a moderate temperature geothermal resource has been clearly identified but it appears to be restricted to a relatively small area that would be difficult to develop.

  17. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Kalina Geothermal Demonstration Project Steamboat Springs, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1999-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) to provide the DOE and other public agency decision makers with the environmental documentation required to take informed discretionary action on the proposed Kalina Geothermal Demonstration project. The EA assesses the potential environmental impacts and cumulative impacts, possible ways to minimize effects associated with partial funding of the proposed project, and discusses alternatives to DOE actions. The DOE will use this EA as a basis for their decision to provide financial assistance to Exergy, Inc. (Exergy), the project applicant. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human or physical environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  18. OPTIMIZATION OF INJECTION INTO VAPOR-DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    OPTIMIZATION OF INJECTION INTO VAPOR-DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS CONSIDERING ADSORPTION governing the behavior of vapor- dominated geothermal reservoirs. These mechanisms affect both was to determine the most effective injection strategy once these two effects are considered. Geothermal reservoir

  19. Modeling shear failure and permeability enhancement due to coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical processes in Enhanced Geothermal Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelkar, Sharad [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The connectivity and accessible surface area of flowing fractures, whether natural or man-made, is possibly the single most important factor, after temperature, which determines the feasibility of an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS). Rock deformation and in-situ stress changes induced by injected fluids can lead to shear failure on preexisting fractures which can generate microseismic events, and also enhance the permeability and accessible surface area of the geothermal formation. Hence, the ability to accurately model the coupled thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) processes in fractured geological formations is critical in effective EGS reservoir development and management strategies. The locations of the microseismic events can serve as indicators of the zones of enhanced permeability, thus providing vital information for verification of the coupled THM models. We will describe a general purpose computational code, FEHM, developed for this purpose, that models coupled THM processes during multiphase fluid flow and transport in fractured porous media. The code incorporates several models of fracture aperture and stress behavior combined with permeability relationships. We provide field scale examples of applications to geothermal systems to demonstrate the utility of the method.

  20. Analysis of Injection-Induced Micro-Earthquakes in a Geothermal Steam Reservoir, The Geysers Geothermal Field, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rutqvist, J.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study we analyze relative contributions to the cause and mechanism of injection-induced micro-earthquakes (MEQs) at The Geysers geothermal field, California. We estimated the potential for inducing seismicity by coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical analysis of the geothermal steam production and cold water injection to calculate changes in stress (in time and space) and investigated if those changes could induce a rock mechanical failure and associated MEQs. An important aspect of the analysis is the concept of a rock mass that is critically stressed for shear failure. This means that shear stress in the region is near the rock-mass frictional strength, and therefore very small perturbations of the stress field can trigger an MEQ. Our analysis shows that the most important cause for injection-induced MEQs at The Geysers is cooling and associated thermal-elastic shrinkage of the rock around the injected fluid that changes the stress state in such a way that mechanical failure and seismicity can be induced. Specifically, the cooling shrinkage results in unloading and associated loss of shear strength in critically shear-stressed fractures, which are then reactivated. Thus, our analysis shows that cooling-induced shear slip along fractures is the dominant mechanism of injection-induced MEQs at The Geysers.

  1. A History of Geothermal Energy Research and Development in the...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1976-2006 The Dixie Valley Geothermal Plant in Nevada produces 60 MW of electricity. A Roadmap for Strategic Development of Geothermal Exploration Technologies 2011 Peer Review...

  2. Evaluation of potential geothermal reservoirs in central and western New York state. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer processes geophysical well logs from central and western New York State were analyzed to evaluate the potential of subsurface formations as a source for low-temperature geothermal water. The analysis indicated that porous sandstone sections at the top of the Ordovician Theresa Formation and at the base of the Cambrian Potsdam Formation have the required depth, porosity, and permeability to act as a source for geothermal fluids over a relatively large area in the central part of the state. The fluid potential plus an advantageous geothermal gradient and the results of the test well drilled in the city of Auburn in Cayuga County suggest that low temperature geothermal energy may be a viable alternative to other more conventional forms of energy that are not indigenous to New York State.

  3. Frio sandstone reservoirs in the deep subsurface along the Texas Gulf Coast: their potential for production of geopressured geothermal energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bebout, D.G.; Loucks, R.G.; Gregory, A.R.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed geological, geophysical, and engineering studies conducted on the Frio Formation have delineated a geothermal test well site in the Austin Bayou Prospect which extends over an area of 60 square miles. A total of 800 to 900 feet of sandstone will occur between the depths of 13,500 and 16,500 feet. At leat 30 percent of the sand will have core permeabilities of 20 to 60 millidarcys. Temperature at the top of the sandstone section will be 300/sup 0/F. Water, produced at a rate of 20,000 to 40,000 barrels per day, will probably have to be disposed of by injection into shallower sandstone reservoirs. More than 10 billion barrels of water are in place in these sandstone reservoirs of the Austin Bayou Prospect; there should be approximately 400 billion cubic feet of methane in solution in this water. Only 10 percent of the water and methane (1 billion barrels of water and 40 billion cubic feet of methane) will be produced without reinjection of the waste water into the producing formation. Reservoir simulation studies indicate that 90 percent of the methane can be produced with reinjection. 106 figures.

  4. Geothermal News | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    May 16, 2013 Nevada Deploys Grid-Connected Electricity from Enhanced Geothermal Systems Ormat Technologies develops first commercial EGS project to supply electricity to the grid....

  5. Two-Stage, Integrated, Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs: An Approach for Sustainable Energy Production, CO2-Sequestration Security, and Reduced Environmental Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buscheck, T A; Chen, M; Sun, Y; Hao, Y; Elliot, T R

    2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a hybrid two-stage energy-recovery approach to sequester CO{sub 2} and produce geothermal energy at low environmental risk and low cost by integrating geothermal production with CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration (CCS) in saline, sedimentary formations. Our approach combines the benefits of the approach proposed by Buscheck et al. (2011b), which uses brine as the working fluid, with those of the approach first suggested by Brown (2000) and analyzed by Pruess (2006), using CO{sub 2} as the working fluid, and then extended to saline-formation CCS by Randolph and Saar (2011a). During stage one of our hybrid approach, formation brine, which is extracted to provide pressure relief for CO{sub 2} injection, is the working fluid for energy recovery. Produced brine is applied to a consumptive beneficial use: feedstock for fresh water production through desalination, saline cooling water, or make-up water to be injected into a neighboring reservoir operation, such as in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), where there is often a shortage of a working fluid. For stage one, it is important to find economically feasible disposition options to reduce the volume of brine requiring reinjection in the integrated geothermal-CCS reservoir (Buscheck et al. 2012a). During stage two, which begins as CO{sub 2} reaches the production wells; coproduced brine and CO{sub 2} are the working fluids. We present preliminary reservoir engineering analyses of this approach, using a simple conceptual model of a homogeneous, permeable CO{sub 2} storage formation/geothermal reservoir, bounded by relatively impermeable sealing units. We assess both the CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity and geothermal energy production potential as a function of well spacing between CO{sub 2} injectors and brine/CO{sub 2} producers for various well patterns and for a range of subsurface conditions.

  6. 3D Magnetotelluic characterization of the Coso Geothermal Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Gregory A.; Hoversten, G. Michael; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Gasperikova, Erika

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    130, 475-496. the Coso Geothermal Field, Proc.28 th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanfords ratio and porosity at Coso geothermal area, California: J.

  7. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Wells of Opportunity Program final contract report, 1980-1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geopressured-geothermal candidates for the Wells of Opportunity program were located by the screening of published information on oil industry activity and through direct contact with the oil and gas operators. This process resulted in the recommendation to the DOE of 33 candidate wells for the program. Seven of the 33 recommended wells were accepted for testing. Of these seven wells, six were actually tested. The first well, the No. 1 Kennedy, was acquired but not tested. The seventh well, the No. 1 Godchaux, was abandoned due to mechanical problems during re-entry. The well search activities, which culminated in the acceptance by the DOE of 7 recommended wells, were substantial. A total of 90,270 well reports were reviewed, leading to 1990 wells selected for thorough geological analysis. All of the reservoirs tested in this program have been restricted by one or more faults or permeability barriers. A comprehensive discussion of test results is presented.

  8. Present Status and Future Prospects of Geothermal Development in Italy with an Appendix on Reservoir Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cataldi, R.; Calamai, A.; Neri, G.; Manetti, G.

    1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper consists of two parts and an appendix. In the first part a review is made of the geothermal activity in Italy from 1975 to 1982, including electrical and non-electrical applications. Remarks then follow on the trends that occurred and the operational criteria that were applied in the same period, which can be considered a transitional period of geothermal development in Italy. Information on recent trends and development objectives up to 1990 are given in the second part of the paper, together with a summary on program activities in the various geothermal areas of Italy. The appendix specifically reviews the main reseroir engineering activities carried out in the past years and the problems likely to be faced in the coming years in developing Itallian fields.

  9. FRACTURE STIMULATION IN ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    FRACTURE STIMULATION IN ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS A REPORT SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (Principal Advisor) #12;#12;v Abstract Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are geothermal reservoirs formed

  10. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    recipients. The Australian Geothermal Energy Group (AGEG) has also seen significant changes and developments. Additionally the joint AGEG ­ Australian Geothermal Energy Association (AGEA) Geothermal Reporting Code Geothermal Energy Centre of Excellence at the University of Queensland, the Western Australian Geothermal

  11. Geothermal probabilistic cost study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orren, L.H.; Ziman, G.M.; Jones, S.C.; Lee, T.K.; Noll, R.; Wilde, L.; Sadanand, V.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tool is presented to quantify the risks of geothermal projects, the Geothermal Probabilistic Cost Model (GPCM). The GPCM model is used to evaluate a geothermal reservoir for a binary-cycle electric plant at Heber, California. Three institutional aspects of the geothermal risk which can shift the risk among different agents are analyzed. The leasing of geothermal land, contracting between the producer and the user of the geothermal heat, and insurance against faulty performance are examined. (MHR)

  12. Resource investigation of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal areas in San Bernardino, California. Part of the third year report, 1980-81, of the US Department of Energy-California State-Coupled Program for Reservoir Assessment and Confirmation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youngs, L.G.; Bezore, S.P.; Chapman, R.H.; Chase, G.W.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ninety-seven geothermal wells and springs were identified and plotted on a compiled geologic map of the 40-square-mile study area. These wells and springs were concentrated in three distinguishable resource areas: Arrowhead Hot Springs; South San Bernardino; and Harlem Hot Springs - in each of which detailed geophysical, geochemical, and geological surveys were conducted. The Arrowhead Hot Springs geothermal area lies just north of the City of San Bernardino in the San Bernardino Mountains astride a shear zone (offshoot of the San Andreas fault) in pre-Cambrian gneiss and schist. The Harlem Hot Springs geothermal area, on the east side of the City, and the south San Bernardino geothermal area, on the south side, have geothermal reservoirs in Quaternary alluvial material which overlies a moderately deep sedimentary basin bound on the southwest by the San Jacinto fault (a ground water barrier). Geothermometry calculations suggest that the Arrowhead Hot Springs geothermal area, with a maximum reservoir temperature of 142/sup 0/C, may have the highest maximum reservoir temperature of the three geothermal areas. The maximum temperature recorded by CDMG in the south San Bernardino geothermal area was 56/sup 0/C from an artesian well, while the maximum temperature recorded in the Harlem Hot Springs geothermal area was 49.5/sup 0/C at 174 meters (570 feet) in an abandoned water well. The geophysical and geological surveys delineated fault traces in association with all three of the designated geothermal areas.

  13. Induced Microearthquake Patterns in Hydrocarbon and Geothermal Reservoirs W. Scott Phillips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , triggering events are critical to generate high levels of seismic activity. At one crystalline site Key Words: induced microseismicity, geothermal, oil and gas, fluid flow, location #12;2 Introduction, such as that in which increased pore pressure reduces normal stress and causes slip (Pearson, 1981). Thus, the presence

  14. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells: Detailed completion prognosis for geopressured-geothermal well of opportunity, prospect #7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godchaux, Frank A.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is a detailed prognosis covering the acquisition, completion, drilling, testing and abandonment of the Frank A. Godchaux, III, Well No. 1 under the Wells of Opportunity Program. The well is located approximately 12 miles southeast of the city of Abbeville, Louisiana. Eaton Operating Company proposes to test a section of the Planulina sand at a depth ranging from 15,584 to 15,692 feet. The reservoir pressure is estimated to be 14,480 psi and the temperature of the formation water is expected to be 298 F. The water salinity is calculated to be 75,000 ppm. The well is expected to produce 20,000 barrels of water per day with a gas content of 44 standard cubic feet pre barrel. The well was acquired from C and K Petroleu, Inc. on March 20, 1981. C and K abandoned the well at a total depth of 16,000 feet. The well has a 7-5/8 inches liner set at 13,387 feet. Eaton proposes to set 5-1/2 inch casing at 16,000 feet and produce the well through the casing using a 2-3/8 inch tubing string for wireline protection and for pressure control. A 4,600 foot saltwater disposal well will be drilled on the site and testing will be conducted similar to previous Eaton tests. The total estimated cost to perform the work is $2,959,000. An optional test from 14,905 to 15,006 feet may be performed after the original test and will require a workover with a rig on location to perform the plugback. The surface production equipment utilized on previous Eaton WOO tests will be utilized on this test. This equipment has worked satisfactorily and all parties involved in the testing are familiar with its operation. The Institute of Gas Technology and Mr. Don Clark will handle the sampling and testing and reservoir evaluation, respectively, as on the previous Eaton tests.

  15. AN ASSESSMENT OF PRECISE SURFACE GRAVITY MEASUREMENTS FOR MONITORING THE RESPONSE OF A GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR TO EXPLOITATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grannell, R.B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the ffeld work a t the Cerro Prieto geothermal field. Normanhas been observed i n the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, w iduring our surveys a t Cerro Prieto geothermal field, where

  16. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    which has potential for a geothermal sitting at the eastern flanks INTRODUCTION The geothermal energy), which is green geothermal area and as a lesson learned to apply in the similar area in order

  17. GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIR INVESTIGATIONS OF U.S. BUREAU OF RECLAMATION LEASEHOLDS AT EAST MESA, IMPERIAL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    southwest. Much valuable reservoir data have been collectedAnalysis of pressure data gives reservoir transmissivityThe detailed data of the reservoir that are needed to

  18. Advancing reactive tracer methods for measuring thermal evolution in CO2-and water-based geothermal reservoirs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. This project aims to develop reactive tracer method for monitoring thermal drawdown in enhanced geothermal systems.

  19. Assessment of the geothermal resources of Carson-Eagle valleys and Big Smoky Valley, Nevada. First annual report, May 1, 1979-May 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trexler, D.T.; Koenig, B.A.; Flynn, T.; Bruce, J.L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two geothermal investigations were completed in three Nevada locations. The regions studied were selected from areas outlined as having direct utilization potential (Trexler and others, 1979) and included the Carson-Eagle Valley, Bis Smoky Valley and Caliente. Studies were organized around the completion of a group of tasks in each area. These tasks included: geologic reconnaissance, gravity surveys, aerial photography, fluid sampling and analysis, shallow depth temperature probe surveys, soil mercury surveys, shallow electrical resistivity measurements, and temperature gradient hole drilling. Goals of the project were to provide regional information about the nature and extent of the resources and to offer a critical evaluation of the techniques employed. Results from the work in the Carson-Eagle Valley and Big Smoky Valley are presented. (MHR)

  20. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    . While geomechanics in conventional reservoir simulator is often governed by change in pore addresses the modelling of the geomechanical effects induced by reservoir production and reinjection, the optimum production rate and the reservoir performance, reservoir geomechanics tries to capture rock

  1. Longevity evaluation for optimum development in a liquid dominated geothermal field; Effects of interaction of reservoir pressure and fluid temperature on steam production at operating conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanano, M.; Takahashi, M. (Japan Metals and Chemicals Co., Ltd., 24 Ukai, Takizawa-mura, Iwate 020-01 (JP)); Hirako, Y.; Nakamura, H. (Japan Metals and Chemicals Co., Ltd., 8-4 Koami-cho, Nihonbashi, Chuo-ku. Tokyo 103 (JP)); Fuwa, S. (Cosco Co., Ltd., 4-9-12 Takatanobaba, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160 (JP)); Itoi, R. (Geothermal Research Center, Kyushu Univ., 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga-shi, Fukuoka 816 (JP))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The steam production rate of a well at fixed operating conditions in a liquid-dominated geothermal field is reduced at first by a decline in reservoir pressure and then by a decrease in fluid temperature, if reinjected water returns to the production well. In many cases, the fluid temperature decrease reduces the steam production rate more than does the reservoir pressure decline. Those effects should therefore be taken into due account in the evaluation of the longevity of an area, because sufficient longevity and recoverable electric energy are the minimum requirements for planning field development.

  2. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    GEOTHERMAL SIPHON Edited by Hal Gurgenci Queensland Geothermal Energy Centre of Excellence School a small Workshop organised by the Queensland Geothermal Energy Centre of Excellence in Brisbane on 25. The second day of the Workshop discussed the future research strategies for the Queensland Geothermal Energy

  3. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 ARE GEOTHERMAL ENERGY RETURNS ON INVESTMENT as the investment energy for the next generation system. In the case of geothermal energy that means using on geothermal EROI of closing the loop is examined. The benefit of using geothermal energy, as compared

  4. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    OF THE GEOTHERMAL PARAMETERS OF THE GROUND IN CYPRUS FOR THE EXPLOITATION OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY AND THE IMPACT aware of the benefits of geothermal energy and in order to increase the share of energy from renewable sources consumed in heating and cooling in 2020, promotes the geothermal energy systems through a Scheme

  5. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    The concept of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) has long been recognized by geothermal energy experts as being the necessary technology for substantially increasing the contribution of geothermal energy DOE sponsored study led by MIT entitled "The Future of Geothermal Energy", hereafter referred

  6. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    are all directed at achieving the Australian Geothermal Energy Group's (AGEG) aspirational targets (the Australian Geothermal Energy Association, AGEA) and the AGEG is to see geothermal energy providing renewable energy sources by 2020. Recognising the tremendous potential of geothermal energy to provide

  7. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    tracers in the Raft River geothermal system. INTRODUCTION Geothermal energy will be one component by geothermal energy, like all energy sources, will depend on a combination of viable engineering and uncertainty will be critical to the design and operation of future geothermal energy sources. This paper

  8. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    conditioning via sorption chillers and geothermal desalination. The technologies are not new in their basic

  9. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 A CONCEPTUAL MODEL FOR GEOTHERMAL ENERGY of the Caribbean islands have great potential for Geothermal Energy. These islands have been formed partially for geothermal energy. The only operating geothermal plant in the Caribbean is at Bouillante in Guadeloupe

  10. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    The Ogiri geothermal power plant located in the West Kirishima area was opened in early 1996. Nittetsu Kagoshima Geothermal Co. (NKGC) supplies the geothermal steam to the power plant with installed capacity wells were completed when the power plant started its operation (Japan Geothermal Energy Association

  11. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Carlo Simulation results, these eleven fields have 453 MWe of power generation potential and 13 876 MWt and encouraging the installation of power generating plant are underway. New geothermal legislation calls of geothermal resources and geothermal power production potential. As a first step, the geothermal inventory

  12. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    that are associated with the Northern German Basin, a geothermal power plant will need to incorporate an Enhanced to reduce the probability of downtime in such geothermal power systems in order to achieve higher plant geothermal power plants in Germany. There are three potential regions for geothermal energy production

  13. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    physics. Nowadays geothermal resources are used to get heat supply, produce electric power, and extract

  14. Comprehensive Evaluation of the Geothermal Resource Potential...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    data for the National Geothermal Database * Validate state-of-the-art reservoir simulation techniques to reduce model uncertainty and project risk 4 | US DOE Geothermal...

  15. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Fracture Characterization in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore and Reservoir Analysis Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log...

  16. Integrated Chemical Geothermometry System for Geothermal Exploration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Develop practical and reliable system to predict geothermal reservoir temperatures from integrated chemical analyses of spring and well fluids.

  17. Mise-A-La-Masse Mapping of the HGP-A Geothermal Reservoir, Hawaii | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee|MililaniMindanaoMinuanoIV Jump to:1980) | Open

  18. Hammond et al., Geothermal Resources Council Transactions, Vol. 31, 2007 Exploring the Relationship between Geothermal Resources and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Joseph V.

    Hammond et al., Geothermal Resources Council Transactions, Vol. 31, 2007 - 1 - Exploring the Relationship between Geothermal Resources and Geodetically Inferred Faults Slip Rates in the Great Basin Laboratory University of Nevada, Reno Keywords: geothermal, energy resources, Great Basin, GPS, geodesy

  19. Geologic, geochemical, and geographic controls on NORM in produced water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal reservoirs. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, R.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal wells contains natural radioactivity that ranges from several hundred to several thousand Picocuries per liter (pCi/L). This natural radioactivity in produced fluids and the scale that forms in producing and processing equipment can lead to increased concerns for worker safety and additional costs for handling and disposing of water and scale. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in oil and gas operations are mainly caused by concentrations of radium-226 ({sup 226}Ra) and radium-228 ({sup 228}Ra), daughter products of uranium-238 ({sup 238}U) and thorium-232 ({sup 232}Th), respectively, in barite scale. We examined (1) the geographic distribution of high NORM levels in oil-producing and gas-processing equipment, (2) geologic controls on uranium (U), thorium (Th), and radium (Ra) in sedimentary basins and reservoirs, (3) mineralogy of NORM scale, (4) chemical variability and potential to form barite scale in Texas formation waters, (5) Ra activity in Texas formation waters, and (6) geochemical controls on Ra isotopes in formation water and barite scale to explore natural controls on radioactivity. Our approach combined extensive compilations of published data, collection and analyses of new water samples and scale material, and geochemical modeling of scale Precipitation and Ra incorporation in barite.

  20. Detachment Faulting and Geothermal Resources - An Innovative...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resources - An Innovative Integrated Geological and Geophysical Investigation in Fish Lake Valley, Nevada Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on...

  1. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    air pollution and save conventional energy, geothermal energy as a heat source for district heating on some typical geothermal wells. 1.2 Cliamte Air temperature affects the indoor temperature through heat

  2. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    as the innovative method of geothermal development. This paper presents scenarios for heat harvesting from typical.35×1016 Mscf of natural gas. Despite these impressive figures, extraction of geothermal energy is mostly exploit only those sites that have anomalously high geothermal gradients and strong water drives ­ the so

  3. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    ), water consumption, and land use from geothermal electricity generation than from traditional fossil-fuel­based electricity generators. However, the environmental impacts from the construction of geothermal energy. INTRODUCTION It is generally recognized that electricity production from geothermal power plants releases fewer

  4. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    of the techniques that are in the "tool bag" for creating and managing Enhanced Geothermal Systems. This project is funded by the Department of Energy, Enhanced Geothermal Systems Technology Development program. The DOE in geothermal systems. Peaks in FIS data are assumed to be related to location of fractures. The working

  5. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 2010 PRESENT STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY IN TURKEY of geothermal energy in Turkey has focused mainly on district heating. The first of these systems came on line installed. Based on these recent projects it is clear that geothermal energy will contribute significantly

  6. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 FUTURE OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY Subir K. Sanyal Geotherm This paper first describes the salient features of the various types of geothermal energy resources) geopressured systems, and (6) magma energy. Of these six types, only hydrothermal systems have been

  7. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Park, CA 94025 2. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program Washington, DC e-mail: colin of energy resources, including geothermal energy. Stakeholders at all levels of government, within in the 1970s during a time of rapid development and new interest in geothermal energy. That many

  8. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    by an assessment of geothermal potential for electric generation on Hammam Faraun hot spring. Keywords: geothermal of the geothermal potential for the electric generation of the Hammam Faraun hot spring. GEOLOGICAL & GEOCHEMICAL is characterized by superficial thermal manifestations including a cluster of hot springs with varied temperatures

  9. STATE-OF-THE-ART OF MODELS FOR GEOTHERMAL RECOVERY PROCESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent interest in geothermal energy development hasassociated with a geothermal energy reservoir are describeddevelopment and use of geothermal energy. Many ex- periments

  10. Rock failure during massive hydraulic stimulation of the Baca location geothermal reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, C.; Keppler, H.; Albright, J.; Potter, R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analyses of microearthquake signals occurring during hydraulic stimulation provide an estimate of the size and location of the fractures thus produced. Studies of microearthquakes occurring during two large (> 10/sup 3/m/sup 3/) hydraulic stimulations of the hydrothermal reservoir at the Baca Location in the Jemez Mountains of northeastern New Mexico are reported. Both stimulations consisted of water, viscosity enhancer, and proppant. The microearthquake event rate was low but variable throughout most of the treatment. Rock failure as indicated by the distribution of the microearthquakes' foci appeared restricted to a nearly vertical NE striking zone. This orientation is in good agreement with the local earth stresses inferred from geological considerations. The second stimulation which occurred in a neighboring well was similar to the first except for a larger injected volume. The lateral extent of the detected fracture system was 600 m in both stimulations.

  11. Factors controlling reservoir quality in tertiary sandstones and their significance to geopressured geothermal production. Annual report, May 1, 1979-May 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loucks, R.G.; Richmann, D.L.; Milliken, K.L.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Differing extents of diagenetic modification is the factor primarily responsible for contrasting regional reservoir quality of Tertiary sandstones from the Upper and Lower Texas Gulf Coast. Detailed comparison of Frio sandstones from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury Dome area, Brazoria County, and Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area, Hidalgo County, reveals that extent of diagenetic modification is most strongly influenced by (1) detrital mineralogy and (2) regional geothermal gradients. Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area are less stable, chemically and mechanically, than Frio sandstones from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury dome area. Vicksburg sandstones are mineralogically immature and contain greater proportions of feldspars and rock fragments than do Frio sandstones. Thr reactive detrital assemblage of Vicksubrg sandstones is highly susceptible to diagenetic modification. Susceptibility is enhanced by higher than normal geothermal gradients in the McAllen Ranch Field area. Thus, consolidation of Vicksburg sandstones began at shallower depth of burial and precipitation of authigenic phases (especially calcite) was more pervasive than in Frio sandstones. Moreover, the late-stage episode of ferroan calcite precipitation that occluded most secondary porosity in Vicksburg sandstones did not occur significantly in Frio sandstones. Therefore, regional reservoir quality of Frio sandstones from Brazoria County is far better than that characterizing Vicksburg sandstones from Hidalgo County, especially at depths suitable for geopressured geothermal energy production.

  12. Modeling studies of heat transfer and phase distribution in two-phase geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, C.H.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Truesdell, A.H. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase distribution as well as mass flow and heat transfer behavior in two-phase geothermal systems have been studied by numerical modeling. A two-dimensional porous-slab model was used with a non-uniform heat flux boundary conditions at the bottom. Steady-state solutions are obtained for the phase distribution and heat transfer behavior for cases with different mass of fluid (gas saturation) in place, permeabilities, and capillary pressures. The results obtained show very efficient heat transfer in the vapor-dominated zone due to the development of heat pipes and near-uniform saturations. The phase distribution below the vapor-dominated zone depends on permeability. For relatively high-permeability systems, single-phase liquid zones prevail, with convection providing the energy throughput. For lower permeability systems, a two-phase liquid-dominated zone develops, because single-phase liquid convection is not sufficient to dissipate heat released from the source. These results are consistent with observations from the field, where most high-temperature liquid-dominated two-phase systems have relatively low permeabilities e.g. Krafla, Iceland; Kenya; Baca, New Mexico. The numerical results obtained also show that for high heat flow a high-temperature single-phase vapor zone can develop below a typical (240 C) vapor-dominated zone, as has recently been found at the Geysers, California, and Larderello, Italy.

  13. FRAC-STIM: A Physics-Based Fracture Simulation, /reservoir Flow...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Simulator track 4: enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) | geothermal 2015 peer review Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore and Reservoir Analysis...

  14. Stanford Geothermal Program Tnterdisciplinary Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Stanford Geothermal Program Tnterdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences Stanford University Stanford, California A LABORATORY MODEL OF STWLATED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS by A. Hunsbedt P. Kruger created by artificial stimulation of geothermal reservoirs has been con- structed. The model has been used

  15. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    -mail: hector.carlos.pulido@pemex.com ABSTRACT Complex reservoir geometries can influence the results obtained

  16. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References J. W....

  17. Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Salt Wells Area...

  18. Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  19. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At...

  20. Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geodetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful...

  1. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Exploration...

  2. Field Mapping At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness...

  3. Field Mapping At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness could be...

  4. Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown...

  5. Refraction Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Heimgartner...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Heimgartner, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Refraction Survey At Central...

  6. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 34105 Stanford Geothermal, California SGP-TR-72 A RESERVOIR ENGINEERING ANALYSIS OF A VAPOR-DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL FIELD BY John Forrest Dee June 1983 Financial support was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department

  7. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459 heat sweep model for estimating energy recovery from fractured geothermal reservoirs based on early

  8. Geothermal energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renner, J.L. [Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Fall, ID (United States); Reed, M.J. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of geothermal energy (heat from the earth) has a small impact on the environmental relative to other energy sources; avoiding the problems of acid rain and greenhouse emissions. Geothermal resources have been utilized for centuries. US electrical generation began at The Geysers, California in 1960 and is now about 2300 MW. The direct use of geothermal heat for industrial processes and space conditioning in the US is about 1700 MW of thermal energy. Electrical production occurs in the western US and direct uses are found throughout the US. Typical geothermal power plants produce less than 5% of the CO{sub 2} released by fossil plants. Geothermal plants can now be configured so that no gaseous emissions are released. Sulfurous gases are effectively removed by existing scrubber technology. Potentially hazardous elements produced in geothermal brines are injected back into the producing reservoir. Land use for geothermal wells, pipelines, and power plants is small compared to land use for other extractive energy sources like oil, gas, coal, and nuclear. Per megawatt produced, geothermal uses less than one eighth the land that is used by a typical coal mine and power plant system. Geothermal development sites often co-exist with agricultural land uses like crop production or grazing.

  9. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Stanford Geothermal Program Department of Energy Resources Engineering, 367 Panama Street Stanford various strategies we have implemented or are implementing to improve the efficiency of the simulations

  10. National Geothermal Data System: Transforming the Discovery, Access, and Analytics of Data for Geothermal Exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patten, Kim [Arizona Geological Survey

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compendium of Papers from the 38th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California February 11-13, 2013 The National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) is a distributed, interoperable network of data collected from state geological surveys across all fifty states and the nation’s leading academic geothermal centers. The system serves as a platform for sharing consistent, reliable, geothermal-relevant technical data with users of all types, while supplying tools relevant for their work. As aggregated data supports new scientific findings, this content-rich linked data ultimately broadens the pool of knowledge available to promote discovery and development of commercial-scale geothermal energy production. Most of the up-front risks associated with geothermal development stem from exploration and characterization of subsurface resources. Wider access to distributed data will, therefore, result in lower costs for geothermal development. NGDS is on track to become fully operational by 2014 and will provide a platform for custom applications for accessing geothermal relevant data in the U.S. and abroad. It is being built on the U.S. Geoscience Information Network (USGIN) data integration framework to promote interoperability across the Earth sciences community. The basic structure of the NGDS employs state-of-the art informatics to advance geothermal knowledge. The following four papers comprising this Open-File Report are a compendium of presentations, from the 38th Annual Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, taking place February 11-13, 2013 at Stanford University, Stanford, California. “NGDS Geothermal Data Domain: Assessment of Geothermal Community Data Needs,” outlines the efforts of a set of nationwide data providers to supply data for the NGDS. In particular, data acquisition, delivery, and methodology are discussed. The paper addresses the various types of data and metadata required and why simple links to existing data are insufficient for promoting geothermal exploration. Authors of this paper are Arlene Anderson, US DOE Geothermal Technologies Office, David Blackwell, Southern Methodist University (SMU), Cathy Chickering (SMU), Toni Boyd, Oregon Institute of Technology’s GeoHeat Center, Roland Horne, Stanford University, Matthew MacKenzie, Uberity, Joe Moore, University of Utah, Duane Nickull, Uberity, Stephen Richard, Arizona Geological Survey, and Lisa Shevenell, University of Nevada, Reno. “NGDS User Centered Design: Meeting the Needs of the Geothermal Community,” discusses the user- centered design approach taken in the development of a user interface solution for the NGDS. The development process is research based, highly collaborative, and incorporates state-of-the-art practices to ensure a quality user interface for the widest and greatest utility. Authors of this paper are Harold Blackman, Boise State University, Suzanne Boyd, Anthro-Tech, Kim Patten, Arizona Geological Survey, and Sam Zheng, Siemens Corporate Research. “Fueling Innovation and Adoption by Sharing Data on the DOE Geothermal Data Repository Node on the National Geothermal Data System,” describes the motivation behind the development of the Geothermal Data Repository (GDR) and its role in the NGDS. This includes the benefits of using the GDR to share geothermal data of all types and DOE’s data submission process. Authors of this paper are Jon Weers, National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Arlene Anderson, US DOE Geothermal Technologies Office. Finally, “Developing the NGDS Adoption of CKAN for Domestic & International Data Deployment,” provides an overview of the “Node-In-A-Box” software package designed to provide data consumers with a highly functional interface to access the system, and to ease the burden on data providers who wish to publish data in the system. It is important to note that this software package constitutes a reference implementation and that the NGDS architecture is based on open standards, which means other server software can make resources available, a

  11. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    and around the wells? · How will injection affect to the temperature distribution in the reservoir. There is no overpressure in the reservoir. The pressure distribution is hydrostatic along the depth. Horizontal extension

  12. Geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford University. Third annual report for the period October 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is reported in the following areas: heat extraction from hydrothermal reservoirs; radon reservoir engineering; well test analysis and bench scale experiments; field applications; workshop, seminars, and technical information; reinjection technology; and seismic monitoring of vapor/liquid interfaces. (MHR)

  13. GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIR INVESTIGATIONS OF U.S. BUREAU OF RECLAMATION LEASEHOLDS AT EAST MESA, IMPERIAL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    shale lenses can strongly effect the local vertical permeability of the reservoir, leading to misinterpretation of the data.

  14. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    reservoir to obtain the probability distribution function for the stored energy ("heat in place distributions of the reservoir parameters. The data acquired during each phase of the reservoir development, and thickness are assumed based on uncertain estimates in order to calculate the probability distribution

  15. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , characterization of the reservoir is mainly accomplished by evaluation of drilling data and seismic surveys, characterization of a reservoir is difficult because direct and indirect survey data are lacking. Investigation sufficient reservoir property prognosis necessary based on quantitative data sets. Facies concepts have

  16. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    a simplified reservoir model geometry to a combination of conservative and reactive tracer data (2) using a simplified reservoir model geometry to a combination of conservative and reactive tracer data (2) using geometry, our approach attempts to fit a simple reservoir description to observed tracer test data

  17. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Australia and Western Australia, that have been established with complementary programs to achieve research for industry and government to access research services Geothermal energy development in Australia will be best and Resources SA, Petroleum and Geothermal Group GPO Box 1671 Adelaide, SA, 5000, Australia e-mail: alexandra

  18. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Geothermal Energy Centre of Excellence, The University of Queensland, Queensland 4072, Australia 2 Radiogenic, Australia 3 School of Earth Sciences, The University of Queensland, Queensland 4072, Australia e-mail: t travertine vein and breccia deposits in the CO2-rich Pamukkale and Kirsehir geothermal fields in western

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    the effectiveness of these small-scale power plants hybrid systems are to be designed or existing technologies, no geothermal power plant facility exists in Central- Eastern Europe. There are professional investors, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 GEOTHERMAL POWER PLANT CONCEPTS IN THE PANNONIAN BASIN

  20. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    city, capital of the province (Fig.1). The field has been proved to be one of the geothermal prospects in Indonesia (Hochstein and Sudarman, 2008). PT. Pertamina Geothermal Energy (PT.PGE) conducted reconnaissance not been developed yet. Thus, we have carried out geochemical survey in this area and tried to develop

  1. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    characteristics with unique problems caused by high-volume, hot water flows. This paper is an overview of state, geothermal electric plants have been built on the edges of tectonic plates where high temperature geothermal blanketing effect resulting in #12;temperatures as high as 270°C. The high-heat producing granite formations

  2. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009 SGP-TR-187 HOT ROCK GEOTHERMAL ENERGY PLAYS IN AUSTRALIA & Geothermal Group, PIRSA Level 6, 101 Grenfell St., Adelaide SA 5000, Australia 2 Onshore Energy & Minerals industries. Converting just 1% of Australia's estimated Hot Rock crustal energy to electricity, from

  3. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    AND LOW TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES Timothy Reinhardt1 , Lyle A. Johnson2 and Neil Popovich3 1 U the production of power from coproduced and low temperature geothermal resources. To this end, and through production technologies. These technologies produce electricity by leveraging existing oil and gas field

  4. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    geothermal resource of Germany with an estimated utilizable energy of about 180'000 EJ in a depth of 3-7 km and south German Variscian crystalline basement is considered to be the largest geothermal resource require complex and costly processing. Often they are anyhow limited to the topmost part of the basement

  5. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Department of Energy Resources Engineering, Stanford University 367 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305, USA e and geometry are key for the optimum energy extraction from geothermal resources. Existing fracture systems, enhanced geothermal systems do not require natural convective hydrothermal resources, but rather

  6. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Keyan Zheng1 Fang He2 1 Geothermal Council of China Energy Society 20 Da Hui Si Road, Haidian District Beijing, 100081, China e-mail: kyzheng@punlic3.bta.net.cn 2 GHP Council of China Renewable Energy Society of Renewable Energy of PRC" had clearly explained that geothermal energy belongs to renewable energy

  7. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 TURKEY'S GEOTHERMAL ENERGY POTENTIAL: UPDATED RESULTS E. The estimated recoverable thermal energy of the other 38 geothermal fields evaluated for direct utilization of identified apparent capacity, power generation potential and thermal energy potential are discussed. Also

  8. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 GREAT EXPECTATIONS FOR GEOTHERMAL ENERGY.goldstein@sa.gov.au ABSTRACT Geothermal energy systems: have a modest environmental footprint; will not be impacted by climate for zero-emission, base-load direct use and power generation. Displacement of more emissive fossil energy

  9. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    for the simulation of steam flow in a geothermal power plant network". The fluid movement is governed. In the pipeline network of geothermal power plant the steam flows from high to low pressure and heat flows from, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 GeoSteamNet: 2. STEAM FLOW SIMULATION IN A PIPELINE

  10. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES IN THE PACIFIC ISLANDS: THE POTENTIAL OF POWER GENERATION TO BENEFIT INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES Alex J. McCoy-West1,2 , Sarah Milicich1 their untapped geothermal resources) for cost effective power production and direct-use applications. As part

  11. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    needs from a geothermal resource found on its property. Finally, the "waste" fluid from the heating AND PROJECTS PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE John W. Lund and Tonya "Toni" Boyd Geo-Heat Center, Oregon Institute of the geothermal hot water that could be used for heating the buildings. Three wells between 1200 and 1800 feet

  12. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 STRENGTH RETROGRESSION IN CEMENTS UNDER HIGH-TEMPERATURE designs for high-temperature geothermal applications have typically included 35 to 40% additional be inadequate to provide a high-strength, low-permeability cement at temperatures typical for geothermal

  13. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    -of-the-art electrolyte models, to gain insight into CO2-induced fluid-rock interactions for temperatures in the range 10 GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS WITH CO2 AS HEAT TRANSFER FLUID John Apps and Karsten Pruess Earth Sciences Division to as an Enhanced Geothermal System with CO2 (EGSCO2). The concept has yet to be tested in the field

  14. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    is an important parameter in geothermal drilling since it affects drilling fluid, operations and equipment THE INLET AND OUTLET MUD TEMPERATURES WHILE DRILLING GEOTHERMAL FORMATIONS Sema Tekin1 and Serhat Akin2 1-Omerbeyli field were estimated by using mud inlet and outlet temperatures obtained during drilling. GTEMP wellbore

  15. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    . MOL, Enex ehf. of Iceland and Vulcan Kft. (its owner is Green Rock Energy Ltd. of Australia EXPLORATION IN HUNGARY Attila Kujbus CEGE Central-European Geothermal Energy Production Plc. Infopark D of this fact, there are hardly any geothermal energy facilities in Hungary, and those few are operated

  16. A Comprehensive Study of Fracture Patterns and Densities in The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir Using Microearthquake Shear-Wave Splitting Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter E. Malin; Eylon Shalev; Min Lou; Silas M. Simiyu; Anastasia Stroujkova; Windy McCausland

    2004-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project we developed a method for using seismic S-wave data to map the patterns and densities of sub-surface fractures in the NW Geysers Geothermal Field/ (1) This project adds to both the general methods needed to characterize the geothermal production fractures that supply steam for power generation and to the specific knowledge of these in the Geysers area. (2)By locating zones of high fracture density it will be possible to reduce the cost of geothermal power development with the targeting of high production geothermal wells. (3) The results of the project having been transferred to both US based and international geothermal research and exploration agencies and concerns by several published papers and meeting presentations, and through the distribution of the data handling and other software codes we developed.

  17. BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SYSTEM RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED...

  18. Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by this program can be applied to geothermal exploration, which may expand geothermal production. Knowledge of the gas contents in reservoir fluids can be applied to fluid...

  19. Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore and Reservoir Analysis; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Fracture Characterization in Enhanced...

  20. Novel Multidimensional Tracers for Geothermal Inter-Well Diagnostics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Tracers to Characterize Fractures in Engineered Geothermal Systems Advancing reactive tracer methods for measuring thermal evolution in CO2-and water-based geothermal reservoirs...

  1. Geothermal Direct-Use — Minimizing Land Use and Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With geothermal direct-use applications, land use issues usually only arise during exploration and development when geothermal reservoirs are located in or near urbanized areas, critical habitat...

  2. Monitoring and Modeling Fluid Flow in a Developing Enhanced Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Program Peer Review Report DOE 2010 Geothermal Technologies Program Peer Review seismic025fehler.pdf More Documents & Publications Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir...

  3. Inverse modeling and forecasting for the exploitation of the Pauzhetsky geothermal field, Kamchatka, Russia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiryukhin, A.V.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    abandoned, poorly cemented wells allow the inflow of shallow groundwater into the geothermal reservoir.

  4. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) comparing water with CO2 as heat transmission fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for a hypothetical fractured reservoir with parametersfor the five-spot fractured reservoir problem (full wellSwelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir, Transactions,

  5. Comprehensive Evaluation of the Geothermal Resource Potential within the Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objective: to characterize the geothermal reservoir using novel technologies and integrating this information into a 3D geologic and reservoir model numerical model to determine the efficacy of future geothermal production.

  6. Technology for Increasing Geothermal Energy Productivity. Computer Models to Characterize the Chemical Interactions of Goethermal Fluids and Injectates with Reservoir Rocks, Wells, Surface Equiptment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nancy Moller Weare

    2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report describes the results of a research program we carried out over a five-year (3/1999-9/2004) period with funding from a Department of Energy geothermal FDP grant (DE-FG07-99ID13745) and from other agencies. The goal of research projects in this program were to develop modeling technologies that can increase the understanding of geothermal reservoir chemistry and chemistry-related energy production processes. The ability of computer models to handle many chemical variables and complex interactions makes them an essential tool for building a fundamental understanding of a wide variety of complex geothermal resource and production chemistry. With careful choice of methodology and parameterization, research objectives were to show that chemical models can correctly simulate behavior for the ranges of fluid compositions, formation minerals, temperature and pressure associated with present and near future geothermal systems as well as for the very high PT chemistry of deep resources that is intractable with traditional experimental methods. Our research results successfully met these objectives. We demonstrated that advances in physical chemistry theory can be used to accurately describe the thermodynamics of solid-liquid-gas systems via their free energies for wide ranges of composition (X), temperature and pressure. Eight articles on this work were published in peer-reviewed journals and in conference proceedings. Four are in preparation. Our work has been presented at many workshops and conferences. We also considerably improved our interactive web site (geotherm.ucsd.edu), which was in preliminary form prior to the grant. This site, which includes several model codes treating different XPT conditions, is an effective means to transfer our technologies and is used by the geothermal community and other researchers worldwide. Our models have wide application to many energy related and other important problems (e.g., scaling prediction in petroleum production systems, stripping towers for mineral production processes, nuclear waste storage, CO2 sequestration strategies, global warming). Although funding decreases cut short completion of several research activities, we made significant progress on these abbreviated projects.

  7. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    and include uncertainties. Dealing with uncertainty analysis is a common tool e.g. for safety assessment of nuclear waste repositories (Rautman and Treadway, 1991). For HDR geothermal systems, aspects

  8. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Callahan1 , Will Osborn1 , Stephen Hickman2 and Nicholas Davatzes3 1 AltaRock Energy, 7900 E. Green Lake by AltaRock Energy (ARE) with participants from Newberry Geothermal, Davenport Power, Temple University

  9. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    to the relatively high abundance and reactivity of the main geothermal gases (CO2, H2S, H2 and to a lesser extent. This high-temperature field is part of the Hengill volcanic system, and is host to the largest geothermal for the concentrations of the major reactive gases (CO2, H2S, H2 and CH4). Aquifer chemical compositions were calculated

  10. Geothermal energy abstract sets. Special report No. 14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, C. (comp.)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography contains annotated citations in the following areas: (1) case histories; (2) drilling; (3) reservoir engineering; (4) injection; (5) geothermal well logging; (6) environmental considerations in geothermal development; (7) geothermal well production; (8) geothermal materials; (9) electric power production; (10) direct utilization of geothermal energy; (11) economics of geothermal energy; and (12) legal, regulatory and institutional aspects. (ACR)

  11. Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    . () : GRC; p. () Related Geothermal Exploration Activities Activities (8) Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009)...

  12. A Preliminary Structural Model for the Blue Mountain Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Preliminary Structural Model for the Blue Mountain Geothermal Field, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: A...

  13. A Preliminary Conceptual Model for the Blue Mountain Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for the Blue Mountain Geothermal System, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: A Preliminary Conceptual Model...

  14. Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Discovery, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Geology and...

  15. Epithermal Gold Mineralization and a Geothermal Resource at Blue...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Epithermal Gold Mineralization and a Geothermal Resource at Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  16. Structural Analysis of the Desert Peak-Brady Geothermal Fields...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Structural Analysis of the Desert Peak-Brady Geothermal Fields, Northwestern Nevada: Implications for...

  17. Energy Department Addresses Largest Gathering of Geothermal Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Resources Council (GRC) in Reno, Nevada-the industry's largest annual gathering of geothermal energy stakeholders in the nation. In his keynote address, Hollett discussed...

  18. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Olkaria I (East) reservoir began producing steam for the 45 MWe Olkaria I power plant. During the twenty to this good performance, numerical simulation was done to establish how much more additional power could (Figure 3 & 4). Olkaria I reservoir serves the pioneer 45 MWe plant which was commissioned between 1981

  19. Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir Abstract In...

  20. Geothermal Power Generation as Related to Resource Requirements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falcon, J. A.; Richards, R. G.; Keilman, L. R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the past several years geothermal exploratory work has been conducted in northern Nevada. In conjunction with that effort a proposed 55-MW steam geothermal power plant was considered for initial installation in one of the fields being developed...

  1. Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) using CO2 as working fluid - A novelapproach for generating renewable energy with simultaneous sequestration of carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Clay Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir,Transactions, Geothermal Resources Council, Vol. 28, pp.Renewable Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies, of the

  2. The Role of Cost Shared R&D in the Development of Geothermal Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1995-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Program Review starts with two interesting pieces on industries outlook about market conditions. Dr. Allan Jelacics introductory talk includes the statistics on the impacts of the Industry Coupled Drilling Program (late-1970's) on geothermal power projects in Nevada and Utah (about 140 MWe of power stimulated). Most of the papers in these Proceedings are in a technical report format, with results. Sessions included: Exploration, The Geysers, Reservoir Engineering, Drilling, Energy Conversion (including demonstration of a BiPhase Turbine Separator), Energy Partnerships (including the Lake County effluent pipeline to The Geysers), and Technology Transfer (Biochemical processing of brines, modeling of chemistry, HDR, the OIT low-temperature assessment of collocation of resources with population, and geothermal heat pumps). There were no industry reviews at this meeting.

  3. Role of Fluid Pressure in the Production Behavior of Enhanced Geothermal Systems with CO2 as Working Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat Flow in Fractured Reservoirs, SPE Advanced TechnologySwelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir, Transactions,for a hypothetical fractured reservoir patterned after the

  4. Evaluation of C-14 as a natural tracer for injected fluids at the Aidlin sector of The Geysers geothermal system through modeling of mineral-water-gas Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Patrick; Sonnenthal, Eric; Lewicki, Jennifer; Kennedy, Mack

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transfer in fractured geothermal reservoirs is controlled byThe Aidlin reservoir rocks consist of fractured argillites

  5. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , "heat exchange area" is often used in a sense similar to residence times or their distribution; we within reservoir); RTD: residence time distribution; FSR: flow-storage repartition; SWIW: single

  6. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    on fracture distribution is presented in this study. In this model, the reservoir is simulated using a system of blocks some of which contain fracture zones and fracture-free matrix zones. The fracture distribution

  7. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    hydraulic fracture operations, since even automatic picks often require assessment and correction. To aid in the seismic characterization of reservoir fracture networks, we propose to complement conventional earthquake location techniques and subsequently relocated using advanced processing techniques

  8. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    in the reservoir, (2) prevention of waste water contamination, and (3) enhancing heat recovery by heat mining to trace reinjected waste water by seismic monitoring. By observing microseismic activities it was hoped

  9. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , there has been some interest in the use of carbon dioxide as a heat extraction fluid. CO2 offers a number and geological sequestration of CO2 within the reservoir · Possibility of direct use of produced CO2

  10. Geothermal Resources Council Transactions,Vol. 26, September 22-25, 2002 Targeting of Potential Geothermal Resources in the Great Basin from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geothermal Resources Council Transactions,Vol. 26, September 22-25, 2002 Targeting of Potential Geothermal Resources in the Great Basin from Regional Relationships Between Geodetic Strain and GeologicalA. Bennett3 lGreat Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, Universityof Nevada, Reno, Nevada *State Universityof

  11. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    EXPLORATION DATA William Cumming Cumming Geoscience 4728 Shade Tree Lane Santa Rosa, CA, 95405, USA e. A common alternative approach to both targeting and assessment is to focus on a data anomaly or, in some conceptual models based on information from typical geothermal exploration data sets. A conceptual model

  12. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    of an ORC (Organic Rankine Cycle) plant having a net power capacity of 1,5MWe. Surface equipments (turbine fluid geochemistry, the temperature field and the hydraulic properties of the deep crystalline basement). The geothermal wells were hydraulically and chemically stimulated between 2000 and 2007 in order to enhance

  13. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    and control of crack branching during hydraulic fracturing is essential for both geothermal and petroleum models have serious difficulties in simulating crack growth, especially, when the path of fracture) model with cohesive interactions between material particles as an alternative approach to modeling

  14. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    of Energy Resources Engineering, 367 Panama St. Stanford University, CA 94305-2220, USA e-mail: mcclure the pressures, temperatures, and stresses. An efficient method for calculating thermal stresses along a fracture Future of Geothermal Energy" (Tester, 2007). An important observation from EGS projects has been

  15. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Provide Effective Well Construction: A Proven Technology Rafael Hernández, Halliburton; and Daniel Bour of geothermal wells that are effectively cemented and durable poses a significant operational challenge. Typically, lost circulation while drilling and cementing can make it seemingly impossible to place

  16. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    " drilling of a geothermal well with a stimulation treatment that involves cold water injection over time, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 THERMAL SINGLE-WELL INJECTION-WITHDRAWAL TRACER TESTS, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA K_Pruess@lbl.gov ABSTRACT Single-well

  17. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    and containing a lot of natural gas. It is very suitable for development and utilization, including geothermal energy (and natural gas) electricity generation, heating and cooling, bathing and swimming, tourism , Xuanpeng Liu1 1 China University of Geosciences (Beijing), 29 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District 2 Pi

  18. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Borozdina1 , Laura Foulquier1 , Maria Papachristou2 1 GPC IP, PARIS-NORD 2 ­ Immeuble Business Park ­ Bât. 4@geo.auth.gr ABSTRACT Three-dimensional modelling of geologic structures is routinely applied in petroleum and, at a lesser extent though, in geothermal engineering and has proven an efficient tool in investigating complex

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    2 Innovation Center Iceland, Department of Materials, Biotechnology and Energy, Keldnaholt in a bulge in the wall of the casing and is detrimental to the geothermal energy production and the lifetime. This deformation of the casing can lead to reduced energy output and in worst cases render the well inoperative

  20. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    the porosity and permeability of a hot dry rock resource are presented. INTRODUCTIONS Geothermal energy is an established form of alternative energy that is being harvested in many locations around the world. An almost limitless supply of energy is available from the core of the Earth, arising as hot spots near the surface

  1. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    supercritical geothermal resources located at depths 4-5 km or deeper, where the temperature estimates could of the estimates was carried out using the temperature records not involved in the calibration. The results%. This result makes it possible to increase significantly the deepness of indirect temperature estimations

  2. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    for the measurement of distributed temperature and pressure in geothermal wells. Our effort in the first year has been Fiber Bragg grating pressure and temperature sensors distributed along the length of the fiber distributed temperature measurement system (DTS). A single mode step index fiber will be used for Brillouin

  3. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Madrid, Spain; vrath@fis.ucm.es ABSTRACT Information on the distribution of permeability at depth distribution: A fully physical, gradient-based Bayesian inversion, a massive Monte Carlo (MC) approach the technical and economic risk of geothermal projects (Manzella, 2010). Information on the distribution

  4. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    and the resulting probability distributions of permeability, net-to-gross ratio and temperature are combined of the planned geothermal wells. A second Monte Carlo simulation provides the probability distributions: the probability distributions of the feasible thermal capacity and the feasible flow rate, which are calculated

  5. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    GEOTHERMAL MANIFESTATION, DOMUYO VN., NEUQUÉN, ARGENTINA G. Mas1, 2 , L. Bengochea1, 2 , L. C. Mas3 & N is located in the northern of the Neuquen Province, 36°63'S and 70ş42'W, in the Mines and Chos Malal

  6. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401, USA ABSTRACT In order for enhanced of the amount of energy generated from enhanced geothermal systems (EGS), which allows for the exploitation distinguishes EGS from most other energy sources is the difficulty and expense associated with characterizing

  7. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    of Energy (MOE) and Renewable Energy Organization of Iran (SUNA). In this study, an attempt was made with some mitigation plans and monitoring program is accepted. INTRODUCTION Geothermal energy is generally accepted as being an environmentally benign energy source, particularly when compared to fossil fuel energy

  8. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    1 , R.C.M. Malate1 and R. N. Horne2 1 Energy Development Corporation, Energy Center, Merritt Road, Fort Bonifacio, 1201 Taguig City, Philippines 2 Stanford Geothermal Program, Department of Energy Resources Engineering, 367 Panama St., Stanford, CA 94305-2220, USA villacorte.jd@energy.com.ph, malate@energy

  9. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    'S 2009 RISK ANALYSIS Katherine R. Young National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO, 80401-3305, United States e-mail: Katherine.Young@nrel.gov Chad Augustine National Renewable Energy Anderson U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Geothermal

  10. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    internationally significant Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) developments. Recognizing EGS is (at least relatively straightforward regulatory system, which could be considered a benchmark for other jurisdictions to the public) a new technology with uncertain risks, PIRSA has taken account of international developments

  11. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 DIRECTIONAL WELLS AT THE PAILAS GEOTHERMAL Costa Rica. Since 2009, the Costa Rican Electricity Company (ICE) has drilled 7 deep directional boreholes (in addition to the 9 existing vertical boreholes). The purpose of directional drilling has been

  12. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Second Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 22-24, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    at geothermal areas provide information, particularly about seismic volume changes, that conventional "fault processes, however, is non-unique; different processes can produce identical seismic wave fields, and thus. Seismicity is monitored by a high-quality permanent network of 16 three-component digital borehole

  13. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    for managing CO2 greenhouse gas emission from geothermal power plant and also provide additional value MW of electricity and 150 MW of thermal water, emits approximately 181 g CO2/kWh (power production has been conducted and shown the feasibility to reduce the CO2 gas emission by utilizing the concept

  14. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    thermal energy resources, or by waste heat. In addition, direct thermal use of geothermal energy also has supplied by high grade fossil fuels. For example, most of the energy we need for water and space heating%) and commercial (21%) sectors. Also quite importantly, almost 80% of 33.5 EJ is used to provide heat below 150°C

  15. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    @itu.edu.tr ABSTRACT The heat content of a hydrothermal aquifer can be utilized by producing the aquifer's hot fluid whereas the waste cooled water is reinjected into the aquifer and such a scheme is called the doublet attention in the last five decades. Geothermal heating and cooling are possible in zones having a normal

  16. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    BY AIR LIFTING Per-Gunnar Alm Lund University, Engineering Geology, P.O. Box 118, S-22100 Lund, Sweden plant in Sweden. The plant has been in operation for 25 years. Four production wells are used and after. INTRODUCTION Back in 1984 the first geothermal heat plant in Sweden, and so far the only existing, was built

  17. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    ] Basics of Geological Carbon Sequestration and Well Integrity (Adapted from Carbon Sequestration Research and Mechanical coupling affecting the design of a geothermal or a geological carbon sequestration system or supercritical carbon dioxide in the subsurface for storage or heat extraction involves understanding

  18. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , Stanford University, Stanford, CA, spistone@stanford.edu 2 GeothermEx Inc., Richmond, CA ABSTRACT Carbon CO2 sequestration via subsurface fluid loss. In order to entertain this idea seriously in water, as can be observed in carbonated beverages. Furthermore, you can observe that the CO2 gas comes

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    /or water resources (EGS systems), and (2) effective and safe sequestration of carbon dioxide in deep to geothermal heat mining using carbon dioxide instead of water. While manometric, volumetric, and gravimetric-tubes. Sorption and desorption of carbon dioxide on the same solid was measured at 35 °C at pressures to 120 bar

  20. Stanford Geothermal Program Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Stanford Geothermal Program Final Report July 1996 - June 1999 Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG07-95ID13370 Stanford Geothermal Program Department of Petroleum ....................................................................................................................6 2. THE ROLE OF CAPILLARY FORCES IN THE NATURAL STATE OF FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

  1. Stanford Geothermal Program Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    s Stanford Geothermal Program Stanford University Stanford, California RADON MEASUEMENTS I N GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS ? d by * ** Alan K. Stoker and Paul Kruger SGP-TR-4 January 1975 :: raw at Lcs Alams S c i and water, o i l and n a t u r a l gas wells. with radon i n geothermal reservoirs. Its presence i n

  2. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 94305 SGP-TR-35 SECOND ANNUAL #12;INTRODUCTION The research e f f o r t of t h e Stanford Geothermal Program is focused on geothermal reservoir engineering. The major o b j e c t i v e of t h e protiram is t o develop techniques f o

  3. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Final report P. R. Girouard Well No. 1, Lafayette Parish, Louisiana. Volume I. Completion and testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The P.R. Girouard No. 1 Well, located approximately 10 miles southeast of Lafayette, Louisiana, was the fourth successful test of a geopressured-geothermal aquifer under the Wells of Opportunity program. The well was tested through 3-1/2 inch tubing set on a packer at 14,570 feet without major problems. The geological section tested was the Oligocene Marginulina Texana No. 1 sand of upper Frio age. The interval tested was from 14,744 to 14,819 feet. Produced water was piped down a disposal well perforated from 2870 to 3000 feet in a Miocene saltwater sand. Four flow tests were conducted for sustained production rates of approximately 4000 BWPD to approximately 15,000 BWPD. The highest achieved, during a fifth short test, was 18,460 BWPD. The test equipment was capable of handling higher rates. The gas-to-water ratio was relatively uniform at approximately 40 SCF/bbl. The heating value of the gas is 970 Btu/SCF. The reservoir tests show that is is doubtful that this well would sustain production rates over 10,000 BWPD for any lengthy period from the sand zone in which it was completed. This limited flow capacity is due to the well's poor location in the reservoir and is not a result of any production deficiencies of the Marginulina Texana sand.

  4. U.S. Geothermal Announces Successful Completion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Geothermal Inc. (“U.S. Geothermal”), a renewable energy company focused on the production of electricity from geothermal energy, announced today that the first full size production well (NHS-1) at the Neal Hot Springs Project was successfully completed on May 23 and an initial flow test confirms the presence of a geothermal reservoir.

  5. Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2010 Bali, Indonesia, 25-29 April 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2010 Bali, Indonesia, 25-29 April 2010 1 Borehole Instruments for Supercritical Geothermal Reservoirs Nigel Halladay1 , Jean-Luc Deltombe2 , Jean-Marc Naisse2 , Colin Johnston3 Geothermal Reservoirs ABSTRACT Exploration and exploitation of supercritical geothermal reservoirs requires

  6. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    generation by utilizing hot fluids co-produced from oil and gas field were studied using numerical simulation energy and power generation by utilizing hot fluids co-produced from oil and gas reservoirs (Li, et al TEMPERATURE DURING POWER GENERATION IN OIL FIELDS Bin Gong1 , Hongbin Liang2 , Shouliang Xin2 , and Kewen Li

  7. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    a preferably conservative behavior in the reservoir. Therefore, it must be stable under the physico-chemical defined temperature sensitive reaction kinetics (Robinson 1987) we investigate the structural elements the influences of structural characteristics on the reaction kinetics are studied on 42 phenol acetates in order

  8. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , are as follows: (a) reduce the operations and maintenance cost; (b) reduce the power plant cost; (c) choose, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009 SGP-TR-187 OPTIMIZATION OF THE ECONOMICS OF ELECTRIC POWER FROM) developed to date, numerical simulation of idealized EGS reservoirs, economic sensitivity analysis

  9. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    /stimulation is that sufficient rock volumes can be hydraulically fractured via both tensile and shear failure, and more importantly by reactivation of naturally existing fractures (by shearing), to create the reservoir. The advancement of EGS greatly depends on our understanding of the dynamics of the intimately coupled rock

  10. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    2 1 Istanbul Technical University, Department of Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering, Maslak. In order to evaluate the ACE approach, we applied it to a subset of the Palinpinon data set and checked, prolonging the economic life of the reservoir. Presently, the developer relies on a variety of ways ranging

  11. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 REMOVAL OF WATER FOR CARBON DIOXIDE for carbon dioxide-based EGS operation. We examine the relationship between drying time and reservoir amount of carbon dioxide sequestered, and total amount of water produced. INTRODUCTION Carbon

  12. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Eighth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 11-13, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    -elastic deformation with damage evolution, and groundwater flow are solved using the Explicit Finite Difference Lagrangian Method for solid deformation and the Finite Element Method for fluid mass conservation. Rock, Stanford, California, February 11-13, 2013 SGP-TR-198 MODELING RESERVOIR STIMULATION INDUCED BY WELLBORE

  13. Reservoir environment of the Onuma geothermal power plant, northeast Japan, estimated by forward analysis of long-term artificial-tracer concentration change, using single-box-model simulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shigeno, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masaaki; Tetsuro, Noda

    1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-box-model numerical simulator for personal computer analysis was developed in order to estimate macroscopic parameter values for exploited geothermal reservoirs and essential fluids coming from the depth. The simulator was designed to compute history data concerning total production and reinjection fluids at geothermal power plants from the assumed parameter values, based on conservation laws for water mass, heat energy and masses of conservative chemical constituents of geothermal fluids. Using two kinds of forward analysis techniques, i.e. the cast-net and pursuit methods, programs containing the simulator can semiautomatically select the optimum combination of the unknown parameter values by minimizing the differences between the simulated and measured history data for specific enthalpy and chemical compositions of the production fluids. The forward analysis programs were applied to the history data from the Onuma geothermal power plant (production capacity, 10MWe) where waste hot water reinjection, chemical monitoring and artificial tracer tests have been conducted since 1970, almost the beginning of the geothermal exploitation. Using the history data, enthalpy and iodine concentrations of the total production fluids with the amounts of KI tracer injected as spikes, the macroscopic parameter values for the exploited reservoir and the essential hot water from the depth were uniquely determined as follows: mass of the hot water convecting in the exploited reservoir (M0), 3.23x109kg; recycling fraction of the reinjected waste hot water to the reservoir (R), 0.74; specific enthalpy of the essential water from the depth (H1), 385kcalkg; iodine concentration of the water (I1), 0.086mg/kg with chlorine concentration (C1), 259mg/kg. These results support the conceptual model that the exploited Onuma reservoir mainly in the Tertiary volcanics is supplied with the neutral Na-Cl type hot water of abnormally high B/CI mole ratio of around 1.0 by a large essential reservoir distributed at depth in the Paleozoic to Mesozoic detrital marine sedimentary rocks.

  14. Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Principal Investigator: John H. Queen Hi-Q Geophysical Inc. Track Name: Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture...

  15. A Phase-Partitioning Model for CO2–Brine Mixtures at Elevated Temperatures and Pressures: Application to CO2-Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for ?ve-spot fractured reservoir Formation Thicknesswell pattern), and a fractured reservoir represented by twotransport in fractured geothermal reservoirs. Geother- mics

  16. Conceptual design study of geothermal district heating of a thirty-house subdivision in Elko, Nevada, using existing water-distribution systems, Phase III. Final technical report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitts, D.R.

    1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A conceptual design study for district heating of a 30-home subdivision located near the southeast extremity of the city of Elko, Nevada is presented. While a specific residential community was used in the study, the overall approach and methodologies are believed to be generally applicable for a large number of communities where low temperature geothermal fluid is available. The proposed district heating system utilizes moderate temperature, clean domestic water and existing community culinary water supply lines. The culinary water supply is heated by a moderate temperature geothermal source using a single heat exchanger at entry to the subdivision. The heated culinary water is then pumped to the houses in the community where energy is extracted by means of a water supplied heat pump. The use of heat pumps at the individual houses allows economic heating to result from supply of relatively cool water to the community, and this precludes the necessity of supplying objectionably hot water for normal household consumption use. Each heat pump unit is isolated from the consumptive water flow such that contamination of the water supply is avoided. The community water delivery system is modified to allow recirculation within the community, and very little rework of existing water lines is required. The entire system coefficient of performance (COP) for a typical year of heating is 3.36, exclusive of well pumping energy.

  17. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Recovery Act: Sub?Soil Gas and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and Slim Well Drilling, Pumpernickel Valley, Nevada Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search...

  18. Why Is Nevada in Hot Water? Structural Controls and Tectonic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to the northwest in west-central Nevada near the southeast margin of the high heat-flow region. The abundant geothermal fields may therefore result from a transfer of...

  19. Nevada Department of Transportation - 2004 Nevada Commercial...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2004 Nevada Commercial Vehicle Handbook Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Nevada Department of Transportation - 2004 Nevada Commercial...

  20. Novel use of 4D Monitoring Techniques to Improve Reservoir Longevity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Novel use of 4D Monitoring Techniques to Improve Reservoir Longevity and Productivity in Enhanced Geothermal Systems Novel use of 4D Monitoring Techniques to Improve Reservoir...

  1. New Zealand Geothermal Workshop 2011 Proceedings 21 -23 November 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 New Zealand Geothermal Workshop 2011 Proceedings 21 - 23 November 2011 Auckland, New Zealand ADVANCED SEISMIC IMAGING FOR GEOTHERMAL DEVELOPMENT John N. Louie1 , Satish K. Pullammanappallil2 and William Honjas2 1 Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, Mailstop 0174, University of Nevada, Reno, NV

  2. Geothermal well log interpretation state of the art. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An in-depth study of the state of the art in Geothermal Well Log Interpretation has been made encompassing case histories, technical papers, computerized literature searches, and actual processing of geothermal wells from New Mexico, Idaho, and California. A classification scheme of geothermal reservoir types was defined which distinguishes fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, salinity, and fluid chemistry. Major deficiencies of Geothermal Well Log Interpretation are defined and discussed with recommendations of possible solutions or research for solutions. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated primarily on Western US reservoirs. Geopressured geothermal reservoirs are not considered.

  3. Tracer Testing At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (U.S. Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    testing program was initiated in order to map the flow of geothermal fluids through the reservoir and incorporate the data into the numerical reservoir model for a more accurate...

  4. Stanford geothermal program. Final report, July 1990--June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following: (1) improving models of vapor-dominated geothermal fields: the effects of adsorption; (2) adsorption characteristics of rocks from vapor-dominated geothermal reservoir at the Geysers, CA; (3) optimizing reinjection strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines based on chloride data; (4) optimization of water injection into vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs; and (5) steam-water relative permeability.

  5. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells: Pauline Kraft Well No. 1, Nueces County, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pauline Kraft Well No. 1 was originally drilled to a depth of 13,001 feet and abandoned as a dry hole. The well was re-entered in an effort to obtain a source of GEO/sup 2/ energy for a proposed gasohol manufacturing plant. The well was tested through a 5-inch by 2-3/8 inch annulus. The geological section tested was the Frio-Anderson sand of Mid-Oligocene age. The interval tested was from 12,750 to 12,860 feet. A saltwater disposal well was drilled on the site and completed in a Micocene sand section. The disposal interval was perforated from 4710 to 4770 feet and from 4500 to 4542 feet. The test well failed to produce water at substantial rates. Initial production was 34 BWPD. A large acid stimulation treatment increased productivity to 132 BWPD, which was still far from an acceptable rate. During the acid treatment, a failure of the 5-inch production casing occurred. The poor production rates are attributed to a reservoir with very low permeability and possible formation damage. The casing failure is related to increased tensile strain resulting from cooling of the casing by acid and from the high surface injection pressure. The location of the casing failure is now known at this time, but it is not at the surface. Failure as a result of a defect in a crossover joint at 723 feet is suspected.

  6. Recent drilling activities at the earth power resources Tuscarora geothermal power project's hot sulphur springs lease area.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goranson, Colin

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth Power Resources, Inc. recently completed a combined rotary/core hole to a depth of 3,813 feet at it's Hot Sulphur Springs Tuscarora Geothermal Power Project Lease Area located 70-miles north of Elko, Nevada. Previous geothermal exploration data were combined with geologic mapping and newly acquired seismic-reflection data to identify a northerly tending horst-graben structure approximately 2,000 feet wide by at least 6,000 feet long with up to 1,700 feet of vertical offset. The well (HSS-2) was successfully drilled through a shallow thick sequence of altered Tertiary Volcanic where previous exploration wells had severe hole-caving problems. The ''tight-hole'' drilling problems were reduced using drilling fluids consisting of Polymer-based mud mixed with 2% Potassium Chloride (KCl) to reduce Smectite-type clay swelling problems. Core from the 330 F fractured geothermal reservoir system at depths of 2,950 feet indicated 30% Smectite type clays existed in a fault-gouge zone where total loss of circulation occurred during coring. Smectite-type clays are not typically expected at temperatures above 300 F. The fracture zone at 2,950 feet exhibited a skin-damage during injection testing suggesting that the drilling fluids may have caused clay swelling and subsequent geothermal reservoir formation damage. The recent well drilling experiences indicate that drilling problems in the shallow clays at Hot Sulphur Springs can be reduced. In addition, average penetration rates through the caprock system can be on the order of 25 to 35 feet per hour. This information has greatly reduced the original estimated well costs that were based on previous exploration drilling efforts. Successful production formation drilling will depend on finding drilling fluids that will not cause formation damage in the Smectite-rich fractured geothermal reservoir system. Information obtained at Hot Sulphur Springs may apply to other geothermal systems developed in volcanic settings.

  7. Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORTI UNIVERSITY Stanford, California SGP-TR-85 ANALYSIS OF THE STANFORD GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR MODEL EXPERIMENTS was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459

  8. . Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    . Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford, California SGP-TR- 80 DEPLETION MODELING OF LIQUID DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS BY Gudmund 01sen June 1984 Financial support was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under

  9. Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459 and by the Departnent by water cir- culated in a " hot dry rock" geothermal reservoir will induce tensile thermal stresses i n

  10. SGP-TR-32 STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    SGP- TR- 32 STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM PROGRESS REPORT NO. 7 t o U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Recent Radon Transient Experiments Energy Recovery from Fracture-Stimulated Geothermal Reservoirs 1 2 l e c t i o n of Summary presentations prepared by t h e Stanford Geothermal Program s t a f f

  11. Geothermal Energy Development annual report 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an exerpt from Earth Sciences Division Annual Report 1979 (LBL-10686). Progress in thirty-four research projects is reported including the following area: geothermal exploration technology, geothermal energy conversion technology, reservoir engineering, and geothermal environmental research. Separate entries were prepared for each project. (MHR)

  12. Gas chemistry and thermometry of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nehring, N.L. (US Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA); D'Amore, F.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal gases at Cerro Prieto are derived from high temperature reactions within the reservoir or are introduced with recharge water. Gases collected from geothermal wells should, therefore, reflect reservoir conditions. Interpretation of gas compositions of wells indicates reservoir temperatures, controls of oxygen and sulfur fugacities, and recharge source and direction.

  13. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PR0GRAh.I STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PR0GRAh.I STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD,CALIFORNIA 94305 SGP-TR-5 1 GEOTHERMAL Implications of Adsorption and Formation Fluid Composition on Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation . . 40 TASK 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 APPENDIX A: PARTICIPANTS I N THE STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM . . 59 APPENDIX B: VISITING

  14. Assessing geothermal energy potential in upstate New York. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, D.S. [SUNY, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential of geothermal energy for future electric power generation in New York State is evaluated using estimates of temperatures of geothermal reservoir rocks. Bottom hole temperatures from over 2000 oil and gas wells in the region were integrated into subsurface maps of the temperatures for specific geothermal reservoirs. The Theresa/Potsdam formation provides the best potential for extraction of high volumes of geothermal fluids. The evaluation of the Theresa/Potsdam geothermal reservoir in upstate New York suggests that an area 30 miles east of Elmira, New York has the highest temperatures in the reservoir rock. The Theresa/Potsdam reservoir rock should have temperatures about 136 {degrees}C and may have as much as 450 feet of porosity in excess of 8%. Estimates of the volumes of geothermal fluids that can be extracted are provided and environmental considerations for production from a geothermal well is discussed.

  15. Sustaining the National Geothermal Data System: Considerations for a System Wide Approach and Node Maintenance, Geothermal Resources Council 37th Annual Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada, September 29-October 2, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, Lee [Arizona Geological Survey; Chickering, Cathy [Southern Methodist University; Anderson, Arlene [U. S. Department of Energy, Geothermal Technologies Office; Richard, Stephen M. [Arizona Geological Survey

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act the U.S. Department of Energy’s Geothermal Technologies Office has funded $33.7 million for multiple data digitization and aggregation projects focused on making vast amounts of geothermal relevant data available to industry for advancing geothermal exploration. These projects are collectively part of the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS), a distributed, networked system for maintaining, sharing, and accessing data in an effort to lower the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE). Determining “who owns” and “who maintains” the NGDS and its data nodes (repositories in the distributed system) is yet to be determined. However, the invest- ment in building and populating the NGDS has been substantial, both in terms of dollars and time; it is critical that this investment be protected by ensuring sustainability of the data, the software and systems, and the accessibility of the data. Only then, will the benefits be fully realized. To keep this operational system sustainable will require four core elements: continued serving of data and applications; maintenance of system operations; a governance structure; and an effective business model. Each of these presents a number of challenges. Data being added to the NGDS are not strictly geothermal but data considered relevant to geothermal exploration and develop- ment, including vast amounts of oil and gas and groundwater wells, among other data. These are relevant to a broader base of users. By diversifying the client base to other users and other fields, the cost of maintaining core infrastructure can be spread across an array of stakeholders and clients. It is presumed that NGDS will continue to provide free and open access to its data resources. The next-phase NGDS operation should be structured to eventually pursue revenue streams to help off-set sustainability expenses as necessary and appropriate, potentially including income from: grants and contracts (agencies, foundations, pri- vate sector), membership, fees for services (consulting, training, customization, ‘app’ development), repository services (data, services, apps, models, documents, multimedia), advertisements, fees for premier services or applications, subscriptions to value added services, licenses, contributions and donations, endow- ments, and sponsorships.

  16. Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northern Basin and Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Brophy br Model br Moeck br Beardsmore br Type br Volume br Geothermal br Region Mean br Reservoir br Temp br Mean br Capacity Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northern Basin...

  17. Geothermal program review 16: Proceedings. A strategic plan for geothermal research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The proceedings contain 21 papers arranged under the following topical sections: Exploration technology (4 papers); Reservoir technology (5 papers); Energy conversion technology (8 papers); Drilling technology (2 papers); and Direct use and geothermal heat pump technology (2 papers). An additional section contains a report on a workshop on dual-use technologies for hydrothermal and advanced geothermal reservoirs.

  18. Geothermal Research and Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are reported on adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks, physics of injection of water into vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs, earth-tide effects on downhole pressures, injection optimization at the Geysers, effects of salinity in adsorption experiments, interpreting multiwell pressure data from Ohaaki, and estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments.

  19. Geothermal Permeability Enhancement - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joe Beall; Mark Walters

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective is to apply known permeability enhancement techniques to reduce the number of wells needed and demonstrate the applicability of the techniques to other undeveloped or under-developed fields. The Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) concept presented in this project enhances energy extraction from reduced permeability zones in the super-heated, vapor-dominated Aidlin Field of the The Geysers geothermal reservoir. Numerous geothermal reservoirs worldwide, over a wide temperature range, contain zones of low permeability which limit the development potential and the efficient recovery of heat from these reservoirs. Low permeability results from poorly connected fractures or the lack of fractures. The Enhanced Geothermal System concept presented here expands these technologies by applying and evaluating them in a systematic, integrated program.

  20. azufres geothermal energy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the productivity of geothermal reservoirs by providing increased Stanford University 490 LCA can help determine environmental burdens from"cradle to grave"and facilitate more...

  1. Fluid Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    defined as enhanced reservoirs that have been created to extract economical amounts of heat from low permeability andor porosity geothermal resources. Critical to the success...

  2. U.S. and Australian Advanced Geothermal Projects Face Setbacks...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of hot water embedded in hot rock or expanding an existing geothermal reservoir. But drilling into hard rock at high temperatures and pressures has always presented a technical...

  3. Fluid Circulation and Heat Extraction from Engineered Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A large amount of fluid circulation and heat extraction (i.e., thermal power production) research and testing has been conducted on engineered geothermal reservoirs in the...

  4. Characterization Of Fracture Patterns In The Geysers Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Patterns In The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir By Shear-Wave Splitting Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Characterization Of Fracture...

  5. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Economics of Developing Hot...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Economics of Developing Hot Stratigraphic Reservoirs Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search...

  6. Ground Gravity Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Allis...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Gravity surveys were conducted to monitor the evolution of the geothermal reservoir. Notes A 12 month long experiment was conducted using a...

  7. Fluid Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization Novel use of 4D Monitoring Techniques to Improve Reservoir Longevity and Productivity in Enhanced...

  8. Advances In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration Resource Evaluation And Reservoir Management Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference...

  9. Comprehensive Evaluation of the Geothermal Potential within the...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Astor Pass using innovative technologies * 3D geologic and reservoir model * SeisOpt seismic data analysis to create fault-plane images - Exploration to locate blind geothermal...

  10. Simulation of geothermal subsidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, I.; Dershowitz, W.; Jones, K.; Myer, L.; Roman, K.; Schauer, M.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of an assessment of existing mathematical models for subsidence simulation and prediction are summarized. The following subjects are discussed: the prediction process, physical processes of geothermal subsidence, computational models for reservoir flow, computational models for deformation, proficiency assessment, and real and idealized case studies. (MHR)

  11. 2D Seismic Reflection Survey Crump Geyser Geothermal Prospect...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Additional Info Field Value Author Nevada Geothermal Power Company Maintainer Nicole Smith bureaucode 019:20 Catalog DOE harvestobjectid d542f4da-f04b-4172-ac22-483b3b5ff60a...

  12. Geophysical Setting of the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, North...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Setting of the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, North-Central Nevada and Its Relationship to a Crustal-Scale Fracture Associated with the Inception of the Yellowstone Hotspot Jump...

  13. Nevada Renewable Energy Projects June 10, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Nevada Renewable Energy Projects June 10, 2009 WASHOE ELKO HUMBOLDT EUREKA LANDER PERSHING Winnemucca Reno Carson City Tonopah Ely Las Vegas Pahrump Project Type and Dispostion Solar Energy ROW, Pending Wind Testing ROW, Authorized Wind Energy ROW, Pending Geothermal Energy Leases, Authorized

  14. Pleasant Bayou geopressured/geothermal testing project, Brazoria County, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortego, P.K.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase II-B production testing of the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well began September 22, 1982. The test plan was designed to evaluate the capabilities of the geopressured-geothermal reservoir during an extended flow period. Tests were conducted to determine reservoir areal extent; aquifer fluid properties; fluid property change with production; information on reservoir production drive mechanism; long-term scale and corrosion control methods; and disposal well operations. Operatinal aspects of geopressured-geothermal production were also evaluated. The test was discontinued prematurely in May 1983 because of a production tubing failure. Most of the production tubing was recovered from the well and cause of the failure was determined. Plans for recompletion of the well were prepared. However, the well was not recompleted because of funding constraints and/or program rescheduling. In March 1984, the Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) directed that the site be placed in a standby-secured condition. In August 1984, the site was secured. Routine site maintenance and security was provided during the secured period.

  15. Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    from the Coso geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir...

  16. Dispersed Fluid Flow in Fractured Reservoirs- an Analysis of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Distributions Abstract A methodology for analyzing the internal flow characteristics of a fractured geothermal reservoir using tracer-determined residence time distribution curves...

  17. Using Thermally-Degrading, Partitioning, and Nonreactive Tracers to Determine Temperature Distribution and Fracture/Heat Transfer Surface Area in Geothermal Reservoirs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Project Summary. The goal of this project is to provide integrated tracer and tracer interpretation tools to facilitate quantitative characterization of temperature distributions and surface area available for heat transfer in EGS.

  18. HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, R.C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reviewed with data from Cerro Prieto as the primary example.using data from Cerro Prieto as an' example. Downhole toolsare reviewed. Data from Cerro Prieto are used as an example

  19. EnergyFit Nevada (Nevada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EnergyFit Nevada is a home energy retrofit program. The program assists homeowners in finding and contacting an energy assessment professional to perform an energy assessment and a certified...

  20. Geothermal energy production with supercritical fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Donald W.

    2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been invented a method for producing geothermal energy using supercritical fluids for creation of the underground reservoir, production of the geothermal energy, and for heat transport. Underground reservoirs are created by pumping a supercritical fluid such as carbon dioxide into a formation to fracture the rock. Once the reservoir is formed, the same supercritical fluid is allowed to heat up and expand, then is pumped out of the reservoir to transfer the heat to a surface power generating plant or other application.