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1

PROGRESS OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE PROJECT, IG-0532 |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PROGRESS OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE PROJECT, IG-0532 PROGRESS OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE PROJECT, IG-0532 When completed, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be...

2

Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project progress report  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics on the advanced neutron source: quality assurance (QA) program; reactor core development; fuel element specification; corrosion loop tests and analyses; thermal-hydraulic loop tests; reactor control concepts; critical and subcritical experiments; material data, structural tests, and analysis; cold source development; beam tube, guide, and instrument development; hot source development; neutron transport and shielding; I C research and development; facility concepts; design; and safety.

McBee, M.R.; Chance, C.M. (eds.) (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Peretz, F.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project. Progress report FY 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers the progress made in 1993 in the following sections: (1) project management; (2) research and development; (3) design and (4) safety. The section on research and development covers the following: (1) reactor core development; (2) fuel development; (3) corrosion loop tests and analysis; (4) thermal-hydraulic loop tests; (5) reactor control and shutdown concepts; (6) critical and subcritical experiments; (7) material data, structure tests, and analysis; (8) cold source development; (9) beam tube, guide, and instrument development; (10) neutron transport and shielding; (11) I and C research and development; and (12) facility concepts.

Campbell, J.H. [ed.; Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Thompson, P.B. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Engineering Div.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project progress report, FY 1994  

SciTech Connect

The President`s budget request for FY 1994 included a construction project for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). However, the budget that emerged from the Congress did not, and so activities during this reporting period were limited to continued research and development and to advanced conceptual design. A significant effort was devoted to a study, requested by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and led by Brookhaven National Laboratory, of the performance and cost impacts of reducing the uranium fuel enrichment below the baseline design value of 93%. The study also considered alternative core designs that might mitigate those impacts. The ANS Project proposed a modified core design, with three fuel elements instead of two, that would allow operation with only 50% enriched uranium and use existing fuel technology. The performance penalty would be 15--20% loss of thermal neutron flux; the flux would still just meet the minimum design requirement set by the user community. At the time of this writing, DOE has not established an enrichment level for ANS, but two advisory committees have recommended adopting the new core design, provided the minimum flux requirements are still met.

Campbell, J.H.; King-Jones, K.H. [eds.; Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Thompson, P.B. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Central Engineering Services

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

A status report on the Advanced Neutron Source Project  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) will be a new laboratory for neutron research, centered around a 330 MW(f) research reactor cooled and reflected by heavy water and including extensive experiment systems and support facilities. The major components of the baseline design, occupying about 16 heetares, are a guide hall/research support area, containing most of the neutron beam experiment systems, shops and supporting laboratories; a 60 m diameter containment building housing the reactor and its primary coolant system, and selected scientific research facilities; an operations support building with the majority of the remaining plant systems; an office/interface complex providing a carefully designed, user friendly entry point for access control; and several other major facilities including user housing, an electrical substation, a diesel generator building, a cryorefrigerator building, and heavy water cleanup and upgrade systems.

West, C.D.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Neutron source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron source which is particularly useful for neutron radiography consists of a vessel containing a moderating media of relatively low moderating ratio, a flux trap including a moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio at the center of the vessel, a shell of depleted uranium dioxide surrounding the moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio, a plurality of guide tubes each containing a movable source of neutrons surrounding the flux trap, a neutron shield surrounding one part of each guide tube, and at least one collimator extending from the flux trap to the exterior of the neutron source. The shell of depleted uranium dioxide has a window provided with depleted uranium dioxide shutters for each collimator. Reflectors are provided above and below the flux trap and on the guide tubes away from the flux trap.

Cason, J.L. Jr.; Shaw, C.B.

1975-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

7

NEUTRON SOURCES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron source is obtained without employing any separate beryllia receptacle, as was formerly required. The new method is safer and faster, and affords a source with both improved yield and symmetry of neutron emission. A Be container is used to hold and react with Pu. This container has a thin isolating layer that does not obstruct the desired Pu--Be reaction and obviates procedures previously employed to disassemble and remove a beryllia receptacle. (AEC)

Richmond, J.L.; Wells, C.E.

1963-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

NEUTRON SOURCE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron source of the antimony--beryllium type is presented. The source is comprised of a solid mass of beryllium having a cylindrical recess extending therein and a cylinder containing antimony-124 slidably disposed within the cylindrical recess. The antimony cylinder is encased in aluminum. A berylliunn plug is removably inserted in the open end of the cylindrical recess to completely enclose the antimony cylinder in bsryllium. The plug and antimony cylinder are each provided with a stud on their upper ends to facilitate handling remotely.

Reardon, W.A.; Lennox, D.H.; Nobles, R.G.

1959-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

9

Neutron Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Characteristics of neutron radiography at various neutron-energy ranges...Good discrimination between materials, and ready

10

Neutron Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for Neutron Reaction Rate Measurements, JA Grundl, V. Spiegel, CM Eisenhauer, HT Heaton II, DM Gilliam (NBS), and J. Bigelow (ORNL), Nucl. ...

2013-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

11

Advanced neutron source project information management. A model for the future  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a proposed new research facility that will provide steady-state beams of neutrons for experiments by more than 1000 researchers per year in the fields of materials science and engineering, biology, chemistry, materials analysis, and nuclear science. The facility will also include irradiation capabilities to produce radioisotopes for medical applications, research, industry, and materials testing. This paper discusses the architecture and data flow used by the project, some quantitative examinations of potential cost savings and return on investment and software applications used to generate and manage data across IBM-compatible personal computers, Macintosh, and Unix-based workstations. Personnel management aspects addressed include providing paper copy to users only when needed for adequate technical review, using graded approaches to providing support for numerous user-needed software applications, and implementing a phased approach to compliance with computer-aided acquisition and logistic support (CALS) standards that allows sufficient user flexibility for performing technical tasks while providing needed data sharing and integration.

King-Jones, K.; Cleaves, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

Advanced Neutron Source project information management: A model for the future  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a proposed new research facility that will provide steady-state beams of neutrons for experiments by more than 1,000 researchers per year in the fields of materials science and engineering, biology, chemistry, materials analysis, and nuclear science. The facility will also include irradiation capabilities to produce radioisotopes for medical applications, research, industry, and materials testing. This paper discusses the architecture and data flow used by the project, some quantitative examinations of potential cost savings and return on investment, and software applications used to generate and manage data across IBM-compatible personal computers, Macintosh, and Unix-based workstations. Personnel management aspects addressed include providing paper copy to users only when needed for adequate technical review, using graded approaches to providing support for numerous user-needed software applications, and implementing a phased approach to compliance with computer-aided acquisition and logistic support (CALS) standards that allows sufficient user flexibility for performing technical tasks while providing needed data sharing and integration.

King-Jones, K.; Cleaves, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

13

Spallation Neutron Source, SNS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spallation Neutron Source Spallation Neutron Source Providing the most intense pulsed neutron beams in the world... Accumulator Ring Commissioning Latest Step for Spallation Neutron Source The Spallation Neutron Source, located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has passed another milestone on the way to completion this year--the commissioning of the proton accumulator ring. Brookhaven led the design and construction of the accumulator ring, which will allow an order of magnitude more beam power than any other facility in the world. The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based neutron source being built in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, by the U.S. Department of Energy. The figure on the right shows a schematic of the accumulator ring and transport beam lines that are being designed and built by Brookhaven

14

Neutron sources and applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Review of Neutron Sources and Applications was held at Oak Brook, Illinois, during September 8--10, 1992. This review involved some 70 national and international experts in different areas of neutron research, sources, and applications. Separate working groups were asked to (1) review the current status of advanced research reactors and spallation sources; and (2) provide an update on scientific, technological, and medical applications, including neutron scattering research in a number of disciplines, isotope production, materials irradiation, and other important uses of neutron sources such as materials analysis and fundamental neutron physics. This report summarizes the findings and conclusions of the different working groups involved in the review, and contains some of the best current expertise on neutron sources and applications.

Price, D.L. [ed.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Rush, J.J. [ed.] [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Spallation Neutron Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D/gim D/gim Spallation Neutron Source SNS is an accelerator-based neutron source. This one-of-a-kind facility pro- vides the most intense pulsed neutron beams in the world. When ramped up to its full beam power of 1.4 MW, SNS will be eight times more powerful than today's best facility. It will give researchers more detailed snapshots of the smallest samples of physical and biological materials than ever before

16

FABRICATION OF NEUTRON SOURCES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for preparing a neutron source from polonium-210 and substances, such as beryllium and boron, characterized by emission of neutrons upon exposure to alpha particles from the polonium. According to the invention, a source is prepared by placing powdered beryllium and a platinum foil electroplated with polonium-2;.0 in a beryllium container. The container is sealed and then heated by induction to a temperature of 450 to 1100 deg C to volatilize the polonium off the foil into the powder. The heating step is terminated upon detection of a maximum in the neutron flux level.

Birden, J.H.

1959-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

17

FABRICATION OF NEUTRON SOURCES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for preparing a more efficient neutron source comprising inserting in a container a quantity of Po-210, inserting B powder coated with either Ag, Pt, or Ni. The container is sealed and then slowly heated to about 450 C to volatilize the Po and effect combination of the coated powder with the Po. The neutron flux emitted by the unit is moritored and the heating step is terminated when the flux reaches a maximum or selected level.

Birden, J.H.

1959-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

18

Spallation Neutron Source | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spallation Neutron Source SNS site, Spring 2012 The 80-acre SNS site is located on the east end of the ORNL campus and is about a three-minute drive from her sister neutron...

19

MATERIALS FOR SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCES: IV: Neutronics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has initiated a pre-conceptual design study for the National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS) and given preliminary approval for the...

20

SNS | Spallation Neutron Source | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SNS SNS Instruments Working with SNS Contact Us User Program Manager Laura Morris Edwards 865.574.2966 Spallation Neutron Source Home | User Facilities | SNS SNS | Spallation Neutron Source SHARE SNS is an accelerator-based neutron source in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. This one-of-a-kind facility provides the most intense pulsed neutron beams in the world for scientific research and industrial development. The 80-acre SNS site is located on Chestnut Ridge and is part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Although most people don't know it, neutron scattering research has a lot to do with our everyday lives. For example, things like medicine, food, electronics, and cars and airplanes have all been improved by neutron scattering research. Neutron research also helps scientists improve materials used in a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "neutron source project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Spallation Neutron Source The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

F/gim F/gim Spallation Neutron Source The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) gives researchers more detailed informa- tion on the structure and dynamics of physical and biological materials than ever before possible. This accelerator- based facility provides the most intense pulsed neutron beams in the world. Scien- tists are able to count scattered neutrons, measure their energies and the angles at which they scatter, and map their final positions. SNS enables measurements of greater sensitivity, higher speed, higher resolution, and in more complex sample environments than have been possible at existing neutron facilities. Future Growth SNS was designed from the outset to accommodate a second target station, effectively doubling the capacity of the

22

Research on fusion neutron sources  

SciTech Connect

The use of fusion devices as powerful neutron sources has been discussed for decades. Whereas the successful route to a commercial fusion power reactor demands steady state stable operation combined with the high efficiency required to make electricity production economic, the alternative approach to advancing the use of fusion is free of many of complications connected with the requirements for economic power generation and uses the already achieved knowledge of Fusion physics and developed Fusion technologies. 'Fusion for Neutrons' (F4N), has now been re-visited, inspired by recent progress achieved on comparably compact fusion devices, based on the Spherical Tokamak (ST) concept. Freed from the requirement to produce much more electricity than used to drive it, a fusion neutron source could be efficiently used for many commercial applications, and also to support the goal of producing energy by nuclear power. The possibility to use a small or medium size ST as a powerful or intense steady-state fusion neutron source (FNS) is discussed in this paper in comparison with the use of traditional high aspect ratio tokamaks. An overview of various conceptual designs of compact fusion neutron sources based on the ST concept is given and they are compared with a recently proposed Super Compact Fusion Neutron Source (SCFNS), with major radius as low as 0.5 metres but still able to produce several MW of neutrons in a steady-state regime.

Gryaznevich, M. P. [Tokamak Solutions UK, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OXON, OX133DB (United Kingdom)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

23

Calibrated Neutron Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST designed a compliant source. ... needed for new purposes and as old sources decay ... The figure shows a reprentative energy spectrum from such ...

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

24

Cold Neutron and Ultracold Neutron Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Moderators Solid Methane CH 4 CD 4 ... In a cold neutron flux with a continuous spectrum, more neutrons could ... Magneto-vibrational Scatt. + ...

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

25

MATERIALS FOR SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCES: II: Radiation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MATERIALS FOR SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCES: Session II: Radiation Effects, B. Sponsored by: Jt. SMD/MSD Nuclear Materials Committee Program...

26

MATERIALS FOR SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCES: I: Radiation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MATERIALS FOR SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCES: Session I: Radiation Effects, A. Sponsored by: Jt. SMD/MSD Nuclear Materials Committee Program...

27

Advanced Neutron Source enrichment study  

SciTech Connect

A study has been performed of the impact on performance of using low enriched uranium (20% {sup 235}U) or medium enriched uranium (35% {sup 235}U) as an alternative fuel for the Advanced Neutron Source, which is currently designed to use uranium enriched to 93% {sup 235}U. Higher fuel densities and larger volume cores were evaluated at the lower enrichments in terms of impact on neutron flux, safety, safeguards, technical feasibility, and cost. The feasibility of fabricating uranium silicide fuel at increasing material density was specifically addressed by a panel of international experts on research reactor fuels. The most viable alternative designs for the reactor at lower enrichments were identified and discussed. Several sensitivity analyses were performed to gain an understanding of the performance of the reactor at parametric values of power, fuel density, core volume, and enrichment that were interpolations between the boundary values imposed on the study or extrapolations from known technology.

Bari, R.A.; Ludewig, H.; Weeks, J.R.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

28

Instrument and Source Design Division | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ron Crone, RRD Director Ron Crone, RRD Director ISDD Director Ron Crone. Instrument and Source Design Division The Instrument and Source Design Division (ISDD) supports the engineering and development of scientific instruments at the High Flux Isotope Reactor and the Spallation Neutron Source. ISDD continuously develops facilities and capabilities associated with neutron science through research and development. Organization Chart A PDF version of the ISDD Organization Chart is available. Key Division Contacts Director Ron Crone Administrative Assistant Wendy Brooks HFIR Instrument Engineering Doug Selby SNS Instrument Engineering David Vandergriff Instrumentation Projects and Development Ken Herwig Project Management/Operations and Analysis Barbara Thibadeau Source Development and Engineering Analysis Phil Ferguson

29

MATERIALS FOR SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCES: III: Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both liquid mercury and liquid lead-bismuth eutectic have been proposed as possible target materials for spallation neutron sources. During the 1950's and...

30

Switchable radioactive neutron source device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a switchable neutron generating apparatus comprised of a pair of plates, the first plate having an alpha emitter section on it and the second plate having a target material portion on it which generates neutrons when its nuclei absorb an alpha particle. In operation, the alpha portion of the first plate is aligned with the neutron portion of the second plate to produce neutrons and brought out of alignment to cease production of neutrons. 3 figs.

Stanford, G.S.; Rhodes, E.A.; Devolpi, A.; Boyar, R.E.

1987-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

31

International workshop on cold neutron sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first meeting devoted to cold neutron sources was held at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on March 5--8, 1990. Cosponsored by Los Alamos and Oak Ridge National Laboratories, the meeting was organized as an International Workshop on Cold Neutron Sources and brought together experts in the field of cold-neutron-source design for reactors and spallation sources. Eighty-four people from seven countries attended. Because the meeting was the first of its kind in over forty years, much time was spent acquainting participants with past and planned activities at reactor and spallation facilities worldwide. As a result, the meeting had more of a conference flavor than one of a workshop. The general topics covered at the workshop included: Criteria for cold source design; neutronic predictions and performance; energy deposition and removal; engineering design, fabrication, and operation; material properties; radiation damage; instrumentation; safety; existing cold sources; and future cold sources.

Russell, G.J.; West, C.D. (comps.) (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)) [comps.; Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

-- Why Use Neutrons? -- Neutron Sources -- Continuous vs ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Pulsed Sources: -- WNR/PSR LANSCE (Los Alamos). http://lansce.lanl.gov -- SNS (Oak Ridge National Lab). http://www.sns.gov. Page 6. ...

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Neutron dosimetry at SLAC: Neutron sources and instrumentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes in detail the dosimetric characteristics of the five radioisotopic type neutron sources ({sup 238}PuBe, {sup 252}Cf, {sup 238}PuB, {sup 238}PuF{sub 4}, and {sup 238}PuLi) and the neutron instrumentation (moderated BF{sub 3} detector, Anderson-Braun (AB) detector, AB remmeter, Victoreen 488 Neutron Survey Meter, Beam Shut-Off Ionization Chamber, {sup 12}C plastic scintillator detector, moderated indium foil detector, and moderated and bare TLDs) that are commonly used for neutron dosimetry at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). 36 refs,. 19 figs.

Liu, J.C.; Jenkins, T.M.; McCall, R.C.; Ipe, N.E.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

The Cold Neutron Source core  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... walls are necessary for the containment of the ... a recombination of radiolysis products is induced in ... Neutrons are produced by fission with energies ...

2009-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

35

Fission fragment driven neutron source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fissionable uranium formed into a foil is bombarded with thermal neutrons in the presence of deuterium-tritium gas. The resulting fission fragments impart energy to accelerate deuterium and tritium particles which in turn provide approximately 14 MeV neutrons by the reactions t(d,n).sup.4 He and d(t,n).sup.4 He.

Miller, Lowell G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Young, Robert C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Brugger, Robert M. (Columbia, MO)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Optimal Neutron Source and Beam Shaping Assembly for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There were three objectives to this project: (1) The development of the 2-D Swan code for the optimization of the nuclear design of facilities for medical applications of radiation, radiation shields, blankets of accelerator-driven systems, fusion facilities, etc. (2) Identification of the maximum beam quality that can be obtained for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) from different reactor-, and accelerator-based neutron sources. The optimal beam-shaping assembly (BSA) design for each neutron source was also to e obtained. (3) Feasibility assessment of a new neutron source for NCT and other medical and industrial applications. This source consists of a state-of-the-art proton or deuteron accelerator driving and inherently safe, proliferation resistant, small subcritical fission assembly.

Vujic, J L; Greenspan, E; Guess, S; Karni, Y; Kastenber, W E; Kim, L; Leung, K N; Regev, D; Verbeke, J M; Waldron, W L; Zhu, Y

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Modulating the Neutron Flux from a Mirror Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 14-MeV neutron source based on a Gas-Dynamic Trap will provide a high flux of 14 MeV neutrons for fusion materials and sub-component testing. In addition to its main goal, the source has potential applications in condensed matter physics and biophysics. In this report, the author considers adding one more capability to the GDT-based neutron source, the modulation of the neutron flux with a desired frequency. The modulation may be an enabling tool for the assessment of the role of non-steady-state effects in fusion devices as well as for high-precision, low-signal basic science experiments favoring the use of the synchronous detection technique. A conclusion is drawn that modulation frequency of up to 1 kHz and modulation amplitude of a few percent is achievable. Limitations on the amplitude of modulations at higher frequencies are discussed.

Ryutov, D D

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Portable Low Energy Neutron Source - Industrial Partnerships Office  

Typically, sources of low energy neutrons are large and immobile, often filling entire rooms. A portable source of low energy neutrons would allow for accurate and ...

39

Aspects of a high intensity neutron source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A unique methodology for creating a neutron source model was developed for deuterons and protons incident on solid phase beryllium and lithium targets. This model was then validated against experimental results already ...

Chapman, Peter H. (Peter Henry)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Manhattan Project: Fast Neutron Experiment  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

An experiment to determine the cross section of uranium-235 for fast neutrons. The target is the small pile of cubes of uranium hydride. The uranium target is surrounded by larger...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "neutron source project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Directional Detection of Fast Neutrons Using a Time Projection Chamber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spontaneous fission in Special Nuclear Material (SNM) such as plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU) results in the emission of neutrons with energies in the MeV range (hereafter 'fast neutrons'). These fast neutrons are largely unaffected by the few centimeters of intervening high-Z material that would suffice for attenuating most emitted gamma rays, while tens of centimeters of hydrogenous materials are required to achieve substantial attenuation of neutron fluxes from SNM. Neutron detectors are therefore an important complement to gamma-ray detectors in SNM search and monitoring applications. The rate at which SNM emits fast neutrons varies from about 2 per kilogram per second for typical HEU to some 60,000 per kilogram per second for metallic weapons grade plutonium. These rates can be compared with typical sea-level (cosmogenic) neutron backgrounds of roughly 5 per second per square meter per steradian in the relevant energy range [1]. The fact that the backgrounds are largely isotropic makes directional neutron detection especially attractive for SNM detection. The ability to detect, localize, and ultimately identify fast neutron sources at standoff will ultimately be limited by this background rate. Fast neutrons are particularly well suited to standoff detection and localization of SNM or other fast neutrons sources. Fast neutrons have attenuation lengths of about 60 meters in air, and retain considerable information about their source direction even after one or two scatters. Knowledge of the incoming direction of a fast neutron, from SNM or otherwise, has the potential to significantly improve signal to background in a variety of applications, since the background arriving from any one direction is a small fraction of the total background. Imaging or directional information therefore allows for source detection at a larger standoff distance or with shorter dwell times compared to nondirectional detectors, provided high detection efficiency can be maintained. Directional detection of neutrons has been previously considered for applications such as controlled fusion neutron imaging [2], nuclear fuel safety research [3], imaging of solar neutrons and SNM [4], and in nuclear science [5]. The use of scintillating crystals and fibers has been proposed for directional neutron detection [6]. Recently, a neutron scatter camera has been designed, constructed, and tested for imaging of fast neutrons, characteristic for SNM material fission [7]. The neutron scatter camera relies on the measurement of the proton recoil angle and proton energy by time of flight between two segmented solid-state detectors. A single-measurement result from the neutron scatter camera is a ring containing the possible incident neutron direction. Here we describe the development and commissioning of a directional neutron detection system based on a time projection chamber (TPC) detector. The TPC, which has been widely used in particle and nuclear physics research for several decades, provides a convenient means of measuring the full 3D trajectory, specific ionization (i.e particle type) and energy of charged particles. For this application, we observe recoil protons produced by fast neutron scatters on protons in hydrogen or methane gas. Gas pressures of a few ATM provide reasonable neutron interaction/scattering rates.

Bowden, N; Heffner, M; Carosi, G; Carter, D; Foxe, M; Jovanovic, I

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

42

Science Opportunities at ORNL's Neutron Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Neutron Sciences Directorate at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) operates two of the world's most advanced neutron scattering research facilities: the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Our vision is to provide unprecedented capabilities for understanding structure and properties across the spectrum of biology, chemistry, physics, and engineering, and to stay at the leading edge of neutron science by developing new instruments, tools, and services. This talk will provide an update on the operations of the two research facilities and highlight the significant research that is emerging. For example, scientists from ORNL are at the forefront of research on a new class of iron-based superconductors based on experiments performed at the Triple-Axis Spectrometer at HFIR and ARCS at SNS. The complementary nature of neutron and x-ray techniques will be discussed to spark discussion among attendees.

Anderson, Ian [ORNL, SNS

2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

43

Manhattan Project: Sources and Notes  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SOURCES AND NOTES SOURCES AND NOTES Resources > Sources Below are the collected specific notes for the text and images used on the pages of this web site. For a discussion of the most important works on the Manhattan Project, see the "Suggested Readings." For a general discussion of the use of sources in this web site, see "A Note on Sources." To scan the sources and notes for various categories, choose from the list below. To view the sources and notes for a specific web page, see the footnote at the bottom of each page (exceptions include this page and the home page; the sources and notes for the home page are the first ones listed below). Home Events 1890s-1939: Atomic Discoveries 1939-1942: Early Government Support 1942: Difficult Choices

44

High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept  

SciTech Connect

In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH{sub 2} cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept.

Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Hyman, C.R. [and others

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

The advanced neutron source research and development plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is being designed as a user-oriented neutron research laboratory centered around the most intense continuous beams of thermal and subthermal neutrons in the world (an order of magnitude more intense than beams available from the most advanced existing reactors). The ANS will be built around a new research reactor of 330-MW fission power, producing an unprecedented peak thermal flux of >7 {center_dot} 10{sup 19} {center_dot} m{sup -2} {center_dot} s{sup -1}. Primarily a research facility, the ANS will accommodate more than 1000 academic, industrial, and government researchers each year. They will conduct basic research in all branches of science as well as applied research leading to better understanding of new materials, including high temperature super conductors, plastics, and thin films. Some 48 neutron beam stations will be set up in the ANS beam rooms and the neutron guide hall for neutron scattering and for fundamental and nuclear physics research. There also will be extensive facilities for materials irradiation, isotope production, and analytical chemistry. The top level work breakdown structure (WBS) for the project. As noted in this figure, one component of the project is a research and development (R&D) program (WBS 1.1). This program interfaces with all of the other project level two WBS activities. Because one of the project guidelines is to meet minimum performance goals without relying on new inventions, this R&D activity is not intended to produce new concepts to allow the project to meet minimum performance goals. Instead, the R&D program will focus on the four objectives described.

Selby, D.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Secondary electron ion source neutron generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron generator employing an electron emitter, an ion source bombarded by the electrons from the electron emitter, a plasma containment zone, and a target situated between the plasma containment zone and the electron emitter. The target contains occluded deuterium, tritium, or a mixture thereof

Brainard, John P. (Albuquerque, NM); McCollister, Daryl R. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Cold moderators for pulsed neutron sources  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews cold moderators in pulsed neutron sources and provides details of the performance of different cold moderator materials and configurations. Analytical forms are presented which describe wavelength spectra and emission time distributions. Several types of cooling arrangements used in pulsed source moderators are described. Choices of materials are surveyed. The author examines some of the radiation damage effects in cold moderators, including the phenomenon of burping'' in irradiated cold solid methane. 9 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

Carpenter, J.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Neutron Cross Section Measurements at the Spallation Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the prospect of construction of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at ORNL, and the fantastic high neutron flux, new, up to now impossible, experiments seem to be feasible in the fields of applied nuclear physics and astrophysics. These experiments will supply crucial neutron-induced cross section data for radionuclides, which are badly needed by many applied physics programs. The SNS will be uniquely suited for measuring the cross sections of interest to nuclear criticality safety, accelerator transmutation of nuclear waste (ATW), and heavy element nucleosynthesis for astrophysics. Because the sample sizes required at current facilities are usually too large for practical measurements, scarce information of these cross sections is available. Using the high neutron flux at the SNS will allow these measurements to be made with samples about 40 times smaller than at the next best facility. The large reduction in sample size at the SNS will result in orders of magnitude reduction in background from the radioactive samples and make them much easier to produce; hence, a much wider range of samples will be accessible for measurement at the SNS than at any other facility.

Guber, K.H.

2001-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

49

The Spallation Neutron Source: A powerful tool for materials research  

SciTech Connect

When completed in 2006, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will use an accelerator to produce the most intense beams of pulsed neutrons in the world. This unique facility is being built by a collaboration of six US Department of Energy laboratories and will serve a diverse community of users drawn from academia, industry, and government labs. The project continues on schedule and within budget, with commissioning and installation of all systems going well. Installation of 14 state-of-the-art instruments is under way, and design work is being completed for several others. These new instruments will enable inelastic and elastic-scattering measurements across a broad range of science such as condensed-matter physics, chemistry, engineering materials, biology, and beyond. Neutron Science at SNS will be complemented by research opportunities at several other facilities under way at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Mason, Thom [ORNL; Anderson, Ian S [ORNL; Ankner, John Francis [ORNL; Egami, Takeshi [ORNL; Ekkebus, Allen E [ORNL; Herwig, Kenneth W [ORNL; Hodges, Jason P [ORNL; Horak, Charlie M [ORNL; Horton, Linda L [ORNL; Klose, Frank Richard [ORNL; Mesecar, Andrew D. [University of Illinois, Chicago; Myles, Dean A A [ORNL; Ohl, M. [Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich, Germany; Zhao, Jinkui [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Physics design of a cold neutron source for KIPT neutron source facility.  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of a neutron source facility. It is based on the use of an electron accelerator driven subcritical (ADS) facility with low enriched uranium fuel, using the existing electron accelerators at KIPT of Ukraine [1]. The neutron source of the subcritical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100-KW electron beam, which has a uniform spatial distribution and the electron energy in the range of 100 to 200 MeV, with a natural uranium target [2]. The main functions of the facility are the production of medical isotopes and the support of the Ukraine nuclear power industry. Neutron beam experiments and material studies are also included. Over the past two-three decades, structures with characteristic lengths of 100 {angstrom} and correspondingly smaller vibrational energies have become increasingly important for both science and technology [3]. The characteristic dimensions of the microstructures can be well matched by neutrons with longer vibrational wavelength and lower energy. In the accelerator-driven subcritical facility, most of the neutrons are generated from fission reactions with energy in the MeV range. They are slowed down to the meV energy range through scattering reactions in the moderator and reflector materials. However, the fraction of neutrons with energies less than 5 meV in a normal moderator spectrum is very low because of up-scattering caused by the thermal motion of moderator or reflector molecules. In order to obtain neutrons with energy less than 5 meV, cryogenically cooled moderators 'cold neutron sources' should be used to slow down the neutrons. These cold moderators shift the neutron energy spectrum down because the thermal motion of moderator molecules as well as the up-scattering is very small, which provides large gains in intensity of low energy neutrons, E < 5 meV. The accelerator driven subcritical facility is designed with a provision to add a cryogenically cooled moderator system. This cold neutron source could provide the neutrons beams with lower energy, which could be utilized in scattering experiment and material structures analysis. This study describes the performed physics analyses to define and characterize the cold neutron source of the KIPT neutron source facility. The cold neutron source is designed to optimize the cold neutron brightness to the experimental instruments outside the radial heavy concrete shield of the facility. Liquid hydrogen or solid methane with 20 K temperature is used as a cold moderator. Monte Carlo computer code MCNPX [4], with ENDF/B-VI nuclear data libraries, is utilized to calculate the cold neutron source performance and estimate the nuclear heat load to the cold moderator. The surface source generation capability of MCNPX code has been used to provide the possibility of analyzing different design configurations and perform design optimization analyses with reasonable computer resources. Several design configurations were analyzed and their performance were characterized and optimized.

Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y.; Kellogg, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

51

Physics design of a cold neutron source for KIPT neutron source facility.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of a neutron source facility. It is based on the use of an electron accelerator driven subcritical (ADS) facility with low enriched uranium fuel, using the existing electron accelerators at KIPT of Ukraine [1]. The neutron source of the subcritical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100-KW electron beam, which has a uniform spatial distribution and the electron energy in the range of 100 to 200 MeV, with a natural uranium target [2]. The main functions of the facility are the production of medical isotopes and the support of the Ukraine nuclear power industry. Neutron beam experiments and material studies are also included. Over the past two-three decades, structures with characteristic lengths of 100 {angstrom} and correspondingly smaller vibrational energies have become increasingly important for both science and technology [3]. The characteristic dimensions of the microstructures can be well matched by neutrons with longer vibrational wavelength and lower energy. In the accelerator-driven subcritical facility, most of the neutrons are generated from fission reactions with energy in the MeV range. They are slowed down to the meV energy range through scattering reactions in the moderator and reflector materials. However, the fraction of neutrons with energies less than 5 meV in a normal moderator spectrum is very low because of up-scattering caused by the thermal motion of moderator or reflector molecules. In order to obtain neutrons with energy less than 5 meV, cryogenically cooled moderators 'cold neutron sources' should be used to slow down the neutrons. These cold moderators shift the neutron energy spectrum down because the thermal motion of moderator molecules as well as the up-scattering is very small, which provides large gains in intensity of low energy neutrons, E neutron source could provide the neutrons beams with lower energy, which could be utilized in scattering experiment and material structures analysis. This study describes the performed physics analyses to define and characterize the cold neutron source of the KIPT neutron source facility. The cold neutron source is designed to optimize the cold neutron brightness to the experimental instruments outside the radial heavy concrete shield of the facility. Liquid hydrogen or solid methane with 20 K temperature is used as a cold moderator. Monte Carlo computer code MCNPX [4], with ENDF/B-VI nuclear data libraries, is utilized to calculate the cold neutron source performance and estimate the nuclear heat load to the cold moderator. The surface source generation capability of MCNPX code has been used to provide the possibility of analyzing different design configurations and perform design optimization analyses with reasonable computer resources. Several design configurations were analyzed and their performance were characterized and optimized.

Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y.; Kellogg, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

52

SNS/BNL Diagnostics System Group, Spallation Neutron Source, SNS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SNS/BNL Diagnostics System Group SNS/BNL Diagnostics System Group Homepage The Spallation Neutron Source project is a collaboration between six national laboratories of the United states to build a Mega Watt neutrons source driven by a proton accelerator. The complex is going to be build in Oak Ridge (Tennessee) and consists of a full energy (1 Gev) linac, an accumulator ring and a mercury target with several instruments for neutron scattering. Information on the project can be found at http://www.sns.gov. At Brookhaven National Laboratory we work mainly on the accumulator ring and transfer lines diagnostics (HEBT, Ring, RTBT). Some of the systems are SNS-wide ie: the Beam Loss Monitor system and Beam Current Monitor system. In addition our group provides parts of other systems to our partner laboratories. Our group is part or the Collider Accelerator Division that is also in charge of RHIC and the AGS complex. If you are looking for information on a particular topic you can contact the persons working on it.

53

"Development and Neutronic Validation of pelletized Cold and Very Cold Moderators for Pulsed Neutron Sources" Phase II Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intense beams of cold neutrons are produced at several DOE facilities and are used by researchers to study the microscopic structure of materials. Energetic neutrons are produced by a high energy proton beam impacting a target. The fast neutrons are converted to the desired cold neutrons passing through a cryogenic moderator vessel, presently filled with dense cold hydrogen gas. Moderators made from solid methane have demonstrated superior performance to the hydrogen moderators but cannot be implemented on high power sources such as the SNS due to the difficulty of removing heat from the solid blocks of methane. Cryogenic Applications F, Inc has developed the methane pellet formation and transport technologies needed to produce a hydrogen cooled solid methane pellet moderator, potentially capable of being used in a high power spallation neutron facility. Such a methane pellet moderator could double the brightness of the neutron beam. Prior to this work a methane pellet moderator had not been produced or studied. The Indiana University LENS facility is a small pulsed neutron source used in part to study and develop cold neutron moderators. In this project cold neutrons were produced in a solid methane pellet moderator and analyzed with the LENS facility diagnostics. The results indicated that the neutron beam formed by the pellet moderator was similar to that of a solid methane block moderator.

Foster, Christopher; Baxter, David V

2012-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

54

The status of the spallation neutron source ion source  

SciTech Connect

The ion source for the spallation neutron source (SNS) is a radio-frequency, multicusp source designed to deliver 45 mA of H2 to the SNS accelerator with a pulse length of 1 ms and repetition rate of 60 Hz. A total of three ion sources have been fabricated and commissioned at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and subsequently delivered to the SNS at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The ion sources are currently being rotated between operation on the SNS accelerator, where they are involved in ongoing efforts to commission the SNS LINAC, and the hot spare stand (HSS), where high-current tests are in progress. Commissioning work involves operating the source in a low duty-factor mode (pulse width {approx}200 ms and repetition rate {approx}5 Hz) for extended periods of time while the high-current tests involve source operation at full duty-factor of 6 percent (1 ms/60 Hz). This report discusses routine performance of the source employed in the commissioning role as well as the initial results o f high-current tests performed on the HSS.

Welton, R.F.; Stockli, M.P.; Murray, S.N.; Keller, R.

2003-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

55

Status of the intense pulsed neutron source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IPNS is not unique in having concerns about the level of funding, and the future looks good despite these concerns. This report details the progress made at IPNS during the last two years. Other papers in these proceedings discuss in detail the status of the enriched uranium Booster target, the two instruments that are under construction, GLAD and POSY II, and a proposal for research on an Advanced Pulsed Neutron Source (ASPUN) that has been submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE). Further details on IPNS are available in the IPNS Progress Report 1987--1988, available by writing the IPNS Division Office. 9 refs., 3 tabs.

Brown, B.S.; Carpenter, J.M.; Crawford, R.K.; Rauchas, A.V.; Schulke, A.W.; Worlton, T.G.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Modernization of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to Provide a Cold Neutron Source and Experimentation Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the installation of a cold neutron source at HFIR with respect to the project as a modernization of the facility. The paper focuses on why the project was required, the scope of the cold source project with specific emphasis on the design, and project management information.

Rothrock, Benjamin G [ORNL; Farrar, Mike B [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

EIS-0247: Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron Source |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

247: Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron 247: Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron Source EIS-0247: Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron Source SUMMARY The United States needs a high-flux, short- pulsed neutron source to provide its scientific and industrial research communities with a much more intense source of pulsed neutrons for neutron scattering research than is currently available. This source would assure the availability of a state-of-the-art neutron research facility in the United States in the decades ahead. This facility would be used to conduct research in areas such as materials science, condensed matter physics, the molecular structure of biological materials, properties of polymers and complex fluids, and magnetism. In addition to creating new scientific and

58

A compact neutron generator using a field ionization source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the gas/oil industry radioactive sources are routinelyreplacement of radioactive sources for oil-well logging withto build a neutron source suit- able for oil-well logging

Persaud, Arun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

rf improvements for Spallation Neutron Source H ion source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is ramping up the accelerated proton beam power to 1.4 MW and just reached 1 MW. The rf-driven multicusp ion source that originates from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been delivering 38 mA H beam in the linac at 60 Hz, 0.9 ms. To improve availability, a rf-driven external antenna multicusp ion source with a water-cooled ceramic aluminum nitride AlN plasma chamber is developed. Computer modeling and simulations have been made to analyze and optimize the rf performance of the new ion source. Operational statistics and test runs with up to 56 mA medium energy beam transport beam current identify the 2 MHz rf system as a limiting factor in the system availability and beam production. Plasma ignition system is under development by using a separate 13 MHz system. To improve the availability of the rf power system with easier maintenance, we tested a 70 kV isolation transformer for the 80 kW, 6% duty cycle 2 MHz amplifier to power the ion source from a grounded solid-state amplifier. 2010 American Institute of Physics.

Kang, Yoon W [ORNL; Fuja, Raymond E [ORNL; Goulding, Richard Howell [ORNL; Hardek, Thomas W [ORNL; Lee, Sung-Woo [ORNL; McCarthy, Mike [ORNL; Piller, Chip [ORNL; Shin, Ki [ORNL; Stockli, Martin P [ORNL; Welton, Robert F [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Radioactive Neutron Sources Emission Rates (44010C and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Safe handling of neutron sources and the industrial safety aspects are taught through an apprentice-type relationship with each new handler. ...

2010-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "neutron source project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

H- radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent {approx}38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of {approx}90%. H{sup -} beam pulses ({approx}1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, {approx}60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of {approx}0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of {approx}99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of {approx}75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance/installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to {approx}100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

Welton, Robert F [ORNL; Pennisi, Terry R [ORNL; Roseberry, Ron T [ORNL; Stockli, Martin P [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Latent social structure in open source projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercial software project managers design project organizational structure carefully, mindful of available skills, division of labour, geographical boundaries, etc. These organizational "cathedrals" are to be contrasted with the "bazaar-like" nature ... Keywords: collaboration, open source software, social networks

Christian Bird; David Pattison; Raissa D'Souza; Vladimir Filkov; Premkumar Devanbu

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Measurement of Neutron Background at the Pyhasalmi mine for CUPP Project, Finland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A natural neutron flux is one of significant kind of background in high-sensitive underground experiments. Therefore, when scheduling a delicate underground measurements one needs to measure neutron background. Deep underground the most significant source of neutrons are the U-Th natural radioactive chains giving a fission spectrum with the temperature of 2-3 MeV. Another source is the U-Th alpha-reactions on light nuclei of mine rock giving neutrons with different spectra in the 1-15 MeV energy region. Normal basalt mine rocks contain 1 ppm g/g of U-238 and less. Deep underground those rocks produce natural neutron fluxes of 10^{-7} - 10^{-6} cm^{-2}s^{-1} above 1 MeV. To measure such a background one needs a special techniques. In the Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow, the neutron spectrometer was developed and built which is sensitive to such a low neutron fluxes. At the end of 2001 the collection of neutron data at the Pyhasalmi mine was started for the CUPP project. During 2002 the background and rough energy spectra of neutron at underground levels 410, 660, 990 and 1410 m were measured. The result of the measurement of the neutron background at different levels of the Pyhasalmi mine is presented and discussed. Data analysis is performed in different energy ranges from thermal neutrons up to 25 MeV and above.

J. N. Abdurashitov; V. N. Gavrin; V. L. Matushko; A. A. Shikhin; V. E. Yants; J. Peltoniemi; T. Keranen

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

64

5 MW pulsed spallation neutron source, Preconceptual design study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a self-consistent base line design for a 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (PSNS). It is intended to establish feasibility of design and as a basis for further expanded and detailed studies. It may also serve as a basis for establishing project cost (30% accuracy) in order to intercompare competing designs for a PSNS not only on the basis of technical feasibility and technical merit but also on the basis of projected total cost. The accelerator design considered here is based on the objective of a pulsed neutron source obtained by means of a pulsed proton beam with average beam power of 5 MW, in {approx} 1 {mu}sec pulses, operating at a repetition rate of 60 Hz. Two target stations are incorporated in the basic facility: one for operation at 10 Hz for long-wavelength instruments, and one operating at 50 Hz for instruments utilizing thermal neutrons. The design approach for the proton accelerator is to use a low energy linear accelerator (at 0.6 GeV), operating at 60 Hz, in tandem with two fast cycling booster synchrotrons (at 3.6 GeV), operating at 30 Hz. It is assumed here that considerations of cost and overall system reliability may favor the present design approach over the alternative approach pursued elsewhere, whereby use is made of a high energy linear accelerator in conjunction with a dc accumulation ring. With the knowledge that this alternative design is under active development, it was deliberately decided to favor here the low energy linac-fast cycling booster approach. Clearly, the present design, as developed here, must be carried to the full conceptual design stage in order to facilitate a meaningful technology and cost comparison with alternative designs.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Optimization of an accelerator-based epithermal neutron source for neutron capture therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nowadays at several nuclear reactors were created BNCTand intensity. Nuclear reactors as neutron source forsource based on a nuclear reactor [4]. The comparison shows

Kononov, O.E.; Kononov, V.N.; Bokhovko, M.V.; Korobeynikov, V.V.; Soloviev, A.N.; Chu, W.T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Virtual Gamma Ray Radiation Sources through Neutron Radiative Capture  

SciTech Connect

The countrate response of a gamma spectrometry system from a neutron radiation source behind a plane of moderating material doped with a nuclide of a large radiative neutron capture cross-section exhibits a countrate response analogous to a gamma radiation source at the same position from the detector. Using a planar, surface area of the neutron moderating material exposed to the neutron radiation produces a larger area under the prompt gamma ray peak in the detector than a smaller area of dimensions relative to the active volume of the gamma detection system.

Scott Wilde, Raymond Keegan

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Summary of alpha-neutron sources in GADRAS.  

SciTech Connect

A common source of neutrons for calibration and testing is alpha-neutron material, named for the alpha-neutron nuclear reaction that occurs within. This material contains a long-lived alpha-emitter and a lighter target element. When the alpha particle from the emitter is absorbed by the target, neutrons and gamma rays are released. Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) includes built-in alpha-neutron source definitions for AcC, AmB, AmBe, AmF, AmLi, CmC, and PuC. In addition, GADRAS users may create their own alpha-neutron sources by placing valid alpha-emitters and target elements in materials within their one-dimensional models (1DModel). GADRAS has the ability to use pre-built alpha-neutron sources for plotting or as trace-sources in 1D models. In addition, if any material (existing or user-defined) specified in a 1D model contains both an alpha emitter in conjunction with a target nuclide, or there is an interface between such materials, then the appropriate neutron-emission rate from the alpha-neutron reaction will be computed. The gamma-emissions from these sources are also computed, but are limited to a subset of nine target nuclides. If a user has experimental data to contribute to the alpha-neutron gamma emission database, it may be added directly or submitted to the GADRAS developers for inclusion. The gadras.exe.config file will be replaced when GADRAS updates are installed, so sending the information to the GADRAS developers is the preferred method for updating the database. This is also preferable because it enables other users to benefit from your efforts.

Mitchell, Dean James; Thoreson, Gregory G.; Harding, Lee T.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Compact, energy EFFICIENT neutron source: enabling technology for various applications  

SciTech Connect

A novel neutron source comprising of a deuterium beam (energy of about 100 KeV) injected into a tube filled with tritium gas and/or tritium plasma that generates D-T fusion reactions, whose products are 14.06 MeV neutrons and 3.52 MeV alpha particles, is described. At the opposite end of the tube, the energy of deuterium ions that did not interact is recovered. Beryllium walls of proper thickness can be utilized to absorb 14 MeV neutrons and release 2-3 low energy neutrons. Each ion source and tube forms a module. Larger systems can be formed from multiple units. Unlike currently proposed methods, where accelerator-based neutron sources are very expensive, large, and require large amounts of power for operation, this neutron source is compact, inexpensive, easy to test and to scale up. Among possible applications for this neutron source concept are sub-critical nuclear breeder reactors and transmutation of radioactive waste.

Hershcovitch, A.; Roser, T.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

January 16, 2009: Expansion of Spallation Neutron Source  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

January 16, 2009The Department gives its initial approval to begin plans for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to build a second target station for the Spallation Neutron Source, expanding...

70

Neutronic Design Calculations on Moderators for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory will provide an intense source of neutrons for a large variety of experiments. It consists of a high-energy (1-GeV) and high-power ({approximately}1-MW) proton accelerator, an accumulator ring, together with a target station and an experimental area. In the target itself, the proton beam will produce neutrons via the spallation process and these will be converted to low-energy (<2-eV) neutrons in moderators located close to the target. Current plans are to have two liquid-hydrogen (20-K) moderators and two room-temperature H{sub 2}O moderators. Extensive engineering design work has been conducted on the moderator vessels. For our studies we have produced realistic neutronic representations of these moderators. We report on neutronic studies conducted on these representations of the moderators using Monte Carlo simulation techniques.

Murphy, D.B.

1999-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

71

The early development of neutron diffraction: Science in the wings of the Manhattan Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although neutron diffraction was first observed using radioactive decay sources shortly after the discovery of the neutron, it was only with the availability of higher intensity neutron beams from the first nuclear reactors, constructed as part of the Manhattan project, that systematic investigation of Bragg scattering became possible. Remarkably, at a time when the war effort was singularly focused on the development of the atomic bomb, groups working at Oak Ridge and Chicago carried out key measurements and recognized the future utility of neutron diffraction quite independent of its contributions to the measurements of nuclear cross sections. Ernest O. Wollan, Lyle B. Borst, and Walter H. Zinn were all able to observe neutron diffraction in 1944 using the X-10 graphite reactor and the CP-3 heavy water reactor.

Mason, Thom [ORNL; Gawne, Timothy J [ORNL; Nagler, Stephen E [ORNL; Nestor, Margaret Boone {Bonnie} [ORNL; Carpenter, John M [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Other Links, Spallation Neutron Source, SNS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Other Links ORNL Project Information ORNL Control Web Page ORNL Construction Progress - Real Time WebCam BNLORNL Database...

73

Core Vessel Insert Handling Robot for the Spallation Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source provides the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams for scientific research and industrial development. Its eighteen neutron beam lines will eventually support up to twenty-four simultaneous experiments. Each beam line consists of various optical components which guide the neutrons to a particular instrument. The optical components nearest the neutron moderators are the core vessel inserts. Located approximately 9 m below the high bay floor, these inserts are bolted to the core vessel chamber and are part of the vacuum boundary. They are in a highly radioactive environment and must periodically be replaced. During initial SNS construction, four of the beam lines received Core Vessel Insert plugs rather than functional inserts. Remote replacement of the first Core Vessel Insert plug was recently completed using several pieces of custom-designed tooling, including a highly complicated Core Vessel Insert Robot. The design of this tool are discussed.

Graves, Van B [ORNL; Dayton, Michael J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

LOW VOLTAGE 14 Mev NEUTRON SOURCE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus yielding high-energy neutrons at the rate of 10/sup 8/ or more per second by the D,T or D,D reactions is described. The deuterium gas filling is ionized by electrons emitted from a filament, and the resulting ions are focused into a beam and accelerated against a fixed target. The apparatus is built in accordance with the relationship V/sub s/ = A--B log pd, where V/sub s/ is the sparking voltage, p the gas pressure, and d the gap length between the high voltage electrodes. Typical parameters to obtain the high neutron yields are 55 to 80 kv, 0.5 to 7.0 ma beam current, 5 to 12 microns D/sub 2/, and a gap length of 1 centimeter.

Little, R.N. Jr.; Graves, E.R.

1959-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

75

Manhattan Project: A Note on Sources  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

A NOTE ON SOURCES A NOTE ON SOURCES Resources > Note on Sources The text for this web site is a combination of original material and adaptations from previous publications of the Department of Energy (including contractors), its predecessor agencies (primarily the Atomic Energy Commission and the Manhattan Engineer District), and other government agencies. Adaptations run the gamut from summaries to close paraphrases to text being taken directly. This material was gathered and adapted for use by the DOE's Office of History and Heritage Resources. For detailed notes on what sources were used for any particular page, see the footnote at the bottom of the page or its entry in Sources and Notes. For a discussion of the best general sources on the Manhattan Project, see the Suggested Readings.

76

Subcritical Neutron Multiplication Measurements of HEU Using Delayed Neutrons as the Driving Source  

SciTech Connect

A new method for the determination of the multiplication of highly enriched uranium systems is presented. The method uses delayed neutrons to drive the HEU system. These delayed neutrons are from fission events induced by a pulsed 14-MeV neutron source. Between pulses, neutrons are detected within a medium efficiency neutron detector using {sup 3}He ionization tubes within polyethylene enclosures. The neutron detection times are recorded relative to the initiation of the 14-MeV neutron pulse, and subsequently analyzed with the Feynman reduced variance method to extract singles, doubles and triples neutron counting rates. Measurements have been made on a set of nested hollow spheres of 93% enriched uranium, with mass values from 3.86 kg to 21.48 kg. The singles, doubles and triples counting rates for each uranium system are compared to calculations from point kinetics models of neutron multiplicity to assign multiplication values. These multiplication values are compared to those from MC NP K-Code calculations.

Hollas, C.L.; Goulding, C.A.; Myers, W.L.

1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

77

Design considerations for neutron activation and neutron source strength monitors for ITER  

SciTech Connect

The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor will require highly accurate measurements of fusion power production in time, space, and energy. Spectrometers in the neutron camera could do it all, but experience has taught us that multiple methods with redundancy and complementary uncertainties are needed. Previously, conceptual designs have been presented for time-integrated neutron activation and time-dependent neutron source strength monitors, both of which will be important parts of the integrated suite of neutron diagnostics for this purpose. The primary goals of the neutron activation system are: to maintain a robust relative measure of fusion energy production with stability and wide dynamic range; to enable an accurate absolute calibration of fusion power using neutronic techniques as successfully demonstrated on JET and TFTR; and to provide a flexible system for materials testing. The greatest difficulty is that the irradiation locations need to be close to plasma with a wide field of view. The routing of the pneumatic system is difficult because of minimum radius of curvature requirements and because of the careful need for containment of the tritium and activated air. The neutron source strength system needs to provide real-time source strength vs. time with {approximately}1 ms resolution and wide dynamic range in a robust and reliable manner with the capability to be absolutely calibrated by in-situ neutron sources as done on TFTR, JT-60U, and JET. In this paper a more detailed look at the expected neutron flux field around ITER is folded into a more complete design of the fission chamber system.

Barnes, C.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Jassby, D.L.; LeMunyan, G.; Roquemore, A.L. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Walker, C. [ITER Joint Central Team, Garching (Germany)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

SNS Meetings, Spallation Neutron Source, SNS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SNS Meetings Meetings at BNL - Pam Manning Upcoming Project Office Reviews and Meetings - Bill McGahern BNL SNS Control Group Lunch Meeting - Jenny Weng Top of Page Last Modified:...

79

Rationale for a spallation neutron source target system test facility at the 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conceptual design study for a 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center has shown the feasibility of including a spallation neutron test facility at a relatively low cost. This document presents a rationale for developing such a test bed. Currently, neutron scattering facilities operate at a maximum power of 0.2 MW. Proposed new designs call for power levels as high as 10 MW, and future transmutation activities may require as much as 200 MW. A test bed will allow assessment of target neutronics; thermal hydraulics; remote handling; mechanical structure; corrosion in aqueous, non-aqueous, liquid metal, and molten salt systems; thermal shock on systems and system components; and materials for target systems. Reliable data in these areas are crucial to the safe and reliable operation of new high-power facilities. These tests will provide data useful not only to spallation neutron sources proposed or under development, but also to other projects in accelerator-driven transmutation technologies such as the production of tritium.

Sommer, W.F.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Proton Driver Linac for the Frankfurt Neutron Source  

SciTech Connect

The Frankfurt Neutron Source at the Stern-Gerlach-Zentrum (FRANZ) will deliver high neutron fluxes in the energy range of 1 to 500 keV. The Activation Mode provides a high averaged neutron flux created by a cw proton beam of up to 5 mA, while in the Compressor Mode intense neutron pulses of 1 ns length are formed with a repetition rate of up to 250 kHz. The Compressor Mode is well-suited for energy-dependent neutron capture measurements using the Time-of-Flight method in combination with a 4{pi} BaF{sub 2} detector array. The design of the proton driver linac for both operation modes is presented. This includes the volume type ion source, the ExB chopper located in the low energy section, the RFQ-IH combination for beam acceleration and the bunch compressor. Finally, the neutron production at the lithium-7 target and the resulting energy spectrum is described.

Wiesner, C.; Chau, L. P.; Dinter, H.; Droba, M.; Heilmann, M.; Joshi, N.; Maeder, D.; Metz, A.; Meusel, O.; Noll, D.; Podlech, H.; Ratzinger, U.; Reichau, H.; Schempp, A.; Schmidt, S.; Schweizer, W.; Volk, K.; Wagner, C. [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Goethe-Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Reifarth, R. [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Goethe-Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Mueller, I.

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "neutron source project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0.times.10.sup.9 neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use.

Yoon, Woo Y. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jones, James L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Nigg, David W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Harker, Yale D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Residual stress measurement using the pulsed neutron source at LANSCE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The presence of residual stress in engineering components can effect their mechanical properties and structural integrity. Neutron diffraction is the only measuring technique which can make spatially resolved non-destructive strain measurements in the interior of components. By recording the change in the crystalline interplanar spacing, elastic strains can be measured for individual lattice reflections. Using a pulsed neutron source, all the lattice reflections are recorded in each measurement which allows anisotropic effects to be studied. Measurements made at the Manuel Lujan Jr Neutron Scattering Centre (LANSCE) demonstrate the potential for stress measurements on a pulsed source and indicate the advantages and disadvantages over measurements made on a reactor. 15 refs., 7 figs.

Bourke, M.A.M.; Goldstone, J.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Holden, T.M. (Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Opportunities for Neutrino Physics at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss opportunities for a neutrino program at the Spallation Neutrons Source (SNS) being commissioning at ORNL. Possible investigations can include study of neutrino-nuclear cross sections in the energy rage important for supernova dynamics and neutrino nucleosynthesis, search for neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering, and various tests of the standard model of electro-weak interactions.

Yu Efremenko; W R Hix

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

84

(International Panel on 14 MeV Intense Neutron Source Based on Accelerators for Fusion Materials Study)  

SciTech Connect

Both travelers were members of a nine-person US delegation that participated in an international workshop on accelerator-based 14 MeV neutron sources for fusion materials research hosted by the University of Tokyo. Presentations made at the workshop reviewed the technology developed by the FMIT Project, advances in accelerator technology, and proposed concepts for neutron sources. One traveler then participated in the initial meeting of the IEA Working Group on High Energy, High Flux Neutron Sources in which efforts were begun to evaluate and compare proposed neutron sources; the Fourth FFTF/MOTA Experimenters' Workshop which covered planning and coordination of the US-Japan collaboration using the FFTF reactor to irradiate fusion reactor materials; and held discussions with several JAERI personnel on the US-Japan collaboration on fusion reactor materials.

Thoms, K.R.; Wiffen, F.W.

1991-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

85

Design of a High Intensity Neutron Source for Neutron-Induced Fission Yield Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The upgraded IGISOL facility with JYFLTRAP, at the accelerator laboratory of the University of Jyv\\"askyl\\"a, has been supplied with a new cyclotron which will provide protons of the order of 100 {\\mu}A with up to 30 MeV energy, or deuterons with half the energy and intensity. This makes it an ideal place for measurements of neutron-induced fission products from various actinides, in view of proposed future nuclear fuel cycles. The groups at Uppsala University and University of Jyv\\"askyl\\"a are working on the design of a neutron converter that will be used as neutron source in fission yield studies. The design is based on simulations with Monte Carlo codes and a benchmark measurement that was recently performed at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala. In order to obtain a competitive count rate the fission targets will be placed very close to the neutron converter. The goal is to have a flexible design that will enable the use of neutron fields with different energy distributions. In the present paper, some considerations for the design of the neutron converter will be discussed, together with different scenarios for which fission targets and neutron energies to focus on.

M. Lantz; D. Gorelov; A. Jokinen; V. S. Kolhinen; A. Mattera; H. Penttil; S. Pomp; V. Rakopoulos; S. Rinta-Antila; A. Solders

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

86

SNS Ring, Spallation Neutron Source, SNS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RING RING Lattice Version 1.0 in MAD structure Version 1.1: SNSRing.v.1.1 | 623_620_00.mad Version 1.2 SNSRing.v.1.2 | 623_620_00.mad Matching example MAD optics outputs UAL compatible input example Schematic (one super-period) and mechanical drawing Diagnostics Impedance budget Magnets List and mechanical parameters Mechanical drawings Magnetic field modeling and measurements Installation and survey Power supplies summary and changes Polarity conventions tech.memo and schematic (A polarity) Magnet assemblies Documentation ASAC review presentations DOE review presentations SNS/BNL tech.notes, conference and journal papers SNS/ORNL papers SNS project documentation Other links SNS ring aperture, collimation and beam losses SNS transfer lines SNS/BNL Accelerator Physics SNS/ORNL Accelerator Physics

87

Performance of the intense pulsed neutron source accelerator system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) facility has now been operating in a routine way for outside users since November 1, 1981. From that date through December of 1982, the accelerator system was scheduled for neutron science for 4500 hours. During this time the accelerator achieved its short-term goals by delivering about 380,000,000 pulses of beam totaling over 6 x 10/sup 20/ protons. The changes in equipment and operating practices that evolved during this period of intense running are described. The intensity related instability threshold was increased by a factor of two and the accelerator beam current has been ion source limited. Plans to increase the accelerator intensity are also described. Initial operating results with a new H/sup -/ ion source are discussed.

Potts, C.; Brumwell, F.; Rauchas, A.; Stipp, V.; Volk, G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

A field evaporation deuterium ion source for neutron generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proof-of-principle experiments have demonstrated an electrostatic field evaporation based deuterium ion source for use in compact, high-output deuterium-tritium neutron generators. The ion source produces principally atomic deuterium and titanium ions. More than 100 monolayers of deuterated titanium thin film can be removed and ionized from a single tip in less than 20 ns. The measurements indicate that with the use of microfabricated tip arrays the deuterium ion source could provide sufficient ion current to produce 10^9 to 10^10 n/cm^2 of tip array area.

Reichenbach, Birk; Schwoebel, P R; 10.1063/1.2913331

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Dense Plasma Focus Fusion Neutron Sources Progress at NSTec, September 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of dense plasma focus (DPF) sources are introduced, including their operating characteristics and current activities. Neutron resonance spectroscopy is discussed and the feasibility of using DPF for neutron sources is considered.

Hagen, E. C.

2011-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

90

Control System Availability for the Spallation Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is continuing its ramp up of beam power, while simultaneously increasing production hours and striving for reduced unplanned downtime. For the large, highly-distributed EPICS-based control system of the SNS, this demand for increased availability is combined with the need for ongoing system maintenance, upgrades and improvements. Causes of recent control system related downtime will be reviewed along with experiences in addressing the competing needs of availability and system improvements.

Hartman, Steven M [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE AT 1 MW  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has been operating at the MW level for about one year. Experience in beam loss control and machine activation at this power level is presented. Also experience with machine protection systems is reviewed, which is critical at this power level. One of the most challenging operational aspects of high power operation has been attaining high availability, which is also discussed

Galambos, John D [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

The continued development of the Spallation Neutron Source external antenna H{sup -} ion source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based, pulsed neutron-scattering facility, currently in the process of ramping up neutron production. In order to ensure that the SNS will meet its operational commitments as well as provide for future facility upgrades with high reliability, we are developing a rf-driven, H{sup -} ion source based on a water-cooled, ceramic aluminum nitride (AlN) plasma chamber. To date, early versions of this source have delivered up to 42 mA to the SNS front end and unanalyzed beam currents up to {approx}100 mA (60 Hz, 1 ms) to the ion source test stand. This source was operated on the SNS accelerator from February to April 2009 and produced {approx}35 mA (beam current required by the ramp up plan) with availability of {approx}97%. During this run several ion source failures identified reliability issues, which must be addressed before the source re-enters production: plasma ignition, antenna lifetime, magnet cooling, and cooling jacket integrity. This report discusses these issues, details proposed engineering solutions, and notes progress to date.

Welton, R. F.; Carmichael, J.; Fuga, R.; Goulding, R. H.; Han, B.; Kang, Y.; Lee, S. W.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T.; Potter, K. G.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830-6471 (United States); Desai, N. J. [Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, Massachusetts 01609 (United States)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Computational Benchmark Calculations Relevant to the Neutronic Design of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will provide an intense source of low-energy neutrons for experimental use. The low-energy neutrons are produced by the interaction of a high-energy (1.0 GeV) proton beam on a mercury (Hg) target and slowed down in liquid hydrogen or light water moderators. Computer codes and computational techniques are being benchmarked against relevant experimental data to validate and verify the tools being used to predict the performance of the SNS. The LAHET Code System (LCS), which includes LAHET, HTAPE ad HMCNP (a modified version of MCNP version 3b), have been applied to the analysis of experiments that were conducted in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In the AGS experiments, foils of various materials were placed around a mercury-filled stainless steel cylinder, which was bombarded with protons at 1.6 GeV. Neutrons created in the mercury target, activated the foils. Activities of the relevant isotopes were accurately measured and compared with calculated predictions. Measurements at BNL were provided in part by collaborating scientists from JAERI as part of the AGS Spallation Target Experiment (ASTE) collaboration. To date, calculations have shown good agreement with measurements.

Gallmeier, F.X.; Glasgow, D.C.; Jerde, E.A.; Johnson, J.O.; Yugo, J.J.

1999-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

94

Neutron source in the MCNPX shielding calculating for electron accelerator driven facility  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Inst. of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the design development of an experimental neutron source facility. It is an accelerator driven system (ADS) utilizing a subcritical assembly driven by electron accelerator. The facility will be utilized for performing basic and applied nuclear researches, producing medical isotopes, and training young nuclear specialists. Monte Carlo code MCNPX has been utilized as a design tool due to its capability to transport electrons, photons, and neutrons at high energies. However the facility shielding calculations with MCNPX need enormous computational resources and the small neutron yield per electron makes sampling difficulty for the Monte Carlo calculations. A method, based on generating and utilizing neutron source file, was proposed and tested. This method reduces significantly the required computer resources and improves the statistics of the calculated neutron dose outside the shield boundary. However the statistical errors introduced by generating the neutron source were not directly represented in the results, questioning the validity of this methodology, because an insufficiently sampled neutron source can cause error on the calculated neutron dose. This paper presents a procedure for the validation of the generated neutron source file. The impact of neutron source statistic on the neutron dose is examined by calculating the neutron dose as a function of the number of electron particles used for generating the neutron source files. When the value of the calculated neutron dose converges, it means the neutron source has scored sufficient records and statistic does not have apparent impact on the calculated neutron dose. In this way, the validity of neutron source and the shield analyses could be verified. (authors)

Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y. [Nuclear Engineering Div., Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

A SEARCH FOR POINT SOURCES OF EeV NEUTRONS  

SciTech Connect

A thorough search of the sky exposed at the Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory reveals no statistically significant excess of events in any small solid angle that would be indicative of a flux of neutral particles from a discrete source. The search covers from -90 Degree-Sign to +15 Degree-Sign in declination using four different energy ranges above 1 EeV (10{sup 18} eV). The method used in this search is more sensitive to neutrons than to photons. The upper limit on a neutron flux is derived for a dense grid of directions for each of the four energy ranges. These results constrain scenarios for the production of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays in the Galaxy.

Abreu, P.; Andringa, S. [LIP and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon (Portugal); Aglietta, M. [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (INAF), Universita di Torino and Sezione INFN, Torino (Italy); Ahlers, M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Ahn, E. J. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Albuquerque, I. F. M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Allard, D. [Laboratoire AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC), Universite Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, Paris (France); Allekotte, I. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro (CNEA-UNCuyo-CONICET), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Allen, J. [New York University, New York, NY (United States); Allison, P. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Almela, A. [Facultad Regional Buenos Aires, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Alvarez Castillo, J. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Alvarez-Muniz, J. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Alves Batista, R. [IFGW, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C. [Universita di Napoli 'Federico II' and Sezione INFN, Napoli (Italy); Aminaei, A. [IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Anchordoqui, L. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Antici'c, T. [Rudjer Boskovi'c Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Arganda, E. [IFLP, Universidad Nacional de La Plata and CONICET, La Plata (Argentina); Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration; and others

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Materials Selection for the HFIR Cold Neutron Source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In year 2002 the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) will be fitted with a source of cold neutrons to upgrade and expand its existing neutron scattering facilities. The in-reactor components of the new source consist of a moderator vessel containing supercritical hydrogen gas moderator at a temperature of 20K and pressure of 15 bar, and a surrounding vacuum vessel. They will be installed in an enlarged beam tube located at the site of the present horizontal beam tube, HB-4; which terminates within the reactor's beryllium reflector. These components must withstand exceptional service conditions. This report describes the reasons and factors underlying the choice of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy for construction of the in-reactor components. The overwhelming considerations are the need to minimize generation of nuclear heat and to remove that heat through the flowing moderator, and to achieve a minimum service life of about 8 years coincident with the replacement schedule for the beryllium reflector. 6061-T6 aluminum alloy offers the best combination of low nuclear heating, high thermal conductivity, good fabricability, compatibility with hydrogen, superior cryogenic properties, and a well-established history of satisfactory performance in nuclear environments. These features are documented herein. An assessment is given of the expected performance of each component of the cold source.

Farrell, K.

2001-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

97

Novel Large Area High Resolution Neutron Detector for the Spallation Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron scattering is a powerful technique that is critically important for materials science and structural biology applications. The knowledge gained from past developments has resulted in far-reaching advances in engineering, pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, to name a few. New facilities for neutron generation at much higher flux, such as the SNS at Oak Ridge, TN, will greatly enhance the capabilities of neutron scattering, with benefits that extend to many fields and include, for example, development of improved drug therapies and materials that are stronger, longer-lasting, and more impact-resistant. In order to fully realize this enhanced potential, however, higher neutron rates must be met with improved detection capabilities, particularly higher count rate capability in large size detectors, while maintaining practicality. We have developed a neutron detector with the technical and economic advantages to accomplish this goal. This new detector has a large sensitive area, offers 3D spatial resolution, high sensitivity and high count rate capability, and it is economical and practical to produce. The proposed detector technology is based on B-10 thin film conversion of neutrons in long straw-like gas detectors. A stack of many such detectors, each 1 meter in length, and 4 mm in diameter, has a stopping power that exceeds that of He-3 gas, contained at practical pressures within an area detector. With simple electronic readout methods, straw detector arrays can provide spatial resolution of 4 mm FWHM or better, and since an array detector of such form consists of several thousand individual elements per square meter, count rates in a 1 m^2 detector can reach 2?10^7 cps. Moreover, each individual event can be timetagged with a time resolution of less than 0.1 ?sec, allowing accurate identification of neutron energy by time of flight. Considering basic elemental cost, this novel neutron imaging detector can be commercially produced economically, probably at a small fraction of the cost of He-3 detectors. In addition to neutron scattering science, the fully developed base technology can be used as a rugged, low-cost neutron detector in area monitoring and surveying. Radiation monitors are used in a number of other settings for occupational and environmental radiation safety. Such a detector can also be used in environmental monitoring and remote nuclear power plant monitoring. For example, the Department of Energy could use it to characterize nuclear waste dumps, coordinate clean-up efforts, and assess the radioactive contaminants in the air and water. Radiation monitors can be used to monitor the age and component breakdown of nuclear warheads and to distinguish between weapons and reactor grade plutonium. The UN's International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) uses radiation monitors for treaty verification, remote monitoring, and enforcing the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons. As part of treaty verification, monitors can be used to certify the contents of containers during inspections. They could be used for portal monitoring to secure border checkpoints, sea ports, air cargo centers, public parks, sporting venues, and key government buildings. Currently, only 2% of all sea cargo shipped is inspected for radiation sources. In addition, merely the presence of radiation is detected and nothing is known about the radioactive source until further testing. The utilization of radiation monitors with neutron sensitivity and capability of operation in hostile port environments would increase the capacity and effectiveness of the radioactive scanning processes.

Lacy, Jeffrey L

2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

98

Neutron source capability assessment for cumulative fission yields measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent analysis of high-quality cumulative fission yields data for Pu-239 published in the peer-reviewed literature showed that the quoted experimental uncertainties do not allow a clear statement on how the fission yields vary as a function of energy. [Prussin2009] To make such a statement requires a set of experiments with well 'controlled' and understood sources of experimental errors to reduce uncertainties as low as possible, ideally in the 1 to 2% range. The Inter Laboratory Working Group (ILWOG) determined that Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) would benefit from an experimental program with the stated goal to reduce the measurement uncertainties significantly in order to make a definitive statement of the relationship of energy dependence to the cumulative fission yields. Following recent discussions between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), there is a renewed interest in developing a concerted experimental program to measure fission yields in a neutron energy range from thermal energy (0.025 eV) to 14 MeV with an emphasis on discrete energies from 0.5 to 4 MeV. Ideally, fission yields would be measured at single energies, however, in practice there are only 'quasi-monoenergetic' neutrons sources of finite width. This report outlines a capability assessment as of June 2011 of available neutron sources that could be used as part of a concerted experimental program to measure cumulative fission yields. In a framework of international collaborations, capabilities available in the United States, at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) in the United Kingdom and at the Commissariat Energie Atomique (CEA) in France are listed. There is a need to develop an experimental program that will reduce the measurement uncertainties significantly in order to make a definitive statement of the relationship of energy dependence to the cumulative fission yields. Fission and monoenergetic neutron sources are available that could support these fission yield experiments in the US, as well as at AWE and CEA. Considerations that will impact the final choice of experimental venues are: (1) Availability during the timeframe of interest; (2) Ability to accommodate special nuclear materials; (3) Cost; (4) Availability of counting facilities; and (5) Expected experimental uncertainties.

Descalle, M A; Dekin, W; Kenneally, J

2011-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

99

A compact neutron generator using a field ionization source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field ionization as a means to create ions for compact and rugged neutron sources is pursued. Arrays of carbon nano-#12;bers promise the high #12;eld-enhancement factors required for efficient field ionization. We report on the fabrication of arrays of #12;field emitters with a density up to 10{sup 6} tips/cm{sup 2} and measure their performance characteristics using electron field emission. The critical issue of uniformity is discussed, as are efforts towards coating the nano-fibers to enhance their lifetime and surface properties.

Persaud, Arun; Waldmann, Ole; Kapadia, Rehan; Takei, Kuniharu; Javey, Ali; Schenkel, Thomas

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

BEAM LOSS MITIGATION IN THE OAK RIDGE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator complex routinely delivers 1 MW of beam power to the spallation target. Due to this high beam power, understanding and minimizing the beam loss is an ongoing focus area of the accelerator physics program. In some areas of the accelerator facility the equipment parameters corresponding to the minimum loss are very different from the design parameters. In this presentation we will summarize the SNS beam loss measurements, the methods used to minimize the beam loss, and compare the design vs. the loss-minimized equipment parameters.

Plum, Michael A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "neutron source project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Shielding Design of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The shielding design is important for the construction of an intense high-energy accelerator facility like the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) due to its impact on conventional facility design, maintenance operations, and since the cost for the radiation shielding shares a considerable part of the total facility costs. A calculational strategy utilizing coupled high energy Monte Carlo calculations and multi-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations, along with semi-empirical calculations, was implemented to perform the conceptual design shielding assessment of the proposed SNS. Biological shields have been designed and assessed for the proton beam transport system and associated beam dumps, the target station, and the target service cell and general remote maintenance cell. Shielding requirements have been assessed with respect to weight, space, and dose-rate constraints for operating, shutdown, and accident conditions. A discussion of the proposed facility design, conceptual design shielding requirements, calculational strategy, source terms, preliminary results and conclusions, and recommendations for additional analyses are presented.

Johnson, J.O.

1998-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

102

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) conceptual design shielding analysis  

SciTech Connect

The shielding design is important for the construction of an intense high-energy accelerator facility like the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) due to its impact on conventional facility design, maintenance operations, and since the cost for the radiation shielding shares a considerable part of the total facility costs. A calculational strategy utilizing coupled high energy Monte Carlo calculations and multi-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations, along with semi-empirical calculations, was implemented to perform the conceptual design shielding assessment of the proposed SNS. Biological shields have been designed and assessed for the proton beam transport system and associated beam dumps, the target station, and the target service cell and general remote maintenance cell. Shielding requirements have been assessed with respect to weight, space, and dose-rate constraints for operating, shutdown, and accident conditions. A discussion of the proposed facility design, conceptual design shielding requirements calculational strategy, source terms, preliminary results and conclusions, and recommendations for additional analyses are presented.

Johnson, J.O.; Odano, N.; Lillie, R.A.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

EXPERIENCE WITH COLLABORATIVE DEVELOPMENT FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE FROM A PARTNER LAB PERSPECTIVE.  

SciTech Connect

Collaborative development and operation of large physics experiments is fairly common. Less common is the collaborative development or operation of accelerators. A current example of the latter is the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The SNS project was conceived as a collaborative effort between six DOE facilities. In the SNS case, the control system was also developed collaboratively. The SNS project has now moved beyond the collaborative development phase and into the phase where Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) is integrating contributions from collaborating ''partner labs'' and is beginning accelerator operations. In this paper, the author reflects on the benefits and drawbacks of the collaborative development of an accelerator control system as implemented for the SNS project from the perspective of a partner lab.

HOFF, L.T.

2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

104

Risk Management Plan Electron Beam Ion Source Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The estimated costs and contingencies to mitigate these risks are incorporated in the Project baseline costRisk Management Plan for the Electron Beam Ion Source Project (EBIS) Project # 06-SC-002 of Nuclear Physics (SC ­ 26) #12;1. Background and References 1.1 Background The EBIS Project will manage

Homes, Christopher C.

105

Demonstration of a solid deuterium source of ultra-cold neutrons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ultra-cold neutrons (UCN), neutrons with energies low enough to be confined by the Fermi potential in material bottles, are playing an increasing role in measurements of fundamental properties of the neutron. The ability to manipulate UCN with material guides and bottles, magnetic fields, and gravity can lead to experiments with lower systematic errors than have been obtained in experiments with cold neutron beams. The UCN densities provided by existing reactor sources limit these experiments. The promise of much higher densities from solid deuterium sources has led to proposed facilities coupled to both reactor and spallation neutron sources. In this paper we report on the performance of a prototype spallation neutron-driven solid deuterium source. This source produced bottled UCN densities of 145 +/-7 UCN/cm3, about three times greater than the largest bottled UCN densities previously reported. These results indicate that a production UCN source with substantially higher densities should be possible.

A. Saunders; J. M. Anaya; T. J. Bowles; B. W. Filippone; P. Geltenbort; R. E. Hill; M. Hino; S. Hoedl; G. E. Hogan; T. M. Ito; K. W. Jones; T. Kawai; K. Kirch; S. K. Lamoreaux; C. -Y. Liu; M. Makela; L. J. Marek; J. W. Martin; C. L. Morris; R. N. Mortensen; A. Pichlmaier; S. J. Seestrom; A. Serebrov; D. Smith; W. Teasdale; B. Tipton; R. B. Vogelaar; A. R. Young; J. Yuan

2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

106

Optimization of the target of an accelerator-driven neutron source through Monte Carlo numerical simulation of neutron and gamma transport by the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intense neutron beams for research on the structure and dynamics of materials in fields such as physics07-G00050D/gim SpallationNeutronSource SNS is an accelerator-based neutron source. This one-of-a-kind facility pro- vides the most intense pulsed neutron beams in the world. When ramped up to its full beam

Taskaev, Sergey Yur'evich

107

Light in the dark; the new German neutron source FRM-II for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Light in the dark; the new German neutron source FRM-II for science, medicine and industry. Winfried Petry, ZWE FRM-II ...

108

Conceptual design of a high-intensity positron source for the Advanced Neutron Source  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a planned new basic and applied research facility based on a powerful steady-state research reactor that provides neutrons for measurements and experiments in the fields of materials science and engineering, biology, chemistry, materials analysis, and nuclear science. The useful neutron flux will be at least five times more than is available in the world`s best existing reactor facility. Construction of the ANS provides a unique opportunity to build a positron spectroscopy facility (PSF) with very-high-intensity beams based on the radioactive decay of a positron-generating isotope. The estimated maximum beam current is 1000 to 5000 times higher than that available at the world`s best existing positron research facility. Such an improvement in beam capability, coupled with complementary detectors, will reduce experiment durations from months to less than one hour while simultaneously improving output resolution. This facility will remove the existing barriers to the routine use of positron-based analytical techniques and will be a giant step toward realization of the full potential of the application of positron spectroscopy to materials science. The ANS PSF is based on a batch cycle process using {sup 64}Cu isotope as the positron emitter and represents the status of the design at the end of last year. Recent work not included in this report, has led to a proposal for placing the laboratory space for the positron experiments outside the ANS containment; however, the design of the positron source is not changed by that relocation. Hydraulic and pneumatic flight tubes transport the source material between the reactor and the positron source where the beam is generated and conditioned. The beam is then transported through a beam pipe to one of several available detectors. The design presented here includes all systems necessary to support the positron source, but the beam pipe and detectors have not been addressed yet.

Hulett, L.D.; Eberle, C.C.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Plasma ignition schemes for the SNS radio-frequency driven H- source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project, EPAC 98,ignition schemes for the SNS radio-frequency driven H -the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a cesiated, radio-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Commissioning of the new high-intensity ultracold neutron source at the Paul Scherrer Institut  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commissioning of the new high-intensity ultracold neutron (UCN) source at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) has started in 2009. The design goal of this new generation high intensity UCN source is to surpass by a factor of ~100 the current ultracold neutron densities available for fundamental physics research, with the greatest thrust coming from the search for a neutron electric dipole moment. The PSI UCN source is based on neutron production via proton induced lead spallation, followed by neutron thermalization in heavy water and neutron cooling in a solid deuterium crystal to cold and ultracold energies. A successful beam test with up to 2 mA proton beam on the spallation target was conducted recently. Most source components are installed, others being finally mounted. The installation is on the track for the first cool-down and UCN production in 2010.

Bernhard Lauss

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

111

Spallation-Driven Cold Neutron Sources Dr. Bradley J. Micklich  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, et al. "Direct observation of fermion spin superposition by neutron interferometry," Physical ReviewNeutron Interferometry with Polarized Spin States Frank Rioux Department of Chemistry CSB|SJU The following paragraph appears in an encyclopedia entry on neutron optics.(1) A description of the original

McDonald, Kirk

112

Mechanical design considerations of a spherical torus volumetric neutron source  

SciTech Connect

The mechanical design of a spherical torus based volumetric neutron source (ST VNS) is being studied under the support of a DOE-SBIR funding. A device capable of staged operation from a neutron wall loading of 0.5-5.0 MW/m(2) has been scoped out, as the physics and engineering design assumptions are raised from modest to aggressive levels. Margins in the design are ensured since operation of the VNS will be adequate st a wall loading of 2 MW/m(2). The device has a naturally diverted plasma with major radius of 1.07 m, a minor radius of 0.77 m for an aspect ratio of 1.4, an elongation of 3 and triangularity of 0,6. In the neutral beam driven version, the plasma current is 11.1 MA and the toroidal field at the plasma major radius is 2.13 T, The baseline fusion power is 151 MW giving an average neutron wall loading of 2 MV/m(2) on the outboard side over an accessible area of over 15 m(2) for blanket testing. The device utilizes a normal Cu conducting bell jar as the return leg of the toroidal field current, a concept developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The current is carried by an unshielded single-turn center post (CP) made of dispersion strengthened Cu which is cooled by water in a single pass from top to bottom. A special sliding electrical interface between the CP and the bell jar is provided on the upper end to allow for differential expansion and to isolate the CP from tensile and torsional forces from the bell jar. The ohmic heating in the CP is 153 MW at the start of operation and increases to 178 MW after 3 full power years of operation. Over this period the maximum Cu temperature does not exceed 160 C. This report primarily deals with the design of the CP, one of the most challenging Issues of a low aspect ratio spherical torus. Maintenance approaches for the Or and the divertor assemblies have been determined and are addressed in the paper.

Sviatoslavky, I. N. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Use of the WNR spallation neutron source at LAMPF to determine the absolute efficiency of a neutron scintillation detector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prompt fission neutron spectrum measurements at the University of Massachusetts Lowell 5.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator laboratory require that the neutron detector efficiency be well known over a neutron energy range of 100 keV to 20 MeV. The efficiency of the detector, has been determined for energies greater than 5.0 MeV using the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) white neutron source at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) in a pulsed beam, time-of-flight (TOF) experiment. Carbon matched polyethylene and graphite scatterers were used to obtain a hydrogen spectrum. The detector efficiency was determined using the well known H(n,n) scattering cross section. Results are compared to the detector efficiency calculation program SCINFUL available from the Radiation Shielding Information Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Staples, P.A.; Egan, J.J.; Kegel, G.H.R.; Woodring, M.L.; DeSimone, D.J. [University of Massachusetts, Lowell, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Applied Physics; Lisowski, P.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Design and estimated performance of a new neutron guide system for the NCNR expansion project  

SciTech Connect

An integral part of the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) expansion project is the addition of five cold neutron guide tubes serving multiple experimental stations in an expanded guide hall. The guides have curved-straight arrangements in the horizontal plane, employing horizontally or vertically defocusing and focusing sections in some cases to improve transmission efficiency or for beam reshaping. The horizontally curved sections eliminate direct lines of sight between the source and the experimental stations, and the outer (concave) surfaces generally have higher critical angles than the inner (convex) surfaces. These features result in well-filtered cold neutron beams with no intensity losses at shorter wavelengths with respect to curved guides having the higher critical angle coatings on both surfaces. For all guides the critical angle of the outer coating of the curved section is selected to achieve a desirable characteristic wavelength, consistent with the instrument requirements. On guides where the scattering-plane beam divergence must be strictly limited, the inner radial coatings of the curved sections and the side coatings and lengths of the final straight sections are chosen to produce the desired beam divergence while the outer radial coating is selected so as to obtain a spatial-angular uniformity of the transmitted beam that is not achievable using a curved guide alone. The long-wavelength transmission of such guides tends to exceed that of equivalent straight guides using crystal filters.

Cook, J. C. [NIST Center for Neutron Research, 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 6103, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-6103 (United States)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

APSTNG: Associated particle sealed-tube neutron generator studies for arms control. Final report on NN-20 Project ST220  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory has performed research and development on the use of Associated Particle Sealed-Tube Neutron Generator (APSTNG) technology for treaty verification and non-proliferation applications, under funding from the DOE Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. Results indicate that this technology has significant potential for nondestructively detecting elemental compositions inside inspected objects or volumes. The final phase of this project was placement of an order for commercial procurement of an advanced sealed tube, with its high-voltage supply and control systems. Procurement specifications reflected lessons learned during the study. The APSTNG interrogates a volume with a continuous 14-MeV neutron flux. Each neutron is emitted coincident with an {open_quotes}associated{close_quotes} alpha-particle emitted in the opposite direction. Thus detection of an alpha-particle marks the emission of a neutron in a cone opposite to that defined by the alpha detector. Detection of a gamma ray coincident with the alpha indicates that the gamma was emitted from a neutron-induced reaction inside the neutron cone: the gamma spectra can be used to identify fissionable materials and many isotopes having an atomic number larger than that of boron. The differences in gamma-ray and alpha-particle detection times yield a coarse measurement of the distance along the cone axis from the APSTNG emitter to each region containing the identified nuclide. A position-sensitive alpha detector would permit construction of coarse three-dimensional images. The source and emission-detection systems can be located on the same side of the interrogated volume. The neutrons and gamma rays are highly penetrating. A relatively high signal-to-background ratio allows the use of a relatively small neutron source and conventional electronics.

Rhodes, E.; Dickerman, C.E.; Brunner, T.; Hess, A.; Tylinski, S.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Final Report US-Japan IEC Workshop on Small Plasma and Accelerator Neutron Sources  

SciTech Connect

Abstract The history of IEC development will be briefly described, and some speculation about future directions will be offered. The origin of IEC is due to the brilliance of Phil Farnsworth, inventor of electronic TV in the US. Early experiments were pioneered in the late 1960s by Robert Hirsch who later became head of the DOE fusion program. At that time studies of IEC physics quickly followed at the University of Illinois and at Penn State University. However, despite many successes in this early work, IEC research died as DOE funding stopped in the mid 1980s. In the early 90s, R. W. Bussard of EMC revived work with a new major project based on a magnetic assisted IEC. While doing supportive studies for that project, G. Miley proposed a grided STAR mode IEC as a neutron source for NAA. This concept was later used commercially by Daimler- Benz in Germany to analysis impurities in incoming ores. This represented a first practical application of the IEC. During this period other research groups at LANL, U of Wisconsin and Kyoto University entered IEC research with innovative new concepts and approaches to IEC physics and applications. Much of this work is documented in the present and in past US-Japan Workshops. At present we stand on the threshold of a new area of IEC applications as neutron source, for isotope production, and as a plasma source. These applications provide a way to continue IEC understanding and technology development with the ultimate goal being a fusion power plant. Indeed, a distinguishing feature of the IEC vs. other fusion confinement approaches is the unique opportunity for spin off applications along the way to a power producing plant.

Miley, George, H.

2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

117

rf improvements for Spallation Neutron Source H{sup -} ion source  

SciTech Connect

The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is ramping up the accelerated proton beam power to 1.4 MW and just reached 1 MW. The rf-driven multicusp ion source that originates from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been delivering {approx}38 mA H{sup -} beam in the linac at 60 Hz, 0.9 ms. To improve availability, a rf-driven external antenna multicusp ion source with a water-cooled ceramic aluminum nitride (AlN) plasma chamber is developed. Computer modeling and simulations have been made to analyze and optimize the rf performance of the new ion source. Operational statistics and test runs with up to 56 mA medium energy beam transport beam current identify the 2 MHz rf system as a limiting factor in the system availability and beam production. Plasma ignition system is under development by using a separate 13 MHz system. To improve the availability of the rf power system with easier maintenance, we tested a 70 kV isolation transformer for the 80 kW, 6% duty cycle 2 MHz amplifier to power the ion source from a grounded solid-state amplifier.

Kang, Y. W.; Fuja, R.; Hardek, T.; Lee, S.-W.; McCarthy, M. P.; Piller, M. C.; Shin, K.; Stockli, M. P.; Welton, R. F. [Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Goulding, R. H. [Fusion Energy Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Control system for the Spallation Neutron Source H{sup -} source test facility Allison scanner  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spallation Neutron Source is currently in progress of a multiyear plan to ramp ion beam power to the initial design power of 1.4 MW. Key to reaching this goal is understanding and improving the operation of the H{sup -} ion source. An Allison scanner was installed on the ion source in the test facility to support this improvement. This paper will discuss the hardware and the software control system of the installed Allison scanner. The hardware for the system consists of several parts. The heart of the system is the scanner head, complete with associated bias plates, slits, and signal detector. There are two analog controlled high voltage power supplies to bias the plates in the head, and a motor with associated controller to position the head in the beam. A multifunction data acquisition card reads the signals from the signal detector, as well as supplies the analog voltage control for the power supplies. To synchronize data acquisition with the source, the same timing signal that is used to trigger the source itself is used to trigger data acquisition. Finally, there is an industrial personal computer to control the rest of the hardware. Control software was developed using National Instruments LABVIEW, and consists of two parts: a data acquisition program to control the hardware and a stand alone application for offline user data analysis.

Long, C. D.; Stockli, M. P.; Gorlov, T. V.; Han, B.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R. [Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

H{sup -} radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent {approx}38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of {approx}90%. H{sup -} beam pulses ({approx}1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, {approx}60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of {approx}0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of {approx}99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of {approx}75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance/installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to {approx}100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

Welton, R. F.; Gawne, K. R.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Roseberry, R. T.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830-6471 (United States); Dudnikov, V. G. [Muons, Inc., 552 N. Batavia Avenue, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Turvey, M. W. [Villanova University, 800E. Lancaster Ave, Villanova, Pennsylvania 19085 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Californium-252: neutron source for industry and medicine  

SciTech Connect

From eleventh conference on radioisotopes; Tokyo, Japan (13 Nov 1973). The history, production, and availability of /sup 252/Cf and its many potential uses are discussed. Applications in life sciences, education chemical analysis, exploration for natural resources, industrial process control, neutron radiography, nondestructive inspection, and neutron flux enhancement are described. (TFD)

Reinig, W.C.; Permar, P.H.; Cornman, W.R.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "neutron source project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

BINP accelerator based epithermal neutron source V. Aleynik a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

medical physics to Homeland security. Summary: Neutrons are a powerful tool for the identificationImaging Technique for a Neutron Based Elemental Analysis Interrogation System D. S. Koltick* and I. S. Novikov Purdue University, Physics Department and Center for Sensing Science and Technology 525

Taskaev, Sergey Yur'evich

122

Feasibility studies of an accelerator for the intense pulsed neutron source (IPNS)  

SciTech Connect

A proton linac plus synchrotron system was studied for the proposed Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne. An Alvarez H$sup -$ linac of 70 MeV and a high intensity fast cycling proton synchrotron to accelerate protons to 800 MeV will be the best choice to give a flux of 10$sup 16$ thermal neutron/sec cm$sup 2$ at the surface of moderator with a spallation neutron target of W or $sup 238$U. (auth)

Khoe, T.K.; Kimura, M.

1974-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Powder diffraction in materials science using the KENS cold-neutron source  

SciTech Connect

Since superconductivity fever spread around the world, neutron powder diffraction has become very popular and been widely used by crystallographers, physicists, chemists, mineralogists, and materials scientists. The purpose of present paper is to show, firstly, important characteristics of time-of-flight TOF powder diffraction using cold-neutron source in the study of materials science, and, secondly, recent studies on the structure and function of batteries at the Neutron Science Laboratory (KENS) in the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK).

Kamiyama, T.; Oikawa, K. [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan). Inst. of Materials Science; Akiba, E. [National Inst. of Materials and Chemical Research, Tsukuba (Japan)] [and others

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

A laser-induced repetitive fast neutron source applied for gold activation analysis  

SciTech Connect

A laser-induced repetitively operated fast neutron source was developed for applications in laser-driven nuclear physics research. The developed neutron source, which has a neutron yield of approximately 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} n/pulse and can be operated up to a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, was applied for a gold activation analysis. Relatively strong delayed gamma spectra of the activated gold were measured at 333 keV and 355 keV, and proved the possibility of the neutron source for activation analyses. In addition, the nuclear reactions responsible for the measured gamma spectra of gold were elucidated by the 14 MeV fast neutrons resulting from the D(t,n)He{sup 4} nuclear reaction, for which the required tritium originated from the primary fusion reaction, D(d,p)T{sup 3}.

Lee, Sungman; Park, Sangsoon; Lee, Kitae; Cha, Hyungki [Quantum Optics Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Basics of Fusion-Fissison Research Facility (FFRF) as a Fusion Neutron Source  

SciTech Connect

FFRF, standing for the Fusion-Fission Research Facility represents an option for the next step project of ASIPP (Hefei, China) aiming to a first fusion-fission multifunctional device [1]. FFRF strongly relies on new, Lithium Wall Fusion plasma regimes, the development of which has already started in the US and China. With R/a=4/1m/m, Ipl=5 MA, Btor=4-6 T, PDT=50- 100 MW, Pfission=80-4000MW, 1 m thick blanket, FFRF has a unique fusion mission of a stationary fusion neutron source. Its pioneering mission of merging fusion and fission consists in accumulation of design, experimental, and operational data for future hybrid applications.

Leonid E. Zakharov

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

126

Supercool Neutrons (Ultracold Neutrons)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the USA. Why neutrons? Neutrons possess physical properties that make them valuable investigative tools Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) The world's most intense pulsed accelerator-based neutron source. High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) The highest flux reactor-based neutron source for condensed matter research

Martin, Jeff

127

Intense Pulsed Neutron Source progress report for 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The IPNS Progress Report 10th Anniversary Edition is being published in recognition of the first ten years of successful IPNS operation. To emphasize the significance of this milestone, we wanted this report to stand apart from the previous IPNS Progress Reports, and the best way to do this, we thought, was to make the design and organization of the report significantly different. In their articles, authors were asked to emphasize not only advances made since IPNS began operating but also the groundwork that was laid at its predecessor facilities - Argonne`s ZING-P and ZING-P` prototype pulsed neutron sources and CP-5 reactor. Each article stands as a separate chapter in the report, since each represents a particular instrument or class of instruments, system, technique, or area of research. In some cases, contributions were similar to review articles in scientific journals, complete with extensive lists of references. Ten-year cumulative lists of members of IPNS committees and of scientists who have visited or done experiments at IPNS were assembled. A list of published and ``in press`` articles in journals, books, and conference proceedings, resulting from work done at IPNS during the past ten years, was compiled. And archival photographs of people and activities during the ten-year history of IPNS were located and were used liberally throughout the report. The titles of the chapters in this report are: accelerator; computer; radiation effects; powder; stress; single crystal; superconductivity; amorphous; small angle; reflection; quasielastic; inelastic; inelastic magnetic; deep inelastic; user program; the future; and publications.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

128

Intense Pulsed Neutron Source progress report for 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The IPNS Progress Report 10th Anniversary Edition is being published in recognition of the first ten years of successful IPNS operation. To emphasize the significance of this milestone, we wanted this report to stand apart from the previous IPNS Progress Reports, and the best way to do this, we thought, was to make the design and organization of the report significantly different. In their articles, authors were asked to emphasize not only advances made since IPNS began operating but also the groundwork that was laid at its predecessor facilities - Argonne's ZING-P and ZING-P' prototype pulsed neutron sources and CP-5 reactor. Each article stands as a separate chapter in the report, since each represents a particular instrument or class of instruments, system, technique, or area of research. In some cases, contributions were similar to review articles in scientific journals, complete with extensive lists of references. Ten-year cumulative lists of members of IPNS committees and of scientists who have visited or done experiments at IPNS were assembled. A list of published and in press'' articles in journals, books, and conference proceedings, resulting from work done at IPNS during the past ten years, was compiled. And archival photographs of people and activities during the ten-year history of IPNS were located and were used liberally throughout the report. The titles of the chapters in this report are: accelerator; computer; radiation effects; powder; stress; single crystal; superconductivity; amorphous; small angle; reflection; quasielastic; inelastic; inelastic magnetic; deep inelastic; user program; the future; and publications.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Fabrication and characterization of the source grating for visibility improvement of neutron phase imaging with gratings  

SciTech Connect

The fabrication of gratings including metal deposition processes for highly neutron absorbing lines is a critical issue to achieve a good visibility of the grating-based phase imaging system. The source grating for a neutron Talbot-Lau interferometer is an array of Gadolinium (Gd) structures that are generally made by sputtering, photo-lithography, and chemical wet etching. However, it is very challenging to fabricate a Gd structure with sufficient neutron attenuation of approximately more than 20 {mu}m using a conventional metal deposition method because of the slow Gd deposition rate, film stress, high material cost, and so on. In this article, we fabricated the source gratings for neutron Talbot-Lau interferometers by filling the silicon structure with Gadox particles. The new fabrication method allowed us a very stable and efficient way to achieve a much higher Gadox filled structure than a Gd film structure, and is even more suitable for thermal polychromatic neutrons, which are more difficult to stop than cold neutrons. The newly fabricated source gratings were tested at the polychromatic thermal neutron grating interferometer system of HANARO at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, and the visibilities and images from the neutron phase imaging system with the new source gratings were compared with those fabricated by a Gd deposition method.

Kim, Jongyul [Neutron Science Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Nuclear and Quantum Engineering Department, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kye Hong; Lim, Chang Hwy; Kim, Taejoo [Neutron Science Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Chi Won [Nano Fusion Technology Division, National Nanofab Center, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Gyuseong [Nuclear and Quantum Engineering Department, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Wook [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Separation of beam and electrons in the spallation neutron source H{sup -} ion source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) requires an ion source producing an H{sup {minus}} beam with a peak current of 35mA at a 6.2 percent duty factor. For the design of this ion source, extracted electrons must be transported and dumped without adversely affecting the H{sup {minus}} beam optics. Two issues are considered: (1) electron containment transport and controlled removal; and (2) first-order H{sup {minus}} beam steering. For electron containment, various magnetic, geometric and electrode biasing configurations are analyzed. A kinetic description for the negative ions and electrons is employed with self-consistent fields obtained from a steady-state solution to Poisson`s equation. Guiding center electron trajectories are used when the gyroradius is sufficiently small. The magnetic fields used to control the transport of the electrons and the asymmetric sheath produced by the gyrating electrons steer the ion beam. Scenarios for correcting this steering by split acceleration and focusing electrodes will be considered in some detail.

Whealton, J.H.; Raridon, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Leung, K.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

RESULTS OF FIRST EXPERIMENTS ON NEUTRON GENERATION IN THE VITA NEUTRON SOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­2821/2000/62#9#/092005#6#/$15.00 ©2000 The American Physical Society 62 092005­1 #12; II. EXPERIMENT The measurement of the neutron and the single­neutron event is shown in the top panel of Fig. F. BOEHM et al. PHYSICAL REVIEW D 62 092005 092005 and # 2 are displayed. NEUTRON PRODUCTION BY COSMIC­RAY MUONS AT . . . PHYSICAL REVIEW D 62 092005 092005

Taskaev, Sergey Yur'evich

132

Designing and testing the neutron source deployment system and calibration plan for a dark matter detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we designed and tested a calibration and deployment system for the MiniCLEAN dark matter detector. The deployment system uses a computer controlled winch to lower a canister containing a neutron source into ...

Westerdale, Shawn (Shawn S.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Proceedings of the 10th meeting of the international collaboration on advanced neutron sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains papers from the 10th meeting of the International Collaboration on Advanced Neutron Sources. Two general types of workshops are discussed, instrument and target-station. Individual papers are indexed separately elsewhere. (LSP)

Hyer, D.K. (comp. and ed.)

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Report of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) safety workshop, Knoxville, Tennessee, October 25--26, 1988  

SciTech Connect

On October 25--26, 1988, about 60 people took part in an Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Safety Workshop, organized in cooperation with the Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) Office of the Department of Energy (DOE) and held in Knoxville, Tennessee. After a plenary session at which ANS Project staff presented status reports on the ANS design, research and development (R and D), and safety analysis efforts, the workshop broke into three working groups, each covering a different topic: Environmental and Waste Management, Applicable Regulatory Safety Criteria and Goals, and Reactor Concepts. Each group was asked to review the Project's approach to safety-related issues and to provide guidance on future reactor safety needs or directions for the Project. With the help of able chairmen, assisted by reporters and secretarial support, the working groups were extremely successful. Draft reports from each group were prepared before the workshop closed, and the major findings of each group were presented for review and discussion by the entire workshop attendance. This report contains the final version of the group reports, incorporating the results of the overall review by all the workshop participants.

Buchanan, J.R.; Dumont, J.N.; Kendrick, C.M.; Row, T.H.; Thompson, P.B.; West, C.D.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Muhlheim, M.D.; McBee, M.R. (comp.)

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Computational and Experimental Validation of a WGPu Neutron Leakage Source Using a Shielded PuBe (,n) Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron Measurements / Special Issue on the 11th International Conference on Radiation Shielding and the 15th Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division (Part 2) / Radiation Protection

Gabriel Ghita; Glenn Sjoden; James Baciak

136

10 years and 20,000 sources: the offsite source recovery project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's (GTRI) Offsite Source Recovery Project (OSRP) has been recovering excess and unwanted sealed sources for ten years. In January 2009, GTRI announced that the project had recovered 20,000 sealed radioactive sources. This project grew out of early efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to recover and disposition excess Plutonium-239 (Pu-239) sealed sources that were distributed in the 1960s and 1970s under the Atoms for Peace Program. Sealed source recovery was initially considered a waste management activity, as evidenced by its initial organization under the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Management (EM) program. After the terrorist attacks of 2001, however, the interagency community began to recognize the threat posed by excess and unwanted radiological material, particularly those that could not be disposed at the end of their useful life. After being transferred to the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to be part of GTRI, OSRP's mission was expanded to include not only material that would be classified as Greater-than-Class-C (GTCC) when it became waste, but also any other materials that might be a 'national security consideration.' This paper discusses OSRP's history, recovery operations, expansion to accept high-activity beta-gamma-emitting sealed sources and devices and foreign-possessed sources, and more recent efforts such as cooperative projects with the Council on Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD) and involvement in GTRI's Search and Secure project. Current challenges and future work will also be discussed.

Whitworth, Julia R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abeyta, Cristy L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pearson, Michael W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

The development of solid methane neutron moderators at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source facility of Argonne National Laboratory.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) started using solid methane moderators in 1985 because of their efficient conversion (about 3.5 times greater than was achieved with a liquid hydrogen moderator) of fast neutrons to long wavelength neutrons. However, the solid methane moderators experienced numerous failures due to pressure surges caused by a combination of (1) the release of stored energy, which occurred when methane radiolytic products recombined, and (2) the expansion of hydrogen, which built up in the solid methane during irradiation. During the ensuing years studies were made to determine how to operate the solid methane moderators without causing failure. The rate at which stored energy built up during irradiation and the temperature at which hydrogen was released during annealing were determined. Since 1993 IPNS has successfully operated the solid methane moderators (at about 30 K) by periodically annealing to the liquid state around 90 K after every roughly three days of irradiation.

Carpenter, J. M.; Miller, M. E.; Scott, T. L.

1999-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

138

Secondary Startup Neutron Sources as a Source of Tritium in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Reactor Coolant System (RCS)  

SciTech Connect

The hypothesis of this paper is that the Zircaloy clad fuel source is minimal and that secondary startup neutron sources are the significant contributors of the tritium in the RCS that was previously assigned to release from fuel. Currently there are large uncertainties in the attribution of tritium in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Reactor Coolant System (RCS). The measured amount of tritium in the coolant cannot be separated out empirically into its individual sources. Therefore, to quantify individual contributors, all sources of tritium in the RCS of a PWR must be understood theoretically and verified by the sum of the individual components equaling the measured values.

Shaver, Mark W.; Lanning, Donald D.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Operation Redwing. Project 2. 52. Neutron-induced soil radioactivity  

SciTech Connect

Soil samples were exposed to neutron radiation from Shot Cherokee to help establish the importance of neutron-induced residual gamma radiation. After exposure and recovery, the samples had no detectable activity because the slant range to the nearest sample was nearly 3.5 miles, due to an error in bomb drop. After this failure, an experiment was designed in the field for Shot Yuma in order that induced-activity data could be obtained for a soil other than Nevada Test Site soil. Samples of sodium, manganese, and coral sand from Site Sally were exposed above and below the surface at a slant range of 120 yards. The difference between the effects of pure fission and fission-fusion neutron spectra on induced activity in soil was not measured, since the soil samples on Shot Cehrokee were not activated. However, a method for predicting neutron-induced gamma-radiation intensities was tested for coral soil on Shot Yuma. Predicted values were within + or - 50% of induced dose rates inferred from field measurements.

Cowan, M.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Flowsheets and source terms for radioactive waste projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flowsheets and source terms used to generate radioactive waste projections in the Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program are given. Volumes of each waste type generated per unit product throughput have been determined for the following facilities: uranium mining, UF/sub 6/ conversion, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, boiling-water reactors (BWRs), pressurized-water reactors (PWRs), and fuel reprocessing. Source terms for DOE/defense wastes have been developed. Expected wastes from typical decommissioning operations for each facility type have been determined. All wastes are also characterized by isotopic composition at time of generation and by general chemical composition. 70 references, 21 figures, 53 tables.

Forsberg, C.W. (comp.)

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "neutron source project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA- booster subcritical assembly Part II : pulsed neutron source.  

SciTech Connect

One of the most reliable experimental methods for measuring the kinetic parameters of a subcritical assembly is the Sjoestrand method applied to the reaction rate generated from a pulsed neutron source. This study developed a new analytical methodology for characterizing the kinetic parameters of a subcritical assembly using the Sjoestrand method, which allows comparing the analytical and experimental time dependent reaction rates and the reactivity measurements. In this methodology, the reaction rate, detector response, is calculated due to a single neutron pulse using MCNP/MCNPX computer code or any other neutron transport code that explicitly simulates the fission delayed neutrons. The calculation simulates a single neutron pulse over a long time period until the delayed neutron contribution to the reaction is vanished. The obtained reaction rate is superimposed to itself, with respect to the time, to simulate the repeated pulse operation until the asymptotic level of the reaction rate, set by the delayed neutrons, is achieved. The superimposition of the pulse to itself was calculated by a simple C computer program. A parallel version of the C program is used due to the large amount of data being processed, e.g. by the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The new calculation methodology has shown an excellent agreement with the experimental results available from the YALINA-Booster facility of Belarus. The facility has been driven by a Deuterium-Deuterium or Deuterium-Tritium pulsed neutron source and the (n,p) reaction rate has been experimentally measured by a {sup 3}He detector. The MCNP calculation has utilized the weight window and delayed neutron biasing variance reduction techniques since the detector volume is small compared to the assembly volume. Finally, this methodology was used to calculate the IAEA benchmark of the YALINA-Booster experiment.

Talamo, A.; Gohar, M. Y. A.; Rabiti, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

142

Directory of financing sources for foreign energy projects  

SciTech Connect

The Office of National Security Policy has produced this Directory of Financing Sources for Foreign Energy Projects. The Directory reviews programs that offer financing from US government agencies, multilateral organizations, public, private, and quasi-private investment funds, and local commercial and state development banks. The main US government agencies covered are the US Agency for International Development (USAID), the Export-Import Bank of the US (EXIM Bank), Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC), US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, and the US Trade and Development Agency (TDA). Other US Government Sources includes market funds that have been in part capitalized using US government agency funds. Multilateral organizations include the World Bank, International Finance Corporation (IFC), Asian Development Bank (ADB), European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), and various organizations of the United Nations. The Directory lists available public, private, and quasi-private sources of financing in key emerging markets in the Newly Independent States and other developing countries of strategic interest to the US Department of Energy. The sources of financing listed in this directory should be considered indicative rather than inclusive of all potential sources of financing. Initial focus is on the Russian Federation, Ukraine, india, China, and Pakistan. Separate self-contained sections have been developed for each of the countries to enable the user to readily access market-specific information and to support country-specific Departmental initiatives. For each country, the directory is organized to follow the project life cycle--from prefeasibility, feasibility, project finance, cofinancing, and trade finance, through to technical assistance and training. Programs on investment and export insurance are excluded.

La Ferla, L. [La Ferla Associates, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

A time-of-flight backscattering spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source, BASIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the design and current performance of the backscattering silicon spectrometer (BASIS), a time-of-flight backscattering spectrometer built at the spallation neutron source (SNS) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). BASIS is the first silicon-based backscattering spectrometer installed at a spallation neutron source. In addition to high intensity, it offers a high-energy resolution of about 3.5 {mu}eV and a large and variable energy transfer range. These ensure an excellent overlap with the dynamic ranges accessible at other inelastic spectrometers at the SNS.

Mamontov, E.; Herwig, K. W. [Neutron Scattering Science Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Awareness, Preference, Utilization, and Messaging Research for the Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) offers the scientific community unique access to two types of world-class neutron sources at a single site - the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The 85-MW HFIR provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world, and the SNS is one of the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams. Management of these two resources is the responsibility of the Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD). NScD commissioned this survey research to develop baseline information regarding awareness of and perceptions about neutron science. Specific areas of investigative interest include the following: (1) awareness levels among those in the scientific community about the two neutron sources that ORNL offers; (2) the level of understanding members of various scientific communities have regarding benefits that neutron scattering techniques offer; and (3) any perceptions that negatively impact utilization of the facilities. NScD leadership identified users of two light sources in North America - the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory - as key publics. Given the type of research in which these scientists engage, they would quite likely benefit from including the neutron techniques available at SNS and HFIR among their scientific investigation tools. The objective of the survey of users of APS, NSLS, SNS, and HFIR was to explore awareness of and perceptions regarding SNS and HFIR among those in selected scientific communities. Perceptions of SNS and FHIR will provide a foundation for strategic communication plan development and for developing key educational messages. The survey was conducted in two phases. The first phase included qualitative methods of (1) key stakeholder meetings; (2) online interviews with user administrators of APS and NSLS; and (3) one-on-one interviews and traditional and online focus groups with scientists. The latter include SNS, HFIR, and APS users as well as scientists at ORNL, some of whom had not yet used HFIR and/or SNS. These approaches informed development of the second phase, a quantitative online survey. The survey consisted of 16 questions and 7 demographic categorizations, 9 open-ended queries, and 153 pre-coded variables and took an average time of 18 minutes to complete. The survey was sent to 589 SNS/HFIR users, 1,819 NSLS users, and 2,587 APS users. A total of 899 individuals provided responses for this study: 240 from NSLS; 136 from SNS/HFIR; and 523 from APS. The overall response rate was 18%.

Bryant, Rebecca [Bryant Research, LLC; Kszos, Lynn A [ORNL

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Note: A portable pulsed neutron source based on the smallest sealed-type plasma focus device  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development and operation of a portable and compact pulsed neutron source based on sealed-type plasma focus (PF) device are reported. The unit is the smallest sealed-type neutron producing PF device. The effective volume of the PF unit is 33 cm{sup 3} only. A compact size single capacitor (4 {mu}F) is used as the energy driver. A battery based power supply unit is used for charging the capacitor and triggering the spark gap. The PF unit is operated at 10 kV (200 J) and at a deuterium gas filling pressure of 8 mb. The device is operated over a time span of 200 days and the neutron emissions have been observed for 200 shots without changing the gas in between the shots. The maximum yield of this device is 7.8 x 10{sup 4} neutrons/pulse. Beyond 200 shots the yield is below the threshold (1050 neutrons/pulse) of our {sup 3}He detector. The neutron energy is evaluated using time of flight technique and the value is (2.49 {+-} 0.27) MeV. The measured neutron pulse width is (24 {+-} 5) ns. Multishot and long duration operations envisage the potentiality of such portable device for repetitive mode of operation.

Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R. K.; Srivastava, Rohit; Rawool, A. M.; Kaushik, T. C.; Gupta, Satish C. [Applied Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Mishra, Prabhat [Materials Processing Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

Neutron imaging with coded sources: new challenges and the implementation of a simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The limitations in neutron flux and resolution (L/D) of current neutron imaging systems can be addressed with a Coded Source Imaging system with magnification (xCSI). More precisely, the multiple sources in an xCSI system can exceed the flux of a single pinhole system for several orders of magnitude, while maintaining a higher L/D with the small sources. Moreover, designing for an xCSI system reduces noise from neutron scattering, because the object is placed away from the detector to achieve magnification. However, xCSI systems are adversely affected by correlated noise such as non-uniform illumination of the neutron source, incorrect sampling of the coded radiograph, misalignment of the coded masks, mask transparency, and the imperfection of the system Point Spread Function (PSF). We argue that a model-based reconstruction algorithm can overcome these problems and describe the implementation of a Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique algorithm for coded sources. Design pitfalls that preclude a satisfactory reconstruction are documented.

Santos-Villalobos, Hector J [ORNL; Bingham, Philip R [ORNL; Gregor, Jens [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Energy spectra of the pneumatically positioned neutron sources at LLNL's Hazards control standards and calibration facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hazards Control Department of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory maintains a Standards and Calibration Laboratory that includes three neutron sources (two /sup 252/Cf and one /sup 238/PuBe that can be positioned pneumatically for irradiations. Ten moderators exist to modify the neutron energy spectra produced by these sources. The thicknesses and materials of these moderators are: 25-cm water; 5-, 10-, 15-, and 25-cm heavy water; 20-cm aluminum; and 2-, 5-, 10-, and 15-cm polyethylene. We used a multisphere spectrometer to measure the neutron spectra at 2 m from both the PuBe source and the smaller Cf source, with the sources bare, and in all of the moderators. These data were reduced in 25 energy groups ranging from 0.25 eV to 16 MeV. Except for the 15-m polyethylene moderator, we also made measurements using a liquid-scintillator fast-neutron spectrometer. These data were reduced in 0.1-MeV increments from 0.5 to 12.5 MeV. Spectra from the measurements and from independent calculations are presented in tabular and graphic form. Dosimetric values, calculated from both the measured and calculated spectra, are also presented.

Thorngate, J.H.

1987-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

A dual neutron/gamma source for the Fissmat Inspection for Nuclear Detection (FIND) system.  

SciTech Connect

Shielded special nuclear material (SNM) is very difficult to detect and new technologies are needed to clear alarms and verify the presence of SNM. High-energy photons and neutrons can be used to actively interrogate for heavily shielded SNM, such as highly enriched uranium (HEU), since neutrons can penetrate gamma-ray shielding and gamma-rays can penetrate neutron shielding. Both source particles then induce unique detectable signals from fission. In this LDRD, we explored a new type of interrogation source that uses low-energy proton- or deuteron-induced nuclear reactions to generate high fluxes of mono-energetic gammas or neutrons. Accelerator-based experiments, computational studies, and prototype source tests were performed to obtain a better understanding of (1) the flux requirements, (2) fission-induced signals, background, and interferences, and (3) operational performance of the source. The results of this research led to the development and testing of an axial-type gamma tube source and the design/construction of a high power coaxial-type gamma generator based on the {sup 11}B(p,{gamma}){sup 12}C nuclear reaction.

Doyle, Barney Lee (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); King, Michael; Rossi, Paolo (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); McDaniel, Floyd Del (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Morse, Daniel Henry; Antolak, Arlyn J.; Provencio, Paula Polyak (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Raber, Thomas N.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Final Technical Report for the Neutron Detection without Helium-3 Project  

SciTech Connect

This report details the results of the research and development work accomplished for the Neutron Detection without Helium-3 project conducted during the 2011-2013 fiscal years. The primary focus of the project was to investigate commercially available technologies that might be used in safeguards applications in the relatively near term. Other technologies that are being developed may be more applicable in the future, but were outside the scope of this study.

Ely, James H.; Bliss, Mary; Kouzes, Richard T.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Robinson, Sean M.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Modeling and Simulation Optimization and Feasibility Studies for the Neutron Detection without Helium-3 Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details the results of the modeling and simulation work accomplished for the Neutron Detection without Helium-3 project during the 2011 and 2012 fiscal years. The primary focus of the project is to investigate commercially available technologies that might be used in safeguards applications in the relatively near term. Other technologies that are being developed may be more applicable in the future, but are outside the scope of this study.

Ely, James H.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Lintereur, Azaree T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Status of Cryogenic System for Spallation Neutron Source's Superconducting Radiofrequency Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Lab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) is building an independent cryogenic system for its Superconducting Radiofrequency Test Facility (SRFTF). The scope of the system is to support the SNS cryomodule test and cavity test at 2-K (using vacuum pump) and 4.5K for the maintenance purpose and Power Upgrade Project of SNS, and to provide the part of the cooling power needed to backup the current CHL to keep Linac at 4.5-K during CHL maintenance period in the future. The system is constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is to construct an independent 4K helium refrigeration system with helium Dewar and distribution box as load interface. It is schedule to be commissioned in 2013. Here we report the concept design of the system and the status of the first phase of this project.

Xu, Ting [ORNL; Casagrande, Fabio [ORNL; Ganni, Venkatarao [ORNL; Knudsen, Peter N [ORNL; Strong, William Herb [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Can Handheld Plastic Detectors Do Both Gamma and Neutron Isotopic Identification with Directional Source Location?  

SciTech Connect

This paper demonstrates, through MCNPX simulations, that a compact hexagonal array of detectors can be utilized to do both gamma isotopic identification (ID) along with neutron identification while simultaneously finding the direction of the source relative to the detector array. The detector array itself is composed of seven borated polyvinyl toluene (PVT) hexagonal light pipes approximately 4 inches long and with a 1.25 inch face-to-face thickness assembled in a tight configuration. The gamma ID capability is realized through judicious windowing algorithms as is the neutron spectral unfolding. By having multiple detectors in different relative positions, directional determination of the source can be realized. By further adding multiplicity counters to the neutron counts, fission events can be measured.

Robert Hayes

2008-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

153

An Ultracold Neutron Source for TRIUMF 4th Draft #  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

location is the availability of hot cells with which to handle safely parts of the UCN source. Additionally handling hot cells for servicing. . existing 50 T crane is available in the area for shielding blocks, target cooling, and remote handling are based predominantly on our experience from the LANL SD 2 UCN

Martin, Jeff

154

Neutrons  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering Oak Ridge 10-24 August 2013 John M. Carpenter ANL, ORNLSNS 18 August 2013 2 Neutron Detection How does one detect a neutron? - It is...

155

GDT-based neutron source with multiple-mirror end plugs  

SciTech Connect

We present a new linear trap to be built at the Budker Institute. It combines gasdynamictype central cell with sloshing ions for beam fusion and the multiple-mirror end plugs for improved axial confinement. Thus it is designed as an efficient neutron source and a testbed for future development of mirror-based fusion reactors.

Beklemishev, A.; Anikeev, A.; Burdakov, A.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, I.; Postupaev, V.; Sinitsky, S. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

156

Coherent Scattering Investigations at the Spallation Neutron Source: a Snowmass White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, provides an intense flux of neutrinos in the few tens-of-MeV range, with a sharply-pulsed timing structure that is beneficial for background rejection. In this white paper, we describe how the SNS source can be used for a measurement of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CENNS), and the physics reach of different phases of such an experimental program (CSI: Coherent Scattering Investigations at the SNS).

D. Akimov; A. Bernstein; P. Barbeau; P. Barton; A. Bolozdynya; B. Cabrera-Palmer; F. Cavanna; V. Cianciolo; J. Collar; R. J. Cooper; D. Dean; Y. Efremenko; A. Etenko; N. Fields; M. Foxe; E. Figueroa-Feliciano; N. Fomin; F. Gallmeier; I. Garishvili; M. Gerling; M. Green; G. Greene; A. Hatzikoutelis; R. Henning; R. Hix; D. Hogan; D. Hornback; I. Jovanovic; T. Hossbach; E. Iverson; S. R. Klein; A. Khromov; J. Link; W. Louis; W. Lu; C. Mauger; P. Marleau; D. Markoff; R. D. Martin; P. Mueller; J. Newby; J. Orrell; C. O'Shaughnessy; S. Pentilla; K. Patton; A. W. Poon; D. Radford; D. Reyna; H. Ray; K. Scholberg; V. Sosnovtsev; R. Tayloe; K. Vetter; C. Virtue; J. Wilkerson; J. Yoo; C. H. Yu

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) cold source project at ORNL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Following the decision to cancel the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), it was determined that a hydrogen cold source should be retrofitted into an existing beam tube of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at ORNL> The preliminary design of this system has been completed and an approval in principal of the design has been obtained from the internal ORNL safety review committees and the US Department of Energy (DOE) safety review committee. The cold source concept is basically a closed loop forced flow supercritical hydrogen system. The supercritical approach was chosen because of its enhanced stability in the proposed high heat flux regions. Neutron and gamma physics of the moderator have been analyzed using the 3D Monte Carlo code MCNP. A 3D structural analysis model of the moderator vessel, vacuum tube, and beam tube was completed to evaluate stress loadings and to examine the impact of hydrogen detonations in the beam tube. A detailed ATHENA system model of the hydrogen system has been developed to simulate loop performance under normal and off-normal transient conditions. Semi-prototypic hydrogen loop tests of the system have been performed at the Arnold Engineering Design Center (AEDC) located in Tullahoma, Tennessee to verify the design and benchmark the analytical system model. A 3.5 kW refrigerator system has been ordered and is expected to be delivered to ORNL by the end of this calendar year. The present schedule shows the assembling of the cold source loop on side during the fall of 1999 for final testing before insertion of the moderator plug assembly into the reactor beam tube during the end of the year 2000.

Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Chang, S.J.; Freels, J.D.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

High-flux neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target  

SciTech Connect

A prototype compact Liquid Lithium Target (LiLiT), able to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source, was built. The neutron source is intended for nuclear astrophysical research, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in hospitals and material studies for fusion reactors. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear research Center (SNRC). The lithium target will produce neutrons through the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated by a high-intensity proton beam, necessary for intense neutron flux for the above applications. The liquid-lithium loop of LiLiT is designed to generate a stable lithium jet at high velocity on a concave supporting wall with free surface toward the incident proton beam (up to 10 kW). During off-line tests, liquid lithium was flown through the loop and generated a stable jet at velocity higher than 5 m/s on the concave supporting wall. The target is now under extensive test program using a high-power electron-gun. Up to 2 kW electron beam was applied on the lithium flow at velocity of 4 m/s without any flow instabilities or excessive evaporation. High-intensity proton beam irradiation will take place at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator currently in commissioning at SNRC.

Halfon, S. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel) and Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Feinberg, G. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel) and Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Paul, M. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Arenshtam, A.; Berkovits, D.; Kijel, D.; Nagler, A.; Eliyahu, I.; Silverman, I. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

159

The Nanoscale Ordered MAterials Diffractometer NOMAD at the Spallation Neutron Source SNS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nanoscale Ordered Materials Diffractometer (NOMAD) is neutron time-of-flight diffractometer designed to determine pair dist ribution functions of a wide range of materials ranging from short range ordered liquids to long range ordered crystals. Due to a large neutron flux provided by the Spallation Neutron Source SNS and a large detector coverage neutron count-rates exceed comparable instruments by one to two orders of magnitude. This is achieved while maintaining a relatively high momentum transfer resolution of a $\\delta Q/Q \\sim 0.8\\%$ FWHM (typical), and an achievable $\\delta Q/Q$ of 0.24\\% FWHM (best). The real space resolution is related to the maximum momentum transfer; A maximum momentum transfer of 50\\AA$^{-1}$ can be achieved routinely and the maximum momentum transfer given by the detector configuration and the incident neutron spectrum is 125 \\AA$^{-1}$. High stability of the source and the detector allow small contrast isotope experiments to be performed. A detailed description of the instrument is given and the results of experiments with standard samples are discussed.

Feygenson, Mikhail [ORNL; Carruth, John William [ORNL; Hoffmann, Ron [ORNL; Chipley, Kenneth King [ORNL; Neuefeind, Joerg C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Subcritical measurements using the /sup 252/Cf source-driven neutron noise analysis method  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes recent measurements of the subcritical neutron multiplication factor using the /sup 252/Cf source-driven neutron noise analysis method. This work was supported by a program of collaboration between the United States Department of Energy and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan related to the development of fast breeder technology. The experiment reported consists of a configuration of two interacting tanks of uranyl nitrate aqueous solution with different uranium concentrations in each tank. The /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method obtains the subcriticality from the signals of three detectors: the first, a parallel plate ionization chamber with /sup 252/Cf electroplated on one of its plates that is located in or near the system containing the fissile material, and produces an electrical pulse for every spontaneous fission that occurs and thereby serves as a timed source of fission neutrons; and the second and third detectors that are placed in or near the system containing fissile material and serve to detect particles from the fission chain multiplication process. 9 refs.

Mihalczo, J.T.; Blakeman, E.D.; Ragan, G.E.; Kryter, R.C.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Phase 1 environmental report for the Advanced Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed the construction and operation of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), a 330-MW(f) reactor, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to support neutron scattering and nuclear physics experiments. ANS would provide a steady-state source of neutrons that are thermalized to produce sources of hot, cold, and very coal neutrons. The use of these neutrons in ANS experiment facilities would be an essential component of national research efforts in basic materials science. Additionally, ANS capabilities would include production of transplutonium isotopes, irradiation of potential fusion and fission reactor materials, activation analysis, and production of medical and industrial isotopes such as {sup 252}Cf. Although ANS would not require licensing by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), DOE regards the design, construction, and operation of ANS as activities that would produce a licensable facility; that is, DOE is following the regulatory guidelines that NRC would apply if NRC were licensing the facility. Those guidelines include instructions for the preparation of an environmental report (ER), a compilation of available data and preliminary analyses regarding the environmental impacts of nuclear facility construction and operation. The ER, described and outlined in NRC Regulatory Guide 4.2, serves as a background document to facilitate the preparation of environmental impact statements (EISs). Using Regulatory Guide 4.2 as a model, this ANS ER provides analyses and information specific to the ANS site and area that can be adopted (and modified, if necessary) for the ANS EIS. The ER is being prepared in two phases. Phase 1 ER includes many of the data and analyses needed to prepare the EIS but does not include data or analyses of alternate sites or alternate technologies. Phase 2 ER will include the additional data and analyses stipulated by Regulatory Guide 4.2.

Blasing, T.J.; Brown, R.A.; Cada, G.F.; Easterly, C.; Feldman, D.L.; Hagan, C.W.; Harrington, R.M.; Johnson, R.O.; Ketelle, R.H.; Kroodsma, R.L.; McCold, L.N.; Reich, W.J.; Scofield, P.A.; Socolof, M.L.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Van Dyke, J.W.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

ICANS-XIV. The fourteenth meeting of the international collaboration on advanced neutron sources.  

SciTech Connect

The meeting began with a reception on Sunday evening. Monday's plenary sessions included status reports on the four operating spallation neutron sources, IPNS, ISIS, KENS, and the Lujan Center; on the INR source under construction at Troitsk; on the IBR-2 pulsed reactor at Dubna; and on proposals for five new installations. We also heard reports on spin-off activities: the ASTE tests (liquid mercury target tests at the AGS accelerator at Brookhaven), the ACoM activities (developments aimed to provide cold moderators suitable for high-power pulsed sources), and the International Workshop on Cold Moderators for Pulsed Neutron Sources, held in September 1997 at Argonne. Jose Alonso and Bob Macek delivered enlightening invited talks overviewing linear accelerators and rings for spallation neutron sources. The rest of the meeting was devoted to targets and moderators and to instrumentation in a normal rotation of ICANS topics. There were altogether 84 oral reports and 23 poster presentations. On Tuesday and on Wednesday morning, we divided into separate series of sessions on Instrumentation and on Targets and Moderators. In the first, we had reports and discussions on instrumentation and techniques, on computer software, on instrument suites, and on new instruments and equipment. In the second series were sessions on liquid target systems, on solid target systems, on neutron production and target physics, on moderator physics and performance, and on target and moderator neutronics. The Tuesday evening meetings went on until 10:00, making for a 14-hour working day. That everyone willingly endured the long hours is a credit to the dedication of the attendees. On Wednesday afternoon, we boarded buses for the 1-hour trip to Argonne, where attendees toured IPNS and the Advanced Photon Source. Returning to Starved Rock, we enjoyed boat rides on the Illinois River and then a barbecue banquet dinner at the Lodge. All day Thursday and Friday morning, the attendees, in small working groups, discussed next-generation powder diffractometers, critical heat flux limitations on solid targets, monte carlo instrument simulation, prospects for high- and low-energy spectroscopy, small angle scattering and reflectometry, and the roles of solid and liquid targets in high-power pulsed spallation sources. Representatives of the laboratories participating in ICANS met Thursday evening to discuss the outcome of ICANS XIV and to decide whether, where, and when the next meeting would take place. They agreed to meet again in about 2 years in Japan. After the lunch break on Friday, the working group chairs presented the findings of their groups to the participants in a final plenary session, and the meeting adjourned with good feelings of accomplishment.

Carpenter, J. M., ed.; Tobin, C. A., ed.

1999-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

163

Performance of the solid deuterium ultra-cold neutron source at the pulsed reactor TRIGA Mainz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of the solid deuterium ultra-cold neutron source at the pulsed reactor TRIGA Mainz with a maximum peak energy of 10 MJ is described. The solid deuterium converter with a volume of V=160 cm3 (8 mol), which is exposed to a thermal neutron fluence of 4.5x10^13 n/cm2, delivers up to 550 000 UCN per pulse outside of the biological shield at the experimental area. UCN densities of ~ 10/cm3 are obtained in stainless steel bottles of V ~ 10 L resulting in a storage efficiency of ~20%. The measured UCN yields compare well with the predictions from a Monte Carlo simulation developed to model the source and to optimize its performance for the upcoming upgrade of the TRIGA Mainz into a user facility for UCN physics.

J. Karch; Yu. Sobolev; M. Beck; K. Eberhardt; G. Hampel; W. Heil; R. Kieser; T. Reich; N. Trautmann; M. Ziegner

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

164

A Permanent-Magnet Microwave Ion Source for a Compact High-Yield Neutron Generator  

SciTech Connect

We present recent work on the development of a microwave ion source that will be used in a high-yield compact neutron generator for active interrogation applications. The sealed tube generator will be capable of producing high neutron yields, 5x1011 n/s for D-T and ~;;1x1010 n/s for D-D reactions, while remaining transportable. We constructed a microwave ion source (2.45 GHz) with permanent magnets to provide the magnetic field strength of 87.5 mT necessary for satisfying the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) condition. Microwave ion sources can produce high extracted beam currents at the low gas pressures required for sealed tube operation and at lower power levels than previously used RF-driven ion sources. A 100 mA deuterium/tritium beam will be extracted through a large slit (60x6 mm2) to spread the beam power over a larger target area. This paper describes the design of the permanent-magnet microwave ion source and discusses the impact of the magnetic field design on the source performance. The required equivalent proton beam current density of 40 mA/cm2 was extracted at a moderate microwave power of 400 W with an optimized magnetic field.

Waldmann, Ole; Ludewigt, Bernhard

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

165

Black hole neutron star coalescence as a source of gamma-ray bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of hydrodynamic (SPH) simulations showing the coalescence of a black hole with a neutron star to be a promising theoretical source of short duration gamma-ray bursts. The favorable features of the process include rapid onset, millisecond variability, a duration much longer than the dynamical timescale, and a range of outcomes sufficient to allow variety in the properties of individual gamma-ray bursts. Interestingly, the process of coalescence differs rather markedly from past predictions.

W. H. Lee; W. Kluzniak

1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

166

ACHIEVING THE REQUIRED COOLANT FLOW DISTRIBUTION FOR THE ACCELERATOR PRODUCTION OF TRITIUM (APT) TUNGSTEN NEUTRON SOURCE  

SciTech Connect

The Accelerator Production of Tritium neutron source consists of clad tungsten targets, which are concentric cylinders with a center rod. These targets are arranged in a matrix of tubes, producing a large number of parallel coolant paths. The coolant flow required to meet thermal-hydraulic design criteria varies with location. This paper describes the work performed to ensure an adequate coolant flow for each target for normal operation and residual heat-removal conditions.

D. SIEBE; K. PASAMEHMETOGLU

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

RESULTS OF BACKGROUND SUBTRACTION TECHNIQUES ON THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE BEAM LOSS MONITORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent improvements to the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) beam loss monitor (BLM) designs have been made with the goal of significantly reducing background noise. This paper outlines this effort and analyzes the results. The significance of this noise reduction is the ability to use the BLM sensors [1], [2], [3] distributed throughout the SNS accelerator as a method to monitor activation of components as well as monitor beam losses.

Pogge, James R [ORNL; Zhukov, Alexander P [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Neutron Energy Spectrum of a Po-Be (alpha,n) Source  

SciTech Connect

The newtron energy spectrum of a Po-Be (alpha, n) source was measured as part of an intercomparison of newtron energy spectral measurements sponsored by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Intensity maxima for neutron energies > 1 MeV were seen at or near 1.4, 2.1, 3.1, 5.0, 6.7, 7.7 and 9.7 MeV.

Anderson, M. E.

1972-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

169

Opportunities for Neutrino Physics at the Spallation Neutron Source: A White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, provides an intense flux of neutrinos in the few tens-of-MeV range, with a sharply-pulsed timing structure that is beneficial for background rejection. In this document, the product of a workshop at the SNS in May 2012, we describe this free, high-quality stopped-pion neutrino source and outline various physics that could be done using it. We describe without prioritization some specific experimental configurations that could address these physics topics.

A. Bolozdynya; F. Cavanna; Y. Efremenko; G. T. Garvey; V. Gudkov; A. Hatzikoutelis; W. R. Hix; W. C. Louis; J. M. Link; D. M. Markoff; G. B. Mills; K. Patton; H. Ray; K. Scholberg; R. G. Van de Water; C. Virtue; D. H. White; S. Yen; J. Yoo

2012-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

170

Containment performance analyses for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses salient aspects of methodology, assumptions, and modeling of various features related to estimation of source terms from two conservatively scoped severe accident scenarios in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Various containment configurations are considered for steaming-pool-type accidents and an accident involving molten core-concrete interaction. Several design features (such as rupture disks) are examined to study containment response during postulated severe accidents. Also, thermal-hydraulic response of the containment and radionuclide transport and retention in the containment are studied. The results are described as transient variations of source terms for each scenario, which are to be used for studying off-site radiological consequences and health effects for these postulated severe accidents. Also highlighted will be a comparison of source terms estimated by two different versions of the MELCOR code.

Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Intense Pulsed Neutron Source: Progress report 1991--1996. 15. Anniversary edition -- Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

The 15th Anniversary Edition of the IPNS Progress Report is being published in recognition of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source`s first 15 years of successful operation as a user facility. To emphasize the importance of this milestone, the author shave made the design and organization of the report significantly different from previous IPNS Progress Reports. This report consists of two volumes. For Volume 1, authors were asked to prepare articles that highlighted recent scientific accomplishments at IPNS, from 1991 to present; to focus on and illustrate the scientific advances achieved through the unique capabilities of neutron studies performed by IPNS users; to report on specific activities or results from an instrument; or to focus on a body of work encompassing different neutron-scattering techniques. Articles were also included on the accelerator system, instrumentation, computing, target, and moderators. A list of published and ``in press` articles in journals, books, and conference proceedings, resulting from work done at IPNS since 1991, was compiled. This list is arranged alphabetically according to first author. Publication references in the articles are listed by last name of first author and year of publication. The IPNS experimental reports received since 1991 are compiled in Volume 2. Experimental reports referenced in the articles are listed by last name of first author, instrument designation, and experiment number.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Intense Pulsed Neutron Source: Progress report 1991--1996. 15. Anniversary edition -- Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 15th Anniversary Edition of the IPNS Progress Report is being published in recognition of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source`s first 15 years of successful operation as a user facility. To emphasize the importance of this milestone, the authors have made the design and organization of the report significantly different from previous IPNS Progress Reports. This report consists of two volumes. For Volume 1, authors were asked to prepare articles that highlighted recent scientific accomplishments at IPNS, from 1991 to present; to focus on and illustrate the scientific advances achieved through the unique capabilities of neutron studies performed by IPNS users; to report on specific activities or results from an instrument; or to focus on a body of work encompassing different neutron-scattering techniques. Articles were also included on the accelerator system, instrumentation, computing, target, and moderators. A list of published and ``in press` articles in journals, books, and conference proceedings, resulting from work done at IPNS since 1991, was compiled. This list is arranged alphabetically according to first author. Publication references in the articles are listed by last name of first author and year of publication. The IPNS experimental reports received since 1991 are compiled in Volume 2. Experimental reports referenced in the articles are listed by last name of first author, instrument designation, and experiment number.

Marzec, B. [ed.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

A graphite-moderated pulsed spallation ultra-cold neutron source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposals exist and efforts are under way to construct pulsed spallation ultra-cold neutron (UCN) sources at accelerator laboratories around the world. At the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Switzerland, and at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), U.S.A., it is planned to use solid deuterium (SD_2) for the UCN production from cold neutrons. The philosophies about how the cold neutrons are obtained are quite different, though. The present proposal describes a third approach which applies a temperature optimized graphite moderator in combination with the SD_2 and qualitatively combines advantages of the different schemes. The scheme described here allows to build a powerful UCN source. Assuming a pulsed 2 mA, 590 MeV proton beam with an average current of 10 microA, one obtains UCN densities in excess of 2000 cm^{-3}, UCN fluxes of about 10^6 cm^{-2} s^{-1}, and total numbers of UCN in excess of 2*10^9 every 800 s.

Klaus Kirch

2001-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

174

Shielding analysis and design of the KIPT experimental neutron source facility of Ukraine.  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of an experimental neutron source facility based on the use of an electron accelerator driven subcritical (ADS) facility [1]. The facility uses the existing electron accelerators of KIPT in Ukraine. The neutron source of the sub-critical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100 KW electron beam with a natural uranium target. The electron beam has a uniform spatial distribution and the electron energy in the range of 100 to 200 MeV, [2]. The main functions of the facility are the production of medical isotopes and the support of the Ukraine nuclear power industry. Reactor physics experiments and material performance characterization will also be carried out. The subcritical assembly is driven by neutrons generated by the electron beam interactions with the target material. A fraction of these neutrons has an energy above 50 MeV generated through the photo nuclear interactions. This neutron fraction is very small and it has an insignificant contribution to the subcritical assembly performance. However, these high energy neutrons are difficult to shield and they can be slowed down only through the inelastic scattering with heavy isotopes. Therefore the shielding design of this facility is more challenging relative to fission reactors. To attenuate these high energy neutrons, heavy metals (tungsten, iron, etc.) should be used. To reduce the construction cost, heavy concrete with 4.8 g/cm{sup 3} density is selected as a shielding material. The iron weight fraction in this concrete is about 0.6. The shape and thickness of the heavy concrete shield are defined to reduce the biological dose equivalent outside the shield to an acceptable level during operation. At the same time, special attention was give to reduce the total shield mass to reduce the construction cost. The shield design is configured to maintain the biological dose equivalent during operation {le} 0.5 mrem/h inside the subcritical hall, which is five times less than the allowable dose for working forty hours per week for 50 weeks per year. This study analyzed and designed the thickness and the shape of the radial and top shields of the neutron source based on the biological dose equivalent requirements inside the subcritical hall during operation. The Monte Carlo code MCNPX is selected because of its capabilities for transporting electrons, photons, and neutrons. Mesh based weight windows variance reduction technique is utilized to estimate the biological dose outside the shield with good statistics. A significant effort dedicated to the accurate prediction of the biological dose equivalent outside the shield boundary as a function of the shield thickness without geometrical approximations or material homogenization. The building wall was designed with ordinary concrete to reduce the biological dose equivalent to the public with a safety factor in the range of 5 to 20.

Zhong, Z.; Gohar, M. Y. A.; Naberezhnev, D.; Duo, J.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

175

Thermal neutron detection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

Peurrung, Anthony J. (Richland, WA); Stromswold, David C. (West Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Oak Ridge Reservation site evaluation report for the Advanced Neutron Source  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a research reactor that is the US Department of Energy (DOE) plans to build for initial service late in this century. The primary purpose of the ANS is to provide a useable neutron flux for scattering experiments 5 to 10 times as a high as that generated by any existing research reactor, secondary purposes include production of a variety of transuranic and other isotopes and irradiation of materials. The ANS is proposed to be located on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and operated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This report documents the evaluation of alternative sites on the ORR and the selection of a site for the ANS.

Sigmon, B.; Heitzman, A.C. Jr.; Morrissey, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Characteristics of a RF-Driven Ion Source for a Neutron Generator Used for Associated Particle Imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present recent work on a prototype compact neutron generator for associated particle imaging (API). API uses alpha particles that are produced simultaneously with neutrons in the deuterium-tritium ({sup 2}D({sup 3}T,n){sup 4}{alpha}) fusion reaction to determine the direction of the neutrons upon exiting the reaction. This method determines the spatial position of each neutron interaction and requires the neutrons to be generated from a small spot in order to achieve high spatial resolution. The ion source for API is designed to produce a focused ion beam with a beam spot diameter of 1-mm or less on the target. We use an axial type neutron generator with a predicted neutron yield of 10{sup 8} n/s for a 50 {mu}A D/T ion beam current accelerated to 80 kV. The generator utilizes an RF planar spiral antenna at 13.56 MHz to create a highly efficient inductively coupled plasma at the ion source. Experimental results show that beams with an atomic ion fraction of over 80% can be obtained while utilizing only 100 watts of RF power in the ion source. A single acceleration gap with a secondary electron suppression electrode is used in the tube. Experimental results from ion source testing, such as the current density, atomic ion fraction, electron temperature, and electron density will be discussed.

Wu Ying; Leung, K.-N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California-Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hurley, John P. [Special Technologies Laboratory, Santa Barbara, CA 93111 (United States); Ji Qing; Kwan, Joe [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

178

Advanced Variable Speed Air-Source Integrated Heat Pumps Research Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Variable Speed Air-Source Advanced Variable Speed Air-Source Integrated Heat Pumps Research Project Advanced Variable Speed Air-Source Integrated Heat Pumps Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy is currently conducting research into advanced variable speed air-source integrated heat pumps (AS-IHPs). Project Description This project seeks to develop AS-IHP products for the larger air-source system market. Development focuses on a fully variable capacity or variable speed AS-IHP option. Project Partners Research is being undertaken through a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between the Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and a CRADA partner. Project Goals The goal of this project is the development of a fully variable-speed version of an AS-IHP product that can provide heating, ventilation, and air

179

Analysis of core-concrete interaction event with flooding for the Advanced Neutron Source reactor  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses salient aspects of the methodology, assumptions, and modeling of various features related to estimation of source terms from an accident involving a molten core-concrete interaction event (with and without flooding) in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Various containment configurations are considered for this postulated severe accident. Several design features (such as rupture disks) are examined to study containment response during this severe accident. Also, thermal-hydraulic response of the containment and radionuclide transport and retention in the containment are studied. The results are described as transient variations of source terms, which are then used for studying off-site radiological consequences and health effects for the support of the Conceptual Safety Analysis Report for ANS. The results are also to be used to examine the effectiveness of subpile room flooding during this type of severe accident.

Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.; Navarro-Valenti, S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Recent Performance of the SNS H-Source for 1-MW Neutron Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the performance of the SNS ion source and LEBT as they continue to deliver ~50 mA H- beams at a 5.3% duty factor required for neutron production with a ~1MW proton beam since the fall of 2009. The source continues to deliver persistent H- beams for up to 6 weeks without adding Cs after an initial dose of ~4 mg, except when there are excessive plasma impurities. In one case the H- beam decayed due to an air leak, which is shown to be consistent with sputtering of the Cs layer, and which allows to bracket the plasma potential. In another case, the performance of two sources degraded progressively, which appears to be consistent with a progressive deterioration of the Cs covered Mo converter. These two and other recently discovered issues are discussed in detail.

Stockli, Martin P [ORNL; Han, Baoxi [ORNL; Murray Jr, S N [ORNL; Pennisi, Terry R [ORNL; Santana, Manuel [ORNL; Welton, Robert F [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "neutron source project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Verification of the content, isotopic composition and age of plutonium in Pu-Be neutron sources by gamma-spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A non-destructive, gamma-spectrometric method for verifying the plutonium content of Pu-Be neutron sources has been developed. It is also shown that the isotopic composition and the age of plutonium (Pu) can be determined in the intensive neutron field of these sources by the ``Multi-Group Analysis'' method. Gamma spectra were taken in the far-field of the sample, which was assumed to be cylindrical. The isotopic composition and the age of Pu were determined using a commercial implementation of the Multi-Group Analysis algorithm. The Pu content of the sources was evaluated from the count rates of the gamma-peaks of 239Pu, relying on the assumption that the gamma-rays are coming to the detector parallel to each other. The determination of the specific neutron yields and the problem of neutron damage to the detector are also discussed.

Nguyen, C T

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Verification of the content, isotopic composition and age of plutonium in Pu-Be neutron sources by gamma-spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A non-destructive, gamma-spectrometric method for verifying the plutonium content of Pu-Be neutron sources has been developed. It is also shown that the isotopic composition and the age of plutonium (Pu) can be determined in the intensive neutron field of these sources by the ``Multi-Group Analysis'' method. Gamma spectra were taken in the far-field of the sample, which was assumed to be cylindrical. The isotopic composition and the age of Pu were determined using a commercial implementation of the Multi-Group Analysis algorithm. The Pu content of the sources was evaluated from the count rates of the gamma-peaks of 239Pu, relying on the assumption that the gamma-rays are coming to the detector parallel to each other. The determination of the specific neutron yields and the problem of neutron damage to the detector are also discussed.

Cong Tam Nguyen

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

183

Ground Source Heat Pump Data Mining Research Project | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground Source Heat Pump Data Mining Ground Source Heat Pump Data Mining Research Project Ground Source Heat Pump Data Mining Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy is currently conducting research into ground source heat pump (GSHP) data mining. This project seeks to build public awareness of GSHP technology through the development of case studies outlining costs and benefits. Project Description This project seeks to produce in-depth case studies on the costs and benefits of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act -funded GSHP demonstration projects, including cross-cutting summaries of lessons learned and best practices for design, installation, and operation. Project Partners Research is being undertaken between the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Project Goals

184

Observations of Space Charge effects in the Spallation Neutron Source Accumulator Ring  

SciTech Connect

The Spallation Neutron Source accumulator ring was designed to allow independent control of the transverse beam distribution in each plane. However, at high beam intensities, nonlinear space charge forces can strongly influence the final beam distribution and compromise our ability to independently control the transverse distributions. In this study we investigate the evolution of the beam at intensities of up to ~8x10^13 ppp through both simulation and experiment. Specifically, we analyze the evolution of the beam distribution for beams with different transverse aspect ratios and tune splits. We present preliminary results of simulations of our experiments.

Potts III, Robert E [ORNL; Cousineau, Sarah M [ORNL; Holmes, Jeffrey A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Simultaneous usage of pinhole and penumbral apertures for imaging small scale neutron sources from inertial confinement fusion experiments  

SciTech Connect

Inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility are designed to understand the basic principles of creating self-sustaining fusion reactions by laser driven compression of deuterium-tritium (DT) filled cryogenic plastic capsules. The neutron imaging diagnostic provides information on the distribution of the central fusion reaction region and the surrounding DT fuel by observing neutron images in two different energy bands for primary (13-17 MeV) and down-scattered (6-12 MeV) neutrons. From this, the final shape and size of the compressed capsule can be estimated and the symmetry of the compression can be inferred. These experiments provide small sources with high yield neutron flux. An aperture design that includes an array of pinholes and penumbral apertures has provided the opportunity to image the same source with two different techniques. This allows for an evaluation of these different aperture designs and reconstruction algorithms.

Guler, N.; Volegov, P.; Danly, C. R.; Grim, G. P.; Merrill, F. E.; Wilde, C. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Transmutation facility for weapons grade plutonium based on a tokamak fusion neutron source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is suggested that weapons grade plutonium could be processed through a transmutation facility to build up sufficient actinide and fission product inventories to serve as a deterrent to diversion or theft, pending eventual use as nuclear reactor fuel. A transmutation facility consisting of a fusion neutron source surrounded by fuel assemblies containing the weapons grade plutonium in the form of PuO2 pebbles in a lithium slurry was investigated and found to be technically feasible. A design concept/operation scenario was developed for a facility which would be able to transmute the world's estimated inventory of weapons grade plutonium to 11% Pu-240 concentration in about 25 years. The fusion neutron source would be based on tokamak plasma operating conditions and magnet technology being qualified in ongoing R D programs, and the plutonium fuel would be based on existing technology. A new R D program would be required to qualify a refractory metal alloy structural material needed to handle the high heat fluxes. Extensions of existing technologies and acceleration of existing R D programs would seem to be adequate to qualify other technologies required for the facility.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Transmutation facility for weapons-grade plutonium disposition based on a tokamak fusion neutron source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is suggested that weapons-grade plutonium could be processed through a transmutation facility to build up sufficient actinide and fission product inventories to serve as a deterrent to diversion or theft during subsequent storage, pending eventual use as fuel in commercial nuclear reactors. A transmutation facility consisting of a tokamak fusion neutron source surrounded by fuel assemblies containing the weapons-grade plutonium in the form of PuO{sub 2} pebbles in a lithium slurry is investigated. A design concept/operation scenario is developed for a facility that would be able to transmute the world`s estimated surplus inventory of weapons-grade plutonium to 11% {sup 240}Pu concentration in nearly 25 yr. The fusion neutron source would be based on plasma physics and plasma support technology being qualified in ongoing research and development (R&D) programs, and the plutonium fuel would be based on existing technology. A new R&D program would be required to qualify a refractory metal alloy structural material that would be needed to handle the high heat fluxes; otherwise, extensions of existing technologies and acceleration of existing R&D programs would seem to be adequate to qualify all required technologies. Such a facility might feasibly be deployed in 20 to 30 yr, or sooner with a crash program. 49 refs., 5 figs., 13 tabs.

Stacey, W.M.; Pilger, B.L.; Mowrey, J.A. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Enhancing software engineering education through open source projects: Four years of students' perspectives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results after four years of running of an instructional method that utilizes free/libre open source software (FLOSS) projects as tools for teaching software engineering in formal education. In the last four academic years, a total ... Keywords: Learning community, Online learning, Open education, Open source, Project-based learning, Software engineering education

Pantelis M. Papadopoulos; Ioannis G. Stamelos; Andreas Meiszner

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Understanding broadcast based peer review on open source software projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Software peer review has proven to be a successful technique in open source software (OSS) development. In contrast to industry, where reviews are typically assigned to specific individuals, changes are broadcast to hundreds of potentially interested ... Keywords: case studies, grounded theory, open source software, peer review

Peter C. Rigby; Margaret-Anne Storey

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Performance of a 14-MeV neutron generator as an in situ calibration source for TFTR  

SciTech Connect

TFTR will soon enter its D-T phase with the introduction of tritium. This will result in the production of neutrons having 14-MeV energy which is significantly greater than the 2.5-MeV neutrons encountered during D-D operation. In preparation for the D-T phase, a calibration of the four neutron detection systems was performed using a 14-MeV neutron generator producing 10{sup 8} n/sec. To account for the spatial extent of the toroidally shaped plasma and for neutrons scattered from surrounding structures, detector responses were determined with the source positioned at many locations inside the vacuum vessel. Before the generator could be used as a calibration source, a characterization of its total yield and angular emission properties was obtained. The total yield was determined by aluminum activation methods to within {plus_minus}6%, while the angular emission was found to be anisotropic in the forward and reverse cones along the generator axis. After the characterization was performed, the generator was mounted on a moveable track inside the vacuum vessel, where it could be remotely moved across the view of each detector. This paper presents details of the methods and results of the source characterization, together with initial results of the in-vessel D-T neutron calibration.

Roquemore, A.L.; Jassby, D.L.; Johnson, L.C.; Strachan, J.D. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Barnes, C.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1993-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

191

6 GeV LIGHT SOURCE PROJECT COST ESTIMATING PROCEDURE LS-34  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GeV LIGHT SOURCE PROJECT GeV LIGHT SOURCE PROJECT COST ESTIMATING PROCEDURE LS-34 October 23, 1985 YC/AVR To maintain uniformity in estimating the cost requirements of the various components of the 6 GeV Light Source, the following procedure will be used by all the task groups. The procedure uses a Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) to break down the project into manageable, easy to estimate, components. The project is first broken down into major tasks or categories. Then each major division is continuously subdivided until the desired level of detail is achieved. This can be shown best by using the example of the WBS of the Aladdin Upgrade Project, excerpts of which are included in Appendix A. As shown in the example, the project is first divided into: 1.1 Project Management and Administration

192

Project Plan: Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization for Nuclear Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project plan outlines the Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization for Nuclear Facilities (CEUS SSC) Project, which will replace the Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States, EPRI report NP-4726, July 1986. The objective of the CEUS SSC project is to develop an up-to-date assessment of probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) SSC for CEUS. Input to a PSHA consists of both seismic source and ground motion characterization. These two components ...

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

193

Plans for an Integrated Front-End Test Stand at the Spallation Neutron Source  

SciTech Connect

A spare Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) is presently being fabricated by industry with delivery to Oak Ridge National Laboratory planned in late 2012. The establishment of a test stand at the Spallation Neutron Source site is underway so that complete acceptance testing can be performed during the winter of 2012-2013. This activity is the first step in the establishment of an integrated front-end test stand that will include an ion source, low-energy beam transport (LEBT), RFQ, medium-energy beam transport, diagnostics, and a beam dump. The test stand will be capable of delivering an H- ion beam of up to 50 mA with a pulse length of 1 ms and a repetition rate of 60 Hz or a proton beam of up to 50 mA, 100us, 1Hz. The test stand will enable the following activities: complete ion source characterization; development of a magnetic LEBT chopper; development of a two-source layout; development of beam diagnostics; and study of beam dynamics of high intensity beam.

Champion, Mark S [ORNL; Aleksandrov, Alexander V [ORNL; Crofford, Mark T [ORNL; Heidenreich, Dale A [ORNL; Kang, Yoon W [ORNL; Moss, John [ORNL; Roseberry, Jr., R Tom [ORNL; Schubert, James Phillip [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Construction of Thermal Neutron Calibration Fields Using a Graphite Pile and Americium-Beryllium Neutron Sources at KAERI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron Measurements / Special Issue on the 11th International Conference on Radiation Shielding and the 15th Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division (Part 2) / Radiation Protection

B. H. Kim; S. M. Jun; J. S. Kim; K. S. Lim; J. L. Kim

195

A New Low-Energy Neutron Spectrometer Based on Position-Sensitive Proportional Counter for Accelerator-Based Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron Measurements / Special Issue on the 11th International Conference on Radiation Shielding and the 15th Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division (Part 2) / Radiation Measurements and Instrumentation

I. Murata; H. Miyamaru; I. Kato; S. Yoshida; Y. Mori

196

Advanced Neutron Source enrichment study -- Volume 1: Main report. Final report, Revision 12/94  

SciTech Connect

A study has been performed of the impact on performance of using low enriched uranium (20% {sup 235}U) or medium enriched uranium (35% {sup 235}U) as an alternative fuel for the Advanced Neutron Source, which is currently designed to use uranium enriched to 93% {sup 235}U. Higher fuel densities and larger volume cores were evaluated at the lower enrichments in terms of impact on neutron flux, safety, safeguards, technical feasibility, and cost. The feasibility of fabricating uranium silicide fuel at increasing material density was specifically addressed by a panel of international experts on research reactor fuels. The most viable alternative designs for the reactor at lower enrichments were identified and discussed. Several sensitivity analyses were performed to gain an understanding of the performance of the reactor at parametric values of power, fuel density, core volume, and enrichment that were interpolations between the boundary values imposed on the study or extrapolations from known technology. Volume 2 of this report contains 26 appendices containing results, meeting minutes, and fuel panel presentations.

Bari, R.A.; Ludewig, H.; Weeks, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Advanced Technology

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

Engineering design issues of a low aspect ratio tokamak volumetric neutron source  

SciTech Connect

Engineering design issues of a volumetric neutron source (VNS) based on a steady state low aspect ratio DT tokamak are presented. At the present the major radius is 0.8 m, the minor radius 0.6 m for an aspect ratio of 1.33, the plasma current is 10.1 MA, the toroidal field at the major radius is 1.8 T, the fusion power is 39 MW giving an average neutron wall loading of 1.0 MW/m(2) on the outboard side with an available testing area of 10 m(2). Two neutral beams delivering more than 20 MW are used to drive the steady state fusion plasma. A single turn unshielded water cooled dispersion strengthened (DS) Cu centerpost is used in conjunction with a conducting Cu bell jar which acts as a vacuum boundary and the return legs for the toroidal field (TF) coils. The centerpost is 9 m long, carries 7.2 MA and is specially shaped to minimize ohmic heating, which is calculated using temperature dependent DS Cu properties and increases in resistivity due to nuclear transmutations are accounted for. A naturally diverted plasma scrapeoff layer dominated by pressure-driven instabilities is assumed giving a peak heat flux of 5.2 MW/m(2) on the diverter plates. Fabrication approaches for the centerpost and its replacement time lines have been estimated to be feasible and reasonable.

Sviatoslavky, I. N. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

DOE/EIS0247; Final Environmental Impact Statement Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron Source  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SNS FEIS SNS FEIS Cover Sheet COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS), Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron Source (DOE/EIS-0247) LOCATIONS OF ALTERNATIVE SITES: Illinois, New Mexico, New York, and Tennessee. CONTACT: For further information on this document, write or call: Mr. David Wilfert, EIS Document Manager Oak Ridge Operations Office U.S. Department of Energy 200 Administration Road, 146/FEDC Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Telephone: (800) 927-9964 Facsimile: (423) 576-4542 E-mail: NSNSEIS@ornl.gov Mr. Jeff Hoy, SNS Program Manager Office of Basic Energy Research U.S. Department of Energy (ER-10) Germantown, MD 20874 Telephone: (301) 903-4924 Facsimile: (301) 903-9513 E-mail: Jeff.Hoy@mailgw.er.doe.gov

199

Record of Decision for the Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron Source  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

140 140 Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 125 / Wednesday, June 30, 1999 / Notices or minimize environmental harm that may result from implementing the Redevelopment Plan. Accordingly, Navy will dispose of the surplus Federal property at Naval Air Station Barbers Point in a manner that is consistent with the State of Hawaii's Redevelopment Plan for the property. Dated: June 17, 1999. William J. Cassidy, Jr., Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Conversion And Redevelopment). Dated: June 25, 1999. Ralph W. Corey, CDR, JAGC, USN, Alternate Federal Register Liaison Officer. [FR Doc. 99-16691 Filed 6-29-99; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3810-FF-M DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Record of Decision for the Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron Source AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Record of decision.

200

Modeling and analysis of hydrogen detonation events in the Advanced Neutron Source reactor containment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes salient aspects of the modeling, analyses, and evaluations for hydrogen detonation in selected regions of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) containment during hypothetical severe accident conditions. Shock wave generation and transport modeling and analyses were conducted for two stratified configurations in the dome region of the high bay. Principal tools utilized for these purposes were the CTH and CET89 computer codes. Dynamic pressure loading functions were generated for key locations and used for evaluating structural response behavior for which a finite-element model was developed using the ANSYS code. For the range of conditions analyzed in the two critical dome regions, it was revealed that the ANS containment would be able to withstand detonation loads without failure.

Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.; Kim, S.H.; Valenti, S.N.; Simpson, D.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Sawruk, W. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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201

Spallation Neutron Source Availability Top-Down Apportionment Using Characteristic Factors and Expert Opinion  

SciTech Connect

Apportionment is the assignment of top-level requirements to lower tier elements of the overall facility. A method for apportioning overall facility availability requirements among systems and subsystems is presented. Characteristics that influence equipment reliability and maintainability are discussed. Experts, using engineering judgment, scored each characteristic for each system whose availability design goal is to be established. The Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) method is used to produce a set of weighted rankings for each characteristic for each alternative system. A mathematical model is derived which incorporates these weighting factors. The method imposes higher availability requirements on those systems in which an incremental increase in availability is easier to achieve, and lower availability requirements where greater availability is more difficult and costly. An example is given of applying this top-down apportionment methodology to the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) facility.

Haire, M.J.; Schryver, J.C.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Fuel plate stability experiments and analysis for the Advanced Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The planned reactor for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) will use closely spaced arrays of involute-shaped fuel plates that will be cooled by water flowing through the channels between the plates. There is concern that at certain coolant flow velocities, adjacent plates may deflect and touch, with resulting failure of the plates. Experiments have been conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to examine this potential phenomenon. Results of the experiments and comparison with analytical predictions are reported. The tests were conducted using full-scale epoxy plate models of the aluminum/uranium silicide ANS involute-shaped fuel plates. Use of epoxy plates and model theory allowed lower flow velocities and pressures to explore the potential failure mechanism. Plate deflections and channel pressures as functions of the flow velocity are examined. Comparisons with mathematical models are noted.

Swinson, W.F.; Battiste, R.L.; Luttrell, C.R.; Yahr, G.T.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

The Status of Research Regarding Magnetic Mirrors as a Fusion Neutron Source or Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

Experimental results, theory and innovative ideas now point with increased confidence to the possibility of a Gas Dynamic Trap (GDT) neutron source which would be on the path to an attractively simple Axisymmetric Tandem Mirror (ATM) power plant. Although magnetic mirror research was terminated in the US 20 years ago, experiments continued in Japan (Gamma 10) and Russia (GDT), with a very small US effort. This research has now yielded data, increased understanding, and generated ideas resulting in the new concepts described here. Early mirror research was carried out with circular axisymmetric magnets. These plasmas were MHD unstable due to the unfavorable magnetic curvature near the mid-plane. Then the minimum-B concept emerged in which the field line curvature was everywhere favorable and the plasma was situated in a MHD stable magnetic well (70% average beta in 2XII-B). The Ioffe-bar or baseball-coil became the standard for over 40 years. In the 1980's, driven by success with minimum-B stabilization and the control of ion cyclotron instabilities in PR6 and 2XII-B, mirrors were viewed as a potentially attractive concept with near-term advantages as a lower Q neutron source for applications such as a hybrid fission fuel factory or toxic waste burner. However there are down sides to the minimum-B geometry: coil construction is complex; restraining magnetic forces limit field strength and mirror ratios. Furthermore, the magnetic field lines have geodesic curvature which introduces resonant and neoclassical radial transport as observed in early tandem mirror experiments. So what now leads us to think that simple axisymmetric mirror plasmas can be stable? The Russian GDT experiment achieves on-axis 60% beta by peaking of the kinetic plasma pressure near the mirror throat (where the curvature is favorable) to counter-balance the average unfavorable mid-plane curvature. Then a modest augmentation of plasma pressure in the expander results in stability. The GDT experiments have confirmed the physics of effluent plasma stabilization predicted by theory. The plasma had a mean ion energy of 10 keV and a density of 5e19m-3. If successful, the axisymmetric tandem mirror extension of the GDT idea could lead to a Q {approx} 10 power plant of modest size and would yield important applications at lower Q. In addition to the GDT method, there are four other ways to augment stability that have been demonstrated; including: plasma rotation (MCX), diverter coils (Tara), pondermotive (Phaedrus & Tara), and end wall funnel shape (Nizhni Novgorod). There are also 5 stabilization techniques predicted, but not yet demonstrated: expander kinetic pressure (KSTM-Post), Pulsed ECH Dynamic Stabilization (Post), wall stabilization (Berk), non-paraxial end mirrors (Ryutov), and cusp ends (Kesner). While these options should be examined further together with conceptual engineering designs. Physics issues that need further analysis include: electron confinement, MHD and trapped particle modes, analysis of micro stability, radial transport, evaluation and optimization of Q, and the plasma density needed to bridge to the expansion-region. While promising all should be examined through increased theory effort, university-scale experiments, and through increased international collaboration with the substantial facilities in Russia and Japan The conventional wisdom of magnetic mirrors was that they would never work as a fusion concept for a number of reasons. This conventional wisdom is most probably all wrong or not applicable, especially for applications such as low Q (DT Neutron Source) aimed at materials testing or for a Q {approx} 3-5 fusion neutron source applied to destroying actinides in fission waste and breeding of fissile fuel.

Simonen, T

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

204

A 4p BaF2 detector for (n,g) cross section measurements at a spallation neutron source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The quest for improved neutron capture cross sections for advanced reactor concepts, transmutation of radioactive wastes as well as for astrophysical scenarios of neutron capture nucleosynthesis has motivated new experimental efforts based on modern techniques. Recent measurements in the keV region have shown that a 4p BaF2 detector represents an accurate and versatile instrument for such studies. The present work deals with the potential of such a 4p BaF2 detector in combination with spallation neutron sources, which offer large neutron fluxes over a wide energy range. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations with the GEANT package have been performed to investigate the critical backgrounds at a spallation facility, to optimize the detector design, and to discuss alternative solutions.

M. Heil; R. Reifarth; M. M. Fowler; R. C. Haight; F. Kppeler; R. S. Rundberg; E. H. Seabury; J. L. Ullmann; J. B. Wilhelmy; K. Wisshak

2013-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

205

Design of an Aluminum Proton Beam Window for the Spallation Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An aluminum proton beam window design is being considered at the Spallation Neutron Source primarily to increase the lifetime of the window, with secondary advantages of higher beam transport efficiency and lower activation. The window separates the core vessel, the location of the mercury target, from the vacuum of the accelerator, while withstanding the pass through of a proton beam of up to 2 MW with 1.0 GeV proton energy. The current aluminum alloy being investigated for the window material is 6061-T651 due to its combination of high strength, high thermal conductivity, and good resistance to aqueous corrosion, as well as demonstrated dependability in previous high-radiation environments. The window design will feature a thin plate with closely spaced cross drilled cooling holes. An analytical approach was used to optimize the dimensions of the window before finite element analysis was used to simulate temperature profiles and stress fields resulting from thermal and static pressure loading. The resulting maximum temperature of 60 C and Von Mises stress of 71 MPa are very low compared to allowables for Al 6061-T651. A significant challenge in designing an aluminum proton beam window for SNS is integrating the window with the current 316L SS shield blocks. Explosion bonding was chosen as a joining technique because of the large bonding area required. A test program has commenced to prove explosion bonding can produce a robust vacuum joint. Pending successful explosion bond testing, the aluminum proton beam window design will be proven acceptable for service in the Spallation Neutron Source.

Janney, Jim G [ORNL; McClintock, David A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

High power testing of the 402.5 MHZ and 805 MHZ RF windows for the spallation neutron source accelerator  

SciTech Connect

Hisorically, Radio Frequency (RF) windows have been a common point of failure in input power couplers; therefore, reliable RF windows are critical to the success of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project. The normal conducting part of the SNS accelerator requires six RF windows at 402.5 MHz and eight RF windows at 805 MHz[l]. Each RF window will transmit up to 180 kW of average power and 2.5 MW peak power at 60 Hz with 1.2 millisecond pulses. The RF windows, designed and manufactured by Thales, were tested at the full average power for 4 hours to ensure no problems with the high average power and then tested to an effective forward power level of 10 MW by testing at 2.5 MW forward power into a short and varying the phase of the standing wave. The sliding short was moved from 0 to 180 degrees to ensure no arcing or breakdown problems occur in any part of the window. This paper discusses the results of the high power testing of both the 402.5 MHz and the 805 MHz RF windows. Problems encountered during testing and the solutions for these problems are discussed.

Cummings, K. A. (Karen Ann); De Baca, J. M. (John M.); Harrison, J. S. (John S.); Rodriguez, M. B. (Manuelita B.); Torrez, P. A. (Phillip A.); Warner, D. K. (David K.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Facilities and Capabilities | Neutron Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Isotope Reactor and the Spallation Neutron Source. The continuous neutron source at HFIR and the pulsed neutron source at SNS complement each other well and, along with their...

208

The New Munich Neutron Source FRM II: Overview and Uses for Biological Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron Physics at NIST M. Arif 8th UCN Workshop St. Petersburg ­ Moscow, Russia June 11-21, 2011 #12;NCNR Guide Hall 20 MW Reactor #12;Neutron Physics at the NCNR Beam Flux n cm-2 s-1 Peak Wavelength Facility Low Scatter Neutron Dosimeter Calibration Facility #12;December 31, 2012 Physics Physics Physics

Doster, Wolfgang

209

Design and operation of the wide angular-range chopper spectrometer ARCS at the Spallation Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wide angular-range chopper spectrometer ARCS at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is optimized to provide a high neutron flux at the sample position with a large solid angle of detector coverage. The instrument incorporates modern neutron instrumentation, such as an elliptically focused neutron guide, high speed magnetic bearing choppers, and a massive array of {sup 3}He linear position sensitive detectors. Novel features of the spectrometer include the use of a large gate valve between the sample and detector vacuum chambers and the placement of the detectors within the vacuum, both of which provide a window-free final flight path to minimize background scattering while allowing rapid changing of the sample and sample environment equipment. ARCS views the SNS decoupled ambient temperature water moderator, using neutrons with incident energy typically in the range from 15 to 1500 meV. This range, coupled with the large detector coverage, allows a wide variety of studies of excitations in condensed matter, such as lattice dynamics and magnetism, in both powder and single-crystal samples. Comparisons of early results to both analytical and Monte Carlo simulation of the instrument performance demonstrate that the instrument is operating as expected and its neutronic performance is understood. ARCS is currently in the SNS user program and continues to improve its scientific productivity by incorporating new instrumentation to increase the range of science covered and improve its effectiveness in data collection.

Abernathy, D. L.; Stone, M. B.; Loguillo, M. J.; Lucas, M. S.; Delaire, O. [Neutron Scattering Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Tang, X.; Lin, J. Y. Y.; Fultz, B. [California Institute of Technology, W. M. Keck Laboratory 138-78, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Design and operation of the wide angular-range chopper spectrometer ARCS at the Spallation Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wide angular-range chopper spectrometer ARCS at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is optimized to provide a high neutron flux at the sample position with a large solid angle of detector coverage. The instrument incorporates modern neutron instrumentation, such as an elliptically-focused neutron guide, high speed magnetic bearing choppers and a massive array of 3He linear position sensitive detectors. Novel features of the spectrometer include the use of a large gate valve between the sample and detector vacuum chambers and the placement of the detectors within the vacuum, both of which provide a window-free final flight path to minimize background scattering while allowing rapid changing of the sample and sample environment equipment. ARCS views the SNS decoupled ambient temperature water moderator, using neutrons with incident energy typically in the range from 15 to 1500 meV. This range, coupled with the large detector coverage, allows a wide variety of studies of excitations in condensed matter, such as lattice dynamics and magnetism, in both powder and single-crystal samples. Comparisons of early results to both analytical and Monte Carlo simulation of the instrument performance demonstrate that the instrument is operating as expected and its neutronic performance is understood. ARCS is currently in the SNS user program, and continues to improve its scientific productivity by incorporating new instrumentation to increase the range of science covered and improve its effectiveness in data collection.

Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL; Stone, Matthew B [ORNL; Loguillo, Mark [ORNL; Lucas, Matthew [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Delaire, Olivier A [ORNL; Tang, Xiaoli [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Lin, J. Y. Y. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Fultz, B. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Neutronic Aspects and Recent Experimental Results with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Neutronic Aspects and Recent Experimental Results with Methane Moderators at IUCF Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS). ...

212

ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linac. The highly successful development of an EBIS at BNL now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based pre-injectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The new RFQ and Linac that are used to accelerate beams from the EBIS to an energy sufficient for injection into the Booster are both very similar to existing devices already in operation at other facilities. Injection into the Booster will occur at the same location as the existing injection from the Tandem.

ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; ET AL.

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

213

Neutron range spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are colliminated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. 1 fig.

Manglos, S.H.

1988-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

214

ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linear accelerator (Linac). The highly successful development of an EBIS at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based preinjectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The proposed pre-injector system would also provide for a major enhancement in capability for the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), which utilizes heavy-ion beams from the RHIC complex. EBIS would allow for the acceleration of all important ion species for the NASA radiobiology program, such as, helium, argon, and neon which are unavailable with the present Tandem injector. In addition, the new system would allow for very rapid switching of ion species for NSRL experiments, reducing delays due to the interference with RHIC injection operations, and allowing enhanced mixed field radiation studies. The new RFQ and Linac that are used to accelerate beams from the EBIS to an energy sufficient for injection into the Booster are both very similar to existing devices already in operation at other facilities. Injection into the Booster will occur at the same location as the existing injection from the Tandem.

ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; GRANDINETTI, R.; HSEUH, H.; JAVIDFAR, A.; KPONOU, A.; LAMBIASE, R.; LESSARD, E.; LOCKEY, R.; LODESTRO, V.; MAPES, M.; MIRABELLA, D.; NEHRING, T.; OERTER, B.; PENDZICK, A.; PIKIN, A.; RAPARIA, D.; RITTER, J.; ROSER, T.; RUSSO, T.; SNYDSTRUP, L.; WILINSKI, M.; ZALTSMAN, A.; ZHANG, S.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Neutron Scattering Facilities 1982  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NEUTRON SOURCES NEUTRON SOURCES Types of Sources U.S. Sources Available for Users Plans for the Future The Neutron Scattering Society of America (NSSA) SNS/ANL School on Neutron and x-Ray Scattering, June 2011 Jim Rhyne Lujan Neutron Scattering Center Los Alamos National Lab. What do we need to do neutron scattering? * Neutron Source - produces neutrons * Diffractometer or Spectrometer - Allows neutrons to interact with sample - Sorts out discrete wavelengths by monochromator (reactor) or by time of flight (pulse source) - Detectors pick up neutrons scattered from sample * Analysis methods to determine material properties * Brain power to interpret results Sources of neutrons for scattering * Nuclear Reactor - Neutrons produced from fission of 235 U - Fission spectrum neutrons

216

How Argonne's Intense Pulsed Neutron Source came to life and gained its niche : the view from an ecosystem perspective.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At first glance the story of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) appears to have followed a puzzling course. When researchers first proposed their ideas for an accelerator-driven neutron source for exploring the structure of materials through neutron scattering, the project seemed so promising that both Argonne managers and officials at the laboratory's funding agency, the Department of Energy (DOE), suggested that it be made larger and more expensive. But then, even though prototype building, testing, and initial construction went well a group of prominent DOE reviewers recommended in fall 1980 that it be killed, just months before it had been slated to begin operation, and DOE promptly accepted the recommendation. In response, Argonne's leadership declared the project was the laboratory's top priority and rallied to save it. In late 1982, thanks to another review panel led by the same scientist who had chaired the panel that had delivered the death sentence, the project was granted a reprieve. However, by the late 1980s, the IPNS was no longer top priority within the international materials science community, at Argonne, or within the DOE budget because prospects for another, larger materials science accelerator emerged. At just this point, the facility started to produce exciting scientific results. For the next two decades, the IPNS, its research, and its experts became valued resources at Argonne, within the U.S. national laboratory system, and within the international materials science community. Why did this Argonne project prosper and then almost suffer premature death, even though it promised (and later delivered) good science? How was it saved and how did it go on to have a long, prosperous life for more than a quarter of a century? In particular, what did an expert assessment of the quality of IPNS science have to do with its fate? Getting answers to such questions is important. The U.S. government spends a lot of money to produce science and technology at multipurpose laboratories like Argonne. For example, in the mid-1990s, about the time the IPNS's fortunes were secured, DOE spent more than $6 billion a year to fund nine such facilities, with Argonne's share totaling $500 million. And an important justification for funding these expensive laboratories is that they operate expensive but powerful scientific tools like the IPNS, generally considered too large to be built and managed by universities. Clearly, 'life and death' decision making has a lot to tell us about how the considerable U.S. federal investment in science and technology at national laboratories is actually transacted and, indeed, how a path is cleared or blocked for good science to be produced. Because forces within Argonne, DOE, and the materials science community obviously dictated the changing fortunes of the IPNS, it makes sense to probe the interactions binding these three environments for an understanding of how the IPNS was threatened and how it survived. In other words, sorting out what happened requires analyzing the system that includes all three environments. In an attempt to find a better way to understand its twists and turns, I will view the life-and-death IPNS story through the lens of an ecological metaphor. Employing the ideas and terms that ecologists use to describe what happens in a system of shared resources, that is, an ecosystem, I will describe the IPNS as an organism that vied with competitors for resources to find a niche in the interrelated environments of Argonne, DOE, and the materials science community. I will start with an explanation of the Argonne 'ecosystem' before the advent of the IPNS and then describe how the project struggled to emerge in the 1970s, how it scratched its way to a fragile niche in the early 1980s, and how it adapted and matured through the turn of the 21st century. The paper will conclude with a summary of what the ecosystem perspective shows about the life and death struggle of the IPNS and reflect on what that perspective reveals about how researc

Westfall, C.; Office of The Director

2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

217

Silicon Photo-Multiplier radiation hardness tests with a beam controlled neutron source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report radiation hardness tests performed at the Frascati Neutron Generator on silicon Photo-Multipliers, semiconductor photon detectors built from a square matrix of avalanche photo-diodes on a silicon substrate. Several samples from different manufacturers have been irradiated integrating up to 7x10^10 1-MeV-equivalent neutrons per cm^2. Detector performances have been recorded during the neutron irradiation and a gradual deterioration of their properties was found to happen already after an integrated fluence of the order of 10^8 1-MeV-equivalent neutrons per cm^2.

Angelone, M; Faccini, R; Pinci, D; Baldini, W; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Ramusino, A Cotta; Malaguti, R; Pozzati, M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Silicon Photo-Multiplier radiation hardness tests with a beam controlled neutron source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report radiation hardness tests performed at the Frascati Neutron Generator on silicon Photo-Multipliers, semiconductor photon detectors built from a square matrix of avalanche photo-diodes on a silicon substrate. Several samples from different manufacturers have been irradiated integrating up to 7x10^10 1-MeV-equivalent neutrons per cm^2. Detector performances have been recorded during the neutron irradiation and a gradual deterioration of their properties was found to happen already after an integrated fluence of the order of 10^8 1-MeV-equivalent neutrons per cm^2.

M. Angelone; M. Pillon; R. Faccini; D. Pinci; W. Baldini; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; A. Cotta Ramusino; R. Malaguti; M. Pozzati

2010-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

219

Replacing a 252Cf source with a neutron generator in a shuffler - a conceptual design performed with MCNPX  

SciTech Connect

The {sup 252}Cf shuffler has been widely used in nuclear safeguards and radioactive waste management to assay fissile isotopes, such as {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu, present in a variety of samples, ranging from small cans of uranium waste to metal samples weighing several kilograms. Like other non-destructive assay instruments, the shuffler uses an interrogating neutron source to induce fissions in the sample. Although shufflers with {sup 252}Cf sources have been reliably used for several decades, replacing this isotopic source with a neutron generator presents some distinct advantages. Neutron generators can be run in a continuous or pulsed mode, and may be turned off, eliminating the need for shielding and a shuffling mechanism in the shuffler. There is also essentially no dose to personnel during installation, and no reliance on the availability of {sup 252}Cf. Despite these advantages, the more energetic neutrons emitted from the neutron generator (141 MeV for D-T generators) present some challenges for certain material types. For example when the enrichment of a uranium sample is unknown, the fission of {sup 238}U is generally undesirable. Since measuring uranium is one of the main uses of a shuffler, reducing the delayed neutron contribution from {sup 238}U is desirable. Hence, the shuffler hardware must be modified to accommodate a moderator configuration near the source to tailor the interrogating spectrum in a manner which promotes sub-threshold fissions (below 1 MeV) but avoids the over-moderation of the interrogating neutrons so as to avoid self-shielding. In this study, where there are many material and geometry combinations, the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) transport code was used to model, design, and optimize the moderator configuration within the shuffler geometry. The code is then used to evaluate and compare the assay performances of both the modified shuffler and the current {sup 252}Cf shuffler designs for different test samples. The matrix effect and the non-uniformity of the interrogating flux are investigated and quantified in each case. The modified geometry proposed by this study can serve s a guide in retrofitting shufflers that are already in use.

Schear, Melissa A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Implementation and qualification of neutronic calculation methodology in subcritical reactors driven by external neutron sources and applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This works had as goal to investigate calculational methodologies on subcritical source driven reactor, such as Accelerator Driven Subcritical Reactor (ADSR) and Fusion Driven Subcritical (more)

Thiago Carluccio

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "neutron source project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Projection of needs for gamma radiation sources and other radioisotopes and assessment of alternatives for providing radiation sources  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed the projected uses and demands for a variety of nuclear byproducts. Because the major large-scale near-term demand is for gamma irradiation sources, this report concentrates on the needs for gamma sources and evaluates the options for providing the needed material. Projections of possible growth in the irradiation treatment industry indicate that there will be a need for 180 to 320 MCi of /sup 60/Co (including /sup 137/Cs equivalent) in service in the year 2000. The largest current and projected use of gamma irradiation is for the sterilization of medical devices and disposable medical supplies. Currently, 40% of US disposable medical products are treated by irradiation, and within 10 years it is expected that 90% will be treated in this manner. Irradiation treatment of food for destruction of pathogens or parasites, disinfestation, or extension of allowable storage periods is estimated to require an active inventory of 75 MCi of /sup 60/Co-equivalent gamma source in about a decade. 90 refs., 7 figs., 25 tabs.

Ross, W.A.; Jensen, G.A.; Clark, L.L.; Eakin, D.E.; Jarrett, J.H.; Katayama, Y.B.; McKee, R.W.; Morgan, L.G.; Nealey, S.M.; Platt, A.M.; Tingey, G.L.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Tagged Neutron Source for API Inspection Systems with Greatly Enhanced Spatial Resolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We recently developed induced fission and transmission imaging methods with time- and directionally-tagged neutrons offer new capabilities for characterization of fissile material configurations and enhanced detection of special nuclear materials (SNM). An Advanced Associated Particle Imaging (API) generator with higher angular resolution and neutron yield than existing systems is needed to fully exploit these methods.

None

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

223

Interim Report on the Optimization and Feasibility Studies for the Neutron Detection without Helium-3 Project  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the status and results of the first year's effort in modeling and simulation to investigate alternatives to helium-3 for neutron detection in safeguards applications.

Ely, James H.

2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

224

Directorate Organization | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL Neutron Sciences Directorate The Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD) manages and operates the Spallation Neutron Source and the High Flux Isotope Reactor, two of the world's...

225

DOE/EIS-0247; Draft Environmental Impact Statement Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron Source, December 1998  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 1998 December 1998 Construction and Operation of the S PALLATION N EUTRON S OURCE DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science DOE/EIS-0247 Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron Source Facility Draft Environmental Impact Statement U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science December 1998 DOE/EIS-0247 Draft, December 1998 Cover Sheet COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS), Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron Source (DOE/EIS-0247) LOCATIONS OF ALTERNATIVE SITES: Illinois, New Mexico, New York, and Tennessee. CONTACT: For further information on this document, write or call: Mr. David Wilfert, EIS Document Manager U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office

226

Design, status and first operations of the spallation neutron source polyphase resonant converter modulator system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a new 1.4 MW average power beam, 1 GeV accelerator being built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The accelerator requires 15 converter-modulator stations each providing between 9 and 11 MW pulses with up to a 1 .I MW average power. The converter-modulator can be described as a resonant 20 kHz polyphase boost inverter. Each converter modulator derives its buss voltage from a standard substation cast-core transformer. Each substation is followed by an SCR pre-regulator to accommodate voltage changes from no load to full load, in addition to providing a soft-start function. Energy storage is provided by self-clearing metallized hazy polypropylene traction capacitors. These capacitors do not fail short, but clear any internal anomaly. Three 'H-Bridge' IGBT transistor networks are used to generate the polyphase 20 kHz transformer primary drive waveforms. The 20 kHz drive waveforms are time-gated to generate the desired klystron pulse width. Pulse width modulation of the individual 20 lcHz pulses is utilized to provide regulated output waveforms with DSP based adaptive feedforward and feedback techniques. The boost transformer design utilizes nanocrystalline alloy that provides low core loss at design flux levels and switching frequencies. Capacitors are used on the transformer secondary networks to resonate the leakage inductance. The transformers are wound for a specific leakage inductance, not turns ratio. This design technique generates multiple secondary volts per turn as compared to the primary. With the appropriate tuning conditions, switching losses are minimized. The resonant topology has the added benefit of being deQed in a klystron fault condition, with little energy deposited in the arc. This obviates the need of crowbars or other related networks. A review of these design parameters, operational performance, production status, and OWL installation and performance to date will be presented.

Reass, W. A. (William A.); Apgar, S. E. (Sean E.); Baca, D. M. (David M.); Doss, James D.; Gonzales, J. (Jacqueline); Gribble, R. F. (Robert F.); Hardek, T. W. (Thomas W.); Lynch, M. T. (Michael T.); Rees, D. E. (Daniel E.); Tallerico, P. J. (Paul J.); Trujillo, P. B. (Pete B.); Anderson, D. E. (David E.); Heidenreich, D. A. (Dale A.); Hicks, J. D. (Jim D.); Leontiev, V. N.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Fuel Cycle Optimization of a Helium-Cooled, Sub-Critical, Fast Transmutation of Waste Reactor with a Fusion Neutron Source.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Possible fuel cycle scenarios for a helium-cooled, sub-critical, fast reactor with a fusion neutron source for the transmutation of spent nuclear fuel have been analyzed. (more)

Maddox, James Warren

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization Project: Workshop 2 Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings document the second of three workshops held as part of the Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization (CEUS SSC) for Nuclear Facilities Project to replace the Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States (EPRI report NP-4726, July 1986).

2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

229

Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization Project: Workshop 3 Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings document the third and final workshop held as part of the Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization (CEUS SSC) for Nuclear Facilities Project to replace the Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States (EPRI report NP-4726, July 1986).

2009-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

230

Mineral Chemistry of Basalts Recovered from Hotspot Snake River Scientific Drilling Project, Idaho: Source and Crystallization Characteristics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recovered by Hotspot: Snake River Scientific Drilling Project, Idaho establish crystallization conditionsMineral Chemistry of Basalts Recovered from Hotspot Snake River Scientific Drilling Project, Idaho: Source and Crystallization Characteristics Richard W. Bradshaw A thesis submitted to the faculty

Seamons, Kent E.

231

Initial observations of cavitation-induced erosion of liquid metal spallation target vessels at the Spallation Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During operation of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory the mechanical properties of the AISI 316L target module are altered by high-energy neutron and proton radiation. The interior surfaces of the target vessel are also damaged by cavitation-induced erosion, which results from repetitive rapid heating of the liquid mercury by high-energy proton beam pulses. Until recently no observations of cavitation-induced erosion were possible for conditions prototypical to the SNS. Post irradiation examination (PIE) of the first and second operational SNS targets was performed to gain insight into the radiation-induced changes in mechanical properties of the 316L target material and the extent of cavitation-induced erosion to the target vessel inner surfaces. Observations of cavitation-induced erosion of the first and second operational SNS target modules are presented here, including images of the target vessel interiors and specimens removed from the target beam-entrance regions.

McClintock, David A [ORNL; Riemer, Bernie [ORNL; Ferguson, Phillip D [ORNL; Carroll, Adam J [ORNL; Dayton, Michael J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Liquid lithium target as a high intensity, high energy neutron source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a target jet for charged particles. In one embodiment the charged particles are high energy deuterons that bombard the target jet to produce high intensity, high energy neutrons. To this end, deuterons in a vacuum container bombard an endlessly circulating, free-falling, sheet-shaped, copiously flowing, liquid lithium jet that gushes by gravity from a rectangular cross-section vent on the inside of the container means to form a moving web in contact with the inside wall of the vacuum container. The neutrons are produced via break-up of the beam in the target by stripping, spallation and compound nuclear reactions in which the projectiles (deuterons) interact with the target (Li) to produce excited nuclei, which then "boil off" or evaporate a neutron.

Parkin, Don M. (Los Alamos, NM); Dudey, Norman D. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

MEASUREMENT OF THE NEUTRON SPECTRUM OF THE HB-4 COLD SOURCE AT THE HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurements of the cold neutron spectrum from the super critical hydrogen cold source at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were made using time-of-flight spectroscopy. Data were collected at reactor power levels of 8.5MW, 42.5MW and 85MW. The moderator temperature was also varied. Data were collected at 17K and 25K while the reactor power was at 8.5MW, 17K and 25K while at 42.5MW and 18K and 22K while at 85MW. The purpose of these measurements was to characterize the brightness of the cold source and to better understand the relationship between reactor power, moderator temperature, and cold neutron production. The authors will discuss the details of the measurement, the changes observed in the neutron spectrum, and the process for determining the source brightness from the measured neutron intensity.

Robertson, Lee [ORNL; Iverson, Erik B [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Theory and Analysis of the Feynman-Alpha Method for Deterministically and Randomly Pulsed Neutron Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contract FIKW-CT-2000-00063. REFERENCES 1. R. UHRIG, Random Noise Techniques in Nuclear Reactor Systems. Conf. New Frontiers of Nuclear Technology: Reactor Phys- ics (PHYSOR 2002), Seoul, Korea, October 7 Determination in Accelerator Driven Nuclear Reactors by Statistics from Neutron Detectors ~Feynman-Alpha Method

Pázsit, Imre

235

Popularity, Interoperability, and Impact of Programming Languages in 100,000 Open Source Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractProgramming languages have been proposed even before the era of the modern computer. As years have gone, computer resources have increased and application domains have expanded, leading to the proliferation of hundreds of programming languages, each attempting to improve over others or to address new programming paradigms. These languages range from procedural languages like C, objectoriented languages like Java, and functional languages such as ML and Haskell. Unfortunately, there is a lack of large scale and comprehensive studies that examine the popularity, interoperability, and impact of various programming languages. To fill this gap, this study investigates a hundred thousands of open source software projects from GitHub to answer various research questions on the popularity, interoperability and impact of various languages measured in different ways (e.g., in terms of lines of code, development teams, issues, etc.). Keywords-Programming languages; Popularity; Interoperability; Open source; Software projects; GitHub

Tegawend F. Bissy; Ferdian Thung; David Lo; Lingxiao Jiang; Laurent Rveillre

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Methods for absorbing neutrons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A conduction cooled neutron absorber may include a metal matrix composite that comprises a metal having a thermal neutron cross-section of at least about 50 barns and a metal having a thermal conductivity of at least about 1 W/cmK. Apparatus for providing a neutron flux having a high fast-to-thermal neutron ratio may include a source of neutrons that produces fast neutrons and thermal neutrons. A neutron absorber positioned adjacent the neutron source absorbs at least some of the thermal neutrons so that a region adjacent the neutron absorber has a fast-to-thermal neutron ratio of at least about 15. A coolant in thermal contact with the neutron absorber removes heat from the neutron absorber.

Guillen, Donna P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Longhurst, Glen R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Porter, Douglas L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Parry, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

237

Neutron reflecting supermirror structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources.

Wood, James L. (Drayton Plains, MI)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Neutron reflecting supermirror structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. 2 figs.

Wood, J.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Characterization of a Be(p,xn) neutron source for fission yields measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on measurements performed at The Svedberg Laboratory (TSL) to characterize a proton-neutron converter for independent fission yield studies at the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP facility (Jyv\\"askyl\\"a, Finland). A 30 MeV proton beam impinged on a 5 mm water-cooled Beryllium target. Two independent experimental techniques have been used to measure the neutron spectrum: a Time of Flight (TOF) system used to estimate the high-energy contribution, and a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer able to provide precise results from thermal energies up to 20 MeV. An overlap between the energy regions covered by the two systems will permit a cross-check of the results from the different techniques. In this paper, the measurement and analysis techniques will be presented together with some preliminary results.

A. Mattera; P. Andersson; A. Hjalmarsson; M. Lantz; S. Pomp; V. Rakopoulos; A. Solders; J. Valldor-Blcher; D. Gorelov; H. Penttil; S. Rinta-Antila; A. V. Prokofiev; E. Passoth; R. Bedogni; A. Gentile; D. Bortot; A. Esposito; M. V. Introini; A. Pola

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

240

Neutron source, linear-accelerator fuel enricher and regenerator and associated methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for producing fissile material inside of fabricated nuclear elements so that they can be used to produce power in nuclear power reactors. Fuel elements, for example, of a LWR are placed in pressure tubes in a vessel surrounding a liquid lead-bismuth flowing columnar target. A linear-accelerator proton beam enters the side of the vessel and impinges on the dispersed liquid lead-bismuth columns and produces neutrons which radiate through the surrounding pressure tube assembly or blanket containing the nuclear fuel elements. These neutrons are absorbed by the natural fertile uranium-238 elements and are transformed to fissile plutonium-239. The fertile fuel is thus enriched in fissile material to a concentration whereby they can be used in power reactors. After use in the power reactors, dispensed depleted fuel elements can be reinserted into the pressure tubes surrounding the target and the nuclear fuel regenerated for further burning in the power reactor.

Steinberg, Meyer (Huntington Station, NY); Powell, James R. (Shoreham, NY); Takahashi, Hiroshi (Setauket, NY); Grand, Pierre (Blue Point, NY); Kouts, Herbert (Brookhaven, NY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "neutron source project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Novel Compact Accelerator-Based Neutron and Gamma Sources for Future Detector Calibration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Novel ultra-compact, electrically switchable, time-structured/pulsed, ~1-14 MeV-level neutron and photon generators have application embedded into large detector systems, especially calorimeters, for energy and operational calibration. The small sizes are applicable to permanent in-situ deployment, or able to be conveniently inserted into large high energy physics detector systems. For bench- testing of prototypes, or for detector module production testing, these compact n and gamma generators offer advantages.

Jennings, G; Winn, D R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Time-of-Flight Bragg Scattering from Aligned Stacks of Lipid Bilayers using the Liquids Reflectometer at the Spallation Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time-of-flight (TOF) neutron diffraction experiments on aligned stacks of lipid bilayers using the horizontal Liquids Reflectometer at the Spallation Neutron Source are reported. Specific details are given regarding the instrumental setup, data collection and reduction, phase determination of the structure factors, and reconstruction of the one-dimensional neutron scattering length density (NSLD) profile. The validity of using TOF measurements to determine the one-dimensional NSLD profile is demonstrated by reproducing the results of two well known lipid bilayer structures. The method is then applied to show how an antimicrobial peptide affects membranes with and without cholesterol.

Pan, Jianjun [ORNL; Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL; Carmichael, Justin R [ORNL; Ankner, John Francis [ORNL; Katsaras, John [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

FISSION TARGET DESIGN AND INTEGRATION OF NEUTRON CONVERTER FOR EURISOL-DS PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of a new fission target for EURISOL-DS is presented with a detailed description of the target. Calculations of several configurations were done using Monte Carlo code FLUKA aimed to obtaining 1015 fissions/s on single target. In Eurisol, neutrons inducing the fission reactions are produced by a proton beam 1GeV-4mA interacting with a mercury converter. The target configuration was customized to gain fission yield from the large amount of low energy neutrons produced by the Hg converter. To this purpose, the fissile material is composed by discs of 238-Uranium carbide enriched with 15 g of 235-U. Studies of several geometries were done in order to define the shape and composition of uranium target, taking into account the mechanical and space constraints

J. Bermudez, O. Alyakrinskiy, M. Barbui, F. Negoita, L. Serbina, L.B. Tecchio, E. Udup

244

Palm top plasma focus device as a portable pulsed neutron source  

SciTech Connect

Development of a palm top plasma focus device generating (5.2 {+-} 0.8) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} neutrons/pulse into 4{pi} steradians with a pulse width of 15 {+-} 3 ns is reported for the first time. The weight of the system is less than 1.5 kg. The system comprises a compact capacitor bank, a triggered open air spark gap switch, and a sealed type miniature plasma focus tube. The setup is around 14 cm in diameter and 12.5 cm in length. The energy driver for the unit is a capacitor bank of four cylindrical commercially available electrolytic capacitors. Each capacitor is of 2 {mu}F capacity, 4.5 cm in diameter, and 9.8 cm in length. The cost of each capacitor is less than US$ 10. The internal diameter and the effective length of the plasma focus unit are 2.9 cm and 5 cm, respectively. A DC to DC converter power supply powered by two rechargeable batteries charges the capacitor bank to the desired voltage and also provides a trigger pulse of -15 kV to the spark gap. The maximum energy of operation of the device is 100 J (8 {mu}F, 5 kV, 59 kA) with deuterium gas filling pressure of 3 mbar. The neutrons have also been produced at energy as low as 36 J (3 kV) of operation. The neutron diagnostics are carried out with a bank of {sup 3}He detectors and with a plastic scintillator detector. The device is portable, reusable, and can be operated for multiple shots with a single gas filling.

Rout, R. K.; Niranjan, Ram; Srivastava, R.; Rawool, A. M.; Kaushik, T. C.; Gupta, Satish C. [Applied Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Mishra, P. [Materials Processing Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Gas projects surge in the Middle East as governments seek new revenue sources  

SciTech Connect

The rapid development of natural gas and condensate reserves in the Middle East results from a simple motivation: the desire of governments to earn revenues. For the past decade, Middle East governments have run budget deficits, which they funded by drawing down foreign assets and issuing debt. Now in the process of structural economic reform, they have begun to use an under-utilized resource--natural gas, of which Middle East governments own about one third of the world`s reserves. Governments receive revenues from several sources in natural gas developments, which makes the projects very attractive. Revenue comes from the sale of the natural gas in the domestic market and, if exported, the international market; the sale of associated condensates; the additional exports of crude oil or refined products if natural gas is substituted for refined products in domestic markets; the increased sale of crude oil if natural gas is injected into reservoirs to maintain pressure; and the sale of petrochemicals where natural gas is used as feedstock. Large projects under way in the Middle East highlight the consequences of multiple revenue sources and interlinked costs of natural gas and condensate development. Other countries in the region are undertaking similar projects, so examples cited represent only a portion of what is occurring. The paper describes Abu Dhabi, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and Iran.

Williams, M.D. [International Energy Agency, Paris (France)

1997-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

246

GALLIUM ARSENIDE SEMICONDUCTOR-BASED NEUTRON DETECTOR  

NEUTRON DETECTOR BENEFITS Portable, ... High Flux Isotope Reactor and Spallation Neutron Source. Several Homeland Security. LINKS TO ONLINE ...

247

INGRID: an intense neutron generator for radiation-induced damage studies in the CTR materials program  

SciTech Connect

The proposal is broken into the following chapters: (1) the need for a neutron irradiation facility, (2) characteristics of the neutron source, (3) the accelerator, (4) the lithium target source, (5) buildings, utilities, and experimental facilities, and (6) project management, schedule, and costs. (MOW)

Saltmarsh, M.J.; Worsham, R.E. (eds.)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) Seismic Source Characterization (SSC) for Nuclear Facilities Project  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a new seismic source characterization (SSC) model for the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS). It will replace the Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States, EPRI Report NP-4726 (July 1986) and the Seismic Hazard Characterization of 69 Nuclear Plant Sites East of the Rocky Mountains, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Model, (Bernreuter et al., 1989). The objective of the CEUS SSC Project is to develop a new seismic source model for the CEUS using a Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) Level 3 assessment process. The goal of the SSHAC process is to represent the center, body, and range of technically defensible interpretations of the available data, models, and methods. Input to a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) consists of both seismic source characterization and ground motion characterization. These two components are used to calculate probabilistic hazard results (or seismic hazard curves) at a particular site. This report provides a new seismic source model. Results and Findings The product of this report is a regional CEUS SSC model. This model includes consideration of an updated database, full assessment and incorporation of uncertainties, and the range of diverse technical interpretations from the larger technical community. The SSC model will be widely applicable to the entire CEUS, so this project uses a ground motion model that includes generic variations to allow for a range of representative site conditions (deep soil, shallow soil, hard rock). Hazard and sensitivity calculations were conducted at seven test sites representative of different CEUS hazard environments. Challenges and Objectives The regional CEUS SSC model will be of value to readers who are involved in PSHA work, and who wish to use an updated SSC model. This model is based on a comprehensive and traceable process, in accordance with SSHAC guidelines in NUREG/CR-6372, Recommendations for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis: Guidance on Uncertainty and Use of Experts. The model will be used to assess the present-day composite distribution for seismic sources along with their characterization in the CEUS and uncertainty. In addition, this model is in a form suitable for use in PSHA evaluations for regulatory activities, such as Early Site Permit (ESPs) and Combined Operating License Applications (COLAs). Applications, Values, and Use Development of a regional CEUS seismic source model will provide value to those who (1) have submitted an ESP or COLA for Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) review before 2011; (2) will submit an ESP or COLA for NRC review after 2011; (3) must respond to safety issues resulting from NRC Generic Issue 199 (GI-199) for existing plants and (4) will prepare PSHAs to meet design and periodic review requirements for current and future nuclear facilities. This work replaces a previous study performed approximately 25 years ago. Since that study was completed, substantial work has been done to improve the understanding of seismic sources and their characterization in the CEUS. Thus, a new regional SSC model provides a consistent, stable basis for computing PSHA for a future time span. Use of a new SSC model reduces the risk of delays in new plant licensing due to more conservative interpretations in the existing and future literature. Perspective The purpose of this study, jointly sponsored by EPRI, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the NRC was to develop a new CEUS SSC model. The team assembled to accomplish this purpose was composed of distinguished subject matter experts from industry, government, and academia. The resulting model is unique, and because this project has solicited input from the present-day larger technical community, it is not likely that there will be a need for significant revision for a number of years. See also Sponsors Perspective for more details. The goal of this project was to implement the CEUS SSC work plan for developing a regional CEUS SSC model. The work plan, formulated by the project manager and a

Kevin J. Coppersmith; Lawrence A. Salomone; Chris W. Fuller; Laura L. Glaser; Kathryn L. Hanson; Ross D. Hartleb; William R. Lettis; Scott C. Lindvall; Stephen M. McDuffie; Robin K. McGuire; Gerry L. Stirewalt; Gabriel R. Toro; Robert R. Youngs; David L. Slayter; Serkan B. Bozkurt; Randolph J. Cumbest; Valentina Montaldo Falero; Roseanne C. Perman' Allison M. Shumway; Frank H. Syms; Martitia (Tish) P. Tuttle

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

249

Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) Seismic Source Characterization (SSC) for Nuclear Facilities Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a new seismic source characterization (SSC) model for the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS). It will replace the Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States, EPRI Report NP-4726 (July 1986) and the Seismic Hazard Characterization of 69 Nuclear Plant Sites East of the Rocky Mountains, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Model, (Bernreuter et al., 1989). The objective of the CEUS SSC Project is to develop a new seismic source model for the CEUS using a Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) Level 3 assessment process. The goal of the SSHAC process is to represent the center, body, and range of technically defensible interpretations of the available data, models, and methods. Input to a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) consists of both seismic source characterization and ground motion characterization. These two components are used to calculate probabilistic hazard results (or seismic hazard curves) at a particular site. This report provides a new seismic source model. Results and Findings The product of this report is a regional CEUS SSC model. This model includes consideration of an updated database, full assessment and incorporation of uncertainties, and the range of diverse technical interpretations from the larger technical community. The SSC model will be widely applicable to the entire CEUS, so this project uses a ground motion model that includes generic variations to allow for a range of representative site conditions (deep soil, shallow soil, hard rock). Hazard and sensitivity calculations were conducted at seven test sites representative of different CEUS hazard environments. Challenges and Objectives The regional CEUS SSC model will be of value to readers who are involved in PSHA work, and who wish to use an updated SSC model. This model is based on a comprehensive and traceable process, in accordance with SSHAC guidelines in NUREG/CR-6372, Recommendations for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis: Guidance on Uncertainty and Use of Experts. The model will be used to assess the present-day composite distribution for seismic sources along with their characterization in the CEUS and uncertainty. In addition, this model is in a form suitable for use in PSHA evaluations for regulatory activities, such as Early Site Permit (ESPs) and Combined Operating License Applications (COLAs). Applications, Values, and Use Development of a regional CEUS seismic source model will provide value to those who (1) have submitted an ESP or COLA for Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) review before 2011; (2) will submit an ESP or COLA for NRC review after 2011; (3) must respond to safety issues resulting from NRC Generic Issue 199 (GI-199) for existing plants and (4) will prepare PSHAs to meet design and periodic review requirements for current and future nuclear facilities. This work replaces a previous study performed approximately 25 years ago. Since that study was completed, substantial work has been done to improve the understanding of seismic sources and their characterization in the CEUS. Thus, a new regional SSC model provides a consistent, stable basis for computing PSHA for a future time span. Use of a new SSC model reduces the risk of delays in new plant licensing due to more conservative interpretations in the existing and future literature. Perspective The purpose of this study, jointly sponsored by EPRI, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the NRC was to develop a new CEUS SSC model. The team assembled to accomplish this purpose was composed of distinguished subject matter experts from industry, government, and academia. The resulting model is unique, and because this project has solicited input from the present-day larger technical community, it is not likely that there will be a need for significant revision for a number of years. See also Sponsors Perspective for more details. The goal of this project was to implement the CEUS SSC work plan for developing a regional CEUS SSC model. The work plan, formulated by the project manager and a

Kevin J. Coppersmith; Lawrence A. Salomone; Chris W. Fuller; Laura L. Glaser; Kathryn L. Hanson; Ross D. Hartleb; William R. Lettis; Scott C. Lindvall; Stephen M. McDuffie; Robin K. McGuire; Gerry L. Stirewalt; Gabriel R. Toro; Robert R. Youngs; David L. Slayter; Serkan B. Bozkurt; Randolph J. Cumbest; Valentina Montaldo Falero; Roseanne C. Perman' Allison M. Shumway; Frank H. Syms; Martitia (Tish) P. Tuttle

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Facilities | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Isotope Reactor. The pulsed neutron source at SNS and the continuous neutron source at HFIR complement each other well and, along with their state-of-the-art instruments, provide...

251

Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization Project: Workshop 1 Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Central and Eastern U.S. Seismic Source Characterization for Nuclear Facilities (CEUS SSC) Workshop on Key Issues and Available Data was the first in a series of workshops jointly sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Advanced Nuclear Technology (ANT) Program, the U.S. DOE, and the U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission in support of the CEUS SSC Project. The objective of the CEUS SSC is to develop a comprehensive and up-to-date SSC for a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) th...

2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

252

Calculation Package: Derivation of Facility-Specific Derived Air Concentration (DAC) Values in Support of Spallation Neutron Source Operations  

SciTech Connect

Derived air concentration (DAC) values for 175 radionuclides* produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), but not listed in Appendix A of 10 CFR 835 (01/01/2009 version), are presented. The proposed DAC values, ranging between 1 E-07 {micro}Ci/mL and 2 E-03 {micro}Ci/mL, were calculated in accordance with the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and are intended to support an exemption request seeking regulatory relief from the 10 CFR 835, Appendix A, requirement to apply restrictive DACs of 2E-13 {micro}Ci/mL and 4E-11 {micro}Ci/mL and for non-listed alpha and non-alpha-emitting radionuclides, respectively.

McLaughlin, David A [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Conceptual Design for Replacement of the DTL and CCL with Superconducting RF Cavities in the Spallation Neutron Source Linac  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source Linac utilizes normal conducting RF cavities in the low energy section from 2.5 MeV to 186 MeV. Six Drift Tube Linac (DTL) structures accelerate the beam to 87 MeV, and four Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL) structures provide further acceleration to 186 MeV. The remainder of the Linac is comprised of 81 superconducting cavities packaged in 23 cryomodules to provide final beam energy of approximately 1 GeV. The superconducting Linac has proven to be substantially more reliable than the normal conducting Linac despite the greater number of stations and the complexity associated with the cryogenic plant and distribution. A conceptual design has been initiated on a replacement of the DTL and CCL with superconducting RF cavities. The motivation, constraints, and conceptual design are presented.

Champion, Mark S [ORNL; Doleans, Marc [ORNL; Kim, Sang-Ho [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Shielding and Activation Analyses in Support of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ES{ampersand}H Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shielding and activation analyses play an important part in determining how to meet the Environmental, Safety and Health (ES{ampersand}H) requirements of an intense high-energy accelerator facility like the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The shielding and activation analyses described in this paper were performed primarily using the CALOR code system coupled with MCNP for radiation transport, the ORIHET95 isotope generation and depletion code for activation analysis, and the DOORS multi-dimensional discrete ordinates transport code system for shielding analyses. Additionally, a portion of the shielding calculations were performed with the semi-empirical code - CASL. This paper gives an overview of relevant ES{ampersand}H policies and requirements, and provides detailed discussions of the shielding and activation analyses completed in support of those policies and requirements.

Odano, Naoteru; Johnson, Jeffrey O.; Harrington, R. M.; DeVore, Joe R.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Accelerator based neutron source for neutron capture therapy B. Bayanov, Yu. Belchenko, V. Belov, V. Davydenko, A. Donin, A. Dranichnikov, A. Ivanov,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF LOW-ENERGY NEUTRONS IN SOLAR FLARES AND THE IMPORTANCE OF THEIR DETECTION IN THE INNER HELIOSPHERE R 20375, USA; murphy@ssd5.nrl.navy.mil 2 Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel ABSTRACT Neutron detectors on spacecraft in the inner heliosphere can observe the low-energy (

Taskaev, Sergey Yur'evich

256

Prospects for future projections of the basic energy sources in Turkey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main goal of this study is to develop the energy sources estimation equations in order to estimate the future projections and make correct investments in Turkey using artificial neural network (ANN) approach. It is also expected that this study will be helpful in demonstrating energy situation of Turkey in amount of EU countries. Basic energy indicators such as population, gross generation, installed capacity, net energy consumption, import, export are used in input layer of ANN. Basic energy sources such as coal, lignite, fuel-oil, natural gas and hydro are in output layer. Data from 1975 to 2003 are used to train. Three years (1981, 1994 and 2003) are only used as test data to confirm this method. Also, in this study, the best approach was investigated for each energy sources by using different learning algorithms (scaled conjugate gradient (SCG) and Levenberg-Marquardt (LM)) and a logistic sigmoid transfer function in the ANN with developed software. The statistical coefficients of multiple determinations (R{sup 2}-value) for training data are equal to 0.99802, 0.99918, 0.997134, 0.998831 and 0.995681 for natural gas, lignite, coal, hydraulic, and fuel-oil, respectively. Similarly, these values for testing data are equal to 0.995623, 0.999456, 0.998545, 0.999236, and 0.99002. The best approach was found for lignite by SCG algorithm with seven neurons so mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) is equal to 1.646753 for lignite. According to the results, the future projections of energy indicators using ANN technique have been obviously predicted within acceptable errors. Apart from reducing the whole time required, the importance of the ANN approach is possible to find solutions that make energy applications more viable and thus more attractive to potential users.

Sozen, A.; Arcaklioglu, E. [Gazi University, Ankara (Turkey). Technical Education Facility

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Effects of an RTG power source on neutron spectroscopy measurements on the martian surface.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A continuing goal of Mars science is to identify the exact locations of near-surface water and/or hydrated minerals using in situ measurements. Recent data from the Mars Odyssey mission has used both neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy to measure large amounts of water ice near both polar regions . Furthermore, these data have also determined that in the mid-latitude regions, there likely exist relatively large amounts of hydrogen (-4-7 equivalent H2O wt.%), although it is not certain in which form this hydrogen exists . While these are exciting results, one drawback of these measurements is that they are averaged over a large (-400 km) footp ri nt and do not reflect any small (<1 km) inhomogenieties in hydrogen abundance that likely exist on the Martian surface. For any future in situ mission (e g, Mars Smart Lander (MSL)) that seeks to measure and characterize nearsurface H 2O, especially in the mid-latitude regions, is will be necessary to know th e locati ons of the H20.

Lawrence, David J. (David Jeffery),; Elphic, R. C. (Richard C.); Wiens, R. C. (Roger C.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Neutron Science Facilities Operating Status | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neutron Science Facilities Operating Status High Flux Isotope Reactor The reactor is currently operating at 100% power for fuel cycle 449. Spallation Neutron Source SNS is shutdown...

259

Lead-Bismuth-Eutectic Spallation Neutron Source for Nuclear Transmuter Y. Gohar, J. Herceg, L Krajtl, D. Pointer, J. Saiveau, T. Sofu, and P. Finck  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-driven test facility (ADTF). The ADTF is a major nuclear research facility that will provide multiple testing to operate as a user facility that allows testing advanced nuclear technologies and applications, materialLead-Bismuth-Eutectic Spallation Neutron Source for Nuclear Transmuter Y. Gohar, J. Herceg, L

McDonald, Kirk

260

Amorphous Silicon Based Neutron Detector  

SciTech Connect

Various large-scale neutron sources already build or to be constructed, are important for materials research and life science research. For all these neutron sources, neutron detectors are very important aspect. However, there is a lack of a high-performance and low-cost neutron beam monitor that provides time and temporal resolution. The objective of this SBIR Phase I research, collaboratively performed by Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC (MWOE), the University of Toledo (UT) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is to demonstrate the feasibility for amorphous silicon based neutron beam monitors that are pixilated, reliable, durable, fully packaged, and fabricated with high yield using low-cost method. During the Phase I effort, work as been focused in the following areas: 1) Deposition of high quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films using very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (VHF PECVD) at high deposition rate and with low device shunting; 2) Fabrication of Si/SiO2/metal/p/i/n/metal/n/i/p/metal/SiO2/ device for the detection of alpha particles which are daughter particles of neutrons through appropriate nuclear reactions; and 3) Testing of various devices fabricated for alpha and neutron detection; As the main results: High quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films have been successfully deposited using VHF PECVD on various low-cost substrates; Various single-junction and double junction detector devices have been fabricated; The detector devices fabricated have been systematically tested and analyzed. Some of the fabricated devices are found to successfully detect alpha particles. Further research is required to bring this Phase I work beyond the feasibility demonstration toward the final prototype devices. The success of this project will lead to a high-performance, low-cost, X-Y pixilated neutron beam monitor that could be used in all of the neutron facilities worldwide. In addition, the technologies developed here could be used to develop X-ray and neutron monitors that could be used in the future for security checks at the airports and other critical facilities. The project would lead to devices that could significantly enhance the performance of multi-billion dollar neutron source facilities in the US and bring our nation to the forefront of neutron beam sciences and technologies which have enormous impact to materials, life science and military research and applications.

Xu, Liwei

2004-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

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261

A diffusion theory model for optimization calculations of cold neutron sources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This summary describes a simple two-group diffusion model of an infinite slab, liquid deuterium (LD/sub 2/) cold source. The simplicity of the model permits us to obtain an analytical solution from which we can deduce the reason for the optimum thickness based solely on diffusion type phenomena. Also, a second more sophisticated model is described, and the results compared to a deterministic transport calculation. The good (particularly qualitative) agreement between the results suggests that diffusion theory methods can be used in parametric and optimization studies in order to avoid the generally more expensive transport calculations. 5 refs., 1 fig.

Azmy, Y.Y.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Producing persistent, high-current, high-duty-factor H{sup -} beams for routine 1 MW operation of Spallation Neutron Source (invited)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 2009, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has been producing neutrons with ion beam powers near 1 MW, which requires the extraction of {approx}50 mA H{sup -} ions from the ion source with a {approx}5% duty factor. The 50 mA are achieved after an initial dose of {approx}3 mg of Cs and heating the Cs collar to {approx}170 deg. C. The 50 mA normally persist for the entire 4-week source service cycles. Fundamental processes are reviewed to elucidate the persistence of the SNS H{sup -} beams without a steady feed of Cs and why the Cs collar temperature may have to be kept near 170 deg. C.

Stockli, Martin P.; Han, B. X.; Hardek, T. W.; Kang, Y. W.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Welton, R. [Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Sources of Spread in Multimodel Projections of the Greenland Ice Sheet Surface Mass Balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The many studies investigating the future change of the Greenland Ice Sheet surface mass balance from climate model output exhibit a wide range of projections. This study makes projections from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 ...

Masakazu Yoshimori; Ayako Abe-Ouchi

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Conceptual design of thorium-fuelled Mitrailleuse accelerator-driven subcritical reactor using D-Be neutron source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A distributed accelerator is a charged-particle accelerator that uses a new acceleration method based on repeated electrostatic acceleration. This method offers outstanding benefits not possible with the conventional radio-frequency acceleration method, including: (1) high acceleration efficiency, (2) large acceleration current, and (3) lower failure rate made possible by a fully solid-state acceleration field generation circuit. A 'Mitrailleuse Accelerator' is a product we have conceived to optimize this distributed accelerator technology for use with a high-strength neutron source. We have completed the conceptual design of a Mitrailleuse Accelerator and of a thorium-fuelled subcritical reactor driven by a Mitrailleuse Accelerator. This paper presents the conceptual design details and approach to implementing the subcritical reactor core. We will spend the next year or so on detailed design work, and then will start work on developing a prototype for demonstration. If there are no obstacles in setting up a development organization, we expect to finish verifying the prototype's performance by the third quarter of 2015. (authors)

Kokubo, Y. [Quan Japan Company Limited, 3-9-15 Sannomiya-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo, 650-0021 (Japan); Kamei, T. [Research Inst. for Applied Sciences, 49 Tanaka Ohicho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-shi, Kyoto, 606-8202 (Japan)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Study on severe accident fuel dispersion behavior in the Advanced Neutron Source reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Core flow blockage events are a leading contributor to core damage initiation risk in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor. During such an accident, insufficient cooling of the fuel could result in core heatup and melting under full coolant flow condition. Coolant inertia forces acting on the melt surface would likely break up the melt into small particles. Under thermal-hydraulic conditions of ANS coolant channel, micro-fine melt particles are expected. Heat transfer between melt particle and coolant, which affects particle breakup, was studied. The study indicates that the thermal effect on melt fragmentation seems to be negligible because the time corresponding to the breakup due to hydrodynamic forces is much shorter than the time for the melt surface to solidify. The study included modeling and analyses to predict transient behavior and transport of debris particles throughout the coolant system. The transient model accounts for the surface forces acting on the particle that results from the pressure variation on the surface, inertia, virtual mass, viscous force due to relative motion of particle in the coolant, gravitation, and resistance due to inhomogenous coolant velocity radially across piping due to possible turbulent coolant motions. Results indicate that debris particles would reside longest in heat exchangers because of lower coolant velocity there. Also core debris tends to move together upon melting and entrainment.

Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Georgevich, V. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Xiang, J.Y. [Wabash Coll., Crawfordsville, IN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Study on severe accident fuel dispersion behavior in the Advanced Neutron Source reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Core flow blockage events have been identified as a leading contributor to core damage initiation risk in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor. During such an accident, insufficient cooling of the fuel in a few adjacent blocked coolant channels out of several hundred channels, could also result in core heatup and melting under full coolant flow condition in other coolant channels. Coolant inertia forces acting on the melt surface would likely break up the melt into small particles. Under thermal-hydraulic conditions of ANS coolant channel, micro-fine melt particles are expected. Heat transfer between melt particle and coolant, which affects the particle breakup characteristics, was studied. The study indicates that the thermal effect on melt fragmentation seems to be negligible because the time corresponding to the breakup due to hydrodynamic forces is much shorter than the time for the melt surface to solidify. The study included modeling and analyses to predict transient behavior and transport of debris particles throughout the coolant system. The transient model accounts for the surface forces acting on the particle that result from the pressure variation on the surface, inertia, virtual mass, viscous force due to the relative motion of the particle in the coolant, gravitation, and resistance due to inhomogeneous coolant velocity radially across piping due to expected turbulent coolant motions. The results indicate that debris particles would reside longest in the heat exchangers because of lower coolant velocity there. Also they are entrained and move together in a cloud.

Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Georgevich, V.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Fusion reactivities and neutron source characteristics of beam-driven toroidal reactors with both D and T injection  

SciTech Connect

The reactor performance is considered for intensely beam-driven tokamak plasmas with 50:50 D-T composition maintained by neutral-beam injection of both D and T, together with plasma recycling. The D and T are injected with equal intensity and velocity. This mode of operation is most appropriate for high-duty- factor, high-power-density operation, in the absence of pellet injection. The isotropic velocity distributions of energetic D and T ions (for multi-angle injection) are calculated from a simple slowing-down model, but include a tail above the injection velocity. The neutron source characteristics are determined from fusion reactivities calculated for beam-target, hot-ion, and thermonuclear reactions. For conditions where Q approximates 1, beam-target reactions are dominant, although reactions among the hot ions contribute substantially to P/sub fusion/ when n/sub hot//n /sub e/ greater than or equal to 0.2. (auth)

Jassby, D.L.; Towner, H.H.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Progress and status of the IAEA coordinated research project: production of Mo-99 using LEU fission or neutron activation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since late 2004, the IAEA has developed and implemented a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) to assist countries interested in initiating indigenous, small-scale production of Mo-99 to meet local nuclear medicine requirements. The objective of the CRP is to provide interested countries with access to non-proprietary technologies and methods to produce Mo-99 using LEU foil or LEU mini-plate targets, or for the utilization of n,gamma neutron activation, e.g. through the use of gel generators. The project has made further progress since the RERTR 2006 meeting, with a Technical Workshop on Operational Aspects of Mo99 Production held 28-30 November 2006 in Vienna and the Second Research Coordination Meeting held in Bucharest, Romania 16-20 April 2007. The paper describes activities carried out as noted above, and as well as the provision of LEU foils to a number of participants, and the progress by a number of groups in preparing for LEU target assembly and disassembly, irradiation, chemical processing, and waste management. The participants' progress in particular on thermal hydraulics computations required for using LEU targets is notable, as also the progress in gel generator plant operations in India and Kazakhstan. Poland has joined as a new research agreement holder and an application by Egypt to be a contract holder is undergoing internal review in the IAEA and is expected to be approved. The IAEA has also participated in several open meetings of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences Study on Producing Medical Radioisotopes without HEU, which will also be discussed in the paper. (author)

Goldman, Ira N.; Adelfang, Pablo [Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Technology, International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: I.Goldman@iaea.org, E-mail: P.Adelfang@iaea.org; Ramamoorthy, Natesan [Division of Physical and Chemical Sciences, International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: N.Ramamoorthy@iaea.org

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

Status of R&D on Mitigating the Effects of Pressure Waves for the Spallation Neutron Source Mercury Target  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been conducting R&D on mitigating the effects of pressure waves in mercury spallation targets since 2001. More precisely, cavitation damage of the target vessel caused by the short beam pulse threatens to limit its lifetime more severely than radiation damage as well as limit its ultimate power capacity and hence its neutron intensity performance. The R&D program has moved from verification of the beam-induced damage phenomena to study of material and surface treatments for damage resistance to the current emphasis on gas injection techniques for damage mitigation. Two techniques are being worked on: injection of small dispersed gas bubbles that mitigate the pressure waves volumetrically; and protective gas walls that isolate the vessel from the damaging effects of collapsing cavitation bubbles. The latter has demonstrated good damage mitigation during in-beam testing with limited pulses, and adequate gas wall coverage at the beam entrance window has been demonstrated with the SNS mercury target flow configuration using a full scale mercury test loop. A question on the required area coverage remains which depends on results from SNS target post irradiation examination. The small gas bubble technique has been less effective during past in-beam tests but those results were with un-optimized and un-verified bubble populations. Another round of in-beam tests with small gas bubbles is planned for 2011. The first SNS target was removed from service in mid 2009 and samples were cut from two locations at the target s beam entrance window. Through-wall damage was observed at the innermost mercury vessel wall (not a containment wall). The damage pattern suggested correlation with the local mercury flow condition which is nearly stagnant at the peak damage location. Detailed post irradiation examination of the samples is under way that will assess the erosion and measure irradiation-induced changes in mechanical properties. Similar samples were cut from the second SNS target after it was removed from service in mid 2010. More extensive damage was observed on the target inner wall but damage to the containment wall was minimal.

Riemer, Bernie [ORNL; Wendel, Mark W [ORNL; Felde, David K [ORNL; Abdou, Ashraf A [ORNL; McClintock, David A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

The NIFFTE project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) is a double-sided Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with micromegas readout designed to measure the energy-dependent neutron-induced fission cross sections of the major and minor actinides with unprecedented accuracy. The NIFFTE project addresses the challenge of minimizing major sources of systematic uncertainties from previous fission chamber measurements such as: target and beam non-uniformities, misidentification of alpha and light charged particles as fission fragments, and uncertainties inherent to the reference standards used. In-beam tests of the NIFFTE TPC at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) started in 2010 and have continued in 2011, 2012 and 2013. An overview of the NIFFTE TPC status and performance at LANSCE will be presented.

Ruz J.; Asner D. M.; Baker R. G.; Bundgaard J.; Burgett E.; Cunningham M.; Deaven J.; Duke D. L.; Greife U.; Grimes S.; Heffner M.; Hill T.; Isenhower D.; Klay J. L.; Kleinrath V.; Kornilov N.; Laptev A. B.; Loveland W.; Masseyf T. N.; Meharchand R.; Qu H.; Sangiorgio S.; Seilhan B.; Snyder L.; Stave S.; Tatishvili G.; Thornton R. T.; Tovesson F.; Towell D.; Towell R. S.; Watson S.; Wendt B.; Wood L

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

271

Neutronic Characterization of the Megapie Target  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MEGAPIE project is one of the key experiments towards the feasibility of Accelerator Driven Systems. On-line operation and post-irradiation analysis will provide the scientific community with unique data on the behavior of a liquid spallation target under realistic irradiation conditions. A good neutronics performance of such a target is of primary importance towards an intense neutron source, where an extended liquid metal loop requires some dedicated verifications related to the delayed neutron activity of the irradiated PbBi. In this paper we report on the experimental characterization of the MEGAPIE neutronics in terms of the prompt neutron (PN) flux inside the target and the delayed neutron (DN) flux on the top of it. For the PN measurements, a complex detector, made of 8 microscopic fission chambers, has been built and installed in the central part of the target to measure the absolute neutron flux and its spatial distribution. Moreover, integral information on the neutron energy distribution as a function of the position along the beam axis could be extracted, providing integral constraints on the neutron production models implemented in transport codes such as MCNPX. For the DN measurement, we used a standard 3He counter and we acquired data during the start-up phase of the target irradiation in order to take sufficient statistics at variable beam power. Experimental results obtained on the PN flux characteristics and their comparison with MCNPX simulations are presented, together with a preliminary analysis of the DN decay time spectrum.

Stefano Panebianco; Olivier Bringer; Pavel Bokov; Sebastien Chabod; Frederic Chartier; Emmeric Dupont; Diane Dore; Xavier Ledoux; Alain Letourneau; Ludovic Oriol; Aurelien Prevost; Danas Ridikas; Jean-Christian Toussaint

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

Neutron reflecting supermirror structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. One layer of each set of bilayers consist of titanium, and the second layer of each set of bilayers consist of an alloy of nickel with carbon interstitially present in the nickel alloy.

Wood, James L. (Drayton Plains, MI)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

NESTLE: Few-group neutron diffusion equation solver utilizing the nodal expansion method for eigenvalue, adjoint, fixed-source steady-state and transient problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NESTLE is a FORTRAN77 code that solves the few-group neutron diffusion equation utilizing the Nodal Expansion Method (NEM). NESTLE can solve the eigenvalue (criticality); eigenvalue adjoint; external fixed-source steady-state; or external fixed-source. or eigenvalue initiated transient problems. The code name NESTLE originates from the multi-problem solution capability, abbreviating Nodal Eigenvalue, Steady-state, Transient, Le core Evaluator. The eigenvalue problem allows criticality searches to be completed, and the external fixed-source steady-state problem can search to achieve a specified power level. Transient problems model delayed neutrons via precursor groups. Several core properties can be input as time dependent. Two or four energy groups can be utilized, with all energy groups being thermal groups (i.e. upscatter exits) if desired. Core geometries modelled include Cartesian and Hexagonal. Three, two and one dimensional models can be utilized with various symmetries. The non-linear iterative strategy associated with the NEM method is employed. An advantage of the non-linear iterative strategy is that NSTLE can be utilized to solve either the nodal or Finite Difference Method representation of the few-group neutron diffusion equation.

Turinsky, P.J.; Al-Chalabi, R.M.K.; Engrand, P.; Sarsour, H.N.; Faure, F.X.; Guo, W. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

133Ba as a gamma-ray surrogate source for 1kg HEU and 10g 239Pu and 252Cf as a Neutron Surrogate for Pu  

SciTech Connect

Monte Carlo was performed for the purpose of relating gamma-ray signal strength from 1kg of HEU and 10g of {sup 239}Pu (as described in the ASTM standards) to the radiation emitted from an amount of {sup 133}Ba. A determination was made on the amount of {sup 133}Ba that could act as a surrogate for the specified amounts of HEU and Pu. {sup 133}Ba is not the ideal source to use as a surrogate for HEU because of its higher energies. {sup 133}Ba was chosen as the surrogate since it has a half-life of 10.54 years, rather then the more ideal surrogate of {sup 57}Co which has a half-life of 271 days. A similar Monte Carlo was performed for the purpose of relating neutron signal strength from 200g of Pu (as described in the ASTM standards) to the radiation emitted from an amount of shielded {sup 252}Cf. A determination was made on the amount of {sup 252}Cf necessary to act as a surrogate for the 200g of Pu. An ASTM standard source is a metallic sphere, cube, or right cylinder of SNM having maximum self-attenuation of its emitted radiation. For plutonium, the source should be at least 93% {sup 239}Pu, less than 6.5% {sup 240}Pu, and less than 0.5% impurities. A cadmium filter of at least 0.08cm thick should be used to reduce the impact of {sup 241}Am. For uranium, the source should contain at least 95% {sup 235}U and less than 0.25% impurities. For neutron detector testing, the neutron source shall be placed in a lead shielding container that reduces the gamma radiation from the source to 1% of its unshielded value.

Pohl, B A; Archer, D E

2004-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

275

Neutron and X-Ray Studies of Advanced Materials IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose to organize a seven-session Symposium on Neutron and X-Ray ... the advent of new powerful neutron sources such as the Spallation Neutron...

276

Phonon Studies with Inelastic Neutron Scattering and First ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Phonon Studies with Inelastic Neutron Scattering and .... by Asynchronous In-Situ Neutron Diffraction at the Spallation Neutron Source.

277

Publications from Research Conducted at FNPB | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the neutron electric dipole moment experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source", University of Kentucky , (2011). Wietfeldt F. E., Greene G. L., "Colloquium: the neutron...

278

Methodology for Assessing Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Assessing Mitigation Options for On-Road Mobile Sources Project for the Houston-Galveston Area Council  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methodology for Assessing Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Assessing Mitigation Options for On-Road Mobile Sources ­ Project for the Houston-Galveston Area Council This project addresses greenhouse gas

279

Neutron Source Strength Calibrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... We are in the process of installing a closed loop chilled water circulator in order to reduce temperature fluctuations of the bath caused by variations ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

280

Sources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SOURCES Microsoft Corporation. "Gasohol," Microsoft Encarta Online Encyclopedia 2001, http:encarta.msn.com. U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, A...

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281

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project Information Project Title: Express Stack Tools  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Express Stack Tools Express Stack Tools Date: 11/16/2010 DOE Code: 6730.020.81023 Contractor Code: 8067-971 Project Lead: Brian Black Project Overview 1) This project will test open and cased Hole logging tools in multiple wells. The tools to be testied include: 1. Brief project description [include anything that could impact the natural gamma, borehole temperature, compensated neutron, compensated density with PE, dual environment] induction/short guard, neutron prompt gamma, and acoustic televiewer tool. Radioactive sources will be run in the well as part of the toolstring. 2. Legal location 3. Duration of the project 2) 48-X-28 well location, SE %, SW %, Tsp 39N Rng 78W, Section 28; 45::3-X-21 well location, NE %, SW 4. Major equipment to be used %, Tsp 39N, Rng 78W, Section 21; 46-TpX-10 well location, NE %, SW Y.., Tsp38N, Rng 78W, Section 10.

282

Neutron Scattering Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gaithersburg, Maryland, USA Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN), Lima, Peru Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, USA University of...

283

Neutron Activation Calculator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and incoherent scattering cross sections). Source neutrons (Ang, meV or m/s), Density (g/cm 3 or lattice), Thickness (cm). ...

284

Neutron streak camera  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for improved sensitivity and time resolution of a neutron measurement. The detector is provided with an electrode assembly having a neutron sensitive cathode which emits relatively low energy secondary electrons. The neutron sensitive cathode has a large surface area which provides increased sensitivity by intercepting a greater number of neutrons. The cathode is also curved to compensate for differences in transit time of the neutrons emanating from the point source. The slower speeds of the secondary electrons emitted from a certain portion of the cathode are matched to the transit times of the neutrons impinging thereupon.

Wang, C.L.

1981-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

285

Operational Status and Life Extension Plans for the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE)  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator and beam delivery complex generates the proton beams that serve three neutron production sources, a proton radiography facility and a medical and research isotope production facility. The recent operating history of the facility, including both achievements and challenges, will be reviewed. Plans for performance improvement will be discussed, together with the underlying drivers for the ongoing LANSCE Linac Risk Mitigation (LRM) project. The details of this latter project will also be discussed.

Erickson, John L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rees, Daniel E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Data Management Practices | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to data generated from neutron scattering experiments at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Any changes to these guidelines will be...

287

What Can You Do With Neutrons?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the globe, including the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Today the number of active neutron users in...

288

Neutron Scatter Camera for Radiaton Detection - Energy ...  

Patent 7,741,613: Neutron scatter camera An instrument that will directly image the fast fission neutrons from a special nuclear material source has ...

289

Triple Ion-Beam Studies of Radiation Damage Effects in a 316LN Austenitic Alloy for a High Power Spallation Neutron Source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Austenitic 316LN alloy was ion-irradiated using the unique Triple Ion Beam Facility (TIF) at ORNL to investigate radiation damage effects relevant to spallation neutron sources. The TIF was used to simulate significant features of GeV proton irradiation effects in spallation neutron source target materials by producing displacement damage while simultaneously injecting helium and hydrogen at appropriately high gas/dpa ratios. Irradiations were carried out at 80, 200, and 350 C using 3.5 MeV Fe{sup 2}, 360 keV He{sup +}, and 180 keV H{sup +} to accumulate 50 dpa by Fe, 10,000 appm of He, and 50,000 appm of H. Irradiations were also carried out at 200 C in single and dual ion beam modes. The specific ion energies were chosen to maximize the damage and the gas accumulation at a depth of {approx} 1 {micro}m. Variations in microstructure and hardness of irradiated specimens were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and a nanoindentation technique, respectively. TEM investigation yielded varying damage defect microstructures, comprising black dots, faulted and unfaulted loops, and a high number density of fine bubbles (typically less than 1 nm in diameter). With increasing temperature, faulted loops had a tendency to unfault, and bubble microstructure changed from a bimodal size distribution to a unimodal distribution. Triple ion irradiations at the three temperatures resulted in similar increases in hardness of approximately a factor of two. Individually, Fe and He ions resulted in a similar magnitude of hardness increase, whereas H ions showed only a very small effect. The present study has yielded microstructural information relevant to spallation neutron source conditions and indicates that the most important concern may be radiation induced hardening and associated ductility loss.

Lee, EH

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Neutron Imaging for Non-Destructive Testing of Nuclear Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After irradiation such samples are strong ? sources themselves. At the spallation neutron source SINQ of the Paul Scherrer Institute operates a unique neutron...

291

Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project  

SciTech Connect

The Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project (REAP), which is being conducted by the Probabilistic Integrity Safety Assessment (PISA) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under funding from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission s (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, aims to provide an archival source of information about the effect of neutron radiation on the properties of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Specifically, this project is an effort to create an Internet-accessible RPV steel embrittlement database. The project s website, https://reap.ornl.gov, provides information in two forms: (1) a document archive with surveillance capsule(s) reports and related technical reports, in PDF format, for the 104 commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States, with similar reports from other countries; and (2) a relational database archive with detailed information extracted from the reports. The REAP project focuses on data collected from surveillance capsule programs for light-water moderated, nuclear power reactor vessels operated in the United States, including data on Charpy V-notch energy testing results, tensile properties, composition, exposure temperatures, neutron flux (rate of irradiation damage), and fluence, (Fast Neutron Fluence a cumulative measure of irradiation for E>1 MeV). Additionally, REAP contains data from surveillance programs conducted in other countries. REAP is presently being extended to focus on embrittlement data analysis, as well. This paper summarizes the current status of the REAP database and highlights opportunities to access the data and to participate in the project.

Klasky, Hilda B [ORNL; Bass, Bennett Richard [ORNL; Williams, Paul T [ORNL; Phillips, Rick [ORNL; Erickson, Marjorie A [ORNL; Kirk, Mark T [ORNL; Stevens, Gary L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Neutron Repulsion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Earth is connected gravitationally, magnetically and electrically to its heat source - a neutron star that is obscured from view by waste products in the photosphere. Neutron repulsion is like the hot filament in an incandescent light bulb. Excited neutrons are emitted from the solar core and decay into hydrogen that glows in the photosphere like a frosted light bulb. Neutron repulsion was recognized in nuclear rest mass data in 2000 as the overlooked source of energy, the keystone of an arch that locked together these puzzling space-age observations: 1.) Excess 136Xe accompanied primordial helium in the stellar debris that formed the solar system (Fig. 1); 2.) The Sun formed on the supernova core (Fig. 2); 3.) Waste products from the core pass through an iron-rich mantle, selectively carrying lighter elements and lighter isotopes of each element into the photosphere (Figs. 3-4); and 4.) Neutron repulsion powers the Sun and sustains life (Figs. 5-7). Together these findings offer a framework for understanding how: a.) The Sun generates and releases neutrinos, energy and solar-wind hydrogen and helium; b.) An inhabitable planet formed and life evolved around an ordinary-looking star; c.) Continuous climate change - induced by cyclic changes in gravitational interactions of the Sun's energetic core with planets - has favored survival by adaptation.

Oliver K. Manuel

2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

293

Project X - a new multi-megawatt proton source at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

Project X is a multi-megawatt proton facility being developed to support intensity frontier research in elementary particle physics, with possible applications to nuclear physics and nuclear energy research, at Fermilab. The centerpiece of this program is a superconducting H-linac that will support world leading programs in long baseline neutrino experimentation and the study of rare processes. Based on technology shared with the International Linear Collider (ILC), Project X will provide multi-MW beams at 60-120 GeV from the Main Injector, simultaneous with very high intensity beams at lower energies. Project X will also support development of a Muon Collider as a future facility at the energy frontier.

Nagaitsev, S.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Operational aspects of an externally driven neutron multiplier assembly concept using a Z-pinch 14-MeV Neutron Source (ZEDNA).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the key safety and operational aspects of a Z-pinch Externally Driven Nuclear Assembly (ZEDNA) reactor concept which is envisioned to be built and operated at the Z-machine facility in Technical Area IV. Operating parameters and reactor neutronic conditions are established that would meet the design requirements of the system. Accident and off-normal conditions are analyzed using a point-kinetics, one-dimensional thermo-mechanical code developed specifically for ZEDNA applications. Downwind dose calculations are presented to determine the potential dose to the collocated worker and public in the event of a hypothetical catastrophic accident. Current and magnetic impulse modeling and the debris shield design are examined for the interface between the Z machine and the ZEDNA. This work was performed as part of the Advanced Fusion Grand Challenge Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. The conclusion of this work is that the ZEDNA concept is feasible and could be operated at the Z-machine facility without undue risk to collocated workers and the public.

Smith, David Lewis; Heames, Terence John (Alion Science and Technology, Albuquerque, NM); Parma, Edward J., Jr.; Peters, Curtis D.; Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma (Alion Science and Technology, Albuquerque, NM)

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

U.S.-CHINA RADIOLOGICAL SOURCE SECURITY PROJECT: CONTINUING AND EXPANDING BILATERAL COOPERATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The successful radiological security cooperation between the U.S. and China to secure at-risk sites near venues of the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics has led to an expanded bilateral nonproliferation cooperation scope. The U.S. Department of Energys National Nuclear Security Administration, the Chinese Atomic Energy Authority and the China Ministry of Environmental Protection are continuing joint efforts to secure radiological sources throughout China under the U.S.-China Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Technology (PUNT) Agreement. Joint cooperation activities include physical security upgrades of sites with International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Category 1 radiological sources, packaging, recovery, and storage of high activity transuranic and beta gamma sources, and secure transportation practices for the movement of recovered sources. Expansion of cooperation into numerous provinces within China includes the use of integrated training workshops that will demonstrate methodologies and best practices between U.S. and Chinese radiological source security and recovery experts. The fiscal year 2009 expanded scope of cooperation will be conducted similar to the 2008 Olympic cooperation with the Global Threat Reduction Initiative taking the lead for the U.S., PUNT being the umbrella agreement, and Los Alamos, Sandia, and Oak Ridge National Laboratories operating as technical working groups. This paper outlines the accomplishments of the joint implementation and training efforts to date and discusses the possible impact on future U.S./China cooperation.

Zhu, Zhixuan; Zhou, Qifu; Yang, Yaoyun; Huang, Chaoyun; Lloyd, James; Williams, Adam; Feldman, Alexander; Streeper, Charles; Pope, Noah G.; Hawk, Mark; Rawl, Rick; Howell, Randy A.; Kennedy, Catherine

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

296

Neutron Scattering Facilities | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Neutron Scattering Facilities Neutron Scattering Facilities Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers Electron-Beam Microcharacterization Centers Accelerator & Detector Research & Development Principal Investigators' Meetings Scientific Highlights Construction Projects BES Home User Facilities Neutron Scattering Facilities Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page This activity supports the operation of three DOE neutron scattering facilities, which are unique and effective tools for probing the structure of matter. Neutron scattering is particularly well-suited for determining the atomic positions of both light and heavy atoms in a solid and thermal fluctuations in these positions. In addition the neutron

297

Status of the ion sources developments for the Spiral2 project at GANIL  

SciTech Connect

The SPIRAL 2 facility is now under construction and will deliver either stable or radioactive ion beams. First tests of nickel beam production have been performed at GANIL with a new version of the large capacity oven, and a calcium beam has been produced on the heavy ion low energy beam transport line of SPIRAL 2, installed at LPSC Grenoble. For the production of radioactive beams, several target/ion-source systems (TISSs) are under development at GANIL as the 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source, the surface ionization source, and the oven prototype for heating the uranium carbide target up to 2000 deg. C. The existing test bench has been upgraded for these developments and a new one, dedicated for the validation of the TISS before mounting in the production module, is under design. Results and current status of these activities are presented.

Leherissier, P.; Bajeat, O.; Barue, C.; Canet, C.; Dubois, M.; Dupuis, M.; Flambard, J. L.; Frigot, R.; Jardin, P.; Leboucher, C.; Lemagnen, F.; Maunoury, L.; Osmond, B.; Pacquet, J. Y.; Pichard, A. [GANIL, Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds, CEA-DSM/CNRS-IN2P3, Bvd H. Becquerel, BP 55027 14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Thuillier, T. [LPSC, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut Polytechnique de Grenoble, Grenoble (France); Peaucelle, C. [IPNL, Universite de Lyon, Universite de Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Villeurbanne (France)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

NEUTRON-ENHANCED CALORIMETRY FOR HADRONS (NECH): FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of a project to apply scintillator technology recently developed at Louisiana Tech University to hadronic calorimetry. In particular, we developed a prototype calorimeter module incorporating scintillator embedded with metal oxide nanoparticles as the active layers. These metal oxide nanoparticles of gadolinium oxide, have high cross-sections for interactions with slow neutrons. As a part fo this research project, we have developed a novel method for producing plastic scintillators with metal oxide nanoparticles evenly distributed through the plastic without aggregation.We will test the performance of the calorimeter module in test beam and with a neutron source, in order to measure the response to the neutron component of hadronic showers. We will supplement our detector prototyping activities with detailed studies of the effect of neutron component on the resolution of hadronic energy measurements, particular in the next generation of particle flow calorimeters.

Andrew Stroud, Lee Sawyer

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

Estimation of the sub-criticality of the sodium-cooled fast reactor Monju using the modified neutron source multiplication method  

SciTech Connect

The Modified Neutron Source Method (MNSM) is applied to the Monju reactor. This static method to estimate sub-criticality has already given good results on commercial Pressurized Water Reactors. The MNSM consists both in the extraction of the fundamental mode seen by a detector to avoid the effect of higher modes near sources, and the correction of flux distortion effects due to control rod movement. Among Monju's particularities that have a big influence on MNSM factors are: the presence of two californium sources and the position of the detector which is located far from the core outside of the reactor vessel. The importance of spontaneous fission and ({alpha}, n) reactions which have increased during the shutdown period of 15 years will also be discussed. The relative position of detectors and sources deeply affect the correction factors in some regions. In order to evaluate the detector count rate, an analytical propagation has been conducted from the reactor vessel. For two subcritical states, an estimation of the reactivity has been made and compared to experimental data obtained in the restart experiments at Monju (2010). (authors)

Truchet, G. [Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires, Centre CEA de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Van Rooijen, W. F. G.; Shimazu, Y. [Research Inst. of Nuclear Engineering, Univ. of Fukui, Kanawa-cho, 1-2-4, T 914-0055, Fukui-ken, Tsuruga-shi (Japan); Yamaguchi, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, FBR Plant Engineering Center, 919-1279 Fukui-ken, Tsuruga-shi Shiraki 1 (Japan)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Analysis of containment performance and radiological consequences under severe accident conditions for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A severe accident study was conducted to evaluate conservatively scoped source terms and radiological consequences to support the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Conceptual Safety Analysis Report (CSAR). Three different types of severe accident scenarios were postulated with a view of evaluating conservatively scoped source terms. The first scenario evaluates maximum possible steaming loads and associated radionuclide transport, whereas the next scenario is geared towards evaluating conservative containment loads from releases of radionuclide vapors and aerosols with associated generation of combustible gases. The third scenario follows the prescriptions given by the 10 CFR 100 guidelines. It was included in the CSAR for demonstrating site-suitability characteristics of the ANS. Various containment configurations are considered for the study of thermal-hydraulic and radiological behaviors of the ANS containment. Severe accident mitigative design features such as the use of rupture disks were accounted for. This report describes the postulated severe accident scenarios, methodology for analysis, modeling assumptions, modeling of several severe accident phenomena, and evaluation of the resulting source term and radiological consequences.

Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "neutron source project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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301

Author manuscript, published in "13th International Conference on Quality Software (QSIC 2013), Nanjing: China (2013)" An Empirical Study of Adoption of Software Testing in Open Source Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractTesting is an indispensable part of software development efforts. It helps to improve the quality of software systems by finding bugs and errors during development and deployment. Huge amount of resources are spent on testing efforts. However, to what extent are they used in practice? In this study, we investigate the adoption of testing in open source projects. We study more than 20,000 non-trivial software projects and explore the correlation of test cases with various project development characteristics including: project size, development team size, number of bugs, number of bug reporters, and the programming languages of these projects. Keywords-Empirical study, Software testing, Adequacy, Test cases

Pavneet Singh Kochhar; Tegawend F. Bissy; David Lo; Lingxiao Jiang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Compact D-D/D-T neutron generators and their applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cold neutrons have an excellent resolution for the fusion-the fusion-based neutron source is more suitable for coldCold neutron source for Small Angle Neutron Scattering51 5.4 Summary of fusion-

Lou, Tak Pui

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Spermatogonia survival in mice after exposure to low doses of $^{60}$Co gamma-ray neutrons of 14 MeV and 400 MeV and neutrons from a Pu Be source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spermatogonia survival in mice after exposure to low doses of $^{60}$Co gamma-ray neutrons of 14 MeV and 400 MeV and neutrons from a Pu

Quintiliani, M; Baarli, Johan

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

In-Situ Neutron-Diffraction Study of a Ferritic Superalloy during ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The neutron diffraction experiments were conducted at VULCAN diffractometer, Spallation Neutron Source, ORNL, with the state-of-art thermomechanical...

305

O1: Advanced Neutron Monte-Carlo Ray-Tracing Simulations Using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, O. Advanced Neutron and Synchrotron Studies of Materials .... Status of China Spallation Neutron Source and Perspectives of Neutron Research in...

306

Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploring the Standard Model Exploring the Standard Model       You've heard a lot about the Standard Model and the pieces are hopefully beginning to fall into place. However, even a thorough understanding of the Standard Model is not the end of the story but the beginning. By exploring the structure and details of the Standard Model we encounter new questions. Why do the most fundamental particles have the particular masses we observe? Why aren't they all symmetric? How is the mass of a particle related to the masses of its constituents? Is there any other way of organizing the Standard Model? The activities in this project will elucidate but not answer our questions. The Standard Model tells us how particles behave but not necessarily why they do so. The conversation is only beginning. . . .

307

THE SAL NEUTRON DETECTOR EFFICIENCY USING PHOTODISINTEGRATION OF THE DEUTERON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Physics and Power Engineering (Obninsk) have proposed an accelerator based neutron source for neutron for neutron capture therapy is under construction now at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, NovosibirskAccelerator based neutron source for neutron capture therapy B. Bayanov, Yu. Belchenko, V. Belov, V

Saskatchewan, University of

308

Thirteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spallation-Driven Cold Neutron Sources Dr. Bradley J. Micklich Senior Physicist, Physics Division physics research Want neutron wavelengths about the dimensions of interest, or neutron energies that can using an intense source of longerwavelength neutrons ­ fundamental nuclear physics (neutron halflife

309

Awards 2012 | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neutron Source, and multiscale simulations using the computational resources at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility. This year awards were given to 68 recipients from...

310

Neutron Characterization for Additive Manufacturing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) shown in Fig. 1 to solve challenging problems in additive manu- facturing (AM)....

311

News & Events | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or your library directly. December Our Views: Bipartisan state, federal support for SNS necessary Oak Ridger, 1220 The success, thus far, of the Spallation Neutron Source...

312

Federal Project Director of the Year for 2011 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Project Director of the Year for 2011 Federal Project Director of the Year for 2011 Federal Project Director of the Year for 2011 (from left to right) Daniel Poneman; David Arakawa; Phillip Kraushaar; Johnny Moore; Daniel Lehman; Ingrid Kolb (from left to right) Daniel Poneman; David Arakawa; Phillip Kraushaar; Johnny Moore; Daniel Lehman; Ingrid Kolb Presented to: David K. Arakawa For demonstrating exceptional leadership and project management acumen as Federal Project Director (FPD) for the $68.5 million Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Instruments - Next Generation (SING) Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The SING project provides five best-in-class neutron instruments to support the neutron-scattering needs of the U.S. research community. FPD since June of 2006, David led by example with a

313

DOEE A-1059 Environmental Assessment Radioactive Source Recovery...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the country. These neutron sources would be temporarily stored in floor holes at the CMR Hot Cell Facility. Recovery reduces the neutron emissions from the source material and...

314

Neutron Scattering Science User ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposals for beam time at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be accepted via the web-based proposal system...

315

Source and replica calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The starting point of the Hiroshima-Nagasaki Dose Reevaluation Program is the energy and directional distributions of the prompt neutron and gamma-ray radiation emitted from the exploding bombs. A brief introduction to the neutron source calculations is presented. The development of our current understanding of the source problem is outlined. It is recommended that adjoint calculations be used to modify source spectra to resolve the neutron discrepancy problem.

Whalen, P.P.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Neutron Stress, Texture, and Phase Transformation for Industry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NST2 Neutron Stress, Texture, and Phase Transformation for Industry April 19, 2007 Spallation Neutron Source Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN Presentation PDF's & Group...

317

The Extended Q-Range Small Angle Neutron Scattering ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The Extended Q-Range Small Angle Neutron Scattering Diffractometer (EQ-SANS) at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a high intensity...

318

Imaging and Neutrons - IAN 2006 - Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SNS Home Saturday, January 11, 2014 SNS Home Saturday, January 11, 2014 Go IAN 2006 Imaging and Neutrons 2006 October 23-25, 2006 Iran Thomas Auditorium Central Laboratory and Office Building Spallation Neutron Source Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN Who Should Attend Synopsis Goals and Expected Outcomes Application Areas Techniques International Advisory Committee Local Organizing Committee Agenda with Presentations NEW Confirmed Speakers Frequently Asked Questions - FAQ Satellite Workshop - Progress in Electron Volt Neutron Spectroscopy eV Worshop Agenda presentations NEW Lodging, Transportation, Bus Schedule Location Directions and Map Registration CLOSED Abstracts, Posters, Contributed Talks Scholarships Sponsors Vendors May Attend Relevant Reports Important Dates Weather Attractions

319

Glossary Term - Neutron Emission  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neutron Previous Term (Neutron) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Niobe) Niobe Neutron Emission After neutron emission, an atom contains one less neutron. Neutron emission is one...

320

News & Events - ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 News 0 News Neutron Science In the News - 2000 December November October September August July June May April March February January Because some media sources archive past articles and require a subscription for access, some of the links below might not be active. If a citation listed here is no longer available, please contact the newspaper or your library directly. December Construction trade program graduates first class Oak Ridger, 12/19 Lawrence T. Young, president and chief executive officer of CROET, "Apprenticeships and pre-apprenticeship programs ensure East Tennesseans have access to the economic opportunities that are opening up at SNS." SNS Holds Construction Job Fair Dec. 20 Oak Ridger, 12/19 The Spallation Neutron Source project is sponsoring a construction worker

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "neutron source project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

R&D Status for In-Situ Plasma Surface Cleaning of SRF Cavities at Spallation Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SNS SCL is reliably operating at 0.93 GeV output energy with an energy reserve of 10MeV with high availability. Most of the cavities exhibit field emission, which directly or indirectly (through heating of end groups) limits the gradients achievable in the high beta cavities in normal operation with the beam. One of the field emission sources would be surface contaminations during surface processing for which mild surface cleaning, if any, will help in reducing field emission. An R&D effort is in progress to develop in-situ surface processing for the cryomodules in the tunnel without disassembly. As the first attempt, in-situ plasma processing has been applied to the CM12 in the SNS SRF facility after the repair work with a promising result. This paper will report the R&D status of plasma processing in the SNS.

S.-H. Kim, M.T. Crofford, M. Doleans, J.D. Mammosser, J. Saunders

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

SINGLE CRYSTAL NEUTRON DIFFRACTION.  

SciTech Connect

Single-crystal neutron diffraction measures the elastic Bragg reflection intensities from crystals of a material, the structure of which is the subject of investigation. A single crystal is placed in a beam of neutrons produced at a nuclear reactor or at a proton accelerator-based spallation source. Single-crystal diffraction measurements are commonly made at thermal neutron beam energies, which correspond to neutron wavelengths in the neighborhood of 1 Angstrom. For high-resolution studies requiring shorter wavelengths (ca. 0.3-0.8 Angstroms), a pulsed spallation source or a high-temperature moderator (a ''hot source'') at a reactor may be used. When complex structures with large unit-cell repeats are under investigation, as is the case in structural biology, a cryogenic-temperature moderator (a ''cold source'') may be employed to obtain longer neutron wavelengths (ca. 4-10 Angstroms). A single-crystal neutron diffraction analysis will determine the crystal structure of the material, typically including its unit cell and space group, the positions of the atomic nuclei and their mean-square displacements, and relevant site occupancies. Because the neutron possesses a magnetic moment, the magnetic structure of the material can be determined as well, from the magnetic contribution to the Bragg intensities. This latter aspect falls beyond the scope of the present unit; for information on magnetic scattering of neutrons see Unit 14.3. Instruments for single-crystal diffraction (single-crystal diffractometers or SCDs) are generally available at the major neutron scattering center facilities. Beam time on many of these instruments is available through a proposal mechanism. A listing of neutron SCD instruments and their corresponding facility contacts is included in an appendix accompanying this unit.

KOETZLE,T.F.

2001-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

323

Neutron Imaging by Boric Acid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper a new type of passive neutron detector based on the already existing one, CR39, is described. Its operation was verified by three different neutron sources: an Americium-Beryllium (Am241-Be) source; a TRIGA type nuclear reactor; and a fast neutron reactor called TAPIRO. The obtained results, reported here, positively confirm its operation and the accountability of the new developed detecting technique.

Fabio Cardone; Giovanni Cherubini; Walter Perconti; Andrea Petrucci; Alberto Rosada

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

324

Neutron Diffraction @ TOPAZ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Topaz Guide Bender Topaz Guide Bender Neutron Diffraction @ TOPAZ Workshop on Single Crystal Neutron Diffraction picture 2 September 29 - October 1, 2011 * Spallation Neutron Source * Oak Ridge National Laboratory * Oak Ridge TN, USA TOPAZ 2011 Home Contacts Agenda and Important Deadlines Registration and Payment filler Workshop summary and purpose A workshop on single crystal neutron diffraction will be held at the Spallation Neutron Source at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It will present invited and contributed talks to showcase cutting edge science and examples where neutron diffraction can make significant contributions; and provide training in neutron structure analysis and sample screening for the preparation of instrument beam-time proposals. TOPAZ is a high resolution wavelength-resolved Laue diffractometer with a versatile sample environment. Commissioning user experiments have demonstrated successfully the instrument capability for structural study of a vitamin B12 derivative, ion distribution in Li-ion battery materials, order and disorder in shape memory intermetallics, magnetic phase transition in multiferroic single crystal and functional thin films. The workshop is directed towards experienced neutron diffraction users and new users alike and encourages members to highlight their research and interest in structure analysis and investigation. The workshop will give opportunity to bring your own single crystal and screen sample quality and scattering power on TOPAZ @ room temperature, to evaluate data collection time and quality for an anticipated experiment. Finally, an opportunity to compose a proposal for neutron beam time (http://neutrons.ornl.gov/users/proposals.shtml) with staff will be provided in the framework of the workshop. The workshop format is well suited for researchers to contribute by showcasing their research and bring their research group or graduate student, who would like to test a single crystal sample. User access training for the ORNL neutron scattering facility will be included. It will be valid for future experiments.

325

Measurements of the Thermal Neutron Scattering Kernel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

world's most powerful neutron source, the $1.4 billion Spallation Neutron Source At 1.4MW, SNS produces. SNS will feature 24 beamlines for physics, chemistry, biology, materials research. www.sns.gov #12 · Coproduction of epithermal, thermal and cold neutrons #12;SNS Instrument Beam Lines 1st experimentproposed 2nd

Danon, Yaron

326

Versatile neutron NDA  

SciTech Connect

Non-destructive analysis (NDA) of bulk samples is a major tool in international safeguards and domestic MC&A. Yet, enhancements are needed to reduce inspection time, financial cost, and radiation exposure-while improving reliability and accuracy-particularly for mixtures of fissile and fertile isotopes. Perhaps the greatest remaining direction for NDA improvement is the development of a single controllable neutron source that would add versatility and capability. One of the primary prospects is a switchable radioactive neutron source (SRNS) that has been under advanced-concept development at Argonne with DOE funding. The SRNS would be in a sealed capsule that can be remotely switched on and off, or pulsed at a controllable rate. Li({alpha}, n) or Be({alpha}, n) reactions could give a choice of sub-threshold or hard-spectrum neutrons at yields ranging from 10{sup 4}/s to more than 10{sup 8}s. The SRNS would provide improved capabilities for (1) simultaneous or alternating interrogation with fast and slow neutrons, (2) detection of the first few seconds of delayed neutrons, (3) measurements in the presence of high neutron and/or gamma background, and (4) inspection of heterogeneous materials. When the neutrons are switched off, the source would be portable with vastly reduced shielding. Proof-of-concept with a single switchable plate has been established under laboratory conditions.

DeVolpi, A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Neutron Scattering Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Software Software A new portal for neutron scattering has just been established at neutronsources.org. The information contained here in the Neutron Scattering Web has been transferred to the new site. We will leave the current content here for archival purposes but no new content will be added. We encourage everyone interested in neutron scattering to take full advantage of this exciting new resource for our community. Neutronsources.org Data Formats NeXus: Neutron and X-ray Data Format Crystallographic Binary Format (CBF/imgCIF) Hierarchical Data Format (HDF) Data Analysis and Visualization Data Analysis for Neutron Scattering Experiments (DANSE): distributed data analysis project Large Array Manipulation Program (LAMP): IDL-based data analysis and visualization

328

Neutron Radiography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 8   Characteristics of neutron radiography at various neutron-energy ranges...Good discrimination between materials and ready availability

329

Neutron proton crystallography station (PCS)  

SciTech Connect

The PCS (Protein Crystallography Station) at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a unique facility in the USA that is designed and optimized for detecting and collecting neutron diffraction data from macromolecular crystals. PCS utilizes the 20 Hz spallation neutron source at LANSCE to enable time-of-flight measurements using 0.6-7.0 {angstrom} neutrons. This increases the neutron flux on the sample by using a wavelength range that is optimal for studying macromolecular crystal structures. The diagram below show a schematic of PCS and photos of the detector and instrument cave.

Fisher, Zoe [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kovalevsky, Andrey [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Hannah [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mustyakimov, Marat [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Rhodium self-powered neutron detector as a suitable on-line thermal neutron flux monitor in BNCT treatments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: A rhodium self-powered neutron detector (Rh SPND) has been specifically developed by the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) of Argentina to measure locally and in real time thermal neutron fluxes in patients treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this work, the thermal and epithermal neutron response of the Rh SPND was evaluated by studying the detector response to two different reactor spectra. In addition, during clinical trials of the BNCT Project of the CNEA, on-line neutron flux measurements using the specially designed detector were assessed. Methods: The first calibration of the detector was done with the well-thermalized neutron spectrum of the CNEA RA-3 reactor thermal column. For this purpose, the reactor spectrum was approximated by a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution in the thermal energy range. The second calibration was done at different positions along the central axis of a water-filled cylindrical phantom, placed in the mixed thermal-epithermal neutron beam of CNEA RA-6 reactor. In this latter case, the RA-6 neutron spectrum had been well characterized by both calculation and measurement, and it presented some marked differences with the ideal spectrum considered for SPND calibrations at RA-3. In addition, the RA-6 neutron spectrum varied with depth in the water phantom and thus the percentage of the epithermal contribution to the total neutron flux changed at each measurement location. Local (one point-position) and global (several points-positions) and thermal and mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities were determined from these measurements. Thermal neutron flux was also measured during BNCT clinical trials within the irradiation fields incident on the patients. In order to achieve this, the detector was placed on patient's skin at dosimetric reference points for each one of the fields. System stability was adequate for this kind of measurement. Results: Local mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities and global thermal and mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities derived from measurements performed at the RA-6 were compared and no significant differences were found. Global RA-6-based thermal neutron sensitivity showed agreement with pure thermal neutron sensitivity measurements performed in the RA-3 spectrum. Additionally, the detector response proved nearly unchanged by differences in neutron spectra from real (RA-6 BNCT beam) and ideal (considered for calibration calculations at RA-3) neutron source descriptions. The results confirm that the special design of the Rh SPND can be considered as having a pure thermal response for neutron spectra with epithermal-to-thermal flux ratios up to 12%. In addition, the linear response of the detector to thermal flux allows the use of a mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivity of 1.95 {+-} 0.05 x 10{sup -21} A n{sup -1}{center_dot}cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s. This sensitivity can be used in spectra with up to 21% epithermal-to-thermal flux ratio without significant error due to epithermal neutron and gamma induced effects. The values of the measured fluxes in clinical applications had discrepancies with calculated results that were in the range of -25% to +30%, which shows the importance of a local on-line independent measurement as part of a treatment planning quality control system. Conclusions: The usefulness of the CNEA Rh SPND for the on-line local measurement of thermal neutron flux on BNCT patients has been demonstrated based on an appropriate neutron spectra calibration and clinical applications.

Miller, Marcelo E.; Sztejnberg, Manuel L.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Thorp, Silvia I.; Longhino, Juan M.; Estryk, Guillermo [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina); Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1429, Argentina and CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 1917, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1033 (Argentina); Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

Statistically based uncertainty analysis for ranking of component importance in the thermal-hydraulic safety analysis of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) has been used to help determine the importance of components and phenomena in thermal-hydraulic safety analyses of nuclear reactors. The AHP results are based, in part on expert opinion. Therefore, it is prudent to evaluate the uncertainty of the AHP ranks of importance. Prior applications have addressed uncertainty with experimental data comparisons and bounding sensitivity calculations. These methods work well when a sufficient experimental data base exists to justify the comparisons. However, in the case of limited or no experimental data the size of the uncertainty is normally made conservatively large. Accordingly, the author has taken another approach, that of performing a statistically based uncertainty analysis. The new work is based on prior evaluations of the importance of components and phenomena in the thermal-hydraulic safety analysis of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR), a new facility now in the design phase. The uncertainty during large break loss of coolant, and decay heat removal scenarios is estimated by assigning a probability distribution function (pdf) to the potential error in the initial expert estimates of pair-wise importance between the components. Using a Monte Carlo sampling technique, the error pdfs are propagated through the AHP software solutions to determine a pdf of uncertainty in the system wide importance of each component. To enhance the generality of the results, study of one other problem having different number of elements is reported, as are the effects of a larger assumed pdf error in the expert ranks. Validation of the Monte Carlo sample size and repeatability are also documented.

Wilson, G.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Neutron flux, spectrum, and dose equivalent measurements for a 4500-W(th) /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ general purpose heat source  

SciTech Connect

The total emission rate is (4.5 +- 0.4) 10/sup 7/ n/s, and the average neutron energy is (1.64 +- 0.07) MeV. The factor for converting from neutron fluence to dose equivalent for this spectrum is (3.10 +- 0.24) 10/sup -5/ mRem/n-cm/sup -2/. The factor for converting from neutron fluence to tissue absorbed dose is (3.18 +- 0.26) 10/sup -6/ mRad/n-cm/sup -2/.

Anderson, M.E.

1985-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

333

NCNR Advanced Cold Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... with an improved design (called Unit 2) during last year's maintenance outage. ... the helium refrigerator heat load as reactor power was increased. ...

334

Documents, Spallation Neutron Source, SNS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanical Released Drawings - Jim Alduino Accelerator System Division Weekly Report BNL SNS Monthly Progress Report - Pam Manning BNL SNS Equipment Status - Pam Manning Design...

335

Glossary Term - Neutron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neutrino Previous Term (Neutrino) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Neutron Emission) Neutron Emission Neutron A Neutron Neutrons are uncharged particles found within atomic nuclei....

336

About Neutrons  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neutron Basics Neutron Basics A neutron is one of the fundamental particles that make up matter. This uncharged particle exists in the nucleus of a typical atom, along with its positively charged counterpart, the proton. Protons and neutrons each have about the same mass, and both can exist as free particles away from the nucleus. In the universe, neutrons are abundant, making up more than half of all visible matter. Find Out What a Neutron Is Youtube icon Properties of Neutrons How Can Neutrons Be Used for Research? Image of glucose movement in plants Neutron imaging techniques have been able to determine the precise movement of glucose in plants. This knowledge can help scientists better understand how biomass can be efficiently converted into fuel. Neutrons have many properties that make them ideal for certain types of

337

Milliwatt Generator Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers progress on the Milliwatt Generator Project from April 1986 through March 1988. Activities included fuel processing and characterization, production of heat sources, fabrication of pressure-burst test units, compatibility studies, impact testing, and examination of surveillance units. The major task of the Los Alamos Milliwatt Generator Project is to fabricate MC2893A heat sources (4.0 W) for MC2730A radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGS) and MC3599 heat sources (4.5 W) for MC3500 RTGs. The MWG Project interfaces with the following contractors: Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (designer); E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Co. (Inc.), Savannah River Plant (fuel); Monsanto Research Corporation, Mound Facility (metal hardware); and General Electric Company, Neutron Devices Department (RTGs). In addition to MWG fabrication activities, Los Alamos is involved in (1) fabrication of pressure-burst test units, (2) compatibility testing and evaluation, (3) examination of surveillance units, and (4) impact testing and subsequent examination of compatibility and surveillance units.

Latimer, T.W.; Rinehart, G.H.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

NCNR Offers Financial Assistance for Neutron Science ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in the environment to low-energy "cold" neutron ... available this fiscal year for first-year funding for ... Funding for additional years of multiyear projects is ...

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

339

Coated gallium arsenide neutron detectors : results of characterizationmeasurements.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Effective detection of special nuclear materials (SNM) is essential for reducing the threat associated with stolen or improvised nuclear devices. Passive radiation detection technologies are primarily based on gamma-ray detection and subsequent isotope identification or neutron detection (specific to neutron sources and SNM). One major effort supported by the Department of Homeland Security in the area of advanced passive detection is handheld or portable neutron detectors for search and localization tasks in emergency response and interdiction settings. A successful SNM search detector will not only be able to confirm the presence of fissionable materials but also establish the location of the source in as short of time as possible while trying to minimize false alarms due to varying background or naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). For instruments based on neutron detectors, this translates to detecting neutrons from spontaneous fission or alpha-n reactions and being able to determine the direction of the source (or localizing the source through subsequent measurements). Polyethylene-coated gallium arsenide detectors were studied because the detection scheme is based on measuring the signal in the gallium arsenide wafers from the electrical charge of the recoil protons produced from the scattering of neutrons from the hydrogen nucleus. The inherent reaction has a directional dependence because the neutron and hydrogen nucleus have equivalent masses. The assessment and measurement of polyethylene-coated gallium arsenide detector properties and characteristics was the first phase of a project being performed for the Department of Homeland Security and the results of these tests are reported in this report. The ultimate goal of the project was to develop a man-portable neutron detection system that has the ability to determine the direction of the source from the detector. The efficiency of GaAs detectors for different sizes of polyethylene layers and different angles between the detector and the neutron source were determined. Preliminary measurements with a neutron generator based on a deuterium-tritium reaction ({approx}14 MeV neutrons) were performed and the results are discussed. This report presents the results of these measurements in terms of efficiency and angular efficiency and compares them to Monte Carlo calculations to validate the calculation scheme in view of further applications. Based on the results of this study, the polyethylene-coated gallium arsenide detectors provide adequate angular resolution based on proton recoil detection from the neutron scattering reaction from hydrogen. However, the intrinsic efficiency for an individual detector is extremely low. Because of this low efficiency, large surface area detectors ( or a large total surface area from many small detectors) would be required to generate adequate statistics to perform directional detection in near-real time. Large surface areas could be created by stacking the detector wafers with only a negligible attenuation of source neutrons. However, the cost of creating such a large array of GaAs is cost-prohibitive at this time.

Klann, R. T.; Perret, G.; Sanders, J.

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

340

Long-Range Neutron Detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A neutron detector designed for detecting neutron sources at distances of 50 to 100 m has been constructed and tested. This detector has a large surface area (1 m{sup 2}) to enhance detection efficiency, and it contains a collimator and shielding to achieve direction sensitivity and reduce background. An unusual feature of the detector is that it contains no added moderator, such as polyethylene, to moderate fast neutrons before they reach the {sup 3}He detector. As a result, the detector is sensitive mainly to thermal neutrons. The moderator-free design reduces the weight of the detector, making it more portable, and it also aids in achieving directional sensitivity and background reduction. Test results show that moderated fission-neutron sources of strength about 3 x 10{sup 5} n/s can be detected at a distance out to 70 m in a counting time of 1000 s. The best angular resolution of the detector is obtained at distances of 30 m or less. As the separation .distance between the source and detector increases, the contribution of scattered neutrons to the measured signal increases with a resultant decrease in the ability to detect the direction to a distant source. Applications for which the long-range detector appears to be suitable include detecting remote neutron sources (including sources in moving vehicles) and monitoring neutron storage vaults for the intrusion of humans and the effects they make on the detected neutron signal. Also, the detector can be used to measure waste for the presence of transuranic material in the presence of high gamma-ray background. A test with a neutron source (3 x 10{sup 5} n/s) in a vehicle showed that the detector could readily measure an increase in count rate at a distance of 10 m for vehicle speeds up to 35 mph (the highest speed tested). These results. indicate that the source should be detectable at this distance at speeds up to 55 mph.

AJ Peurrung; DC Stromswold; RR Hansen; PL Reeder; DS Barnett

1999-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "neutron source project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Neutron Research Programs and Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Department of Homeland Security/Domestic Nuclear Detection Office ... In an inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactor, the plasma-facing ...

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

342

Project Brief: General Motors, LLC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... This project will also apply neutron detectors to study lithium transport in batteries to assess mechanisms for degradation of battery capacity and ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

343

Detecting fission from special nuclear material sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron detector system for discriminating fissile material from non-fissile material wherein a digital data acquisition unit collects data at high rate, and in real-time processes large volumes of data directly into information that a first responder can use to discriminate materials. The system comprises counting neutrons from the unknown source and detecting excess grouped neutrons to identify fission in the unknown source. The system includes a graphing component that displays the plot of the neutron distribution from the unknown source over a Poisson distribution and a plot of neutrons due to background or environmental sources. The system further includes a known neutron source placed in proximity to the unknown source to actively interrogate the unknown source in order to accentuate differences in neutron emission from the unknown source from Poisson distributions and/or environmental sources.

Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

344

Neutron Scattering Analysis of Magnetostructural Phase ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments to observe the structural and magnetic phase transformations were performed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National...

345

Spherical neutron generator - Energy Innovation Portal  

A spherical neutron generator is formed with a small spherical target and a spherical shell RF-driven plasma ion source surrounding the target. A ...

346

SNS Instrument Systems | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

instrument layout. Click for details. Instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source SNS currently has 13 instruments available for users. Each instrument is designed to complement...

347

Acknowledgement Statement for User Publications | ORNL Neutron...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with this required statement: Part of the Research conducted at ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor andor Spallation Neutron Source, as appropriate was sponsored by the...

348

Industry - ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PartTec PartTec ORNL, PartTec Inc. Licensing Agreement ORNL and PartTec sign licensing agreement (Front) ORNL Deputy Director for Science & Technology Thomas Zacharia and PartTec CEO Herschel Workman. (Back) Bruce Hannan (SNS), PartTec production manager Craig Kline, Rick Riedel (SNS), Jason Hodges (SNS) and Ron Cooper (SNS). The SNS guys were on the development team. Representatives from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and PartTec, an Indiana-based firm, formally signed a licensing agreement Thursday, Aug. 12, to market an advanced neutron detector system developed for the Spallation Neutron Source. The Shifting Scintillator Neutron Detector can determine the time and position of captured neutrons, which enables researchers to obtain very accurate time-of-flight measurements.

349

Education | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Education banner Education banner Sunil Sinha A Chat with Sunil Sinha, Distinguished Professor of Physics at the University of California-San Diego and speaker at the recent CNMS-SNS Research Forum more... The purpose of the Spallation Neutron Source and the High Flux Isotope Reactor is to facilitate neutron scattering as an integral tool for scientific research and technological development across many scientific and engineering domains within the scientific, academic,and industrial communities. Coupled with this role is a recognized need to inspire, educate, and facilitate the next generation of users and hence foster enhanced use of the unique neutron scattering facilities at ORNL. This is the central theme of the education activities within the Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD).

350

Neutron Emission Characteristics of Two Mixed-Oxide Fuels: Simulations and Initial Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations and experiments have been carried out to investigate the neutron emission characteristics of two mixed-oxide (MOX) fuels at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These activities are part of a project studying advanced instrumentation techniques in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cycle Research and Development program and it's Materials Protection, Accounting, and Control for Transmutation (MPACT) campaign. This analysis used the MCNP-PoliMi Monte Carlo simulation tool to determine the relative strength and energy spectra of the different neutron source terms within these fuels, and then used this data to simulate the detection and measurement of these emissions using an array of liquid scintillator neutron spectrometers. These calculations accounted for neutrons generated from the spontaneous fission of the actinides in the MOX fuel as well as neutrons created via (alpha,n) reactions with oxygen in the MOX fuel. The analysis was carried out to allow for characterization of both neutron energy as well as neutron coincidences between multiple detectors. Coincidences between prompt gamma rays and neutrons were also analyzed. Experiments were performed at INL with the same materials used in the simulations to benchmark and begin validation tests of the simulations. Data was collected in these experiments using an array of four liquid scintillators and a high-speed waveform digitizer. Advanced digital pulse-shape discrimination algorithms were developed and used to collect this data. Results of the simulation and modeling studies are presented together with preliminary results from the experimental campaign.

D. L. Chichester; S. A. Pozzi; J. L. Dolan; M. Flaska; J. T. Johnson; E. H. Seabury; E. M. Gantz

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Neutron dosimetry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of measuring neutron radiation within a nuclear reactor is provided. A sintered oxide wire is disposed within the reactor and exposed to neutron radiation. The induced radioactivity is measured to provide an indication of the neutron energy and flux within the reactor.

Quinby, Thomas C. (Kingston, TN)

1976-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

352

Development of advanced neutron/gamma generators for imaging ...  

We report here on the development of neutron and photon sources ... The radiation producing devices developed by Plasma and Ion Source ... The testing ...

353

News & Events | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spallation Neutron Source. ORNL said the Spin Echo was installed on Beam Line 15 at the SNS. Eventually, there'll be 25 research instruments of varying types and capabilities,...

354

Using MCNP for fusion neutronics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Any fusion reactor using tritium-deuterium fusion will be a prolific source of 14 MeV neutrons. In fact, 80% of the fusion energy will be carried (more)

Wasastjerna, Frej

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Decontamination and decommissioning of the Argonne Thermal Source Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory - East project final report.  

SciTech Connect

The ATSR D&D Project was directed toward the following goals: (1) Removal of radioactive and hazardous materials associated with the ATSR Reactor facility; (2) Decontamination of the ATSR Reactor facility to unrestricted use levels; and (3)Documentation of all project activities affecting quality (i.e., waste packaging, instrument calibration, audit results, and personnel exposure). These goals had been set in order to eliminate the radiological and hazardous safety concerns inherent in the ATSR Reactor facility and to allow, upon completion of the project, unescorted and unmonitored access to the area. The reactor aluminum, reactor lead, graphite piles in room E-111, and the contaminated concrete in room E-102 were the primary areas of concern. NES, Incorporated (Danbury, CT) characterized the ATSR Reactor facility from January to March 1998. The characterization identified a total of thirteen radionuclides, with a total activity of 64.84 mCi (2.4 GBq). The primary radionuclides of concern were Co{sup 60}, Eu{sup 152}, Cs{sup 137}, and U{sup 238}. No additional radionuclides were identified during the D&D of the facility. The highest dose rates observed during the project were associated with the reactor tank and shield tank. Contact radiation levels of 30 mrem/hr (0.3 mSv/hr) were measured on reactor internals during dismantlement of the reactor. A level of 3 mrem/hr (0.03 mSv/hr) was observed in a small area (hot spot) in room E-102. DOE Order 5480.2A establishes the maximum whole body exposure for occupational workers at 5 rem/yr (50 mSv/yr); the administrative limit at ANL-E is 1 rem/yr (10 mSv/yr).

Fellhauer, C.; Garlock, G.; Mathiesen, J.

1998-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

356

In-Situ Neutron Diffraction Study of Recrystallization Kinetics in a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Neutron and X-Ray Studies of Advanced Materials IV ... engineering materials difffractometer from Spallation Neutron Source [SNS] and at HIPPO...

357

Top neutron scientists named to positions at ORNL | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), has filled two high-level administrative positions with leaders in the neutron...

358

Neutron Generators for Spent Fuel Assay  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. DOE has initiated a multi-lab/university collaboration to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass in, and detect the diversion of pins from, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies with non-destructive assay (NDA). The 14 NDA techniques being studied include several that require an external neutron source: Delayed Neutrons (DN), Differential Die-Away (DDA), Delayed Gammas (DG), and Lead Slowing-Down Spectroscopy (LSDS). This report provides a survey of currently available neutron sources and their underlying technology that may be suitable for NDA of SNF assemblies. The neutron sources considered here fall into two broad categories. The term 'neutron generator' is commonly used for sealed devices that operate at relatively low acceleration voltages of less than 150 kV. Systems that employ an acceleration structure to produce ion beam energies from hundreds of keV to several MeV, and that are pumped down to vacuum during operation, rather than being sealed units, are usually referred to as 'accelerator-driven neutron sources.' Currently available neutron sources and future options are evaluated within the parameter space of the neutron generator/source requirements as currently understood and summarized in section 2. Applicable neutron source technologies are described in section 3. Commercially available neutron generators and other source options that could be made available in the near future with some further development and customization are discussed in sections 4 and 5, respectively. The pros and cons of the various options and possible ways forward are discussed in section 6. Selection of the best approach must take a number of parameters into account including cost, size, lifetime, and power consumption, as well as neutron flux, neutron energy spectrum, and pulse structure that satisfy the requirements of the NDA instrument to be built.

Ludewigt, Bernhard A

2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

359

High-power Waveguide Dampers for the Short-Pulse X-Ray Project at the Advanced Photon Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-power waveguide dampers have been designed and prototyped for the Short-Pulse X-ray (SPX) cavities at the Advanced Photon Source. The cavities will operate at 2.815 GHz and utilize the TM110 dipole mode. As a result, higher-order (HOM) and lower-order mode (LOM) in-vacuum dampers have been designed to satisfy the demanding broadband damping requirements in the APS storage ring. The SPX single-cell cavity consists of two WR284 waveguides for damping the HOMs and one WR284 waveguide for primarily damping the LOM where up to 2kW will be dissipated in the damping material. The damper designs and high-power experimental results will be discussed in this paper.

Waldschmidt, G J; Liu, J; Middendorf, M E; Nassiri, A; Smith, T L; Wu, G; Henry, J; Mammosser, J D; Rimmer, R A

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Simulation of Neutron Backscattering applied to organic material detection  

SciTech Connect

The Neutron Backscattering technique is tested when performing the task of localizing hydrogenated explosives hidden in soil. Detector system, landmine, soil and neutron source are simulated with Geant4 in order to obtain the number of neutrons detected when several parameters like mine composition, relative position mine-source and soil moisture are varied.0.

Forero, N. C.; Cruz, A. H.; Cristancho, F. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Centro Internacional de Fisica, Apartado Aereo 4948, Bogota (Colombia)

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "neutron source project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

News & Events | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News › 2005 News News › 2005 News Neutron Science In the News - 2005 December November October September August July June May April March February January John Sullivan, Associate Under Secretary, took a tour of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), October 4, 2005 John Sullivan, Associate Under Secretary, took a tour of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), October 4, 2005. Because some media sources archive past articles and require a subscription for access, some of the links below might not be active. If a citation listed here is no longer available, please contact the newspaper or your library directly. December Spallation Neutron Source Amazing Science Facts Newswise 12/22 The New Year is bringing the science community a grand present: The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. On schedule for

362

Chemical characteristics of material released during Source Term Experiments Project (STEP) in-pile tests: Part 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of four experiments aimed at characterizing the radiological source term associated with postulated severe light water reactor (LWR) accidents has been conducted at Argonne's Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT). The STEP tests drove fuel elements to the point of severe cladding disruption in steam environments by fission heating and oxidation of the Zircaloy cladding. The released fission products and volatile cladding constituents entrained in the steam/hydrogen flows were captured by the test vehicles' sampling systems and analyzed by SEM/EDX. The principal constituents of the deposits were fission product cesium, molybdenum and rubidium, and tin from the cladding. Iodine was generally seen collocated with cesium, although lone iodine deposits were observed indicating that the iodine was not completely transported as CsI. Structural material was also observed. The composition information in conjunction with counted particle distributions were used to determine the particle loading of that portion of the material released during the first test that was transported in aerosol form.

Schlenger, B.J.; Dunn, P.F.; Herceg, J.E.; Simms, R.; Horton, E.L.; Baker, L. Jr.; Ritzman, R.L.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

METHOD OF PRODUCING NEUTRONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing neutrons is described in which there is employed a confinement zone defined between longitudinally spaced localized gradient regions of an elongated magnetic field. Changed particles and neutralizing electrons, more specifically deuterons and tritons and neutralizng electrons, are injected into the confinement field from ion sources located outside the field. The rotational energy of the parrticles is increased at the gradients by imposing an oscillating transverse electrical field thereacross. The imposition of such oscillating transverse electrical fields improves the reflection capability of such gradient fielda so that the reactive particles are retained more effectively within the zone. With the attainment of appropriate densities of plasma particles and provided that such particles are at a sufficiently high temperature, neutron-producing reactions ensue and large quantities of neutrons emerge from the containment zone. (AEC)

Imhoff, D.H.; Harker, W.H.

1964-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Neutronic reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield.

Wende, Charles W. J. (West Chester, PA)

1976-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

365

Directional Stand-off Detection of Fast Neutrons and Gammas Using Angular Scattering Distributions  

SciTech Connect

We have investigated the response of a DoubleScatter Neutron Spectrometer (DSNS) for sources at long distances (gr than 200 meters). We find that an alternative method for analyzing double scatter data avoids some uncertainties introduced by amplitude measurements in plastic scintillators.Time of flight is used to discriminate between gamma and neutron events, and the kinematic distributions of scattering angles are assumed to apply. Non-relativistic neutrons are most likely to scatter at 45, while gammas with energies greater than 2 MeV are most likely to be forward scattered. The distribution of scattering angles of fission neutrons arriving from a distant point source generates a 45 cone, which can be back-projected to give the source direction. At the same time, the distribution of Compton-scattered gammas has a maximum in the forward direction, and can be made narrower by selecting events that deposit minimal energy in the first scattering event. We have further determined that the shape of spontaneous fission neutron spectra at ranges gr than 110 m is still significantly different from thecosmic ray background.

Vanier P. e.; Dioszegi, I.; Salwen, C.; Forman, L.

2009-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

366

NXS 2010 - Neutron Scattering School  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2-26, 2010 2-26, 2010 Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN NXS2010 Travel Airport Shuttles Departure Flights Schedule Participants Lectures Lecturers Lecture Notes/Videos Experiments Schedule, Desc, Groups Student Presentations ANL Facilities APS Facility ANL Map ANL Visitor's Guide ORNL Facilities HFIR Facility SNS Facility HFIR/SNS Map Access Requirements ANL ORNL Rad Worker Training Study Guide Wireless Networks ANL ORNL Safety & Security Rules ANL ORNL NSSA New Initiatives NSSA Weblink Contacts ANL ORNL 12th National School on Neutron & X-ray Scattering 2009 Neutron Scattering School participants 2010 National School Participants Students share their thoughts about NXS 2010. Purpose: The main purpose of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major neutron and x-ray facilities. Lectures, presented by researchers from academia, industry, and national laboratories, will include basic tutorials on the principles of scattering theory and the characteristics of the sources, as well as seminars on the application of scattering methods to a variety of scientific subjects. Students will conduct four short experiments at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source and Oak Ridge's Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor facilities to provide hands-on experience for using neutron and synchrotron sources.

367

Conference on New Frontiers in Neutron Macromolecular Crystallography  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

systems being studied by x-ray diffraction. The advent of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) with over an order of magnitude increase in neutron flux, in combination with advances...

368

Development of Lithium Lanthanide Borate Scintillator for Neutron Scattering Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have completed the design and testing of neutron scattering instrument detectors for powder diffractometers and single crystal diffractometers. These detectors meet the performance requirements for these types of instruments at the Department of Energy Spallation Neutron Source facility.

Czirr, J.B.; McKnight, T.; Merrill, D.

2004-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

369

DETERMINATION OF SPECIFIC NEUTRONIC REACTIVITY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for production-line determination of the specific neutronic reactivity of such objects as individual nuclear fuel or neutron absorber elements and is notable for rapidity and apparatus simplicity. The object is incorporated in a slightly sub-critical chain fission reactive assembly having a discrete neutron source, thereby establishing a K/sub eff/ within the crucial range of 0.95 to 0.995. The range was found to afford, uniquely, flux- transient damped response in a niatter of seconds simultaneously with acceptable analytical sensitivity. The resulting neutron flux measured at a situs spaced from both object and source within the assembly serves as a calibrable indication of said reactivity.

Dessauer, G.

1960-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

370

Construction Projects | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Construction Construction Projects Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities Accelerator & Detector Research & Development Principal Investigators' Meetings Scientific Highlights Construction Projects BES Home Construction Projects Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Experiments in support of basic research require that state-of-the-art facilities are built or existing facilities are modified to meet unique research requirements and keep the U.S. scientific enterprise world leading. Reactors, x-ray light sources, and pulsed neutron sources are among the expensive, but necessary, facilities required, and the BES program funds for the construction and modification of these facilities. The BES construction projects are conceived and planned with the broad user

371

Neutron production by cosmic-ray muons at shallow depth J. Busenitz,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SNSsiteincludingsupport facilitiesandtheCenter forNanophaseMaterials Sciences. SpallationNeutronSource The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based science fa- cility that will provide neutron beams, magnetic materials, polymers and complex fluids, chemistry, and biology. What is the importance of neutron

Gratta, Giorgio

372

NEUTRONIC REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor is described wherein horizontal rods of thermal- neutron-fissionable material are disposed in a body of heavy water and extend through and are supported by spaced parallel walls of graphite.

Wigner, E.P.

1960-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

373

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutronic reactor in which neutron moderation is achieved primarily in its reflector is described. The reactor structure consists of a cylindrical central "island" of moderator and a spherical moderating reflector spaced therefrom, thereby providing an annular space. An essentially unmoderated liquid fuel is continuously passed through the annular space and undergoes fission while contained therein. The reactor, because of its small size, is particularly adapted for propulsion uses, including the propulsion of aircraft. (AEC)

Fraas, A.P.; Mills, C.B.

1961-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

374

ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL's Neutron Science Future: Integrating Neutron Scattering Across the Laboratory Greg Smith, HFIR Center for Neutron Scattering Upgrade Status and Scientific Opportunities...

375

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor for isotope production is described. This reactor is designed to provide a maximum thermal neutron flux in a region adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the center of the reactor. The core of the reactor is generally centrally located with respect tn a surrounding first reflector, constructed of beryllium. The beryllium reflector is surrounded by a second reflector, constructed of graphite, which, in tune, is surrounded by a conventional thermal shield. Water is circulated through the core and the reflector and functions both as a moderator and a coolant. In order to produce a greatsr maximum thermal neutron flux adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the core, the reactor is designed so tbat the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the materials in the reflector is approximately twice the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the material of the core of the reactor.

Wigner, E.P.

1958-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

376

1987 calibration of the TFTR neutron spectrometers  

SciTech Connect

The {sup 3}He neutron spectrometer used for measuring ion temperatures and the NE213 proton recoil spectrometer used for triton burnup measurements were absolutely calibrated with DT and DD neutron generators placed inside the TFTR vacuum vessel. The details of the detector response and calibration are presented. Comparisons are made to the neutron source strengths measured from other calibrated systems. 23 refs., 19 figs., 6 tabs.

Barnes, C.W.; Strachan, J.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.)

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Californium Neutron Irradiation Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Californium Neutron Irradiation Facility. Summary: ... Cf irradiation facility (Photograph by: Neutron Physics Group). Lead Organizational Unit: pml. Staff: ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

378

Neutron Physics Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... spectrum and fluencies is essential for several ... Neutron Interferometer and Optics Facility performed a ... other neutron scattering facilities depends on ...

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

379

6.21 Improving Neutron Beams for Cancer Treatment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the most advanced epithermal neutron source in the world for cancer treatment. Social Impact: Preliminary trials of BNCT therapy supported by the Office of Science have shown...

380

NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) Expansion and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A major new Department of Energy neutron source is under construction, but even ... in a 2002 study by the Office of Science and Technology Policy. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "neutron source project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Available Technologies: Plasma-Driven Neutron/Gamma Generators  

Biofuels; Biotechnology & Medicine. ... with changes in appropriate source gases and target materials, for creating either a neutron beam or a gamma ray beam, ...

382

O7: VITESS Software for Neutronic Monte-Carlo Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It provides users the opportunity to optimize or design instruments on both reactor and spallation neutron sources. To optimize the applicability of VITESS...

383

Accumulator Ring Commissioning Latest Step for Spallation Neutron...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accumulator Ring Commissioning Latest Step for Spallation Neutron Source BNL SNS Homepage The following is from a press release issued by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. OAK RIDGE,...

384

LLRF 2007 Workshop Oct 22-25 2007 - Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

conference dinner transportation between the hotel and the Spallation Neutron Source tour at Oak Ridge National Laboratory A tour of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL)...

385

Neutron Sciences Staff Receive 2012 ORNL Awards Night Honors...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and innovation in establishing the foundation for reliability-centered operations and maintenance management at the Spallation Neutron Source and achieving a world-leading...

386

Chapter 13 - NEUTRON AREA DETECTORS 1. NEUTRON ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The neutron peak corresponds to both reaction products being entirely absorbed in the ... 6. A fission chamber is a very low efficiency neutron detector ...

2009-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

387

Project information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Information Amistad Project (Texas) Collbran Project (Colorado) Colorado River Storage Project Dolores Project (Colorado) Falcon Project (Texas) Provo River Project (Utah)...

388

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor which uses uranium in the form of elongated tubes as fuel elements and liquid as a coolant is described. Elongated tubular uranium bodies are vertically disposed in an efficient neutron slowing agent, such as graphite, for example, to form a lattice structure which is disposed between upper and lower coolant tanks. Fluid coolant tubes extend through the uranium bodies and communicate with the upper and lower tanks and serve to convey the coolant through the uranium body. The reactor is also provided with means for circulating the cooling fluid through the coolant tanks and coolant tubes, suitable neutron and gnmma ray shields, and control means.

Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.W.; Young, G.J.

1958-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

MSc thesis topic: Coupled Thermal-hydraulic MC neutronic calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute of Nuclear Physics the source of epithermal neutrons based on a vacuum insulation tandem At the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics the VITA-facility for the boron neutron capture therapyNew technical solution for using the time-of-flight technique to measure neutron spectra V. Aleynik

Haviland, David

390

Neutron Scattering Society of America Purpose and New Initiatives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's personal copy Dosimetry and spectrometry at accelerator based neutron source for boron neutron capture Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Lavrentiev Ave., 630090 Novosibirsk, Russia Federation a r t i c l e i n f Keywords: Epithermal neutrons Accelerator Time-of-flight technique a b s t r a c t An innovative

391

Introduction to Neutron Coincidence Counter Design Based on Boron-10  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation Policy (NA-241) is supporting the project 'Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology' at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for development of an alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is ultimately to design, build and demonstrate a boron-lined proportional tube based alternative system in the configuration of a coincidence counter. This report, providing background information for this project, is the deliverable under Task 1 of the project.

Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

2012-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

392

About the EV Project Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About the EV Project Reports The EV Project fact sheets and reports are based on data from several different sources (vehicle and electric vehicle supply equipment EVSE...

393

VULCAN Research Highlights | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VULCAN Far beyond cookware: Corning Inc. uses Spallation Neutron Source's VULCAN to test limits of ceramic material for car emission controls, filtration devices ORNL team wins R&D...

394

Research Reactors Division | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactors Division (RRD) is responsible for operation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Operating at 85 MW, HFIR is the highest flux reactor-based source of neutrons for...

395

Research Reactors Division | Neutron Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is responsible for operation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor. Operating at 85 MW, HFIR is the highest flux reactor-based source of neutrons for research in the United States,...

396

SHUG Chairman's Message | ORNL Neutron Sciences Users  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

shall be the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) User Group, "SHUG." II. PURPOSE The purpose of the SHUG is to: Provide a formal and...

397

Ultracold neutron accumulation in a superfluid-helium converter with magnetic multipole reflector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze accumulation of ultracold neutrons (UCN) in a superfluid-helium converter vessel surrounded by a magnetic multipole reflector. Employing formulas valid for trapped UCN in mechanical equilibrium we solved the rate equation and obtained results for the saturation density of low field seeking UCN for any field strength of the multipolar field. The addition of magnetic storage can increase the density and energy of the UCN produced and serves to mitigate the effects of wall losses on the source performance. This work was performed in preparation of the UCN source project SuperSUN at the ILL.

O. Zimmer; R. Golub

2013-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

398

Plans for a Neutron EDM Experiment at SNS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric dipole moment of the neutron, leptons, and atoms provide a unique window to Physics Beyond the Standard Model. We are currently developing a new neutron EDM experiment (the nEDM Experiment). This experiment, which will be run at the 8.9 A Neutron Line at the Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline (FNPB) at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, will search for the neutron EDM with a sensitivity two orders of magnitude better than the present limit. In this paper, the motivation for the experiment, the experimental method, and the present status of the experiment are discussed.

Takeyasu M. Ito

2007-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

399

Superconductivity Highlights | Neutron Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Superconductivity Superconductivity SHARE Superconductivity Highlights 1-6 of 6 Results Doug Scalapino discusses "common thread" linking unconventional superconducting materials December 01, 2012 - Douglas Scalapino was the inaugural speaker for a new joint lecture series sponsored by the Spallation Neutron Source and the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. New VULCAN tests of Japanese cable for US ITER's central magnet system February 01, 2012 - Neutron testing of the Japanese-made superconducting cable for the central solenoid (CS) magnetic system for US ITER begins next Tuesday, says Ke An, lead instrument scientist for the VULCAN Engineering Materials Diffractometer at the Spallation Neutron Source. ARCS maps collaborative magnetic spin behavior in iron telluride

400

NEUTRONIC REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The design of control rods for nuclear reactors are described. In this design the control rod consists essentially of an elongated member constructed in part of a neutron absorbing material and having tube means extending therethrough for conducting a liquid to cool the rod when in use.

Anderson, H.L.

1958-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The Neutron Imaging Diagnostic at NIF  

SciTech Connect

A neutron imaging diagnostic has recently been commissioned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This new system is an important diagnostic tool for inertial fusion studies at the NIF for measuring the size and shape of the burning DT plasma during the ignition stage of ICF implosions. The imaging technique utilizes a pinhole neutron aperture, placed between the neutron source and a neutron detector. The detection system measures the two dimensional distribution of neutrons passing through the pinhole. This diagnostic has been designed to collect two images at two times. The long flight path for this diagnostic, 28 m, results in a chromatic separation of the neutrons, allowing the independently timed images to measure the source distribution for two neutron energies. Typically the first image measures the distribution of the 14 MeV neutrons and the second image of the 6-12 MeV neutrons. The combination of these two images has provided data on the size and shape of the burning plasma within the compressed capsule, as well as a measure of the quantity and spatial distribution of the cold fuel surrounding this core.

Merrill, F E; Buckles, R; Clark, D; Danly, C R; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Fatherly, V E; Fittinghoff, D N; Gallegos, R; Grim, G P; Guler, N; Loomis, E N; Lutz, S; Malone, R M; Martinson, D D; Mares, D; Morley, D J; Morgan, G L; Oertel, J A; Tregillis, I L; Volegov, P L; Weiss, P B; Wilde, C H

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

The neutron imaging diagnostic at NIF (invited)  

SciTech Connect

A neutron imaging diagnostic has recently been commissioned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This new system is an important diagnostic tool for inertial fusion studies at the NIF for measuring the size and shape of the burning DT plasma during the ignition stage of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions. The imaging technique utilizes a pinhole neutron aperture, placed between the neutron source and a neutron detector. The detection system measures the two dimensional distribution of neutrons passing through the pinhole. This diagnostic has been designed to collect two images at two times. The long flight path for this diagnostic, 28 m, results in a chromatic separation of the neutrons, allowing the independently timed images to measure the source distribution for two neutron energies. Typically the first image measures the distribution of the 14 MeV neutrons and the second image of the 6-12 MeV neutrons. The combination of these two images has provided data on the size and shape of the burning plasma within the compressed capsule, as well as a measure of the quantity and spatial distribution of the cold fuel surrounding this core.

Merrill, F. E.; Clark, D. D.; Danly, C. R.; Drury, O. B.; Fatherley, V. E.; Gallegos, R.; Grim, G. P.; Guler, N.; Loomis, E. N.; Martinson, D. D.; Mares, D.; Morley, D. J.; Morgan, G. L.; Oertel, J. A.; Tregillis, I. L.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H.; Wilson, D. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Bower, D.; Dzenitis, J. M. [Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Neutron Energy Measurements in Radiological Emergency Response Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present significant results in recent advances in the determination of neutron energy. Neutron energy measurements are a small but very significant part of radiological emergency response applications. Mission critical information can be obtained by analyzing the neutron energy given off from radioactive materials. In the case of searching for special nuclear materials, neutron energy information from an unknown source can be of paramount importance.

Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Paul Guss, Michael Hornish, Scott Wilde, Tom Stampahar, Michael Reed

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

404

Dr. Georg Ehlers - ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Georg Ehlers Georg Ehlers Lead Instrument Scientist: Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer (CNCS), SNS Education PhD in Experimental Condensed Matter Physics, the Hahn Meitner Institut, in Berlin, Germany Description of Research Dr. Ehlers joined the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) in 2003 as the lead instrument scientist for beam line 5, the Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer (CNCS). CNCS is a high-resolution, direct geometry, cold neutron, inelastic multi-chopper spectrometer, designed to make use of neutrons with an energy of <50 meV. Before joining the SNS, Dr. Ehlers worked at the Institute Laue-Langevin (ILL), a leading European neutron research facility situated in Grenoble, France for six years. At the ILL, he was instrument-responsible for the spin-echo spectrometers IN11 and IN15, and established a strong research

405

A system for fast neutron radiography  

SciTech Connect

A system has been designed and a neutron generator installed to perform fast neutron radiography. With this sytem, objects as small as a coin or as large as a waste drum can be radiographed. The neutron source is an MF Physics A-711 neutron generator which produces 3x10{sup 10} neutrons/second with an average energy of 14.5 MeV. The radiography system uses x-ray scintillation screens and film in commercially available cassettes. The cassettes have been modified to include a thin sheet of plastic to convert neutrons to protons through elastic scattering from hydrogen and other low Z materials in the plastic. For film densities from 1.8 to 3.0, exposures range from 1.9x10{sup 7} to 3.8x10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2} depending on the type of screen and film.

Klann, R.T.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

CRC handbook of fast neutron generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook reviews those problems and methods of science and technology where the neutrons produced in the /sup 3/H/d, n//sup 4/He and /sup 2/H/d, N//sup 3/He reactions play the main role. It also discusses possible applications of these small generators as thermal neutron sources, addresses the small accelerators as charged particle and X-ray sources, enables suitable topics to be selected for education and training and provides a wide range of experiments with the detection of neutrons and charged particles, including the study of shielding and the generator technology itself.

Csikai, G.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

New technical solution for using the time-of-flight technique to measure neutron spectra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Russian Research Institute of Technical Physics, Snezhinsk, Russia Pilot innovative facility for neutron capture. Conclusion At Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics the first experiments on generation of neutrons for BNCT772 RESULTS OF FIRST EXPERIMENTS ON NEUTRON GENERATION IN THE VITA NEUTRON SOURCE B. F. Bayanov1

Taskaev, Sergey Yur'evich

408

Old and new neutron stars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The youngest known radiopulsar in the rapidly spinning magnetized neutron star which powers the Crab Nebula, the remnant of the historical supernova explosion of 1054 AD. Similar neutron stars are probably born at least every few hundred years, but are less frequent than Galactic supernova explosions. They are initially sources of extreme relativistic electron and/or positron winds (approx.10/sup 38/s/sup -1/ of 10/sup 12/ eV leptons) which greatly decrease as the neutron stars spin down to become mature pulsars. After several million years these neutron stars are no longer observed as radiopulsars, perhaps because of large magnetic field decay. However, a substantial fraction of the 10/sup 8/ old dead pulsars in the Galaxy are the most probable source for the isotropically distributed ..gamma..-ray burst detected several times per week at the earth. Some old neutron stars are spun-up by accretion from companions to be resurrected as rapidly spinning low magnetic field radiopulsars. 52 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

Ruderman, M.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

How the Spallation Neutron Source Works | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How SNS Works SNS conceptual drawing Conceptual layout of the SNS facility. At full power, SNS will deliver 1.4 million watts (1.4 MW) of beam power onto the target. SNS was...

410

Photon and neutron active interrogation of highly enriched uranium.  

SciTech Connect

The physics of photon and neutron active interrogation of highly enriched uranium (HEU) using the delayed neutron reinterrogation method is described in this paper. Two sets of active interrogation experiments were performed using a set of subcritical configurations of cocentric HEU metal hemishells. One set of measurements utilized a pulsed 14-MeV neutron generator as the active source. The second set of measurements utilized a linear accelerator-based bremsstrahlung photon source as an active interrogation source. The neutron responses were measured for both sets of experiments. The operational details and results for both measurement sets are described.

Myers, W. L. (William L.); Goulding, C. A. (Charles A.); Hollas, C. L. (Charles L.); Moss, C. E. (Calvin E.)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

SOURCE OF PRODUCTS OF NUCLEAR FISSION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A source of fission product recoil energy suitable for use in radiation chemistry is reported. The source consists of thermal neutron irradiated glass wool having a diameter of 1 to 5 microns and containing an isotope fissionable by thermal neutrons, such as U/sup 235/.

Harteck, P.; Dondes, S.

1960-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

DIFFERENTIAL NEUTRON THERMALIZATION. Annual Summary Report, October 1, 1961 through September 30, 1962  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental and theoretical work on the interaction mechanisms by which neutrons exchange energy with H atoms involves treating neutron thermalization as neutron interactions with energy levels in the atoms. Cold moderators are presently being studied in order to optimize the source of cold neutrons. Cold neutrons are provided from an accelerator arrangement that directs electrons against a Fansteel target producing fast neutrons. Thermal neutrons, produced by moderation of fast neutrons, are passed through a chopper. Several moderators are evaluated, and neutron emission time measurements by crystal diffraction and beam chopper techniques point out emission time dependence on thickness, moderator, and temperature. The neutron beam chopper used presently is described, and results of neutron scattering by liquid para- and orthohydrogen are displayed and compared with theoretical predictions made with a perfect hydrogen gas model. Inelastic scattering of neutrons by liquid H is discussed, and theoretical and experimental results of inelastic scattering by polyethylene are also included. (D.C.W.)

Whittemore, W L

1962-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

413

Compound Refractive Lenses for Thermal Neutron Applications  

SciTech Connect

This project designed and built compound refractive lenses (CRLs) that are able to focus, collimate and image using thermal neutrons. Neutrons are difficult to manipulate compared to visible light or even x rays; however, CRLs can provide a powerful tool for focusing, collimating and imaging neutrons. Previous neutron CRLs were limited to long focal lengths, small fields of view and poor resolution due to the materials available and manufacturing techniques. By demonstrating a fabrication method that can produce accurate, small features, we have already dramatically improved the focal length of thermal neutron CRLs, and the manufacture of Fresnel lens CRLs that greatly increases the collection area, and thus efficiency, of neutron CRLs. Unlike a single lens, a compound lens is a row of N lenslets that combine to produce an N-fold increase in the refraction of neutrons. While CRLs can be made from a variety of materials, we have chosen to mold Teflon lenses. Teflon has excellent neutron refraction, yet can be molded into nearly arbitrary shapes. We designed, fabricated and tested Teflon CRLs for neutrons. We demonstrated imaging at wavelengths as short as 1.26 ? with large fields of view and achieved resolution finer than 250 ?m which is better than has been previously shown. We have also determined designs for Fresnel CRLs that will greatly improve performance.

Gary, Charles K.

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

414

Projects to expand energy sources in the western states: an update of Information Circular 8719. [24 states west of the Mississippi River  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an expansion and update of BM-IC-8719 and comprises maps and tables listing the name, location, and other pertinent data concerning certain fuel-related projects. The maps show the locations of the planned or proposed facilities. The tables include information on projects involving the proposed or planned development of fuel resources, as well as the development of storage, transportation, and conversion facilities. The report covers the 24 states west of the Mississippi River including Alaska and Hawaii. Of the 808 projects for which information is provided, 219 concern coal mines, 246 concern electric generating plants, and 115 concern uranium mines; Energy Supply and Environmental Coordination Act coal conversion notices are also included. Because of the dynamic nature of the energy industry, many uncertainties exist and some of the listed projects may never become realities. Also, no attempt has been made to determine the degree of certainty or viability of each project.

Rich, C.H. Jr.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Naysaying the Neutron Scattering Society Lawrence Cranberg, Jill Trewhella, and Henry R. Glyde  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The New Munich Neutron Source FRM II: Overview and Uses for Biological Studies Wolfgang Doster Technical University Munich, Physics Department E 13, D-85748 Garching, Email: wdoster@ph.tum.de Abstract. The application of neutron scattering to biological systems using the new neutron source in Munich is discussed

Glyde, Henry R.

416

Hallmark Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Project Commercialization of the Secure SCADA Communications Protocol, a cryptographic security solution for device-to-device communication Increased connectivity and automation in the control systems that manage the nation's energy infrastructure have improved system functionality, but left systems more vulnerable to cyber attack. Intruders could severely disrupt control system operation by sending fabricated information or commands to control system devices. To ensure message integrity, supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems require a method to validate device-to- device communication and verify that information has come from a trusted source and not been altered in transit. The Secure SCADA Communications Protocol (SSCP) provides message

417

Contact ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sciences Organization Charts Neutron Sciences Directorate Associate Laboratory Director for Neutron Sciences, Kelly Beierschmitt Biology and Soft Matter Division Director, Paul...

418

Precision Measurement Of The Neutron's Beta Asymmetry Using Ultra-Cold Neutrons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A measurement of A{beta}, the correlation between the electron momentum and neutron (n) spin (the beta asymmetry) in n beta-decay, together with the n lifetime, provides a method for extracting fundamental parameters for the charged-current weak interaction of the nucleon. In particular when combined with decay measurements, one can extract the Vud element of the CKM matrix, a critical element in CKM unitarity tests. By using a new SD2 super-thermal source at LANSCE, large fluxes of UCN (ultra-cold neutrons) are expected for the UCNA project. These UCN will be 100% polarized using a 7 T magnetic field, and directed into the {beta} spectrometer. This approach, together with an expected large reduction in backgrounds, will result in an order of magnitude reduction in the critical systematic corrections associated with current n {beta}-asymmetry measurements. This paper will give an overview of the UCNA A{beta} measurement as well as an update on the status of the experiment.

Makela, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Back, H. O. [North Carolina State University Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Melconian, D. [University of Washington, Department of Physics, Box 351560 Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Plaster, B. [California Institute of Technology, Kellogg Radiation Lab, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

419

HFIR History - ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home › Facilities › HFIR › History Home › Facilities › HFIR › History History of HFIR HFIR was constructed in the mid-1960s to fulfill a need for the production of transuranic isotopes (i.e., "heavy" elements such as plutonium and curium). Since then its mission has grown to include materials irradiation, neutron activation, and, most recently, neutron scattering. In 2007, HFIR completed the most dramatic transformation in its 40-year history. During a shutdown of more than a year, the facility was refurbished and a number of new instruments were installed, as well as a cold neutron source. The reactor was restarted in mid-May; it attained its full power of 85 MW within a couple of days, and experiments resumed within a week. Improvements and upgrades to HFIR include an overhaul of the

420

WHITE PAPER A "VolumetricNeutron Source" -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a Central Nonproliferation Mission S. Locke Bogart General Dynamics Space SystemsDivision 9 November 1992

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "neutron source project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Californium--palladium metal neutron source material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Californium, as metal or oxide, is uniformly dispersed throughout a noble metal matrix, provided in compact, rod or wire form. A solution of californium values is added to palladium metal powder, dried, blended and pressed into a compact having a uni-form distribution of californium. The californium values are decomposed to californium oxide or metal by heating in an inert or reducing atmosphere. Sintering the compact to a high density closes the matrix around the dispersed californium. The sintered compact is then mechanically shaped into an elongated rod or wire form. (4 claims, no drawings) (Official Gazette)

Dahlen, B.L.; Mosly, W.C. Jr.; Smith, P.K.; Albenesius, E.L.

1974-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

422

SNS Control Group, Spallation Neutron Source, SNS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control Group at Brookhaven Global Controls References SNS PowerSupply Control - John Smith SNS Diagnostics Control - Peter Cameron SNS Vacuum Control - Johnny Tang SNS Database...

423

Review and Workshops, Spallation Neutron Source, SNS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review and Workshops DOE Review May 7 - 9 2002 SNS Diagnostics Review Agenda July 2002 ICFA Advanced Workshop on HALO Dynamics, Diagnostics, Collimation (HALO '03) Top of Page Last...

424

Neutron Production, Moderation, and Characterization of Sources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SNS-TM-2001163. (2002). See section 6.6. 9 J. R. Lamarsh, "Introduction to Nuclear Reactor Theory," Addison Wesley, 1966. See page 168. 10 Ibid, page 186. 11...

425

X-Ray Light Sources | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

X-Ray Light Sources X-Ray Light Sources Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers Electron-Beam Microcharacterization Centers Accelerator & Detector Research & Development Principal Investigators' Meetings Scientific Highlights Construction Projects BES Home User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page This activity supports the operation of five DOE light sources. The unique properties of synchrotron radiation include its continuous spectrum, high flux and brightness, and in the case of the Linac Coherent Light Source, high coherence, which makes it an indispensable tool in the exploration of matter. The wavelengths of the emitted photons span a range of dimensions

426

Neutronic design of a fission converter-based epithermal neutron beam for neutron capture therapy  

SciTech Connect

To meet the needs for neutron capture theory (NCT) irradiations, a high-intensity, high-quality fusion converter-based epithermal neutron beam has been designed for the MITR-II research reactor. This epithermal neutron beam, capable of delivering treatments in a few minutes with negligible background contamination from fast neutrons and photons, will be installed in the present thermal column and hohlraum of the 5-MW MITR-II research reactor. Spent or fresh MITR-II fuel elements will be used to fuel the converter. With a fission converter power of {approximately}80 kW using spent fuel, epithermal fluxes (1 eV < E < 10 keV) in excess of 10{sup 10} n/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s are achievable at the target position with negligible photon and fast neutron contamination, i.e., <2 {times} 10{sup {minus}11}cGy-cm{sup 2}/n. With the currently available {sup 10}B delivery compound boronophenylalanine-fructose, average therapeutic ratios of {approximately}5 can be achieved using this beam for brain irradiations with deep effective penetration ({approximately}9.5 cm) and high dose rates of up to 400 to 600 RBE cGy/min. If NCT becomes an accepted therapy, fission converter-based beams constructed at existing reactors could meet a large fraction of the projected requirements for intense, low-background epithermal neutron beams at a relatively low cost. The results of an extensive set of neutronic design studies investigating all components of the beam are presented. These detailed studies can be useful as guidance for others who may wish to use the fission converter approach to develop epithermal beams for NCT.

Kiger, W.S. III; Sakamoto, S.; Harling, O.K. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Science | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neutron Science Neutron Science Neutron Scattering Science Neutrons are one of the fundamental particles that make up matter and have properties that make them ideal for certain types of research. In the universe, neutrons are abundant, making up more than half of all visible matter. Neutron scattering provides information about the positions, motions, and magnetic properties of solids. When a beam of neutrons is aimed at a sample, many neutrons will pass through the material. But some will interact directly with atomic nuclei and "bounce" away at an angle, like colliding balls in a game of pool. This behavior is called neutron diffraction, or neutron scattering. Using detectors, scientists can count scattered neutrons, measure their energies and the angles at which they scatter, and map their final position

428

Alternatives to 3He for Neutron Detection for Homeland Security  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron detection is an essential aspect of interdiction of radiological threats for national security purposes, since plutonium, a material used for nuclear weapons, is a significant source of fission neutrons. Radiation portal monitoring systems, of which there are thousands deployed for homeland security and non-proliferation purposes, currently use 3He gas-filled proportional counters for detecting neutrons. Because of the high usage of 3He for neutron scattering science and national security, the supply has dwindled, and can no longer meet the demand. Consequently, a replacement technology for neutron detection is required in the very near future.

Kouzes, Richard T.; Conlin, Kenneth E.; Ely, James H.; Erikson, Luke E.; Kernan, Warnick J.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Stephens, Daniel L.; Stromswold, David C.; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

429

Workshop on NEUtron WAVElength Dependent Imaging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NEUtron WAVElength Dependent Imaging NEUtron WAVElength Dependent Imaging (NEUWAVE-4) Workshop October 2 - 5, 2011 Spallation Neutron Source * Oak Ridge National Laboratory * Gatlinburg, TN, USA About the Workshop Workshop Agenda Contact Information Important Dates NEUWAVE-4 Program Registration Lodging Social Events Tourist Information Organizing Committee Program Committee Workshop Flyer filler About the Workshop The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Neutron Sciences Directorate and Energy & Environmental Sciences Directorate are pleased to host the 4th Workshop on NEUtron WAVElength Dependent Imaging (NEUWAVE-4). This meeting discusses the latest development in energy selective imaging techniques, applications and existing and future instrumentation. This meeting follows the successful meeting held in Garching, Germany (April 2008,) Abingdon, UK (June 2009,) and Hokkaido University (June 2010.)

430

Breast Tissue Imaging | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neutron scattering measures samples too hot to hold Neutron scattering measures samples too hot to hold Research Contact: Kenneth Kelton August 2013 Liquids and glasses can have unique optical, electronic, and structural applications but are poorly understood compared to crystalline materials, limiting the ability to take advantage of the characteristics of glasses in a range of applications. Containers can react with molten samples at high temperatures or can favor the growth of crystals over the formation of glasses. Using the chemical and isotopic sensitivity of neutron scattering to understand these disordered structures requires a new capability to hold samples in a neutron beam at high temperature without using a solid physical container. New sample environment equipment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) enables scientists to

431

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Results from Simulation Project Results from Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO 2 Storage Infrastructure along Arches Province of Midwest United States DOE Award No. DE-FE0001034 Ohio Dept. of Dev. Grant CDO/D-10-03 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting August 21-23, 2012 Joel Sminchak and Neeraj Gupta Battelle Energy Systems sminchak@battelle.org, 614-424-7392 gupta@battelle.org, 614-424-3820 BUSINESS SENSITIVE 2 Presentation Outline 1. Technical Status 2. Background (CO 2 Sources, Geologic Setting) 3. Injection Well history 4. Geocellular Model Development 5. Geological Data (Geological dataset, Geostatistics) 6. Geocellular porosity/permeability model development 7. Pipeline Routing Analysis

432

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Number (DE-FE0002056) W. Lynn Watney & Jason Rush (Joint PIs) Kansas Geological Survey Lawrence, KS 66047 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY Bittersweet Energy Inc. Partners FE0002056 Devilbiss Coring Service Basic Energy Services Wellington Field Operator Industrial and Electrical Power Sources of CO 2 Southwest Kansas CO 2 -EOR Initiative Industry Partners (modeling 4 Chester/Morrowan oil fields to make CO2 ready) +drilling and seismic contractors TBN

433

ORNL neutron facilities deliver neutrons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) resumed full power operations on May 16, 2007. There were three experiment cycles of 23 to 25 days in FY2007 and another six are proposed for FY2008 beginning in November 2007. During FY 2007, the High Flux Isotope Reactor delivered 1178 operating hours to users. Commissioning of two SANS instruments is under way and these instruments will join the user program in 2008. The Neutron Scattering Science Advisory Committee endorsed language encouraging development of the science case for two instruments proposed for HFIR.

Ekkebus, Allen E [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar Model Utilizing Boron-10 Lined Tubes  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of a 3He proportional counter alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a system based upon 10B-lined proportional tubes in a configuration typical for 3He-based coincidence counter applications. This report, providing results for model development of Alternative Boron-Based Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (ABUNCL) designs, is a deliverable under Task 2 of the project.

Rogers, Jeremy L.; Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

435

ORNL Neutron Sciences Annual Report for 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the first annual report of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Neutron Sciences Directorate for calendar year 2007. It describes the neutron science facilities, current developments, and future plans; highlights of the year's activities and scientific research; and information on the user program. It also contains information about education and outreach activities and about the organization and staff. The Neutron Sciences Directorate is responsible for operation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor and the Spallation Neutron Source. The main highlights of 2007 were highly successful operation and instrument commissioning at both facilities. At HFIR, the year began with the reactor in shutdown mode and work on the new cold source progressing as planned. The restart on May 16, with the cold source operating, was a significant achievement. Furthermore, measurements of the cold source showed that the performance exceeded expectations, making it one of the world's most brilliant sources of cold neutrons. HFIR finished the year having completed five run cycles and 5,880 MWd of operation. At SNS, the year began with 20 kW of beam power on target; and tha