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1

Enel Green Power- Innovative Geothermal Power for Nevada | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enel Green Power- Innovative Geothermal Power for Nevada Enel Green Power- Innovative Geothermal Power for Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Periodical: Enel Green Power- Innovative Geothermal Power for Nevada Abstract Two binary geothermal power plants inaugurated today with a total capacity of 65 MW: They will generate enough energy to meet the needs of some 40 thousand American households. Author Hank Sennott Published Press Release, 04/15/2009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Enel Green Power- Innovative Geothermal Power for Nevada Citation Hank Sennott. 04/15/2009. Enel Green Power- Innovative Geothermal Power for Nevada. Press Release. 1-2. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Enel_Green_Power-_Innovative_Geothermal_Power_for_Nevada&oldid=680547"

2

Draft Environmental Assessment Ormat Nevada Northern Nevada Geothermal Power Plant Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Ormat Nevada Northern Nevada Geothermal Power Plant Projects Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for ORMAT LLC's Tuscarora Geothermal Power Plant, Elko County, Nevada; Jersey Valley Geothermal Project, Pershing County, Nevada; and McGinness Hills Geothermal Project, Lander County, Nevada U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee Program Office Washington, D.C. 20585 August 2011 NORTHERN NEVADA GEOTHERMAL POWER PLANT PROJECTS - ORMAT NEVADA AUGUST 2011 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION.................................................................................................................1 1.1 SUMMARY AND LOCATION OF PROPOSED ACTION .....................................................1

3

Nevada geothermal power plant project approved  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A proposal to construct and test a 12.5-megawatt geothermal power plant in the Steamboat Hot Springs KGRA in Washoe County, Nevada, has been approved by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The power plant could be completed by October 1987. Several stipulations are included in the BLM approval. The stipulations include a program to monitor ground water, surface water, and hydrothermal features to detect any impacts on the hydrology in the Steamboat Hot Springs area. When plant operations are tested, an emission test will be required to verify that noncondensible gas concentrations are within federal and state standards. No geothermal fluid will be discharged on the land's surface. Other stipulations include the special construction of electrical distribution lines to protect birds of prey; the fencing of hazardous areas; and a minimal disturbance of surface areas.

Not Available

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Nevada manufacturer installing geothermal power plant | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nevada manufacturer installing geothermal power plant Nevada manufacturer installing geothermal power plant Nevada manufacturer installing geothermal power plant August 26, 2010 - 4:45pm Addthis Chemetall extracts lithium carbonate, a powder, from brine, a salty solution from within the earth. | Photo courtesy Chemetall Chemetall extracts lithium carbonate, a powder, from brine, a salty solution from within the earth. | Photo courtesy Chemetall Joshua DeLung Chemetall supplies materials for lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles $28.4 million in Recovery Act funding going toward geothermal plant Plant expected to produce 4 MW of electrical power, employ 25 full-time workers Chemetall produces lithium carbonate to customers in a wide range of industries, including for batteries used in electric vehicles, and now the

5

STATEMENT OF BRIAN D. FAIRBANK Nevada Geothermal Power Inc.'s Blue Mountain  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

STATEMENT OF BRIAN D. FAIRBANK Nevada Geothermal Power Inc.'s Blue Mountain STATEMENT OF BRIAN D. FAIRBANK Nevada Geothermal Power Inc.'s Blue Mountain Geothermal Power Facility Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library General: STATEMENT OF BRIAN D. FAIRBANK Nevada Geothermal Power Inc.'s Blue Mountain Geothermal Power Facility Author BRIAN D. FAIRBANK Published Publisher Not Provided, 2012 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for STATEMENT OF BRIAN D. FAIRBANK Nevada Geothermal Power Inc.'s Blue Mountain Geothermal Power Facility Citation BRIAN D. FAIRBANK. 2012. STATEMENT OF BRIAN D. FAIRBANK Nevada Geothermal Power Inc.'s Blue Mountain Geothermal Power Facility. N/Ap. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=STATEMENT_OF_BRIAN_D._FAIRBANK_Nevada_Geothermal_Power_Inc.%27s_Blue_Mountain_Geothermal_Power_Facility&oldid=682760

6

Nevada/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada/Geothermal Nevada/Geothermal < Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Nevada Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Nevada Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Alligator Geothermal Geothermal Project Oski Energy LLC Ely, Nevada 20 MW20,000 kW 20,000,000 W 20,000,000,000 mW 0.02 GW 2.0e-5 TW Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Alum Geothermal Project Ram Power Silver Peak, Nevada 64 MW64,000 kW 64,000,000 W 64,000,000,000 mW 0.064 GW 6.4e-5 TW Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Alum Geothermal Area Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Aurora Geothermal Project Gradient Resources Hawthorne, Nevada 190 MW190,000 kW

7

STATEMENT OF BRIAN D. FAIRBANK Nevada Geothermal Power Inc.'s...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2012 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for STATEMENT OF BRIAN D. FAIRBANK Nevada Geothermal Power Inc.'s Blue Mountain...

8

Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth to Generate Sustainable Power Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth to Generate Sustainable...

9

Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Open-File Report 12-3 Data Tables and Graphs of Geothermal Power Production in Nevada,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report summarizes statistics on geothermal power production in Nevada from initial plant construction in 1985 through 2011. Data are compiled on nameplate capacity, gross production, and net production by producing geothermal area. Graphs illustrate trends for individual areas and for Nevada overall. The data and graphs are in an Excel spreadsheet, which is also available online with this document, at

Lisa Shevenell; Jonathan G. Price; Ronald H. Hess

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Geothermal energy in Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The nature of goethermal resources in Nevada and resource applications are discussed. The social and economic advantages of utilizing geothermal energy are outlined. Federal and State programs established to foster the development of geothermal energy are discussed. The names, addresses, and phone numbers of various organizations actively involved in research, regulation, and the development of geothermal energy are included. (MHR)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Geothermal systems of northern Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot springs are numerous and nearly uniformly distributed in northern Nevada. Most occur on the flanks of basins, along Basin and Range (late Miocene to Holocene) faults, while some occur in the inner parts of the basins. Surface temperatures of the springs range from slightly above ambient to boiling; some springs are superheated. Maximum subsurface water temperatures calculated on the basis of quartz solubility range as high as 252/sup 0/C, although most are below 190/sup 0/C. Flows range from a trickle to several hundred liters per minute. The Nevada geothermal systems differ markedly from the power-producing system at The Geysers, Calif., and from those areas with a high potential for power production (e.g., Yellowstone Park, Wyo.; Jemez Mountains, N. Mex.). These other systems are associated with Quaternary felsic volcanic rocks and probably derive their heat from cooling magma rather high in the crust. In northern Nevada, however, felsic volcanic rocks are virtually all older than 10 million years, and analogous magmatic heat sources are, therefore, probably lacking. Nevada is part of an area of much higher average heat flow than the rest of the United States. In north-central Nevada, geothermal gradients are as great as 64/sup 0/C per kilometer in bedrock and even higher in basin fill. The high gradients probably result from a combination of thin crust and high temperature upper mantle. It is suggested that the geothermal systems of northern Nevada result from circulation of meteoric waters along Basin and Range faults and that their temperature chiefly depends upon (1) depth of circulation and (2) the geothermal gradient near the faults.

Hose, R.K.; Taylor, B.E.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Geothermal exploration and development in Nevada through 1973  

SciTech Connect

A brief description is given of Nevada's geothermal resources, and exploration activity for geothermal power through 1973. The use, geology, exploration, and regulation of the State's geothermal energy resources are discussed.

Garside, L.J.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Northern Nevada Joint Utility Geothermal Project  

SciTech Connect

After approximately eight months of formation discussion between a number of western utilities, a group of five companies defined a project scope, schedule and budget for assessing the prospects for electric power production using Nevada geothermal resources.

Richards, R.G.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth to Generate Sustainable Power Enhanced...

15

NORTHERN NEVADA GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION STRATEGY ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

School of Mines Nevada Geothermal Study: Report No. 4, Feb.J. , 1976, Assessing the geothermal resource base of the1977, Microseisms in geothermal Studies in Grass Valley,

Goldstein, N.E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Geothermal energy in Nevada: development and utilization  

SciTech Connect

The nature of geothermal resources in Nevada and resource applications are discussed. The social and economic advantages of using geothermal energy are outlined. Federal and state programs established to foster the development of geothermal energy are discussed. (MHR)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

EA-1116: Kalina Geothermal Demonstration Project, Steamboat Springs, Nevada  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16: Kalina Geothermal Demonstration Project, Steamboat 16: Kalina Geothermal Demonstration Project, Steamboat Springs, Nevada EA-1116: Kalina Geothermal Demonstration Project, Steamboat Springs, Nevada SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy Golden Field Office to partially fund assistance for the construction and operation of a privately owned 6-megawatt geothermal power plant which includes one geothermal production well, one injection well, and ancillary facilities such as on-site access road(s) and interconnected to electric transmission lines to existing geothermal power plants. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD February 22, 1999 EA-1116: Finding of No Significant Impact Kalina Geothermal Demonstration Project, Steamboat Springs, Nevada

18

Sierra Nevada Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Region Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Sierra Nevada Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) Map: {{{Name}}} California's Sierra Nevada is a west-tilting 350-mile (560-km)-long block of granite. Extending from 14,494 feet (Mt. Whitney, the highest peak in the lower 48 states) in the east to near sea level in the west, it contains the spectacular Yosemite and Sequoia National Parks (not indicated on the map). The massive granite intruded the crust in Mesozoic time and was uplifted and faulted in the Tertiary during formation of the basin and range to the east. USGS[1] References ↑ "USGS" Geothermal Region Data State(s) California Area 56,363 km²56,363,000,000 m² 21,756.118 mi² 606,685,695,700 ft²

19

Environmental overview of geothermal development: northern Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Regional environmental problems and issues associated with geothermal development in northern Nevada are studied to facilitate environmental assessment of potential geothermal resources. The various issues discussed are: environmental geology, seismicity of northern Nevada, hydrology and water quality, air quality, Nevada ecosystems, noise effects, socio-economic impacts, and cultural resources and archeological values. (MHR)

Slemmons, D.B.; Stroh, J.M.; Whitney, R.A. (eds.) [eds.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Nevada Geothermal Operating Company LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Operating Company LLC Operating Company LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Nevada Geothermal Operating Company LLC Place Blue Mountain, NV Sector Geothermal energy Website http://www.nevadageothermal.co References Alternative Earth Resources Inc Website[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Nevada Geothermal Operating Company LLC is a subsidiary of Alternative Earth Resources Inc based in Blue Mountain, NV. Alternative Earth Resources Inc. (formerly Nevada Geothermal Power) is an experienced renewable energy company, focused on developing and generating clean, sustainable electric power from geothermal resources. The Company has headquarters in Vancouver, BC and trades on the Toronto Venture Exchange under the symbol AER. Alternative Earth holds leasehold interests in four geothermal projects

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nevada geothermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Geothermal studies in northern Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and University of California (UCB), under the auspices of the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration, are conducting field studies at potential geothermal resource areas in north-central Nevada. The goal of the LBL-UCB program is to develop and evaluate techniques for the assessment of the resource potential of liquid-dominated systems. Field studies presently being conducted in northern Nevada incorporate an integrated program of geologic, geophysical, and geochemical surveys leading to heat flow measurements, and eventually to deep (1.5 to 2 km) confirmatory drill holes. Techniques evaluated include geophysical methods to measure contrasts in electrical resistivity and seismic parameters. Geochemical studies have emphasized techniques to disclose the pathways of water from its meteoric origin into and through the hydrothermal systems. Geochemical and radiometric analyses also help to provide a baseline upon which the effects of future geothermal development may be superimposed.

Wollenberg, H.A.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Geothermal heating for Caliente, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utilization of geothermal resources in the town of Caliente, Nevada (population 600) has been the objective of two grants. The first grant was awarded to Ferg Wallis, part-owner and operator of the Agua Caliente Trailer Park, to assess the potential of hot geothermal water for heating the 53 trailers in his park. The results from test wells indicate sustainable temperatures of 140/sup 0/ to 160/sup 0/F. Three wells were drilled to supply all 53 trailers with domestic hot water heating, 11 trailers with space heating and hot water for the laundry from the geothermal resource. System payback in terms of energy cost-savings is estimated at less than two years. The second grant was awarded to Grover C. Dils Medical Center in Caliente to drill a geothermal well and pipe the hot water through a heat exchanger to preheat air for space heating. This geothermal preheater served to convert the existing forced air electric furnace to a booster system. It is estimated that the hospital will save an average of $5300 in electric bills per year, at the current rate of $.0275/KWH. This represents a payback of approximately two years. Subsequent studies on the geothermal resource base in Caliente and on the economics of district heating indicate that geothermal may represent the most effective supply of energy for Caliente. Two of these studies are included as appendices.

Wallis, F.; Schaper, J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth to Generate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth to Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth to Generate Sustainable Power Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth to Generate Sustainable Power April 12, 2013 - 11:17am Addthis Learn the basics of enhanced geothermal systems technology. I Infographic by Sarah Gerrity. Learn the basics of enhanced geothermal systems technology. I Infographic by Sarah Gerrity. Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Desert Peak 2 is the nation's first commercial enhanced geothermal system to supply electricity to the grid. Based in Churchill County, Nevada, the project has increased power

24

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Geothermal Power Generation...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Sponsored by OSTI -- Geothermal Power Generation - A Primer on Low-Temperature, Small-Scale Applications Geothermal Technologies Legacy...

25

Kakkonda Geothermal Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

A brief general description is given of a geothermal resource. Geothermal exploration in the Takinoue area is reviewed. Geothermal drilling procedures are described. The history of the development at the Takinoue area (the Kakkonda Geothermal Power Plant), and the geothermal fluid characteristics are discussed. The technical specifications of the Kakkonda facility are shown. Photographs and drawings of the facility are included. (MHR)

DiPippo, R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Geothermal Power of America | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power of America Power of America Jump to: navigation, search Name Geothermal Power of America Place Los Angeles, California Sector Geothermal energy Product A Nevada-based company focusing on geothermal project development and operation. References Geothermal Power of America[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Geothermal Power of America is a company located in Los Angeles, California . References ↑ "Geothermal Power of America" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Power_of_America&oldid=345810" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

27

Northern Nevada Geothermal Exploration Strategy Analysis | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Geothermal Exploration Strategy Analysis Nevada Geothermal Exploration Strategy Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Northern Nevada Geothermal Exploration Strategy Analysis Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The results of exploration techniques applied to geothermal resource investigations in northern Nevada were evaluated and rated by seven investigators involved in the work. A quantitative rating scheme was used to obtain estimates of technique effectiveness. From survey cost information we also obtained and compared cost-effectiveness estimates for the various techniques. Effectiveness estimates were used to develop an exploration strategy for the area. However, because no deep confirmatory drilling has been done yet, the technique evaluations and exploration

28

Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (5) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

29

Sierra Geothermal's Key Find in Southern Nevada | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sierra Geothermal's Key Find in Southern Nevada Sierra Geothermal's Key Find in Southern Nevada Sierra Geothermal's Key Find in Southern Nevada July 13, 2010 - 5:17pm Addthis Sierra Geothermal discovered temperatures hot enough for large-scale geothermal energy production at one of its wells near Silver Peak, Nev. | Photo courtesy of Sierra Geothermal Sierra Geothermal discovered temperatures hot enough for large-scale geothermal energy production at one of its wells near Silver Peak, Nev. | Photo courtesy of Sierra Geothermal Paul Lester Communications Specialist for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy In May 2010, Sierra Geothermal determined temperature at the bottom of a well drilled at the company's Alum project near Silver Peak, Nev., was hot enough for commercial-sized geothermal energy production - measured as 147

30

Sierra Geothermal's Key Find in Southern Nevada | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sierra Geothermal's Key Find in Southern Nevada Sierra Geothermal's Key Find in Southern Nevada Sierra Geothermal's Key Find in Southern Nevada July 13, 2010 - 5:17pm Addthis Sierra Geothermal discovered temperatures hot enough for large-scale geothermal energy production at one of its wells near Silver Peak, Nev. | Photo courtesy of Sierra Geothermal Sierra Geothermal discovered temperatures hot enough for large-scale geothermal energy production at one of its wells near Silver Peak, Nev. | Photo courtesy of Sierra Geothermal Paul Lester Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy In May 2010, Sierra Geothermal determined temperature at the bottom of a well drilled at the company's Alum project near Silver Peak, Nev., was hot enough for commercial-sized geothermal energy production - measured as 147

31

Status of Nevada Geothermal Resource Development - Spring 2011 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resource Development - Spring 2011 Resource Development - Spring 2011 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Status of Nevada Geothermal Resource Development - Spring 2011 Abstract Recent increases in geothermal exploration and power plant construction in Nevada are the first significant activities since the Steamboat II/III and Brady plants came on line in 1992.Exploration activity on existing projects grew between 2005 and 2010, culminating in the construction of several new power plants. The BLM's 2007 lease auction (first since the 2005 Energy Policy Act revisions) opened the door to exploration on green field properties. The number of wells permitted and drilled remained low from 1994 through 2003, but rose sharply to peak in 2009.However, over 760,000

32

Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area (Redirected from Nevada Test And Training Range Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (5) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

33

Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA, Including Warm Ground, Borate Deposits, and Siliceous Alteration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

34

Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Counc, 1999 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- Preliminary...

35

An investigation of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2007 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for An investigation of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada, using...

36

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mW 0.385 GW 3.85e-4 TW Plants Included in Planned Estimate 4 Plants with Unknown Planned Capacity 9 Geothermal Areas within the Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region...

37

Nevada Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Enhanced Geothermal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nevada Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Enhanced Nevada Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Enhanced Geothermal System Nevada Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Enhanced Geothermal System April 12, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON -- As part of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above energy strategy, the Energy Department today recognized the nation's first commercial enhanced geothermal system (EGS) project to supply electricity to the grid. Based in Churchill County, Nevada, Ormat Technologies' Desert Peak 2 EGS project has increased power output of its nearby operating geothermal field by nearly 38 percent - providing an additional 1.7 megawatts of power to the grid and validating this emerging clean energy technology. "Developing America's vast renewable energy resources sustainably is an

38

NREL: Geothermal Technologies - Financing Geothermal Power Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Technologies Search More Search Options Site Map Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance Thumbnail of the Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance NREL's Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance provides an overview of the strategies used to raise capital for geothermal power projects that: Use conventional, proven technologies Are located in the United States Produce utility power (roughly 10 megawatts or more). Learn more about the Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance. NREL's Financing Geothermal Power Projects website, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Program, provides information for geothermal power project developers and investors interested in financing utility-scale geothermal power projects. Read an overview of how financing works for geothermal power projects, including

39

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Geothermal Power Generation...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Geothermal Power Generation - A Primer on Low-Temperature, Small-Scale Applications Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On Home...

40

An investigation of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada, using  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

investigation of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada, using investigation of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada, using temporal moment analysis of tracer tests Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: An investigation of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada, using temporal moment analysis of tracer tests Author Marshall J. Reed Conference Proceedings, 32nd Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering; Stanford University; 2007 Published Publisher Not Provided, 2007 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for An investigation of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada, using temporal moment analysis of tracer tests Citation Marshall J. Reed. 2007. An investigation of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada, using temporal moment analysis of tracer tests. In:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nevada geothermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA, Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA, Including Warm Ground, Borate Deposits, and Siliceous Alteration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA, Including Warm Ground, Borate Deposits, and Siliceous Alteration Abstract Surface indicators of geothermal activity are often present above blind or concealed geothermal systems in the Great Basin, but their expressions are sometimes subtle. When mapped in detail, these indicators yield valuable information on the location, structural controls, and potential subsurface reservoir temperatures of geothermal fluids. An example is provided by the Salt Wells geothermal system in Churchill County, Nevada, USA, where

42

Integrated Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Integrated Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 3-D surface seismic reflection survey, covering an area of over 3 square miles, was conducted at the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada) to explore the structural features that may control geothermal production in the area. In addition to the surface sources and receivers, a high-temperature three-component seismometer was deployed in a borehole at a depth of 3900 ft within the basement below the reservoir, which recorded the waves generated by all surface sources. A total of 1959 first-arrival travel times were determined out of 2134 possible traces. Two-dimensional

43

Nevada low-temperaure geothermal resource assessment: 1994. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data compilation for the low-temperature program is being done by State Teams in two western states. Final products of the study include: a geothermal database, in hardcopy and as digital data (diskette) listing information on all known low- and moderate- temperature springs and wells in Nevada; a 1:1,000,000-scale map displaying these geothermal localities, and a bibliography of references on Nevada geothermal resources.

Garside, L.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- Preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- Preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data Authors Gregory Nimz, Cathy Janik, Fraser Goff, Charles Dunlap, Mark Huebner, Dale Counce and Stuart D. Johnson Published Journal Trans Geotherm Resour Counc, 1999 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- Preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data Citation Gregory Nimz,Cathy Janik,Fraser Goff,Charles Dunlap,Mark Huebner,Dale

45

Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir from Well-Test Analyses Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir from Well-Test Analyses Abstract Temperature, pressure, and spinner (TPS) logs have been recorded in several wells from the Dixie Valley Geothermal Reservoir in west central Nevada. A variety of well-test analyses has been performed with these data to quantify the hydrologic properties of this fault-dominated geothermal resource. Four complementary analytical techniques were employed, their individual application depending upon availability and quality of data and validity of scientific assumptions. In some instances, redundancy in

46

Origin And Characterization Of Geothermal Waters At Desert Queen, Nevada |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Origin And Characterization Of Geothermal Waters At Desert Queen, Nevada Origin And Characterization Of Geothermal Waters At Desert Queen, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Origin And Characterization Of Geothermal Waters At Desert Queen, Nevada Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Desert Queen geothermal system, which is in close proximity to two locations where geothermal energy is currently being harnessed, may host an additional reservoir. A _18O vs _D plot indicates that Desert Queen waters likely originate from the Humboldt River, and reflects Humboldt River water that is clearly evaporated. Temperatures of the reservoir at depth are estimated to be between 92-141°C and were calculated using the _18O(SO4-H2O) geothermometer. It is unclear whether these temperatures

47

Evaluation Of Baltazor Known Geothermal Resources Area, Nevada | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Baltazor Known Geothermal Resources Area, Nevada Baltazor Known Geothermal Resources Area, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Evaluation Of Baltazor Known Geothermal Resources Area, Nevada Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: By virtue of the Geothermal Steam Act of 1970, the U.S. Geological Survey is required to appraise geothermal resources of the United States prior to competitive lease sales. This appraisal involves coordinated input from a variety of disciplines, starting with reconnaissance geology and geophysics. This paper describes how the results of several geophysical methods used in KGRA evaluation were interpreted by the authors, two geophysicists, involved with both the Evaluation Committee and the research program responsible for obtaining and interpreting the

48

Empire Geothermal Power LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power LLC Power LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Empire Geothermal Power LLC Place Reno, Nevada Zip 89509 Sector Geothermal energy Product Empire owns and operates a 3.5MW geothermal project in Nevada. Coordinates 32.944065°, -97.578279° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.944065,"lon":-97.578279,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

49

Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir from Well-Test Analyses Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

50

Geothermal Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION A PRIMER ON LOW-TEMPERATURE, SMALL-SCALE APPLICATIONS by Kevin Rafferty Geo-Heat Center January 2000 REALITY CHECK Owners of low-temperature...

51

Exploration for Geothermal Resources in Dixie Valley, Nevada- Case History  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in Dixie Valley, Nevada- Case History in Dixie Valley, Nevada- Case History Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Exploration for Geothermal Resources in Dixie Valley, Nevada- Case History Abstract After several years of reconnaissance geology in Nevada, an exploration program to evaluate the geothermal resource potential of Dixie Valley was begun in 1974. Between 1974 and 1978 Sunoco Energy Development Co. conducted two heat-flow drilling programs, a resistivity survey, a seismic emission study, a ground noise survey, two magnetotelluric surveys, a hydrology study, and a surface geology survey. The synthesis of the data resulting from these projects into the regional geologic framework led to the acquisition of geothermal resource leases from fee property owners,

52

Nevada: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM. Part A  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All chemical data for geothermal fluids in Nevada available as of December 1981 are maintained on GEOTHERM, a computerized information system. This report presents summaries and sources of records for Nevada. 7 refs. (ACR)

Bliss, J.D.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Our Evolving Knowledge Of Nevada'S Geothermal Resource Potential | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Our Evolving Knowledge Of Nevada'S Geothermal Resource Potential Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Our Evolving Knowledge Of Nevada'S Geothermal Resource Potential Details Activities (16) Areas (9) Regions (0) Abstract: The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy (GBCGE) is conducting site-specific and regional geothermal research both in direct collaboration with industry (typically site-specific) and independently (typically regional exploration), communicating findings with public and industrial partners. These studies are research-oriented and are developing

54

Geothermal Drilling Success at Blue Mountain, Nevada | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Drilling Success at Blue Mountain, Nevada Drilling Success at Blue Mountain, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geothermal Drilling Success at Blue Mountain, Nevada Abstract Exploration in a blind prospect has led to the confirmation of a geothermal resource at Blue Mt.Nevada. The latest results include drilling of three production wells into Piedmont faults. These wells produce from a 185 to 190°C dilute benign brine reservoir. Short flow tests have shown prolific flow rates and indications of reservoir continuity.Well entries have shown that system permeability is fault-dominated. This is confirmed by the results of seismic reflection imaging. Young faulting in the area includes intersecting range front faults that strike NW, NS, and NE. Exposure of

55

Photogeologic Interpretation of the Baltazor-McGee Geothermal Prospects, Humboldt County, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GeothermEx, Inc. was asked by Earth Power Corporation in October 1977 to perform a photogeologic study of the Baltazor and McGee geothermal prospects, northern Humboldt County, Nevada and southern Harney County, Oregon (figure 1), as a means of evaluating the geothermal reservoir and heat source at these prospects. Work began in October and was completed in December 1977. It included a brief field reconnaissance, to clarify particular points. This report summarizes findings and offers interpretations of structural features, stratigraphy, recent tectonic events, and subsurface conditions.

Gardner, Murray C.; Koenig, James B.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

NREL: Financing Geothermal Power Projects - Guidebook to Geothermal Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance The Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance (the Guidebook), funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Program, provides insights and conclusions related to past influences and recent trends in the geothermal power project financing market before and after the 2008 economic downturn. Using the information in the Guidebook, developers and investors can innovate in new ways and develop partnerships that match investors' risk tolerance with the capital requirements of geothermal power projects in a dynamic and evolving marketplace. The Guidebook relies heavily on interviews conducted with leaders in the field of geothermal project finance. It includes detailed information on

57

BEOWAWE number1-A 10 MW geothermal unit in northern Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a project to build and operate a nominal 10 mw electrical generating unit using the geothermal heat from the Beowawe, Nevada, geothermal reservoir to power an isobutane binary unit. This 10 mw unit would be fabricated on portable skids by equipment supplier for shipment to the site. The project will be owned and operated by the NORNEV Demonstration Geothermal Company which is made up of Pacific Power and Light, Eugene Water and Electric Board, Sierra Pacific Power Company, and Sacramento Municipal Utility District. The geothermal brine for powering the 10 mw binary WGU will be purchased from Chevron Resource Company. This first unit is a research and development unit and will, hopefully, lead to total development of the 300 mw plus Beowawe reservoir.

Keilman, L.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes several approaches to reduce the costs and enhance the performance of geothermal power generation plants. Electricity supply planners, research program managers, and engineers evaluating geothermal power plant additions or modifications can use this report to compare today's geothermal power systems to several near- and long-term future options.

1996-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

59

Our Evolving Knowledge Of Nevada's Geothermal Resource Potential | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Our Evolving Knowledge Of Nevada's Geothermal Resource Potential Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Our Evolving Knowledge Of Nevada's Geothermal Resource Potential Abstract The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy (GBCGE) is conducting site-specific and regional geothermal research both in direct collaboration with industry (typically site-specific) and independently (typically regional exploration), communicating findings with public and industrial partners. These studies are research-oriented and are developing new tools

60

Microseisms in geothermal exploration: studies in Grass Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Frequency-wavenumber (f-k) spectra of seismic noise in the bands 1 less than or equal to f less than or equal to 10 Hz in frequency and parallel bar k parallel bar less than or equal to 35.7 cycles/km in wavenumber, measured at several places in Grass Valley, Nevada, exhibit numerous features which can be correlated with variations in surface geology and sources associated with hot spring activity. Exploration techniques for geothermal reservoirs, based upon the spatial distribution of the amplitude and frequency characteristics of short-period seismic noise, are applied and evaluated in a field program at a potential geothermal area in Grass Valley, Nevada. A detailed investigation of the spatial and temporal characteristics of the noise field was made to guide subsequent data acquisition and processing. Contour maps of normalized noise-level derived from carefully sampled data are dominated by the hot spring noise source and the generally high noise levels outlining the regions of thick alluvium. Major faults are evident when they produce a shallow lateral contrast in rock properties. Conventional seismic noise mapping techniques cannot differentiate noise anomalies due to buried seismic sources from those due to shallow geological effects. The noise radiating from a deep reservoir ought to be evident as body waves of high phase velocity with time-invariant source azimuth. A small two-dimensional array was placed at 16 locations in the region to map propagation parameters. The f-k spectra reveal local shallow sources, but no evidence for a significant body wave component in the noise field was found. With proper data sampling, array processing provides a powerful method for mapping the horizontal component of the vector phase velocity of the noise field. In Grass Valley, and probably in most areas, the 2 to 10 Hz microseismic field is predominantly fundamental mode Rayleigh waves controlled by the very shallow structure.

Liaw, A.L.C.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nevada geothermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Sierra Nevada Region - Western Area Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contact Us Customers Environmental Review (NEPA) Power Marketing Power Operations The Sierra Nevada Region is one of five offices in the Western Area Power Administration. SN...

62

GRC Workshop: The Power of the National Geothermal Data System | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GRC Workshop: The Power of the National Geothermal Data System GRC Workshop: The Power of the National Geothermal Data System GRC Workshop: The Power of the National Geothermal Data System October 2, 2013 (All day) Flyer for the National Geothermal Data System workshop at the Geothermal Resources Council Annual Meeting on October 2, 2013 in Las Vegas. Drilling Down: How Legacy and New Research Data Can Advance Geothermal Development-The Power of the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) A workshop at the Geothermal Resources Council Annual Meeting in Las Vegas, Nevada Abstract: The National Geothermal Data System's (NGDS) launch in 2014 will provide open access to millions of datasets, sharing technical geothermal-relevant data across the geosciences to propel geothermal development and production forward. By aggregating findings from the Energy Department's RD&D projects

63

NREL: Financing Geothermal Power Projects - Planning and Timing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Transfer Technology Deployment Energy Systems Integration Financing Geothermal Power Projects Geothermal Technologies Financing Geothermal Power Projects Search...

64

EA-1849: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Ormat Nevada...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home EA-1849: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Ormat Nevada, Inc. for a Geothermal Power Facility in Nevada EA-1849: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Ormat...

65

BLM Fact Sheet- Vulcan Power Company Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BLM Fact Sheet- Vulcan Power Company Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project BLM Fact Sheet- Vulcan Power Company Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: BLM Fact Sheet- Vulcan Power Company Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project Abstract No abstract available. Author Bureau of Land Management Organization Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada Published U.S. Department of the Interior, 2011 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for BLM Fact Sheet- Vulcan Power Company Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project Citation Bureau of Land Management (Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada). 2011. BLM Fact Sheet- Vulcan Power Company Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project. Carson City, Nevada: U.S. Department of the

66

Railroad Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Activities (1) NEPA(0) Geothermal Area Profile Location Nevada Exploration Region Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase...

67

Nevada - State Energy Profile Analysis - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Hydroelectric and geothermal power plants supply most of the remainder and Nevada is one of the few States that generate electricity from geothermal resources.

68

Economic Study of Geothermal Steam Production and Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the study to determine the required selling price of geothermal flash steam in order for Phillips Petroleum Company to obtain a rate of return on investment of 10, 15 or 20% on its discovery in Nevada. The economic evaluations are based on an order-of-magnitude type of estimate of capital costs for the flash steam production, steam gathering and brine reinjection system to supply steam to a 55 MW (Gross) geothermal power generating plant, using mixed pressure (double flash steam) and turbine design. Geothermal well costs, brine quality and well productivity data were provided by Phillips Petroleum Company and are based on the discovery wells in Nevada. Power plant costs are based on current technology and available hardware, under construction at the present time. Costs have been escalated to 1977.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Geothermal chemistry/exploration investigations at Dixie Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dixie Valley geothermal field has continuously produced electric power since 1988. At the request of Oxbow Geothermal Corp. and the US Department of Energy, the authors have organized an inter-agency team of investigators to examine several topics of concern regarding management and behavior of the resource. These topics include scaling of the injection system, recharge of the reservoir, geochemical monitoring of the reservoir, and development of increased fumarolic activity north of the power plant.

Goff, F.; Bergfeld, D.; Counce, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Janik, C.J. [Geological Survey (United States); Bruton, C.J.; Nimz, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

List of Geothermal Facilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facilities Facilities Jump to: navigation, search Facility Location Owner Aidlin Geothermal Facility Geysers Geothermal Area Calpine Amedee Geothermal Facility Honey Lake, California Amedee Geothermal Venture BLM Geothermal Facility Coso Junction, California, Coso Operating Co. Bear Canyon Geothermal Facility Clear Lake, California, Calpine Beowawe Geothermal Facility Beowawe, Nevada Beowawe Power LLC Big Geysers Geothermal Facility Clear Lake, California Calpine Blundell 1 Geothermal Facility Milford, Utah PacificCorp Energy Blundell 2 Geothermal Facility Milford, Utah PacificCorp Brady Hot Springs I Geothermal Facility Churchill, Nevada Ormat Technologies Inc CE Turbo Geothermal Facility Calipatria, California CalEnergy Generation Calistoga Geothermal Facility The Geysers, California Calpine

71

Geothermal reservoir assessment: Northern Basin and Range Province, Stillwater prospect, Churchill County, Nevada. Final report, April 1979-July 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Union Oil Company of California drilled two exploratory geothermal wells in the Stillwater geothermal prospect area in northwestern Nevada to obtain new subsurface data for inclusion in the geothermal reservoir assessment program. Existing data from prior investigations, which included the drilling of four earlier deep temperature gradient wells in the Stillwater area, was also provided. The two wells were drilled to total depths of 6946 ft and 10,014 ft with no significant drilling problems. A maximum reservoir temperature of 353 F was measured at 9950 ft. The most productive well flow tested at a rate of 152,000 lbs/hr with a wellhead temperature of 252 F and pressure of 20 psig. Based upon current economics, the Stillwater geothermal prospect is considered to be subcommercial for the generation of electrical power. This synopsis of the exploratory drilling activities and results contains summary drilling, geologic, and reservoir information from two exploratory geothermal wells.

Ash, D.L.; Dondanville, R.F.; Gulati, M.S.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Geothermal Power Generation as Related to Resource Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the past several years geothermal exploratory work has been conducted in northern Nevada. In conjunction with that effort a proposed 55-MW steam geothermal power plant was considered for initial installation in one of the fields being developed. The characteristics of the geothermal fields under consideration were not firm, with data indicating widely varying downhole temperatures. Thus, neither the resource nor the plant operating conditions could be set. To assist both the ultimate user of the resource, the utility, and the developer of the geothermal field, a series of parametric sensitivity studies were conducted for the initial evaluation of a field vis-a-vis the power plant. Using downhole temperature as the variable, the amount of brine, brine requirements/kWh, and pounds brine/pound of steam to the turbine were ascertained. This was done over a range of downhole temperatures of from 350F to 475F. The studies illustrate the total interdependence of the geothermal resource and its associated power plant. The selection of geothermal steam power plant design conditions must be related to the field in which the plant is located. The results of the work have proven to be valuable in two major respects: (1) to determine the production required of a particular geothermal field to meet electrical generation output and (2) as field characteristics become firm, operating conditions can be defined for the associated power plant.

Falcon, J. A.; Richards, R. G.; Keilman, L. R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Today's geothermal power economics and risks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Capital and power generation costs are developed as a parameterized composite of a number of ongoing geothermal power projects, and evaluates several of the most commonly accepted risks of geothermal power in terms of cost penalties to a basic cost of power. The status of geothermal power in the US is also reviewed briefly.

Lawford, T.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Use of slim holes for reservoir evaluation at the Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field, Nevada, USA  

SciTech Connect

Three slim holes were drilled at the Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field in northwestern Nevada about 15 km south of Reno. The slim holes were drilled to investigate the geologic conditions, thermal regime and productive characteristics of the geothermal system. They were completed through a geologic sequence consisting of alluvium cemented by geothermal fluids, volcaniclastic materials, and granodiorite. Numerous fractures, mostly sealed, were encountered throughout the drilled depth; however, several open fractures in the granodiorite, dipping between 65 and 90{degree}, had apertures up to 13 mm in width. The depths of the slim holes vary from 262 to 277 m with open-hole diameters of 76 mm. Pressure and temperature logs gave bottom-hole temperatures ranging from 163 to 166{degree} C. During injection testing, downhole pressures were measured using capillary tubing with a surface quartz transducer while temperatures were measured with a Kuster temperature tool located below the capillary tubing pressure chamber. No pressure increase was measured at reservoir depths in any of the three slim holes while injecting 11 kg/s of 29{degree}C water indicating a very high permeability in the geothermal reservoir. These injection test results suggested that productive geothermal fluids could be found at depths sufficient for well pumping equipment and at temperatures needed for electrical power production using binary-type conversion technology.

Combs, Jim; Goranson, Colin

1994-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

75

Black Warrior, Nevada: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warrior, Nevada: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Name Black Warrior, Nevada References Nevada Geothermal Power1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

76

Nevada Power: Clark Station; Las Vegas, Nevada (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

A partnership with the University of Nevada and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect solar data to support future solar power generation in the United States. The measurement station monitors global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location. The solar measurement instrumentation is also accompanied by meteorological monitoring equipment to provide scientists with a complete picture of the solar power possibilities.

Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

77

Nevada Power: Clark Station; Las Vegas, Nevada (Data)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A partnership with the University of Nevada and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect solar data to support future solar power generation in the United States. The measurement station monitors global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location. The solar measurement instrumentation is also accompanied by meteorological monitoring equipment to provide scientists with a complete picture of the solar power possibilities.

Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

78

Geothermal Resource Analysis and Structure of Basin and Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Publish new thermal and drill data from the Dizie Valley Geothermal Field that affect evaluation of Basin and Range Geothermal Resources in a very major and positive way. Completed new geophysical surveys of Dizie Valley including gravity and aeromagnetics and integrated the geophysical, seismic, geological and drilling data at Dizie Valley into local and regional geologic models. Developed natural state mass and energy transport fluid flow models of generic Basin and Range systems based on Dizie Valley data that help to understand the nature of large scale constraints on the location and characteristics of the geothermal systems. Documented a relation between natural heat loss for geothermal and electrical power production potential and determined heat flow for 27 different geothermal systems. Prepared data set for generation of a new geothermal map of North American including industry data totaling over 25,000 points in the US alone.

David Blackwell; Kenneth Wisian; Maria Richards; Mark Leidig; Richard Smith; Jason McKenna

2003-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

79

Nevada Power Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Power Co Nevada Power Co (Redirected from NV Energy) Jump to: navigation, search Name Nevada Power Co Place Nevada Utility Id 13407 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO Other Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png DEFERRED ENERGY ACCOUNTING ADJUSTMENT

80

Geothermal/Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Power Plant Geothermal/Power Plant < Geothermal(Redirected from Power Plant) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Power Plants General List of Plants Map of Plants Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (19) Binary power system equipment and cooling towers at the ORMAT Ormesa Geothermal Power Complex in Southern California. Geothermal Power Plants discussion Electricity Generation Converting the energy from a geothermal resource into electricity is achieved by producing steam from the heat underground to spin a turbine which is connected to a generator to produce electricity. The type of energy conversion technology that is used depends on whether the resource is predominantly water or steam, the temperature of the resource, and the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nevada geothermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidebook to Geothermal Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance J. Pater Salmon, J. Meurice, N. Wobus, F. Stern, and M. Duaime Navigant Consulting Boulder, Colorado Subcontract Report NREL/SR-6A20-49391 March 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance J. Pater Salmon, J. Meurice, N. Wobus, F. Stern, and M. Duaime Navigant Consulting Boulder, Colorado NREL Technical Monitor: Paul Schwabe Prepared under Subcontract No. LGJ-0-40242-01 Subcontract Report

82

Proceedings of a Topical Meeting On Small Scale Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Power Plant Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings describe the workshop of the Topical Meeting on Small Scale Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Power Plant Projects. The projects covered include binary power plants, rotary separator, screw expander power plants, modular wellhead power plants, inflow turbines, and the EPRI hybrid power system. Active projects versus geothermal power projects were described. In addition, a simple approach to estimating effects of fluid deliverability on geothermal power cost is described starting on page 119. (DJE-2005)

None

1986-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

83

NREL: Financing Geothermal Power Projects - Related Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Related Links Related Links View these websites for more information on geothermal power project financing. NREL Geothermal Policymakers' Guidebooks NREL Geothermal Policymakers' Guidebooks Learn the five key steps for creating effective policy and increasing the deployment of geothermal electricity generation technologies. California Energy Commission's Geothermal Program Here you'll find information on the California Energy Commission's geothermal program, including geothermal energy, funding opportunities, and contacts. Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Energy Efficiency This database of state, local, utility, and federal incentives and policies that promote renewable energy and energy efficiency can help you find financing incentives and opportunities in your state.

84

Microsoft Word - BlueMountainGeotherm_FONSI_FinalDrft v3 Clean...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LOAN GUARANTEE FOR NEVADA GEOTHERMAL POWER'S BLUE MOUNTAIN GEOTHERMAL DEVELOPMENT PROJECT IN HUMBOLDT AND PERSHING...

85

Powered by Renewables formerly Nevada Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

formerly Nevada Wind formerly Nevada Wind Jump to: navigation, search Name Powered by Renewables (formerly Nevada Wind) Place Las Vegas, Nevada Zip 89102 Sector Renewable Energy Product PBR develops, manages and sells utility-scale renewable energy projects. References Powered by Renewables (formerly Nevada Wind)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Powered by Renewables (formerly Nevada Wind) is a company located in Las Vegas, Nevada . References ↑ "Powered by Renewables (formerly Nevada Wind)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Powered_by_Renewables_formerly_Nevada_Wind&oldid=349890" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies

86

Geothermal/Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geothermal/Power Plant < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Power Plants General List of Plants Map of Plants Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (20) Binary power system equipment and cooling towers at the ORMAT Ormesa Geothermal Power Complex in Southern California. Geothermal Power Plants discussion Electricity Generation Converting the energy from a geothermal resource into electricity is achieved by producing steam from the heat underground to spin a turbine

87

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants: 2012 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intent of this report is to provide an update of historical and current trends in geothermal power plant technology, extending the previous Next Generation Geothermal Power Plant (NGGPP) report originally developed by EPRI in 1996.BackgroundIn its 1996 study, EPRI evaluated a number of technologies with the potential to lower the cost of geothermal power production or to expand cost effective power production to lower temperature resources, thus opening ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

88

MICROSEISMS IN GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION: STUDIES IN GRASS VALLEY, NEVADA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

period seismic noise (T>30 sec) . . . 2.5 Geothermal ground226. Clacy, G.R.T. ? 1968, Geothermal ground noise amplitudestudies at the Cos0 geothermal area, China Lake, California:

Liaw, A.L.C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Environmental assessment for a geothermal direct utilization project in Reno, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed action involves the development of geothermal wells to provide hot water and heat for five users in Reno, Nevada. Data from nearby wells indicate the sufficient hot water is available from the Moana Known Geothermal Resource Area for this action. Construction activities have been planned to minimize or eliminate problems with noise, runoff, and disturbance of biota as well as other potential environmental effects. Disposal of the geothermal fluids via surface water or injection will be determined based on water quality of the geothermal fluids and geologic effects of injection. The affected environment is described by this document and needed mitigation procedures discussed.

Perino, J.V.; McCloskey, M.H.; Wolterink, T.J.; Wallace, R.C.; Baker, D.W.; Harper, D.L.; Anderson, D.T.; Siteman, J.V.; Sherrill, K.T.

1980-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

90

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a giv

Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a given pr

Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

TS Power Plant, Eureka County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Not all coal-fired power plants are constructed by investor-owned utilities or independent power producers selling to wholesale markets. When Newmont Mining Corp. recognised that local power supplies were inadequate and too expensive to meet long-term electricity needs for its major gold- and copper-mining operations in northern Nevada, it built its own generation. What is more, Newmont's privately owned 200-MW net coal-fired plant features power plant technologies that will surely become industry standards. Newmont's investment in power and technology is also golden: the capital cost will be paid back in about eight years. 4 figs.

Peltier, R. [DTE Energy Services (United States)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Geothermal Blog | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Blog Blog Geothermal Blog RSS October 23, 2013 This diagram shows how electricity is produced using enhanced geothermal systems. | Energy Department Geothermal Energy: A Glance Back and a Leap Forward This year marks the centennial of the first commercial electricity production from geothermal resources. As geothermal technologies advance, the Energy Department is working to improve, and lower the cost of, enhanced geothermal systems. April 12, 2013 Learn the basics of enhanced geothermal systems technology. I Infographic by Sarah Gerrity. Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth to Generate Sustainable Power Innovative clean energy project is up and running in Nevada.

94

Dixie Valley, Nevada: A promising geothermal area under development by industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selected subsurface reservoirs located in the Western United States may contain significant geothermal energy, and if development continues, this energy source may provide substantial electrical power or related energy by the year 2,000. Utility management must be convinced of the reliability and cost attractiveness of this energy source. A number of exploration programs are in progress to evaluate the potential of geothermal energy in the United States. For example, numerous exploration methods have been employed in Dixie Valley, Nevada, since 1967 with mixed results. However, with DOE support, additional data have recently become available. The authors have revised earlier structural models of the basin and have made recommendations for additional investigations that should assist in clarifying the geologic relationships within the reservoir. The principal geologic characteristics of the reservoir that may place limits on project economics appear to be the depth and trend area of producing zones, fluid quality and the amenability of the upper zones to accept large volumes of spent fluids. However, reservoir temperature, flow rates, recharge characteristics, and other factors appear to be acceptable either for electrical power production of more than 1,000 MWe, or for direct applications such as on-site agricultural processing.

Campbell, M.D.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Geothermal Power Development in the Phillippines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The generation of electric power to meet the needs of industrial growth and dispersal in the Philippines is aimed at attaining self-reliance through availment of indigenous energy resources. The Philippines by virtue of her position in the high-heat flow region has in abundance a number of exploitable geothermal fields located all over the country. Results indicate that the geothermal areas of the Philippines presently in various stages of exploration and development are of such magnitude that they can be relied on to meet a significant portion of the country's power need. Large scale geothermal energy for electric power generation was put into operation last year with the inauguration of two 55-MW geothermal generating units at Tiwi, Albay in Southern Luzon. Another two 55-MW units were added to the Luzon Grid in the same year from Makiling-Banahaw field about 70 kilometers south of Manila. For 1979 alone, therefore, 220-MW of generating capacity was added to the power supply coming from geothermal energy. This year a total of 220-MW power is programmed for both areas. This will bring to 443-MW of installed generating capacity from geothermal energy with 3-MW contributed by the Tongonan Geothermal pilot plant in Tongonan, Leyte, Central Philippines in operation since July 1977. Financial consideration of Philippine experience showed that electric power derived from geothermal energy is competitive with other sources of energy and is a viable source of baseload electric power. Findings have proven the technical and economic acceptability of geothermal energy resources development. To realize the benefits that stem from the utilization of indigenous geothermal resources and in the light of the country's ever increasing electric power demand and in the absence of large commercial oil discovery in the Philippines, geothermal energy resource development has been accelerated anew. The program includes development of eight fields by 1989 by adding five more fields to the currently developed and producing geothermal areas.

Jovellanos, Jose U.; Alcaraz, Arturo; Datuin, Rogelio

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Geothermal Power Plants in China  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nine small experimental geothermal power plants are now operating at six sites in the People's Republic of China. These range in capacity from 50 kW to 3MW, and include plants of the flash-steam and binary type. All except two units utilize geofluids at temperatures lower than 100 C. The working fluids for the binary plants include normal- and iso-butane, ethyl chloride, and Freon. The first geothermal plant came on-line in 1970, the most recent ones in 1979. Figure 1 shows the location of the plants. Major cities are also shown for reference. Table 1 contains a listing of the plants and some pertinent characteristics. The total installed capacity is 5,186 kW, of which 4,386 kW is from flash-steam units. In the report, they given an example of the results of exploratory surveys, and show system diagrams, technical specifications, and test results for several of the power plants.

DiPippo, Ronald

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Nevada: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in geotherm. Part B  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This GEOTHERM sample file contains 1367 records for Nevada. The records contain data on location, sample description, analysis type, collection condition, flow rates, and the chemical and physical properties of the fluid. Stable and radioactive isotope data are occassionally available. (ACR)

Bliss, J.D.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOE-funding Unknown References Lisa Shevenell, Ted De Rocher (2005) Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir Temperatures At Nevada Geothermal Power...

99

Oregon/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oregon/Geothermal Oregon/Geothermal < Oregon Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Oregon Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Oregon Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Crump Geyser Geothermal Project Nevada Geo Power, Ormat Utah 80 MW80,000 kW 80,000,000 W 80,000,000,000 mW 0.08 GW 8.0e-5 TW Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Crump's Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Project U.S. Geothermal Vale, Oregon Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area Snake River Plain Geothermal Region Neal Hot Springs II Geothermal Project U.S. Geothermal Vale, Oregon Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area Snake River Plain Geothermal Region

100

EA-1849: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Ormat Nevada, Inc. for a  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1849: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Ormat Nevada, Inc. EA-1849: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Ormat Nevada, Inc. for a Geothermal Power Facility in Nevada EA-1849: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Ormat Nevada, Inc. for a Geothermal Power Facility in Nevada Overview Ormat Nevada Inc. (ORMAT), through its subsidiaries, proposes to construct and operate three geothermal power production facilities and associated power transmission lines in northern Nevada. The power production facilities include the Tuscarora Geothermal Power Plant Facility (Tuscarora Facility) in Elko County, the Jersey Valley Geothermal Development Facility (Jersey Valley Facility) in Pershing County, and the McGinness Hills Geothermal Facility (McGinness Hills Facility) in Lander County (Figure 1). The Hot Sulphur Springs Transmission Line (Transmission Line) would connect

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nevada geothermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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101

Report on Hawaii Geothermal Power Plant Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report describes the design, construction, and operation of the Hawaii Geothermal Generator Project. This power plant, located in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii, produces three megawatts of electricity from the steam phase of a geothermal well. (ACR)

Not Available

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Nicaragua-San Jacinto-Tizate Geothermal Power Project | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Power Project AgencyCompany Organization Inter-American Development Bank Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Geothermal Topics Background analysis...

103

Preliminary investigation of scale formation and fluid chemistry at the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The chemistry of geothermal, production, and injection fluids at the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada, was characterized to address an ongoing scaling problem and to evaluate the effects of reinjection into the reservoir. Fluids generally followed mixing-dilution trends. Recharge to the Dixie Valley system apparently originates from local sources. The low-pressure brine and injection waters were saturated with respect to amorphous silica, which correlated with the ongoing scaling problem. Local shallow ground water contains about 15% geothermal brine mixed with regional recharge. The elevated Ca, Mg, and HCO{sub 3} content of this water suggests that carbonate precipitation may occur if shallow groundwater is reinjected. Downhole reservoir fluids are close to equilibrium with the latest vein mineral assemblage of wairakite-epidote-quartz-calcite. Reinjection of spent geothermal brine is predicted to affect the region near the wellbore differently than it does the region farther away.

Bruton, C.J.; Counce, D.; Bergfeld, D.; Goff, F.; Johnson, S.D.; Moore, J.N.; Nimz, G.

1997-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

104

President Obama Discusses Solar Power in Nevada | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Discusses Solar Power in Nevada Discusses Solar Power in Nevada President Obama Discusses Solar Power in Nevada March 22, 2012 - 10:26am Addthis President Barack Obama delivers remarks on energy after a tour of a solar panel field at the Copper Mountain Solar 1 Facility, the largest photovoltaic plant operating in the country with nearly one million solar panels powering 17,000 homes, in Boulder City, Nevada, March 21, 2012. | Official White House Photo by Lawrence Jackson. President Barack Obama delivers remarks on energy after a tour of a solar panel field at the Copper Mountain Solar 1 Facility, the largest photovoltaic plant operating in the country with nearly one million solar panels powering 17,000 homes, in Boulder City, Nevada, March 21, 2012. | Official White House Photo by Lawrence Jackson.

105

Small geothermal electric systems for remote powering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes conditions and costs at which quite small (100 to 1,000 kilowatt) geothermal systems could be used for off-grid powering at remote locations. This is a first step in a larger process of determining locations and conditions at which markets for such systems could be developed. The results suggest that small geothermal systems offer substantial economic and environmental advantages for powering off-grid towns and villages. Geothermal power is most likely to be economic if the system size is 300 kW or greater, down to reservoir temperatures of 100{degree}C. For system sizes smaller than 300 kW, the economics can be favorable if the reservoir temperature is about 120{degree}C or above. Important markets include sites remote from grids in many developing and developed countries. Estimates of geothermal resources in many developing countries are shown.

Entingh, Daniel J.; Easwaran, Eyob.; McLarty, Lynn

1994-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

106

Nevada Power Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Co Power Co Place Nevada Utility Id 13407 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO Other Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png DEFERRED ENERGY ACCOUNTING ADJUSTMENT GS (General Service) Commercial LGS-1 (Large General Service) Commercial

107

Today's geothermal power economics and risks  

SciTech Connect

Capital and power generation costs are developed as a parameterized composite of a number of ongoing geothermal power projects, and evaluates several of the most commonly accepted risks of geothermal power in terms of cost penalties to a basic cost of power. The status of geothermal power in the US is also reviewed briefly.

Lawford, T.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Geothermal systems of the Mono Basin-Long Valley region, eastern California and western Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The region that includes Mono Basin, Long Valley, the Bridgeport-Bodie Hills area, and Aurora, in eastern California and western Nevada was studied to determine the possible causes and interactions of the geothermal anomalies in the Mono Basin-Long Valley region as a whole. A special goal of the study was to locate possible shallow bodies of magma and to determine their influence on the hydrothermal systems in the region. (ACR)

Higgins, C.T.; Flynn, T.; Chapman, R.H.; Trexler, D.T.; Chase, G.R.; Bacon, C.F.; Ghusn, G. Jr.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Monitoring Biological Activity at Geothermal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The economic impact of microbial growth in geothermal power plants has been estimated to be as high as $500,000 annually for a 100 MWe plant. Many methods are available to monitor biological activity at these facilities; however, very few plants have any on-line monitoring program in place. Metal coupon, selective culturing (MPN), total organic carbon (TOC), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), respirometry, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) characterizations have been conducted using water samples collected from geothermal plants located in California and Utah. In addition, the on-line performance of a commercial electrochemical monitor, the BIoGEORGE?, has been evaluated during extended deployments at geothermal facilities. This report provides a review of these techniques, presents data on their application from laboratory and field studies, and discusses their value in characterizing and monitoring biological activities at geothermal power plants.

Peter Pryfogle

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

San Emido Geothermal Energy North Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Emido Geothermal Energy North Project San Emido Geothermal Energy North Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: San Emido Geothermal Energy North Project EA at San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Power Plant, Geothermal/Well Field, {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EA Applicant USG Nevada LLC Geothermal Area San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area Project Location Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Power Plant, Geothermal/Well Field Techniques Production Wells Comments USG Nevada submitted Utilization POU on 7/25/2013 Time Frame (days) Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Winnemucca Managing Field Office BLM Black Rock

111

Annual US Geothermal Power Production and Development Report | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

US Geothermal Power Production and Development Report US Geothermal Power Production and Development Report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Annual US Geothermal Power Production and Development Report Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: To increase the accuracy and value of information presented in its annual US Geothermal Power Production and Development Report, the Geothermal Energy Association (GEA) developed a reporting system, known as the Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions, in 2010. The Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions serve as a guideline to project developers in reporting geothermal project development information to the GEA. A basic understanding of the Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions will also aid the reader in fully understanding the information presented in this

112

Direct use of geothermal energy, Elko, Nevada district heating. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In early 1978 the US Department of Energy, under its Project Opportunity Notice program, granted financial assistance for a project to demonstrate the direct use application of geothermal energy in Elko, Nevada. The project is to provide geothermal energy to three different types of users: a commercial office building, a commercial laundry and a hotel/casino complex, all located in downtown Elko. The project included assessment of the geothermal resource potential, resource exploration drilling, production well drilling, installation of an energy distribution system, spent fluid disposal facility, and connection of the end users buildings. The project was completed in November 1982 and the three end users were brought online in December 1982. Elko Heat Company has been providing continuous service since this time.

Lattin, M.W.; Hoppe, R.D.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Electromagnetic soundings for geothermal resources in Dixie Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An electromagnetic (EM) sounding survey was performed over a region encompassing the Dixie Valley geothermal field to map the subsurface resistivity in the geothermal field and the surrounding area. The EM survey, consisting of 19 frequency-domain depth soundings made with the LBL EM-60 system, was undertaken to explore a narrow region adjacent to the Stillwater Range to a depth of 2 to 3 km. Lithologic and well log resistivity information from well 66-21 show that for EM interpretation the section can be reduced to a three-layer model consisting of moderately resistive alluvial sediments, low resistivity lacustrine sediments, and high resistivity Tertiary volcanics and older rocks. This three layer model was used as a starting point in interpreting EM sounding data. Variations in resistivity and thickness provided structural information and clues to the accumulation of geothermal fluids. The interpreted soundings reveal a 1 to 1.5-km-deep low-resistivity zone spatially associated with the geothermal field. The shallow depth suggests that the zone detected is either fluid leakage or hydrothermal alteration, rather than high-temperature reservoir fluids. The position of the low-resistivity zone also conforms to changes in depth to the high resistivity basal layer, suggesting that faulting is a control on the location of productive intervals. 10 refs., 7 figs.

Wilt, M.J.; Goldstein, N.E.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

HL Power Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » HL Power Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home HL Power Geothermal Facility General Information Name HL Power Geothermal Facility Facility HL Power Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Wendel, California Coordinates 40.3482346°, -120.2335461° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.3482346,"lon":-120.2335461,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

115

Report on Hawaii geothermal power plant project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hawaii Geothermal Generator Project is the first power plant in the State of Hawaii to be powered by geothermal energy. This plant, which is located in the Puna District on the Island of Hawaii, produces three (3) megawatts of electricity utilizing the steam phase from the geothermal well. This project represents the climax of the geophysical research efforts going on for two decades in the Hawaiian Islands which resulted in the discovery of a significant reservoir of geothermal energy which could be put to practical use. In 1978 the Department of Energy, in conjunction with the State of Hawaii, entered into negotiations to design and build a power plant. The purpose and objective of this plant was to demonstrate the feasibility of constructing and operating a geothermal power plant located in a remote volcanically active area. A contract was signed in mid 1978 between the Research Corporation of the University of Hawaii (RCUH) and the Department of Energy (DOE). To date, the DOE has provided 8.3 million dollars with the State of Hawaii and others contributing 2.1 million dollars. The cost of the project exceeded its original estimates by approximately 25%. These increases in cost were principally contributed to the higher cost for construction than was originally estimated. Second, the cost of procuring the various pieces of equipment exceed their estimates by 10 to 20 percent, and third, the engineering dollar per man hour rose 20 to 25 percent.

Not Available

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Ahuachapan Geothermal Power Plant, El Salvador  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Ahuachapan geothermal power plant has been the subject of several recent reports and papers (1-7). This article is a condensation of the author's earlier writings (5-7), and incorporates new information on the geothermal activities in El Salvador obtained recently through a telephone conversation with Ing. R. Caceres of the Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (C.E.L.) who has been engaged in the design and engineering of the newest unit at Ahuachapan. El Salvador is the first of the Central American countries to construct and operate a geothermal electric generating station. Exploration began in the mid-1960's at the geothermal field near Ahuachapan in western El Salvador. The first power unit, a separated-steam or so-called ''single-flash'' plant, was started up in June 1975, and was followed a year later by an identical unit. In July 1980, the Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (C.E.L.) will complete the installation of a third unit, a dual-pressure (or ''double-flash'') unit rated at 35 MW. The full Ahuachapan plant will then constitute about 20% of the total installed electric generating capacity of the country. During 1977, the first two units generated nearly one-third of all the electricity produced in El Salvador. C.E.L. is actively pursuing several other promising sites for additional geothermal plants. There is the possibility that eventually geothermal energy will contribute about 450 MW of electric generating capacity. In any event it appears that by 1985 El Salvador should be able to meet its domestic needs for electricity by means of its indigenous geothermal and hydroelectric power plants, thus eliminating any dependence on imported petroleum for power generation.

DiPippo, Ronald

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Characterization of injection wells in a fractured reservoir using PTS logs, Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field, Nevada, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field in northwestern Nevada, about 15 km south of Reno, is a shallow (150m to 825m) moderate temperature (155 C to 168 C) liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir situated in highly-fractured granodiorite. Three injection wells were drilled and completed in granodiorite to dispose of spent geothermal fluids from the Steamboat II and III power plants (a 30 MW air-cooled binary-type facility). Injection wells were targeted to depths below 300m to inject spent fluids below producing fractures. First, quasi-static downhole pressure-temperature-spinner (PTS) logs were obtained. Then, the three wells were injection-tested using fluids between 80 C and 106 C at rates from 70 kg/s to 200 kg/s. PTS logs were run both up and down the wells during these injection tests. These PTS surveys have delineated the subsurface fracture zones which will accept fluid. The relative injectivity of the wells was also established. Shut-in interzonal flow within the wells was identified and characterized.

Goranson, Colin; Combs, Jim

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

118

Capital cost models for geothermal power plants  

SciTech Connect

A computer code, titled GEOCOST, has been developed at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, to rapidly and systematically calculate the potential costs of geothermal power. A description of the cost models in GEOCOST for the geothermal power plants is given here. Plant cost models include the flashed steam and binary systems. The data sources are described, along with the cost data correlations, resulting equations, and uncertainties. Comparison among GEOCOST plant cost estimates and recent A-E estimates are presented. The models are intended to predict plant costs for second and third generation units, rather than the more expensive first-of-a-kind units.

Cohn, P.D.; Bloomster, C.H.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Advanced Condenser Boosts Geothermal Power Plant Output (Fact ...  

... Indonesia, and Turkey. Promising greater efficiency and reduced costs ADCC technology holds great promise for geothermal power plants seeking ...

120

The Moana geothermal system in Reno, Nevada: A hydrologic, geochemical, and thermal analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Moana geothermal systems, located in Reno, Nevada, is a moderate-temperature geothermal resource used for space heating applications. Both historic and new hydrologic, thermal, and groundwater chemistry data were collected to evaluate the Moana system and to develop a calibrated numerical model of the geothermal aquifer for investigation of resource development scenarios. The new data collection consisted of static water level measurements and temperature with depth measurements for a 13-month period at 26 geothermal wells to investigate hydrologic and thermal changes with time. In addition, groundwater chemistry sampling at 10 wells was used to evaluate mixing of thermal and nonthermal waters. Collected information indicates that in the most heavily used portion of the geothermal aquifer, the hydraulic heads have declined. This decline may induce additional leakage of cooler water from the overlying unconfined aquifer and lead to decreased temperatures at well locations in the geothermal aquifer. The groundwater chemistry data show concentration changes with temperature for boron, chloride, fluoride, lithium, and bicarbonate that are a function of the degree of mixing of thermal and nonthermal waters. Temporal changes in these constituents may be used as an indication of relative temperature changes in the geothermal system caused by mixing at a given location. An attempt was made to use the hydraulic head and maximum temperature data to develop a calibrated numerical model for the Moana geothermal system. However, lack of information about the horizontal and vertical thermal and fluid fluxes made the development of a calibrated model not possible at this time. 25 refs., 54 figs., 6 tabs.

Jacobson, E.A.; Johnston, J.W.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nevada geothermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Exploration ofr geothermal resources in Dixie Valley, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case history of SUNEDCO's exploratory efforts, which ultimately led to the drilling and discovery of the Dixie Valley goethermal field, is presented. The geochemistry from three active lot springs in the area: Dixie Hot Springs, South Hot Springs, and Hyder Hot Springs, was examined. Two heat flow drilling programs were conducted at Dixie Hot Springs consisting of 45 temperature gradient holes ranging in depth from 30 to 1500 ft. From this program a heat-flow anomaly was mapped extending along the Stillwater Range front in which temperature gradients are greater than 100/sup 0/c/Km. in 1978, the number 1 SW Lamb well was drilled on a 152 acre farmout from Chevron. The well was completed as a geothermal producer in a zone of fractured volcanic rocks. Since then, five additional geothermal producing wells were completed within the anomalous area. (MJF)

Parchman, W.L.; Knox, J.W.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Small-Scale Geothermal Power Plant Field Verification Projects: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

In the spring of 2000, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory issued a Request for Proposal for the construction of small-scale (300 kilowatt [kW] to 1 megawatt [MW]) geothermal power plants in the western United States. Five projects were selected for funding. Of these five, subcontracts have been completed for three, and preliminary design work is being conducted. The three projects currently under contract represent a variety of concepts and locations: a 1-MW evaporatively enhanced, air-cooled binary-cycle plant in Nevada; a 1-MW water-cooled Kalina-cycle plant in New Mexico; and a 750-kW low-temperature flash plant in Utah. All three also incorporate direct heating: onion dehydration, heating for a fish hatchery, and greenhouse heating, respectively. These projects are expected to begin operation between April 2002 and September 2003. In each case, detailed data on performance and costs will be taken over a 3-year period.

Kutscher, C.

2001-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

123

Electromagnetic soundings over a geothermal reservoir in Dixie Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An electromagnetic (EM) sounding survey was performed over a region encompassing the Dixie Valley geothermal field with the purpose of mapping the subsurface resistivity in the geothermal field and its surroundings. The EM survey consisted of 19 frequency-domain depth soundings made with the EM-60 system using three separate horizontal-loop transmitters, and was designed to explore a narrow region adjacent to the Stillwater Range to a depth of 2 to 3 k. Most sounding curves could be fitted to three-layer resistivity models. The surface layer is moderately conductive (10 to 15 ohm-m), has a maximum thickness of 500 m, and consists mainly of alluvial fan and lake sediments. More conductive zones are associated with hydrothermally altered rocks; a resistivity high may be associated with siliceous hot spring deposits. The conductive second layer (2 to 5 ohm-m) varies in thickness from 400 to 800 m and thickens toward the center of the valley. This layer probably consists of lacustrine sediments saturated with saline waters. Local resistivity lows observed in the second layer may be related to elevated subsurface temperatures. This layer may act as a cap rock for the geothermal system. Resistivities of the third layer are high (50 to 100 ohm-m) except in a narrow 5-km band paralleling the range front. This low-resistivity zone, within volcanic rocks, correlates well in depth and location with reported zones of geothermal fluid production. It also seems to correlate with the western margin of a concealed graben structure previously inferred from other geophysical data.

Wilt, M.J.; Goldstein, N.E.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Geothermal reservoir assessment case study: Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two 1500 foot temperature gradient holes and two deep exploratory wells were drilled and tested. Hydrologic-hydrochemical, shallow temperature survey, structural-tectonic, petrologic alteration, and solid-sample geochemistry studies were completed. Eighteen miles of high resolution reflection seismic data were gathered over the area. The study indicates that a geothermal regime with temperatures greater than 400/sup 0/F may exist at a depth of approximately 7500' to 10,000' over an area more than ten miles in length.

Denton, J.M.; Bell, E.J.; Jodry, R.L.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Geology of Nevada: The  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geology plays a central role in Nevadas human history, economy, and future. Cordilleran tectonics have created the Basin and Range landscape and interior drainage of the Great Basin, provided a rain shadow to make Nevada the nations driest state, and generated frequent earthquakes along normal and strike-slip faults. Geology is key to reducing risks from Nevadas natural and anthropogenic hazards (earthquakes, flash floods, drought, land subsidence, erosion after wildland fires, landslides, swelling and collapsing soils, radon, arsenic, and others). Nevadas geologic fortunes make it the leading state in the production of gold, silver, barite, lithium, and mercury and a major producer of geothermal power and gypsum. The metals are primarily related to igneous activity, with major pulses of magma during the Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary. Barite is mined from Paleozoic

Jonathan G. Price

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Geothermal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal power plants are commercially mature, dispatchable, base-loaded renewable energy sources. Most existing geothermal power plants exploit moderate- to high-temperature geothermal resources greater than 150C. These conditions exist in a few, relatively small geographic areas of the world, but these areas currently host thousands of megawatts of reliable, base-loaded renewable power, with thousands more megawatts in development. According to the Geothermal Resources Council, between 4000 and 7000 ...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

127

Waste heat rejection from geothermal power stations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study of waste heat rejection from geothermal power stations is concerned only with the heat rejected from the power cycle. The heat contained in reinjected or otherwise discharged geothermal fluids is not included with the waste heat considered here. The heat contained in the underflow from the flashtanks in such systems is not considered as part of the heat rejected from the power cycle. By following this definition of the waste heat to be rejected, various methods of waste heat dissipation are discussed without regard for the particular arrangement to obtain heat from the geothermal source. Recent conceptual design studies made for 50-MW(e) geothermal power stations at Heber and Niland, California, are of particular interst. The former uses a flashed-steam system and the latter a binary cycle that uses isopentane. In last-quarter 1976 dollars, the total estimated capital costs were about $750/kW and production costs about 50 mills/kWhr. If wet/dry towers were used to conserve 50% of the water evaporation at Heber, production costs would be about 65 mills/kWhr.

Robertson, R.C.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Geochemistry of the Colado geothermal area, Pershing County, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Multielement geochemical analysis of drill cuttings from 18 shallow and 2 intermediate-depth temperature gradient holes outlines an area of anomalous geochemistry related to the fluid flow and temperature distribution within the Colado geothermal area. The concentrations of Hg, As, Li, and Be belong to more than one statistical population and provide the clearest expression of hydrothermal processes. Enrichments of these four elements define anomalous zones which are spatially coincident with a measured temperature anomaly. The spatial distribution suggests that thermal fluid rises into alluvium in the vicinity of a major Basin and Range fault to depths of 200 to 400 feet (60 to 120 m), then flows laterally within shallow alluvial aquifers down the local hydrologic gradient. As the fluid cools, Li, Be, As, and Hg are deposited in response to changing physical and chemical conditions. As and Be appear to be deposited early in higher temperature zones; Li begins to deposit early but forms a rather dispersed geochemical anomaly; Hg is anomalous throughout the entire geothermal area but is concentrated in a shallow halo above the As and Be anomalies. The distributions suggest that the entry of thermal fluids from depth into the alluvium is spatially restricted to a small area and that the larger area of the observed thermal anomaly is due to the flow of warm fluid within shallow aquifers.

Christensen, O.D.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Geothermal Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home General List of Dry Steam Plants List of Flash Steam Plants Steam Power Plants Dry Steam Power Plants Simple Dry Steam Powerplant process description - DOE EERE 2012 Dry steam plants use hydrothermal fluids that are primarily steam. The steam travels directly to a turbine, which drives a generator that produces electricity. The steam eliminates the need to burn fossil fuels to run the turbine (also eliminating the need to transport and store fuels). These plants emit only excess steam and very minor amounts of gases.[1] Dry steam power plants systems were the first type of geothermal power generation plants built (they were first used at Lardarello in Italy in 1904). Steam technology is still effective today at currently in use at The

130

Geothermal Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Dry Steam) (Redirected from Dry Steam) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home General List of Dry Steam Plants List of Flash Steam Plants Steam Power Plants Dry Steam Power Plants Simple Dry Steam Powerplant process description - DOE EERE 2012 Dry steam plants use hydrothermal fluids that are primarily steam. The steam travels directly to a turbine, which drives a generator that produces electricity. The steam eliminates the need to burn fossil fuels to run the turbine (also eliminating the need to transport and store fuels). These plants emit only excess steam and very minor amounts of gases.[1] Dry steam power plants systems were the first type of geothermal power generation plants built (they were first used at Lardarello in Italy in 1904). Steam technology is still effective today at currently in use at The

131

Hypothesis testing for resource evaluation: an application to geothermal potential estimation in Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A hypothesis testing methodology for the statistical integration of diverse data types has been further investigated. In an earlier study the technique was developed and applied, with limited data, to evaluation of the geothermal potential of Nevada. That effort has been extended in this report to include the implementation of data on major lineaments and surface lithology. Information from the new data bases is integrated with that from the seismicity and small scale linear data previously studied. The new data added in this study has improved the results considerably. A number of new areas appropriate for further, more detailed geophysical investigation are indicated by high likelihood ratios.

Parr, J.T.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Geology and thermal regime, geothermal test USA No. 11-36, Grass Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of drilling of an 8,565 foot geothermal test near Leach Hot Springs, Pershing County, Nevada, by Sunoco Energy Development Company. USA No.11-36 is located 500 feet south and 500 feet east of the northwest corner of Section 36, T. 32 N., R. 38 E (Mount Diablo Meridian), elevation 4,573 feet. It was drilled between May 15 and July 2, 1980. USA No.11-36 was deemed unsuccessful, having encountered no temperature higher than 270 F and no significant permeability, and was plugged and abandoned without testing prior to releasing the rig.

Wilde, Walter R.; Koenig, James B.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Experience with the EM-60 electromagnetic system for geothermal exploration in Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) conducted controlled-source electromagnetic (EM) surveys at three geothermal prospects in northern Nevada. Over 40 soundings were made in Panther Canyon (Grass Valley), near Winnemucca; Soda Lakes, near Fallon; and McCoy, west of Austin, to test and demonstrate the applicability of LBL's EM-60 system to geothermal exploration. The EM-60 is a frequency-domain system using three-component magnetic detection. Typically, +-65 A is applied to an 100-m-diameter four-turn horizontal loop, generating a dipole moment >10/sup 6/ MKS over the frequency range 10/sup -3/ to 10/sup -3/ Hz. With such a source loop, soundings were made, at transmitter-receiver separations of up to 4 km, providing a maximum depth of penetration of 4 km.

Wilt, M.; Goldstein, N.E.; Stark, M.; Haught, J.R.; Morrison, H.F.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

GeoPowering the West: Hawaii; Why Geothermal?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheets provides a summary of geothermal potential, issues, and current development in Hawaii. This fact sheet was developed as part of DOE's GeoPowering the West initiative, part of the Geothermal Technologies Program.

Not Available

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

NREL: Financing Geothermal Power Projects - Overview of Financing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview of Financing Geothermal Power Projects Overview of Financing Geothermal Power Projects Financing geothermal power projects involves specific processes, costs, and risks. There are also several advantages and challenges to developing and financing geothermal power projects. The financing strategies presented apply to geothermal power projects that: Use conventional, proven technologies Are located in the United States Produce utility power (roughly 10 megawatts or more). In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey completed an assessment of moderate- and high-temperature geothermal resources in 13 states. These data help lower project costs and risks for project developers by shortening the resource identification phase of project development; yet geothermal resource development still has risk. Financing Processes, Costs, and Risks

136

Hydrologic properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, geothermal reservoir from well-test analyses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Temperature, pressure, and spinner (TPS) logs have been recorded in several wells from the Dixie Valley Geothermal Reservoir in west central Nevada. A variety of well-test analyses has been performed with these data to quantify the hydrologic properties of this fault-dominated geothermal resource. Four complementary analytical techniques were employed, their individual application depending upon availability and quality of data and validity of scientific assumptions. In some instances, redundancy in methodologies was used to decouple interrelated terms. The methods were (1) step-drawdown, variable-discharge test; (2) recovery analysis; (3) damped-oscillation response; and (4) injection test. To date, TPS logs from five wells have been examined and results fall into two distinct categories. Productive, economically viable wells have permeability-thickness values on the order of 10{sup 5} millidarcy-meter (mD-m) and storativities of about 10{sup {minus}3}. Low-productivity wells, sometimes located only a few kilometers from their permeable counterparts, are artesian and display a sharp reduction in permeability-thickness to about 10 mD-m with storativities on the order of 10{sup {minus}4}. These results demonstrate that the hydrologic characteristics of this liquid-dominated geothermal system exhibit a significant spatial variability along the range-bounding normal fault that forms the predominant aquifer. A large-scale, coherent model of the Dixie Valley Geothermal Reservoir will require an understanding of the nature of this heterogeneity and the parameters that control it.

Morin, R.H. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Hickman, S.H. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Barton, C.A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics; Shapiro, A.M. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States); Benoit, W.R. [Oxbow Geothermal Corp., Reno, NV (United States); Sass, J.H. [Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Report on Geothermal Power Plant Cost and Comparative Cost of Geothermal and Coal Fired Steam Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is to be used by Utah Power and Light Company (UP and L) in making studies of geothermal power plants. The dollars per kilowatt comparison between a geothermal plant and a UP and L coal-fired plant is to be developed. Geothermal gathering system costs and return to owner are to be developed for information.

None

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Waste heat rejection from geothermal power stations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waste heat rejection systems for geothermal power stations have a significantly greater influence on plant operating performances and costs than do corresponding systems in fossil- and nuclear-fueled stations. With thermal efficiencies of only about 10%, geothermal power cycles can reject four times as much heat per kilowatt of output. Geothermal sites in the United States tend to be in water-short areas that could require use of more expensive wet/dry or dry-type cooling towers. With relatively low-temperature heat sources, the cycle economics are more sensitive to diurnal and seasonal variations in sink temperatures. Factors such as the necessity for hydrogen sulfide scrubbers in off-gas systems or the need to treat cooling tower blowdown before reinjection can add to the cost and complexity of goethermal waste heat rejection systems. Working fluids most commonly considered for geothermal cycles are water, ammonia, Freon-22, isobutane, and isopentane. Both low-level and barometric-leg direct-contact condensers are used, and reinforced concrete has been proposed for condenser vessels. Multipass surface condensers also have wide application. Corrosion problems at some locations have led to increased interest in titanium tubing. Studies at ORNL indicate that fluted vertical tubes can enhance condensing film coefficients by factors of 4 to 7.

Robertson, R C

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Energy Department Offers Conditional Commitment to Support Nevada  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department Offers Conditional Commitment to Support Nevada Department Offers Conditional Commitment to Support Nevada Geothermal Development with Recovery Act Funds Energy Department Offers Conditional Commitment to Support Nevada Geothermal Development with Recovery Act Funds June 15, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington D.C. --- Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced a conditional commitment to provide a partial guarantee for a $98.5 million loan by John Hancock Financial Services to the Nevada Geothermal Power Company (NGP) for a 49.5 megawatt geothermal project in Humboldt County in northwestern Nevada. The NGP Blue Mountain ("Blue Mountain") project consists of a geothermal well field, fluid collection and injection systems that enable energy to be extracted from rock and fluid below the Earth's surface, and a power plant

140

Nevada Southwest Regional Geothermal Development Operations Research Project. Appendix 8 of regional operations research program for development of geothermal energy in the Southwest United States. Final technical report, June 1977--August 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By the end of the first year of the Southwest Regional Geothermal Project, the Nevada State Team has defined over 300 geothermal sites. Because of the multitude of sites and data, scenarios for this first project-year have been completed for the twenty-six Nevada Geothermal Areas, which include all the specific sites. It is not improbable that fully one-third of the sites will eventually prove to be of high to intermediate temperature (i.e. > 150 C and 90-150 C) resources. Low temperature sites are also prominent, not only in number, but also in their distribution--each of Nevada's 17 counties has several such sites.

Clark, Noel A.; Booth, G. Martin, III; Weber, Dorismae; Helseth, Barbara K.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nevada geothermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Geothermal/Leasing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Leasing Leasing < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Geothermal Leasing General List of Geothermal Leases Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (1) The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Leasing ... Geothermal Leasing NEPA Documents Fluid Mineral Leasing within Six Areas on the Carson City District (January 2009) Geothermal Resources Leasing in Churchill, Mineral, & Nye Counties, Nevada (May 2008)

142

Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell & De  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Region (Shevenell & De Region (Shevenell & De Rocher, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell & De Rocher, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Lisa Shevenell, Ted De Rocher (2005) Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir Temperatures At Nevada Geothermal Power Plants Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermometry_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Shevenell_%26_De_Rocher,_2005)&oldid=401374" Category: Exploration Activities What links here

143

Geothermal enhancement of mineral processing in Nevada: Final report, April 25, 1985-June 30, 1986  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews mineral recovery techniques practiced at active mines throughout Nevada and determines those that may be enhanced by the application of geothermal heat energy from a nearby resource. Of the thirty-two active precious metal mines identified, ten have hot water on or near the property and could potentially benefit. A second purpose was to collect ore samples and geothermal fluids, determine if they are compatible in the hydrometallurgical process, and carry out laboratory tests to determine the effects of heating on recovery rates. In addition, interfering or counterproductive factors were also identified. The laboratory work consisted of measuring the effects of thermally enhancing two hydrometallurgical processes; cyanide heap-leaching of gold and silver ores and bacterial leaching of sulfide rich gold ores. Thermally enhanced cyanide heap-leaching of gold and silver ores produced increases in extraction ranging from 8 to 20% for gold and 17 to 40% for silver. The temperature required for these increases is 35/sup 0/C to 40/sup 0/C, well within the range of available geothermal resources.

Flynn, T.; Trexler, D.T.; Hendrix, J.L.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Unalaska geothermal exploration project. Electrical power generation analysis. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to determine the most cost-effective power cycle for utilizing the Makushin Volcano geothermal resource to generate electricity for the towns of Unalaska and Dutch Harbor. It is anticipated that the geothermal power plant would be intertied with a planned conventional power plant consisting of four 2.5 MW diesel-generators whose commercial operation is due to begin in 1987. Upon its completion in late 1988, the geothermal power plant would primarily fulfill base-load electrical power demand while the diesel-generators would provide peak-load electrical power and emergency power at times when the geothermal power plant would be partially or completely unavailable. This study compares the technical, environmental, and economic adequacy of five state-of-the-art geothermal power conversion processes. Options considered are single- and double-flash steam cycles, binary cycle, hybrid cycle, and total flow cycle.

Not Available

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Designing geothermal power plants to avoid reinventing the corrosion wheel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper addresses how designers can take into account, the necessary chemical and materials precautions that other geothermal power plants have learned. Current worldwide geothermal power plant capacity is presented as well as a comparison of steam composition from seven different geothermal resources throughout the world. The similarities of corrosion impacts to areas of the power plants are discussed and include the turbines, gas extraction system, heat rejection system, electrical/electronic systems, and structures. Materials problems and solutions in these corrosion impact areas are identified and discussed. A geothermal power plant design team organization is identified and the efficacy of a new corrosion/materials engineering position is proposed.

Conover, Marshall F.

1982-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

146

Geothermal Power: Meeting the Challenge of Electric Price Stabilizatio...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office EETD Safety Program Development Contact Us Department Contacts Media Contacts Geothermal Power: Meeting the Challenge of Electric Price Stabilization in the West Speaker(s):...

147

Deep Geothermal Well and Power Plant Project Final Environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) Deep Geothermal Well and Power Plant Project Final Environmental Assessment September 2008 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy 1617 Cole...

148

Energy Department Finalizes Loan Guarantee for Ormat Geothermal Project in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ormat Geothermal Ormat Geothermal Project in Nevada Energy Department Finalizes Loan Guarantee for Ormat Geothermal Project in Nevada September 23, 2011 - 3:37pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced the Department finalized a partial guarantee for up to a $350 million loan to support a geothermal power generation project. The project, sponsored by Ormat Nevada, Inc., is expected to produce up to 113 megawatts (MW) of clean, baseload power from three geothermal power facilities and will increase geothermal power production in Nevada by nearly 25 percent. The facilities are Jersey Valley in Pershing County, McGinness Hills in Lander County and Tuscarora in Elko County. The company estimates the project will fund 332 jobs during construction and 64 during operations.

149

SaskPower Geothermal and Self-Generated Renewable Power Loan...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Savings SaskPower Geothermal and Self-Generated Renewable Power Loan Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) SaskPower...

150

Nevada Solar One Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Nevada Solar One Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Nevada Solar One Solar Power Plant Facility Nevada Solar One Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Facility Status In Service Developer Lauren Engineers & Constructors, Acciona Solar Power Inc. Location Boulder City, Nevada Coordinates 35.801003°, -114.976301° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.801003,"lon":-114.976301,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

151

Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Power Plant Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Power Plant General Information Name Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Power Plant Facility Neal Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Malheur County, Oregon Coordinates 44.02239°, -117.4631° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.02239,"lon":-117.4631,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

152

North Brawley Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brawley Geothermal Power Plant Brawley Geothermal Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home North Brawley Geothermal Power Plant General Information Name North Brawley Geothermal Power Plant Facility North Brawley Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Imperial Valley, California Coordinates 33.015046°, -115.542267° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.015046,"lon":-115.542267,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

153

Electromagnetic (EM-69) survey of the McCoy geothermal prospect, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A frequency-domain electromagnetic survey was conducted at 19 stations over a 200 km/sup 2/ area encompassing the McCoy geothermal prospect, Churchill County, central Nevada. The McCoy area is characterized by high heat flow, mercury mineralization, and recent volcanics. Three horizontal-loop transmitters were used with receivers from 0.5 to more than 4.0 km from the loops. Receiver stations were arranged along a pair of crossing north-south and east-west lines. Data were interpreted first with a simple apparent resistivity formula and then with a least-squares lumped-model inversion program. The rough terrain and complex geology introduce an element of uncertainty to the interpretations.

Wilt, M.; Haught, R.; Goldstein, N.E.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Reservoir-scale fracture permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, geothermal field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wellbore image data recorded in six wells penetrating a geothermal reservoir associated with an active normal fault at Dixie Valley, Nevada, were used in conjunction with hydrologic tests and in situ stress measurements to investigate the relationship between reservoir productivity and the contemporary in situ stress field. The analysis of data from wells drilled into productive and non-productive segments of the Stillwater fault zone indicates that fractures must be both optimally oriented and critically stressed to have high measured permeabilities. Fracture permeability in all wells is dominated by a relatively small number of fractures oriented parallel to the local trend of the Stillwater Fault. Fracture geometry may also play a significant role in reservoir productivity. The well-developed populations of low angle fractures present in wells drilled into the producing segment of the fault are not present in the zone where production is not commercially viable.

Barton, C.A.; Zoback, M.D. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics; Hickman, S. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Morin, R. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Benoit, D. [Oxbow Geothermal Corp., Reno, NV (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Comparison of elementary geothermal-brine power-production processes  

SciTech Connect

From applied technology geothermal committee meeting; Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA (7 Aug 1973). A comparison of three simple geothermal power- production systems shows that the flashed steam and the compound systems are favored for use with high-temperature brines. The binary system becomes economically competitive only when used on low-temperature brines (enthalpies less than 350 Btu/lb). Geothermal power appears to be economically attractive even when low-temperature brines are used. (auth)

Green, M.A.; Laird, A.D.K.

1973-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Sierra Pacific Power Co (Nevada) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada) Nevada) Jump to: navigation, search Name Sierra Pacific Power Co Place Nevada Utility Id 17166 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO Other Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1]Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png D-1 (Residential Service) - Bundled Residential

157

A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The performance of a flashing binary combined cycle for geothermal power generation is analysed. It is proposed to utilize hot residual brine from the separator in flashing-type plants to run a binary cycle, thereby producing incremental power. Parametric variations were carried out to determine the optimum performance of the combined cycle. Comparative evaluation with the simple flashing plant was made to assess its thermodynamic potential and economic viability. Results of the analyses indicate that the combined cycle can generate 13-28% more power than the

158

Evaluation of lineament analysis as an exploration technique for geothermal energy, western and central Nevada. Final report, June 1976--October 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lineament analysis as an exploration technique for geothermal energy using multi-scale, multi-format imagery and geophysical data is investigated and evaluated. Two areas in Nevada, each having distinct differences in structural style were studied. One area, which encompasses a portion of the Battle Mountain Heat Flow High, was studied to determine the relationship between regional and local structural controls and geothermal activity. Four geothermal sites within this area (Winnemucca AMS) were selected and studied in detail. These sites include: 1) Leach Hot Springs, 2) Kyle Hot Springs, 3) Beowawe geothermal area and Buffalo Valley Hot Springs. A second area encompassed by the Reno AMS Sheet was selected for further study in a region dominated by three diverse tectonic styles; these are: 1) the Sierra Nevada Front, 2) the Walker Lane, and 3) basin-and-range structures. Geothermal sites analyzed at site specific scales within the Reno AMS Sheet included Steamboat Hot Springs in the Sierra Nevada Front subprovince, Dixie Valley Hot Springs located in typical basin-and-range terrain and the Brady's-Desert Peak area which is marginal to the Walker Lane. Data products employed included LANDSAT imagery, SKYLAB photography, gravity, and aeromagnetic maps. Results of this investigation indicate that in north-central Nevada the major sites of geothermal activity are associated with northeast trending structures related to the Midas Trench lineament and that the most viable geothermal area (Beowawe is located at the intersection of the northeast trend of the Oregon-Nevada Lineament.

Trexler, D.T.; Bell, E.J.; Roquemore, G.R.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Electric Power Generation from Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Electric Power Generation from Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources Project Type / Topic 3 Low Temperature Resources Project Description The team of university and industry engineers, scientists, and project developers will evaluate the power capacity, efficiency, and economics of five commercially available ORC engines in collaboration with the equipment manufacturers. The geothermal ORC system will be installed at an oil field operated by Continental Resources, Inc. in western North Dakota where geothermal fluids occur in sedimentary formations at depths of 10,000 feet. The power plant will be operated and monitored for two years to develop engineering and economic models for geothermal ORC energy production. Data and experience acquired can be used to facilitate the installation of similar geothermal ORC systems in other oil and gas settings.

160

NREL: Financing Geothermal Power Projects - Policies and Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policies and Regulations Affecting Geothermal Power Project Financing Policies and Regulations Affecting Geothermal Power Project Financing Federal and state policies, including leasing and permitting, federal financial incentives, renewable portfolio standards, and greenhouse gas emission reduction regulations, can affect geothermal power project development financing processes and timelines. The related issues that should be considered during the project development cycle regarding these policies are summarized in the following table and described in more detail below. Note that this table is not meant to guide developers through the entire policy landscape, and should not be assumed to include all related issues in geothermal power development. Roles of Policies and Regulations in the Geothermal Power Project Development Process*

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nevada geothermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

NREL: Financing Geothermal Power Projects - Financing Options for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Financing Options for Geothermal Power Projects Financing Options for Geothermal Power Projects Different financing options are used at each stage in geothermal power project development, which include the exploration and drilling stage and construction and operation stage. The financing option in each stage earns a return proportionate with the risk accepted at that stage in the project's development. For each financing option, both financial and non-financial elements should be considered. Financing options and considerations for a typical geothermal power project are shown in the table below. Your project financing options and considerations may be different. Financing Options and Considerations for a Typical Geothermal Power Project* Financial Considerations Financing Stage Exploration and Drilling Construction and Operation

162

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Teels Marsh Geothermal Area (Redirected from Teels Marsh Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

163

Hybrid Cooling Systems for Low-Temperature Geothermal Power Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the identification and evaluation of methods by which the net power output of an air-cooled geothermal power plant can be enhanced during hot ambient conditions with a minimal amount of water use.

Ashwood, A.; Bharathan, D.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Demonstrating the Commercial Feasibility of Geopressured-Geothermal Power  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Demonstrating the Commercial Feasibility of Geopressured-Geothermal Power Demonstrating the Commercial Feasibility of Geopressured-Geothermal Power Development at Sweet Lake Field Cameron Parish, Louisiana Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Demonstrating the Commercial Feasibility of Geopressured-Geothermal Power Development at Sweet Lake Field Cameron Parish, Louisiana Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources Project Type / Topic 3 Geopressured Resources Project Description Within the Sweet Lake Oil and Gas Field, the existence of a geopressured-geothermal system was confirmed in the 1980s as part of the DOE's Gulf Coast Geopressured-Geothermal Program. At the close of that program it was determined that the energy prices at the time could not support commercial production of the resource. Increased electricity prices and technological advancements over the last two decades, combined with the current national support for developing clean, renewable energy and job creation it would entail, provide the opportunity to develop thousands of megawatts of geopressured-geothermal power in the South Eastern United States.

165

Nevada Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nevada Recovery Act State Memo Nevada Recovery Act State Memo Nevada Recovery Act State Memo Nevada has substantial natural resources, including geothermal, solar, wind, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Nevada are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects from energy efficiency and the smart grid to geothermal, advanced battery manufacturing, and environmental cleanup. Through these investments, Nevada's businesses, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Nevada to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Nevada Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

166

Principal facts for a gravity survey of the Double Hot Springs Known Geothermal Resource Area, Humboldt County, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During July 1977, forty-nine gravity stations were obtained in the Double Hot Springs Known Geothermal Resource Area and vicinity, northwestern Nevada. The gravity observations were made with a Worden gravimeter having a scale factor of about 0.5 milligal per division. No terrain corrections have been applied to these data. The earth tide correction was not used in drift reduction. The Geodetic Reference System 1967 formula (International Association of Geodesy, 1967) was used to compute theoretical gravity.

Peterson, D.L.; Kaufmann, H.E.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Geothermal energy as a source of electricity. A worldwide survey of the design and operation of geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An overview of geothermal power generation is presented. A survey of geothermal power plants is given for the following countries: China, El Salvador, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines, Turkey, USSR, and USA. A survey of countries planning geothermal power plants is included. (MHR)

DiPippo, R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Geothermal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal power) Geothermal power) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Overview Technologies Resources Market Data Geothermal Topics Data Resources Financing Permitting & Policy Links Geothermal Energy The Sierra Nevada Mountains provide a spectacular backdrop for a cooling tower array at the ORMAT Mammoth Geothermal Power Plant in Central California. Geothermal energy is heat extracted from the Earth. A wide range of temperatures can be suitable for using geothermal energy, from room temperature to above 300° F.[1] This heat can be drawn from various depths, ranging from the shallow ground (the upper 10 feet beneath the surface of the Earth) that maintains a relatively constant temperature of approximately 50° to 60° F, to reservoirs of extremely hot water and

169

Recent drilling activities at the earth power resources Tuscarora geothermal power project's hot sulphur springs lease area.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Earth Power Resources, Inc. recently completed a combined rotary/core hole to a depth of 3,813 feet at it's Hot Sulphur Springs Tuscarora Geothermal Power Project Lease Area located 70-miles north of Elko, Nevada. Previous geothermal exploration data were combined with geologic mapping and newly acquired seismic-reflection data to identify a northerly tending horst-graben structure approximately 2,000 feet wide by at least 6,000 feet long with up to 1,700 feet of vertical offset. The well (HSS-2) was successfully drilled through a shallow thick sequence of altered Tertiary Volcanic where previous exploration wells had severe hole-caving problems. The ''tight-hole'' drilling problems were reduced using drilling fluids consisting of Polymer-based mud mixed with 2% Potassium Chloride (KCl) to reduce Smectite-type clay swelling problems. Core from the 330 F fractured geothermal reservoir system at depths of 2,950 feet indicated 30% Smectite type clays existed in a fault-gouge zone where total loss of circulation occurred during coring. Smectite-type clays are not typically expected at temperatures above 300 F. The fracture zone at 2,950 feet exhibited a skin-damage during injection testing suggesting that the drilling fluids may have caused clay swelling and subsequent geothermal reservoir formation damage. The recent well drilling experiences indicate that drilling problems in the shallow clays at Hot Sulphur Springs can be reduced. In addition, average penetration rates through the caprock system can be on the order of 25 to 35 feet per hour. This information has greatly reduced the original estimated well costs that were based on previous exploration drilling efforts. Successful production formation drilling will depend on finding drilling fluids that will not cause formation damage in the Smectite-rich fractured geothermal reservoir system. Information obtained at Hot Sulphur Springs may apply to other geothermal systems developed in volcanic settings.

Goranson, Colin

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Geologic and hydrologic research on the Moana geothermal system, Washoe County, Nevada. Final report October 1, 1982-December 31, 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combined geologic, geophysical, geochemical, and drilling exploration surveys were used to assess the Moana geothermal resource in Washoe County, Nevada, and to determine its relationship with nearby Steamboat Hot Springs. Moana is the largest single moderate-temperature resource in Nevada that supports geothermal space heating applications. Results show that the general geology and structure for the two systems is similar, but important differences exist with respect to reservoir rocks. Gravity data delineated the contact between important volcanic and sedimentary rocks in Moana, but contour trends did not correlate well with mapped faults. Fluid geochemistry data show major differences in bulk chemical composition, stable-light isotope ratios, and radiocarbon ages for Moana and Steamboat geothermal waters. Water level measurements in observation wells in Moana show simultaneous increasing and decreasing values in different sections of the geothermal area. Temperature-depth profiles changed little during the six-month monitoring period. Direct use of the resource is increasing and longer-lasting, more efficient down-hole heat exchangers are replacing previous equipment that was prone to scaling and corrosion. A computer program that calculates heat output for state-of-the-art heat exchangers is described. Recommendations for continued monitoring, heat exchanger design, and fluid reinjection studies are included. Data are available to government agencies responsible for regulation as well as local residents and potential developers to ensure prudent resource utilization.

Flynn, T.; Ghusn, G. Jr.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Materials selection guidelines for geothermal power systems. First edition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nine potential power cycles are defined and diagrammed for the generation of electricity from geothermal fluids. General fluid properties that influence the applicability of power cycles to a particular geothermal resource are discussed. The corrosivity of individual process streams in power cycles is described based on variations in chemical composition and temperature. Results of materials performance tests are analyzed based on the chemical composition of the corrosive medium and physical factors such as temperature, duration of exposure, and fluid velocity. The key chemical components in geothermal fluids that are significant in determining corrosivity are identified. Both summarized and detailed results of materials performance tests in U.S. liquid-dominated resources are given. Seven U.S. liquid-dominated KGRA's are classified according to relative corrosiveness and their key chemical components are defined. The various forms and mechanisms of corrosive attack that can occur in geothermal process streams are described. The application of nonmetallic materials in geothermal environments is discussed. The appendices contain information on (1) operating experience at geothermal power plants, (2) corrosion in desalination facilities, (3) reliability of geothermal plants, (4) elastomeric materials, (5) comparative alloy costs, and (6) geothermal equipment manufacturers. (MHR)

DeBerry, D.W.; Ellis, P.F.; Thomas, C.C.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Next generation geothermal power plants. Draft final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop concepts for the next generation geothermal power plant(s) (NGGPP). This plant, compared to existing plants, will generate power for a lower levelized cost and will be more competitive with fossil fuel fired power plants. The NGGPP will utilize geothermal resources efficiently and will be equipped with contingencies to mitigate the risk of reservoir performance. The NGGPP design will attempt to minimize emission of pollutants and consumption of surface water and/or geothermal fluids for cooling service.

Brugman, John; Hattar, John; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Geothermal Power: Meeting the Challenge of Electric Price Stabilization in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geothermal Power: Meeting the Challenge of Electric Price Stabilization in Geothermal Power: Meeting the Challenge of Electric Price Stabilization in the West Speaker(s): Jon Wellinghoff Steve Munson Date: January 30, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Julie Osborn Existing data indicates that extensive geothermal resources of power production grade exist throughout the western United States. These resources may be capable of producing clean, reliable electric power in sufficient quantities to act as a hedge against the price volatility of gas-fired electric generation. The challenge facing energy policy makers is developing effective strategies and appropriate incentives to assist developers in moving competitive quantities of geothermal electric capacity into the western power marketplace. Issues related to achieving this goal

174

Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority - Geothermal Heat Pump Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority - Geothermal Heat Pump Rebate Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority - Geothermal Heat Pump Rebate Program Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority - Geothermal Heat Pump Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Residential Maximum Rebate 1,000/ton Program Info Funding Source American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 State Oklahoma Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $800 - $1,000/ton Provider Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Program funds currently exhausted, additional funds have been requested. Visit the program website for the most up to date information on fund availability and to register for the waiting list for this program. The Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority (OMPA) and the Oklahoma Department of Commerce currently offer the Oklahoma Comfort Program for geothermal

175

Comparison of Geothermal Power Conversion Cycles  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal power conversion cycles are compared with respect to recovery of the available wellhead power. The cycles compared are flash steam, in which steam turbines are driven by steam separated from one or more flash states; binary, in which heat is transferred from flashed steam to an organic turbine cycle; and dual steam, in which two-phase expanders are driven by the flashing steam-brine mixture and steam turbines by the separated steam. Expander efficiencies assumed are 0.7 for steam turbines, 0.8 for organic turbines, and 0.6 for two-phase expanders. The fraction of available wellhead power delivered by each cycle is found to be about the same at all brine temperatures: 0.65 with one stage and 0.7 with four stages for dual stream; 0.4 with one stage and 0.6 with four stages for flash steam; 0.5 for binary; and 0.3 with one stage and 0.5 with four stages for flash binary.

Elliott, David G.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Five-megawatt geothermal-power pilot-plant project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a report on the Raft River Geothermal-Power Pilot-Plant Project (Geothermal Plant), located near Malta, Idaho; the review took place between July 20 and July 27, 1979. The Geothermal Plant is part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) overall effort to help commercialize the operation of electric power plants using geothermal energy sources. Numerous reasons were found to commend management for its achievements on the project. Some of these are highlighted, including: (a) a well-qualified and professional management team; (b) effective cost control, performance, and project scheduling; and (c) an effective and efficient quality-assurance program. Problem areas delineated, along with recommendations for solution, include: (1) project planning; (2) facility design; (3) facility construction costs; (4) geothermal resource; (5) drilling program; (6) two facility construction safety hazards; and (7) health and safety program. Appendices include comments from the Assistant Secretary for Resource Applications, the Controller, and the Acting Deputy Director, Procurement and Contracts Management.

Not Available

1980-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

177

Fluid Temperature and Power Estimation of Geothermal Power Plants by a Simplified Numerical Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an estimation of power generated in a given geothermal heat pipe system. Such power generation is basically controlled by the ultimate temperature of fluid flowing through the u-shape pipes and could also be affected by power consumption ... Keywords: energy, geothermal power plant, numerical model, heat conduction, optimum design

Ge Ou; Itai Einav

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

East Mesa Magmamax Power Process Geothermal Generating Plant, A Preliminary Analysis  

SciTech Connect

During recent months, Magma Power Company has been involved in the shakedown and startup of their 10 MW binary cycle power plant at East Mesa in the Imperial Valley of Southern California. This pilot plant has been designed specifically as an R & D facility, with its primary goal to explore the necessary technology improvements required to make the binary cycle an efficient, cost effective and reliable conversion process. Magma Power's exploration activities, carried out in other parts of the Western United States after the initial discovery and development at The Geyser's, gave evidence that The Geyser's type of steam reservoir was unique and that the majority of geothermal resources would be of the hydrothermal, or pressurized hot water type. Initial flow tests throughout different locations where this type of resource was discovered indicated that well bore scaling occurred at the flash point in the wells. Initial evaluations indicated that if the well fluid could be maintained under pressure as it traversed the well bore, the potential for scaling would be mitigated. Tests carried out in the late 60's at Magma's Brady Hot Springs development in Nevada indicated that scaling was mitigated with the installation of a pump in the geothermal well. Subsequently, designs were developed of a binary process, utilizing heat exchangers for power generation. Magma was able to acquire process patents associated with this and had a patent issued (Magmamax Power Process). This incorporates the concept of pumping a geothermal well and transferring the heat in the geothermal fluid to a secondary power fluid in heat exchangers. Magma's desire to demonstrate this technology was one of the prime motivations associated with the installation of the East Mesa plant.

Hinrichs, T.C.; Dambly, B.W.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Hybrid Cooling Systems for Low-Temperature Geothermal Power Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Hybrid Cooling Systems for Low-Temperature Geothermal Power Production Andrea Ashwood and Desikan Bharathan Technical Report NREL...

180

Hybrid Cooling for Geothermal Power Plants: Final ARRA Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at www.nrel.govpublications. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Hybrid Cooling for Geothermal Power Plants Final ARRA Project Report Desikan Bharathan Technical Report NREL...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nevada geothermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Controlled-source electromagnetic survey at Soda Lakes geothermal area, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The EM-60 system, a large-moment frequency-domain electromagnetic loop prospecting system, was operated in the Soda Lakes geothermal area, Nevada. Thirteen stations were occupied at distances ranging from 0.5-3.0 km from two transmitter sites. These yielded four sounding curves--the normalized amplitudes and phases of the vertical and radial magnetic fields as a function of frequency--at each station. In addition, two polarization ellipse parameters, ellipticity and tilt angle, were calculated at each frequency. The data were interpreted by means of a least-squares inversion procedure which fits a layered resistivity model to the data. A three-layer structure is indicated, with a near-surface 20 ohm-m layer of 100-400 m thickness, a middle 2 ohm-m layer of approximately 1 km thickness, and a basement of greater than 10 ohm-m. The models indicate a northwesterly structural strike; the top and middle layers seem to thicken from northeast to southwest. The results agree quite well with previous results of dipole-dipole and magnetotelluric (MT) surveys. The EM-60 survey provided greater depth penetration (1 to 1.5 km) than dipole-dipole, but MT far surpassed both in its depth of exploration. One advantage of EM in this area is its ease and speed of operation. Another advantage, its relative insensitivity to lateral inhomogeneities, is not as pronounced here as it would be in areas of more complex geology.

Stark, M.; Wilt, M.; Haught, J.R.; Goldstein, N.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Geothermal Resources Council's ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geothermal Resources Council's 36 th Annual Meeting Reno, Nevada, USA September 30 - October 3, 2012 Advanced Electric Submersible Pump Design Tool for Geothermal Applications...

183

Near-Surface CO2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dioxide flux at the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada;volcanic system, USA Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, USAProvince system like the Dixie Valley (Nevada) geothermal

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Geothermal News  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

news Office of Energy Efficiency & news Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 en Nevada Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Enhanced Geothermal System http://energy.gov/articles/nevada-deploys-first-us-commercial-grid-connected-enhanced-geothermal-system nevada-deploys-first-us-commercial-grid-connected-enhanced-geothermal-system" class="title-link">Nevada Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Enhanced Geothermal System

185

THE DEFINITION OF ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH PROBLEMS RELATING TO THE USE OF GEOTHERMAL FLUIDS FOR ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION AND NONELECTRIC HEATING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geothermal resources for electric power generation. i. PlantOF GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS Electric Power Generation SystemsUSE OF GEOTHERMAL FLUIDS FOR ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION AND

Apps, J.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

High geothermal energy utilization geothermal/fossil hybrid power cycle: a preliminary investigation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combining geothermal and fossil fuel energy into the so-called hybrid cycle is compared with a state-of-the-art double-flash geothermal power cycle using resources which vary from 429/sup 0/K (312/sup 0/F) to 588/sup 0/K (598/sup 0/F). It is demonstrated that a hybrid plant can compete thermodynamically with the combined output from both a fossil-fired and a geothermal plant operating separately. Economic comparison of the hybrid and double-flash cycles is outlined, and results are presented that indicate the performance of marginal hydrothermal resources may be improved enough to compete with existing power cycles on a cost basis. It is also concluded that on a site-specific basis a hybrid cycle is capable of complementing double-flash cycles at large-capacity resources, and can operate in a cycling load mode at constant geothermal fluid flow rate.

Grijalva, R. L.; Sanemitsu, S. K.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Principal facts for a gravity survey of the Gerlach Extension Known Geothermal Resource Area, Pershing County, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During July 1977, fifty-one gravity stations were obtained in the Gerlach Extension Known Geothermal Resource Area and vicinity, northwestern Nevada. The gravity observations were made with a Worden gravimeter having a scale factor of about 0.5 milligal per division. No terrain corrections have been applied to these data. The earth tide correction was not used in drift reduction. The Geodetic Reference System 1967 formula (International Association of Geodesy, 1967) was used to compute theoretical gravity. Observed gravity is referenced to a base station in Gerlach, Nevada, having a value based on the Potsdam System of 1930. A density of 2.67 g per cm/sup 3/ was used in computing the Bouguer anomaly.

Peterson, D.L.; Kaufmann, H.E.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Principal facts for a gravity survey of the Fly Ranch Extension Known Geothermal Resource Area, Pershing County, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During July 1977, forty-four gravity stations were obtained in the Fly Ranch Extension Known Geothermal Resource Area and vicinity, northwestern Nevada. The gravity observations were made with a Worden gravimeter having a scale factor of about 0.5 milligal per division. No terrain corrections have been applied to these data. The earth tide correction was not used in drift reduction. The Geodetic Reference System 1967 formula (International Association of Geodesy, 1967) was used to compute theoretical gravity. Observed gravity is referenced to a base station in Gerlach, Nevada, having a value based on the Potsdam System of 1930 (fig. 1). A density of 2.67 g per cm/sup 3/ was used in computing the Bouguer anomaly.

Peterson, D.L.; Kaufmann, H.E.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Low- to moderate-temperature geothermal resource assessment for Nevada: area specific studies, Pumpernickel Valley, Carlin and Moana. Final report June 1, 1981-July 31, 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geological, geophysical and geochemical surveys were used in conjunction with temperature gradient hole drilling to assess the geothermal resources in Pumpernickel Valley and Carlin, Nevada. This program is based on a statewide assessment of geothermal resources that was completed in 1979. The exploration techniques are based on previous federally-funded assessment programs that were completed in six other areas in Nevada and include: literature search and compilation of existing data, geologic reconnaissance, chemical sampling of thermal and non-thermal fluids, interpretation of satellite imagery, interpretation of low-sun angle aerial photographs, two-meter depth temperature probe survey, gravity survey, seismic survey, soil-mercury survey, and temperature gradient drilling.

Trexler, D.T.; Flynn, T.; Koenig, B.A.; Bell, E.J.; Ghusn, G. Jr.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Evaluation of the Geothermal Public Power Utility Workshops in California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The federal government devotes significant resources to educating consumers and businesses about geothermal energy. Yet little evidence exists for defining the kinds of information needed by the various audiences with specialized needs. This paper presents the results of an evaluation of the Geothermal Municipal Utility Workshops that presented information on geothermal energy to utility resource planners at customer-owned utilities in California. The workshops were sponsored by the Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Department of Energy's GeoPowering the West Program and were intended to qualitatively assess the information needs of municipal utilities relative to geothermal energy and get feedback for future workshops. The utility workshop participants found the geothermal workshops to be useful and effective for their purposes. An important insight from the workshops is that utilities need considerable lead-time to plan a geothermal project. They need to know whether it is better to own a project or to purchase geothermal electricity from another nonutility owner. California customer-owned utilities say they do not need to generate more electricity to meet demand, but they do need to provide more electricity from renewable resources to meet the requirements of the state's Renewable Portfolio Standard.

Farhar, B. C.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Tectonic controls on fracture permeability in a geothermal reservoir at Dixie Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To help determine the nature and origins of permeability variations within a fault-hosted geothermal reservoir at Dixie Valley, Nevada, the authors conducted borehole televiewer logging and hydraulic fracturing stress measurements in six wells drilled into the Stillwater fault zone at depths of 2--3 km. Televiewer logs from wells penetrating the highly permeable portion of the fault zone revealed extensive drilling-induced tensile fractures. As the Stillwater fault at this location dips S45{degree}E at {approximately} 53{degree} it is nearly at the optimal orientation for normal faulting in the current stress field. Hydraulic fracturing tests from these permeable wells show that the magnitude of S{sub hmin} is very low relative to the vertical stress S{sub v}. Similar measurements conducted in two wells penetrating a relatively impermeable segment of the Stillwater fault zone 8 and 20 km southwest of the producing geothermal reservoir indicate that the orientation of S{sub hmin} is S20{degree}E and S41{degree}E, respectively, with S{sub hmin}/S{sub v} ranging from 0.55--0.64 at depths of 1.9--2.2 km. This stress orientation is near optimal for normal faulting on the Stillwater fault in the northernmost non-producing well, but {approximately} 40{degree} rotated from the optimal orientation for normal faulting in the southernmost well. The observation that borehole breakouts were present in these nonproducing wells, but absent in wells drilled into the permeable main reservoir, indicates a significant increase in the magnitude of maximum horizontal principal stress, S{sub Hmax}, in going from the producing to non-producing segments of the fault. The increase in S{sub Hmaz}, coupled with elevated S{sub hmin}/S{sub v} values and a misorientation of the Stillwater fault zone with respect to the principal stress directions, leads to a decrease in the proximity of the fault zone to Coulomb failure. This suggests that a necessary condition for high reservoir permeability is that the Stillwater fault zone be critically stressed for frictional failure in the current stress field.

Hickman, S. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Zoback, M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Geothermal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal) Geothermal) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Overview Technologies Resources Market Data Geothermal Topics Data Resources Financing Permitting & Policy Links Geothermal Energy The Sierra Nevada Mountains provide a spectacular backdrop for a cooling tower array at the ORMAT Mammoth Geothermal Power Plant in Central California. Geothermal energy is heat extracted from the Earth. A wide range of temperatures can be suitable for using geothermal energy, from room temperature to above 300° F.[1] This heat can be drawn from various depths, ranging from the shallow ground (the upper 10 feet beneath the surface of the Earth) that maintains a relatively constant temperature of approximately 50° to 60° F, to reservoirs of extremely hot water and

193

Green Energy Geotherm Power Fonds GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geotherm Power Fonds GmbH Co KG Geotherm Power Fonds GmbH Co KG Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Energy Geotherm Power Fonds GmbH & Co. KG Place Hannover, Lower Saxony, Germany Zip 30559 Sector Geothermal energy Product German-based fund that will invest in geothermal projects to be developed by Green Energy Group. References Green Energy Geotherm Power Fonds GmbH & Co. KG[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Green Energy Geotherm Power Fonds GmbH & Co. KG is a company located in Hannover, Lower Saxony, Germany . References ↑ "Green Energy Geotherm Power Fonds GmbH & Co. KG" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Green_Energy_Geotherm_Power_Fonds_GmbH_Co_KG&oldid=346014"

194

Exploration and Development of Geothermal Power in California | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration and Development of Geothermal Power in California Exploration and Development of Geothermal Power in California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Exploration and Development of Geothermal Power in California Abstract From 1955 to 1962, approximately 40 wells were drilled in 15 California thermal areas for the purpose of exploring and developing natural steam to utilize for electric power generation. Twenty-four of the wells were drilled in the three areas which at present seem to have the greatest potential for the production of natural steam: The Geysers, Sonoma County; Casa Diablo, Mono County; and the Salton Sea area, Imperial County.Since June 1960, steam from The Geysers thermal area, produced at a rate of approximately 250,000 Ib/hr, has been utilized to operate a 12,500 kw

195

Potential Economic Impact of Constructing and Operating Solar Power Generation Facilities in Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nevada has a vast potential for electricity generation using solar power. An examination of the stock of renewable resources in Nevada proves that the state has the potential to be a leader in renewable-electric generation--one of the best in the world. This study provides estimates on the economic impact in terms of employment, personal income, and gross state product (GSP) of developing a portion of Nevada's solar energy generation resources.

Schwer, R. K.; Riddel, M.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Stragegies to Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Based on Monitoring and Analysis of CO2 in the Near-Surface Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dioxide flux at the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada;volcanic system, USA Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, USAProvince system like the Dixie Valley (Nevada) geothermal

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Power Contracts - Sierra Nevada Region (SNR) - Western Area Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Operations Outage Coordination Standards of Conduct Transmission Planning You are here: SN Home page > Power Operations > Outage Coordination Outage Coordination Outage...

198

Running head: GEOTHERMAL POWER PRODUCTION 1 Geothermal Power Production for Emmonak, Alaska  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costs. #12;15 Pre-feasibility investigation of water and energy options utilising geothermal energy program to investigate and encourage the use of geothermal and waste heat resources for heat-driven pre with an economic, technical and market analysis of various scales of technology application where geothermal energy

Scheel, David

199

Baca geothermal demonstration project. Power plant detail design document  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Baca Geothermal Demonstration Power Plant document presents the design criteria and detail design for power plant equipment and systems, as well as discussing the rationale used to arrive at the design. Where applicable, results of in-house evaluations of alternatives are presented.

Not Available

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Exploration Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nye County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Exploration Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nevada geothermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Principal facts for gravity stations in the Elko Hot Springs Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA), Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The latitude, longitude, elevation, observed gravity, and Bouguer anomaly are tabulated for 58 stations in the Elko Hot Springs KGRA, Nevada. (WHK)

Peterson, D.L.; Dansereau, D.A.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

The Power and Potential of Geothermal Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Power and Potential of Geothermal Energy The Power and Potential of Geothermal Energy The Power and Potential of Geothermal Energy October 3, 2011 - 7:03pm Addthis Dan Leistikow Dan Leistikow Former Director, Office of Public Affairs As Secretary Chu noted this weekend, America finds itself in a fierce global competition for the clean energy jobs and industries of the future - with countries like China, Germany and others investing tens of billions of dollars to expand their domestic renewable energy industry and capture the lead in a rapidly growing field. In this context, the Department of Energy's loan programs have played a crucially important role in helping the United States compete, by providing affordable financing to innovative projects that might not otherwise happen but that hold the potential to seed entire new industries for U.S.

203

In-line process instrumentation for geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economics of geothermal power depend on satisfactory plant reliability of continuous operation. Plant problems and extended downtime due to corrosion failures, scale buildup, or injection well plugging have affected many past geothermal projects. If in-line instrumentation can be developed to alert plant operators to correctable problems, then the cost and reliability of geothermal power will be improved. PNL has completed a problem of development of in-line corrosion and chemical instrumentation for binary cycle plants, and this technology has been used to set up a monitoring program at the Heber Binary Demonstration Power Plant. The current emphasis has shifted to development of particle meters for use on injection lines and CO/sub 2/ and pH probes for use in control of calcite scaling. Plans have been outlined to develop and demonstrate flash plant instrumentation for corrosion monitoring, scaling, steam purity, and injection line particle counting. 2 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

Shannon, D.W.; Robertus, R.J.; Sullivan, R.G.; Kindle, C.H.; Pierce, D.D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Economic Study for Geothermal Steam Production of Electric Power  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of economic analyses of geothermal electric power production facilities using selected geothermal resource temperature characteristics and relates the cost of power and rate of return on investment thus obtained to those being experienced at present and as projected from nuclear and fossil-fuel generating facilities. The results are set down in a manner to permit easy economic comparison of the various options of electric power generation. It is intended that this study will be a management assist in evaluating the rate of return on invested project capital and the resulting cost of electricity generated from geothermal resources as related to existing alternative generation methods. The resulting electric energy cost is compared with the selected alternative electric generation and their costs.

1977-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

205

EA-1849-S1: Phase II Facility - Ormat Tuscarora Geothermal Power...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-S1: Phase II Facility - Ormat Tuscarora Geothermal Power Plant in Tuscarora, NV EA-1849-S1: Phase II Facility - Ormat Tuscarora Geothermal Power Plant in Tuscarora, NV Summary...

206

Geothermal assessment of the MX deployment area in Nevada. Final report, April 1, 1981-April 30, 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary geothermal resource assessment of the MX deployment area in Nevada focused on Coyote Spring Valley in southeastern Nevada. Initially, an extensive literature search was conducted and a bibliography consisting of 750 entries was compiled covering all aspects of geology pertaining to the study area. A structural study indicates that Coyote Spring Valley lies in a tectonically active area which is favorable for the discovery of geothermal resources. Hot water may be funneled to the near-surface along an extensive fracture and fault system which appears to underlie the valley, according to information gathered during the literature search and aerial photo survey. A total of 101 shallow temperature probes were emplanted in Coyote Spring Valley. Three anomalous temperature points all lying within the same vicinity were identified in the north-central portion of the valley near a fault. A soil-mercury study also identified one zone of anomalous mercury concentrations around the north end of the Arrow Canyon Range. A literature search covering regional fluid geochemistry indicated that the three fluid samples taken from Coyote Spring Valley have a higher concentration of Na + K. During field work, seven fluid samples were collected in Coyote Spring Valley which also appear to be derived from volcanic units due to the presence of Ca-Mg or Na-K carbonate-bicarbonate. A temperature gradient study of six test water wells indicates that only one geothermal well with a temperature of 35.5/sup 0/C (96/sup 0/F) exists in the central portion of the valley at the north end of Arrow Canyon Range near the zone of anomalous soil-mercury points. A cultural assessment of Coyote Spring Valley was performed prior to field work.

Trexler, D.T.; Bruce, J.L.; Cates, D.; Dolan, H.H.; Covington, C.H.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Map: Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: none"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

208

Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Map: Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: none"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

209

Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 10 Geofluid Geochemistry 11 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 12 Exploration Activities (8) 13 References Map: Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Beowawe, Nevada Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

210

Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Redirected from Beowawe Hot Springs Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 10 Geofluid Geochemistry 11 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 12 Exploration Activities (8) 13 References Map: Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Beowawe, Nevada Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

211

Exergetic Performance Investigation of Medium-Low Enthalpy Geothermal Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The renewable energy sources are becoming attractive solutions for clean and sustainable energy needs. Geothermal energy is increasingly contributing to the power supply worldwide. In evaluating the efficiency of energy conservation systems, the most ... Keywords: geothermal energy, power generation, binary cycle, exergetic efficiency, exergy analysis, geothermal power plant

Junkui Cui; Jun Zhao; Chuanshan Dai; Bin Yang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Power Marketing - Sierra Nevada Region - Western Area Power Administra...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Help Environment News in SNR Power Marketing Customer Representatives BR and CVP Forecasts Contracts Rates RA Capacity Scheduling & Resources Senate Bill 1305 2015 Resource...

213

Geothermal resources of the western arm of the Black Rock Desert, northwestern Nevada. Part I. Geology and geophysics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies of the geothermal potential of the western arm of the Black Rock Desert in northwestern Nevada included a compilation of existing geologic data on a detailed map, a temperature survey at 1-meter depth, a thermal-scanner survey, and gravity and seismic surveys to determine basin geometry. The temperature survey showed the effects of heating at shallow depths due to rising geothermal fluids near the known hot spring areas. Lower temperatures were noted in areas of probable near-surface ground-water movement. The thermal-scanner survey verified the known geothermal areas and showed relatively high-temperature areas of standing water and ground-water discharge. The upland areas of the desert were found to be distinctly warmer than the playa area, probably due to the low thermal diffusivity of upland areas caused by low moisture content. Surface geophysical surveys indicated that the maximum thickness of valley-fill deposits in the desert is about 3200 meters. Gravity data further showed that changes in the trend of the desert axis occurred near thermal areas. 53 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Schaefer, D.H.; Welch, A.H.; Maurer, D.K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

215

Desert Queen Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Desert Queen Geothermal Area Desert Queen Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Desert Queen Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (4) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

216

Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

217

Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power Production And Space Heating, Florence 1984, Section 2- Geothermal Resources Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power Production And Space Heating, Florence 1984, Section 2- Geothermal Resources Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): o ozkocak Published: Geothermics, 1985 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Modeling-Computer Simulations (Ozkocak, 1985) Observation Wells (Ozkocak, 1985) Reflection Survey (Ozkocak, 1985) Unspecified Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Un_Seminar_On_The_Utilization_Of_Geothermal_Energy_For_Electric_Power_Production_And_Space_Heating,_Florence_1984,_Section_2-_Geothermal_Resources&oldid=386949"

218

Measurement and control techniques in geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This information provided the background and source material used in preparing the chapter of the Geothermal Source Book on instrumentation, measurement, and control techniques. Here more complete and detailed information is presented than could be included in the source book chapter and is being published for reference. Included are detailed examples of instrumentation and control techniques currently being used in geothermal power plants. In addition, the basic guidelines and unique characteristics of instrumentation and control in geothermal systems, are presented. The instrumentation and control philosophy and the hardware involved in geothermal electric plants and their supply and injection systems are addressed. The intent is to address the unique characteristics of geothermal electric instrumentation and control (I and C) systems. Standard I and C practice is available in the general literature. Sources of information for standard I and C practice are listed in the Appendix. The information presents the philosophy of I and C system design; the development of the system, from power grid considerations through subsystem operation to specific system details; and component selection and operating considerations.

Whitbeck, J.F.; Dart, R.H.; Miller, J.D.; Brewer, D.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Technical Proposal Salton Sea Geothermal Power Pilot Plant Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed Salton Sea Geothermal Power Pilot Plant Program comprises two phases. The objective of Phase 1 is to develop the technology for power generation from high-temperature, high-salinity geothermal brines existing in the Salton Sea known geothermal resources area. Phase 1 work will result in the following: (a) Completion of a preliminary design and cost estimate for a pilot geothermal brine utilization facility. (b) Design and construction of an Area Resource Test Facility (ARTF) in which developmental geothermal utilization concepts can be tested and evaluated. Program efforts will be divided into four sub-programs; Power Generation, Mineral Extraction, Reservoir Production, and the Area Resources Test Facility. The Power Generation Subprogram will include testing of scale and corrosion control methods, and critical power cycle components; power cycle selection based on an optimization of technical, environmental and economic analyses of candidate cycles; preliminary design of a pilot geothermal-electric generating station to be constructed in Phase 2 of this program. The Mineral Extraction Subprogram will involve the following: selection of an optimum mineral recovery process; recommendation of a brine clean-up process for well injection enhancement; engineering, construction and operation of mineral recovery and brine clean-up facilities; analysis of facility operating results from environmental, economical and technical point-of-view; preliminary design of mineral recovery and brine clean-up facilities of sufficient size to match the planned pilot power plant. The Reservoir Production Subprogram will include monitoring the operation and maintenance of brine production, handling and injection systems which were built with private funding in phase 0, and monitoring of the brine characteristics and potential subsidence effects during well production and injection. Based on the above, recommendations and specifications will be prepared for production and injection systems necessary to serve the pilot power and mineral recovery plants planned for Phase 3. The scope of the Area Resource Test Facility Subprogram will include evaluation, costing, design, construction and operation of an ARTF that can serve as a field facility for testing and evaluating high temperature, high salinity geothermal brine utilization components and systems being developed by various organizations and laboratories in the United States. [DJE-2005

None

1975-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

220

Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (6) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nevada geothermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area (Redirected from Dixie Meadows Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (6) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

222

Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area (Redirected from Gabbs Valley Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (4) 9 Exploration Activities (11) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

223

Nevada's natural resources put to work | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nevada's natural resources put to work Nevada's natural resources put to work Nevada's natural resources put to work February 22, 2010 - 11:58am Addthis The Faulkner 1 geothermal power plant sits atop Blue Mountain, just outside Winnemucca, Nev.| Photo courtesy NGP The Faulkner 1 geothermal power plant sits atop Blue Mountain, just outside Winnemucca, Nev.| Photo courtesy NGP Joshua DeLung What will the project do? The site could eventually produce of 100 MW of power a year. Americans are seeing renewable energy sources put to use all around the country, and now some power plants are taking advantage of one source that rests deep within the Earth - geothermal energy. Just a short distance down the dusty Winnemucca road in Humboldt County, Nev., rests a power plant at Blue Mountain. And nearby residents are ecstatic.

224

GeoPowering the West: Geothermal Energy--The Bountiful, Clean Energy Source for the West  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

General fact sheet describing U.S. Department of Energy's GeoPowering the West program. Geothermal energy represents a major economic opportunity for the American West, an area characterized by a steadily increasing population that requires reliable sources of heat and power. GeoPowering the West is pursuing this opportunity by: (1) Bringing together national, state and local stakeholders for state-sponsored geothermal development workshops; (2) Working with public power companies and rural electric cooperatives to promote use of geothermal power; (3) Promoting increased federal use of geothermal energy; (4) Helping American Indians identify and develop geothermal resources on tribal lands; and (5) Sponsoring non-technical educational workshops.

Not Available

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Hydrogen sulfide stress corrosion cracking in materials for geothermal power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies to evaluate the performance of alloys used in geothermal power systems are reported. Alloys which are commercially available and those which have modified metallurgical structures and/or composition modifications were tested to determine the corrosive effects of the H/sub 2/S and thermal environments in geothermal fluids. Hydrogen embrittlement and sulfide stress corrosion cracking were tested. Test results showing the effects of alloy composition, tempering temperatures, fluid temperature and salt content, and ageing on sulfide stress cracking are tabulated. (LCL)

Hehemann, R.F.; Troiano, A.R.; Abu-Khater, B.; Ferrigno, S.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Kenya geothermal private power project: A prefeasibility study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Twenty-eight geothermal areas in Kenya were evaluated and prioritized for development. The prioritization was based on the potential size, resource temperature, level of exploration risk, location, and exploration/development costs for each geothermal area. Suswa, Eburru and Arus are found to offer the best short-term prospects for successful private power development. It was found that cost per kill developed are significantly lower for the larger (50MW) than for smaller-sized (10 or 20 NW) projects. In addition to plant size, the cost per kill developed is seen to be a function of resource temperature, generation mode (binary or flash cycle) and transmission distance.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Principal facts for gravity stations in the Darrough Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA), Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The latitude, longitude, elevation, observed gravity, theoretical gravity, terrain correction, free-air correction, Bougner correction, and Bougner anomaly are tabulated for 71 gravity stations in the Darrough KGRA, Nevada area. (WHK)

Peterson, D.L.; Dansereau, D.A.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Principal facts for a gravity survey of Baltazor Known Geothermal Resource Area, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The data presented are referenced to a gravity base station in Denio, Nevada at the Post Office, 50 meters south of the Oregon-Nevada State line, 1.6 meters south of the door in the southeast corner of the concrete porch, near the mailbox. Site is monumented with a ''USAF Gravity Station'' disc (A.C.I.C. reference number 2352-1). Base value is 979945.94.

Peterson, D.L.; Hoover, D.B.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Control of hydrogen sulfide emission from geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process for controlling H/sub 2/S emissions at geothermal power plants was evaluated in laboratory scale equipment and by process engineering analysis. The process is based on scrubbing geothermal steam with a metal salt solution to selectively remove and precipitate the contained H/sub 2/S. The metal sulfide is roasted or oxygen/acid leached to regenerate the metal salt, and sulfur is rejected from the system as elemental sulfur or as sulfate. Up to 95 percent removal of H/sub 2/S from simulated geothermal steams was obtained in a 2'' diameter scrubbing column packed with 3 feet of 5/8'' Flexirings by use of a recirculating slurry of copper sulfate/copper sulfide. Information is included on the chemistry, thermodynamics, kinetics and process control aspects of the process, scrubber system design, operation, and corrosion, and design proposals and cost estimates for a H/sub 2/S removal system. (LCL)

Harvey, W.W.; Brown, F.C.; Turchan, M.J.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance Agency/Company /Organization: J. Pater Salmon, J. Meurice, N. Wobus, F. Stern, and M. Duaime Partner: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Geothermal Phase: Create a Vision, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Develop Finance and Implement Projects Topics: Finance, Implementation Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Other Website: www.nrel.gov/docs/fy11osti/49391.pdf Country: United States Cost: Free UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 37.09024°, -95.712891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.09024,"lon":-95.712891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

231

Geothermal power production: impact assessments and environmental monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The role that baseline and postoperational environmental monitoring plays in assessing impacts of geothermal power production is emphasized. Based on experience in the Imperial Valley, where substantial geothermal resources exist, the important characteristics of monitoring programs involving subsidence, seismicity, and air and water quality are examined. The importance of environmental monitoring for situations where predictive models either do not exist (e.g., seismicity), or are still being developed (e.g., land subsidence) are discussed. In these cases the need for acquiring and analyzing data that can provide timely information on changes caused by geothermal operations are emphasized. Monitoring is also useful in verifying predictions of air quality changes - in particular, violations of ambient standards after control technologies are implemented. Water quality can be monitored with existing sampling programs where the potential for geothermal impacts is thought to be rather small. The significant issues in these environmental areas, the status of baseline data and predictive capability that currently exists, and the need for future monitoring and modeling programs to assess the impacts of geothermal development are summarized.

Layton, D.W.; Pimentel, K.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Modeling and optimization of geothermal power plants using the binary fluid cycle  

SciTech Connect

A computer simulation of a binary fluid cycle power plant for use with geothermal energy sources, and the subsequent optimization of this power plant type over a range of geothermal source conditions are described. The optimization technique employed for this analysis was based upon the principle of maximum use of geothermal energy.

Walter, R.A.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

SaskPower Geothermal and Self-Generated Renewable Power Loan Program (Saskatchewan, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

SaskPower offers a loan program for residential and farm customers who choose to install a Canadian Geoexchange Coalition (CGC) certified geothermal heating and/or a renewable electricity system.

234

Dual-temperature Kalina cycle for geothermal-solar hybrid power systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis analyzes the thermodynamics of a power system coupling two renewable heat sources: low-temperature geothermal and a high-temperature solar. The process, referred to as a dual-temperature geothermal-solar Kalina ...

Boghossian, John G

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Distributed Power Program DER Pilot Test at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Distributed Power Program conducted a pilot test of interconnection test procedures November 12-16, 2001 at Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The objective of this pilot test was to respond to Congressional direction in the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act of 2001 to complete a distributed power demonstration at the Nevada Test Site and validated interconnection tests in the field. The demonstration consisted of field verification of tests in IEEE P1547 (Draft 7) that are required for interconnection of distributed generation equipment to electrical power systems. Some of the testing has been conducted in a laboratory setting, but the Nevada Test Site provided a location to verify the interconnection tests in the field. The testing also provided valuable information for evaluating the potential for the Nevada Test Site to host future field-testing activities in support of Distributed Energy Resources System Integration R&D.

Kroposki, B.; DeBlasio, R.; Galdo, J.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Aspects of the Kalina technology applied to geothermal power production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the results of studies conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) concerning the applicability of the Kalina technology to geothermal (hydrothermal) power production. This report represents a correction and addition to that report. The Heat Cycle Research Program (HCRP) has as its primary goal the cost-effective production of electric power from moderate temperature hydrothermal resources. Recent work has included the study of supercritical cycles with counterflow condensation which utilize mixtures as working fluids. These advanced concepts are projected to give a 20 to 30% improvement in power produced per unit geofluid flow rate (geofluid effectiveness, w hr/lb). The original Kalina cycle is a system which is similar to the cycles being studied in the Heat Cycle Research program and it was felt that this new cycle should be studied in the geothermal context. 15 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Bliem, C.J.

1989-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

237

Occidental Geothermal, Inc. , Oxy Geothermal Power Plant No. 1: draft environmental impact report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following aspects of the proposed geothermal power plant are discussed: the project description; the environment in the vicinity of project as it exists before the project begins, from both a local and regional perspective; the adverse consequences of the project, any significant environmental effects which cannot be avoided, and any mitigation measures to minimize significant effects; the potential feasible alternatives to the proposed project; the significant unavoidable, irreversible, and long-term environmental impacts; and the growth inducing impacts. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Low-Temperature Binary Geothermal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal power plants are commercially mature, dispatchable, base-loaded renewable energy sources. Most existing geothermal power plants exploit moderate-to-high-temperature geothermal resources greater than 150C (300F). These conditions exist in a few relatively small geographic areas of the world, which has limited the amount of geothermal deployment. Emerging technologies, new exploration and drilling techniques, and pre-engineered systems are contributing to make generation from lower-temperature r...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

239

Floating power optimization studies for the cooling system of a geothermal power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The floating power concept was studied for a geothermal power plant as a method of increasing the plant efficiency and decreasing the cost of geothermal power. The stored cooling concept was studied as a method of reducing the power fluctuations of the floating power concept. The studies include parametric and optimization studies for a variety of different types of cooling systems including wet and dry cooling towers, direct and indirect cooling systems, forced and natural draft cooling towers, and cooling ponds. The studies use an indirect forced draft wet cooling tower cooling system as a base case design for comparison purposes.

Shaffer, C.J.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

California/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California/Geothermal California/Geothermal < California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF California Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in California Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Alum Geothermal Project Ram Power Silver Peak, Nevada 64 MW64,000 kW 64,000,000 W 64,000,000,000 mW 0.064 GW 6.4e-5 TW Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Alum Geothermal Area Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Bald Mountain Geothermal Project Oski Energy LLC Susanville, California 20 MW20,000 kW 20,000,000 W 20,000,000,000 mW 0.02 GW 2.0e-5 TW Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Black Rock I Geothermal Project CalEnergy Generation Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development North Shore Mono Lake Geothermal Area Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nevada geothermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Geothermal direct heat use: market potential/penetration analysis for Federal Region IX (Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary study was made of the potential for geothermal direct heat use in Arizona, California, Hawaii, and Nevada (Federal Region IX). The analysis for each state was performed by a different team, located in that state. For each state, the study team was asked to: (1) define the resource, based on the latest available data; (2) assess the potential market growth for geothermal energy; and (3) estimate the market penetration, projected to 2020. Each of the four states of interest in this study is unique in its own way. Rather than impose the same assumptions as to growth rates, capture rates, etc. on all of the study teams, each team was asked to use the most appropriate set of assumptions for its state. The results, therefore, should reflect the currently accepted views within each state. The four state reports comprise the main portion of this document. A brief regional overview section was prepared by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, following completion of the state reports.

Powell, W.; Tang, K. (eds.) [eds.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

McCoy Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

McCoy Geothermal Area McCoy Geothermal Area (Redirected from Mccoy Geothermal Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: McCoy Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (2) 9 Exploration Activities (12) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

243

Hydrogeologic and hydrogeochemical assessment of geothermal fluids in the Pyramid Lake area, Washoe country, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical characteristics of the geothermal fluids in the Pyramid Lake area using data from existing published and unpublished reports on springs, challow and deep wells in the area. Four geochemical provinces, namely, chloride, bicarbonate, suphate and nixed chloride-bicarbonate have been identified. Chloride waters are found in known geothermal areas. Two subsurface water recharge zones which reed the shallow and deep geothermal systems are proposed. These are the Virginia Mountains and their Northern extension and the Fox and Lake Ranges. Tertiary and Quaternary faulting systems in these mountains and Ranges act as heat conduits for geothermal fluids. The Needle Rocks geothermal system is postulated to be deeper than the San Emidio system. A connection between the Needle Rocks system and the Pyramid and Anaho islands warm springs is not clear from this study because of lack of chemical data from these islands. More systematic measurements of static water levels, temperatures, well lithology, water chemistry and isotopes data are recommended to enable better understanding of the geothermal systems in the area.

Ojiambo, S. Bwire

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Geothermal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Overview Technologies Resources Market Data Geothermal Topics Data Resources Financing Permitting & Policy Links Geothermal Energy The Sierra Nevada Mountains provide a spectacular backdrop for a cooling tower array at the ORMAT Mammoth Geothermal Power Plant in Central California. Geothermal energy is heat extracted from the Earth. A wide range of temperatures can be suitable for using geothermal energy, from room temperature to above 300° F.[1] This heat can be drawn from various depths, ranging from the shallow ground (the upper 10 feet beneath the surface of the Earth) that maintains a relatively constant temperature of approximately 50° to 60° F, to reservoirs of extremely hot water and steam located several miles deep into the Earth.[2][3]

245

Use of Geothermal Energy for Electric Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association and its 1,000 member systems are involved in the research, development and utilization of many different types of supplemental and alternative energy resources. We share a strong commitment to the wise and efficient use of this country's energy resources as the ultimate answer to our national prosperity and economic growth. WRECA is indebted to the United States Department of Energy for funding the NRECA/DOE Geothermal Workshop which was held in San Diego, California in October, 1980. We would also like to express our gratitude to each of the workshop speakers who gave of their time, talent and experience so that rural electric systems in the Western U. S. might gain a clearer understanding of the geothermal potential in their individual service areas. The participants were also presented with practical, expert opinion regarding the financial and technical considerations of using geothermal energy for electric power production. The organizers of this conference and all of those involved in planning this forum are hopeful that it will serve as an impetus toward the full utilization of geothermal energy as an important ingredient in a more energy self-sufficient nation. The ultimate consumer of the rural electric system, the member-owner, expects the kind of leadership that solves the energy problems of tomorrow by fully utilizing the resources at our disposal today.

Mashaw, John M.; Prichett, III, Wilson (eds.)

1980-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

246

Brawley- Resurrection Of A Previously Developed Geothermal Field | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brawley- Resurrection Of A Previously Developed Geothermal Field Brawley- Resurrection Of A Previously Developed Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Brawley- Resurrection Of A Previously Developed Geothermal Field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Brawley Geothermal Field was originally developed by Unocal. In addition to drilling geothermal wells, this development included building and operating a 10 MWe power plant. Corrosion and scaling issues resulted in Unocal abandoning the project in the 1980's. Ormat Nevada investigated the potential of the shallow sands in 2006. It was concluded that these matrixpermeable sands contained moderately saline water, high porosity, and could support a binary-type power plant. In 2007, Ormat Nevada drilled and tested five wells. These test results confirmed the

247

Terra-Gen Power and TAS Celebrate Innovative Binary Geothermal Technology |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and TAS Celebrate Innovative Binary Geothermal Technology and TAS Celebrate Innovative Binary Geothermal Technology Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Terra-Gen Power and TAS Celebrate Innovative Binary Geothermal Technology Abstract N/A Authors Terra-Gen Power and LLC Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Terra-Gen Power and TAS Celebrate Innovative Binary Geothermal Technology Citation Terra-Gen Power, LLC. Terra-Gen Power and TAS Celebrate Innovative Binary Geothermal Technology [Internet]. [updated 2011;cited 2011]. Available from: http://www.terra-genpower.com/News/TERRA-GEN-POWER-AND-TAS-CELEBRATE-INNOVATIVE-BINAR.aspx Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Terra-Gen_Power_and_TAS_Celebrate_Innovative_Binary_Geothermal_Technology&oldid=682514

248

Strategies for Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems by Near-Surface Gas Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conceptual models of the Dixie Valley, Nevada Geothermaldioxide flux at the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada;by faulting. At the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, USA, CO 2

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Nevada's 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2nd congressional district: Energy Resources 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Nevada. Registered Energy Companies in Nevada's 2nd congressional district Arete Power Inc Biodiesel Solutions Inc BlackHawk Fund Brady Power Partners Chapeau Inc dba BluePoint Energy Inc China Recycling Energy Corp CREG Collier Technologies Inc Constellation Operating Services ElectraTherm Inc ElectraTherm, Inc. Empire Geothermal Power LLC Geothermal Development Associates Geothermal Technical Partners Gradient Resources Kodali Inc Lumenergi Magma Energy NV Energy Sierra Pacific Resources NV Energy formerly Sierra Pacific Power Newcore Energy Inc OHm Geothermal Ormat Funding Corp

250

Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (4) 9 Exploration Activities (11) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

251

Power Production from Geothermal Brine with the Rotary Separator Turbine  

SciTech Connect

The rotary separator turbine is a new turbine device that operates with gas-liquid mixtures. This device achieves complete gas-liquid separation, generates power from the liquid and repressurizes the liquid. The use of the rotary separator turbine for geothermal power generation was investigated on this program. A pilot scale unit was designed and tested. Tests were conducted with a clean water/steam mixture and with geothermal brine/steam flows at East Mesa, California; Raft River, Idaho; and Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah. The test results were used to calculate the performance advantage of a rotary separator turbine power system compared to a flash steam power system and a binary power system. The calculated performance advantages were then used to estimate market potential for wellhead and central station Biphase units. The measured performance in the laboratory and in the field agreed to within {+-} 10% of the predicted values. The design goal of 20 kWe was generated both in the laboratory and from brine. Separated steam quality was measured to be greater than 99.96% at all three geothermal resources and in the laboratory. Brine pressure leaving the test unit was greater than reinjection pressure requirements. Maximum brine outlet pressure of 90 psig was demonstrated. The measured performance values would result in a 34% increase in electric power production above a single stage flash steam system. Increasing the size from the pilot size unit (20kWe) to a wellhead unit (2000 kWe) gave a calculated performance advantage of 40%. Based on these favorable results, design, construction and testing of a full-size well-head unit was initiated.

Cerini, Donald J.; Hays, Lance G.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Documentation of the status of international geothermal power plants and a list by country of selected geothermally active governmental and private sector entities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report includes the printouts from the International Geothermal Power Plant Data Base and the Geothermally Active Entity Data Base. Also included are the explanation of the abbreviations used in the power plant data base, maps of geothermal installations by country, and data base questionnaires and mailing lists.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

McGuiness Hills Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

McGuiness Hills Geothermal Area McGuiness Hills Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: McGuiness Hills Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Map: McGuiness Hills Geothermal Area McGuiness Hills Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: none"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

254

Economic assessment of polymer concrete usage in geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of a study established to review the Heber and Niland, California 50 MWe conceptual geothermal power plants designs and to identify areas where non-metallic materials, such as polymer concrete, can be technically and economically employed are reported. Emphasis was directed toward determining potential economic advantages and resulting improvements in plant availability. It is estimated that use of polymer concrete in the Heber plant will effect a savings of 6.18 mills per KWH in the cost of power delivered to the network, a savings of 9.7%. A similar savings should be effected in the Niland plant.

Not Available

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

SMUDGEO No. 1: economic impacts on geothermal power plant design  

SciTech Connect

The Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) is currently in the design phase of a geothermal power plant located in The Geysers area of Northern California. The unit, SMUDGEO No. 1, has a turbine nameplate rating of 55 MWe at 4.0 in hgA, and is expected to be in commercial operation by December 1983. The benefits of efficient steam utilization for SMUDGEO No. 1 differ greatly from other units already installed due to the purchase of geothermal steam on a per pound basis. For this reason, SMUDGEO No. 1 will be the most efficient yet installed in The Geysers area. The efficiency-conscious design of the turbine cycle is described.

Tucker, R.E. (Stone and Webster Engineering Corp., Denver, CO); Kleinhans, P.V. Jr.; Keilman, L.R.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Hybrid Cooling for Geothermal Power Plants: Final ARRA Project Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many binary-cycle geothermal plants use air as the heat rejection medium. Usually this is accomplished by using an air-cooled condenser (ACC) system to condense the vapor of the working fluid in the cycle. Many air-cooled plants suffer a loss of production capacity of up to 50% during times of high ambient temperatures. Use of limited amounts of water to supplement the performance of ACCs is investigated. Deluge cooling is found to be one of the least-cost options. Limiting the use of water in such an application to less than one thousand operating hours per year can boost plant output during critical high-demand periods while minimizing water use in binary-cycle geothermal power plants.

Bharathan, D.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

McCoy Area, Nevada geothermal reservoir assessment case history - Northern Basin and Range. Final report, 1 October 1978-30 September 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The McCoy geothermal prospect is located in north-central Nevada at the junction of the Augusta Mountains, Clan Alpine Mountains and the New Pass Range. Geothermal exploration on the prospect consisted of an integrated program of geologic, geochemical and geophysical studies. The geochemical studies included hydrogeochemistry, soil geochemistry, and drill cuttings geochemistry. Geophysical exploration included heatflow studies, aeromagnetic, self-potential, gravity, passive seismic, dipole-dipole resistivity, electromagnetic and magnetotelluric surveys. Exploration drilling includes fifty-two (52) shallow thermal gradient holes and five (5) intermediate depth temperature gradient wells. Shallow low-temperature geothermal reservoirs were encountered in two areas. In the McCoy Mine area the resource was found in the Permo-Pennsylvanian rocks. In the southern part of the prospect a resource with temperatures of 100/sup 0/C was encountered in the basal conglomeratic sandstone of the Triassic section.

Pilkington, H.D.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Category:Geothermal Development Phases | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of 6 total. G GeothermalExploration GeothermalLand Use GeothermalLeasing GeothermalPower Plant GeothermalTransmission GeothermalWell Field Retrieved from "http:...

259

Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And...

260

Geothermometry At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Nevada Test And...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nevada geothermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

262

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area (Redirected from Salt Wells Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

263

Jersey Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jersey Valley Geothermal Area Jersey Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Jersey Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: near Fallon, NV Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

264

Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (3) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Fallon, NV Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: none"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

265

Heber geothermal demonstration power plant. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The binary power plant is to be a 45 MW net electrical facility deriving energy from the low salinity (14,000 ppM), moderate temperature (360/sup 0/F, 182/sup 0/C) Heber reservoir in Southern California. The optimized baseline design established for the power plant is described, and the design and optimization work that formed the basis for the baseline design is documented. The work accomplished during Phase II, Preliminary Design is also recorded, and a base provided from which detailed plant design could be continued. Related project activities in the areas of licensing, environmental, cost, and schedule are also described. The approach used to establish the Phase II optimized baseline design was to (1) review the EPRI Phase I conceptual design and feasibility studies; (2) identify current design criteria and state-of-the-art technology; and (3) develop a preliminary design optimized to the Heber site based on utiliity standards.

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Hyperspectral Imaging At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Imaging At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) Imaging At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Hyperspectral Imaging At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Hyperspectral Imaging Activity Date Spectral Imaging Sensor AVIRIS Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geology and Geophysics of Geothermal Systems, Gregory Nash, 2005. Hyperspectral data was also used to successfully map soil-mineral anomalies that are structurally related in Dixie Valley, Nevada. In the area of the power plant, 20 m spatial resolution AVIRIS data were used. For Dixie Meadows, Nevada, 3 m spatial resolution HyVista HyMap hyperspectral data

267

McCoy Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

McCoy Geothermal Area McCoy Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: McCoy Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (2) 9 Exploration Activities (12) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

268

Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada: preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical and isotopic analyses of Dixie Valley regional waters indicate several distinct groups ranging in recharge age from Pleistocene (1000a). Geothermal field fluids ({approximately}12-14 ka) appear derived from water similar in composition to non-thermal groundwater observed today in valley artesian wells (also -14 ka). Geothermal fluid interaction with mafic rocks (Humboldt Lopolith) appears to be common, and significant reaction with granodiorite may also occur. Despite widespread occurrence of carbonate rocks, large scale chemical interaction appears minor. Age asymmetry of the ranges, more extensive interaction with deep-seated waters in the west, and distribution of springs and artesian wells suggest the existence of a regional upward hydrologic gradient with an axis in proximity to the Stillwater range.

Counce, D; Dunlap, C; Goff, F; Huebner, M; Janik, C; Johnson, S; Nimz, G

1999-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

269

Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada: preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data  

SciTech Connect

Chemical and isotopic analyses of Dixie Valley regional waters indicate several distinct groups ranging in recharge age from Pleistocene (<20 ka) to recent (<50a). Valley groundwater is older than water from perennial springs and artesian wells in adjacent ranges, with Clan Alpine range (east) much younger (most <50a) than Stillwater range (west; most >1000a). Geothermal field fluids ({approximately}12-14 ka) appear derived from water similar in composition to non-thermal groundwater observed today in valley artesian wells (also -14 ka). Geothermal fluid interaction with mafic rocks (Humboldt Lopolith) appears to be common, and significant reaction with granodiorite may also occur. Despite widespread occurrence of carbonate rocks, large scale chemical interaction appears minor. Age asymmetry of the ranges, more extensive interaction with deep-seated waters in the west, and distribution of springs and artesian wells suggest the existence of a regional upward hydrologic gradient with an axis in proximity to the Stillwater range.

Counce, D; Dunlap, C; Goff, F; Huebner, M; Janik, C; Johnson, S; Nimz, G

1999-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

270

Program in geothermal well technology directed toward achieving DOE/DGE power-on-line goals  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents the material used in an oral presentation to the DOE/Division of Geothermal Energy, which was designed to illustrate the importance of well technology development in reducing geothermal well costs, and to achieve geothermal power-on-line goals. Examination of recent studies of the economics of geothermal energy leads to the conclusion that the overall sensitivity of geothermal power-on-line to well cost is in the range of one to two. Current data suggest that a vigorous R and D program in rotary drilling technology can reduce geothermal drilling costs by about 20%, but a reduction of 40 to 50% is needed to achieve DOE/DGE goals. Research in advanced drilling systems is needed to satisfy this more stringent requirement. Some critical technological deficiencies that occur when current rotary drilling techniques are used for geothermal drilling are discussed. A broadly based development program directed at correcting these deficiencies is defined.

Polito, J.; Varnado, S.G.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Advanced binary geothermal power plants: Limits of performance  

SciTech Connect

The Heat Cycle Research Program is currently investigating the potential improvements to power cycles utilizing moderate temperature geothermal resources to produce electrical power. Investigations have specifically examined Rankine cycle binary power systems. Binary Rankine cycles are more efficient than the flash steam cycles at moderate resource temperatures, achieving a higher net brine effectiveness. At resource conditions similar to those at the Heber binary plant, it has been shown that mixtures of saturated hydrocarbons (alkanes) or halogenated hydrocarbons operating with a supercritical Rankine cycle gave improved performance over Rankine cycles with the pure working fluids executing single boiling cycles. Recently, in addition to the supercritical Rankine Cycle, other types of cycles have been proposed for binary geothermal service. This paper explores the limits on efficiency of a feasibility plant and discusses the methods used in these advanced concept plants to achieve the maximum possible efficiency. The advanced plants considered appear to be approaching the feasible limit of performance so that the designer must weigh all considerations to find the best plant for a given service. 16 refs., 12 figs.

Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Assessment of Geothermal Resources for Electric Generation in the Pacific Northwest, Draft Issue Paper for the Northwest Power Planning Council  

SciTech Connect

This document reviews the geothermal history, technology, costs, and Pacific Northwest potentials. The report discusses geothermal generation, geothermal resources in the Pacific Northwest, cost and operating characteristics of geothermal power plants, environmental effects of geothermal generation, and prospects for development in the Pacific Northwest. This report was prepared expressly for use by the Northwest Power Planning Council. The report contains numerous references at the end of the document. [DJE-2005

Geyer, John D.; Kellerman, L.M.; Bloomquist, R.G.

1989-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

273

7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160C at a specified rate as the heat source. The actual and maximum possible thermal efficiencies and the rate of heat rejected from this power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7-31 7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160ºC at a specified rate and potential energy changes are zero. 3 Steam properties are used for geothermal water. Properties Using saturated liquid properties, the source and the sink state enthalpies of geothermal water are (Table A-4) k

Bahrami, Majid

274

Geothermal Power and Interconnection: The Economics of Getting to Market  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power and Power and Interconnection: The Economics of Getting to Market David Hurlbut Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-54192 April 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Geothermal Power and Interconnection: The Economics of Getting to Market David Hurlbut Prepared under Task No. WE11.0815 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-54192 April 2012 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

275

Geothermal Turbine  

SciTech Connect

The first geothermal power generation in the world was started at Larderello, Italy in 1904. Then, New Zealand succeeded in the geothermal power generating country. These developments were then followed by the United States, Mexico, Japan and the Soviet Union, and at present, about 25 countries are utilizing geothermal power, or investigating geothermal resources.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Brawley Resurrection of a Previously Developed Geothermal Field | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brawley Resurrection of a Previously Developed Geothermal Field Brawley Resurrection of a Previously Developed Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Brawley Resurrection of a Previously Developed Geothermal Field Abstract The Brawley Geothermal Field was originally developed byUnocal. In addition to drilling geothermal wells, this developmentincluded building and operating a 10 MWe power plant.Corrosion and scaling issues resulted in Unocal abandoning theproject in the 1980's. Ormat Nevada investigated the potentialof the shallow sands in 2006. It was concluded that these matrixpermeablesands contained moderately saline water, high porosity,and could support a binary-type power plant. In 2007, OrmatNevada drilled and tested five wells. These test results confirmedthe earlier conclusions and

277

City of Klamath Falls, Oregon Geothermal Power Plant Feasibility Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the Klamath Falls project is to demonstrate the effectiveness of a combined thermal distribution system and power generation facility. The city of Klamath Falls operates a geothermal district heating system which would appear to be an attractive opportunity to install a power generation system. Since the two wells have operated reliably and consistently over many years, no new sources or resource exploration would be necessary. It appears that it will cost more to construct, operate, maintain and amortize a proposed geothermal facility than the long?term value of the power it would produce. The success of a future project will be determined by whether utility power production costs will remain low and whether costs of construction, operations, or financing may be reduced. There are areas that it would be possible to reduce construction cost. More detailed design could enable the city to obtain more precise quotes for components and construction, resulting in reduction in contingency projections. The current level of the contingency for uncertainty of costs is between $200,000 and $300,000. Another key issue with this project appears to be operation cost. While it is expected that only minimal routine monitoring and operating expenses will occur, the cost of water supply and waste water disposal represents nearly one quarter of the value of the power. If the cost of water alone could be reduced, the project could become viable. In addition, the projected cost of insurance may be lower than estimated under a city?wide policy. No provisions have been made for utilization of federal tax incentives. If a transaction with a third-party owner/taxpayer were to be negotiated, perhaps the net cost of ownership could be reduced. It is recommended that these options be investigated to determine if the costs and benefits could be brought together. The project has good potential, but like many alternative energy projects today, they only work economically if the federal tax incentives come into play.

Brian Brown, PE; Stephen Anderson, PE, Bety Riley

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Worldwide Geothermal Power Plants: Status as of June 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are 100 geothermal power units now in operation throughout 12 countries, with a total installed capacity of just over 2110 MW. The average unit thus is rated at 21.1 MW. Newer units may be broadly classified as follows: (a) wellhead units of less than 5 MW; (b) small plants of about 10 MW; (c) medium plants of 30-35 MW; (d) large plants of about 55 MW; and (e) complexes typically consisting of several 55 MW units in a large geothermal field. There is a trend toward turbine units of the double-flow type with a 55 MW rating, used either alone or in a tandem-compound arrangement giving 110 MW in a single power house. This is particularly evident at The Geysers field in California. Double-flash units (separated-steam followed by a surface flash) are suited to high quality reservoirs having high temperature, high steam fractions at the wellhead, and low scaling potential. Single-flash units (separated steam) may be called for where scaling by the spent brine is a potential problem for the liquid disposal system. Binary plants are being used for some very low temperature reservoirs, particularly in the People's Republic of China, albeit in extremely small units. A large-scale pilot plant of the binary type is being planned for the Imperial Valley of California.

DiPippo, Ronald

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

280

ORISE: 2012 DOE EERE National Geothermal Student Competition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Winners of 2012 DOE EERE National Geothermal Student Competition Announced Winners of 2012 DOE EERE National Geothermal Student Competition Announced The U.S. Department of Energy announced the top three winners in the 2012 National Geothermal Student Competition at the 36th Annual Geothermal Resources Council Meeting in Reno, Nevada. This student competition challenged teams at universities across the country to conduct cutting-edge research in geology, geoscience, chemical and bio-molecular energy, and engineering that could lead to breakthroughs in geothermal energy development. First place: Idaho State University Second place: Boise State University Third place: Southern Methodist University Geothermal Laboratory Geothermal power station First place winners: Idaho State University Photo courtesy of the Geothermal Resources Council

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nevada geothermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

282

Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

283

Under Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Under Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area Under Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Under Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

284

Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

285

CO{sub 2} flux measurements across portions of the Dixie Valley geothermal system, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A map of the CO{sub 2} flux across a newly formed area of plant kill in the NW part of the Dixie Valley geothermal system was constructed to monitor potential growth of a fumarole field. Flux measurements were recorded using a LI-COR infrared analyzer. Sample locations were restricted to areas within and near the dead zone. The data delineate two areas of high CO{sub 2} flux in different topographic settings. Older fumaroles along the Stillwater range front produce large volumes of CO{sub 2} at high temperatures. High CO{sub 2} flux values were also recorded at sites along a series of recently formed ground fractures at the base of the dead zone. The two areas are connected by a zone of partial plant kill and moderate flux on an alluvial fan. Results from this study indicate a close association between the range front fumaroles and the dead zone fractures. The goals of this study are to characterize recharge to the geothermal system, provide geochemical monitoring of reservoir fluids and to examine the temporal and spatial distribution of the CO{sub 2} flux in the dead zone. This paper reports the results of the initial CO{sub 2} flux measurements taken in October, 1997.

Bergfeld, D.; Goff, F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Earth and Environmental Sciences Div.; Janik, C.J. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Johnson, S.D. [Oxbow Power Services, Reno, NV (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

286

Near-Surface CO2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flux at the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada; relationssurface phenomena and the geothermal reservoir, Chemicalapplication to volcanic- geothermal areas and landfills,

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Geothermal power development in Hawaii. Volume I. Review and analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The history of geothermal exploration in Hawaii is reviewed briefly. The nature and occurrences of geothermal resources are presented island by island. An overview of geothermal markets is presented. Other topies covered are: potential markets of the identified geothermal areas, well drilling technology, hydrothermal fluid transport, overland and submarine electrical transmission, community aspects of geothermal development, legal and policy issues associated with mineral and land ownership, logistics and infrastructure, legislation and permitting, land use controls, Regulation 8, Public Utilities Commission, political climate and environment, state plans, county plans, geothermal development risks, and business planning guidelines.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Supersaturated Turbine Expansions for Binary Geothermal Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Heat Cycle Research project is developing the technology base that will permit a much greater utilization of the moderate-temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal resources, particularly for the generation of electrical power. The emphasis in the project has been the improvement of the performance of binary power cycles. The investigations have been examining concepts projected to improve the brine utilization by 20% relative to a ''Heber-type'' binary plant; these investigations are nearing completion. preparations are currently underway in the project to conduct field investigations of the condensation behavior of supersaturated turbine expansions. These investigations will evaluate whether the projected additional 8% to 10% improvement in brine utilization can be realized by allowing these expansions. Future program efforts will focus on the problems associated with heat rejection and on the transfer of the technology being developed to industry.

Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

289

Exploration of the Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some exploration activity. Permitting activities began in Dec. 2004 for the temperature-gradient holes but took much longer than expected with all drilling permits finally being received in early August 2005. The drilling and geochemical sampling occurred in August 2005. Ten temperature gradient holes up to 500 deep were initially planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300 to 400 encountered temperatures close to the expected regional thermal background conditions. These four holes failed to find any evidence of a large thermal anomaly surrounding the UHCR hot springs. The fifth hole, located within a narrow part of Hot Creek Canyon, encountered a maximum temperature of 81 oF at a depth of 105 but had cooler temperatures at greater depth. Temperature data from this hole can not be extrapolated to greater depths. Any thermal anomaly associated with the UHCR geothermal system is apparently confined to the immediate vicinity of Hot Creek Canyon where challenges such as topography, a wilderness study area, and wetlands issues will make further exploration time consuming and costly. Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all three thermometers closely agree gives the predictions added credibility. Unfortunately, the final result of this exploration is that a moderate temperature geothermal resource has been clearly identified but it appears to be restricted to a relatively small area that would be difficult to develop.

Dick Benoit; David Blackwell

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

290

Exploration of the Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some exploration activity. Permitting activities began in Dec. 2004 for the temperature-gradient holes but took much longer than expected with all drilling permits finally being received in early August 2005. The drilling and geochemical sampling occurred in August 2005. Ten temperature gradient holes up to 500 deep were initially planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300 to 400 encountered temperatures close to the expected regional thermal background conditions. These four holes failed to find any evidence of a large thermal anomaly surrounding the UHCR hot springs. The fifth hole, located within a narrow part of Hot Creek Canyon, encountered a maximum temperature of 81 oF at a depth of 105 but had cooler temperatures at greater depth. Temperature data from this hole can not be extrapolated to greater depths. Any thermal anomaly associated with the UHCR geothermal system is apparently confined to the immediate vicinity of Hot Creek Canyon where challenges such as topography, a wilderness study area, and wetlands issues will make further exploration time consuming and costly. Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all three thermometers closely agree gives the predictions added credibility. Unfortunately, the final result of this exploration is that a moderate temperature geothermal resource has been clearly identified but it appears to be restricted to a relatively small area that would be difficult to develop.

Dick Benoit; David Blackwell

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Performance Assessment of Flashed Steam Geothermal Power Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Five years of operating experience at the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) Cerro Prieto flashed steam geothermal power plant are evaluated from the perspective of U. S. utility operations. We focus on the design and maintenance of the power plant that led to the achievement of high plant capacity factors for Units No. 1 and 2 since commercial operation began in 1973. For this study, plant capacity factor is the ratio of the average load on the machines or equipment for the period of time considered to the capacity rating of the machines or equipment. The plant capacity factor is the annual gross output in GWh compared to 657 GWh (2 x 37.5 MW x 8760 h). The CFE operates Cerro Prieto at base load consistent with the system connected electrical demand of the Baja California Division. The plant output was curtailed during the winter months of 1973-1975 when the system electric demand was less than the combined output capability of Cerro Prieto and the fossil fuel plant near Tijuana. Each year the system electric demand has increased and the Cerro Prieto units now operate at full load all the time. The CFE added Units 3 and 4 to Cerro Prieto in 1979 which increased the plant name plate capacity to 150 MW. Part of this additional capacity will supply power to San Diego Gas and Electric Company through an interconnection across the border. The achievement of a high capacity factor over an extensive operating period was influenced by operation, design, and maintenance of the geothermal flash steam power plant.

Alt, Theodore E.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Kalina Geothermal Demonstration Project Steamboat Springs, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) to provide the DOE and other public agency decision makers with the environmental documentation required to take informed discretionary action on the proposed Kalina Geothermal Demonstration project. The EA assesses the potential environmental impacts and cumulative impacts, possible ways to minimize effects associated with partial funding of the proposed project, and discusses alternatives to DOE actions. The DOE will use this EA as a basis for their decision to provide financial assistance to Exergy, Inc. (Exergy), the project applicant. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human or physical environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

N /A

1999-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

293

Advanced Condenser Boosts Geothermal Power Plant Output (Fact Sheet), The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When power production at The Geysers geothermal power complex began to falter, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) stepped in, developing advanced condensing technology that dramatically boosted production efficiency - and making a major contribution to the effective use of geothermal power. NREL developed advanced direct-contact condenser (ADCC) technology to condense spent steam more effectively, improving power production efficiency in Unit 11 by 5%.

Not Available

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Geothermal power plants around the world. A sourcebook on the production of electricity from geothermal energy, draft of Chapter 10  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report constitutes a consolidation and a condensation of several individual topical reports dealing with the geothermal electric power stations around the world. An introduction is given to various types of energy conversion systems for use with geothermal resouces. Power plant performance and operating factors are defined and discussed. Existing geothermal plants in the following countries are covered: China, El Salvador, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, Turkey, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, and the United States. In each case, the geological setting is outlined, the geothermal fluid characteristics are given, the gathering system, energy conversion system, and fluid disposal method are described, and the environmental impact is discussed. In some cases the economics of power generation are also presented. Plans for future usage of geothermal energy are described for the above-mentioned countries and the following additional ones: the Azores (Portugal), Chile, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Indonesia, Kenya, Nicaragua, and Panama. Technical data is presented in twenty-two tables; forty-one figures, including eleven photographs, are also included to illustrate the text. A comprehensive list of references is provided for the reader who wishes to make an in-depth study of any of the topics mentioned.

DiPippo, R.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration...

296

Galena 3 Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Galena 3 Geothermal Facility Galena 3 Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Galena 3 Geothermal Facility General Information Name Galena 3 Geothermal Facility Facility Galena 3 Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Address 1010 Power Plant Drive Location Reno, Nevada Zip 89521 Coordinates 39.388680147984°, -119.74885225296° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.388680147984,"lon":-119.74885225296,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

297

Program Geothm: A thermodynamic process program for geothermal power plant cycles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program GEOTHM is a thermodynamic process program now under development for the LBL Geothermal Energy Program. To date, the program development has centered upon the modeling of working fluid properties, developing thermodynamic process models, and modeling the design performance of geothermal power plants. When the program is completed, it will be able to optimize a power plant or refrigeration plant for minimum cost power or refrigeration. Furthermore, operation of the thermodynamic cycles at off design conditions will be able to be simulated. Program GEOTHM is currently able to calculate several types of geothermal power cycles using a wide variety of working fluids.

Green, M.A.; Pines, H.S.

1974-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

BACA Project: geothermal demonstration power plant. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The various activities that have been conducted by Union in the Redondo Creek area while attempting to develop the resource for a 50 MW power plant are described. The results of the geologic work, drilling activities and reservoir studies are summarized. In addition, sections discussing the historical costs for Union's involvement with the project, production engineering (for anticipated surface equipment), and environmental work are included. Nineteen geothermal wells have been drilled in the Redondo Creek area of the Valles Caldera: a prominent geologic feature of the Jemez mountains consisting of Pliocene and Pleistocene age volcanics. The Redondo Creek area is within a complex longitudinal graben on the northwest flank of the resurgent structural dome of Redondo Peak and Redondo Border. The major graben faults, with associated fracturing, are geologically plausible candidates for permeable and productive zones in the reservoir. The distribution of such permeable zones is too erratic and the locations too imprecisely known to offer an attractive drilling target. Log analysis indicates there is a preferred mean fracture strike of N31W in the upper portion of Redondo Creek wells. This is approximately perpendicular to the major structure in the area, the northeast-striking Redondo Creek graben. The geothermal fluid found in the Redondo Creek reservoir is relatively benign with low brine concentrations and moderate H/sub 2/S concentrations. Geothermometer calculations indicate that the reservoir temperature generally lies between 500/sup 0/F and 600/sup 0/F, with near wellbore flashing occurring during the majority of the wells' production.

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Advanced binary geothermal power plants: Limits of performance  

SciTech Connect

The Heat Cycle Research Program is investigating potential improvements to power cycles utilizing moderate temperature geothermal resources to produce electrical power. Investigations have specifically examined Rankine cycle binary power systems. Binary Rankine cycles are more efficient than the flash steam cycles at moderate resource temperature, achieving a higher net brine effectiveness. At resource conditions similar to those at the Heber binary plant, it has been shown that mixtures of saturated hydrocarbons (alkanes) or halogenated hydrocarbons operating in a supercritical Rankine cycle gave improved performance over Rankine cycles with the pure working fluids executing single or dual boiling cycles or supercritical cycles. Recently, other types of cycles have been proposed for binary geothermal service. This report explores the feasible limits on efficiency of a plant given practical limits on equipment performance and discusses the methods used in these advanced concept plants to achieve the maximum possible efficiency. (Here feasible is intended to mean reasonably achievable and not cost-effective.) No direct economic analysis has been made because of the sensitivity of economic results to site specific input. The limit of performance of three advanced plants were considered in this report. The performance predictions were taken from the developers of each concept. The advanced plants considered appear to be approaching the feasible limit of performance. Ultimately, the plant designer must weigh the advantages and disadvantages of the the different cycles to find the best plant for a given service. In addition, this report presents a standard of comparison of the work which has been done in the Heat Cycle Research Program and in the industrial sector by Exergy, Inc. and Polythermal Technologies. 18 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Geothermal power economics: an annotated bibliography. Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume 1 contains annotations and abstracts of thirty-two papers on geothermal exploration, worldwide geothermal development, geothermal by-products, economic aspects, and environmental and legal aspects. A bibliography of 192 citations is also included. Individual items were previously indexed for the energy data base. (LBS)

El-Ramly, N.; Peterson, R.; Seo, K.K.

1974-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nevada geothermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Geothermal Energy--Clean Power From the Earth's Heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One, at Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake in southern California (U.S. Navy photograph). #12;iii annually of geothermal energy. Geothermal heating and cooling of both com- mercial and residential, and summarize the role of earth-science information in assessing geothermal resources worldwide. Energy

302

Nevada | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 5, 2010 CX-002125: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program CX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9 Date: 05052010 Location(s): Nevada Office(s):...

303

Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Discovery, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Discovery, Humboldt County, Nevada Abstract Triassic argillite and sandstone of the Grass Valley Formation and phyllitic mudstone of the overlying Raspberry Formation, also of Triassic age, host a blind geothermal system under exploration by Blue Mountain Power Company Inc. with assistance from the Energy & Geoscience Institute. Geologically young, steeply dipping, open fault sets, striking N50-60°E,N50-60°W, and N-S intersect in the geothermal zone providing deep permeability over a wide area. Extensive silicification andhydro

304

Geothermal Power and Interconnection: The Economics of Getting to Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a baseline description of the transmission issues affecting geothermal technologies. The report begins with a comprehensive overview of the grid, how it is planned, how it is used, and how it is paid for. The report then overlays onto this 'big picture' three types of geothermal technologies: conventional hydrothermal systems; emerging technologies such as enhanced engineered geothermal systems (EGS) and geopressured geothermal; and geothermal co-production with existing oil and gas wells. Each category of geothermal technology has its own set of interconnection issues, and these are examined separately for each. The report draws conclusions about each technology's market affinities as defined by factors related to transmission and distribution infrastructure. It finishes with an assessment of selected markets with known geothermal potential, identifying those that offer the best prospects for near-term commercial development and for demonstration projects.

Hurlbut, D.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Fracture Permeability and in Situ Stress in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have collected and analyzed fracture and fluid flow data from wells both within and outside the producing geothermal reservoir at Dixie Valley. Data from wellbore imaging and flow tests in wells outside the producing field that are not sufficiently hydraulically connected to the reservoir to be of commercial value provide both the necessary control group of fracture populations and an opportunity to test the concepts proposed in this study on a regional, whole-reservoir scale. Results of our analysis indicate that fracture zones with high measured permeabilities within the producing segment of the fault are parallel to the local trend of the Stillwater fault and are optimally oriented and critically stressed for frictional failure in the overall east-southeast extensional stress regime measured at the site. In contrast, in the non-producing (i.e., relatively impermeable:) well 66-21 the higher ratio of S{sub hmin} to S{sub v} acts to decrease the shear stress available to drive fault slip. Thus, although many of the fractures at this site (like the Stillwater fault itself) are optimally oriented for normal faulting they are not critically stressed for frictional failure. Although some of the fractures observed in the non-producing well 45-14 are critically stressed for frictional failure, the Stillwater fault zone itself is frictionally stable. Thus, the high horizontal differential stress (i.e., S{sub Hmax}-S{sub hmin}) together with the severe misorientation of the Stillwater fault zone for normal faulting at this location appear to dominate the overall potential for fluid flow.

M. D. Zoback

1999-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

306

A study of geothermal drilling and the production of electricity from geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report gives the results of a study of the production of electricity from geothermal energy with particular emphasis on the drilling of geothermal wells. A brief history of the industry, including the influence of the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act, is given. Demand and supply of electricity in the United States are touched briefly. The results of a number of recent analytical studies of the cost of producing electricity are discussed, as are comparisons of recent power purchase agreements in the state of Nevada. Both the costs of producing electricity from geothermal energy and the costs of drilling geothermal wells are analyzed. The major factors resulting in increased cost of geothermal drilling, when compared to oil and gas drilling, are discussed. A summary of a series of interviews with individuals representing many aspects of the production of electricity from geothermal energy is given in the appendices. Finally, the implications of these studies are given, conclusions are presented, and program recommendations are made.

Pierce, K.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Livesay, B.J. [Livesay Consultants, Inc., Encinitas, CA (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region MW K Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Pull Apart in Strike Slip Fault Zone Mesozoic Granitic MW K Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones major range front fault Jurassic Basalt MW K Geysers Geothermal Area Geysers Geothermal Area Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region Pull Apart in Strike Slip Fault Zone intrusion margin and associated fractures MW K Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Displacement Transfer Zone Caldera Margin Quaternary Rhyolite MW K

308

System design verification of a hybrid geothermal/coal fired power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This hybrid plant utilizes geothermal fluid for feedwater heating. With respect to the extraction of available work from the geothermal fluids, this cycle is approximately two times as efficient as the all geothermal plant. The System Design Verification Study presented verifies the technical and economic feasibility of the hybrid plant. This report is comprised of a conceptual design, cost estimate, and economic analysis of a one-unit 715 MW hybrid geothermal/coal fired power plant. In addition to the use of geothermal fluid for feedwater heating, its use is also investigated for additional power generation, condensate and cooling tower makeup water, coal beneficiation, air preheating, flue gas reheating and plant space heating requirements. An engineering and construction schedule for the hybrid plant is also included.

Not Available

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Beowawe Bottoming Binary Project Geothermal Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Beowawe Bottoming Binary Project Geothermal Project Beowawe Bottoming Binary Project Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Beowawe Bottoming Binary Project Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources Project Type / Topic 3 Low Temperature Resources Project Description The proposed two-year project supports the DOE GTP's goal of promoting the development and commercial application of energy production from low-temperature geothermal fluids, i.e., between 150°F and 300°F. State Nevada Objectives Demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of electricity generation from nonconventional geothermal resources of 205°F using the first commercial use of a cycle at a geothermal power plant inlet temperature of less than 300°F.

310

Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area (Redirected from Winnemucca Dry Lake Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

311

Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area (Redirected from Walker Lake Valley Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

312

Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area (Redirected from Gabbs Alkali Flat Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

313

BACA Project: geothermal demonstration power plant. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The various activities that have been conducted by Union in the Redondo Creek area while attempting to develop the resource for a 50 MW power plant are described. The results of the geologic work, drilling activities and reservoir studies are summarized. In addition, sections discussing the historical costs for Union's involvement with the project, production engineering (for anticipated surface equipment), and environmental work are included. Nineteen geothermal wells have been drilled in the Redondo Creek area of the Valles Caldera: a prominent geologic feature of the Jemez mountains consisting of Pliocene and Pleistocene age volcanics. The Redondo Creek area is within a complex longitudinal graben on the northwest flank of the resurgent structural dome of Redondo Peak and Redondo Border. The major graben faults, with associated fracturing, are geologically plausible candidates for permeable and productive zones in the reservoir. The distribution of such permeable zones is too erratic and the locations too imprecisely known to offer an attractive drilling target. Log analysis indicates there is a preferred mean fracture strike of N31W in the upper portion of Redondo Creek wells. This is approximately perpendicular to the major structure in the area, the northeast-striking Redondo Creek graben. The geothermal fluid found in the Redondo Creek reservoir is relatively benign with low brine concentrations and moderate H/sub 2/S concentrations. Geothermometer calculations indicate that the reservoir temperature generally lies between 500/sup 0/F and 600/sup 0/F, with near wellbore flashing occurring during the majority of the wells' production.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Supply of geothermal power from hydrothermal sources: A study of the cost of power in 20 and 40 years  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study develops estimates for the amount of hydrothermal geothermal power that could be on line in 20 and 40 years. This study was intended to represent a snapshot'' in 20 and 40 years of the hydrothermal energy available for electric power production should a market exist for this power. This does not represent the total or maximum amount of hydrothermal power, but is instead an attempt to estimate the rate at which power could be on line constrained by the exploration, development and support infrastructure available to the geothermal industry, but not constrained by the potential market for power.

Petty, S. (Petty (Susan) Consulting, Solano Beach, CA (United States)); Livesay, B.J. (Livesay Consultants, Inc., Encinitas, CA (United States)); Long, W.P. (Carlin Gold Co., Inc., Grass Valley, CA (United States)); Geyer, J. (Geyer (John) and Associates, Vancouver, WA (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Electric Power Generation from Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

low-temperature geothermal resources will spawn a new domestic industry, lead to job creation, and would be a positive step toward increasing domestic energy supplies and reducing...

316

Energy Department Finalizes Loan Guarantee for Ormat Geothermal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agencies You are here Home Energy Department Finalizes Loan Guarantee for Ormat Geothermal Project in Nevada Energy Department Finalizes Loan Guarantee for Ormat Geothermal...

317

Modular 5 MW geothermal power plant design considerations and guidelines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design considerations and guideline documents given define the principal design requirements for a nominal 5 MW geothermal power plant of a type to permit over-the-road transport of its several modules. The power plant system defined is supplied with steam from a single flash steam separator stage, located at the plant area, and supplied with steam from two wells at nominal pressure of 3.8 Kg/cm/sup 2/ Abs (54 psia). In some cases where the content of noxious noncondensable gases is high, a shell and tube condenser would be substituted for the direct contact type condenser specified and an additional module containing an H/sub 2/S removal system would be added. Guidelines are given for the following: site preparation, collection system, plant installation, assembly, and test; turbine generator module; condenser and noncondensable gas removal module; plant control and switchgear module; cooling water circulation pump module; steam-water separator module; maintenance, office, and lavatory module; reinjection pump module; cooling tower modules; spray pond installation and piping; and auxiliary generator module. (MHR)

Not Available

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Capital cost models for geothermal power plants and fluid transmission systems. [GEOCOST  

SciTech Connect

The GEOCOST computer program is a simulation model for evaluating the economics of developing geothermal resources. The model was found to be both an accurate predictor of geothermal power production facility costs and a valid designer of such facilities. GEOCOST first designs a facility using thermodynamic optimization routines and then estimates costs for the selected design using cost models. Costs generated in this manner appear to correspond closely with detailed cost estimates made by industry planning groups. Through the use of this model, geothermal power production costs can be rapidly and accurately estimated for many alternative sites making the evaluation process much simpler yet more meaningful.

Schulte, S.C.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Geotechnical environmental aspects of geothermal power generation at Herber, Imperial Valley, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of constructing a 25-50 MWe geothermal power plant using low salinity hydrothermal fluid as the energy source was assessed. Here, the geotechnical aspects of geothermal power generation and their relationship to environmental impacts in the Imperial Valley of California were investigated. Geology, geophysics, hydrogeology, seismicity and subsidence are discussed in terms of the availability of data, state-of-the-art analytical techniques, historical and technical background and interpretation of current data. Estimates of the impact of these geotechnical factors on the environment in the Imperial Valley, if geothermal development proceeds, are discussed.

Not Available

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

MEMS Materials and Temperature Sensors for Down Hole Geothermal System Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geothermal power plants. US DOE EERE Geothermal Technologieswas made for the US DOE EERE Geothermal Technologies

Wodin-Schwartz, Sarah

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nevada geothermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study: Northern Basin and Range Province, Leach Hot Springs Area, Pershing County, Nevada. Final report, April 1979-December 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study was conducted in the Leach Hot Springs Known Geothermal Resource Area of Pershing County, Nevada. The case study included the drilling of twenty-three temperature gradient wells, a magnetotelluric survey, seismic data acquisition and processing, and the drilling of one exploratory well. Existing data from prior investigations, which included water geochemistry, gravity, photogeologic reports and a hydrothermal alteration study, was also provided. The exploratory well was drilled to total depth of 8565' with no significant mud losses or other drilling problems. A maximum temperature of 260/sup 0/F was recorded at total depth. The relatively low temperature and the lack of permeability (as shown by absence of mud loss) indicated that a current, economic geothermal resource had not been located, and the well was subsequently plugged and abandoned. However, the type and extent of rock alteration found implied that an extensive hot water system had existed in this area at an earlier time. This report is a synopsis of the case study activities and the data obtained from these activities.

Beard, G.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Study of practical cycles for geothermal power plants. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A comparison is made of the performance and cost of geothermal power cycles designed specifically, utilizing existing technology, to exploit the high temperature, high salinity resource at Niland and the moderate temperature, moderately saline resource at East Mesa in California's Imperial Valley. Only two kinds of cycles are considered in the analysis. Both employ a dual flash arrangement and the liberated steam is either utilized directly in a condensing steam turbine or used to heat a secondary working fluid in a closed Rankine (binary) cycle. The performance of several organic fluids was investigated for the closed cycle and the most promising were selected for detailed analysis with the given resource conditions. Results show for the temperature range investigated that if the noncondensible gas content in the brine is low, a dual flash condensing steam turbine cycle is potentially better in terms of resource utilization than a dual flash binary cycle. (The reverse is shown to be true when the brine is utilized directly for heat exchange.) It is also shown that despite the higher resource temperature, the performance of the dual flash binary cycle at Niland is degraded appreciably by the high salinity and its output per unit of brine flow is almost 20 percent lower than that of the steam turbine cycle at East Mesa. Turbine designs were formulated and costs established for power plants having a nominal generating capacity of 50 MW. Three cycles were analyzed in detail. At East Mesa a steam turbine and a binary cycle were compared. At Niland only the binary cycle was analyzed since the high CO/sub 2/ content in the brine precludes the use of a steam turbine there. In each case only the power island equipment was considered and well costs and the cost of flash separators, steam scrubbers and piping to the power plant boundary were excluded from the estimate.

Eskesen, J.H.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Study of practical cycles for geothermal power plants. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparison is made of the performance and cost of geothermal power cycles designed specifically, utilizing existing technology, to exploit the high temperature, high salinity resource at Niland and the moderate temperature, moderately saline resource at East Mesa in California's Imperial Valley. Only two kinds of cycles are considered in the analysis. Both employ a dual flash arrangement and the liberated steam is either utilized directly in a condensing steam turbine or used to heat a secondary working fluid in a closed Rankine (binary) cycle. The performance of several organic fluids was investigated for the closed cycle and the most promising were selected for detailed analysis with the given resource conditions. Results show for the temperature range investigated that if the noncondensible gas content in the brine is low, a dual flash condensing steam turbine cycle is potentially better in terms of resource utilization than a dual flash binary cycle. (The reverse is shown to be true when the brine is utilized directly for heat exchange.) It is also shown that despite the higher resource temperature, the performance of the dual flash binary cycle at Niland is degraded appreciably by the high salinity and its output per unit of brine flow is almost 20 percent lower than that of the steam turbine cycle at East Mesa. Turbine designs were formulated and costs established for power plants having a nominal generating capacity of 50 MW. Three cycles were analyzed in detail. At East Mesa a steam turbine and a binary cycle were compared. At Niland only the binary cycle was analyzed since the high CO/sub 2/ content in the brine precludes the use of a steam turbine there. In each case only the power island equipment was considered and well costs and the cost of flash separators, steam scrubbers and piping to the power plant boundary were excluded from the estimate.

Eskesen, J.H.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

,"Nevada Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

325

Electric Power Acronyms and Definitions - Sierra Nevada Region  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the ISO transmission grid. Responsible for providing non-discriminatory access to the power grid, managing congestion, maintaining grid reliability and security, and providing...

326

GEOTHERMAL PILOT STUDY FINAL REPORT: CREATING AN INTERNATIONAL GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMMUNITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. Direct Application of Geothermal Energy . . . . . . . . .Reservoir Assessment: Geothermal Fluid Injection, ReservoirD. E. Appendix Small Geothermal Power Plants . . . . . . .

Bresee, J. C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Wisconsin/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal < Wisconsin Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Wisconsin Geothermal edit General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under...

328

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area (Redirected from Flint Geothermal Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

329

Western States Geothermal Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

States Geothermal Company States Geothermal Company Jump to: navigation, search Name Western States Geothermal Company Place Sparks, Nevada Zip 89432-2627 Sector Geothermal energy Product Geothermal power plant developer and operator. Acquired by Ormat in 2001. Coordinates 35.61145°, -96.821309° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.61145,"lon":-96.821309,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

330

Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Project Thermal Gradient Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area is located near the eastern edge of the Sonoma Range and is positioned within the structurally complex Winnemucca fold and thrust belt of north-central Nevada. A series of approximately north-northeast-striking faults related to the Basin and Range tectonics are superimposed on the earlier structures within the project area, and are responsible for the final overall geometry and distribution of the pre-existing structural features on the property. Two of these faults, the Pumpernickel Valley fault and Edna Mountain fault, are range-bounding and display numerous characteristics typical of strike-slip fault systems. These characteristics, when combined with geophysical data from Shore (2005), indicate the presence of a pull-apart basin, formed within the releasing bend of the Pumpernickel Valley Edna Mountain fault system. A substantial body of evidence exists, in the form of available geothermal, geological and geophysical information, to suggest that the property and the pull-apart basin host a structurally controlled, extensive geothermal field. The most evident manifestations of the geothermal activity in the valley are two areas with hot springs, seepages, and wet ground/vegetation anomalies near the Pumpernickel Valley fault, which indicate that the fault focuses the fluid up-flow. There has not been any geothermal production from the Pumpernickel Valley area, but it was the focus of a limited exploration effort by Magma Power Company. In 1974, the company drilled one exploration/temperature gradient borehole east of the Pumpernickel Valley fault and recorded a thermal gradient of 160oC/km. The 1982 temperature data from five unrelated mineral exploration holes to the north of the Magma well indicated geothermal gradients in a range from 66 to 249oC/km for wells west of the fault, and ~283oC/km in a well next to the fault. In 2005, Nevada Geothermal Power Company drilled four geothermal gradient wells, PVTG-1, -2, -3, and -4, and all four encountered geothermal fluids. The holes provided valuable water geochemistry, supporting the geothermometry results obtained from the hot springs and Magma well. The temperature data gathered from all the wells clearly indicates the presence of a major plume of thermal water centered on the Pumpernickel Valley fault, and suggests that the main plume is controlled, at least in part, by flow from this fault system. The temperature data also defines the geothermal resource with gradients >100oC/km, which covers an area a minimum of 8 km2. Structural blocks, down dropped with respect to the Pumpernickel Valley fault, may define an immediate reservoir. The geothermal system almost certainly continues beyond the recently drilled holes and might be open to the east and south, whereas the heat source responsible for the temperatures associated with this plume has not been intersected and must be at a depth greater than 920 meters (depth of the deepest well Magma well). The geological and structural setting and other characteristics of the Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area are markedly similar to the portions of the nearby Dixie Valley geothermal field. These similarities include, among others, the numerous, unexposed en echelon faults and large-scale pull-apart structure, which in Dixie Valley may host part of the geothermal field. The Pumpernickel Valley project area, for the majority of which Nevada Geothermal Power Company has geothermal rights, represents a geothermal site with a potential for the discovery of a relatively high temperature reservoir suitable for electric power production. Among locations not previously identified as having high geothermal potential, Pumpernickel Valley has been ranked as one of four sites with the highest potential for electrical power production in Nevada (Shevenell and Garside, 2003). Richards and Blackwell (2002) estimated the total heat loss and the preliminary production capacity for the entire Pumpernickel Valley geothermal system to be at 35MW. A more conservative estimate, for

Z. Adam Szybinski

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Category:Geothermal Regions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermalpower.jpg Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Geothermal Regions page? For detailed information on Geothermal Regions, click here. Category:Geothermal Regions Add.png Add a new Geothermal Region Pages in category "Geothermal Regions" The following 22 pages are in this category, out of 22 total. A Alaska Geothermal Region C Cascades Geothermal Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region G Gulf of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region H Hawaii Geothermal Region Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region I Idaho Batholith Geothermal Region N Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region N cont. Northern Rockies Geothermal Region Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region O Outside a Geothermal Region R Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region S San Andreas Geothermal Region San Andreas Split Geothermal Region

332

New Hampshire/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < New Hampshire Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF New Hampshire Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in New Hampshire No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in New Hampshire No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in New Hampshire Mean Capacity (MW) Number of Plants Owners Geothermal Region White Mountains Geothermal Area Other GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for New Hampshire Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and

333

EERE News: Nevada Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Subscribe RSS Feeds Nevada Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Enhanced Geothermal System April 12, 2013 Photo of pipelines connected to a geothermal heating plant....

334

Tuscarora area, Nevada: geothermal reservoir assessment case history, northern basin and range. Final report, 1 October 1978-9 September 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Tuscarora prospect is located at the north end of Independence Valley approximately 90 km north-northwest of Elko, Nevada. Geothermal exploration on the prospect consisted of an integrated program of geologic, hydrogeochemical and soil geochemistry studies. Geophysical exploration included heatflow studies, aeromagnetic, self-potential, gravity, dipole-dipole resistivity and magnetotelluric surveys. Exploration drilling includes thirty-two shallow thermal gradient holes, six intermediate depth temperature gradient wells and one 5454 foot test for discovery well. Shallow low-temperature reservoirs were encountered in the Tertiary rocks and in the Paleozoic rocks immediately beneath the Tertiary. Drilling problems forced the deep well to be stopped before the high-temperature reservoir was reached.

Pilkington, H.D.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Baltazor KGRA and vicinity, Nevada: geothermal reservoir assessment case study, northern Basin and Range province. Final report, 1 October 1978-31 January 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Baltazor KGRA and McGee/Painted Hills geothermal prospects are located in northern Humboldt County, Nevada along the northwestern margin of the Basin and Range province. Exploration work other than drilling has included groundwater sampling, a microearthquake study, a geologic literature search and photogeologic mapping, compilation of aeromagnetic and gravity mapping, soil mercury surveying, electrical resistivity and self-potential surveys and detailed hydrothermal alteration mapping. Exploration drilling included 27 shallow temperature gradient holes, four intermediate-depth gradient wells and one 3703-foot deep test, Baltazor 45-14. The deep test penetrated Miocene rhyolite, andesite, basalt and andesitic basalt flows before excessive hold deviation forced an end to drilling and completion as a deep temperature observation well. A temperature survey two weeks after completion obtained a 119.7/sup 0/C (247.4/sup 0/F) reading at survey total depth, 1110 m (3640 feet).

Wright, T.C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Assessment of the geothermal resources of Carson-Eagle valleys and Big Smoky Valley, Nevada. First annual report, May 1, 1979-May 30, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two geothermal investigations were completed in three Nevada locations. The regions studied were selected from areas outlined as having direct utilization potential (Trexler and others, 1979) and included the Carson-Eagle Valley, Bis Smoky Valley and Caliente. Studies were organized around the completion of a group of tasks in each area. These tasks included: geologic reconnaissance, gravity surveys, aerial photography, fluid sampling and analysis, shallow depth temperature probe surveys, soil mercury surveys, shallow electrical resistivity measurements, and temperature gradient hole drilling. Goals of the project were to provide regional information about the nature and extent of the resources and to offer a critical evaluation of the techniques employed. Results from the work in the Carson-Eagle Valley and Big Smoky Valley are presented. (MHR)

Trexler, D.T.; Koenig, B.A.; Flynn, T.; Bruce, J.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Optimization of non-condensable gas removal system in geothermal power plant  

SciTech Connect

Optimization of non-condensable gas (hereinafter called N.C.G.) removal system in geothermal power station, in a special case that the geothermal steam contains large amount of noncondensable gas, is discussed. Four different alternative N.C.G. removal systems are studied, which are steam jet gas ejectors, centrifugal gas compressors, combined systems of steam ejectors and centrifugal compressors and back pressure turbine-without N.C.G. removal system. This report summarizes the results and gives recommendations as to the most suitable gas removal system and also as to optimum condenser pressure, in cases of large quantity N.C.G. content in geothermal steam.

Tajima, S.; Nomura, M.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Geothermal power plants of Iceland: a technical survey of existing and planned installations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical features of the geothermal electric power plants of Iceland are described. Some description is given of the geology of the geothermal regions, and recent volcanic eruptions are discussed relative to their impact on the geothermal plant sites. The 3 MW, single-flash plant at Namafjall, the 60 MW, double-flash plant at Krafla, and the 1 MW unit at Grindavik are included. Information is given on well arrangements, casing programs, energy conversion systems, capital investments, and operating experiences, where such information is available.

DiPippo, R.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Geothermal power plants of Italy: A technical survey of existing installations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The dry-steam geothermal power plants in the Boraciferous (Larderello), Monte Amiata, and Travale regions of Italy are described. The geology of these areas is described along with the nature of the geothermal steam. Details are given about the drilling techniques and the methods used to complete the wells. Noncondensing and condensing steam turbines are described in detail, including special features aimed at improving the flexibility of the machines to meet a variety of geofluid specifications while, at the same time, maintaining high performance. The type of materials used to resist the corrosive and erosive nature of the geothermal fluid are also covered. Economic data and operating experience are presented.

DiPippo, R.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

International data exchange for geothermal energy power production  

SciTech Connect

An approach to the problem of economic data handling and dissemination of geothermal information is the establishment of an international data exchange cooperative program with the idea to avoid unnecessary and expensive duplication of research and development effort.

Phillips, S.L.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nevada geothermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Hybrid Cooling for Geothermal...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Sponsored by OSTI -- Hybrid Cooling for Geothermal Power Plants: Final ARRA Project Report Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection...

342

Working fluid selection for an increased efficiency hybridized geothermal-solar thermal power plant in Newcastle, Utah.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Renewable sources of energy are of extreme importance to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from traditional power plants. Such renewable sources include geothermal and solar thermal (more)

Carnell, John Walter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Details Areas (48) Power Plants (8) Projects (15) Techniques (33) The Basin and Range Province in northwestern Nevada and northeastern California is characterized by late Cretaceous - early Cenozoic regional erosion, Oligocene - Miocene volcanism, and subsequent late Miocene extension. Extensional faulting in northwestern Nevada began everywhere at 12 Ma and has continued up to the present. Faulting in the Warner Range in northeastern California can only be constrained to have begun between 14 and 3 Ma, but may represent westward migration of Basin and Range extension during the Pliocene. Compared to the many parts of the Basin and Range in

344

Project Financial Summary Report Concerning Financing Surface Facilities for a 50 Megawatt Geothermal Electric Power Plant Facility in Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the economic and financial conditions pertaining to geothermal electric power plant utilization of geothermal fluids produced from the Roosevelt Hot springs area of Utah. The first year of electric power generation is scheduled to be 1982. The non-resource facilities will be called ''surface facilities'' and include the gathering system, the power plant, the substation, and the injection system.

None

1978-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

345

Technology Advancements to Support Growth in Geothermal Power Sales in a Dynamic Utility Market  

SciTech Connect

We are assembled today to discuss the opportunities and challenges for expanding the sales of geothermally-generated electric power in a competitive utility market. First, however, I would like to note that growth in geothermal sales might not be a germane topic were it not for the early participation in the development of the geothermal industry by utilities themselves. Without their contributions to research and development, environmental breakthroughs, and, perhaps, above all, their early use of geothermal power and continuing investment in the industry, we might still be at ''Square One''--confronting inhibiting doubts of the energy utilization industry. I feel certain that utility involvement has served to inspire far greater confidence in the reliability of the resource on the part of other utilities and other investors than could have been generated by federal programs and/or the resource developer arm of the geothermal community. While acknowledging that we have not completely resolved all problems which geothermal energy faced 20 years ago--confidence, institutional restraints, environmental compliance, and technical and economic uncertainties--this audience and our predecessors have addressed them, individually and collectively, and, to a large extent, we have surmounted them. But it took generation or contracted purchase of geothermal power by utilities--whatever their discrete reasons for doing so--to demonstrate to the public and government regulators that there is a place for geothermal power in the service areas of large utilities. In addition, in using an alternative fuel, the participating utilities have already exposed themselves to changing concepts and practices in their industry.

Mock, John E.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

346

Technology Advancements to Support Growth in Geothermal Power Sales in a Dynamic Utility Market  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We are assembled today to discuss the opportunities and challenges for expanding the sales of geothermally-generated electric power in a competitive utility market. First, however, I would like to note that growth in geothermal sales might not be a germane topic were it not for the early participation in the development of the geothermal industry by utilities themselves. Without their contributions to research and development, environmental breakthroughs, and, perhaps, above all, their early use of geothermal power and continuing investment in the industry, we might still be at ''Square One''--confronting inhibiting doubts of the energy utilization industry. I feel certain that utility involvement has served to inspire far greater confidence in the reliability of the resource on the part of other utilities and other investors than could have been generated by federal programs and/or the resource developer arm of the geothermal community. While acknowledging that we have not completely resolved all problems which geothermal energy faced 20 years ago--confidence, institutional restraints, environmental compliance, and technical and economic uncertainties--this audience and our predecessors have addressed them, individually and collectively, and, to a large extent, we have surmounted them. But it took generation or contracted purchase of geothermal power by utilities--whatever their discrete reasons for doing so--to demonstrate to the public and government regulators that there is a place for geothermal power in the service areas of large utilities. In addition, in using an alternative fuel, the participating utilities have already exposed themselves to changing concepts and practices in their industry.

Mock, John E.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

347

Performance and operational experience of a prototype binary geothermal power plant  

SciTech Connect

At the Raft River geothermal site in south central Idaho, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is investigating and demonstrating the production of electrical power from a moderate temperature (140/sup 0/ to 145/sup 0/C) geothermal resource. The initial production of electrical power at the Raft River site was accomplished with the Prototype Power Plant which was built to investigate and demonstrate the operation of binary power cycles where the energy in the geothermal fluid is transferred to a secondary working fluid. This plant serves as a test bed for testing pilot scale components, systems, and/or concepts that have the potential for enhancing the feasibility of power generation from moderate temperature geothermal resources. During the automatic run test the plant was able to produce a maximum of 59kW(e). Although the plant was not (and has not) operated at design turbine conditions, performance was predictable. During the automatic run test, the plant operation was stable and the facility was operated for 1357 hours producing electrical power approximately 87% of the time geothermal fluid was available for operation.

Mines, G.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Energy Basics: Geothermal Electricity Production  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Geothermal Electricity Production A photo of steam emanating from geothermal power plants at The Geysers in California. Geothermal energy originates from deep...

349

Geothermal Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Energy Technology (GET) announces on a bimonthly basis the current worldwide information available on the technologies required for economic recovery of geothermal energy and its use as direct heat or for electric power production.

Steele, B.C.; Harman, G.; Pitsenbarger, J. [eds.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Geothermal Energy Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Following is complete draft.Geothermal Summary for AAPG Explorer J. L. Renner, Idaho National Laboratory Geothermal energy is used to produce electricity in 24 countries. The United States has the largest capacity (2,544 MWe) followed by Philippines (1,931 MWe), Mexico (953 MWe), Indonesia (797 MWe), and Italy (791 MWe) (Bertani, 2005). When Chevron Corporation purchased Unocal Corporation they became the leading producer of geothermal energy worldwide with projects in Indonesia and the Philippines. The U. S. geothermal industry is booming thanks to increasing energy prices, renewable portfolio standards, and a production tax credit. California (2,244 MWe) is the leading producer, followed by Nevada (243 MWe), Utah (26 MWe) and Hawaii (30 MWe) and Alaska (0.4 MWe) (Bertani, 2005). Alaska joined the producing states with two 0.4 KWe power plants placed on line at Chena Hot Springs during 2006. The plant uses 30 liters per second of 75C water from shallow wells. Power production is assisted by the availability of gravity fed, 7C cooling water (http://www.yourownpower.com/) A 13 MWe binary power plant is expected to begin production in the fall of 2007 at Raft River in southeastern Idaho. Idaho also is a leader in direct use of geothermal energy with the state capital building and several other state and Boise City buildings as well as commercial and residential space heated using fluids from several, interconnected geothermal systems. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 modified leasing provisions and royalty rates for both geothermal electrical production and direct use. Pursuant to the legislation the Bureau of Land management and Minerals Management Service published final regulations for continued geothermal leasing, operations and royalty collection in the Federal Register (Vol. 72, No. 84 Wednesday May 2, 2007, BLM p. 24358-24446, MMS p. 24448-24469). Existing U. S. plants focus on high-grade geothermal systems located in the west. However, interest in non-traditional geothermal development is increasing. A comprehensive new MIT-led study of the potential for geothermal energy within the United States predicts that mining the huge amounts of stored thermal energy in the Earths crust not associated with hydrothermal systems, could supply a substantial portion of U.S. electricity with minimal environmental impact (Tester, et al., 2006, available at http://geothermal.inl.gov). There is also renewed interest in geothermal production from other non-traditional sources such as the overpressured zones in the Gulf Coast and warm water co-produced with oil and gas. Ormat Technologies, Inc., a major geothermal company, recently acquired geothermal leases in the offshore overpressured zone of Texas. Ormat and the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center recently announced plans to jointly produce geothermal power from co-produced water from the Teapot Dome oilfield (Casper Star-Tribune, March 2, 2007). RMOTC estimates that 300 KWe capacity is available from the 40,000 BWPD of 88C water associated with oil production from the Tensleep Sandstone (Milliken, 2007). The U. S. Department of Energy is seeking industry partners to develop electrical generation at other operating oil and gas fields (for more information see: https://e-center.doe.gov/iips/faopor.nsf/UNID/50D3734745055A73852572CA006665B1?OpenDocument). Several web sites offer periodically updated information related to the geothermal industry and th

J. L. Renner

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Nevada Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Enhanced...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here Home Nevada Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Enhanced Geothermal System Nevada Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Enhanced Geothermal...

352

New York Canyon Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » New York Canyon Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: New York Canyon Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (6) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Lovelock, NV Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

353

Site-specific analysis of hybrid geothermal/fossil power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of an analytical effort to determine the cost effectiveness of hybrid geothermal/fossil-fuel electrical-power generating stations. The analysis is directed at combining hydrothermal and coal energy in a Rankine steam cycle, for electrical power generation for the City of Burbank, California. This effort develops a methodology for hybrid power-plant cost analysis so that preliminary plant designs can be optimized as a function of specific site conditions and characteristics. It also defines cost-optimized site-specific plant designs for four potential sites: Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah, Coso Thermal Area, California, East Mesa, California, and Long Valley, California. These optimized designs are compared for the costs, geothermal-resource utilization, and fossil fuel saved. The results indicate that development of geothermal resources to support a hybrid power plant are favorable for at least two of the four sites.

Anno, G.H.; Dore, M.A.; Grijalva, R.L.; Lang, G.D.; Thomas, F.J.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Power-cycle studies for a geothermal electric plant for MX operating bases  

SciTech Connect

Binary geothermal plants were investigated for providing electrical power for MX missile bases. A number of pure hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon mixtures were evaluated as working fluids for geothermal resource temperatures of 365, 400, and 450/sup 0/F. Cycle thermodynamic analyses were conducted for pure geothermal plants and for two types of coal-geothermal hybrid plants. Cycle performance results were presented as net geofluid effectiveness (net plant output in watts per geofluid flow in 1 bm/hr) and cooling water makeup effectiveness (net plant output in watts per makeup water flow in 1 bm/hr). A working fluid containing 90% (mass) isobutane/10% hexane was selected, and plant statepoints and energy balances were determined for 20MW(e) geothermal plants at each of the three resource temperatures. Working fluid heaters and condensers were sized for these plants. It is concluded that for the advanced plants investigated, geothermal resources in the 365 to 450/sup 0/F range can provide useful energy for powering MX missile bases.

Bliem, C.J.; Kochan, R.J.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Compound hybrid geothermal-fossil power plants: thermodynamic analyses and site-specific applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The analysis of hybrid fossil-geothermal power plants is extended to compound hybrid systems which combine the features of previously analyzed systems: the geothermal-preheat and the fossil-superheat systems. Compound systems of the one- and two-stage type are considered. A compilation of working formulae from earlier studies is included for completeness. Results are given for parametric analyses of compound hybrid plants. System performance was determined for wellhead conditions of 150, 200, and 250/sup 0/C, and for steam fractions of 10, 20, 30, and 40%. For two-stage systems an additional cycle variable, the hot water flash fraction, was varied from 0 to 100% in increments of 25%. From the viewpoint of thermodynamics, compound hybrid plants are superior to individual all-geothermal and all-fossil plants, and are shown to have certain advantages over basic geothermal-preheat and fossil-superheat hybrid plants. The flexibility of compound hybrid systems is illustrated by showing how such plants might be used at six geothermal sites in the western United States. The question of the optimum match between the energy resources and the power plant is addressed, and an analysis given for a hypothetical geothermal resource.

DiPippo, R.; Avelar, E.M.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Microsoft Word - BlueMountainGeotherm_FONSI_FinalDrft v3 Clean_4-26-10 Clean  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BLUE MOUNTAIN BLUE MOUNTAIN GEOTHERMAL DEVELOPMENT PROJECT HUMBOLDT COUNTY, NEVADA PERSHING COUNTY, NEVADA DECEMBER 2007 EA NUMBER: NV-020-08-01 Lead Agency: BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT Winnemucca Field Office 5100 E. Winnemucca Blvd. Winnemucca, Nevada 89445 Project Applicant: NEVADA GEOTHERMAL POWER COMPANY 900-409 Granville Street Vancouver, BC V6C 1T2 It is the mission of the Bureau of Land Management to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of the public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. BLM·NV·WN·ES·OB·01·1310 NV·020-08-EA-Ol ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT BLUE MOUNTAIN GEOTHERMAL DEVELOPMENT PROJECT TABLE OF CONTENTS Page LIST OF TABLES ........................................................................................................................ IV

357

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tectonic br Setting Host br Rock br Age Host br Rock br Lithology Tectonic br Setting Host br Rock br Age Host br Rock br Lithology Mean br Capacity Mean br Reservoir br Temp Amedee Geothermal Area Amedee Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics Mesozoic granite granodiorite MW K Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics MW K Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics triassic metasedimentary MW K Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics MW Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone

358

Honey Lake hybrid geothermal wood residue power plant, Lassen County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of a proposed 50 MW (gross) electric power project located near Wendel, California about 25 miles east of Susanville was studied. The project would be the first commercial power plant to combine the use of geothermal energy and wood fuel for power production. Wood fuel consisting primarily of various forms of forest management residues would be processed and partially dehydrated with geothermal energy prior to combustion. Geothermal energy would also be used for boiler feedwater heating and combustion air preheating. The study defines the range of site-specific benefits and economics of using wood fuel and moderate temperature geothermal energy, both of which are abundant and often located in proximity at many locations in the western United States. The study results document conclusively that overall project economics can be very favorable and that in addition to providing an important source of electric power, many benefits to forest land managers, local communities, project developers and the state of the environment can be derived from the combined use of moderate temperature geothermal energy and wood fuel.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Site-specific analysis of hybrid geothermal/fossil power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary economic analysis of a hybrid geothermal/coal power plant has been completed for four geothermal Resource areas: Roosevelt Hot Springs, Coso Hot Springs, East Mesa and Long Valley. A hybrid plant would be economically viable at Roosevelt Hot Springs and somewhat less so at Coso Hot Springs. East Mesa and Long Valley show no economic promise. A well-designed hybrid plant could use geothermal energy for boiler feedwater heating, auxiliary power, auxiliary heating, and cooling water. Construction and operation of a hybrid plant at either Roosevelt Hot Springs or Coso Hot Springs is recommended. Brown University provided the theoretical basis for the hybrid study. A modified version of the Lawrence Berkeley Livermore GEOTHM Program is the major analytical tool used in the analysis. The Intermountain Power Project is the reference all coal-fired plant. Costing methods followed recommendations issued by the Energy research and Development Administration.

Not Available

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Site-specific analysis of hybrid geothermal/fossil power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary economic analysis of a hybrid geothermal/coal power plant was completed for four geothermal resource areas: Roosevelt Hot Springs, Coso Hot Springs, East Mesa, and Long Valley. A hybrid plant would be economically viable at Roosevelt Hot Springs and somewhat less so at Coso Hot Springs. East Mesa and Long Valley show no economic promise. A well-designed hybrid plant could use geothermal energy for boiler feedwater heating, auxiliary power, auxiliary heating, and cooling water. Construction and operation of a hybrid plant at either Roosevelt Hot Springs or Coso Hot Springs is recommended. A modified version of the Lawrence Berkeley Livermore GEOTHM Program is the major analytical tool used in the analysis. The Intermountain Power Project is the reference all coal-fired plant.

Not Available

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nevada geothermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Potential of hybrid geothermal/coal fired power plants in Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The City of Burbank and the Ralph M. Parsons Company studies showed several advantages for hybrid geothermal/coal fired power plants, as follows: (1) the estimated cost of producing electricity in hybrid plant is about 18.3 mills/kWh, compared to 19.3 mills/kWh in an all-coal fired power plant; (2) the coal requirements for a given plant can be reduced about 12 to 17%; and (3) the geothermal brines can be used for power plant cooling water, and in some cases, as boiler feedwater. The pertinent results of the City of Burbank studies are summarized and applied to the geothermal and coal resources of Arizona for possible future utilization.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Direct-flash-steam geothermal-power-plant assessment. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the project was to analyze the capacity and availability factors of an operating direct flash geothermal power plant. The analysis was to include consideration of system and component specifications, operating procedures, maintenance history, malfunctions, and outage rate. The plant studied was the 75 MW(e) geothermal power plant at Cerro Prieto, Mexico, for the years 1973 to 1979. To describe and assess the plant, the project staff reviewed documents, visited the plant, and met with staff of the operating utility. The high reliability and availability of the plant was documented and actions responsible for the good performance were identified and reported. The results are useful as guidance to US utilities considering use of hot water geothermal resources for power generation through a direct flash conversion cycle.

Alt, T.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Northern California Power Association--Shell Oil Company Geothermal Project No. 2: energy and materials resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential environmental impact of the energy and material resources expended in site preparation, construction, operation, maintenance, and abandonment of all phases of the Northern California Power Association--Shell Geothermal Project in The Geysers--Calistoga Known Geothermal Resource Area is described. The impact of well field development, operation, and abandonment is insignificant, with the possible exception of geothermal resource depletion due to steam withdrawal from supply wells during operation. The amount of resource renewal that may be possible through reinjection is unknown because of uncertainties in the exact amount of heat available in the steam supply field. Material resources to be used in construction, operation, and abandonment of the power plant and transmission lines are described. Proposed measures to mitigate the environmental impacts from the use of these resources are included. Electric power supply and demand forecasts to the year 2005 are described for the area served by the NCPA.

Hall, C.H.; Ricker, Y.E.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Geothermal power plants of the United States: a technical survey of existing and planned installations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of geothermal energy as a source of electric power in the United States is reviewed. A thorough description is given of The Geysers geothermal power project in northern California. The recent efforts to exploit the hot-water resources of the Mexicali-Imperial Rift Valley are described. Details are given concerning the geology of the several sites now being used and for those at which power plants will soon be built. Attention is paid to the technical particulars of all existing plants, including wells, gathering systems, energy conversion devices, materials, environmental impacts, economics and operating characteristics. Specifically, plants which either exist or are planned for the following locations are covered: The Geysers, CA; East Mesa, CA; Heber, CA; Roosevelt Hot Springs, UT; Valles Caldera, NM; Salton Sea, CA; Westmorland, CA; Brawley, CA; Desert Peak, NV; and Raft River, ID. The growth of installed geothermal electric generating capacity is traced from the beginning in 1960 and is projected to 1984.

DiPippo, R.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Accelerated Geothermal Resource Development in the Great Basin Through Enhanced Public Awareness and Outreach to Shareholders.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy conducted work encompassing two main tasks. We (1) produced a web-based, stakeholder geothermal information system for Nevada geothermal data relevant to assessing and developing geothermal resources, and (2) we held informational stakeholder workshops (both as part of GeoPowering the West Initiative). The objective of this grant was to conduct workshops and fund database and web development activities. This grant funds salaries for web and database developers and part of the administrative assistant who helps to coordinate and organize workshops, and maintain selected databases.

Taranik, James V.; Oppliger, Gary; Sawatsky, Don

2002-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

366

Geothermal training prepares Nevadans for jobs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geothermal training prepares Nevadans for jobs Geothermal training prepares Nevadans for jobs Geothermal training prepares Nevadans for jobs April 15, 2010 - 4:52pm Addthis What does this project do? Students attend a two-day seminar on teamwork, decision-making, and leadership, complete a three weeks of course on geothermal training, and then participate in a three-week job club, where they learn about resume writing and interview techniques. When geothermal power companies began moving to northwestern Nevada's Churchill County, each one seemed to bring an out of state workforce with them. "It's not that the companies didn't want to hire locals," says Michal Hewitt of Churchill County Social Services. "They just weren't trained to do this type of work." Armed with advice from power companies and Recovery Act funding, social

367

Analysis of Power Cycles for Geothermal Wellhead Conversion Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the guidelines and data developed from 240 representative cases, utility engineers can make preliminary estimates of the performance of alternative energy conversion systems proposed for specific geothermal sites. This approach can reduce the cost and scope of initial engineering studies.

1985-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

368

Geothermal power economics: an annotated bibliography. Volume II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Annotations and abstracts of fifteen papers on geothermal energy economics, utilization, development, and legal and environmental aspects are presented. A bibliography of 198 citations is included. A separate abstract was prepared for each of 5 papers. Ten papers were previously abstracted for EDB. (LCL)

Peterson, R.E.; Seo, K.K.

1974-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Life-cycle analysis results of geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions analysis has been conducted with Argonne National Laboratory's expanded Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model for geothermal power-generating technologies, including enhanced geothermal, hydrothermal flash, and hydrothermal binary technologies. As a basis of comparison, a similar analysis has been conducted for other power-generating systems, including coal, natural gas combined cycle, nuclear, hydroelectric, wind, photovoltaic, and biomass by expanding the GREET model to include power plant construction for these latter systems with literature data. In this way, the GREET model has been expanded to include plant construction, as well as the usual fuel production and consumption stages of power plant life cycles. For the plant construction phase, on a per-megawatt (MW) output basis, conventional power plants in general are found to require less steel and concrete than renewable power systems. With the exception of the concrete requirements for gravity dam hydroelectric, enhanced geothermal and hydrothermal binary used more of these materials per MW than other renewable power-generation systems. Energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) ratios for the infrastructure and other life-cycle stages have also been developed in this study per kilowatt-hour (kWh) of electricity output by taking into account both plant capacity and plant lifetime. Generally, energy burdens per energy output associated with plant infrastructure are higher for renewable systems than conventional ones. GHG emissions per kWh of electricity output for plant construction follow a similar trend. Although some of the renewable systems have GHG emissions during plant operation, they are much smaller than those emitted by fossil fuel thermoelectric systems. Binary geothermal systems have virtually insignificant GHG emissions compared to fossil systems. Taking into account plant construction and operation, the GREET model shows that fossil thermal plants have fossil energy use and GHG emissions per kWh of electricity output about one order of magnitude higher than renewable power systems, including geothermal power.

Sullivan, J. L.; Clark, C. E.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Energy Systems

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

370

New Mexico/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico/Geothermal Mexico/Geothermal < New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF New Mexico Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in New Mexico Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Lightning Dock I Geothermal Project Raser Technologies Inc Lordsburg, New Mexico Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region Lightning Dock II Geothermal Project Raser Technologies Inc Lordsburg, NV Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in New Mexico

371

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants (NGGPP) process data for binary cycle plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants (NGGPP) study provides the firm estimates - in the public domain - of the cost and performance of U.S. geothermal systems and their main components in the early 1990s. The study was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Research Program, managed for DOE by Evan Hughes of the Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA, and conducted by John Brugman and others of the CE Holt Consulting Firm, Pasadena, CA. The printed NGGPP reports contain detailed data on the cost and performance for the flash steam cycles that were characterized, but not for the binary cycles. The nine Tables in this document are the detailed data sheets on cost and performance for the air cooled binary systems that were studied in the NGGPP.

Not Available

1996-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

372

Heber Geothermal Demonstration Power Plant. Interim report No. 1, August 1977--January 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work performed from August 1977 through January 1978 pertinent to the design of the Heber Geothermal Demonstration Power Plant is summarized. The report discusses review of earlier baseline geothermal studies performed by Holt/Procon and the design optimization performed by Fluor Engineers and Constructors, Inc., and The Ben Holt Company. The Heber project objective is to design, construct and operate a power plant to produce a net power output of 45 MW/sub e/, deriving energy from a low-salinity, moderate temperature (360/sup 0/F, 182/sup 0/C) brine heat source available from the Heber geothermal reservoir. A binary cycle conversion system employs a light aliphatic hydrocarbon mixture to derive heat from the brine supply, throuh heat exchangers, and drive the turbine-generator to produce power. Chevron Resources Company develops the geothermal resource for sale to San Diego Gas and Electric Company. Power output will be distributed to California's Imperial Valley by the Imperial Valley Irrigation District.

Unitt, S.G.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

The Kalina cycle and similar cycles for geothermal power production  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a brief discussion of the mechanics of the Kalina cycle and ideas to extend the concept to other somewhat different cycles. A modified cycle which has a potential heat rejection advantage but little or no performance improvement is discussed. Then, the results of the application of the Kalina cycle and the modified cycle to a geothermal application (360/degree/F resource) are discussed. The results are compared with published results for the Kalina cycle with high temperature sources and estimates about performance at the geothermal temperatures. Finally, the conclusions of this scoping work are given along with recommendations of the direction of future work in this area. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Bliem, C.J.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Missouri/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Missouri/Geothermal Missouri/Geothermal < Missouri Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Missouri Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Missouri No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Missouri No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Missouri No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Missouri Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

375

Oklahoma/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Oklahoma Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Oklahoma Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Oklahoma No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Oklahoma No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Oklahoma No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Oklahoma Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

376

Arkansas/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Arkansas/Geothermal Arkansas/Geothermal < Arkansas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Arkansas Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Arkansas No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Arkansas No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Arkansas No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Arkansas Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

377

Vermont/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vermont/Geothermal Vermont/Geothermal < Vermont Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Vermont Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Vermont No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Vermont No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Vermont No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Vermont Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

378

Louisiana/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Louisiana/Geothermal Louisiana/Geothermal < Louisiana Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Louisiana Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Louisiana No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Louisiana No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Louisiana No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Louisiana Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

379

Mississippi/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mississippi/Geothermal Mississippi/Geothermal < Mississippi Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Mississippi Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Mississippi No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Mississippi No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Mississippi No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Mississippi Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

380

Maine/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maine/Geothermal Maine/Geothermal < Maine Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Maine Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Maine No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Maine No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Maine No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Maine Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nevada geothermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Connecticut/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Connecticut Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Connecticut Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Connecticut No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Connecticut No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Connecticut No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Connecticut Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

382

Georgia/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Georgia/Geothermal Georgia/Geothermal < Georgia Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Georgia Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Georgia No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Georgia No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Georgia No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Georgia Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

383

Indiana/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Indiana Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Indiana Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Indiana No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Indiana No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Indiana No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Indiana Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

384

Michigan/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Michigan/Geothermal Michigan/Geothermal < Michigan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Michigan Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Michigan No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Michigan No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Michigan No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Michigan Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

385

Maryland/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maryland/Geothermal Maryland/Geothermal < Maryland Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Maryland Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Maryland No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Maryland No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Maryland No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Maryland Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

386

Alabama/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alabama/Geothermal Alabama/Geothermal < Alabama Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Alabama Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Alabama No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Alabama No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Alabama No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Alabama Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

387

Illinois/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Illinois/Geothermal Illinois/Geothermal < Illinois Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Illinois Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Illinois No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Illinois No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Illinois No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Illinois Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

388

Minnesota/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minnesota/Geothermal Minnesota/Geothermal < Minnesota Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Minnesota Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Minnesota No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Minnesota No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Minnesota No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Minnesota Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

389

Massachusetts/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Massachusetts/Geothermal Massachusetts/Geothermal < Massachusetts Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Massachusetts Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Massachusetts No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Massachusetts No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Massachusetts No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Massachusetts Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

390

Delaware/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Delaware Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Delaware Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Delaware No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Delaware No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Delaware No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Delaware Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

391

Kansas/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kansas/Geothermal Kansas/Geothermal < Kansas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Kansas Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Kansas No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Kansas No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Kansas No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Kansas Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

392

Kentucky/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kentucky/Geothermal Kentucky/Geothermal < Kentucky Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Kentucky Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Kentucky No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Kentucky No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Kentucky No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Kentucky Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

393

Nebraska/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nebraska/Geothermal Nebraska/Geothermal < Nebraska Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Nebraska Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Nebraska No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Nebraska No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Nebraska No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Nebraska Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

394

Florida/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida/Geothermal Florida/Geothermal < Florida Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Florida Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Florida No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Florida No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Florida No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Florida Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

395

Pennsylvania/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pennsylvania/Geothermal Pennsylvania/Geothermal < Pennsylvania Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Pennsylvania Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Pennsylvania No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Pennsylvania No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Pennsylvania No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Pennsylvania Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

396

Ohio/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Ohio Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Ohio Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Ohio No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Ohio No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Ohio No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Ohio Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water resource acquisition, and relevant environmental considerations.

397

Conceptual design of a 10MW regenerative isobutane geothermal power plant. Technical report No. 18  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At present, there are basically three different systems for converting energy in geothermal fluid into power: vapor-flashing system, total flow system, and binary system. A comparison of the power production processes was made on the basis of work output in Kwh per 1000 pounds of geothermal fluid for self flowing wells with wellhead pressure of 100 psia and for wells with downhole pumps. For simplicity, the assumptions were made that the enthalpy of the geothermal fluid in the reservoir is approximately equal to that at the wellhead, that the thermodynamic properties of geothermal fluid may be approximated by those of water, and that the pressure effects on the properties of fluid are negligible. The results showed that the performance of the two-stage vapor-flashing system is not appreciably improved by using a downhole pump. The total flow system is simple, but its success depends mainly on the development of a reliable machine with sufficiently high thermal efficiency. The regenerative isobutane system is impractical, if the geothermal fluid temperature is below 380/sup 0/F. But, when the brine temperatures range from 485 to 600/sup 0/F, the regenerative isobutane system with downhole pump exhibits superior performance as compared to two-stage vapor-flashing system, basic isobutane system, or total flow system.

Gupta, A.K.; Chou, J.C.S.

1976-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS). Awardees (Company Institution) AltaRock Energy, Inc. Awardee Website http:www.altarockenergy.com Partner 1 University of Nevada at...

399

Detachment Faulting and Geothermal Resources - An Innovative...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological and Geophysical Investigation in Fish Lake Valley, Nevada Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Detachment...

400

Dixie Valley Geothermal Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Citation Online Nevada Encyclopedia. Dixie...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nevada geothermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Life-cycle analysis results for geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems: Part II.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study has been conducted on the material demand and life-cycle energy and emissions performance of power-generating technologies in addition to those reported in Part I of this series. The additional technologies included concentrated solar power, integrated gasification combined cycle, and a fossil/renewable (termed hybrid) geothermal technology, more specifically, co-produced gas and electric power plants from geo-pressured gas and electric (GPGE) sites. For the latter, two cases were considered: gas and electricity export and electricity-only export. Also modeled were cement, steel and diesel fuel requirements for drilling geothermal wells as a function of well depth. The impact of the construction activities in the building of plants was also estimated. The results of this study are consistent with previously reported trends found in Part I of this series. Among all the technologies considered, fossil combustion-based power plants have the lowest material demand for their construction and composition. On the other hand, conventional fossil-based power technologies have the highest greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, followed by the hybrid and then two of the renewable power systems, namely hydrothermal flash power and biomass-based combustion power. GHG emissions from U.S. geothermal flash plants were also discussed, estimates provided, and data needs identified. Of the GPGE scenarios modeled, the all-electric scenario had the highest GHG emissions. Similar trends were found for other combustion emissions.

Sullivan, J.L.; Clark, C.E.; Yuan, L.; Han, J.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems)

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

402

Use of program GEOTHM to design and optimize geothermal power cycles  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory program GEOTHM has been under development for nearly two years. GEOTHM will design and optimize a wide variety of thermodynamic cycles. The most recent improvements in the GEOTHM program are included. These improvements include: a model for concentrated saline brines and a single step cycle optimization process. Geothermal power cycles are given as examples.

Pines, H.S.; Green, M.A.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Evaluation of a superheater enhanced geothermal steam power plant in the Geysers area. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was conducted to determine the attainable generation increase and to evaluate the economic merits of superheating the steam that could be used in future geothermal steam power plants in the Geyser-Calistoga Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). It was determined that using a direct gas-fired superheater offers no economic advantages over the existing geothermal power plants. If the geothermal steam is heated to 900/sup 0/F by using the exhaust energy from a gas turbine of currently available performance, the net reference plant output would increase from 65 MW to 159 MW (net). Such hybrid plants are cost effective under certain conditions identified in this document. The power output from the residual Geyser area steam resource, now equivalent to 1437 MW, would be more than doubled by employing in the future gas turbine enhancement. The fossil fuel consumed in these plants would be used more efficiently than in any other fossil-fueled power plant in California. Due to an increase in evaporative losses in the cooling towers, the viability of the superheating concept is contingent on development of some of the water resources in the Geysers-Calistoga area to provide the necessary makeup water.

Janes, J.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Geotechnical Environmental Aspects of Geothermal Power Generation at Heber, Imperial Valley, California. Topical report 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents a portion of the results from a one-year feasibility study sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to assess the feasibility of constructing a 25-50 MWe geothermal power plant using low salinity hydrothermal fluid as the energy source. The impact of power generation from hydrothermal resources on subsurface water flow, seismicity and subsidence are of acute interest in the determination of the environmental acceptance of geothermal energy. At the same time, the experience and data bases in these areas are very limited. The objective of the project was to assess the technical, geotechnical, environmental and economic feasibility of producing electricity from hydrothermal resources like those known to exist in the US. The objective of this part of the study was to investigate the geotechnical aspects of geothermal power generation and their relationship to environmental impacts in the Imperial Valley of California. This report discusses geology, geophysics, hydrogeology, seismicity and subsidence in terms of the availability of data, state-of-the-art analytical techniques, historical and technical background and interpretation of current data. it also discusses estimates of the impact of these geotechnical factors on the environment in the Imperial Valley, if geothermal development proceeds.

None

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

ORNI 9, LLC, AND ORMAT NEVADA INC. APPLICATIONS FOR PERMIT TO...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNI 9, LLC, AND ORMAT NEVADA INC. APPLICATIONS FOR PERMIT TO DRILL GEOTHERMAL OBSERVATION WELLS 82-14 AND 55-14 AND GEOTHERMAL PRODUCTION WELL 15-12 AND POSSIBLE FUTURE GEOTHERMAL...

406

Market survey of geothermal wellhead power generation systems. Final report, March 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to assess the market potential for a portable geothermal wellhead power conversion device (1-10 MW generating capacity). Major study objectives included identifying the most promising applications for such a system, the potential impediments confronting their industrialization, and the various government actions needed to overcome these impediments. The heart of the study was a series of structured interviews with key decision-making individuals in the various disciplines of the geothermal community. In addition, some technical and economic analyses of a candidate system were performed to support the feasibility of the basic concept.

Leeds, M.W.; Evensizer, J.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Inversion of synthetic aperture radar interferograms for sources of production-related subsidence at the Dixie Valley geothermal field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a tracer test at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Proc. 22 ndand footwall faulting at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermalthe shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field,

Foxall, B.; Vasco, D.W.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Geothermal Technologies Program: Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Technologies Program Utah fact sheet describes the geothermal areas and use in Utah, focusing on power generation as well as direct use, including geothermally heated greenhouses, swimming pools, and therapeutic baths.

Not Available

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Small scale hydroelectric power potential in Nevada: a preliminary reconnaissance survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This preliminary reconnaissance survey is intended to: develop a first estimate as to the potential number, location and characteristics of small-scale (50 kW to 15 MW) hydroelectric sites in Nevada; provide a compilation of various Federal and state laws and regulations, including tax and financing regulations, that affect small-scale hydroelectric development and provide information on sources of small-scale hydroelectric generation hardware and consultants/ contractors who do small scale hydroelectric work. The entire survey has been conducted in the office working with various available data bases. The site survey and site evaluation methods used are described, and data are tabulated on the flow, power potential, predicted capital expenditures required, etc. for 61 potential sites with measured flows and for 77 sites with derived flows. A map showing potential site locations is included. (LCL)

Cochran, G.F.; Fordham, J.W.; Richard, K.; Loux, R.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Geothermal Electricity Technologies Evaluation Model DOE Tool for Assessing Impact of Research on Cost of Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a spreadsheet model to provide insight as to how its research activities can impact of cost of producing power from geothermal energy. This model is referred to as GETEM, which stands for Geothermal Electricity Technologies Evaluation Model. Based on user input, the model develops estimates of costs associated with exploration, well field development, and power plant construction that are used along with estimated operating costs to provide a predicted power generation cost. The model allows the user to evaluate how reductions in cost, or increases in performance or productivity will impact the predicted power generation cost. This feature provides a means of determining how specific technology improvements can impact generation costs, and as such assists DOE in both prioritizing research areas and identifying where research is needed.

Greg Mines

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Thermal Waters of Nevada | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Waters of Nevada Thermal Waters of Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Thermal Waters of Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors Larry J. Garside and John H. Schilling Organization Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Published Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 1979 Report Number Bulletin 91 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Thermal Waters of Nevada Citation Larry J. Garside,John H. Schilling (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology). 1979. Thermal Waters of Nevada. Reno, NV: Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology. Report No.: Bulletin 91. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermal_Waters_of_Nevada&oldid=690515" Categories: References Geothermal References

412

Advanced Condenser Boosts Geothermal Power Plant Output (Fact Sheet), The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geothermal resources-the steam and water that lie below the earth's surface-have the Geothermal resources-the steam and water that lie below the earth's surface-have the potential to supply vast amounts of clean energy. But continuing to produce geothermal power efficiently and inexpensively can require innovative adjustments to the technology used to process it. Located in the Mayacamas Mountains of northern California, The Geysers is the world's larg- est geothermal complex. Encompassing 45 square miles along the Sonoma and Lake County border, the complex harnesses natural steam reservoirs to create clean renewable energy that accounts for one-fifth of the green power produced in California. In the late 1990s, the pressure of geothermal steam at The Geysers was falling, reducing the output of its power plants. NREL teamed with Pacific

413

Geothermal power plants of Japan: a technical survey of existing and planned installations. Report No. CATMEC/9  

SciTech Connect

The technical features of the existing and planned geothermal power plants in Japan are surveyed. A description is given of the Geothermal Energy Research and Development Co., Ltd. (GERD) which has capabilities in all areas of geothermal power development, from exploratory geological activities through construction and operation of the plants. The survey includes reports on four types of plants: natural, dry steam; separated steam or ''single flash;'' separated steam/flash or ''double flash;'' and binary fluid. For each geothermal power plant, the following are included or discussed: exploration and geology of the site; wells and gathering system; turbine-generator; condenser, gas extractor and cooling tower; economic data; environmental effects; and plant operations. Many tables and figures are included, and a summary is given of the geothermal resource utilization efficiency for each operating plant. Promising areas of new development are listed with estimates of potential capacity.

DiPippo, R.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Geothermal power plants of Japan: a technical survey of existing and planned installations. Report No. CATMEC/9  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical features of the existing and planned geothermal power plants in Japan are surveyed. A description is given of the Geothermal Energy Research and Development Co., Ltd. (GERD) which has capabilities in all areas of geothermal power development, from exploratory geological activities through construction and operation of the plants. The survey includes reports on four types of plants: natural, dry steam; separated steam or ''single flash;'' separated steam/flash or ''double flash;'' and binary fluid. For each geothermal power plant, the following are included or discussed: exploration and geology of the site; wells and gathering system; turbine-generator; condenser, gas extractor and cooling tower; economic data; environmental effects; and plant operations. Many tables and figures are included, and a summary is given of the geothermal resource utilization efficiency for each operating plant. Promising areas of new development are listed with estimates of potential capacity.

DiPippo, R.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Utility of drill-stem tests in determination of the geothermal regime of Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate representation of geothermal conditions is necessary to determine generation potential of source rocks buried in Railroad Valley. Boreholes, provide the best source of geothermal information, but formation temperature data must be screened for variations caused by drilling. Bottomhole temperatures from wireline logs are affected by initial formation conditions, drilling fluid that moves into the formation while drilling, and lag time between cessation of drilling fluid circulation and acquisition of logs. More accurate indicators of formation conditions are temperatures recorded during drill-stem tests, especially for tests that recovered large amounts of fluid. Over 130 drill-stem tests were examined to establish the viability of this source of data and to determine the geothermal conditions of the Railroad Valley basin. Results indicate that 500 feet or more of fluid recovery on a test is necessary to get a temperature recorded that is not influenced by drilling perturbations. The formation temperature data collected for Railroad Valley indicate the possibility of 2 thermal regimes. A low-temperature gradient regime is probably influenced by meteoric water. The high-temperature gradient regime probably reflects the regional heat flow associated with the thin crust of the Great Basin.

French, D.E. [Independent Geologist, Billings, MT (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Geothermal power plants of Mexico and Central America: a technical survey of existing and planned installations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this report, the fifth in a series describing the geothermal power plants of the world, the countries of Mexico and of Central America are studied. The geothermal plants are located in areas of recent and active volcanism; the resources are of the liquid-dominated type. Details are given about the plants located at Cerro Prieto in Mexico and at Ahuachapan in El Salvador. In both cases, attention is paid to the geologic nature of the fields, the well programs, geofluid characteristics, energy conversion systems, materials of construction, effluent handling systems, economic factors and plant operating experience. Exploration and development activities are described for other promising geothermal areas in Mexico and El Salvador, along with those in the countries of Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Guatemala, Honduras, and Panama.

DiPippo. R.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Geophysical investigations of the Baltazor Hot Springs known geothermal resource area and the Painted Hills thermal area, Humboldt County, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geophysical investigations of the Baltazor Hot Springs KGRA and the Painted Hills thermal area, Humboldt Co., Nevada are described. The study includes a gravity survey of 284 stations covering 750 sq km, numerical modeling and interpretation of five detailed gravity profiles, numerical modeling and inerpretation of 21.8 line-km of dipole-dipole electrical resistivity data along four profiles, and a qualitative inerpretation of 38 line-km of self-potential data along eight profiles. The primary purpose of the investigation is to try to determine the nature of the geologic controls of the thermal anomalies at the two areas.

Edquist, R.K.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Geothermal commercial power plant study. Monthly progress report, January 29, 1977-February 25, 1977  

SciTech Connect

Conceptual designs and capital cost estimates were completed for the six different Heber power plants in this study. The six plants involve two types of operating modes, constant geothermal fluid flow rate and constant power output, each for net capacities of 50, 100, and 200 MWe. Conceptual designs were completed for the six plants by modifying and scaling-up the base case design. The capital costs for all six plants were estimated in fourth-quarter 1976 dollars.

1977-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Geothermal resource base of the world: a revision of the Electric Power Research Institute's estimate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Review of the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI) method for calculating the geothermal resource base of a country shows that modifications are needed for several of the assumptions used in the calculation. These modifications include: (1) separating geothermal belts into volcanic types with a geothermal gradient of 50{sup 0}C/km and complex types in which 80% of the area has a temperature gradient of 30{sup 0}C/km and 20% has a gradient of 45{sup 0}C/km, (2) using the actual mean annual temperature of a country rather than an assumed 15{sup 0}C average ambient temperature, and (3) making separate calculations for the resource stored in water/brine and that stored in rock. Comparison of this method (Revised EPRI) for calculating a geothermal resource base with other resource base estimates made from a heat flow map of Europe indicates that the technique yields reasonable values. The calculated geothermal resource bases, stored in water and rock to a depth of 5 km, for each country in the world are given. Approximately five times as much energy is stored in rock as is stored in water.

Aldrich, M.J.; Laughlin, A.W.; Gambill, D.T.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Teleseismic-Seismic_Monitoring_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Biasi,_Et_Al.,_2009)&oldid=425640"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nevada geothermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Project Financial Summary Report Concerning Financing Surface Facilities for a 50 Megawatt Geothermal Electric Power Plant Facility in Utah  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the economic and financial conditions pertaining to geothermal electric power plant utilization of geothermal fluids produced from the Roosevelt Hot springs area of Utah. The first year of electric power generation is scheduled to be 1982. The non-resource facilities will be called ''surface facilities'' and include the gathering system, the power plant, the substation, and the injection system.

1978-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

422

Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells...

423

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nevada Test And Training Range...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

424

Energy Department Offers Conditional Commitment to Support Nevada...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

are here Home Energy Department Offers Conditional Commitment to Support Nevada Geothermal Development with Recovery Act Funds Energy Department Offers Conditional Commitment...

425

Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration...

426

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic...

427

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Exploration...

428

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2)...

429

Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

430

A Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Helium Isotope...

431

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration...

432

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

433

Geographic Information System At Nevada Test And Training Range...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Geographic Information System At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

434

Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

435

Potential growth of electric power production from Imperial Valley geothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The growth of geothermal electric power operations in Imperial Valley, California is projected over the next 40 years. With commercial power forecast to become available in the 1980's, the scenario considers three subsequent growth rates: 40, 100, and 250 MW per year. These growth rates, along with estimates of the total resource size, result in a maximum level of electric power production ranging from 1000 to 8000 MW to be attained in the 2010 to 2020 time period. Power plant siting constraints are developed and used to make siting patterns for the 400- through 8000-MW level of power production. Two geothermal technologies are included in the scenario: flashed steam systems that produce cooling water from the geothermal steam condensate and emit noncondensable gases to the atmosphere; and high pressure, confined flow systems that inject the geoghermal fluid back into the ground. An analysis of the scenario is made with regard to well drilling and power plant construction rates, land use, cooling water requirements, and hydrogen sulfide emissions.

Ermak, D.L.

1977-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

436

Conceptual design and cost evaluation of organic Rankine cycle electric generating plant powered by medium temperature geothermal water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic production of electrical power from high temperature steam and liquid dominated geothermal resources has been demonstrated. Large quantities of geothermal energy are considered to exist at moderate temperatures, however, the economics of converting this energy into electricity has not been established. This paper presents the design concept of a dual boiler isobutane cycle selected for use with the moderate temperature hydrothermal resource and presents a cost estimate for a 10 and 50 MW power plant. Cost of electrical power from these plants is estimated and compared with that from coal, oil and nuclear plants. The impact of selling a portion of the residual heat in the geothermal effluent is assessed. (auth)

Dart, R.H.; Neill, D.T.; Whitbeck, J.F.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Geothermal evaluation and analysis of the Yucca Mountain Repository, Nevada; Final report, July 1, 1989--December 31, 1989  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report on the geothermal analysis and evaluation for the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, for the period of July 1, 1989 to December 31, 1989. Heat flow values were derived by measuring the thermal conductivities of samples taken from selected exploratory wells. Temperature gradients are recorded from the same wells. By using computer generated contour maps of the area, another interpretation of the heat-flow can be derived. Results of the mapping do not coincide with the past observations of the data. Another method used to evaluate the heat-flow of Yucca Mountain was to compare the temperature-depth relationship of the area. (MB)

NONE

1989-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

438

Transition Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transition Zone Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Transition Zone Geothermal Region edit Details Areas (5) Power Plants (0) Projects...

439

MULTIPARAMETER OPTIMIZATION STUDIES ON GEOTHERMAL ENERGY CYCLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~Iilora and J. W. Tester, Geothermal Energy as a Source ofpresented at the Susanville Geothermal Energy Converence,of Practical Cycles for Geothermal Power Plants." General

Pope, W.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Idaho Batholith Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Idaho Batholith Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Idaho Batholith Geothermal Region Details Areas (24) Power Plants (0) Projects (1)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nevada geothermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.