National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for neutron capture therapy

  1. Neutron capture therapies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.; Shefer, Ruth E.; Klinkowstein, Robert E.

    1999-01-01

    In one embodiment there is provided an application of the .sup.10 B(n,.alpha.).sup.7 Li nuclear reaction or other neutron capture reactions for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This application, called Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), requires substantially altered demands on neutron beam design than for instance treatment of deep seated tumors. Considerations for neutron beam design for the treatment of arthritic joints via BNCS are provided for, and comparisons with the design requirements for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of tumors are made. In addition, exemplary moderator/reflector assemblies are provided which produce intense, high-quality neutron beams based on (p,n) accelerator-based reactions. In another embodiment there is provided the use of deuteron-based charged particle reactions to be used as sources for epithermal or thermal neutron beams for neutron capture therapies. Many d,n reactions (e.g. using deuterium, tritium or beryllium targets) are very prolific at relatively low deuteron energies.

  2. Workshop on neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P.

    1986-01-01

    Potentially optimal conditions for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) may soon be in hand due to the anticipated development of band-pass filtered beams relatively free of fast neutron contaminations, and of broadly applicable biomolecules for boron transport such as porphyrins and monoclonal antibodies. Consequently, a number of groups in the US are now devoting their efforts to exploring NCT for clinical application. The purpose of this Workshop was to bring these groups together to exchange views on significant problems of mutual interest, and to assure a unified and effective approach to the solutions. Several areas of preclinical investigation were deemed to be necessary before it would be possible to initiate clinical studies. As neither the monomer nor the dimer of sulfhydryl boron hydride is unequivocally preferable at this time, studies on both compounds should be continued until one is proven superior.

  3. Porphyrins for boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko; Gabel, Detlef

    1990-01-01

    Novel compounds for treatment of brain tumors in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy are disclosed. A method for preparing the compounds as well as pharmaceutical compositions containing said compounds are also disclosed. The compounds are water soluble, non-toxic and non-labile boronated porphyrins which show significant uptake and retention in tumors.

  4. BERAC Subcommittee Report on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Clinical

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Trials. | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) BERAC Subcommittee Report on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Clinical Trials. Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) BERAC Home Meetings Members Charges/Reports Current BERAC Charges Archive of BERAC Reports Charter .pdf file (135KB) BER Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees BER Home Charges/Reports BERAC Subcommittee Report on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Clinical Trials. Print Text Size: A A A

  5. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1995-10-03

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  6. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1997-03-18

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  7. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1997-08-05

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  8. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1997-03-18

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  9. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1997-08-05

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized. by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  10. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1995-10-03

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  11. Proceedings of the first international symposium on neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairchild, R.G.; Brownell, G.L.

    1982-01-01

    This meeting was arranged jointly by MIT and BNL in order to illuminate progress in the synthesis and targeting of boron compounds and to evaluate and document progress in radiobiological and dosimetric aspects of neutron capture therapy. It is hoped that this meeting will facilitate transfer of information between groups working in these fields, and encourage synergistic collaboration.

  12. Boron containing compounds and their preparation and use in neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gabel, Detlef

    1992-01-01

    The present invention pertains to boron containing thiouracil derivatives, their method of preparations, and their use in the therapy of malignant melanoma using boron neutron capture therapy.

  13. Thiourea derivatives, methods of their preparation and their use in neutron capture therapy of malignant melanoma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gabel, Detlef

    1991-01-01

    The present invention pertains to boron containing thiouracil derivatives, their method of preparations, and their use in the therapy of malignant melanoma using boron neutron capture therapy.

  14. Design and construction of an optimized neutron beam shaping assembly for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy at the Tandar accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burlon, A.; Kreiner, A. J.; Valda, A. A.; Somacal, H.; Minsky, D. M.

    2007-02-12

    In this work we present an optimized neutron beam shaping assembly for epithermal Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT) and discuss the simulations leading to its design.

  15. Boron containing compounds and their preparation and use in neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gabel, D.

    1992-09-01

    The present invention pertains to boron containing thiouracil derivatives, their method of preparations, and their use in the therapy of malignant melanoma using boron neutron capture therapy. No Drawings

  16. Thiourea derivatives, methods of their preparation and their use in neutron capture therapy of malignant melanoma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gabel, D.

    1991-06-04

    The present invention pertains to boron containing thiouracil derivatives, their method of preparations, and their use in the therapy of malignant melanoma using boron neutron capture therapy. No Drawings

  17. Design of a boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhonglu

    2006-08-01

    The use of boron neutron capture to boost tumor dose in fast neutron therapy has been investigated at several fast neutron therapy centers worldwide. This treatment is termed boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy (BNCEFNT). It is a combination of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and fast neutron therapy (FNT). It is believed that BNCEFNT may be useful in the treatment of some radioresistant brain tumors, such as glioblastoma multiform (GBM). A boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy assembly has been designed for the Fermilab Neutron Therapy Facility (NTF). This assembly uses a tungsten filter and collimator near the patient's head, with a graphite reflector surrounding the head to significantly increase the dose due to boron neutron capture reactions. The assembly was designed using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP version 5 for a standard 20x20 cm{sup 2} treatment beam. The calculated boron dose enhancement at 5.7-cm depth in a water-filled head phantom in the assembly with a 5x5 cm{sup 2} collimation was 21.9% per 100-ppm {sup 10}B for a 5.0-cm tungsten filter and 29.8% for a 8.5-cm tungsten filter. The corresponding dose rate for the 5.0-cm and 8.5-cm thick filters were 0.221 and 0.127 Gy/min, respectively; about 48.5% and 27.9% of the dose rate of the standard 10x10 cm{sup 2} fast neutron treatment beam. To validate the design calculations, a simplified BNCEFNT assembly was built using four lead bricks to form a 5x5 cm{sup 2} collimator. Five 1.0-cm thick 20x20 cm{sup 2} tungsten plates were used to obtain different filter thicknesses and graphite bricks/blocks were used to form a reflector. Measurements of the dose enhancement of the simplified assembly in a water-filled head phantom were performed using a pair of tissue-equivalent ion chambers. One of the ion chambers is loaded with 1000-ppm natural boron (184-ppm {sup 10}B) to measure dose due to boron neutron capture. The measured dose enhancement at 5.0-cm depth in

  18. MCNP speed advances for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goorley, J.T.; McKinney, G.; Adams, K.; Estes, G.

    1998-04-01

    The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) treatment planning process of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center-M.I.T team relies on MCNP to determine dose rates in the subject`s head for various beam orientations. In this time consuming computational process, four or five potential beams are investigated. Of these, one or two final beams are selected and thoroughly evaluated. Recent advances greatly decreased the time needed to do these MCNP calculations. Two modifications to the new MCNP4B source code, lattice tally and tracking enhancements, reduced the wall-clock run times of a typical one million source neutrons run to one hour twenty five minutes on a 200 MHz Pentium Pro computer running Linux and using the GNU FORTRAN compiler. Previously these jobs used a special version of MCNP4AB created by Everett Redmond, which completed in two hours two minutes. In addition to this 30% speedup, the MCNP4B version was adapted for use with Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) on personal computers running the Linux operating system. MCNP, using PVM, can be run on multiple computers simultaneously, offering a factor of speedup roughly the same as the number of computers used. With two 200 MHz Pentium Pro machines, the run time was reduced to forty five minutes, a 1.9 factor of improvement over the single Linux computer. While the time of a single run was greatly reduced, the advantages associated with PVM derive from using computational power not already used. Four possible beams, currently requiring four separate runs, could be run faster when each is individually run on a single machine under Windows NT, rather than using Linux and PVM to run one after another with each multiprocessed across four computers. It would be advantageous, however, to use PVM to distribute the final two beam orientations over four computers.

  19. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yoon, Woo Y. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jones, James L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Nigg, David W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Harker, Yale D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0.times.10.sup.9 neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use.

  20. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yoon, W.Y.; Jones, J.L.; Nigg, D.W.; Harker, Y.D.

    1999-05-11

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0{times}10{sup 9} neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use. 3 figs.

  1. Neutron capture therapy with deep tissue penetration using capillary neutron focusing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peurrung, Anthony J.

    1997-01-01

    An improved method for delivering thermal neutrons to a subsurface cancer or tumor which has been first doped with a dopant having a high cross section for neutron capture. The improvement is the use of a guide tube in cooperation with a capillary neutron focusing apparatus, or neutron focusing lens, for directing neutrons to the tumor, and thereby avoiding damage to surrounding tissue.

  2. Neutron capture therapy with deep tissue penetration using capillary neutron focusing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peurrung, A.J.

    1997-08-19

    An improved method is disclosed for delivering thermal neutrons to a subsurface cancer or tumor which has been first doped with a dopant having a high cross section for neutron capture. The improvement is the use of a guide tube in cooperation with a capillary neutron focusing apparatus, or neutron focusing lens, for directing neutrons to the tumor, and thereby avoiding damage to surrounding tissue. 1 fig.

  3. Final Stage in the Design of a Boron Neutron Capture Therapy facility at CEADEN, Cuba

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabal, F. Padilla; Martin, G.

    2008-08-11

    A neutron beam simulation study is carried out to determine the most suitable neutron energy for treatment of shallow and deep-seated brain tumors in the context of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Two figures-of-merit, the therapeutic gain and the neutron fluence are utilized as beam assessment parameters. An irradiation cavity is used instead of a parallel beam port for the therapy. Calculations are performed using the MCNP5 code. After the optimization of our beam-shaper a study of the dose distribution in the head, neck, tyroids, lungs and upper and middle spine had been made. The therapeutic gain is increased while the current required for one hour treatment is decreased in comparison with the trading prototypes of NG used for BNCT.

  4. IMPROVED COMPUTATIONAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE THERMAL NEUTRON SOURCE FOR NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY RESEARCH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart R. Slattery; David W. Nigg; John D. Brockman; M. Frederick Hawthorne

    2010-05-01

    Parameter studies, design calculations and initial neutronic performance measurements have been completed for a new thermal neutron beamline to be used for neutron capture therapy cell and small-animal radiobiology studies at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. The beamline features the use of single-crystal silicon and bismuth sections for neutron filtering and for reduction of incident gamma radiation. The computational models used for the final beam design and performance evaluation are based on coupled discrete-ordinates and Monte Carlo techniques that permit detailed modeling of the neutron transmission properties of the filtering crystals with very few approximations. This is essential for detailed dosimetric studies required for the anticipated research program.

  5. Technical aspects of boron neutron capture therapy at the BNL Medical Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden, N.E.; Rorer, D.C.; Patti, F.J.; Liu, H.B.; Reciniello, R.; Chanana, A.D.

    1997-07-01

    The Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, BMRR, is a 3 MW heterogeneous, tank-type, light water cooled and moderated, graphite reflected reactor, which was designed for biomedical studies. Early BNL work in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) used a beam of thermal neutrons for experimental treatment of brain tumors. Research elsewhere and at BNL indicated that higher energy neutrons would be required to treat deep seated brain tumors. Epithermal neutrons would be thermalized as they penetrated the brain and peak thermal neutron flux densities would occur at the depth of brain tumors. One of the two BMRR thermal port shutters was modified in 1988 to include plates of aluminum and aluminum oxide to provide an epithermal port. Lithium carbonate in polyethylene was added in 1991 around the bismuth port to reduce the neutron flux density coming from outside the port. To enhance the epithermal neutron flux density, the two vertical thimbles A-3 (core edge) and E-3 (in core) were replaced with fuel elements. There are now four fuel elements of 190 grams each and 28 fuel elements of 140 grams each for a total of 4.68 kg of {sup 235}U in the core. The authors have proposed replacing the epithermal shutter with a fission converter plate shutter. It is estimated that the new shutter would increase the epithermal neutron flux density by a factor of seven and the epithermal/fast neutron ratio by a factor of two. The modifications made to the BMRR in the past few years permit BNCT for brain tumors without the need to reflect scalp and bone flaps. Radiation workers are monitored via a TLD badge and a self-reading dosimeter during each experiment. An early concern was raised about whether workers would be subject to a significant dose rate from working with patients who have been irradiated. The gamma ray doses for the representative key personnel involved in the care of the first 12 patients receiving BNCT are listed. These workers did not receive unusually high exposures.

  6. Experimental and Simulated Characterization of a Beam Shaping Assembly for Accelerator- Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burlon, Alejandro A.; Valda, Alejandro A.; Girola, Santiago; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andres J.

    2010-08-04

    In the frame of the construction of a Tandem Electrostatic Quadrupole Accelerator facility devoted to the Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, a Beam Shaping Assembly has been characterized by means of Monte-Carlo simulations and measurements. The neutrons were generated via the {sup 7}Li(p, n){sup 7}Be reaction by irradiating a thick LiF target with a 2.3 MeV proton beam delivered by the TANDAR accelerator at CNEA. The emerging neutron flux was measured by means of activation foils while the beam quality and directionality was evaluated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The parameters show compliance with those suggested by IAEA. Finally, an improvement adding a beam collimator has been evaluated.

  7. First Evaluation of the Biologic Effectiveness Factors of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in a Human Colon Carcinoma Cell Line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dagrosa, Maria Alejandra; Crivello, Martin; Perona, Marina; Thorp, Silvia; Santa Cruz, Gustavo Alberto; Pozzi, Emiliano; Casal, Mariana; Thomasz, Lisa; Cabrini, Romulo; Kahl, Steven; Juvenal, Guillermo Juan; Pisarev, Mario Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: DNA lesions produced by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and those produced by gamma radiation in a colon carcinoma cell line were analyzed. We have also derived the relative biologic effectiveness factor (RBE) of the neutron beam of the RA-3- Argentine nuclear reactor, and the compound biologic effectiveness (CBE) values for p-boronophenylalanine ({sup 10}BPA) and for 2,4-bis ({alpha},{beta}-dihydroxyethyl)-deutero-porphyrin IX ({sup 10}BOPP). Methods and Materials: Exponentially growing human colon carcinoma cells (ARO81-1) were distributed into the following groups: (1) BPA (10 ppm {sup 10}B) + neutrons, (2) BOPP (10 ppm {sup 10}B) + neutrons, (3) neutrons alone, and (4) gamma rays ({sup 60}Co source at 1 Gy/min dose-rate). Different irradiation times were used to obtain total absorbed doses between 0.3 and 5 Gy ({+-}10%) (thermal neutrons flux = 7.5 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2} sec). Results: The frequency of micronucleated binucleated cells and the number of micronuclei per micronucleated binucleated cells showed a dose-dependent increase until approximately 2 Gy. The response to gamma rays was significantly lower than the response to the other treatments (p < 0.05). The irradiations with neutrons alone and neutrons + BOPP showed curves that did not differ significantly from, and showed less DNA damage than, irradiation with neutrons + BPA. A decrease in the surviving fraction measured by 3-(4,5-dimetiltiazol-2-il)-2,5-difeniltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay as a function of the absorbed dose was observed for all the treatments. The RBE and CBE factors calculated from cytokinesis block micronucleus (CBMN) and MTT assays were, respectively, the following: beam RBE: 4.4 {+-} 1.1 and 2.4 {+-} 0.6; CBE for BOPP: 8.0 {+-} 2.2 and 2.0 {+-} 1; CBE for BPA: 19.6 {+-} 3.7 and 3.5 {+-} 1.3. Conclusions: BNCT and gamma irradiations showed different genotoxic patterns. To our knowledge, these values represent the first experimental ones obtained for the RA-3 in a

  8. Final Report for the “WSU Neutron Capture Therapy Facility Support”

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald E. Tripard; Keith G. Fox

    2006-08-24

    The objective for the cooperative research program for which this report has been written was to provide separate NCT facility user support for the students, faculty and scientists who would be doing the U.S. Department of Energy Office (DOE) of Science supported advanced radiotargeted research at the WSU 1 megawatt TRIGA reactor. The participants were the Idaho National laboratory (INL, P.I., Dave Nigg), the Veterinary Medical Research Center of Washington State University (WSU, Janean Fidel and Patrick Gavin), and the Washington State University Nuclear Radiation Center (WSU, P.I., Gerald Tripard). A significant number of DOE supported modifications were made to the WSU reactor in order to create an epithermal neutron beam while at the same time maintaining the other activities of the 1 MW reactor. These modifications were: (1) Removal of the old thermal column. (2) Construction and insertion of a new epithermal filter, collimator and shield. (3) Construction of a shielded room that could accommodate the very high radiation field created by an intense neutron beam. (4) Removal of the previous reactor core fuel cluster arrangement. (5) Design and loading of the new reactor core fuel cluster arrangement in order to optimize the neutron flux entering the epithermal neutron filter. (6) The integration of the shielded rooms interlocks and radiological controls into the SCRAM chain and operating electronics of the reactor. (7) Construction of a motorized mechanism for moving and remotely controlling the position of the entire reactor bridge. (8) The integration of the reactor bridge control electronics into the SCRAM chain and operating electronics of the reactor. (9) The design, construction and attachment to the support structure of the reactor of an irradiation box that could be inserted into position next to the face of the reactor. (Necessitated by the previously mentioned core rearrangement). All of the above modifications were successfully completed and tested

  9. L-Boronophenylalanine-Mediated Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Glioma Progressing After External Beam Radiation Therapy: A Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kankaanranta, Leena; Seppaelae, Tiina; Koivunoro, Hanna; Vaelimaeki, Petteri; Beule, Annette; Collan, Juhani; Kortesniemi, Mika; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Kotiluoto, Petri; Auterinen, Iiro; Seren, Tom; Paetau, Anders; Saarilahti, Kauko; Savolainen, Sauli; Joensuu, Heikki

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the safety of boronophenylalanine-mediated boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of malignant gliomas that progress after surgery and conventional external beam radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Adult patients who had histologically confirmed malignant glioma that had progressed after surgery and external beam radiotherapy were eligible for this Phase I study, provided that >6 months had elapsed from the last date of radiation therapy. The first 10 patients received a fixed dose, 290 mg/kg, of L-boronophenylalanine-fructose (L-BPA-F) as a 2-hour infusion before neutron irradiation, and the remaining patients were treated with escalating doses of L-BPA-F, either 350 mg/kg, 400 mg/kg, or 450 mg/kg, using 3 patients on each dose level. Adverse effects were assessed using National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria version 2.0. Results: Twenty-two patients entered the study. Twenty subjects had glioblastoma, and 2 patients had anaplastic astrocytoma, and the median cumulative dose of prior external beam radiotherapy was 59.4 Gy. The maximally tolerated L-BPA-F dose was reached at the 450 mg/kg level, where 4 of 6 patients treated had a grade 3 adverse event. Patients who were given >290 mg/kg of L-BPA-F received a higher estimated average planning target volume dose than those who received 290 mg/kg (median, 36 vs. 31 Gy [W, i.e., a weighted dose]; p = 0.018). The median survival time following BNCT was 7 months. Conclusions: BNCT administered with an L-BPA-F dose of up to 400 mg/kg as a 2-hour infusion is feasible in the treatment of malignant gliomas that recur after conventional radiation therapy.

  10. ABSTRACT Bayarbadrakh, Baramsai. Neutron Capture Reactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bayarbadrakh, Baramsai. Neutron Capture Reactions on Gadolinium Isotopes. (Under the direction of Dr. G. E. Mitchell and U. Agvaanluvsan). The neutron capture reaction on 155 Gd, 156 Gd and 158 Gd isotopes has been studied with the DANCE calorimeter at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The highly segmented calorimeter provided detailed multiplicity distributions of the capture γ-rays. With this information the spins of the neutron capture resonances have been determined. The new technique

  11. Boron neutron capture therapy: A guide to the understanding of the pathogenesis of late radiation damage to the rat spinal cord

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, G.M.; Whitehouse, E.M.; Hopewell, J.W. ); Coderre, J.A.; Micca, P. )

    1994-03-30

    Before the commencement of new boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) clinical trials in Europe and North America, detailed information on normal tissue tolerance is required. In this study, the pathologic effects of BNCT on the central nervous system (CNS) have been investigated using a rat spinal cord model. The neutron capture agent used was [sup 10]B-enriched sodium mercaptoundecahydro-closo-dodecaborate (BSH), at a dosage of 100 mg/kg body weight. Rats were irradiated on the thermal beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor. The large spine of vertebra T[sub 2] was used as the lower marker of the irradiation field. Rats were irradiated with thermal neutrons alone to a maximum physical absorbed dose of 11.4 Gy, or with thermal neutrons in combination with BSH, to maximum absorbed physical doses of 5.7 Gy to the CNS parenchyma and 33.7 Gy to the blood in the vasculature of the spinal cord. An additional group of rats was irradiated with 250 kVp X-rays to a single dose of 35 Gy. Spinal cord pathology was examined between 5 and 12 months after irradiation. The physical dose of radiation delivered to the CNS parenchyma, using thermal neutron irradiation in the presence of BSH, was a factor of two to three lower than that delivered to the vascular endothelium, and could not account for the level of damage observed in the parenchyma. The histopathological observations of the present study support the hypothesis that the blood vessels, and the endothelial cells in particular, are the critical target population responsible for the lesions seen in the spinal cord after BNCT type irradiation and by inference, after more conventional irradiation modalities such as photons or fast neutrons. 30 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Collaborative Physical and Biological Dosimetry Studies for Neutron Capture Therapy at the RA-1 Research Reactor Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David W. Nigg; Amanda E. Schwint; John K. Hartwell; Elisa M. Heber; Veronica Trivillin; Jorge Castillo; Luis Wentzeis; Patrick Sloan; Charles A. Wemple

    2004-10-01

    Initial physical dosimetry measurements have been completed using activation spectrometry and thermoluminiscent dosimeters to characterize the BNCT irradiation facility developed at the RA-1 research reactor operated by the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission in Buenos Aires. Some biological scoping irradiations have also been completed using a small-animal (hamster) oral mucosa tumor model. Results indicate that the RA-1 neutron source produces useful dose rates but that some improvements in the initial configuration will be needed to optimize the spectrum for thermal-neutron BNCT research applications.

  13. “Sequential” Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT): A Novel Approach to BNCT for the Treatment of Oral Cancer in the Hamster Cheek Pouch Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ana J. Molinari; Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; Andrea Monti Hughes; Elisa M. Heber; Marcela A. Garabalino; Silvia I. Thorp; Marcelo Miller; Maria E. Itoiz; Romina F. Aromando; David W. Nigg; Jorge Quintana; Gustavo A. Santa Cruz; Veronica A. Trivillin; Amanda E. Schwint

    2011-04-01

    In the present study we evaluated the therapeutic effect and/or potential radiotoxicity of the novel “Tandem” Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (T-BNCT) for the treatment of oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch model at RA-3 Nuclear Reactor. Two groups of animals were treated with “Tandem BNCT”, i.e. BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) followed by BNCT mediated by sodium decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) either 24 h (T-24h-BNCT) or 48 h (T-48h-BNCT) later. A total tumor dose-matched single application of BNCT mediated by BPA and GB-10 administered jointly [(BPA + GB-10)-BNCT] was administered to an additional group of animals. At 28 days post-treatment, T-24h-BNCT and T-48h-BNCT induced, respectively, overall tumor control (OTC) of 95% and 91%, with no statistically significant differences between protocols. Tumor response for the single application of (BPA + GB-10)-BNCT was 75%, significantly lower than for T-BNCT. The T-BNCT protocols and (BPA + GB-10)-BNCT induced reversible mucositis in dose-limiting precancerous tissue around treated tumors, reaching Grade 3/4 mucositis in 47% and 60% of the animals respectively. No normal tissue radiotoxicity was associated to tumor control for any of the protocols. “Tandem” BNCT enhances tumor control in oral cancer and reduces or, at worst, does not increase, mucositis in dose-limiting precancerous tissue.

  14. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in the Treatment of Locally Recurred Head-and-Neck Cancer: Final Analysis of a Phase I/II Trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kankaanranta, Leena; Seppaelae, Tiina; Koivunoro, Hanna; Saarilahti, Kauko; Atula, Timo; Collan, Juhani; Salli, Eero; Kortesniemi, Mika; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Vaelimaeki, Petteri; Maekitie, Antti; Seppaenen, Marko; Minn, Heikki; Revitzer, Hannu; Kouri, Mauri; Kotiluoto, Petri; Seren, Tom; Auterinen, Iiro; Savolainen, Sauli; Joensuu, Heikki

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy and safety of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of inoperable head-and-neck cancers that recur locally after conventional photon radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: In this prospective, single-center Phase I/II study, 30 patients with inoperable, locally recurred head-and-neck cancer (29 carcinomas and 1 sarcoma) were treated with BNCT. Prior treatments consisted of surgery and conventionally fractionated photon irradiation to a cumulative dose of 50 to 98 Gy administered with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Tumor responses were assessed by use of the RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) and adverse effects by use of the National Cancer Institute common terminology criteria version 3.0. Intravenously administered L-boronophenylalanine-fructose (400 mg/kg) was administered as the boron carrier. Each patient was scheduled to be treated twice with BNCT. Results: Twenty-six patients received BNCT twice; four were treated once. Of the 29 evaluable patients, 22 (76%) responded to BNCT, 6 (21%) had tumor growth stabilization for 5.1 and 20.3 months, and 1 (3%) progressed. The median progression-free survival time was 7.5 months (95% confidence interval, 5.4-9.6 months). Two-year progression-free survival and overall survival were 20% and 30%, respectively, and 27% of the patients survived for 2 years without locoregional recurrence. The most common acute Grade 3 adverse effects were mucositis (54% of patients), oral pain (54%), and fatigue (32%). Three patients were diagnosed with osteoradionecrosis (each Grade 3) and one patient with soft-tissue necrosis (Grade 4). Late Grade 3 xerostomia was present in 3 of the 15 evaluable patients (20%). Conclusions: Most patients who have inoperable, locally advanced head-and-neck carcinoma that has recurred at a previously irradiated site respond to boronophenylalanine-mediated BNCT, but cancer recurrence after BNCT remains frequent. Toxicity was

  15. Experimental Studies of Boronophenylalanine ({sup 10}BPA) Biodistribution for the Individual Application of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for Malignant Melanoma Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpano, Marina; Perona, Marina; Rodriguez, Carla; Nievas, Susana; Olivera, Maria; Santa Cruz, Gustavo A.; Brandizzi, Daniel; Cabrini, Romulo; Pisarev, Mario; Juvenal, Guillermo Juan; Dagrosa, Maria Alejandra

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Patients with the same histopathologic diagnosis of cutaneous melanoma treated with identical protocols of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) have shown different clinical outcomes. The objective of the present studies was to evaluate the biodistribution of boronophenilalanina ({sup 10}BPA) for the potential application of BNCT for the treatment of melanoma on an individual basis. Methods and Materials: The boronophenilalanine (BPA) uptake was evaluated in 3 human melanoma cell lines: MEL-J, A375, and M8. NIH nude mice were implanted with 4 10{sup 6} MEL-J cells, and biodistribution studies of BPA (350 mg/kg intraperitoneally) were performed. Static infrared imaging using a specially modified infrared camera adapted to measure the body infrared radiance of small animals was used. Proliferation marker, Ki-67, and endothelial marker, CD31, were analyzed in tumor samples. Results: The in vitro studies demonstrated different patterns of BPA uptake for each analyzed cell line (P<.001 for MEL-J and A375 vs M8 cells). The in vivo studies showed a maximum average boron concentration of 25.9 ± 2.6 μg/g in tumor, with individual values ranging between 11.7 and 52.0 μg/g of {sup 10}B 2 hours after the injection of BPA. Tumor temperature always decreased as the tumors increased in size, with values ranging between 37°C and 23°C. A significant correlation between tumor temperature and tumor-to-blood boron concentration ratio was found (R{sup 2} = 0.7, rational function fit). The immunohistochemical studies revealed, in tumors with extensive areas of viability, a high number of positive cells for Ki-67, blood vessels of large diameter evidenced by the marker CD31, and a direct logistic correlation between proliferative status and boron concentration difference between tumor and blood (R{sup 2} = 0.81, logistic function fit). Conclusion: We propose that these methods could be suitable for designing new screening protocols applied before melanoma BNCT

  16. Thermal Neutron Capture y's (CapGam)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) presents two tables showing energy and photon intensity with uncertainties of gamma rays as seen in thermal-neutron capture.  One table is organized in ascending order of gamma energy, and the second is organized by Z, A of the target. In the energy-ordered table the three strongest transitions are indicated in each case. The nuclide given is the target nucleus in the capture reaction. The gamma energies given are in keV. The gamma intensities given are relative to 100 for the strongest transition. %Iγ (per 100 n-captures) for the strongest transition is given, where known. All data are taken from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), a computer file of evaluated nuclear structure data and from the eXperimental Unevaluated Nuclear Data List (XUNDL). (Specialized Interface)

  17. Thermal Neutron Capture y's (CapGam)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) presents two tables showing energy and photon intensity with uncertainties of gamma rays as seen in thermal-neutron capture. One table is organized in ascending order of gamma energy, and the second is organized by Z, A of the target. In the energy-ordered table the three strongest transitions are indicated in each case. The nuclide given is the target nucleus in the capture reaction. The gamma energies given are in keV. The gamma intensities given are relative to 100 for the strongest transition. %I? (per 100 n-captures) for the strongest transition is given, where known. All data are taken from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), a computer file of evaluated nuclear structure data and from the eXperimental Unevaluated Nuclear Data List (XUNDL). (Specialized Interface)

  18. Toward a clinical application of ex situ boron neutron capture therapy for lung tumors at the RA-3 reactor in Argentina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farías, R. O.; Trivillin, V. A.; Portu, A. M.; Schwint, A. E.; González, S. J.; Garabalino, M. A.; Monti Hughes, A.; Pozzi, E. C. C.; Thorp, S. I.; Curotto, P.; Miller, M. E.; Santa Cruz, G. A.; Saint Martin, G.; Ferraris, S.; Santa María, J.; Rovati, O.; Lange, F.; Bortolussi, S.; Altieri, S.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Many types of lung tumors have a very poor prognosis due to their spread in the whole organ volume. The fact that boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) would allow for selective targeting of all the nodules regardless of their position, prompted a preclinical feasibility study of ex situ BNCT at the thermal neutron facility of RA-3 reactor in the province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. (L)-4p-dihydroxy-borylphenylalanine fructose complex (BPA-F) biodistribution studies in an adult sheep model and computational dosimetry for a human explanted lung were performed to evaluate the feasibility and the therapeutic potential of ex situ BNCT. Methods: Two kinds of boron biodistribution studies were carried out in the healthy sheep: a set of pharmacokinetic studies without lung excision, and a set that consisted of evaluation of boron concentration in the explanted and perfused lung. In order to assess the feasibility of the clinical application of ex situ BNCT at RA-3, a case of multiple lung metastases was analyzed. A detailed computational representation of the geometry of the lung was built based on a real collapsed human lung. Dosimetric calculations and dose limiting considerations were based on the experimental results from the adult sheep, and on the most suitable information published in the literature. In addition, a workable treatment plan was considered to assess the clinical application in a realistic scenario. Results: Concentration-time profiles for the normal sheep showed that the boron kinetics in blood, lung, and skin would adequately represent the boron behavior and absolute uptake expected in human tissues. Results strongly suggest that the distribution of the boron compound is spatially homogeneous in the lung. A constant lung-to-blood ratio of 1.3 ± 0.1 was observed from 80 min after the end of BPA-F infusion. The fact that this ratio remains constant during time would allow the blood boron concentration to be used as a surrogate and indirect

  19. Neutron Capture Experiments on Unstable Nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Sudowe, Ralf; Folden, Charles M., III; Nitsche, Heino; Hoffman, Darleane C.

    2005-01-15

    The overall objective of this project is the measurement of neutron capture cross sections of importance to stewardship science and astrophysical modeling of nucleosynthesis, while at the same time helping to train the next generation of scientists with expertise relevant to U.S. national nuclear security missions and to stewardship science. A primary objective of this project is to study neutron capture cross sections for various stable and unstable isotopes that will contribute to the Science Based Stockpile Stewardship (SBSS) program by providing improved data for modeling and interpretation of nuclear device performance. Much of the information obtained will also be important in astrophysical modeling of nucleosynthesis. Measurements of these neutron capture cross sections are being conducted in collaboration with researchers at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facility using the unique Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE). In our early discussions with the DANCE group, decisions were made on the first cross sections to be measured and how our expertise in target preparation, radiochemical separations chemistry, and data analysis could best be applied. The initial emphasis of the project was on preparing suitable targets of both natural and separated stable europium isotopes in preparation for the ultimate goal of preparing a sufficiently large target of radioactive 155Eu (t1/2 = 4.7 years) and other radioactive and stable species for neutron cross-section measurements at DANCE. Our Annual Report, ''Neutron Capture Experiments on Unstable Nuclei'' by J. M. Schwantes, R. Sudowe, C. M. Folden III, H. Nitsche, and D. C. Hoffman, submitted to NNSA in December 2003, gives details about the initial considerations and scope of the project. During the current reporting period, electroplated targets of natural Eu together with valuable, stable, and isotopically pure 151Eu and 153Eu, and isotopically separated 154Sm were measured for

  20. Description of the proton and neutron radiative capture reactions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Description of the proton and neutron radiative capture reactions in the Gamow shell model Not Available Temp HTML Storage 2: Fossez, K.; Michel, N.; Poszajczak, M.; Jaganathen, ...

  1. System and method for delivery of neutron beams for medical therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nigg, D.W.; Wemple, C.A.

    1999-07-06

    A neutron delivery system that provides improved capability for tumor control during medical therapy is disclosed. The system creates a unique neutron beam that has a bimodal or multi-modal energy spectrum. This unique neutron beam can be used for fast-neutron therapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), or both. The invention includes both an apparatus and a method for accomplishing the purposes of the invention. 5 figs.

  2. System and method for delivery of neutron beams for medical therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nigg, David W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wemple, Charles A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01

    A neutron delivery system that provides improved capability for tumor control during medical therapy. The system creates a unique neutron beam that has a bimodal or multi-modal energy spectrum. This unique neutron beam can be used for fast-neutron therapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), or both. The invention includes both an apparatus and a method for accomplishing the purposes of the invention.

  3. Enhancing the detector for advanced neutron capture experiments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Couture, A.; Mosby, S.; Baramsai, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Jandel, M.; Macon, K.; O’Donnell, J. M.; Rusev, G.; Taddeucci, T. N; Ullmann, J. L.; et al

    2015-05-28

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) has been used for extensive studies of neutron capture, gamma decay, photon strength functions, and prompt and delayed fission-gamma emission. Despite these successes, the potential measurements have been limited by the data acquisition hardware. We report on a major upgrade of the DANCE data acquisition that simultaneously enables strait-forward coupling to auxiliary detectors, including high-resolution high-purity germanium detectors and neutron tagging array. The upgrade will enhance the time domain accessible for time-of-flight neutron measurements as well as improve the resolution in the DANCE barium fluoride crystals for photons.

  4. FAST NEUTRON SPECTROMETER USING SPACED SEMICONDUCTORS FOR MEASURING TOTAL ENERGY OF NEUTRONS CAPTURED

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Love, T.A.; Murray, R.B.

    1964-04-14

    A fast neutron spectrometer was designed, which utilizes a pair of opposed detectors having a layer of /sup 6/LiF between to produce alpha and T pair for each neutron captured to provide signals, which, when combined, constitute a measure of neutron energy. (AEC)

  5. Therapeutic efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy mediated by boron-rich liposomes for oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heber, Elisa M.; Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Kueffer, Peter J.; Garabalino, Marcela A.; Thorp, Silvia I.; Pozzi, Emiliano C. C.; Hughes, Andrea Monti; Maitz, Charles A.; Jalisatgi, Satish S.; Nigg, David W.; Curotto, Paula; Trivillin, Vernica A.; Schwint, Amanda E.

    2014-11-11

    Unilamellar liposomes formulated with an equimolar mixture of cholesterol and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, incorporating K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] in the lipid bilayer, and encapsulating Na3[1-(2-B10-H9)-2-NH3B10H8] were prepared by probe sonication and investigated in vivo. Microwave assisted digestion followed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy was utilized to determine the biodistribution of boron in various tissues following either a single tail vein injection or two identical injections (separated by 24 hours) of the liposomal suspension in BALB/c mice bearing EMT6 mammary adenocarcinomas in their right flank. Double-injection protocols resulted in a boron content in the tumor exceeding 50 g of boron per gram of tissue for 48 to 72 hours subsequent to the initial injection while tumor:blood boron ratios were more ideal from 54 hours (1.9:1) to 96 hours (5.7:1) subsequent to the initial injection. Tumor bearing mice were given a double-injection of liposomes containing the 10B-enriched analogs of the aforementioned agents and subjected to a 30 minute irradiation by thermal neutrons with a flux of 8.8 x 108 (7%) neutrons/cm2 s integrated over the energy range of 0.0 0.414 eV. Significant tumor response for a single BNCT treatment was demonstrated by growth curves versus a control group. Vastly diminished tumor growth was witnessed at 14 days (186% increase versus 1551% in controls) in mice that were given a second injection/radiation treatment 7 days after the first. Mice given a one hour neutron irradiation following the double-injection of liposomes had a similar response (169% increase at 14 days) suggesting that neutron fluence is the limiting factor towards BNCT efficacy in this study.

  6. Neutron capture strategy and technique developments for GNEP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couture, Aaron Joseph

    2008-01-01

    The initial three years of neutron capture measurements have been very successful in providing data for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative/Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (AFCI/GNEP) program. Now that the most straightforward measurements have been completed, additional technical challenges face future measurements. In particular, techniques are needed to perform measurements that exhibit at least one of three major problems -- large fission:capture ratios, large capture:capture ratios, and high intrinsic activity samples. This paper will set forward a plan for attacking these technical challenges and moving forward with future measurements.

  7. SU-E-J-104: Single Photon Image From PET with Insertable SPECT Collimator for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, J; Yoon, D; Suh, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of our proposed system is to confirm the feasibility of extraction of two types of images from one positron emission tomography (PET) module with an insertable collimator for brain tumor treatment during the BNCT. Methods: Data from the PET module, neutron source, and collimator was entered in the Monte Carlo n-particle extended (MCNPX) source code. The coincidence events were first compiled on the PET detector, and then, the events of the prompt gamma ray were collected after neutron emission by using a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) collimator on the PET. The obtaining of full width at half maximum (FWHM) values from the energy spectrum was performed to collect effective events for reconstructed image. In order to evaluate the images easily, five boron regions in a brain phantom were used. The image profiles were extracted from the region of interest (ROI) of a phantom. The image was reconstructed using the ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) reconstruction algorithm. The image profiles and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were compiled for quantitative analysis from the two kinds of reconstructed image. Results: The prompt gamma ray energy peak of 478 keV appeared in the energy spectrum with a FWHM of 41 keV (6.4%). On the basis of the ROC curve in Region A to Region E, the differences in the area under the curve (AUC) of the PET and SPECT images were found to be 10.2%, 11.7%, 8.2% (center, Region C), 12.6%, and 10.5%, respectively. Conclusion: We attempted to acquire the PET and SPECT images simultaneously using only PET without an additional isotope. Single photon images were acquired using an insertable collimator on a PET detector. This research was supported by the Leading Foreign Research Institute Recruitment Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) and Future Planning (MSIP)(Grant No

  8. Neutron capture cross section standards for BNL 325, Fourth Edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden, N.E.

    1981-01-01

    This report evaluates the experimental data and recommends values for the thermal neutron cross sections and resonance integrals for the neutron capture reactions: /sup 55/Mn(n,..gamma..), /sup 59/Co(n,..gamma..) and /sup 197/Au(n,..gamma..). The failure of lithium and boron as standards due to the natural variation of the absorption cross sections of these elements is discussed. The Westcott convention, which describes the neutron spectrum as a thermal Maxwellian distribution with an epithermal component, is also discussed.

  9. Neutron-capture nucleosynthesis in the first stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roederer, Ian U.; Preston, George W.; Thompson, Ian B.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Sneden, Christopher

    2014-04-01

    Recent studies suggest that metal-poor stars enhanced in carbon but containing low levels of neutron-capture elements may have been among the first to incorporate the nucleosynthesis products of the first generation of stars. We have observed 16 stars with enhanced carbon or nitrogen using the MIKE Spectrograph on the Magellan Telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory and the Tull Spectrograph on the Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory. We present radial velocities, stellar parameters, and detailed abundance patterns for these stars. Strontium, yttrium, zirconium, barium, europium, ytterbium, and other heavy elements are detected. In four stars, these heavy elements appear to have originated in some form of r-process nucleosynthesis. In one star, a partial s-process origin is possible. The origin of the heavy elements in the rest of the sample cannot be determined unambiguously. The presence of elements heavier than the iron group offers further evidence that zero-metallicity rapidly rotating massive stars and pair instability supernovae did not contribute substantial amounts of neutron-capture elements to the regions where the stars in our sample formed. If the carbon- or nitrogen-enhanced metal-poor stars with low levels of neutron-capture elements were enriched by products of zero-metallicity supernovae only, then the presence of these heavy elements indicates that at least one form of neutron-capture reaction operated in some of the first stars.

  10. Thermal Neutron Capture for Nuclei A = 3 - 20

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermal Neutron Capture Evaluated Data for Nuclei A 3 - 20 Go to the Text Only below if you prefer to view the nuclides in a text list. 19Ne 20Ne 18F 19F 20F 15O 16O 17O 18O 19O...

  11. Validating (d,pγ) as a surrogate for neutron capture (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Validating (d,p) as a surrogate for neutron capture Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Validating (d,p) as a surrogate for neutron capture The r-process is ...

  12. Review of Livermore-Led Neutron Capture Studies Using DANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, W; Sheets, S; Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J; Becvar, F; Bredeweg, T; Clement, R; Couture, A; Esch, E; Haight, R; Jandel, M; Krticka, M; Mitchell, G; Macri, R; O'Donnell, J; Reifarth, R; Rundberg, R; Schwantes, J; Ullmann, J; Vieira, D; Wouters, J; Wilk, P

    2007-05-11

    We have made neutron capture cross-section measurements using the white neutron source at the Los Alamos Science Center, the DANCE detector array (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) and targets important for basic science and stockpile stewardship. In this paper, we review results from (n,{gamma}) reactions on {sup 94,95}Mo, {sup 152,154,157,160,nat}Gd, {sup 151,153}Eu and {sup 242m}Am for neutron energies from < 1eV up to {approx} 20 keV. We measured details of the {gamma}-ray cascade following neutron capture, for comparison with results of statistical model simulations. We determined the neutron energy dependent (n,{gamma}) cross section and gained information about statistical decay properties, including the nuclear level density and the photon strength function. Because of the high granularity of the detector array, it is possible to look at gamma cascades with a specified number of transitions (a specific multiplicity). We simulated {gamma}-ray cascades using a combination of the DICEBOX/GEANT computer codes. In the case of the deformed nuclei, we found evidence of a scissors-mode resonance. For the Eu, we also determined the (n,{gamma}) cross sections. For the {sup 94,95}Mo, we focused on the spin and parity assignments of the resonances and the determination of the photon strength functions for the compound nuclei {sup 95,96}Mo. Future plans include measurements on actinide targets; our immediate interest is in {sup 242m}Am.

  13. Neutron Capture Cross Sections for the Re/Os Clock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosconi, M.; Heil, M.; Kaeppeler, F.; Plag, R.; Voss, F.; Wisshak, K.; Mengoni, A.; Cennini, P.; Chiaveri, E.; Ferrari, A.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Kadi, Y.; Sarchiapone, L.; Vlachoudis, V.; Wendler, H.; Aerts, G.; Andriamonje, S.; Berthoumieux, E.; Dridi, W.

    2005-05-24

    The radioactive decay of 187Re {yields} 187Os (t1/2 = 43 Gyr) is suited for dating the onset of heavy-element nucleosynthesis. The radiogenic contribution to the 187Os abundance is the difference between the natural abundance and the corresponding s-process component. This component can be obtained via the well-established {sigma}N systematics using the neighboring s-only isotope 186Os, provided the neutron-capture cross sections of both isotopes are known with sufficient accuracy. We report on a new set of experiments performed with a C6D6 detector array at the n{sub T}OF neutron spallation facility of CERN. The capture cross sections of 186Os, 187Os, and 188Os have been measured in the neutron-energy range between 1 eV and 1 MeV, and Maxwellian-averaged cross sections were deduced for the relevant thermal energies from kT=5 keV to 100 keV.

  14. Scissors Mode of 162 Dy Studied from Resonance Neutron Capture

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baramsai, B.; Bečvář, F.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Kroll, J.; Krtička, M.; Mitchell, G. E.; O’Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; et al

    2015-05-28

    Multi-step cascade γ-ray spectra from the neutron capture at isolated resonances of 161Dy nucleus were measured at the LANSCE/DANCE time-of-flight facility in Los Alamos National Laboratory. The objectives of this experiment were to confirm and possibly extend the spin assignment of s-wave neutron resonances and get new information on photon strength functions with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors mode vibration. The preliminary results show that the scissors mode plays a significant role in all transitions between accessible states of the studied nucleus. The photon strength functions describing well our data are compared to results from 3He-induced reactions,more » (n,γ) experiments on Gd isotopes, and (γ,γ’) reactions.« less

  15. Scissors mode of Gd nuclei studied from resonance neutron capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kroll, J.; Baramsai, B.; Becker, J. A.; and others

    2012-10-20

    Spectra of {gamma} rays following the neutron capture at isolated resonances of stable Gd nuclei were measured. The objectives were to get new information on photon strength of {sup 153,155-159}Gd with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors-mode vibration. An analysis of the data obtained clearly indicates that the scissors mode is coupled not only to the ground state, but also to all excited levels of the nuclei studied. The specificity of our approach ensures unbiasedness in estimating the sumed scissors-mode strength {Sigma}B(M1){up_arrow}, even for odd product nuclei, for which conventional nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements yield only limited information. Our analysis indicates that for these nuclei the sum {Sigma}B(M1){up_arrow} increases with A and for {sup 157,159}Gd it is significantly higher compared to {sup 156,158}Gd.

  16. DANCE : a 4[pi] barium fluoride detector for measuring neutron capture on unstable nuclei /.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullmann, J. L.; Haight, Robert C.; Hunt, L. F.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, Malcolm M.; Miller, G. G.; Heil, M.; Käppeler, F.; Chamberlin, E. P.

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of neutron capture on unstable nuclei are important for studies of s-process nucleosynthesis, nuclear waste transmutation, and stewardship science. A 160-element, 4{pi} barium fluoride detector array, and associated neutron flight path, is being constructed to make capture measurements at the moderated neutron spallation source at LANSCE. Measurements can be made on as little as 1 mg of sample material over energies from near thermal to near 100 keV. The design of the DANCE array is described and neutron flux measurements from flight path commissioning are shown. The array is expected to be complete by the end of 2002.

  17. Neutron-capture gamma-ray data for obtaining elemental abundances...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    However, much of the data for the energies and intensities of neutron-capture gamma rays in the existing literature e.g. Lo81 are poor RF99,RF00. With gamma-ray spectrometers ...

  18. Measurements of neutron capture cross section for {sup 207,208}Pb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Segawa, M.; Toh, Y.; Harada, H.; Kitatani, F.; Koizumi, M.; Fukahori, T.; Iwamoto, N.; Iwamoto, O.; Oshima, M.; Hatsukawa, Y.; Nagai, Y.; Igashira, M.; Kamada, S.; Tajika, M.

    2014-05-02

    The neutron capture cross sections for {sup 207,208}Pb have been measured in the neutron energy region from 10 to 110 keV. The ?-rays cascaded from a capture state to the ground state or low-lying states of {sup 208,209}Pb were observed for the first time, using an anti-Compton Nal(Tl) spectrometer and a TOF method. The observed discrete ?-ray energy spectra enabled us to determine neutron capture cross sections for {sup 207,208}Pb with small systematic errors, since we could distinguish ?-ray of {sup 207,208}Pb(n,?) reactions from background ?-ray with use of the ?-ray spectra. The obtained cross sections include both contributions of resonance and direct capture components different from the previous TOF measurements.

  19. Measurement of the keV-neutron capture cross section and capture gamma-ray spectrum of isotopes around N=82 region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katabuchi, Tatsuya; Igashira, Masayuki

    2012-11-12

    The keV-neutron capture cross section and capture {gamma}-ray spectra of nuclides with a neutron magic number N= 82, {sup 139}La and {sup 142}Nd, were newly measured by the time-of-flight method. Capture {gamma}-rays were detected with an anti-Compton NaI(T1) spectrometer, and the pulse-height weighting technique was applied to derive the neutron capture cross section. The results were provided with our previous measurements of other nuclides around N= 82, {sup 140}Ce, {sup 141}Pr, {sup 143}Nd and {sup 145}Nd.

  20. A new MCNPX PTRAC coincidence capture file capability: a tool for neutron detector design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Louise G; Schear, Melissa A; Hendricks, John S; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Tobin, Stephen J; Croft, Stephen

    2011-02-16

    The existing Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNPX) particle tracking (PTRAC) coincidence capture file allows a full list of neutron capture events to be recorded in any simulated detection medium. The originating event history number (e.g. spontaneous fission events), capture time, location and source particle number are tracked and output to file for post-processing. We have developed a new MCNPX PTRAC coincidence capture file capability to aid detector design studies. New features include the ability to track the nuclides that emitted the detected neutrons as well as induced fission chains in mixed samples before detection (both generation number and nuclide that underwent induced fission). Here, the power of this tool is demonstrated using a detector design developed for the non-destructive assay (NDA) of spent nuclear fuel. Individual capture time distributions have been generated for neutrons originating from Curium-244 source spontaneous fission events and induced fission events in fissile nuclides of interest: namely Plutonium-239, Plutonium-241, and Uranium-235. Through this capability, a full picture for the attribution of neutron capture events in the detector can be simulated.

  1. Feasibility of the Utilization of BNCT in the Fast Neutron Therapy Beam at Fermilab

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Langen, Katja; Lennox, Arlene J.; Kroc, Thomas K.; DeLuca, Jr., Paul M.

    2000-06-01

    The Neutron Therapy Facility at Fermilab has treated cancer patients since 1976. Since then more than 2,300 patients have been treated and a wealth of clinical information accumulated. The therapeutic neutron beam at Fermilab is produced by bombarding a beryllium target with 66 MeV protons. The resulting continuous neutron spectrum ranges from thermal to 66 MeV in neutron energy. It is clear that this spectrum is not well suited for the treatment of tumors with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) only However, since this spectrum contains thermal and epithermal components the authors are investigating whether BNCT can be used in this beam to boost the tumor dose. There are clinical scenarios in which a selective tumor dose boost of 10 - 15% could be clinically significant. For these cases the principal treatment would still be fast neutron therapy but a tumor boost could be used either to deliver a higher dose to the tumor tissue or to reduce the dose to the normal healthy tissue while maintaining the absorbed dose level in the tumor tissue.

  2. On the capture of dark matter by neutron stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Güver, Tolga; Erkoca, Arif Emre; Sarcevic, Ina; Reno, Mary Hall E-mail: aeerkoca@gmail.com E-mail: ina@physics.arizona.edu

    2014-05-01

    We calculate the number of dark matter particles that a neutron star accumulates over its lifetime as it rotates around the center of a galaxy, when the dark matter particle is a self-interacting boson but does not self-annihilate. We take into account dark matter interactions with baryonic matter and the time evolution of the dark matter sphere as it collapses within the neutron star. We show that dark matter self-interactions play an important role in the rapid accumulation of dark matter in the core of the neutron star. We consider the possibility of determining an exclusion region of the parameter space for dark matter mass and dark matter interaction cross section with the nucleons as well as dark matter self-interaction cross section, based on the observation of old neutron stars. We show that for a dark matter density of 10{sup 3} GeV/cm{sup 3}and dark matter mass m{sub χ} ∼< 10 GeV, there is a potential exclusion region for dark matter interactions with nucleons that is three orders of magnitude more stringent than without self-interactions. The potential exclusion region for dark matter self-interaction cross sections is many orders of magnitude stronger than the current Bullet Cluster limit. For example, for high dark matter density regions, we find that for m{sub χ} ∼ 10 GeV when the dark matter interaction cross section with the nucleons ranges from σ{sub χn} ∼ 10{sup −52} cm{sup 2} to σ{sub χn} ∼ 10{sup −57} cm{sup 2}, the dark matter self-interaction cross section limit is σ{sub χχ} ∼< 10{sup −33} cm{sup 2}, which is about ten orders of magnitude stronger than the Bullet Cluster limit.

  3. New measurement of θ13 via neutron capture on hydrogen at Daya Bay

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    F. P. An

    2016-04-21

    This article reports an improved independent measurement of neutrino mixing angle θ13 at the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. Electron antineutrinos were identified by inverse β-decays with the emitted neutron captured by hydrogen, yielding a data set with principally distinct uncertainties from that with neutrons captured by gadolinium. With the final two of eight antineutrino detectors installed, this study used 621 days of data including the previously reported 217-day data set with six detectors. The dominant statistical uncertainty was reduced by 49%. Intensive studies of the cosmogenic muon-induced 9Li and fast neutron backgrounds and the neutron-capture energy selection efficiency, resultedmore » in a reduction of the systematic uncertainty by 26%. The deficit in the detected number of antineutrinos at the far detectors relative to the expected number based on the near detectors yielded sin22θ13 = 0.071 ± 0.011 in the three-neutrino-oscillation framework. As a result, the combination of this result with the gadolinium-capture result is also reported.« less

  4. Preparation of iridium targets by electrodeposition for neutron capture cross section measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bond, Evelyn M.; Moody, W. Allen; Arnold, Charles; Bredeweg, Todd A.; Jandel, Marian; Rusev, Gencho Y.

    2015-11-18

    Here, the preparation of 191Ir and 193Ir electrodeposits for neutron capture cross-section measurements at the detector for advanced neutron capture experiments located at the at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center is described. The electrodeposition of iridium in the desired thickness of 0.4–1 mg/cm2 is challenging. Better yields and thicknesses were obtained using electrodeposition from isopropyl alcohol solutions than from ammonium sulfate solutions. 191Ir and 193Ir targets were initially prepared using the standard single-sided electrodeposition cell. Iridium electrodepositions using a double-sided electrodeposition cell were developed and were optimized, resulting in thick, uniform iridium deposits. LA UR 15-22475.

  5. Absolute measurement of the 242Pu neutron-capture cross section

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; Bucher, B.; Chyzh, A.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; et al

    2016-04-21

    Here, the absolute neutron-capture cross section of 242Pu was measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center using the Detector for Advanced Neutron-Capture Experiments array along with a compact parallel-plate avalanche counter for fission-fragment detection. The first direct measurement of the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section was made over the incident neutron energy range from thermal to ≈ 6 keV, and the absolute scale of the (n,γ) cross section was set according to the known 239Pu(n,f) resonance at En,R = 7.83 eV. This was accomplished by adding a small quantity of 239Pu to the 242Pu sample. The relative scale of the crossmore » section, with a range of four orders of magnitude, was determined for incident neutron energies from thermal to ≈ 40 keV. Our data, in general, are in agreement with previous measurements and those reported in ENDF/B-VII.1; the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section at the En,R = 2.68 eV resonance is within 2.4% of the evaluated value. However, discrepancies exist at higher energies; our data are ≈30% lower than the evaluated data at En ≈ 1 keV and are approximately 2σ away from the previous measurement at En ≈ 20 keV.« less

  6. Boronated monoclonal antibody conjugates for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borg, D.C.; Elmore, J.J. Jr.; Ferrone, S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the effectiveness of /sup 10/B-labeled monoclonal antibodies against Colo-38 human melanoma in vitro. The authors obtained high boron to antibody ratios while maintaining antibody activity by using dextran intermediate carriers to link /sup 10/B to the antibody. They developed a double cell quasi-competitive binding bioassay to minimize the effects of nonspecific binding of boronated complexes to cells. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. Validating (d,p gamma) as a Surrogate for Neutron Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratkiewicz, A.; Cizewski, J.A.; Pain, S.D.; Adekola, A.S.; Burke, J.T.; Casperson, R.J.; Fotiades, N.; McCleskey, M.; Burcher, S.; Shand, C.M.; Austin, R.A.E.; Baugher, T.; Carpenter, M.P.; Devlin, M.; Escher, J.E.; Hardy, S.; Hatarik, R.; Howard, M.E.; Hughes, R.O.; Jones, K.L.; Kozub, R.L.; Lister, C.J.; Manning, B.; O’Donnell, J.M.; Peters, W.A.; Ross, T.J.; Scielzo, N.D.; Seweryniak, D.; Zhu, S.; Schwengner, R.; Zuber, K.

    2015-05-28

    The r-process is responsible for creating roughly half of the elements heavier than iron. It has recently become understood that the rates at which neutron capture reactions proceed at late times in the r-process may dramatically affect the final abundance pattern. However, direct measurements of neutron capture reaction rates on exotic nuclei are exceptionally difficult, necessitating the development of indirect approaches such as the surrogate technique. The (d,pγ) reaction at low energies was identified as a promising surrogate for the (n,γ) reaction, as both reactions share many characteristics. We report on a program to validate (d,pγ) as a surrogate for (n,γ) using 95Mo as a target. The experimental campaign includes direct measurements of the γ-ray intensities from the decay of excited states populated in the 95Mo(n,γ) and 95Mo(d,pγ) reactions.

  8. Validating (d,p gamma) as a Surrogate for Neutron Capture

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ratkiewicz, A.; Cizewski, J.A.; Pain, S.D.; Adekola, A.S.; Burke, J.T.; Casperson, R.J.; Fotiades, N.; McCleskey, M.; Burcher, S.; Shand, C.M.; et al

    2015-05-28

    The r-process is responsible for creating roughly half of the elements heavier than iron. It has recently become understood that the rates at which neutron capture reactions proceed at late times in the r-process may dramatically affect the final abundance pattern. However, direct measurements of neutron capture reaction rates on exotic nuclei are exceptionally difficult, necessitating the development of indirect approaches such as the surrogate technique. The (d,pγ) reaction at low energies was identified as a promising surrogate for the (n,γ) reaction, as both reactions share many characteristics. We report on a program to validate (d,pγ) as a surrogate formore » (n,γ) using 95Mo as a target. The experimental campaign includes direct measurements of the γ-ray intensities from the decay of excited states populated in the 95Mo(n,γ) and 95Mo(d,pγ) reactions.« less

  9. Determination of Thermal Neutron Capture Cross-Sections at Budapest PGAA Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revay, Zsolt; Belgya, Tamas; Firestone, Richard B.

    2007-10-26

    Prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) is a powerful nuclear analytical technique to determine the elemental and isotopic composition of materials. The PGAA facility at Budapest, Hungary is one of the leading laboratories of the world, determining spectroscopic data for chemical analysis to be used in other laboratories. These partial gamma-ray production cross-sections and k{sub 0} values, being proportional to the analytical sensitivities of the chemical elements, can be transformed into thermal neutron capture cross-sections, i.e. the probabilities of the (n,{gamma}) reactions, which are of broader interest in different fields of nuclear physics. Some preliminary results on thermal neutron capture cross-sections are presented.

  10. Measurement of the neutron capture cross section of {sup 15}N J

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MeiBner, N.J.; Schatz, H.; Herndl, H.; Wiescher, M.

    1995-10-01

    Neutron capture reactions on fight nuclei may be of considerable importance for the s-process nucleosynthesis in red giant stars as well as in inhomogeneous big bang scenarios and high entropy supernovae neutrino bubbles. To determine the reaction rates for such different temperature conditions, the cross sections need to be known for a wide energy range. The reaction {sup 15}N(n,{gamma}) represents an important link in the reaction seququences for the production of heavier isotopes in such scenarios. At high temperature conditions, the cross section is not only influenced by a non resonant a-wave contribution but also by a non resonant p-wave contribution and higher energy resonances. The (n,{gamma}) cross section has been measured at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe for different neutron energies using a fast cyclic neutron activation technique. The technique and the results will be presented.

  11. An overview of DANCE: a 4II BaF[2] detector for neutron capture measurements at LANSCE.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullmann, J. L.

    2004-01-01

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture experiments (DANCE) is a 162-element, 4{pi} BaF{sub 2} array designed to make neutron capture cross-section measurements on rare or radioactive targets with masses as little as 1 mg. Accurate capture cross sections are needed in many research areas, including stellar nucleosynthesis, advanced nuclear fuel cycles, waste transmutation, and other applied programs. These cross sections are difficult to calculate accurately and must be measured. Up to now, except for a few long-lived nuclides there are essentially no differential capture measurements on radioactive nuclei. The DANCE array is located at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at LANSCE, which is a continuous-spectrum neutron source with useable energies from below thermal to about 100 keV. Data acquisition is done with 320 fast waveform digitizers. The design and initial performance results, including background minimization, will be discussed.

  12. Scissors Mode of 162 Dy Studied from Resonance Neutron Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baramsai, B.; Be?v?, F.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Kroll, J.; Krti?ka, M.; Mitchell, G. E.; ODonnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Valenta, S.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2015-05-28

    Multi-step cascade ?-ray spectra from the neutron capture at isolated resonances of 161Dy nucleus were measured at the LANSCE/DANCE time-of-flight facility in Los Alamos National Laboratory. The objectives of this experiment were to confirm and possibly extend the spin assignment of s-wave neutron resonances and get new information on photon strength functions with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors mode vibration. The preliminary results show that the scissors mode plays a significant role in all transitions between accessible states of the studied nucleus. The photon strength functions describing well our data are compared to results from 3He-induced reactions, (n,?) experiments on Gd isotopes, and (?,?) reactions.

  13. Neutron capture cross sections of {sup 148}Gd and the decay of {sup 149}Gd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rios, M. G.; Casperson, R. J.; Krane, K. S.; Norman, E. B.

    2006-10-15

    The thermal cross section and resonance integral were measured for radiative neutron capture by radioactive {sup 148}Gd. The deduced values are {sigma}=9600{+-}900 b and I=28,200{+-}2300. We also deduced upper limits for the n,p and n, {alpha} cross sections, respectively, 0.25 b and 13 b. The {gamma}-ray spectrum from the decay of {sup 149}Gd was studied in singles mode at high resolution to verify the previously determined energies and intensities. From the latter measurements, new transitions are proposed and upper limits are deduced for previously reported transitions.

  14. Detector-Response Correction of Two-Dimensional γ -Ray Spectra from Neutron Capture

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rusev, G.; Jandel, M.; Arnold, C. W.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Mosby, S. M.; Ullmann, J. L.

    2015-05-28

    The neutron-capture reaction produces a large variety of γ-ray cascades with different γ-ray multiplicities. A measured spectral distribution of these cascades for each γ-ray multiplicity is of importance to applications and studies of γ-ray statistical properties. The DANCE array, a 4π ball of 160 BaF2 detectors, is an ideal tool for measurement of neutron-capture γ-rays. The high granularity of DANCE enables measurements of high-multiplicity γ-ray cascades. The measured two-dimensional spectra (γ-ray energy, γ-ray multiplicity) have to be corrected for the DANCE detector response in order to compare them with predictions of the statistical model or use them in applications. Themore » detector-response correction problem becomes more difficult for a 4π detection system than for a single detector. A trial and error approach and an iterative decomposition of γ-ray multiplets, have been successfully applied to the detector-response correction. Applications of the decomposition methods are discussed for two-dimensional γ-ray spectra measured at DANCE from γ-ray sources and from the 10B(n, γ) and 113Cd(n, γ) reactions.« less

  15. Electron-capture delayed fission properties of neutron-deficient einsteinium nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaughnessy, Dawn A.

    2000-01-05

    Electron-capture delayed fission (ECDF) properties of neutron-deficient einsteinium isotopes were investigated using a combination of chemical separations and on-line radiation detection methods. {sup 242}Es was produced via the {sup 233}U({sup 14}N,5n){sup 242}Es reaction at a beam energy of 87 MeV (on target) in the lab system, and was found to decay with a half-life of 11 {+-} 3 seconds. The ECDF of {sup 242}Es showed a highly asymmetric mass distribution with an average pre-neutron emission total kinetic energy (TKE) of 183 {+-} 18 MeV. The probability of delayed fission (P{sub DF}) was measured to be 0.006 {+-} 0.002. In conjunction with this experiment, the excitation functions of the {sup 233}U({sup 14}N,xn){sup 247{minus}x}Es and {sup 233}U({sup 15}N,xn){sup 248{minus}x}Es reactions were measured for {sup 243}Es, {sup 244}Es and {sup 245}Es at projectile energies between 80 MeV and 100 MeV.

  16. Osteogenic Sarcoma of the Maxilla: Neutron Therapy for Unresectable Disease

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smoron, Geoffrey L.; Lennox, Arlene J.; Mcgee, James L.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose. To present a case study involving the use of fast neutron therapy to treat an extensive unresectable osteogenic sarcoma arising from the left maxilla. Patient. A 14-year-old male presented with a massive tumor producing severe distortion of his facial structures. He had already received six courses of chemotherapy, which had reduced his pain, but had not measurably reduced the tumor. Methods. The patient was treated with 66 MeV fast neutrons to a dose of 20.4 Gy in 13 fractions over 35 days. Results. CT assessments indicate gradually increasing calcification and noticeable reduction of soft-tissue disease in the frontalmore » sinus, orbit and maxillary antrum.There has been some recontouring of the facial structures.The boy conducts an active life, has no pain, and feels well. He was 17 years old at the last follow-up. Discussion. Fast neutrons have a greater biological effectiveness than conventional photon beams. Their use has been associated with improved chance for local control of unresectable disease.This case illustrates their effectiveness in controlling an unusual and aggressive osteogenic sarcoma of the facial bone and sinuses.« less

  17. Prompt Gamma Rays in {sup 77}Ge after Neutron Capture on {sup 76}Ge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meierhofer, Georg; Grabmayr, Peter; Jochum, Josef [Physikalisches Institut, Eberhard Karls Universitaet Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Canella, Lea [Institut fuer Radiochemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Walther-Meissner-Str. 3, 85748 Garching (Germany); Jolie, Jan; Kudejova, Petra; Warr, Nigel [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, 50937 Cologne (Germany)

    2009-01-28

    The observation of neutrinoless double beta decay would be proof of the Majorana nature of the neutrino. Half-lives for these decays are very long (for {sup 76}Ge:>10{sup 25} y), so background reduction and rejection is the major task for double beta experiments. The GERDA (GERmanium Detector Array) experiment at the Gran Sasso Laboratory of the INFN (LNGS) searches for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge. The isotope {sup 76}Ge is an ideal candidate because it can be used as source and detector at the same time. A large remaining contribution to the background arises from the prompt gamma cascade after neutron capture by {sup 76}Ge followed by {beta}{sup -}-decay of {sup 77}Ge. Since the prompt gamma decay scheme is poorly known, measurements with isotopically enriched Germanium samples were carried out at the PGAA facility at the research reactor FRM II (Munich). With the known prompt gamma spectrum it will be possible to improve the overall veto efficiency of the GERDA experiment.

  18. Neutron capture of /sup 122/Te, /sup 123/Te, /sup 124/Te, /sup 125/Te, and /sup 126/Te

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macklin, R.L.; Winters, R.R.

    1989-07-01

    Isotopically enriched samples of the tellurium isotopes from mass 122 to mass 126 were used to measure neutron capture in the energy range 2.6 keV to 600 keV at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator pulsed neutron source. Starting at 2.6 keV, over 200 Breit-Wigner resonances for each isotope were used to describe the capture data. Least-squares adjustment gave parameters and their uncertainties for a total of 1659 resonances. Capture cross sections averaged over Maxwellian neutron distributions with temperatures ranging from kT = 5 keV to kT = 100 keV were derived for comparison with stellar nucleosynthesis calculations. For the three isotopes shielded from the astrophysical r-process, /sup 122/Te, /sup 123/Te and /sup 124/Te at kT = 30 keV the respective values were (280 /plus minus/ 10) mb, (819 /plus minus/ 30) mb and (154 /plus minus/ 6) mb. The corresponding products of cross section and solar system abundance are nearly equal in close agreement with s-process nucleosynthesis calculations. 26 refs., 8 figs., 10 tabs.

  19. Independent measurement of the neutrino mixing angle ?13 via neutron capture on hydrogen at Daya Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaffe, D. E.

    2014-10-03

    A new measurement of the ?13 mixing angle has been obtained at the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment via the detection of inverse beta decays tagged by neutron capture on hydrogen. The antineutrino events for hydrogen capture are distinct from those for gadolinium capture with largely different systematic uncertainties, allowing a determination independent of the gadolinium-capture result and an improvement on the precision of the ?13 measurement. With a 217-day antineutrino data set obtained with six antineutrino detectors and from six 2.9 GWth reactors, the rate deficit observed at the far hall is interpreted as sin22?13=0.0830.018 in the three-flavor oscillation model. When combined with the gadolinium-capture result from Daya Bay, we obtain sin22?13=0.0890.008 as the final result for the six-antineutrino-detector configuration of the Daya Bay experiment.

  20. Independent measurement of the neutrino mixing angle θ13 via neutron capture on hydrogen at Daya Bay

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jaffe, D. E.

    2014-10-03

    A new measurement of the θ13 mixing angle has been obtained at the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment via the detection of inverse beta decays tagged by neutron capture on hydrogen. The antineutrino events for hydrogen capture are distinct from those for gadolinium capture with largely different systematic uncertainties, allowing a determination independent of the gadolinium-capture result and an improvement on the precision of the θ13 measurement. With a 217-day antineutrino data set obtained with six antineutrino detectors and from six 2.9 GWth reactors, the rate deficit observed at the far hall is interpreted as sin22θ13=0.083±0.018 in the three-flavor oscillationmore » model. When combined with the gadolinium-capture result from Daya Bay, we obtain sin22θ13=0.089±0.008 as the final result for the six-antineutrino-detector configuration of the Daya Bay experiment.« less

  1. SU-E-T-329: Tissue-Equivalent Phantom Materials for Neutron Dosimetry in Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halg, R; Lomax, A; Clarke, S; Wieger, B; Pryser, E; Arghal, R; Pozzi, S; Bashkirov, V; Schulte, R; Schneider, U

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To characterize tissue equivalence of phantom materials in terms of secondary neutron production and dose deposition from neutrons produced in radiation therapy phantom materials in the context of proton therapy using Monte Carlo simulations and measurements. Methods: In order to study the influence of material choice on neutron production in therapeutic proton beams, Monte Carlo simulations using the Geant4 and MCNPX-PoliMi transport codes were performed to generate the neutron fields produced by protons of 155 and 200 MeV. A simple irradiation geometry was used to investigate the effect of different materials. The proton beams were stopped in slab phantoms to study the production of secondary neutrons. The investigated materials were water, Lucite, and tissue-equivalent phantom materials (CIRS Inc., Norfolk, VA). Neutron energy spectra and absorbed dose by neutrons and their secondary particles were scored. In addition, simulations were performed for reference tissues (ICRP/ICRU) to assess tissue equivalence with respect to neutron generation and transport. In order to benchmark the simulation results, measurements were performed with a system developed at the University of Michigan; organic liquid scintillators were used to detect the neutron emissions from the irradiation of tissue-equivalent materials. Additionally, the MPPost code was used to calculate the scintillator response from the MCNPX-PoliMi output. Results: The simulated energy spectra and depth dose curves of the neutrons produced in different phantom materials showed similar shape. The differences of spectra and fluences between all studied materials and reference tissues were well within the achievable precision of neutron dosimetry. The shape of the simulated detector response of the liquid scintillators agreed well with measurements on the proton beamline. Conclusion: Based on Geant4 and MCNPX-PoliMi simulations, the investigated materials appear to be suitable to study the production

  2. Capture of a neutron to excited states of a {sup 9}Be nucleus taking into account resonance at 622 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.

    2013-10-15

    Radiative capture of a neutron to the ground and excited states of the 9Be nucleus is considered using the potential cluster model with forbidden states and with classification of cluster states by the Young schemes taking into account resonance at 622 keV for thermal and astrophysical energies.

  3. 18 Sco: A solar twin rich in refractory and neutron-capture elements. Implications for chemical tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meléndez, Jorge; Monroe, TalaWanda R.; Tucci Maia, Marcelo; Freitas, Fabrício C.; Karakas, Amanda I.; Yong, David; Asplund, Martin; Bedell, Megan; Bean, Jacob; Bergemann, Maria; Do Nascimento, José-Dias Jr.; Castro, Matthieu; Bazot, Michael; Alves-Brito, Alan

    2014-08-10

    We study with unprecedented detail the chemical composition and stellar parameters of the solar twin 18 Sco in a strictly differential sense relative to the Sun. Our study is mainly based on high-resolution (R ∼ 110,000), high signal-to-noise ratio (800-1,000) Very Large Telescope UVES spectra, which allow us to achieve a precision of about 0.005 dex in differential abundances. The effective temperature and surface gravity of 18 Sco are T{sub eff} = 5823 ± 6 K and log g = 4.45 ± 0.02 dex, i.e., 18 Sco is 46 ± 6 K hotter than the Sun and log g is 0.01 ± 0.02 dex higher. Its metallicity is [Fe/H] = 0.054 ± 0.005 dex, and its microturbulence velocity is +0.02 ± 0.01 km s{sup –1} higher than solar. Our precise stellar parameters and differential isochrone analysis show that 18 Sco has a mass of 1.04 ± 0.02 M{sub ☉} and that it is ∼1.6 Gyr younger than the Sun. We use precise High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher (HARPS) radial velocities to search for planets, but none are detected. The chemical abundance pattern of 18 Sco displays a clear trend with condensation temperature, thus showing higher abundances of refractories in 18 Sco than in the Sun. Intriguingly, there are enhancements in the neutron-capture elements relative to the Sun. Despite the small element-to-element abundance differences among nearby n-capture elements (∼0.02 dex), we successfully reproduce the r-process pattern in the Solar System. This is independent evidence for the universality of the r process. Our results have important implications for chemical tagging in our Galaxy and nucleosynthesis in general.

  4. SU-D-BRE-07: Neutron Shielding Assessment for a Compact Proton Therapy Vault

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prusator, M; Ahmad, S; Chen, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To perform a neutron shielding assessment of a commercially available compact proton therapy system. Methods: TOPAS (TOol for PArticle Simulation) beta release was used to model beam line components for Mevion S250 proton treatment system the design of which is that the cyclotron is present in the treatment room. Three neutron production sources were taken into account in the simulation. These are the cyclotron, the treatment nozzle and the patient itself, respectively. The cyclotron was modeled as a cylindrical iron target (r =5 cm, length = 8 cm). A water phantom (10 cm ×10 cm ×60 cm) was used to model the patient and various structures (scattering foils, range modulator wheel, applicator and compensator) defaulted in TOPAS were used to model the passive scattering treatment nozzle. Neutron fluences and energy spectra were counted in a spherical scoring geometry per incident proton in 18 angular bins (10 degree each). Fluence to dose conversion factors from ICRU publication 74 were used to acquire neutron ambient dose equivalent H*(10). A point source line of sight model was then used to calculate neutron dose at eight locations beyond shielding barriers. Results: The neutron ambient dose equivalent was calculated at the 8 points of interest around the proton treatment vault. The highest dose was found to be less than 0.781 mSv/year outside south barrier wall. However, the dose is less than 0.05 mSv/year at the control room area of the proton vault. Conclusion: All Points of interest were well under annual dose limits. This suggests that the shielding design of this compact proton therapy system is sufficient for radiation protection purpose. However, it is important to note that the workload and the occupancy factors are direct multipliers for dose calculations beyond the barrier and must be accurately estimated for validation of our results.

  5. Method of synthesizing enriched decaborane for use in generating boron neutron capture therapy pharmaceuticals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cowan, Robert L.; Ginosar, Daniel M.; Dunks, Gary B.

    2000-01-01

    A method is described for synthesizing decaborane wherein at least about 90% of the boron atoms in the decaborane are the .sup.10 B isotope, comprising the steps of: (a) reacting boric acid with a C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkanol to form a .sup.10 B-alkyl borate wherein at least about 90% of the boron atoms in the boric acid are the .sup.10 B isotope; (b) reducing the .sup.10 B-alkyl borate to form an alkali metal .sup.10 B-borohydride; (c) converting the alkali metal .sup.10 B-borohydride to a .sup.10 B-tetradecahydroundecaborate ion; and (d) converting the .sup.10 B-tetradecahydroundecaborate ion to .sup.10 B-decaborane. Methods of preparing tetradecahydroundecaborate ions and decaborane from alkali metal borohydrides are also described.

  6. Measurements of neutron dose equivalent for a proton therapy center using uniform scanning proton beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Yuanshui; Liu Yaxi; Zeidan, Omar; Schreuder, Andries Niek; Keole, Sameer

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: Neutron exposure is of concern in proton therapy, and varies with beam delivery technique, nozzle design, and treatment conditions. Uniform scanning is an emerging treatment technique in proton therapy, but neutron exposure for this technique has not been fully studied. The purpose of this study is to investigate the neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic dose, H/D, under various treatment conditions for uniform scanning beams employed at our proton therapy center. Methods: Using a wide energy neutron dose equivalent detector (SWENDI-II, ThermoScientific, MA), the authors measured H/D at 50 cm lateral to the isocenter as a function of proton range, modulation width, beam scanning area, collimated field size, and snout position. They also studied the influence of other factors on neutron dose equivalent, such as aperture material, the presence of a compensator, and measurement locations. They measured H/D for various treatment sites using patient-specific treatment parameters. Finally, they compared H/D values for various beam delivery techniques at various facilities under similar conditions. Results: H/D increased rapidly with proton range and modulation width, varying from about 0.2 mSv/Gy for a 5 cm range and 2 cm modulation width beam to 2.7 mSv/Gy for a 30 cm range and 30 cm modulation width beam when 18 Multiplication-Sign 18 cm{sup 2} uniform scanning beams were used. H/D increased linearly with the beam scanning area, and decreased slowly with aperture size and snout retraction. The presence of a compensator reduced the H/D slightly compared with that without a compensator present. Aperture material and compensator material also have an influence on neutron dose equivalent, but the influence is relatively small. H/D varied from about 0.5 mSv/Gy for a brain tumor treatment to about 3.5 mSv/Gy for a pelvic case. Conclusions: This study presents H/D as a function of various treatment parameters for uniform scanning proton beams. For similar treatment

  7. Monte Carlo and analytical model predictions of leakage neutron exposures from passively scattered proton therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prez-Andjar, Anglica [Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 1202, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 1202, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Zhang, Rui; Newhauser, Wayne [Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 1202, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, 6767 Bertner Avenue, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 1202, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, 6767 Bertner Avenue, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Stray neutron radiation is of concern after radiation therapy, especially in children, because of the high risk it might carry for secondary cancers. Several previous studies predicted the stray neutron exposure from proton therapy, mostly using Monte Carlo simulations. Promising attempts to develop analytical models have also been reported, but these were limited to only a few proton beam energies. The purpose of this study was to develop an analytical model to predict leakage neutron equivalent dose from passively scattered proton beams in the 100-250-MeV interval.Methods: To develop and validate the analytical model, the authors used values of equivalent dose per therapeutic absorbed dose (H/D) predicted with Monte Carlo simulations. The authors also characterized the behavior of the mean neutron radiation-weighting factor, w{sub R}, as a function of depth in a water phantom and distance from the beam central axis.Results: The simulated and analytical predictions agreed well. On average, the percentage difference between the analytical model and the Monte Carlo simulations was 10% for the energies and positions studied. The authors found that w{sub R} was highest at the shallowest depth and decreased with depth until around 10 cm, where it started to increase slowly with depth. This was consistent among all energies.Conclusion: Simple analytical methods are promising alternatives to complex and slow Monte Carlo simulations to predict H/D values. The authors' results also provide improved understanding of the behavior of w{sub R} which strongly depends on depth, but is nearly independent of lateral distance from the beam central axis.

  8. {gamma}-ray strength function for {sup 116,117}Sn with the pygmy dipole resonance balanced in the photoneutron and neutron capture channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Utsunomiya, H.; Kamata, M.; Kondo, T.; Itoh, O.; Akimune, H.; Yamagata, T.; Goriely, S.; Toyokawa, H.; Lui, Y.-W.; Hilaire, S.; Koning, A. J.

    2009-11-15

    Photoneutron cross sections were measured for {sup 117}Sn and {sup 116}Sn near the neutron thresholds at 6.94 and 9.56 MeV, respectively, with quasi-monochromatic laser-Compton scattering {gamma} rays. The {sup 117}Sn cross section, which is strongly enhanced near the low threshold, provides evidence for the presence of extra {gamma} strength in the low-energy tail of the giant dipole resonance. A coherent analysis of the photoneutron data for {sup 117}Sn together with the neutron capture on {sup 116}Sn shows that the {gamma}-ray strength function is balanced in the photoneutron and neutron capture channels in terms of the microscopic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov plus quasiparticle random-phase approximation model of E1 strength combined with a pygmy E1 resonance at 8.5 MeV. The high-energy part of the pygmy resonance is also suggested in the photoneutron cross section for {sup 116}Sn.

  9. S-process nucleosynthesis in massive stars and the weak component. I. Evolution and neutron captures in a 25 solar mass star

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raiteri, C.M.; Busso, M.; Picchio, G.; Gallino, R.; Pulone, L. Torino Osservatorio Astronomico, Turin Torino Universita, Turin Trieste Osservatorio Astronomico )

    1991-01-01

    Evolutionary calculations of a typical massive star are run in order to analyze the n-capture process occurring during the hydrostatic core He-burning phase, studying the effects of variations in the C-12(alpha, gamma)O-16 and Ne-22(alpha, n)Mg-25 rates within their present uncertainties and in other nuclear inputs. The nucleosynthetic mechanism is characterized by a low mean neutron density, which never exceeds 10 to the 6th n/cu cm. A good production of the s-isotopes in the atomic mass range 70-90 is found, the actual neutron exposure depending on some critical parameters. Important contributions are also found for several light n-rich species and for the heavy rare isotopes Gd-152 and Ta-180. How s-processing in a typical massive star compares with predictions by classical analysis is addressed. 67 refs.

  10. Measurement of neutron dose equivalent outside and inside of the treatment vault of GRID therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xudong; Charlton, Michael A.; Esquivel, Carlos; Eng, Tony Y.; Li, Ying; Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the neutron and photon dose equivalent rates at the treatment vault entrance (H{sub n,D} and H{sub G}), and to study the secondary radiation to the patient in GRID therapy. The radiation activation on the grid was studied.Methods: A Varian Clinac 23EX accelerator was working at 18 MV mode with a grid manufactured by .decimal, Inc. The H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} were measured using an Andersson–Braun neutron REM meter, and a Geiger Müller counter. The radiation activation on the grid was measured after the irradiation with an ion chamber γ-ray survey meter. The secondary radiation dose equivalent to patient was evaluated by etched track detectors and OSL detectors on a RANDO{sup ®} phantom.Results: Within the measurement uncertainty, there is no significant difference between the H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} with and without a grid. However, the neutron dose equivalent to the patient with the grid is, on average, 35.3% lower than that without the grid when using the same field size and the same amount of monitor unit. The photon dose equivalent to the patient with the grid is, on average, 44.9% lower. The measured average half-life of the radiation activation in the grid is 12.0 (±0.9) min. The activation can be categorized into a fast decay component and a slow decay component with half-lives of 3.4 (±1.6) min and 15.3 (±4.0) min, respectively. There was no detectable radioactive contamination found on the surface of the grid through a wipe test.Conclusions: This work indicates that there is no significant change of the H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} in GRID therapy, compared with a conventional external beam therapy. However, the neutron and scattered photon dose equivalent to the patient decrease dramatically with the grid and can be clinical irrelevant. Meanwhile, the users of a grid should be aware of the possible high dose to the radiation worker from the radiation activation on the surface of the grid. A delay in handling the grid after the beam

  11. Gamma-Ray Emission Spectra as a Constraint on Calculations of 234,236,238U Neutron-Capture Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullmann, John Leonard; Kawano, Toshihiko; Bredeweg, Todd Allen; Baramsai, Bayarbadrakh; Couture, Aaron Joseph; Haight, Robert Cameron; Jandel, Marian; Mosby, Shea Morgan; O'Donnell, John M.; Rundberg, Robert S.; Vieira, David J.; Wilhelmy, Jerry B.; Becker, John A.; Wu, Ching-Yen; Krticka, Milan

    2015-05-28

    Neutron capture cross sections in the “continuum” region (>≈1 keV) and gamma-emission spectra are of importance to basic science and many applied fields. Careful measurements have been made on most common stable nuclides, but physicists must rely on calculations (or “surrogate” reactions) for rare or unstable nuclides. Calculations must be benchmarked against measurements (cross sections, gamma-ray spectra, and <Γγ>). Gamma-ray spectrum measurements from resolved resonances were made with 1 - 2 mg/cm2 thick targets; cross sections at >1 keV were measured using thicker targets. The results show that the shape of capture cross section vs neutron energy is not sensitive to the form of the strength function (although the magnitude is); the generalized Lorentzian E1 strength function is not sufficient to describe the shape of observed gamma-ray spectra; MGLO + “Oslo M1” parameters produces quantitative agreement with the measured 238U(n,γ) cross section; additional strength at low energies (~ 3 MeV) -- likely M1-- is required; and careful study of complementary results on low-lying giant resonance strength is needed to consistently describe observations.

  12. Neutronic reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wende, Charles W. J.

    1976-08-17

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield.

  13. Construction of the WSU Epithermal Neutron Filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venhuizen, James Robert; Nigg, David Waler; Tripard, G.

    2002-09-01

    Moderating material has been installed in the original thermal-neutron filter region of the Washington State University (WSU) TRIGA™ type reactor to produce an epithermal-neutron beam. Attention has been focused upon the development of a convenient, local, epithermal-neutron beam facility at WSU for collaborative Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL)/WSU boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) preclinical research and boronated pharmaceutical screening in cell and animal models. The design of the new facility was performed in a collaborative effort1,2 of WSU and INEEL scientists. This paper summarizes the physical assembly of this filter.

  14. Long-range electrostatics-induced two-proton transfer captured by neutron crystallography in an enzyme catalytic site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gerlits, Oksana; Wymore, Troy; Das, Amit; Shen, Chen -Hsiang; Parks, Jerry M.; Smith, Jeremy C.; Weiss, Kevin L.; Keen, David A.; Blakeley, Matthew P.; Louis, John M.; et al

    2016-03-09

    Neutron crystallography was used to directly locate two protons before and after a pH-induced two-proton transfer between catalytic aspartic acid residues and the hydroxy group of the bound clinical drug darunavir, located in the catalytic site of enzyme HIV-1 protease. The two-proton transfer is triggered by electrostatic effects arising from protonation state changes of surface residues far from the active site. The mechanism and pH effect are supported by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations. The low-pH proton configuration in the catalytic site is deemed critical for the catalytic action of this enzyme and may apply more generally to other asparticmore » proteases. Neutrons therefore represent a superb probe to obtain structural details for proton transfer reactions in biological systems at a truly atomic level.« less

  15. Secondary neutron spectrum from 250-MeV passively scattered proton therapy: Measurement with an extended-range Bonner sphere system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, Rebecca M.; Burgett, E. A.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Secondary neutrons are an unavoidable consequence of proton therapy. While the neutron dose is low compared to the primary proton dose, its presence and contribution to the patient dose is nonetheless important. The most detailed information on neutrons includes an evaluation of the neutron spectrum. However, the vast majority of the literature that has reported secondary neutron spectra in proton therapy is based on computational methods rather than measurements. This is largely due to the inherent limitations in the majority of neutron detectors, which are either not suitable for spectral measurements or have limited response at energies greater than 20 MeV. Therefore, the primary objective of the present study was to measure a secondary neutron spectrum from a proton therapy beam using a spectrometer that is sensitive to neutron energies over the entire neutron energy spectrum. Methods: The authors measured the secondary neutron spectrum from a 250-MeV passively scattered proton beam in air at a distance of 100 cm laterally from isocenter using an extended-range Bonner sphere (ERBS) measurement system. Ambient dose equivalent H*(10) was calculated using measured fluence and fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficients. Results: The neutron fluence spectrum had a high-energy direct neutron peak, an evaporation peak, a thermal peak, and an intermediate energy continuum between the thermal and evaporation peaks. The H*(10) was dominated by the neutrons in the evaporation peak because of both their high abundance and the large quality conversion coefficients in that energy interval. The H*(10) 100 cm laterally from isocenter was 1.6 mSv per proton Gy (to isocenter). Approximately 35% of the dose equivalent was from neutrons with energies ≥20 MeV. Conclusions: The authors measured a neutron spectrum for external neutrons generated by a 250-MeV proton beam using an ERBS measurement system that was sensitive to neutrons over the entire

  16. Neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stephan, Andrew C.; Jardret; Vincent D.

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  17. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.; Anderson, H.L.

    1958-09-16

    Means are presenied for increasing the reproduction ratio of a gaphite- moderated neutronic reactor by diminishing the neutron loss due to absorption or capture by gaseous impurities within the reactor. This means comprised of a fluid-tight casing or envelope completely enclosing the reactor and provided with a valve through which the casing, and thereby the reactor, may be evacuated of atmospheric air.

  18. SU-E-T-569: Neutron Shielding Calculation Using Analytical and Multi-Monte Carlo Method for Proton Therapy Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, S; Shin, E H; Kim, J; Ahn, S H; Chung, K; Kim, D-H; Han, Y; Choi, D H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the shielding wall design to protect patients, staff and member of the general public for secondary neutron using a simply analytic solution, multi-Monte Carlo code MCNPX, ANISN and FLUKA. Methods: An analytical and multi-Monte Carlo method were calculated for proton facility (Sumitomo Heavy Industry Ltd.) at Samsung Medical Center in Korea. The NCRP-144 analytical evaluation methods, which produced conservative estimates on the dose equivalent values for the shielding, were used for analytical evaluations. Then, the radiation transport was simulated with the multi-Monte Carlo code. The neutron dose at evaluation point is got by the value using the production of the simulation value and the neutron dose coefficient introduced in ICRP-74. Results: The evaluation points of accelerator control room and control room entrance are mainly influenced by the point of the proton beam loss. So the neutron dose equivalent of accelerator control room for evaluation point is 0.651, 1.530, 0.912, 0.943 mSv/yr and the entrance of cyclotron room is 0.465, 0.790, 0.522, 0.453 mSv/yr with calculation by the method of NCRP-144 formalism, ANISN, FLUKA and MCNP, respectively. The most of Result of MCNPX and FLUKA using the complicated geometry showed smaller values than Result of ANISN. Conclusion: The neutron shielding for a proton therapy facility has been evaluated by the analytic model and multi-Monte Carlo methods. We confirmed that the setting of shielding was located in well accessible area to people when the proton facility is operated.

  19. SU-E-T-557: Measuring Neutron Activation of Cardiac Devices Irradiated During Proton Therapy Using Indium Foils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avery, S; Christodouleas, J; Delaney, K; Diffenderfer, E; Brown, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Measuring Neutron Activation of Cardiac devices Irradiated during Proton Therapy using Indium Foils Methods: The foils had dimensions of 25mm x 25mm x 1mm. After being activated, the foils were placed in a Canberra Industries well chamber utilizing a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. The resulting gamma spectrum was acquired and analyzed using Genie 2000 spectroscopy software. One activation foil was placed over the upper, left chest of RANDO where a pacemaker would be. The rest of the foils were placed over the midline of the patient at different distances, providing a spatial distribution over the phantom. Using lasers and BBs to align the patient, 200 MU square fields were delivered to various treatment sites: the brain, the pancreas, and the prostate. Each field was shot at least a day apart, giving more than enough time for activity of the foil to decay (t1=2 = 54.12 min). Results: The net counts (minus background) of the three aforementioned peaks were used for our measurements. These counts were adjusted to account for detector efficiency, relative photon yields from decay, and the natural abundance of 115-In. The average neutron flux for the closed multi-leaf collimator irradiation was measured to be 1.62 x 106 - 0.18 x 106 cm2 s-1. An order of magnitude estimate of the flux for neutrons up to 1 keV from Diffenderfer et al. gives 3 x 106 cm2 s-1 which does agree on the order of magnitude. Conclusion: Lower energy neutrons have higher interaction cross-sections and are more likely to damage pacemakers. The thermal/slow neutron component may be enough to estimate the overall risk. The true test of the applicability of activation foils is whether or not measurements are capable of predicting cardiac device malfunction. For that, additional studies are needed to provide clinical evidence one way or the other.

  20. SU-E-T-591: Measurement and Monte Carlo Simulation of Stray Neutrons in Passive Scattering Proton Therapy: Needs and Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farah, J; Bonfrate, A; Donadille, L; Dubourg, N; Lacoste, V; Martinetti, F; Sayah, R; Trompier, F; Clairand, I [IRSN - Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, Fontenay-aux-roses (France); Caresana, M [Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Delacroix, S; Nauraye, C [Institut Curie - Centre de Protontherapie d Orsay, Orsay (France); Herault, J [Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Piau, S; Vabre, I [Institut de Physique Nucleaire d Orsay, Orsay (France)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Measure stray radiation inside a passive scattering proton therapy facility, compare values to Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and identify the actual needs and challenges. Methods: Measurements and MC simulations were considered to acknowledge neutron exposure associated with 75 MeV ocular or 180 MeV intracranial passively scattered proton treatments. First, using a specifically-designed high sensitivity Bonner Sphere system, neutron spectra were measured at different positions inside the treatment rooms. Next, measurement-based mapping of neutron ambient dose equivalent was fulfilled using several TEPCs and rem-meters. Finally, photon and neutron organ doses were measured using TLDs, RPLs and PADCs set inside anthropomorphic phantoms (Rando, 1 and 5-years-old CIRS). All measurements were also simulated with MCNPX to investigate the efficiency of MC models in predicting stray neutrons considering different nuclear cross sections and models. Results: Knowledge of the neutron fluence and energy distribution inside a proton therapy room is critical for stray radiation dosimetry. However, as spectrometry unfolding is initiated using a MC guess spectrum and suffers from algorithmic limits a 20% spectrometry uncertainty is expected. H*(10) mapping with TEPCs and rem-meters showed a good agreement between the detectors. Differences within measurement uncertainty (1015%) were observed and are inherent to the energy, fluence and directional response of each detector. For a typical ocular and intracranial treatment respectively, neutron doses outside the clinical target volume of 0.4 and 11 mGy were measured inside the Rando phantom. Photon doses were 210 times lower depending on organs position. High uncertainties (40%) are inherent to TLDs and PADCs measurements due to the need for neutron spectra at detector position. Finally, stray neutrons prediction with MC simulations proved to be extremely dependent on proton beam energy and the used nuclear models and cross

  1. Metalloporphyrins and their uses as radiosensitizers for radiation therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    2004-07-06

    The present invention covers radiosensitizers containing as an active ingredient halogenated derivatives of boronated porphyrins containing multiple carborane cages having the structure ##STR1## which selectively accumulate in neoplastic tissue within the irradiation volume and thus can be used in cancer therapies including, but not limited to, boron neutron--capture therapy and photodynamic therapy. The present invention also covers methods for using these radiosensitizers in tumor imaging and cancer treatment.

  2. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Smolik, Galen R.

    2000-01-01

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  3. Carbon Capture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capture Fact Sheet Key Contacts Carbon Capture Research & Development Carbon capture and storage from fossil-based power generation is a critical component of realistic strategies for arresting the rise in atmospheric CO2 concentrations, but capturing substantial amounts of CO2 using current technology would result in a prohibitive rise in the cost of producing energy. The National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Research and Development (NETL-ORD), in collaboration with researchers

  4. MANTA. An Integral Reactor Physics Experiment to Infer the Neutron Capture Cross Sections of Actinides and Fission Products in Fast and Epithermal Spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youinou, Gilles Jean-Michel

    2015-10-01

    Neutron cross-sections characterize the way neutrons interact with matter. They are essential to most nuclear engineering projects and, even though theoretical progress has been made as far as the predictability of neutron cross-section models, measurements are still indispensable to meet tight design requirements for reduced uncertainties. Within the field of fission reactor technology, one can identify the following specializations that rely on the availability of accurate neutron cross-sections: (1) fission reactor design, (2) nuclear fuel cycles, (3) nuclear safety, (4) nuclear safeguards, (5) reactor monitoring and neutron fluence determination and (6) waste disposal and transmutation. In particular, the assessment of advanced fuel cycles requires an extensive knowledge of transuranics cross sections. Plutonium isotopes, but also americium, curium and up to californium isotope data are required with a small uncertainty in order to optimize significant features of the fuel cycle that have an impact on feasibility studies (e.g. neutron doses at fuel fabrication, decay heat in a repository, etc.). Different techniques are available to determine neutron cross sections experimentally, with the common denominator that a source of neutrons is necessary. It can either come from an accelerator that produces neutrons as a result of interactions between charged particles and a target, or it can come from a nuclear reactor. When the measurements are performed with an accelerator, they are referred to as differential since the analysis of the data provides the cross-sections for different discrete energies, i.e. σ(Ei), and for the diffusion cross sections for different discrete angles. Another approach is to irradiate a very pure sample in a test reactor such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INL and, after a given time, determine the amount of the different transmutation products. The precise characterization of the nuclide densities before and after

  5. Apparatus and method for identification of matrix materials in which transuranic elements are embedded using thermal neutron capture gamma-ray emission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Close, D.A.; Franks, L.A.; Kocimski, S.M.

    1984-08-16

    An invention is described that enables the quantitative simultaneous identification of the matrix materials in which fertile and fissile nuclides are embedded to be made along with the quantitative assay of the fertile and fissile materials. The invention also enables corrections for any absorption of neutrons by the matrix materials and by the measurement apparatus by the measurement of the prompt and delayed neutron flux emerging from a sample after the sample is interrogated by simultaneously applied neutrons and gamma radiation. High energy electrons are directed at a first target to produce gamma radiation. A second target receives the resulting pulsed gamma radiation and produces neutrons from the interaction with the gamma radiation. These neutrons are slowed by a moderator surrounding the sample and bathe the sample uniformly, generating second gamma radiation in the interaction. The gamma radiation is then resolved and quantitatively detected, providing a spectroscopic signature of the constituent elements contained in the matrix and in the materials within the vicinity of the sample. (LEW)

  6. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  7. Metalloporphyrins and their uses as imageable tumor-targeting agents for radiation therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    2003-05-20

    The present invention covers halogenated derivatives of boronated porphyrins containing multiple carborane cages having the formula ##STR1## which selectively accumulate in neoplastic tissue within the irradiation volume and thus can be used in cancer therapies including, but not limited to, boron neutron- capture therapy and photodynamic therapy. The present invention also covers methods for using these halogenated derivatives of boronated porphyrins in tumor imaging and cancer treatment.

  8. Use of novel metalloporphyrins as imageable tumor-targeting agents for radiation therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    2005-10-04

    The present invention covers halogenated derivatives of boronated phorphyrins containing multiple carborane cages having the formula ##STR1## which selectively accumulate in neoplastic tissue within the irradiation volume and thus can be used in cancer therapies including, but not limited to, boron neutron-capture therapy and photodynamic therapy. The present invention also covers methods for using these halogenated derivatives of boronated porphyrins in tumor imaging and cancer treatment.

  9. Total Cross Sections as a Surrogate for Neutron Capture: An Opportunity to Accurately Constrain (n,γ) Cross Sections for Nuclides Beyond the Reach of Direct Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koehler, Paul E.

    2014-03-05

    There are many (n,γ) cross sections of great interest to radiochemical diagnostics and to nuclear astrophysics which are beyond the reach of current measurement techniques, and likely to remain so for the foreseeable future. In contrast, total neutron cross sections currently are feasible for many of these nuclides and provide almost all the information needed to accurately calculate the (n,γ) cross sections via the nuclear statistical model (NSM). I demonstrate this for the case of 151Sm; NSM calculations constrained using average resonance parameters obtained from total cross section measurements made in 1975, are in excellent agreement with recent 151Sm (n,γ) measurements across a wide range of energy. Furthermore, I demonstrate through simulations that total cross section measurements can be made at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for samples as small as 10μg. Samples of this size should be attainable for many nuclides of interest. Finally, I estimate that over half of the radionuclides identified ∼20 years ago as having (n,γ) cross sections of importance to s-process nucleosynthesis studies (24/43) and radiochemical diagnostics (11/19), almost none of which have been measured, can be constrained using this technique.

  10. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fermi, E.; Szilard, L.

    1957-09-24

    Reactors of the type employing plates of natural uranium in a moderator are discussed wherein the plates are um-formly disposed in parallel relationship to each other thereby separating the moderator material into distinct and individual layers. Each plate has an uninterrupted sunface area substantially equal to the cross-sectional area of the active portion of the reactor, the particular size of the plates and the volume ratio of moderator to uranium required to sustain a chain reaction being determinable from the known purity of these materials and other characteristics such as the predictable neutron losses due to the formation of radioactive elements of extremely high neutron capture cross section.

  11. Carbon Capture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon capture involves the separation of carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal-based power plant ... are not ready for implementation on coal-based power plants because they have not ...

  12. Neutron resonance averaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chrien, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    The principles of resonance averaging as applied to neutron capture reactions are described. Several illustrations of resonance averaging to problems of nuclear structure and the distribution of radiative strength in nuclei are provided. 30 refs., 12 figs.

  13. Neutronic Reactor Design to Reduce Neutron Loss

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miles, F. T.

    1961-05-01

    A nuclear reactor construction is described in which an unmoderated layer of the fissionable material is inserted between the moderated portion of the reactor core and the core container steel wall. The wall is surrounded by successive layers of pure fertile material and moderator containing fertile material. The unmoderated layer of the fissionable material will insure that a greater portion of fast neutrons will pass through the steel wall than would thermal neutrons. Since the steel has a smaller capture cross section for the fast neutrons, greater nunnbers of neutrons will pass into the blanket, thereby increasing the over-all efficiency of the reactor. (AEC)

  14. NEUTRONIC REACTOR DESIGN TO REDUCE NEUTRON LOSS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mills, F.T.

    1961-05-01

    A nuclear reactor construction is described in which an unmoderated layer of the fissionable material is inserted between the moderated portion of the reactor core and the core container steel wall which is surrounded by successive layers of pure fertile material and fertile material having moderator. The unmoderated layer of the fissionable material will insure that a greater portion of fast neutrons will pass through the steel wall than would thermal neutrons. As the steel has a smaller capture cross-section for the fast neutrons, then greater numbers of the neutrons will pass into the blanket thereby increasing the over-all efficiency of the reactor.

  15. Radiative neutron capture by {sup 2}H, {sup 7}Li, {sup 14}C, and {sup 14}N nuclei at astrophysical energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.

    2013-07-15

    The possibility of describing experimental data on the total cross sections for the n{sup 2}H, n{sup 7}Li, n{sup 14}C, and n{sup 14}N radiative-capture processes within the potential cluster model involving forbidden states and their classification according to Young's tableaux is considered. It is shown that this model and the methods used here to construct potentials make it possible to describe correctly the behavior of the experimental cross sections at energies between 5 to 10 meV (5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}-10 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} eV) and 1 to 15MeV.

  16. Detection of Neutrons with Scintillation Counters

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Hofstadter, R.

    1948-11-01

    Detection of slow neutrons by: detection of single gamma rays following capture by cadmium or mercury; detection of more than one gamma ray by observing coincidences after capture; detection of heavy charged particles after capture in lithium or baron nuclei; possible use of anthracene for counting fast neutrons investigated briefly.

  17. SU-E-T-602: Beryllium Seeds Implant for Photo-Neutron Yield Using External Beam Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koren, S; Veltchev, I; Furhang, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the Neutron yield obtained during prostate external beam irradiation. Methods: Neutrons, that are commonly a radiation safety concern for photon beams with energy above 10 MV, are induced inside a PTV from Beryllium implemented seeds. A high megavoltage photon beam delivered to a prostate will yield neutrons via the reaction Be-9(?,n)2?. Beryllium was chosen for its low gamma,n reaction cross-section threshold (1.67 MeV) to be combined with a high feasible 25 MV photon beam. This beam spectra has a most probable photon energy of 2.5 to 3.0 MeV and an average photon energy of about 5.8 MeV. For this feasibility study we simulated a Beryllium-made common seed dimension (0.1 cm diameter and 0.5 cm height) without taking into account encapsulation. We created a 0.5 cm grid loading pattern excluding the Urethra, using Variseed (Varian inc.) A total of 156 seeds were exported to a 4cm diameter prostate sphere, created in Fluka, a particle transport Monte Carlo Code. Two opposed 25 MV beams were simulated. The evaluation of the neutron dose was done by adjusting the simulated photon dose to a common prostate delivery (e.g. 7560 cGy in 42 fractions) and finding the corresponding neutron dose yield from the simulation. A variance reduction technique was conducted for the neutrons yield and transported. Results: An effective dose of 3.65 cGy due to neutrons was found in the prostate volume. The dose to central areas of the prostate was found to be about 10 cGy. Conclusion: The neutron dose yielded does not justify a clinical implant of Beryllium seeds. Nevertheless, one should investigate the Neutron dose obtained when a larger Beryllium loading is combined with commercially available 40 MeV Linacs.

  18. Production, Distribution, and Applications of Californium-252 Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balo, P.A.; Knauer, J.B.; Martin, R.C.

    1999-10-03

    reencapsulators domestically and internationally. Sealed {sup 252}Cf sources are also available for loan to agencies and subcontractors of the U.S. government and to universities for educational, research, and medical applications. The REDC has established the Californium User Facility (CUF) for Neutron Science to make its large inventory of {sup 252}Cf sources available to researchers for irradiations inside uncontaminated hot cells. Experiments at the CUF include a land mine detection system, neutron damage testing of solid-state detectors, irradiation of human cancer cells for boron neutron capture therapy experiments, and irradiation of rice to induce genetic mutations.

  19. Sandia Energy - High-Pressure and High-Temperature Neutron Reflectomet...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High-Pressure and High-Temperature Neutron Reflectometry Cell for Solid-Fluid Interface Studies Home Carbon Capture & Storage Climate News News & Events Carbon Capture Carbon...

  20. Fast-neutron capture cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, A.B.; Poenitz, W.P.

    1982-01-01

    SEparate abstracts were prepared for 30 of the 39 papers presented. Nine papers wre previously included in the data base. (WHK)

  1. Neutron spectrometer for improved SNM search.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vance, Andrew L.; Aigeldinger, Georg

    2007-03-01

    With the exception of large laboratory devices with very low sensitivities, a neutron spectrometer have not been built for fission neutrons such as those emitted by special nuclear materials (SNM). The goal of this work was to use a technique known as Capture Gated Neutron Spectrometry to develop a solid-state device with this functionality. This required modifications to trans-stilbene, a known solid-state scintillator. To provide a neutron capture signal we added lithium to this material. This unique triggering signal allowed identification of neutrons that lose all of their energy in the detector, eliminating uncertainties that arise due to partial energy depositions. We successfully implemented a capture gated neutron spectrometer and were able to distinguish an SNM like fission spectrum from a spectrum stemming from a benign neutron source.

  2. Capture and fission with DANCE and NEUANCE

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bond, E.; Rusev, G.; Walker, C.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Chadwick, M. B.; Couture, A.; Fowler, M. M.; Hayes, A.; et al

    2015-12-23

    A summary of the current and future experimental program at DANCE is presented. Measurements of neutron capture cross sections are planned for many actinide isotopes with the goal to reduce the present uncertainties in nuclear data libraries. Detailed studies of capture gamma rays in the neutron resonance region will be performed in order to derive correlated data on the de-excitation of the compound nucleus. New approaches on how to remove the DANCE detector response from experimental data and retain the correlations between the cascade gamma rays are presented. Studies on 235U are focused on quantifying the population of short-lived isomericmore » states in 236U after neutron capture. For this purpose, a new neutron detector array NEUANCE is under construction. It will be installed in the central cavity of the DANCE array and enable the highly efficient tagging of fission and capture events. In addition, developments of fission fragment detectors are also underway to expand DANCE capabilities to measurements of fully correlated data on fission observables.« less

  3. Capture and fission with DANCE and NEUANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bond, E.; Rusev, G.; Walker, C.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Chadwick, M. B.; Couture, A.; Fowler, M. M.; Hayes, A.; Kawano, T.; Mosby, S.; Stetcu, I.; Taddeucci, T. N.; Talou, P.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2015-12-23

    A summary of the current and future experimental program at DANCE is presented. Measurements of neutron capture cross sections are planned for many actinide isotopes with the goal to reduce the present uncertainties in nuclear data libraries. Detailed studies of capture gamma rays in the neutron resonance region will be performed in order to derive correlated data on the de-excitation of the compound nucleus. New approaches on how to remove the DANCE detector response from experimental data and retain the correlations between the cascade gamma rays are presented. Studies on 235U are focused on quantifying the population of short-lived isomeric states in 236U after neutron capture. For this purpose, a new neutron detector array NEUANCE is under construction. It will be installed in the central cavity of the DANCE array and enable the highly efficient tagging of fission and capture events. In addition, developments of fission fragment detectors are also underway to expand DANCE capabilities to measurements of fully correlated data on fission observables.

  4. NEUTRON ABSORPTION AND SHIELDING DEVICE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Axelrad, I.R.

    1960-06-21

    A neutron absorption and shielding device is described which is adapted for mounting in a radiation shielding wall surrounding a radioactive area through which instrumentation leads and the like may safely pass without permitting gamma or neutron radiation to pass to the exterior. The shielding device comprises a container having at least one nonrectilinear tube or passageway means extending therethrough, which is adapted to contain instrumentation leads or the like, a layer of a substance capable of absorbing gamma rays, and a solid resinous composition adapted to attenuate fast-moving neutrons and capture slow- moving or thermal neutrons.

  5. Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capture R&D Carbon Capture R&D DOE's Carbon Capture Program, administered by the Office of Fossil Energy and the National Energy Technology Laboratory, is conducting research and development activities on Second Generation and Transformational carbon capture technologies that have the potential to provide step-change reductions in both cost and energy penalty as compared to currently available First Generation technologies. The Carbon Capture Program consists of two core research

  6. Neutronic reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wende, Charles W. J.; Babcock, Dale F.; Menegus, Robert L.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear reactor includes an active portion with fissionable fuel and neutron moderating material surrounded by neutron reflecting material. A control element in the active portion includes a group of movable rods constructed of neutron-absorbing material. Each rod is movable with respect to the other rods to vary the absorption of neutrons and effect control over neutron flux.

  7. NEUTRON MEASURING METHOD AND APPARATUS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G.T.; Friedlander, G.; Gofman, J.W.

    1958-07-29

    A fast neutron fission detecting apparatus is described consisting of a source of fast neutrons, an ion chamber containing air, two electrodes within the ion chamber in confronting spaced relationship, a high voltage potential placed across the electrodes, a shield placed about the source, and a suitable pulse annplifier and recording system in the electrode circuit to record the impulse due to fissions in a sannple material. The sample material is coated onto the active surface of the disc electrode and shielding means of a material having high neutron capture capabilities for thermal neutrons are provided in the vicinity of the electrodes and about the ion chamber so as to absorb slow neutrons of thermal energy to effectively prevent their diffusing back to the sample and causing an error in the measurement of fast neutron fissions.

  8. Dosimetry in Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility at BMRR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, J. P.; Holden, N. E.; Reciniello, R. N.

    2014-05-23

    Radiation dosimetry for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) has been performed since 1959 at Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility (TNIF) of the three-megawatt light-water cooled Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). In the early 1990s when more effective drug carriers were developed for NCT, in which the eye melanoma and brain tumors in rats were irradiated in situ, extensive clinical trials of small animals began using a focused thermal neutron beam. To improve the dosimetry at irradiation facility, a series of innovative designs and major modifications made to enhance the beam intensity and to ease the experimental sampling at BMRR were performed; including (1) in-core fuel addition to increase source strength and balance flux of neutrons towards two ports, (2) out of core moderator remodeling, done by replacing thicker D2O tanks at graphite-shutter interfacial areas, to expedite neutron thermalization, (3) beam shutter upgrade to reduce strayed neutrons and gamma dose, (4) beam collimator redesign to optimize the beam flux versus dose for animal treatment, (5) beam port shielding installation around the shutter opening area (lithium-6 enriched polyester-resin in boxes, attached with polyethylene plates) to reduce prompt gamma and fast neutron doses, (6) sample holder repositioning to optimize angle versus distance for a single organ or whole body irradiation, and (7) holder wall buildup with neutron reflector materials to increase dose and dose rate from scattered thermal neutrons. During the facility upgrade, reactor dosimetry was conducted using thermoluminescent dosimeters TLD for gamma dose estimate, using ion chambers to confirm fast neutron and gamma dose rate, and by the activation of gold-foils with and without cadmium-covers, for fast and thermal neutron flux determination. Based on the combined effect from the size and depth of tumor cells and the location and geometry of dosimeters, the measured flux from cadmium-difference method was 4 - 7

  9. SETTABLE NEUTRON RADIATION SHIELDING MATERIAL

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Axelrad, I.R.

    1960-11-22

    A settable, viscous, putty-like shielding composition is described. It consists of an intimate admixture of a major proportion of a compound having a ratio of hydrogen atoms to all other atoms therein within the range of from 0.5: 1 to 2:l. from 0.5 to 10% by weight of boron, and a fluid resinous carrier This composition when cured is adapted to attenuate fast moving neutrons and capture slow moving neutrons.

  10. Cryogenic Carbon Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-15

    IMPACCT Project: SES is developing a process to capture CO2 from the exhaust gas of coal-fired power plants by desublimation - the conversion of a gas to a solid. Capturing CO2 as a solid and delivering it as a liquid avoids the large energy cost of CO2 gas compression. SES’ capture technology facilitates the prudent use of available energy resources. Coal is our most abundant energy resource and is an excellent fuel for baseline power production. SES capture technology can capture 99% of the CO2 emissions in addition to a wide range of other pollutants more efficiently and at lower costs than existing capture technologies. SES’ capture technology can be readily added to our existing energy infrastructure.

  11. Monte Carlo Code System for Calculation of Multiple Scattering of Neutrons in the Resonance Region.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1983-01-25

    Version 00 MCRTOF systematically calculates capture and scattering probabilities for neutrons incident on a material disk, with neutron cross sections calculated from the resonance parameters. Capture, front and rear face scattering, transmission, etc., probabilities are obtained from the average destinations of the incident neutrons.

  12. Neutronic reactor construction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huston, Norman E.

    1976-07-06

    1. A neutronic reactor comprising a moderator including horizontal layers formed of horizontal rows of graphite blocks, alternate layers of blocks having the rows extending in one direction, the remaining alternate layers having the rows extending transversely to the said one direction, alternate rows of blocks in one set of alternate layers having longitudinal ducts, the moderator further including slotted graphite tubes positioned in the ducts, the reactor further comprising an aluminum coolant tube positioned within the slotted tube in spaced relation thereto, bodies of thermal-neutron-fissionable material, and jackets enclosing the bodies and being formed of a corrosion-resistant material having a low neutron-capture cross section, the bodies and jackets being positioned within the coolant tube so that the jackets are spaced from the coolant tube.

  13. Jumpstarting the carbon capture industry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jumpstarting the carbon capture industry: Science on the Hill Jumpstarting the carbon capture industry: Science on the Hill Carbon capture, utilization, and storage can provide a...

  14. Reversible Acid Gas Capture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dave Heldebrant

    2012-12-31

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientist David Heldebrant demonstrates how a new process called reversible acid gas capture works to pull carbon dioxide out of power plant emissions.

  15. Carbon Capture, Utilization & Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Learn about the Energy Department's work to advance capture and safe, sustainable storage of carbon dioxide emissions in underground geologic formations.

  16. Capturing Energy Upgrades

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides an overview of how to capture the value of energy efficiency upgrades in the real estate market, from CNT Energy.

  17. Note: Proton irradiation at kilowatt-power and neutron production from a free-surface liquid-lithium target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G.; Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Weissman, L.; Aviv, O.; Berkovits, D.; Dudovitch, O.; Eisen, Y.; Eliyahu, I.; Haquin, G.; Hazenshprung, N.; Kreisel, A.; Mardor, I.; Shimel, G.; Shor, A.; Silverman, I.; Yungrais, Z.; Paul, M. Tessler, M.

    2014-05-15

    The free-surface Liquid-Lithium Target, recently developed at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), was successfully used with a 1.9 MeV, 1.2 mA (2.3 kW) continuous-wave proton beam. Neutrons (∼2 × 10{sup 10} n/s having a peak energy of ∼27 keV) from the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction were detected with a fission-chamber detector and by gold activation targets positioned in the forward direction. The setup is being used for nuclear astrophysics experiments to study neutron-induced reactions at stellar energies and to demonstrate the feasibility of accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

  18. Neutron skins and neutron stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piekarewicz, J.

    2013-11-07

    The neutron-skin thickness of heavy nuclei provides a fundamental link to the equation of state of neutron-rich matter, and hence to the properties of neutron stars. The Lead Radius Experiment ('PREX') at Jefferson Laboratory has recently provided the first model-independence evidence on the existence of a neutron-rich skin in {sup 208}Pb. In this contribution we examine how the increased accuracy in the determination of neutron skins expected from the commissioning of intense polarized electron beams may impact the physics of neutron stars.

  19. Demonstrating carbon capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qader, A.; Hooper, B.; Stevens, G.

    2009-11-15

    Australia is at the forefront of advancing CCS technology. The CO2CRC's H3 (Post-combustion) and Mulgrave (pre-combustion) capture projects are outlined. The capture technologies for these 2 demonstration projects are described. 1 map., 2 photos.

  20. Neutron guide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greene, Geoffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron guide in which lengths of cylindrical glass tubing have rectangular glass plates properly dimensioned to allow insertion into the cylindrical glass tubing so that a sealed geometrically precise polygonal cross-section is formed in the cylindrical glass tubing. The neutron guide provides easier alignment between adjacent sections than do the neutron guides of the prior art.

  1. Neutron dosimetry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quinby, Thomas C.

    1976-07-27

    A method of measuring neutron radiation within a nuclear reactor is provided. A sintered oxide wire is disposed within the reactor and exposed to neutron radiation. The induced radioactivity is measured to provide an indication of the neutron energy and flux within the reactor.

  2. High-flux neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G.; Paul, M.; Arenshtam, A.; Berkovits, D.; Kijel, D.; Nagler, A.; Eliyahu, I.; Silverman, I.

    2013-04-19

    A prototype compact Liquid Lithium Target (LiLiT), able to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source, was built. The neutron source is intended for nuclear astrophysical research, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in hospitals and material studies for fusion reactors. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear research Center (SNRC). The lithium target will produce neutrons through the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated by a high-intensity proton beam, necessary for intense neutron flux for the above applications. The liquid-lithium loop of LiLiT is designed to generate a stable lithium jet at high velocity on a concave supporting wall with free surface toward the incident proton beam (up to 10 kW). During off-line tests, liquid lithium was flown through the loop and generated a stable jet at velocity higher than 5 m/s on the concave supporting wall. The target is now under extensive test program using a high-power electron-gun. Up to 2 kW electron beam was applied on the lithium flow at velocity of 4 m/s without any flow instabilities or excessive evaporation. High-intensity proton beam irradiation will take place at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator currently in commissioning at SNRC.

  3. IMPACCT: Carbon Capture Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    IMPACCT Project: IMPACCT’s 15 projects seek to develop technologies for existing coal-fired power plants that will lower the cost of carbon capture. Short for “Innovative Materials and Processes for Advanced Carbon Capture Technologies,” the IMPACCT Project is geared toward minimizing the cost of removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal-fired power plant exhaust by developing materials and processes that have never before been considered for this application. Retrofitting coal-fired power plants to capture the CO2 they produce would enable greenhouse gas reductions without forcing these plants to close, shifting away from the inexpensive and abundant U.S. coal supply.

  4. ATK - Supersonic Carbon Capture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Castrogiovanni, Anthony (ACEnT Laboratories, President and CEO); Calayag, Bon (ATK, Program Manager)

    2014-04-11

    ATK and ACEnt Laboratories, with the help of ARPA-E funding, have taken an aerospace problem, supersonic condensation, and turned it into a viable clean energy solution for carbon capture.

  5. ATK - Supersonic Carbon Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castrogiovanni, Anthony; Calayag, Bon

    2014-03-05

    ATK and ACEnt Laboratories, with the help of ARPA-E funding, have taken an aerospace problem, supersonic condensation, and turned it into a viable clean energy solution for carbon capture.

  6. Ultracold neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saunders, Alexander

    2015-06-22

    This series of slides describes ultracold neutrons (UCN) and their properties, various UCN sources, and an overview of UCN-based experiments. Numerous diagrams and photographs are included.

  7. Carbon Capture Research and Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Research Institute of Innovative Energy Carbon Capture Research and Development Carbon capture and storage from fossil-based power...

  8. The National Carbon Capture Center

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Laboratory OD Outer Diameter OSU Ohio State University PC Pulverized Coal PC4 Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Center PCC Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture PCD Particulate ...

  9. Spatial Knowledge Capture Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-05-16

    The Spatial Knowledge Capture Library is a set of algorithms to capture regularities in shapes and trajectories through space and time. We have applied Spatial Knowledge Capture to model the actions of human experts in spatial domains, such as an AWACS Weapons Director task simulation. The library constructs a model to predict the expert’s response to sets of changing cues, such as the movements and actions of adversaries on a battlefield, The library includes amore » highly configurable feature extraction functionality, which supports rapid experimentation to discover causative factors. We use k-medoid clustering to group similar episodes of behavior, and construct a Markov model of system state transitions induced by agents’ actions.« less

  10. Conducting Polymers for Neutron Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimblin, Clare; Miller, Kirk; Vogel, Bob; Quam, Bill; McHugh, Harry; Anthony, Glen; Mike, Grover

    2007-12-01

    Conjugated polymers have emerged as an attractive technology for large-area electronic applications. As organic semiconductors, they can be used to make large-area arrays of diodes or transistors using fabrication techniques developed for polymer coatings, such as spraying and screen-printing. We have demonstrated both neutron and alpha detection using diodes made from conjugated polymers and have done preliminary work to integrate a boron carbide layer into the conventional polymer device structure to capture thermal neutrons. The polymer devices appear to be insensitive to gamma rays, due to their small physical thickness and low atomic number.

  11. Proton capture resonance studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, G.E. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States) 27695]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708; Bilpuch, E.G. [Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708; Bybee, C.R. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States) 27695]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708; Cox, J.M.; Fittje, L.M. [Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, Tennessee (United States) 38505]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708; Labonte, M.A.; Moore, E.F.; Shriner, J.D. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States) 27695]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708; Shriner, J.F. Jr. [Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, Tennessee (United States) 38505]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708; Vavrina, G.A. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States) 27695]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708; Wallace, P.M. [Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708

    1997-02-01

    The fluctuation properties of quantum systems now are used as a signature of quantum chaos. The analyses require data of extremely high quality. The {sup 29}Si(p,{gamma}) reaction is being used to establish a complete level scheme of {sup 30}P to study chaos and isospin breaking in this nuclide. Determination of the angular momentum J, the parity {pi}, and the isospin T from resonance capture data is considered. Special emphasis is placed on the capture angular distributions and on a geometric description of these angular distributions. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Neutron tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Reijonen, Jani

    2008-03-11

    A neutron tube or generator is based on a RF driven plasma ion source having a quartz or other chamber surrounded by an external RF antenna. A deuterium or mixed deuterium/tritium (or even just a tritium) plasma is generated in the chamber and D or D/T (or T) ions are extracted from the plasma. A neutron generating target is positioned so that the ion beam is incident thereon and loads the target. Incident ions cause D-D or D-T (or T-T) reactions which generate neutrons. Various embodiments differ primarily in size of the chamber and position and shape of the neutron generating target. Some neutron generators are small enough for implantation in the body. The target may be at the end of a catheter-like drift tube. The target may have a tapered or conical surface to increase target surface area.

  13. Neutron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cason, J.L. Jr.; Shaw, C.B.

    1975-10-21

    A neutron source which is particularly useful for neutron radiography consists of a vessel containing a moderating media of relatively low moderating ratio, a flux trap including a moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio at the center of the vessel, a shell of depleted uranium dioxide surrounding the moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio, a plurality of guide tubes each containing a movable source of neutrons surrounding the flux trap, a neutron shield surrounding one part of each guide tube, and at least one collimator extending from the flux trap to the exterior of the neutron source. The shell of depleted uranium dioxide has a window provided with depleted uranium dioxide shutters for each collimator. Reflectors are provided above and below the flux trap and on the guide tubes away from the flux trap.

  14. Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Long

    2010-07-12

    In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

  15. Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Long

    2010-09-01

    In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

  16. Determination of the effective sample thickness via radiative capture

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hurst, A. M.; Summers, N. C.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Firestone, R. B.; Basunia, M. S.; Escher, J. E.; Sleaford, B. W.

    2015-09-14

    Our procedure for determining the effective thickness of non-uniform irregular-shaped samples via radiative capture is described. In this technique, partial γ-ray production cross sections of a compound nucleus produced in a neutron-capture reaction are measured using Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis and compared to their corresponding standardized absolute values. For the low-energy transitions, the measured cross sections are lower than their standard values due to significant photoelectric absorption of the γ rays within the bulk-sample volume itself. Using standard theoretical techniques, the amount of γ-ray self absorption and neutron self shielding can then be calculated by iteratively varying the sample thicknessmore » until the observed cross sections converge with the known standards. The overall attenuation provides a measure of the effective sample thickness illuminated by the neutron beam. This procedure is illustrated through radiative neutron capture using powdered oxide samples comprising enriched 186W and 182W from which their tungsten-equivalent effective thicknesses are deduced to be 0.077(3) mm and 0.042(8) mm, respectively.« less

  17. Determination of the effective sample thickness via radiative capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurst, A. M.; Summers, N. C.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Firestone, R. B.; Basunia, M. S.; Escher, J. E.; Sleaford, B. W.

    2015-09-14

    Our procedure for determining the effective thickness of non-uniform irregular-shaped samples via radiative capture is described. In this technique, partial ?-ray production cross sections of a compound nucleus produced in a neutron-capture reaction are measured using Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis and compared to their corresponding standardized absolute values. For the low-energy transitions, the measured cross sections are lower than their standard values due to significant photoelectric absorption of the ? rays within the bulk-sample volume itself. Using standard theoretical techniques, the amount of ?-ray self absorption and neutron self shielding can then be calculated by iteratively varying the sample thickness until the observed cross sections converge with the known standards. The overall attenuation provides a measure of the effective sample thickness illuminated by the neutron beam. This procedure is illustrated through radiative neutron capture using powdered oxide samples comprising enriched 186W and 182W from which their tungsten-equivalent effective thicknesses are deduced to be 0.077(3) mm and 0.042(8) mm, respectively.

  18. Final Report on Actinide Glass Scintillators for Fast Neutron Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bliss, Mary; Stave, Jean A.

    2012-10-01

    This is the final report of an experimental investigation of actinide glass scintillators for fast-neutron detection. It covers work performed during FY2012. This supplements a previous report, PNNL-20854 “Initial Characterization of Thorium-loaded Glasses for Fast Neutron Detection” (October 2011). The work in FY2012 was done with funding remaining from FY2011. As noted in PNNL-20854, the glasses tested prior to July 2011 were erroneously identified as scintillators. The decision was then made to start from “scratch” with a literature survey and some test melts with a non-radioactive glass composition that could later be fabricated with select actinides, most likely thorium. The normal stand-in for thorium in radioactive waste glasses is cerium in the same oxidation state. Since cerium in the 3+ state is used as the light emitter in many scintillating glasses, the next most common substitute was used: hafnium. Three hafnium glasses were melted. Two melts were colored amber and a third was clear. It barely scintillated when exposed to alpha particles. The uses and applications for a scintillating fast neutron detector are important enough that the search for such a material should not be totally abandoned. This current effort focused on actinides that have very high neutron capture energy releases but low neutron capture cross sections. This results in very long counting times and poor signal to noise when working with sealed sources. These materials are best for high flux applications and access to neutron generators or reactors would enable better test scenarios. The total energy of the neutron capture reaction is not the only factor to focus on in isotope selection. Many neutron capture reactions result in energetic gamma rays that require large volumes or high densities to detect. If the scintillator is to separate neutrons from gamma rays, the capture reactions should produce heavy particles and few gamma rays. This would improve the detection of a

  19. Thermal neutron detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peurrung, Anthony J. (Richland, WA); Stromswold, David C. (West Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01

    According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

  20. The alanine detector in BNCT dosimetry: Dose response in thermal and epithermal neutron fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitz, T.; Bassler, N.; Blaickner, M.; Ziegner, M.; Hsiao, M. C.; Liu, Y. H.; Koivunoro, H.; Auterinen, I.; Sern, T.; Kotiluoto, P.; Palmans, H.; Sharpe, P.; Langguth, P.; Hampel, G.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The response of alanine solid state dosimeters to ionizing radiation strongly depends on particle type and energy. Due to nuclear interactions, neutron fields usually also consist of secondary particles such as photons and protons of diverse energies. Various experiments have been carried out in three different neutron beams to explore the alanine dose response behavior and to validate model predictions. Additionally, application in medical neutron fields for boron neutron capture therapy is discussed. Methods: Alanine detectors have been irradiated in the thermal neutron field of the research reactor TRIGA Mainz, Germany, in five experimental conditions, generating different secondary particle spectra. Further irradiations have been made in the epithermal neutron beams at the research reactors FiR 1 in Helsinki, Finland, and Tsing Hua open pool reactor in HsinChu, Taiwan ROC. Readout has been performed with electron spin resonance spectrometry with reference to an absorbed dose standard in a {sup 60}Co gamma ray beam. Absorbed doses and dose components have been calculated using the Monte Carlo codes FLUKA and MCNP. The relative effectiveness (RE), linking absorbed dose and detector response, has been calculated using the Hansen and Olsen alanine response model. Results: The measured dose response of the alanine detector in the different experiments has been evaluated and compared to model predictions. Therefore, a relative effectiveness has been calculated for each dose component, accounting for its dependence on particle type and energy. Agreement within 5% between model and measurement has been achieved for most irradiated detectors. Significant differences have been observed in response behavior between thermal and epithermal neutron fields, especially regarding dose composition and depth dose curves. The calculated dose components could be verified with the experimental results in the different primary and secondary particle fields. Conclusions: The

  1. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wigner, E.P.

    1960-11-22

    A nuclear reactor is described wherein horizontal rods of thermal- neutron-fissionable material are disposed in a body of heavy water and extend through and are supported by spaced parallel walls of graphite.

  2. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wade, E.J.

    1958-09-16

    This patent relates to a reflector means for a neutronic reactor. A reflector comprised of a plurality of vertically movable beryllium control members is provided surrounding the sides of the reactor core. An absorber of fast neutrons comprised of natural uramum surrounds the reflector. An absorber of slow neutrons surrounds the absorber of fast neutrons and is formed of a plurality of beryllium blocks having natural uranium members distributcd therethrough. in addition, a movable body is positioned directly below the core and is comprised of a beryllium reflector and an absorbing member attached to the botiom thereof, the absorbing member containing a substance selected from the goup consisting of natural urantum and Th/sup 232/.

  3. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fraas, A.P.; Mills, C.B.

    1961-11-21

    A neutronic reactor in which neutron moderation is achieved primarily in its reflector is described. The reactor structure consists of a cylindrical central "island" of moderator and a spherical moderating reflector spaced therefrom, thereby providing an annular space. An essentially unmoderated liquid fuel is continuously passed through the annular space and undergoes fission while contained therein. The reactor, because of its small size, is particularly adapted for propulsion uses, including the propulsion of aircraft. (AEC)

  4. NEUTRON SOURCES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richmond, J.L.; Wells, C.E.

    1963-01-15

    A neutron source is obtained without employing any separate beryllia receptacle, as was formerly required. The new method is safer and faster, and affords a source with both improved yield and symmetry of neutron emission. A Be container is used to hold and react with Pu. This container has a thin isolating layer that does not obstruct the desired Pu--Be reaction and obviates procedures previously employed to disassemble and remove a beryllia receptacle. (AEC)

  5. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manglos, S.H.

    1988-03-10

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are colliminated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. 1 fig.

  6. Method and apparatus for detecting neutrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perkins, R.W.; Reeder, P.L.; Wogman, N.A.; Warner, R.A.; Brite, D.W.; Richey, W.C.; Goldman, D.S.

    1997-10-21

    The instant invention is a method for making and using an apparatus for detecting neutrons. Scintillating optical fibers are fabricated by melting SiO{sub 2} with a thermal neutron capturing substance and a scintillating material in a reducing atmosphere. The melt is then drawn into fibers in an anoxic atmosphere. The fibers may then be coated and used directly in a neutron detection apparatus, or assembled into a geometrical array in a second, hydrogen-rich, scintillating material such as a polymer. Photons generated by interaction with thermal neutrons are trapped within the coated fibers and are directed to photoelectric converters. A measurable electronic signal is generated for each thermal neutron interaction within the fiber. These electronic signals are then manipulated, stored, and interpreted by normal methods to infer the quality and quantity of incident radiation. When the fibers are arranged in an array within a second scintillating material, photons generated by kinetic neutrons interacting with the second scintillating material and photons generated by thermal neutron capture within the fiber can both be directed to photoelectric converters. These electronic signals are then manipulated, stored, and interpreted by normal methods to infer the quality and quantity of incident radiation. 5 figs.

  7. Method and apparatus for detecting neutrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard W.; Reeder, Paul L.; Wogman, Ned A.; Warner, Ray A.; Brite, Daniel W.; Richey, Wayne C.; Goldman, Don S.

    1997-01-01

    The instant invention is a method for making and using an apparatus for detecting neutrons. Scintillating optical fibers are fabricated by melting SiO.sub.2 with a thermal neutron capturing substance and a scintillating material in a reducing atmosphere. The melt is then drawn into fibers in an anoxic atmosphere. The fibers may then be coated and used directly in a neutron detection apparatus, or assembled into a geometrical array in a second, hydrogen-rich, scintillating material such as a polymer. Photons generated by interaction with thermal neutrons are trapped within the coated fibers and are directed to photoelectric converters. A measurable electronic signal is generated for each thermal neutron interaction within the fiber. These electronic signals are then manipulated, stored, and interpreted by normal methods to infer the quality and quantity of incident radiation. When the fibers are arranged in an array within a second scintillating material, photons generated by kinetic neutrons interacting with the second scintillating material and photons generated by thermal neutron capture within the fiber can both be directed to photoelectric converters. These electronic signals are then manipulated, stored, and interpreted by normal methods to infer the quality and quantity of incident radiation.

  8. Capturing the Daylight Dividend

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Boyce; Claudia Hunter; Owen Howlett

    2006-04-30

    Capturing the Daylight Dividend conducted activities to build market demand for daylight as a means of improving indoor environmental quality, overcoming technological barriers to effective daylighting, and informing and assisting state and regional market transformation and resource acquisition program implementation efforts. The program clarified the benefits of daylight by examining whole building systems energy interactions between windows, lighting, heating, and air conditioning in daylit buildings, and daylighting's effect on the human circadian system and productivity. The project undertook work to advance photosensors, dimming systems, and ballasts, and provided technical training in specifying and operating daylighting controls in buildings. Future daylighting work is recommended in metric development, technology development, testing, training, education, and outreach.

  9. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurwitz, H. Jr.; Brooks, H.; Mannal, C.; Payne, J.H.; Luebke, E.A.

    1959-03-24

    A reactor of the heterogeneous, liquid cooled type is described. This reactor is comprised of a central region of a plurality of vertically disposed elongated tubes surrounded by a region of moderator material. The central region is comprised of a central core surrounded by a reflector region which is surrounded by a fast neutron absorber region, which in turn is surrounded by a slow neutron absorber region. Liquid sodium is used as the primary coolant and circulates through the core which contains the fuel elements. Control of the reactor is accomplished by varying the ability of the reflector region to reflect neutrons back into the core of the reactor. For this purpose the reflector is comprised of moderator and control elements having varying effects on reactivity, the control elements being arranged and actuated by groups to give regulation, shim, and safety control.

  10. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.W.; Young, G.J.

    1958-04-15

    A nuclear reactor which uses uranium in the form of elongated tubes as fuel elements and liquid as a coolant is described. Elongated tubular uranium bodies are vertically disposed in an efficient neutron slowing agent, such as graphite, for example, to form a lattice structure which is disposed between upper and lower coolant tanks. Fluid coolant tubes extend through the uranium bodies and communicate with the upper and lower tanks and serve to convey the coolant through the uranium body. The reactor is also provided with means for circulating the cooling fluid through the coolant tanks and coolant tubes, suitable neutron and gnmma ray shields, and control means.

  11. Particle capture device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2016-02-23

    In example embodiments, particle collection efficiency in aerosol analyzers and other particle measuring instruments is improved by a particle capture device that employs multiple collisions to decrease momentum of particles until the particles are collected (e.g., vaporized or come to rest). The particle collection device includes an aperture through which a focused particle beam enters. A collection enclosure is coupled to the aperture and has one or more internal surfaces against which particles of the focused beam collide. One or more features are employed in the collection enclosure to promote particles to collide multiple times within the enclosure, and thereby be vaporized or come to rest, rather than escape through the aperture.

  12. Fragment capture device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Lloyd R.; Cole, David L.

    2010-03-30

    A fragment capture device for use in explosive containment. The device comprises an assembly of at least two rows of bars positioned to eliminate line-of-sight trajectories between the generation point of fragments and a surrounding containment vessel or asset. The device comprises an array of at least two rows of bars, wherein each row is staggered with respect to the adjacent row, and wherein a lateral dimension of each bar and a relative position of each bar in combination provides blockage of a straight-line passage of a solid fragment through the adjacent rows of bars, wherein a generation point of the solid fragment is located within a cavity at least partially enclosed by the array of bars.

  13. Robust automated knowledge capture.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens-Adams, Susan Marie; Abbott, Robert G.; Forsythe, James Chris; Trumbo, Michael Christopher Stefan; Haass, Michael Joseph; Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes research conducted through the Sandia National Laboratories Robust Automated Knowledge Capture Laboratory Directed Research and Development project. The objective of this project was to advance scientific understanding of the influence of individual cognitive attributes on decision making. The project has developed a quantitative model known as RumRunner that has proven effective in predicting the propensity of an individual to shift strategies on the basis of task and experience related parameters. Three separate studies are described which have validated the basic RumRunner model. This work provides a basis for better understanding human decision making in high consequent national security applications, and in particular, the individual characteristics that underlie adaptive thinking.

  14. Neutronic reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carleton, John T.

    1977-01-25

    A graphite-moderated nuclear reactor includes channels between blocks of graphite and also includes spacer blocks between adjacent channeled blocks with an axis of extension normal to that of the axis of elongation of the channeled blocks to minimize changes in the physical properties of the graphite as a result of prolonged neutron bombardment.

  15. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, H.L.

    1958-10-01

    The design of control rods for nuclear reactors are described. In this design the control rod consists essentially of an elongated member constructed in part of a neutron absorbing material and having tube means extending therethrough for conducting a liquid to cool the rod when in use.

  16. Methods for absorbing neutrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guillen, Donna P.; Longhurst, Glen R.; Porter, Douglas L.; Parry, James R.

    2012-07-24

    A conduction cooled neutron absorber may include a metal matrix composite that comprises a metal having a thermal neutron cross-section of at least about 50 barns and a metal having a thermal conductivity of at least about 1 W/cmK. Apparatus for providing a neutron flux having a high fast-to-thermal neutron ratio may include a source of neutrons that produces fast neutrons and thermal neutrons. A neutron absorber positioned adjacent the neutron source absorbs at least some of the thermal neutrons so that a region adjacent the neutron absorber has a fast-to-thermal neutron ratio of at least about 15. A coolant in thermal contact with the neutron absorber removes heat from the neutron absorber.

  17. Temperature dependence of carrier capture by defects in gallium arsenide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wampler, William R.; Modine, Normand A.

    2015-08-01

    This report examines the temperature dependence of the capture rate of carriers by defects in gallium arsenide and compares two previously published theoretical treatments of this based on multi phonon emission (MPE). The objective is to reduce uncertainty in atomistic simulations of gain degradation in III-V HBTs from neutron irradiation. A major source of uncertainty in those simulations is poor knowledge of carrier capture rates, whose values can differ by several orders of magnitude between various defect types. Most of this variation is due to different dependence on temperature, which is closely related to the relaxation of the defect structure that occurs as a result of the change in charge state of the defect. The uncertainty in capture rate can therefore be greatly reduced by better knowledge of the defect relaxation.

  18. Theory of Neutron Chain Reactions: Extracts from Volume I, Diffusion and Slowing Down of Neutrons: Chapter I. Elementary Theory of Neutron Diffusion. Chapter II. Second Order Diffusion Theory. Chapter III. Slowing Down of Neutrons

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Weinberg, Alvin M.; Noderer, L. C.

    1951-05-15

    The large scale release of nuclear energy in a uranium fission chain reaction involves two essentially distinct physical phenomena. On the one hand there are the individual nuclear processes such as fission, neutron capture, and neutron scattering. These are essentially quantum mechanical in character, and their theory is non-classical. On the other hand, there is the process of diffusion -- in particular, diffusion of neutrons, which is of fundamental importance in a nuclear chain reaction. This process is classical; insofar as the theory of the nuclear chain reaction depends on the theory of neutron diffusion, the mathematical study of chain reactions is an application of classical, not quantum mechanical, techniques.

  19. Recent activities for ?-decay half-lives and ?-delayed neutron emission of very neutron-rich isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillmann, Iris; Abriola, Daniel; Singh, Balraj

    2014-05-02

    Beta-delayed neutron (?n) emitters play an important, two-fold role in the stellar nucleosynthesis of heavy elements in the 'rapid neutron-capture process' (r process). On one hand they lead to a detour of the material ?-decaying back to stability. On the other hand, the released neutrons increase the neutron-to-seed ratio, and are re-captured during the freeze-out phase and thus influence the final solar r-abundance curve. A large fraction of the isotopes inside the r-process reaction path are not yet experimentally accessible and are located in the (experimental) 'Terra Incognita'. With the next generation of fragmentation and ISOL facilities presently being built or already in operation, one of the main motivation of all projects is the investigation of these very neutron-rich isotopes. A short overview of one of the planned programs to measure ?n-emitters at the limits of the presently know isotopes, the BRIKEN campaign (Beta delayed neutron emission measurements at RIKEN) will be given. Presently, about 600 ?-delayed one-neutron emitters are accessible, but only for a third of them experimental data are available. Reaching more neutron-rich isotopes means also that multiple neutron-emission becomes the dominant decay mechanism. About 460 ?-delayed two-, three-or four-neutron emitters are identified up to now but for only 30 of them experimental data about the neutron branching ratios are available, most of them in the light mass region below A=30. The International Atomic and Energy Agency (IAEA) has identified the urgency and picked up this topic recently in a 'Coordinated Research Project' on a 'Reference Database for Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission Data'. This project will review, compile, and evaluate the existing data for neutron-branching ratios and half-lives of ?-delayed neutron emitters and help to ensure a reliable database for the future discoveries of new isotopes and help to constrain astrophysical and theoretical models.

  20. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, James L.

    1992-01-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources.

  1. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, J.L.

    1992-12-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. 2 figs.

  2. Capturing the Government Tax Base

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Y , M A D E N V E R , M A Y 5 , 2 0 1 5 CAPTURING THE GOVERNMENT TAX BASE CAPTURING TAX INCENTIVES * Support for tribal government services * Fire protection, roads, environmental, water, security * Property tax, Sales tax, Possessory interest * "Pickle Rule" and tribal governments, ITC * Value of tax incentives to project * ITC/PTC + Accelerated Depreciation can be more than 50% CAPTURING PROPERTY TAX * Definitions * Personal Property, fixed & mobile assets * Possessory Interest *

  3. Resource capture by single leaves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, S.P.

    1992-05-01

    Leaves show a variety of strategies for maximizing CO{sub 2} and light capture. These are more meaningfully explained if they are considered in the context of maximizing capture relative to the utilization of water, nutrients and carbohydrates reserves. There is considerable variation between crops in their efficiency of CO{sub 2} and light capture at the leaf level. Understanding of these mechanisms indicate some ways in which efficiency of resource capture could be level cannot be meaningfully considered without simultaneous understanding of implications at the canopy level. 36 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Accelerators for Cancer Therapy

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Lennox, Arlene J.

    2000-05-30

    The vast majority of radiation treatments for cancerous tumors are given using electron linacs that provide both electrons and photons at several energies. Design and construction of these linacs are based on mature technology that is rapidly becoming more and more standardized and sophisticated. The use of hadrons such as neutrons, protons, alphas, or carbon, oxygen and neon ions is relatively new. Accelerators for hadron therapy are far from standardized, but the use of hadron therapy as an alternative to conventional radiation has led to significant improvements and refinements in conventional treatment techniques. This paper presents the rationale for radiation therapy, describes the accelerators used in conventional and hadron therapy, and outlines the issues that must still be resolved in the emerging field of hadron therapy.

  5. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vernon, H.C.

    1959-01-13

    A neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, fluid cooled tvpe is described. The reactor is comprised of a pressure vessel containing the moderator and a plurality of vertically disposed channels extending in spaced relationship through the moderator. Fissionable fuel material is placed within the channels in spaced relationship thereto to permit circulation of the coolant fluid. Separate means are provided for cooling the moderator and for circulating a fluid coolant thru the channel elements to cool the fuel material.

  6. Carbon Capture and Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedmann, S

    2007-10-03

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is the long-term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. This includes a range of approaches including soil carbon sequestration (e.g., through no-till farming), terrestrial biomass sequestration (e.g., through planting forests), direct ocean injection of CO{sub 2} either onto the deep seafloor or into the intermediate depths, injection into deep geological formations, or even direct conversion of CO{sub 2} to carbonate minerals. Some of these approaches are considered geoengineering (see the appropriate chapter herein). All are considered in the 2005 special report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 2005). Of the range of options available, geological carbon sequestration (GCS) appears to be the most actionable and economic option for major greenhouse gas reduction in the next 10-30 years. The basis for this interest includes several factors: (1) The potential capacities are large based on initial estimates. Formal estimates for global storage potential vary substantially, but are likely to be between 800 and 3300 Gt of C (3000 and 10,000 Gt of CO{sub 2}), with significant capacity located reasonably near large point sources of the CO{sub 2}. (2) GCS can begin operations with demonstrated technology. Carbon dioxide has been separated from large point sources for nearly 100 years, and has been injected underground for over 30 years (below). (3) Testing of GCS at intermediate scale is feasible. In the US, Canada, and many industrial countries, large CO{sub 2} sources like power plants and refineries lie near prospective storage sites. These plants could be retrofit today and injection begun (while bearing in mind scientific uncertainties and unknowns). Indeed, some have, and three projects described here provide a great deal of information on the operational needs and field implementation of CCS. Part of this interest comes from several

  7. SHARP Neutronics Expanded

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The SHARP neutronics module, PROTEUS, includes neutron and gamma transport solvers and cross-section processing tools as well as the capability for depletion and fuel cycle analysis.

  8. NEUTRON SOURCE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reardon, W.A.; Lennox, D.H.; Nobles, R.G.

    1959-01-13

    A neutron source of the antimony--beryllium type is presented. The source is comprised of a solid mass of beryllium having a cylindrical recess extending therein and a cylinder containing antimony-124 slidably disposed within the cylindrical recess. The antimony cylinder is encased in aluminum. A berylliunn plug is removably inserted in the open end of the cylindrical recess to completely enclose the antimony cylinder in bsryllium. The plug and antimony cylinder are each provided with a stud on their upper ends to facilitate handling remotely.

  9. NEUTRON COUNTER

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Curtis, C.D.; Carlson, R.L.; Tubinis, M.P.

    1958-07-29

    An ionization chamber instrument is described for cylindrical electrodes with an ionizing gag filling the channber. The inner electrode is held in place by a hermetic insulating seal at one end of the outer electrode, the other end of the outer electrode being closed by a gas filling tube. The outer surface of the inner electrode is coated with an active material which is responsive to neutron bombardment, such as uranium235 or boron-10, to produce ionizing radiations in the gas. The transverse cross sectional area of the inner electrode is small in relation to that of the channber whereby substantially all of the radiations are directed toward the outer electrode.

  10. Novel Materials and Devices for Solid-State Neutron Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Pfeifer, Kent B.

    2015-11-01

    There is a need in many fields, such as nuclear medicine, non-proliferation, energy exploration, national security, homeland security, nuclear energy, etc, for miniature, thermal neutron detectors. Until recently, thermal neutron detection has required physically large devices to provide sufficient neutron interaction and transduction signal. Miniaturization would allow broader use in the fields just mentioned and open up other applications potentially. Recent research shows promise in creating smaller neutron detectors through the combination of high-neutron-cross-section converter materials and solid-state devices. Yet, till recently it is difficult to measure low neutron fluxes by solidstate means given the need for optimized converter materials (purity, chemical composition and thickness) and a lack of designs capable of efficient transduction of the neutron conversion products (x-rays, electrons, gamma rays). Gadolinium-based semiconductor heterojunctions have detected electrons produced by Gd-neutron reactions but only at high neutron fluxes. One of the main limitations to this type of approach is the use of thin converter layers and the inability to utilize all the conversion products. In this LDRD we have optimized the converter material thickness and chemical composition to improve capture of conversion electrons and have detected thermal neutrons with high fidelity at low flux. We are also examining different semiconductor materials and converter materials to attempt to capture a greater percentage of the conversion electrons, both low and higher energy varieties. We have studied detector size and bias scaling, and cross-sensitivity to xrays and shown that we can detect low fluxes of thermal neutrons in less than 30 minutes with high selectivity by our approach. We are currently studying improvements in performance with direct placement of the Gd converter on the detector. The advancement of sensitive, miniature neutron detectors will have benefits in

  11. Radiative capture reactions in astrophysics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brune, Carl R.; Davids, Barry

    2015-08-07

    Here, the radiative capture reactions of greatest importance in nuclear astrophysics are identified and placed in their stellar contexts. Recent experimental efforts to estimate their thermally averaged rates are surveyed.

  12. HAWC Observatory captures first image

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HAWC Observatory captures first image HAWC Observatory captures first image The facility is designed to detect cosmic rays and the highest energy gamma rays ever observed from astrophysical sources. April 30, 2013 The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is under construction. The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is under construction. HAWC is under construction inside the Parque Nacional Pico de Orizaba, a Mexican national park. An international team of researchers,

  13. Toward transformational carbon capture systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, David C.; Litynski, John T.; Brickett, Lynn A.; Morreale, Bryan D.

    2015-10-28

    This paper will briefly review the history and current state of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) research and development and describe the technical barriers to carbon capture. it will argue forcefully for a new approach to R&D, which leverages both simulation and physical systems at the laboratory and pilot scales to more rapidly move the best technoogies forward, prune less advantageous approaches, and simultaneously develop materials and processes.

  14. Nuclear Astrophysics and Neutron Cross Section Measurements Using the ORELA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winters, R. R.

    2000-08-25

    This is the final report for a research program which has been continuously supported by the AEC, ERDA, or USDOE since 1973. The neutron total and capture cross sections for n + {sup 88}Sr have been measured over the neutron energy range 100 eV to 1 MeV. The report briefly summaries our results and the importance of this work for nucleosynthesis and the optical model.

  15. 2010 Review of neutron and non-neutron nuclear data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden, N.E.

    2011-07-01

    The results of a review and evaluation of neutron and non-neutron nuclear data published in the scientific literature over the past three years are presented. The status of new chemical elements is examined. Ten elements have had their atomic weight and uncertainty replaced by interval values of upper and lower bounds. Data on revised values for the isotopic composition of the elements are reviewed and new recommended values are presented for germanium. Radioactive half-lives are reviewed and latest values presented which include measurements on nuclides of interest and very long-lived nuclides such as double beta decay, double electron capture, long-lived alpha decay, and long-lived beta decay. The latest information and the status on the evaluation of atomic masses are discussed. Data from new measurements on the very heavy elements (trans-meitnerium elements) are discussed and tabulated. Data on various recent neutron cross-section and resonance integral measurements are also discussed and the latest measurements are tabulated in both cases. The JENDL-4.0 and ENDF/B-VII.1 nuclear data libraries are discussed. A new initiative on the existence and importance of isotopes is presented. (authors)

  16. High-power liquid-lithium jet target for neutron production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G.; Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Berkovits, D.; Eliyahu, I.; Hazenshprung, N.; Mardor, I.; Nagler, A.; Shimel, G.; Silverman, I.; Paul, M.; Friedman, M.; Tessler, M.

    2013-12-15

    A compact liquid-lithium target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at the Soreq Nuclear Research Center. The lithium target, to be bombarded by the high-intensity proton beam of the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), will constitute an intense source of neutrons produced by the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction for nuclear astrophysics research and as a pilot setup for accelerator-based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. The liquid-lithium jet target acts both as neutron-producing target and beam dump by removing the beam thermal power (>5 kW, >1 MW/cm{sup 3}) with fast transport. The target was designed based on a thermal model, accompanied by a detailed calculation of the {sup 7}Li(p,n) neutron yield, energy distribution, and angular distribution. Liquid lithium is circulated through the target loop at ∼200 °C and generates a stable 1.5 mm-thick film flowing at a velocity up to 7 m/s onto a concave supporting wall. Electron beam irradiation demonstrated that the liquid-lithium target can dissipate electron power areal densities of >4 kW/cm{sup 2} and volume power density of ∼2 MW/cm{sup 3} at a lithium flow of ∼4 m/s while maintaining stable temperature and vacuum conditions. The LiLiT setup is presently in online commissioning stage for high-intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91–2.5 MeV, 1–2 mA) at SARAF.

  17. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stewart, H.B.

    1958-12-23

    A nuclear reactor of the type speclfically designed for the irradiation of materials is discussed. In this design a central cyllndrical core of moderating material ls surrounded by an active portlon comprlsed of an annular tank contalning fissionable material immersed ln a liquid moderator. The active portion ls ln turn surrounded by a reflector, and a well ls provided in the center of the core to accommodate the materlals to be irradiated. The over-all dimensions of the core ln at least one plane are equal to or greater than twice the effective slowing down length and equal to or less than twlce the effective diffuslon length for neutrons in the core materials.

  18. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

    1958-10-14

    A method is presented for loading and unloading rod type fuel elements of a neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, solld moderator, liquid cooled type. In the embodiment illustrated, the fuel rods are disposed in vertical coolant channels in the reactor core. The fuel rods are loaded and unloaded through the upper openings of the channels which are immersed in the coolant liquid, such as water. Unloading is accomplished by means of a coffer dam assembly having an outer sleeve which is placed in sealing relation around the upper opening. A radiation shield sleeve is disposed in and reciprocable through the coffer dam sleeve. A fuel rod engaging member operates through the axial bore in the radiation shield sleeve to withdraw the fuel rod from its position in the reactor coolant channel into the shield, the shield snd rod then being removed. Loading is accomplished in the reverse procedure.

  19. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, James L.

    1992-01-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. One layer of each set of bilayers consist of titanium, and the second layer of each set of bilayers consist of an alloy of nickel with carbon interstitially present in the nickel alloy.

  20. Measurement of cross sections for inelastic cold-neutron scattering in metals and polymers by the method of (n, {gamma}) analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arzumanov, S. S.; Bondarenko, L. N.; Geltenbort, P.; Morozov, V. I.; Panin, Yu. N.; Chernyavsky, S. M.

    2008-11-15

    The results obtained by measuring the cross sections for the inelastic scattering of very cold neutrons for a number of metals and polymers by the method of a neutron-irradiation analysis are presented. The method is based on simultaneously measuring events of inelastic scattering and neutron capture in the sample under investigation via recording gamma radiation with a semiconductor germanium detector. Neutron capture by a nucleus of the sample is accompanied by the prompt radiation of gamma rays having a known spectrum. Upon inelastic scattering, a neutron acquires thermal energy. Upon leaving the sample, this neutron is absorbed in a special converter that contains the isotope {sup 10}B. The capture of the neutron by a {sup 10}B nucleus is followed by the emission of a 477-keV gamma ray. The probabilities of capture and inelastic scattering are proportional to the respective neutron-interaction cross sections, and the ratio of the recorded detector counts corresponding to events of the two types does not depend on the spectrum of the incident flux of very cold neutrons or on the trajectory of neutron motion in the sample. The sought inelastic-scattering cross section at a fixed sample temperature is calculated by using this ratio and the known cross section for neutron capture by the sample isotope having a known gamma-radiation spectrum.

  1. Porphyrin Based neuton capture agents for cancer therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vicente, Maria Da; Shetty, Shankar Jayaram; Jaquinod, Laurent; Smith, Kevin M.

    2006-06-27

    The invention describes the synthesis of a panel of novel carbon-carbon linked carboranyl-containing 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrins bearing 25–44% boron by weight. In certain embodiments, a phenyl porphyrin compound has a carboranyl group attached to the phenyl group by a carbon-carbon linkage, wherein the phenyl group corresponds to the following formula embedded image
    where R7 through R11 are hydrogen, a carboranyl group, or are selected from the group consisting of hydroxyl, NMe3+, PMePh2+, PO(OH)2, SO3H, COOH, and NH2. In this embodiment, the carboranyl group is attached to the phenyl group by a carbon-carbon linkage, either one or two of R7 through R11 are other than hydrogen; and the phenyl porphyrin compound contains at least one phenyl group having at least one of said carboranyl groups.

  2. Porphyrin Based neuton capture agents for cancer therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vicente, Maria Da; Shetty, Shankar Jayaram; Jaquinod, Laurent; Smith, Kevin M.

    2006-06-27

    The invention describes the synthesis of a panel of novel carbon-carbon linked carboranyl-containing 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrins bearing 2544% boron by weight. In certain embodiments, a phenyl porphyrin compound has a carboranyl group attached to the phenyl group by a carbon-carbon linkage, wherein the phenyl group corresponds to the following formula embedded image
    where R7 through R11 are hydrogen, a carboranyl group, or are selected from the group consisting of hydroxyl, NMe3+, PMePh2+, PO(OH)2, SO3H, COOH, and NH2. In this embodiment, the carboranyl group is attached to the phenyl group by a carbon-carbon linkage, either one or two of R7 through R11 are other than hydrogen; and the phenyl porphyrin compound contains at least one phenyl group having at least one of said carboranyl groups.

  3. NEUTRON REACTOR HAVING A Xe$sup 135$ SHIELD

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stanton, H.E.

    1957-10-29

    Shielding for reactors of the type in which the fuel is a chain reacting liquid composition comprised essentially of a slurry of fissionable and fertile material suspended in a liquid moderator is discussed. The neutron reflector comprises a tank containing heavy water surrounding the reactor, a shield tank surrounding the reflector, a gamma ray shield surrounding said shield tank, and a means for conveying gaseous fission products, particularly Xe/sup 135/, from the reactor chamber to the shield tank, thereby serving as a neutron shield by capturing the thermalized neutrons that leak outwardly from the shield tank.

  4. Comparison of MCNP6 and experimental results for neutron counts, Rossi-{alpha}, and Feynman-{alpha} distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.; Sadovich, S.; Kiyavitskaya, H.; Bournos, V.; Fokov, Y.; Routkovskaya, C.

    2013-07-01

    MCNP6, the general-purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle code, has the capability to perform time-dependent calculations by tracking the time interval between successive events of the neutron random walk. In fixed-source calculations for a subcritical assembly, the zero time value is assigned at the moment the neutron is emitted by the external neutron source. The PTRAC and F8 cards of MCNP allow to tally the time when a neutron is captured by {sup 3}He(n, p) reactions in the neutron detector. From this information, it is possible to build three different time distributions: neutron counts, Rossi-{alpha}, and Feynman-{alpha}. The neutron counts time distribution represents the number of neutrons captured as a function of time. The Rossi-a distribution represents the number of neutron pairs captured as a function of the time interval between two capture events. The Feynman-a distribution represents the variance-to-mean ratio, minus one, of the neutron counts array as a function of a fixed time interval. The MCNP6 results for these three time distributions have been compared with the experimental data of the YALINA Thermal facility and have been found to be in quite good agreement. (authors)

  5. Adaptive capture of expert behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.D.; Barrett, C.L.; Hand, U.; Gordon, R.C.

    1994-08-01

    The authors smoothed and captured a set of expert rules with adaptive networks. The motivation for doing this is discussed. (1) Smoothing leads to stabler control actions. (2) For some sets of rules, the evaluation of the rules can be sped up. This is important in large-scale simulations where many intelligent elements are present. (3) Variability of the intelligent elements can be achieved by adjusting the weights in an adaptive network. (4) After capture has occurred, the weights can be adjusted based on performance criteria. The authors thus have the capability of learning a new set of rules that lead to better performance. The set of rules the authors chose to capture were based on a set of threat determining rules for tank commanders. The approach in this paper: (1) They smoothed the rules. The rule set was converted into a simple set of arithmetic statements. Continuous, non-binary inputs, are now permitted. (2) An operational measure of capturability was developed. (3) They chose four candidate networks for the rule set capture: (a) multi-linear network, (b) adaptive partial least squares, (c) connectionist normalized local spline (CNLS) network, and (d) CNLS net with a PLS preprocessor. These networks were able to capture the rule set to within a few percent. For the simple tank rule set, the multi-linear network performed the best. When the rules were modified to include more nonlinear behavior, CNLS net performed better than the other three nets which made linear assumptions. (4) The networks were tested for robustness to input noise. Noise levels of plus or minus 10% had no real effect on the network performance. Noise levels in the plus or minus 30% range degraded performance by a factor of two. Some performance enhancement occurred when the networks were trained with noisy data. (5) The scaling of the evaluation time was calculated. (6) Human variation can be mimicked in all the networks by perturbing the weights.

  6. Carbon Capture | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon Capture Carbon Capture This GIF shows how CO2 emissions vary across the United States. Each bar represents a 50x50 kilometer grid. Bar height is proportional to total CO2 emissions and bar color represents the type of CO2 emissions. Red bars represent proportionately more CO2 emissions from electricity generation (coal, gas and oil). Green bars represent CO2 emissions by other sources (such as ethanol production, iron-steel production and cement manufacture). Yellow/orange bars signify a

  7. Neutron Beam Effects on Spin-Exchange-Polarized 3He

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, M.; Babcock, E.; Anderson, K. H.; Barron-Palos, L.; Becker, M.; Boag, S.; Chen, W. C.; Chupp, T. E.; Danagoulian, A.; Gentile, T. R.; Klein, A.; Penttila, S.; Petoukhov, A.; Soldner, T.; Tardiff, E. R.; Walker, T. G.; Wilburn, W. S.

    2008-08-01

    We have observed depolarization effects when high intensity cold neutron beams are incident on alkali-metal spin-exchange-polarized {sup 3}He cells used as neutron spin filters. This was first observed as a reduction of the maximum attainable {sup 3}He polarization and was attributed to a decrease of alkali-metal polarization, which led us to directly measure alkali-metal polarization and spin relaxation over a range of neutron fluxes at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and Institute Laue-Langevin. The data reveal a new alkali-metal spin-relaxation mechanism that approximately scales as {radical}{phi}{sub n}, where {phi}{sub n} is the neutron capture-flux density incident on the cell. This is consistent with an effect proportional to the concentration of electron-ion pairs but is much larger than expected from earlier work.

  8. Gamma-Free Neutron Detector Based upon Lithium Phosphate Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Wallace

    2007-08-28

    A gamma-free neutron-sensitive scintillator is needed to enhance radiaition sensing and detection for nonproliferation applications. Such a scintillator would allow very large detectors to be placed at the perimeter of spent-fuel storage facilities at commercial nuclear power plants, so that any movement of spontaneously emitted neutrons from spent nuclear fuel or weapons grade plutonium would be noted in real-time. This task is to demonstrate that the technology for manufacturing large panels of fluor-doped plastic containing lithium-6 phosphate nanoparticles can be achieved. In order to detect neutrons, the nanoparticles must be sufficiently small so that the plastic remains transparent. In this way, the triton and alpha particles generated by the capture of the neutron will result in a photon burst that can be coupled to a wavelength shifting fiber (WLS) producing an optical signal of about ten nanoseconds duration signaling the presence of a neutron emitting source.

  9. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manglos, Stephen H.

    1989-06-06

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are collimnated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. The computer solves the following equation in the analysis: ##EQU1## where: N(x).DELTA.x=the number of neutron interactions measured between a position x and x+.DELTA.x, A.sub.i (E.sub.i).DELTA.E.sub.i =the number of incident neutrons with energy between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i, and C=C(E.sub.i)=N .sigma.(E.sub.i) where N=the number density of absorbing atoms in the position sensitive counter means and .sigma. (E.sub.i)=the average cross section of the absorbing interaction between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i.

  10. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ohlinger, L.A.; Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.M.; Young, G.J.

    1958-09-01

    This patent relates to neutronic reactors of the heterogeneous water cooled type, and in particular to a fuel element charging and discharging means therefor. In the embodiment illustrated the reactor contains horizontal, parallel coolant tubes in which the fuel elements are disposed. A loading cart containing a magnzine for holding a plurality of fuel elements operates along the face of the reactor at the inlet ends of the coolant tubes. The loading cart is equipped with a ram device for feeding fuel elements from the magazine through the inlot ends of the coolant tubes. Operating along the face adjacent the discharge ends of the tubes there is provided another cart means adapted to receive irradiated fuel elements as they are forced out of the discharge ends of the coolant tubes by the incoming new fuel elements. This cart is equipped with a tank coataining a coolant, such as water, into which the fuel elements fall, and a hydraulically operated plunger to hold the end of the fuel element being discharged. This inveation provides an apparatus whereby the fuel elements may be loaded into the reactor, irradiated therein, and unloaded from the reactor without stopping the fiow of the coolant and without danger to the operating personnel.

  11. Neutron streak camera

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, C.L.

    1983-09-13

    Disclosed is an apparatus for improved sensitivity and time resolution of a neutron measurement. The detector is provided with an electrode assembly having a neutron sensitive cathode which emits relatively low energy secondary electrons. The neutron sensitive cathode has a large surface area which provides increased sensitivity by intercepting a greater number of neutrons. The cathode is also curved to compensate for differences in transit time of the neutrons emanating from the point source. The slower speeds of the secondary electrons emitted from a certain portion of the cathode are matched to the transit times of the neutrons impinging thereupon. 4 figs.

  12. Neutron streak camera

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Ching L.

    1983-09-13

    Apparatus for improved sensitivity and time resolution of a neutron measurement. The detector is provided with an electrode assembly having a neutron sensitive cathode which emits relatively low energy secondary electrons. The neutron sensitive cathode has a large surface area which provides increased sensitivity by intercepting a greater number of neutrons. The cathode is also curved to compensate for differences in transit time of the neutrons emanating from the point source. The slower speeds of the secondary electrons emitted from a certain portion of the cathode are matched to the transit times of the neutrons impinging thereupon.

  13. Neutron streak camera

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, C.L.

    1981-05-14

    Apparatus for improved sensitivity and time resolution of a neutron measurement. The detector is provided with an electrode assembly having a neutron sensitive cathode which emits relatively low energy secondary electrons. The neutron sensitive cathode has a large surface area which provides increased sensitivity by intercepting a greater number of neutrons. The cathode is also curved to compensate for differences in transit time of the neutrons emanating from the point source. The slower speeds of the secondary electrons emitted from a certain portion of the cathode are matched to the transit times of the neutrons impinging thereupon.

  14. Organic metal neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, M.A.; Ginley, D.S.

    1984-11-21

    A device for detection of neutrons comprises: as an active neutron sensing element, a conductive organic polymer having an electrical conductivity and a cross-section for said neutrons whereby a detectable change in said conductivity is caused by impingement of said neutrons on the conductive organic polymer which is responsive to a property of said polymer which is altered by impingement of said neutrons on the polymer; and means for associating a change in said alterable property with the presence of neutrons at the location of said device.

  15. Spallation Neutron Source | Neutron Science at ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The recently commissioned 11 Tesla horizontal field magnet at GP-SANS will enable advanced neutron scattering research. Credit: Genevieve MartinORNL. 11 Tesla Magnet Commissioned ...

  16. Dose equivalent neutron dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffith, Richard V.; Hankins, Dale E.; Tomasino, Luigi; Gomaa, Mohamed A. M.

    1983-01-01

    A neutron dosimeter is disclosed which provides a single measurements indicating the amount of potential biological damage resulting from the neutron exposure of the wearer, for a wide range of neutron energies. The dosimeter includes a detecting sheet of track etch detecting material such as a carbonate plastic, for detecting higher energy neutrons, and a radiator layer containing conversion material such as .sup.6 Li and .sup.10 B lying adjacent to the detecting sheet for converting moderate energy neutrons to alpha particles that produce tracks in the adjacent detecting sheet. The density of conversion material in the radiator layer is of an amount which is chosen so that the density of tracks produced in the detecting sheet is proportional to the biological damage done by neutrons, regardless of whether the tracks are produced as the result of moderate energy neutrons striking the radiator layer or as the result of higher energy neutrons striking the sheet of track etch material.

  17. Pulsed-neutron monochromator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mook, Jr., Herbert A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1985-01-01

    In one aspect, the invention is an improved pulsed-neutron monochromator of the vibrated-crystal type. The monochromator is designed to provide neutron pulses which are characterized both by short duration and high density. A row of neutron-reflecting crystals is disposed in a neutron beam to reflect neutrons onto a common target. The crystals in the row define progressively larger neutron-scattering angles and are vibrated sequentially in descending order with respect to the size of their scattering angles, thus generating neutron pulses which arrive simultaneously at the target. Transducers are coupled to one end of the crystals to vibrate them in an essentially non-resonant mode. The transducers propagate transverse waves in the crystal which progress longitudinally therein. The wave are absorbed at the undriven ends of the crystals by damping material mounted thereon. In another aspect, the invention is a method for generating neutron pulses characterized by high intensity and short duration.

  18. Ultrafast neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, C.L.

    1985-06-19

    A neutron detector of very high temporal resolution is described. It may be used to measure distributions of neutrons produced by fusion reactions that persist for times as short as about 50 picoseconds.

  19. Neutron dose equivalent meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olsher, Richard H.; Hsu, Hsiao-Hua; Casson, William H.; Vasilik, Dennis G.; Kleck, Jeffrey H.; Beverding, Anthony

    1996-01-01

    A neutron dose equivalent detector for measuring neutron dose capable of accurately responding to neutron energies according to published fluence to dose curves. The neutron dose equivalent meter has an inner sphere of polyethylene, with a middle shell overlying the inner sphere, the middle shell comprising RTV.RTM. silicone (organosiloxane) loaded with boron. An outer shell overlies the middle shell and comprises polyethylene loaded with tungsten. The neutron dose equivalent meter defines a channel through the outer shell, the middle shell, and the inner sphere for accepting a neutron counter tube. The outer shell is loaded with tungsten to provide neutron generation, increasing the neutron dose equivalent meter's response sensitivity above 8 MeV.

  20. Pulsed-neutron monochromator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mook, H.A. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    In one aspect, the invention is an improved pulsed-neutron monochromator of the vibrated-crystal type. The monochromator is designed to provide neutron pulses which are characterized both by short duration and high density. A row of neutron-reflecting crystals is disposed in a neutron beam to reflect neutrons onto a common target. The crystals in the row define progressively larger neutron-scattering angles and are vibrated sequentially in descending order with respect to the size of their scattering angles, thus generating neutron pulses which arrive simultaneously at the target. Transducers are coupled to one end of the crystals to vibrate them in an essentially non-resonant mode. The transducers propagate transverse waves in the crystal which progress longitudinally therein. The waves are absorbed at the undriven ends of the crystals by damping material mounted thereon. In another aspect, the invention is a method for generating neutron pulses characterized by high intensity and short duration.

  1. ULTRASONIC NEUTRON DOSIMETER

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Truell, R.; de Klerk, J.; Levy, P.W.

    1960-02-23

    A neutron dosimeter is described which utilizes ultrasonic waves in the megacycle region for determination of the extent of neutron damage in a borosilicate glass through ultrasonic wave velocity and attenuation measurements before and after damage.

  2. Fusion of neutron-rich oxygen isotopes in the crust of accreting neutron stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horowitz, C. J.; Dussan, H.; Berry, D. K.

    2008-04-15

    Fusion reactions in the crust of an accreting neutron star are an important source of heat, and the depth at which these reactions occur is important for determining the temperature profile of the star. Fusion reactions depend strongly on the nuclear charge Z. Nuclei with Z{<=}6 can fuse at low densities in a liquid ocean. However, nuclei with Z=8 or 10 may not burn until higher densities where the crust is solid and electron capture has made the nuclei neutron rich. We calculate the S factor for fusion reactions of neutron rich nuclei including {sup 24}O+{sup 24}O and {sup 28}Ne+{sup 28}Ne. We use a simple barrier penetration model. The S factor could be further enhanced by dynamical effects involving the neutron rich skin. This possible enhancement in S should be studied in the laboratory with neutron rich radioactive beams. We model the structure of the crust with molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the crust of accreting neutron stars may contain micro-crystals or regions of phase separation. Nevertheless, the screening factors that we determine for the enhancement of the rate of thermonuclear reactions are insensitive to these features. Finally, we calculate the rate of thermonuclear {sup 24}O+{sup 24}O fusion and find that {sup 24}O should burn at densities near 10{sup 11} g/cm{sup 3}. The energy released from this and similar reactions may be important for the temperature profile of the star.

  3. Intense fusion neutron sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-04-15

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 10{sup 15}-10{sup 21} neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 10{sup 20} neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the

  4. Neutrons - 88-Inch Cyclotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutrons Neutron beams are available at the 88-Inch Cyclotron. Available energies range of from 8 to 30 MeV, with fluxes of up to 1E8 neutrons/cm^2/sec. For more information, please contact Mike Johnson via e-mail at MBJohnson@lbl.gov, or by phone at at (510) 486-4389.

  5. Prototype Neutron Energy Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Mitchell, Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Richard Maurer, Ronald Wolff

    2010-06-16

    The project goals are: (1) Use three to five pressurized helium tubes with varying polyethylene moderators to build a neutron energy spectrometer that is most sensitive to the incident neutron energy of interest. Neutron energies that are of particular interest are those from the fission neutrons (typically around 1-2 MeV); (2) Neutron Source Identification - Use the neutron energy 'selectivity' property as a tool to discriminate against other competing processes by which neutrons are generated (viz. Cosmic ray induced neutron production [ship effect], [a, n] reactions); (3) Determine the efficiency as a function of neutron energy (response function) of each of the detectors, and thereby obtain the composite neutron energy spectrum from the detector count rates; and (4) Far-field data characterization and effectively discerning shielded fission source. Summary of the presentation is: (1) A light weight simple form factor compact neutron energy spectrometer ready to be used in maritime missions has been built; (2) Under laboratory conditions, individual Single Neutron Source Identification is possible within 30 minutes. (3) Sources belonging to the same type of origin viz., (a, n), fission, cosmic cluster in the same place in the 2-D plot shown; and (4) Isotopes belonging to the same source origin like Cm-Be, Am-Be (a, n) or Pu-239, U-235 (fission) do have some overlap in the 2-D plot.

  6. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobs, E.L.

    1980-01-28

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5-MeV neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  7. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Eddy L.

    1981-01-01

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5 Mev neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  8. Natural materials for carbon capture.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myshakin, Evgeniy M.; Romanov, Vyacheslav N.; Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2010-11-01

    Naturally occurring clay minerals provide a distinctive material for carbon capture and carbon dioxide sequestration. Swelling clay minerals, such as the smectite variety, possess an aluminosilicate structure that is controlled by low-charge layers that readily expand to accommodate water molecules and, potentially, carbon dioxide. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated the efficacy of intercalating carbon dioxide in the interlayer of layered clays but little is known about the molecular mechanisms of the process and the extent of carbon capture as a function of clay charge and structure. A series of molecular dynamics simulations and vibrational analyses have been completed to assess the molecular interactions associated with incorporation of CO2 in the interlayer of montmorillonite clay and to help validate the models with experimental observation.

  9. Semiconductor neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Littlewood, Peter B.; Blagoev, Krastan B.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Smith, James L.; Sullivan, Clair J.; Alexandrov, Boian S.; Lashley, Jason Charles

    2011-03-08

    A neutron detector has a compound of lithium in a single crystal form as a neutron sensor element. The lithium compound, containing improved charge transport properties, is either lithium niobate or lithium tantalate. The sensor element is in direct contact with a monitor that detects an electric current. A signal proportional to the electric current is produced and is calibrated to indicate the neutrons sensed. The neutron detector is particularly useful for detecting neutrons in a radiation environment. Such radiation environment may, e.g. include gamma radiation and noise.

  10. Neutron scatter camera

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mascarenhas, Nicholas; Marleau, Peter; Brennan, James S.; Krenz, Kevin D.

    2010-06-22

    An instrument that will directly image the fast fission neutrons from a special nuclear material source has been described. This instrument can improve the signal to background compared to non imaging neutron detection techniques by a factor given by ratio of the angular resolution window to 4.pi.. In addition to being a neutron imager, this instrument will also be an excellent neutron spectrometer, and will be able to differentiate between different types of neutron sources (e.g. fission, alpha-n, cosmic ray, and D-D or D-T fusion). Moreover, the instrument is able to pinpoint the source location.

  11. Organic metal neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, Michael A.; Ginley, David S.

    1987-01-01

    A device for detecting neutrons comprises a layer of conductive polymer sandwiched between electrodes, which may be covered on each face with a neutron transmissive insulating material layer. Conventional electrodes are used for a non-imaging integrating total neutron fluence-measuring embodiment, while wire grids are used in an imaging version of the device. The change in conductivity of the polymer after exposure to a neutron flux is determined in either case to provide the desired data. Alternatively, the exposed conductive polymer layer may be treated with a chemical reagent which selectively binds to the sites altered by neutrons to produce an image of the flux detected.

  12. High energy neutron dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rai, K.S.F.

    1994-01-11

    A device for measuring dose equivalents in neutron radiation fields is described. The device includes nested symmetrical hemispheres (forming spheres) of different neutron moderating materials that allow the measurement of dose equivalents from 0.025 eV to past 1 GeV. The layers of moderating material surround a spherical neutron counter. The neutron counter is connected by an electrical cable to an electrical sensing means which interprets the signal from the neutron counter in the center of the moderating spheres. The spherical shape of the device allows for accurate measurement of dose equivalents regardless of its positioning. 2 figures.

  13. PERSONNEL NEUTRON DOSIMETER

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fitzgerald, J.J.; Detwiler, C.G. Jr.

    1960-05-24

    A description is given of a personnel neutron dosimeter capable of indicating the complete spectrum of the neutron dose received as well as the dose for each neutron energy range therein. The device consists of three sets of indium foils supported in an aluminum case. The first set consists of three foils of indium, the second set consists of a similar set of indium foils sandwiched between layers of cadmium, whereas the third set is similar to the second set but is sandwiched between layers of polyethylene. By analysis of all the foils the neutron spectrum and the total dose from neutrons of all energy levels can be ascertained.

  14. High energy neutron dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sun, Rai Ko S.F. (Albany, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring dose equivalents in neutron radiation fields. The device includes nested symmetrical hemispheres (forming spheres) of different neutron moderating materials that allow the measurement of dose equivalents from 0.025 eV to past 1 GeV. The layers of moderating material surround a spherical neutron counter. The neutron counter is connected by an electrical cable to an electrical sensing means which interprets the signal from the neutron counter in the center of the moderating spheres. The spherical shape of the device allows for accurate measurement of dose equivalents regardless of its positioning.

  15. Neutron activation analysis system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, M.C.; Rhodes, J.R.

    1973-12-25

    A neutron activation analysis system for monitoring a generally fluid media, such as slurries, solutions, and fluidized powders, including two separate conduit loops for circulating fluid samples within the range of radiation sources and detectors is described. Associated with the first loop is a neutron source that emits s high flux of slow and thermal neutrons. The second loop employs a fast neutron source, the flux from which is substantially free of thermal neutrons. Adjacent to both loops are gamma counters for spectrographic determination of the fluid constituents. Other gsmma sources and detectors are arranged across a portion of each loop for deterMining the fluid density. (Official Gazette)

  16. 2010 Neutron Review: ORNL Neutron Sciences Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bardoel, Agatha A; Counce, Deborah M; Ekkebus, Allen E; Horak, Charlie M; Nagler, Stephen E; Kszos, Lynn A

    2011-06-01

    chalcogenides), a class of materials discovered in 2008. This research is yielding new insights into the relationship between magnetism and superconductivity and has established several key features of this family of high-temperature superconducting (HTS ) materials: the maximum magnetic field at which they can function, the nature of the electrons involved in the superconductivity, the dependence of the properties upon chemical substitution, and the character of the magnetic fluctuations in the material. The results suggest that despite important differences between these materials and the HTS copper oxides, a universal mechanism may be responsible for the unconventional superconductivity. (4) Coal Sequestration Research: A New Home for Greenhouse Gases - One possibility for slowing down the increasing levels of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in the atmosphere is to capture the gas in natural underground features such as coal seams. Critical to the feasibility of this technology is determining how much CO{sub 2} can be stored, no method for which has been found - until now. (5) Accelerator Reliability Passes 92% - In December 2010, SNS set a new record for itself when the accelerator ran at 1 MW with 100% reliability. Target Performance Exceeds All Expectations - The mercury target used at SNS is the first of its kind. During the design and planning for SNS, many people were skeptical that the target would work. In 2010, it was confirmed that the target was working not only well but much better than anyone would have imagined. (6) Changing the World of Data Acquisition - Researchers at SNS are starting to benefit from event-based data analysis. Event data mode captures and stores an individual data set for every single neutron that strikes a detector - precisely when and where the neutron is detected. This technique provides numerous advantages over traditional methods. Event data mode allows researchers to process their data at the highest resolution possible with no loss of data

  17. NEUTRON DENSITY CONTROL IN A NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Young, G.J.

    1959-06-30

    The method and means for controlling the neutron density in a nuclear reactor is described. It describes the method and means for flattening the neutron density distribution curve across the reactor by spacing the absorbing control members to varying depths in the central region closer to the center than to the periphery of the active portion of the reactor to provide a smaller neutron reproduction ratio in the region wherein the members are inserted, than in the remainder of the reactor thereby increasing the over-all potential power output.

  18. 2011 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Pilot Test of Novel Electrochemical Membrane System for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Power Generation (FE0026580) Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh, FuelCell Energy, Inc. 4:00 p.m. CO2 Capture ...

  19. Realistic costs of carbon capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al Juaied, Mohammed . Belfer Center for Science and International Affiaris); Whitmore, Adam )

    2009-07-01

    There is a growing interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However there are substantial uncertainties about the costs of CCS. Costs for pre-combustion capture with compression (i.e. excluding costs of transport and storage and any revenue from EOR associated with storage) are examined in this discussion paper for First-of-a-Kind (FOAK) plant and for more mature technologies, or Nth-of-a-Kind plant (NOAK). For FOAK plant using solid fuels the levelised cost of electricity on a 2008 basis is approximately 10 cents/kWh higher with capture than for conventional plants (with a range of 8-12 cents/kWh). Costs of abatement are found typically to be approximately US$150/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$120-180/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants the additional cost of electricity with capture is approximately 2-5 cents/kWh, with costs of the range of US$35-70/tCO2 avoided. Costs of abatement with carbon capture for other fuels and technologies are also estimated for NOAK plants. The costs of abatement are calculated with reference to conventional SCPC plant for both emissions and costs of electricity. Estimates for both FOAK and NOAK are mainly based on cost data from 2008, which was at the end of a period of sustained escalation in the costs of power generation plant and other large capital projects. There are now indications of costs falling from these levels. This may reduce the costs of abatement and costs presented here may be 'peak of the market' estimates. If general cost levels return, for example, to those prevailing in 2005 to 2006 (by which time significant cost escalation had already occurred from previous levels), then costs of capture and compression for FOAK plants are expected to be US$110/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$90-135/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants costs are expected to be US$25-50/tCO2. Based on these considerations a likely representative range of costs of abatement from CCS excluding

  20. Carbon Capture and Storage, 2008

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy is researching the safe implementation of a technology called carbon sequestration, also known as carbon capture and storage, or CCS. Based on an oilfield practice, this approach stores carbon dioxide, or CO2 generated from human activities for millennia as a means to mitigate global climate change. In 2003, the Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory formed seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships to assess geologic formations suitable for storage and to determine the best approaches to implement carbon sequestration in each region. This video describes the work of these partnerships.

  1. Carbon Capture and Storage, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-03-19

    The U.S. Department of Energy is researching the safe implementation of a technology called carbon sequestration, also known as carbon capture and storage, or CCS. Based on an oilfield practice, this approach stores carbon dioxide, or CO2 generated from human activities for millennia as a means to mitigate global climate change. In 2003, the Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory formed seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships to assess geologic formations suitable for storage and to determine the best approaches to implement carbon sequestration in each region. This video describes the work of these partnerships.

  2. Neutron Resonance Spectroscopy for the Analysis of Materials and Objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borella, A.; Lampoudis, C.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Kopecky, S.; Postma, H.; Moxon, M.

    2009-12-02

    The presence of resonances in neutron induced reaction cross sections is the basis of the Neutron Resonance Capture (NRCA) and Transmission (NRTA) Analysis techniques. Since resonances can be observed at neutron energies which are specific for each nuclide, they can be used as fingerprints to identify and quantify elements in materials and objects. Both NRCA and NRTA are fully non-destructive methods which determine the bulk elemental composition, do not require any sample preparation and result in a negligible residual activation. In this text we review the technique and present an analysis procedures including one based on a more methodological approach which relies on a full Resonance Shape Analysis (RSA) and accounts directly for the neutron self-shielding, multiple scattering, Doppler broadening and instrumental resolution.

  3. Biological effectiveness of neutrons: Research needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casarett, G.W.; Braby, L.A.; Broerse, J.J.; Elkind, M.M.; Goodhead, D.T.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1994-02-01

    The goal of this report was to provide a conceptual plan for a research program that would provide a basis for determining more precisely the biological effectiveness of neutron radiation with emphasis on endpoints relevant to the protection of human health. This report presents the findings of the experts for seven particular categories of scientific information on neutron biological effectiveness. Chapter 2 examines the radiobiological mechanisms underlying the assumptions used to estimate human risk from neutrons and other radiations. Chapter 3 discusses the qualitative and quantitative models used to organize and evaluate experimental observations and to provide extrapolations where direct observations cannot be made. Chapter 4 discusses the physical principles governing the interaction of radiation with biological systems and the importance of accurate dosimetry in evaluating radiation risk and reducing the uncertainty in the biological data. Chapter 5 deals with the chemical and molecular changes underlying cellular responses and the LET dependence of these changes. Chapter 6, in turn, discusses those cellular and genetic changes which lead to mutation or neoplastic transformation. Chapters 7 and 8 examine deterministic and stochastic effects, respectively, and the data required for the prediction of such effects at different organizational levels and for the extrapolation from experimental results in animals to risks for man. Gaps and uncertainties in this data are examined relative to data required for establishing radiation protection standards for neutrons and procedures for the effective and safe use of neutron and other high-LET radiation therapy.

  4. Lujan Neutron Scattering Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    responds to radiological incident August 27, 2012 The Laboratory is investigating the inadvertent spread of Technetium 99 by employees and contractors at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center August 27, 2012-The Laboratory is investigating the inadvertent spread of Technetium 99 by employees and contractors at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), a multidisciplinary accelerator facility used for both civilian and national security research. The

  5. 2010 Neutron Review: ORNL Neutron Sciences Progress Report (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: 2010 Neutron Review: ORNL Neutron Sciences Progress Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: 2010 Neutron Review: ORNL Neutron Sciences Progress Report During 2010, the Neutron Sciences Directorate focused on producing world-class science, while supporting the needs of the scientific community. As the instrument, sample environment, and data analysis tools at High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR ) and Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have grown

  6. Fast Neutron Detection Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKigney, Edward A.; Stange, Sy

    2014-03-17

    These slides present a summary of previous work, conclusions, and anticipated schedule for the conclusion of our fast neutron detection evaluation.

  7. Neutron detection apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kopp, Manfred K.; Valentine, Kenneth H.

    1983-01-01

    An atomic fission counting apparatus used for neutron detection is provided with spirally curved electrode plates uniformly spaced apart in a circular array and coated with fissile material.

  8. Magnetization of neutron matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigdeli, M.

    2011-09-21

    In this paper, we compute magnetization of neutron matter at strong magnetic field using the lowest order constrained variational (LOCV) technique.

  9. Subsurface capture of carbon dioxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blount, Gerald; Siddal, Alvin A.; Falta, Ronald W.

    2014-07-22

    A process and apparatus of separating CO.sub.2 gas from industrial off-gas source in which the CO.sub.2 containing off-gas is introduced deep within an injection well. The CO.sub.2 gases are dissolved in the, liquid within the injection well while non-CO.sub.2 gases, typically being insoluble in water or brine, are returned to the surface. Once the CO.sub.2 saturated liquid is present within the injection well, the injection well may be used for long-term geologic storage of CO.sub.2 or the CO.sub.2 saturated liquid can be returned to the surface for capturing a purified CO.sub.2 gas.

  10. Bad data packet capture device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Dong; Gara, Alan; Heidelberger, Philip; Vranas, Pavlos

    2010-04-20

    An apparatus and method for capturing data packets for analysis on a network computing system includes a sending node and a receiving node connected by a bi-directional communication link. The sending node sends a data transmission to the receiving node on the bi-directional communication link, and the receiving node receives the data transmission and verifies the data transmission to determine valid data and invalid data and verify retransmissions of invalid data as corresponding valid data. A memory device communicates with the receiving node for storing the invalid data and the corresponding valid data. A computing node communicates with the memory device and receives and performs an analysis of the invalid data and the corresponding valid data received from the memory device.

  11. Neutron and Nuclear Science News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Recent news and events related to neutron and nuclear science at LANSCE. Neutron and Nuclear Science News Links Neutron and Nuclear Science News Media Links Profiles Events at LANSCE

  12. Sustaining knowledge in the neutron generator community and benchmarking study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrentine, Tameka C.; Kennedy, Bryan C.; Saba, Anthony W.; Turgeon, Jennifer L.; Schneider, Julia Teresa; Stubblefield, William Anthony; Baldonado, Esther

    2008-03-01

    In 2004, the Responsive Neutron Generator Product Deployment department embarked upon a partnership with the Systems Engineering and Analysis knowledge management (KM) team to develop knowledge management systems for the neutron generator (NG) community. This partnership continues today. The most recent challenge was to improve the current KM system (KMS) development approach by identifying a process that will allow staff members to capture knowledge as they learn it. This 'as-you-go' approach will lead to a sustainable KM process for the NG community. This paper presents a historical overview of NG KMSs, as well as research conducted to move toward sustainable KM.

  13. Schoenborn wins Bau Neutron Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of LANL's Bioenergy and Biome Sciences group, to receive the 2016 Bau Neutron Diffraction Award. The award recognizes exceptional research achievement in neutron...

  14. Compact neutron generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui

    2005-03-22

    A compact neutron generator has at its outer circumference a toroidal shaped plasma chamber in which a tritium (or other) plasma is generated. A RF antenna is wrapped around the plasma chamber. A plurality of tritium ion beamlets are extracted through spaced extraction apertures of a plasma electrode on the inner surface of the toroidal plasma chamber and directed inwardly toward the center of neutron generator. The beamlets pass through spaced acceleration and focusing electrodes to a neutron generating target at the center of neutron generator. The target is typically made of titanium tubing. Water is flowed through the tubing for cooling. The beam can be pulsed rapidly to achieve ultrashort neutron bursts. The target may be moved rapidly up and down so that the average power deposited on the surface of the target may be kept at a reasonable level. The neutron generator can produce fast neutrons from a T-T reaction which can be used for luggage and cargo interrogation applications. A luggage or cargo inspection system has a pulsed T-T neutron generator or source at the center, surrounded by associated gamma detectors and other components for identifying explosives or other contraband.

  15. Pocked surface neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGregor, Douglas; Klann, Raymond

    2003-04-08

    The detection efficiency, or sensitivity, of a neutron detector material such as of Si, SiC, amorphous Si, GaAs, or diamond is substantially increased by forming one or more cavities, or holes, in its surface. A neutron reactive material such as of elemental, or any compound of, .sup.10 B, .sup.6 Li, .sup.6 LiF, U, or Gd is deposited on the surface of the detector material so as to be disposed within the cavities therein. The portions of the neutron reactive material extending into the detector material substantially increase the probability of an energetic neutron reaction product in the form of a charged particle being directed into and detected by the neutron detector material.

  16. NEUTRON SHIELDING STRUCTURE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mattingly, J.T.

    1962-09-25

    A lightweight neutron shielding structure comprises a honeycomb core which is filled with a neutron absorbing powder. The honeycomb core is faced with parallel planar facing sheets to form a lightweight rigid unit. Suitable absorber powders are selected from among the following: B, B/sub 4/C, B/sub 2/O/ sub 3/, CaB/sub 6/, Li/sub 2/CO3, LiOH, LiBO/sub 2/, Li/s ub 2/O. The facing sheets are constructed of a neutron moderating material, so that fast neutrons will be moderated while traversing the facing sheets, and ultimately be absorbed by the absorber powder in the honeycomb. Beryllium is a preferred moderator material for use in the facing sheets. The advantage of the structure is that it combines the rigidity and light weight of a honeycomb construction with the neutron absorption properties of boron and lithium. (AEC)

  17. Pulsed neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robertson, deceased, J. Craig; Rowland, Mark S.

    1989-03-21

    A pulsed neutron detector and system for detecting low intensity fast neutron pulses has a body of beryllium adjacent a body of hydrogenous material the latter of which acts as a beta particle detector, scintillator, and moderator. The fast neutrons (defined as having En>1.5 MeV) react in the beryllium and the hydrogenous material to produce larger numbers of slow neutrons than would be generated in the beryllium itself and which in the beryllium generate hellium-6 which decays and yields beta particles. The beta particles reach the hydrogenous material which scintillates to yield light of intensity related to the number of fast neutrons. A photomultiplier adjacent the hydrogenous material (scintillator) senses the light emission from the scintillator. Utilization means, such as a summing device, sums the pulses from the photo-multiplier for monitoring or other purposes.

  18. Carbon Capture and Storage | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Storage Carbon Capture and Storage Through Office of Fossil Energy R&D the United States has become a world leader in carbon capture and storage science and technology. Fossil Energy Research Benefits - Carbon Capture and Storage (723.49 KB) More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - PSRP Updates 6-25-10_v2 Fossil Energy Today - Second Quarter, 2011 Fossil Energy FY 2013 Budget-in-Brief

  19. Carbon Capture Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Carbon Capture Corporation Address: 7825 Fay Avenue Place: La Jolla, California Zip: 92037 Region: Southern CA Area Sector: Carbon...

  20. How Carbon Capture Works | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    How Carbon Capture Works Nearly 70 percent of America's electricity is generated from fossil fuels like coal, oil and natural gas. And fossil fuels also account for almost...

  1. INFOGRAPHIC: Carbon Capture 101 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon Capture 101 INFOGRAPHIC: Carbon Capture 101 January 7, 2016 - 11:34am Addthis Carbon capture is an important part of the Energy Department's Fossil Energy research and development efforts, but it can be hard to understand. This infographic breaks it down for you. | Infographic by <a href="/node/1332956">Carly Wilkins</a>, Energy Department. Carbon capture is an important part of the Energy Department's Fossil Energy research and development efforts, but it can be

  2. Gadolinia nanofibers as a multimodal bioimaging and potential radiation therapy agent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grishin, A. M. E-mail: grishin@inmatech.com; Jalalian, A.; Tsindlekht, M. I.

    2015-05-15

    Continuous bead-free C-type cubic gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanofibers 20-30 μm long and 40-100 nm in diameter were sintered by sol-gel calcination assisted electrospinning technique. Dipole-dipole interaction of neighboring Gd{sup 3+} ions in nanofibers with large length-to-diameter aspect ratio results in some kind of superparamagnetic behavior: fibers are magnetized twice stronger than Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder. Being compared with commercial Gd-DTPA/Magnevist{sup ®}, Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} diethyleneglycol-coated (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}-DEG) fibers show high 1/T{sub 1} and 1/T{sub 2} proton relaxivities. Intense room temperature photoluminescence, high NMR relaxivity and high neutron scattering cross-section of {sup 157}Gd nucleus promise to integrate Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} fibers for multimodal bioimaging and neutron capture therapy.

  3. Neutron and Nuclear Science Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications Recent publications related to neutron and nuclear science at LANSCE. Neutron and Nuclear Science Publications Chi-Nu Publications DANCE Publications GEANIE Publications ICE House and ICE II Publications (n,z) Publications Neutron Radiography Publications SPIDER Publications Target 2 Publications TPC Publications Links Publications/Media Neutron and Nuclear Science News Profiles Events at LANSCE LANL Research Libary

  4. Neutron and Nuclear Science News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Recent news and events related to neutron and nuclear science at LANSCE. Neutron and Nuclear Science News Nuclear and Materials Science Research at LANSCE Nuclear science observations and opportunities at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Links Neutron and Nuclear Science News Media Links Profiles Events at LANSCE LAPIS (LANSCE Proposal Intake System

  5. FABRICATION OF NEUTRON SOURCES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Birden, J.H.

    1959-04-21

    A method is presented for preparing a neutron source from polonium-210 and substances, such as beryllium and boron, characterized by emission of neutrons upon exposure to alpha particles from the polonium. According to the invention, a source is prepared by placing powdered beryllium and a platinum foil electroplated with polonium-2;.0 in a beryllium container. The container is sealed and then heated by induction to a temperature of 450 to 1100 deg C to volatilize the polonium off the foil into the powder. The heating step is terminated upon detection of a maximum in the neutron flux level.

  6. Neutron Cross-Section Measurements on Structural Materials at ORELA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guber, Klaus H; Koehler, Paul; Wiarda, Dorothea; Harvey, John A

    2011-01-01

    Neutron capture experiments, using isotopically enriched and natural samples of chromium and titanium, were performed on flight paths 6 and 7 at the 40 m flight station of ORELA. The experimental data were acquired using a pair of deuterated benzene detectors employing the now well-established pulse-height-weighting technique. These data were complemented by new total cross-section measurements where no useful previous data were available.

  7. Elastic Neutron Scattering at 96 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hildebrand, A.; Blomgren, J.; Atac, A.; Bergenwall, B.; Johansson, C.; Klug, J.; Mermod, P.; Nilsson, L.; Pomp, S.; Esterlund, M.; Dangtip, S.; Tippawan, U.; Phansuke, P.; Jonsson, O.; Renberg, P.-U.; Prokofiev, A.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Elmgren, K.; Olsson, N.; Blideanu, V.

    2005-05-24

    A facility for detection of scattered neutrons in the energy interval 50-130 MeV, SCANDAL (SCAttered Nucleon Detection AssembLy), has recently been installed at the 20 - 180-MeV neutron beam line of The Svedberg Laboratory, Uppsala. Elastic neutron scattering from 12C, 16O, 56Fe, 89Y, and 208Pb has been studied at 96 MeV in the 10-70 deg. interval. The results from 12C and 208Pb have recently been published,6 while the data from 16O, 56Fe, and 89Y are under analysis. The achieved energy resolution, 3.7 MeV, is about an order of magnitude better than for any previous experiment above 65 MeV incident energy. The present experiment represents the highest neutron energy where the ground state has been resolved from the first excited state in neutron scattering. A novel method for normalization of the absolute scale of the cross section has been used. The estimated normalization uncertainty, 3%, is unprecedented for a neutron-induced differential cross section measurement on a nuclear target. The results are compared with modern optical model predictions, based on phenomenology or microscopic theory. Applications for these measurements are nuclear-waste incineration, single-event upsets in electronics, and fast-neutron therapy.

  8. Gadolinium-doped water cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma-ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dazeley, Steven A; Svoboda, Robert C; Bernstein, Adam; Bowden, Nathaniel

    2013-02-12

    A water Cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system using water doped with a Gadolinium (Gd)-based compound as the Cerenkov radiator. An optically opaque enclosure is provided surrounding a detection chamber filled with the Cerenkov radiator, and photomultipliers are optically connected to the detect Cerenkov radiation generated by the Cerenkov radiator from incident high energy gamma rays or gamma rays induced by neutron capture on the Gd of incident neutrons from a fission source. The PMT signals are then used to determine time correlations indicative of neutron multiplicity events characteristic of a fission source.

  9. Schoenborn wins Bau Neutron Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Schoenborn wins Bau Neutron Award Schoenborn wins Bau Neutron Award The American Crystallographic Association (ACA) has selected retired Laboratory Senior Fellow Benno Schoenborn to receive the 2016 Bau Neutron Diffraction Award. August 12, 2015 Benno Schoenborn Benno Schoenborn Communications Office (505) 667-7000 Schoenborn is honored for his pioneering research in macromolecular neutron crystallography and the design and development of the neutron crystallography beamline (Protein

  10. Switchable radioactive neutron source device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stanford, G.S.; Rhodes, E.A.; Devolpi, A.; Boyar, R.E.

    1987-11-06

    This invention is a switchable neutron generating apparatus comprised of a pair of plates, the first plate having an alpha emitter section on it and the second plate having a target material portion on it which generates neutrons when its nuclei absorb an alpha particle. In operation, the alpha portion of the first plate is aligned with the neutron portion of the second plate to produce neutrons and brought out of alignment to cease production of neutrons. 3 figs.

  11. Shifting scintillator neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clonts, Lloyd G; Cooper, Ronald G; Crow, Jr., Morris Lowell; Hannah, Bruce W; Hodges, Jason P; Richards, John D; Riedel, Richard A

    2014-03-04

    Provided are sensors and methods for detecting thermal neutrons. Provided is an apparatus having a scintillator for absorbing a neutron, the scintillator having a back side for discharging a scintillation light of a first wavelength in response to the absorbed neutron, an array of wavelength-shifting fibers proximate to the back side of the scintillator for shifting the scintillation light of the first wavelength to light of a second wavelength, the wavelength-shifting fibers being disposed in a two-dimensional pattern and defining a plurality of scattering plane pixels where the wavelength-shifting fibers overlap, a plurality of photomultiplier tubes, in coded optical communication with the wavelength-shifting fibers, for converting the light of the second wavelength to an electronic signal, and a processor for processing the electronic signal to identify one of the plurality of scattering plane pixels as indicative of a position within the scintillator where the neutron was absorbed.

  12. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-06-14

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  13. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-04-22

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  14. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2009-12-29

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  15. FABRICATION OF NEUTRON SOURCES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Birden, J.H.

    1959-01-20

    A method is presented for preparing a more efficient neutron source comprising inserting in a container a quantity of Po-210, inserting B powder coated with either Ag, Pt, or Ni. The container is sealed and then slowly heated to about 450 C to volatilize the Po and effect combination of the coated powder with the Po. The neutron flux emitted by the unit is moritored and the heating step is terminated when the flux reaches a maximum or selected level.

  16. NEUTRON FLUX INTENSITY DETECTION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Russell, J.T.

    1964-04-21

    A method of measuring the instantaneous intensity of neutron flux in the core of a nuclear reactor is described. A target gas capable of being transmuted by neutron bombardment to a product having a resonance absorption line nt a particular microwave frequency is passed through the core of the reactor. Frequency-modulated microwave energy is passed through the target gas and the attenuation of the energy due to the formation of the transmuted product is measured. (AEC)

  17. Neutron Reference Benchmark Field Specification: ACRR Free-Field Environment (ACRR-FF-CC-32-CL).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vega, Richard Manuel; Parma, Edward J.; Griffin, Patrick J.; Vehar, David W.

    2015-07-01

    This report was put together to support the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) REAL- 2016 activity to validate the dosimetry community’s ability to use a consistent set of activation data and to derive consistent spectral characterizations. The report captures details of integral measurements taken in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) central cavity free-field reference neutron benchmark field. The field is described and an “a priori” calculated neutron spectrum is reported, based on MCNP6 calculations, and a subject matter expert (SME) based covariance matrix is given for this “a priori” spectrum. The results of 31 integral dosimetry measurements in the neutron field are reported.

  18. Isotope separation by photoselective dissociative electron capture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stevens, C.G.

    1978-08-29

    Disclosed is a method of separating isotopes based on photoselective electron capture dissociation of molecules having an electron capture cross section dependence on the vibrational state of the molecule. A molecular isotope source material is irradiated to selectively excite those molecules containing a desired isotope to a predetermined vibrational state having associated therewith an electron capture energy region substantially non-overlapping with the electron capture energy ranges associated with the lowest vibration states of the molecules. The isotope source is also subjected to electrons having an energy corresponding to the non-overlapping electron capture region whereby the selectively excited molecules preferentially capture electrons and dissociate into negative ions and neutrals. The desired isotope may be in the negative ion product or in the neutral product depending upon the mechanism of dissociation of the particular isotope source used. The dissociation product enriched in the desired isotope is then separated from the reaction system by conventional means. Specifically, [sup 235]UF[sub 6] is separated from a UF[sub 6] mixture by selective excitation followed by dissociative electron capture into [sup 235]UF[sub 5]- and F. 2 figs.

  19. Isotope separation by photoselective dissociative electron capture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stevens, Charles G. [Pleasanton, CA

    1978-08-29

    A method of separating isotopes based on photoselective electron capture dissociation of molecules having an electron capture cross section dependence on the vibrational state of the molecule. A molecular isotope source material is irradiated to selectively excite those molecules containing a desired isotope to a predetermined vibrational state having associated therewith an electron capture energy region substantially non-overlapping with the electron capture energy ranges associated with the lowest vibration states of the molecules. The isotope source is also subjected to electrons having an energy corresponding to the non-overlapping electron capture region whereby the selectively excited molecules preferentially capture electrons and dissociate into negative ions and neutrals. The desired isotope may be in the negative ion product or in the neutral product depending upon the mechanism of dissociation of the particular isotope source used. The dissociation product enriched in the desired isotope is then separated from the reaction system by conventional means. Specifically, .sup.235 UF.sub.6 is separated from a UF.sub.6 mixture by selective excitation followed by dissociative electron capture into .sup.235 UF.sub.5 - and F.

  20. MAGNETIC NEUTRON SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZALIZNYAK,I.A.; LEE,S.H.

    2004-07-30

    Much of our understanding of the atomic-scale magnetic structure and the dynamical properties of solids and liquids was gained from neutron-scattering studies. Elastic and inelastic neutron spectroscopy provided physicists with an unprecedented, detailed access to spin structures, magnetic-excitation spectra, soft-modes and critical dynamics at magnetic-phase transitions, which is unrivaled by other experimental techniques. Because the neutron has no electric charge, it is an ideal weakly interacting and highly penetrating probe of matter's inner structure and dynamics. Unlike techniques using photon electric fields or charged particles (e.g., electrons, muons) that significantly modify the local electronic environment, neutron spectroscopy allows determination of a material's intrinsic, unperturbed physical properties. The method is not sensitive to extraneous charges, electric fields, and the imperfection of surface layers. Because the neutron is a highly penetrating and non-destructive probe, neutron spectroscopy can probe the microscopic properties of bulk materials (not just their surface layers) and study samples embedded in complex environments, such as cryostats, magnets, and pressure cells, which are essential for understanding the physical origins of magnetic phenomena. Neutron scattering is arguably the most powerful and versatile experimental tool for studying the microscopic properties of the magnetic materials. The magnitude of the cross-section of the neutron magnetic scattering is similar to the cross-section of nuclear scattering by short-range nuclear forces, and is large enough to provide measurable scattering by the ordered magnetic structures and electron spin fluctuations. In the half-a-century or so that has passed since neutron beams with sufficient intensity for scattering applications became available with the advent of the nuclear reactors, they have became indispensable tools for studying a variety of important areas of modern science

  1. Fundamental neutron physics at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, G.

    1995-10-01

    Modern neutron sources and science share a common origin in mid-20th-century scientific investigations concerned with the study of the fundamental interactions between elementary particles. Since the time of that common origin, neutron science and the study of elementary particles have evolved into quite disparate disciplines. The neutron became recognized as a powerful tool for studying condensed matter with modern neutron sources being primarily used (and justified) as tools for neutron scattering and materials science research. The study of elementary particles has, of course, led to the development of rather different tools and is now dominated by activities performed at extremely high energies. Notwithstanding this trend, the study of fundamental interactions using neutrons has continued and remains a vigorous activity at many contemporary neutron sources. This research, like neutron scattering research, has benefited enormously by the development of modern high-flux neutron facilities. Future sources, particularly high-power spallation sources, offer exciting possibilities for continuing this research.

  2. Apparatus and method for the simultaneous detection of neutrons and ionizing electromagnetic radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, Zane W.

    2000-01-01

    A sensor for simultaneously detecting neutrons and ionizing electromagnetic radiation comprising: a sensor for the detection of gamma radiation, the sensor defining a sensing head; the sensor further defining an output end in communication with the sensing head; and an exterior neutron-sensitive material configured to form around the sensing head; wherein the neutron-sensitive material, subsequent to the capture of the neutron, fissions into an alpha-particle and a .sup.7 Li ion that is in a first excited state in a majority of the fissions, the first excited state decaying via the emission of a single gamma ray at 478 keV which can in turn be detected by the sensing head; and wherein the sensing head can also detect the ionizing electromagnetic radiation from an incident radiation field without significant interference from the neutron-sensitive material. A method for simultaneously detecting neutrons and ionizing electromagnetic radiation comprising the steps of: providing a gamma ray sensitive detector comprising a sensing head and an output end; conforming an exterior neutron-sensitive material configured to form around the sensing head of the detector; capturing neutrons by the sensing head causing the neutron-sensitive material to fission into an alpha-particle and a .sup.7 Li ion that is in a first excited state in a majority of the fissions, the state decaying via the emission of a single gamma ray at 478 keV; sensing gamma rays entering the detector through the neutron-sensitive material; and producing an output through a readout device coupled to the output end; wherein the detector provides an output which is proportional to the energy of the absorbed ionizing electromagnetic radiation.

  3. Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Fossil Energy (FE) and Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) co-hosted the Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration (BECCS) Workshop on...

  4. How Carbon Capture Works | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    -- is a process that captures carbon dioxide emissions from sources like coal-fired power plants and either reuses or stores it so it will not enter the atmosphere. We'll...

  5. Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pre-combustion capture refers to removing CO2 from fossil fuels before combustion is completed. For example, in gasification processes a feedstock (such as coal) is partially oxidized in steam and...

  6. Neutron-deuteron breakup reaction as a tool for studying neutron-neutron interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konobeevski, E. S., E-mail: konobeev@inr.ru; Zuyev, S. V.; Mordovskoy, M. V.; Potashev, S. I.; Sharapov, I. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    An analysis of the most recent data on the reaction nd {yields} pnn revealed a serious discrepancy between theoretical predictions and cross sections measured for this reaction in various configurations where the role of neutron-neutron interactions is important. In view of this, it seems necessary both to develop theoretical approaches and to obtain new experimental data. For this purpose, a setup for studying the neutron-deuteron breakup reaction was created at the Institute for Nuclear Research on the basis of the neutron beam in the RADEX channel and deuterium targets. This facility makes it possible to perform experiments over a broad region of primary-neutron energies (10-60 MeV) and in various (final-state interaction, quasifree scattering, and spatial-star) configurations. Preliminary results of the respective experiment were obtained for configurations of final-state neutron-neutron interaction and quasifree neutron-neutron scattering.

  7. Supercomputers Capture Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supercomputers Capture Turbulence in the Solar Wind Supercomputers Capture Turbulence in the Solar Wind Berkeley Lab visualizations could help scientists forecast destructive space weather December 16, 2013 Linda Vu, +1 510 495 2402, lvu@lbl.gov eddies1.jpg This visualization zooms in on current sheets revealing the "cascade of turbulence" in the solar wind occurring down to electron scales. This is a phenomenon common in fluid dynamics-turbulent energy injected at large eddies is

  8. Black hole birth captured by cosmic voyeurs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Black hole birth captured by cosmic voyeurs Black hole birth captured by cosmic voyeurs The RAPTOR system is a network of small robotic observatories that scan the skies for optical anomalies such as flashes emanating from a star in its death throes as it collapses and becomes a black hole. November 21, 2013 Los Alamos National Laboratory astrophysicist Tom Vestrand poses with a telescope array that is part of the RAPTOR (RAPid Telescopes for Optical Response) system. RAPTOR is an intelligent

  9. Clifford G. Shull, Neutron Diffraction, Hydrogen Atoms, and Neutron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Laue Photography of Neutron Diffraction; Physical Review, Vol 73, Issue 5, 527-528, March 1, 1948 The Crystal Structure of Thorium and Zirconium Dihydrides by X-ray and Neutron ...

  10. Neutron Detection Using an Embedded Sol-Gel Neutron Absorber...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Date Patent 5,973,328 Patent 5,973,328 Neutron detector using sol-gel absorber An neutron detector composed of fissionable material having ions of lithium, uranium, thorium, ...

  11. Category:Neutron Log | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Looking for the Neutron Log page? For detailed information on Neutron Log, click here. Category:Neutron Log Add.png Add a new Neutron Log Technique Pages in category...

  12. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merlo, V.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M.; Scherillo, A.; Celentano, G.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2015-03-16

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, {sup 10}B + n → α + {sup 7}Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current I{sub c}, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  13. Portable Neutron Sensors for Emergency Response Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, S., Maurer, R., Detweiler, R.

    2012-06-22

    This slide-show presents neutron measurement work, including design, use and performance of different neutron detection systems.

  14. Spherical neutron generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2006-11-21

    A spherical neutron generator is formed with a small spherical target and a spherical shell RF-driven plasma ion source surrounding the target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) ion plasma is produced by RF excitation in the plasma ion source using an RF antenna. The plasma generation region is a spherical shell between an outer chamber and an inner extraction electrode. A spherical neutron generating target is at the center of the chamber and is biased negatively with respect to the extraction electrode which contains many holes. Ions passing through the holes in the extraction electrode are focused onto the target which produces neutrons by D-D or D-T reactions.

  15. Personnel electronic neutron dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Falk, Roger B.; Tyree, William H.

    1984-12-18

    A personnel electronic dosimeter includes a neutron-proton and neutron-alpha converter for providing an electrical signal having a magnitude proportional to the energy of a detected proton or alpha particle produced from the converter, a pulse generator circuit for generating a pulse having a duration controlled by the weighed effect of the amplitude of the electrical signal, an oscillator enabled by the pulse for generating a train of clock pulses for a time dependent upon the pulse length, a counter for counting the clock pulses, and an indicator for providing a direct reading and aural alarm when the count indicates that the wearer has been exposed to a selected level of neutron dose equivalent.

  16. Personnel electronic neutron dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Falk, R.B.; Tyree, W.H.

    1982-03-03

    A personnel electronic dosimeter includes a neutron-proton and neutron-alpha converter for providing an electrical signal having a magnitude proportional to the energy of a detected proton or alpha particle produced from the converter, a pulse generator circuit for generating a pulse having a duration controlled by the weighed effect of the amplitude of the electrical signal, an oscillator enabled by the pulse for generating a train of clock pulses for a time dependent upon the pulse length, a counter for counting the clock pulses, and an indicator for providing a direct reading and aural alarm when the count indicates that the wearer has been exposed to a selected level of neutron dose equivalent.

  17. METHOD OF PRODUCING NEUTRONS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Imhoff, D.H.; Harker, W.H.

    1964-02-01

    A method for producing neutrons is described in which there is employed a confinement zone defined between longitudinally spaced localized gradient regions of an elongated magnetic field. Changed particles and neutralizing electrons, more specifically deuterons and tritons and neutralizng electrons, are injected into the confinement field from ion sources located outside the field. The rotational energy of the parrticles is increased at the gradients by imposing an oscillating transverse electrical field thereacross. The imposition of such oscillating transverse electrical fields improves the reflection capability of such gradient fielda so that the reactive particles are retained more effectively within the zone. With the attainment of appropriate densities of plasma particles and provided that such particles are at a sufficiently high temperature, neutron-producing reactions ensue and large quantities of neutrons emerge from the containment zone. (AEC)

  18. Ultrafast neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Ching L.

    1987-01-01

    The invention comprises a neutron detector (50) of very high temporal resolution that is particularly well suited for measuring the fusion reaction neutrons produced by laser-driven inertial confinement fusion targets. The detector comprises a biased two-conductor traveling-wave transmission line (54, 56, 58, 68) having a uranium cathode (60) and a phosphor anode (62) as respective parts of the two conductors. A charge line and Auston switch assembly (70, 72, 74) launch an electric field pulse along the transmission line. Neutrons striking the uranium cathode at a location where the field pulse is passing, are enabled to strike the phosphor anode and produce light that is recorded on photographic film (64). The transmission line may be variously configured to achieve specific experimental goals.

  19. Neutron Log | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dictionary.png Neutron Log: The neutron log responds primarily to the amount of hydrogen in the formation which is contained in oil, natural gas, and water. The amount of...

  20. Feasibility of CO2 Capture from Mobile Sources | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CO2 Capture from Mobile Sources Feasibility of CO2 Capture from Mobile Sources Presents integrated system for post-combustion CO2 capture from mobile sources PDF icon ...

  1. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C.; Lee, Chuck K.; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  2. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C; Lee, Chuck K; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2013-11-12

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  3. GUIDE FOR POLARIZED NEUTRONS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sailor, V.L.; Aichroth, R.W.

    1962-12-01

    The plane of polarization of a beam of polarized neutrons is changed by this invention, and the plane can be flipped back and forth quicitly in two directions in a trouble-free manner. The invention comprises a guide having a plurality of oppositely directed magnets forming a gap for the neutron beam and the gaps are spaced longitudinally in a spiral along the beam at small stepped angles. When it is desired to flip the plane of polarization the magnets are suitably rotated to change the direction of the spiral of the gaps. (AEC)

  4. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL ELEMENT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Newson, H.W.

    1960-09-13

    A novel composite neutronic reactor control element is offered. The element comprises a multiplicity of sections arranged in end-to-end relationship, each of the sections having a markedly different neutron-reactive characteristic. For example, a three-section control element could contain absorber, moderator, and fuel sections. By moving such an element longitudinally through a reactor core, reactivity is decreased by the absorber, increased slightly by the moderator, or increased substantially by the fuel. Thus, control over a wide reactivity range is provided.

  5. Simplified fast neutron dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sohrabi, Mehdi

    1979-01-01

    Direct fast-neutron-induced recoil and alpha particle tracks in polycarbonate films may be enlarged for direct visual observation and automated counting procedures employing electrochemical etching techniques. Electrochemical etching is, for example, carried out in a 28% KOH solution at room temperature by applying a 2000 V peak-to-peak voltage at 1 kHz frequency. Such recoil particle amplification can be used for the detection of wide neutron dose ranges from 1 mrad. to 1000 rads. or higher, if desired.

  6. FAST NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snell, A.H.

    1957-12-01

    This patent relates to a reactor and process for carrying out a controlled fast neutron chain reaction. A cubical reactive mass, weighing at least 920 metric tons, of uranium metal containing predominantly U/sup 238/ and having a U/sup 235/ content of at least 7.63% is assembled and the maximum neutron reproduction ratio is limited to not substantially over 1.01 by insertion and removal of a varying amount of boron, the reactive mass being substantially freed of moderator.

  7. Neutron activated switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, David M.

    1991-01-01

    A switch for reacting quickly to a neutron emission. A rod consisting of fissionable material is located inside a vacuum tight body. An adjustable contact is located coaxially at an adjustable distance from one end of the rod. Electrical leads are connected to the rod and to the adjustable contact. With a vacuum drawn inside the body, a neutron bombardment striking the rod causes it to heat and expand longitudinally until it comes into contact with the adjustable contact. This circuit closing occurs within a period of a few microseconds.

  8. Neutron counting and gamma spectroscopy with PVT detectors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Dean James; Brusseau, Charles A.

    2011-06-01

    Radiation portals normally incorporate a dedicated neutron counter and a gamma-ray detector with at least some spectroscopic capability. This paper describes the design and presents characterization data for a detection system called PVT-NG, which uses large polyvinyl toluene (PVT) detectors to monitor both types of radiation. The detector material is surrounded by polyvinyl chloride (PVC), which emits high-energy gamma rays following neutron capture reactions. Assessments based on high-energy gamma rays are well suited for the detection of neutron sources, particularly in border security applications, because few isotopes in the normal stream of commerce have significant gamma ray yields above 3 MeV. Therefore, an increased count rate for high-energy gamma rays is a strong indicator for the presence of a neutron source. The sensitivity of the PVT-NG sensor to bare {sup 252}Cf is 1.9 counts per second per nanogram (cps/ng) and the sensitivity for {sup 252}Cf surrounded by 2.5 cm of polyethylene is 2.3 cps/ng. The PVT-NG sensor is a proof-of-principal sensor that was not fully optimized. The neutron detector sensitivity could be improved, for instance, by using additional moderator. The PVT-NG detectors and associated electronics are designed to provide improved resolution, gain stability, and performance at high-count rates relative to PVT detectors in typical radiation portals. As well as addressing the needs for neutron detection, these characteristics are also desirable for analysis of the gamma-ray spectra. Accurate isotope identification results were obtained despite the common impression that the absence of photopeaks makes data collected by PVT detectors unsuitable for spectroscopic analysis. The PVT detectors in the PVT-NG unit are used for both gamma-ray and neutron detection, so the sensitive volume exceeds the volume of the detection elements in portals that use dedicated components to detect each type of radiation.

  9. Polyacrylonitrile-Chalcogel Hybrid Sorbents for Radioiodine Capture...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Polyacrylonitrile-Chalcogel Hybrid Sorbents for Radioiodine Capture Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Polyacrylonitrile-Chalcogel Hybrid Sorbents for Radioiodine Capture ...

  10. 2011 Department of Energy Investments in Carbon Capture Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Investments in Carbon Capture Technologies 2011 Department of Energy Investments in Carbon Capture Technologies 2011 Department of Energy Investments in Carbon...

  11. FE Carbon Capture and Storage News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to maintain integrity of turbine components. May 10, 2013 Breakthrough Industrial Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage Project Begins Full-Scale Operations Captured...

  12. EFRC Carbon Capture and Sequestration Activities at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EFRC Carbon Capture and Sequestration Activities at NERSC EFRC Carbon Capture and Sequestration Activities at NERSC Why it Matters: Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas is considered to be...

  13. co2 capture meeting | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting July 8-11, 2013 Previous Proceedings 2012: NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Proceedings of the 2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Table of Contents Presentations Monday, July 8 Opening/Overview Post-Combustion Sorbent-Based Capture Tuesday, July 9 Post-Combustion Solvent-Based Capture CO2 Compression Wednesday, July 10 Post-Combustion Membrane-Based Capture Pre-Combustion Capture Projects Thursday, July 11 ARPA-E Capture Projects System Studies

  14. Adsorbent and adsorbent bed for materials capture and separation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Adsorbent and adsorbent bed for materials capture and separation processes Title: Adsorbent and adsorbent bed for materials capture and separation processes A method device and ...

  15. Grangemouth Advanced CO2 Capture Project GRACE | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Grangemouth Advanced CO2 Capture Project GRACE Jump to: navigation, search Name: Grangemouth Advanced CO2 Capture Project (GRACE) Place: United Kingdom Sector: Carbon Product:...

  16. Report to the President on Capturing Domestic Competitive Advantage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report to the President on Capturing Domestic Competitive Advantage in Advanced Manufacturing Report to the President on Capturing Domestic Competitive Advantage in Advanced ...

  17. Nuclear Hydrogen and Captured Carbon Dioxide for Alternative...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Nuclear Hydrogen and Captured Carbon Dioxide for Alternative Liquid Fuels. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Hydrogen and Captured Carbon Dioxide for ...

  18. NUCLEAR HYDROGEN AND CAPTURED CARBON DIOXIDE FOR ALTERNATIVE...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: NUCLEAR HYDROGEN AND CAPTURED CARBON DIOXIDE FOR ALTERNATIVE LIQUID FUELS. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: NUCLEAR HYDROGEN AND CAPTURED CARBON DIOXIDE ...

  19. Capturing Energy Upgrades in the Real Estate Transaction | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Capturing Energy Upgrades in the Real Estate Transaction Capturing Energy Upgrades in the Real Estate Transaction Because green building techniques and products may impact the ...

  20. Methods of capturing and immobilizing radioactive nuclei with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Methods of capturing and immobilizing radioactive nuclei with metal fluorite-based inorganic materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Methods of capturing and...

  1. Secretary Chu Announces Carbon Capture and Storage Simulation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon Capture and Storage Simulation Initiative Secretary Chu Announces Carbon Capture and Storage Simulation Initiative September 8, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC -U.S. ...

  2. New Mathematics Accurately Captures Liquids and Surfaces Moving...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Mathematics Accurately Captures Liquids and Surfaces Moving in Synergy New Mathematics Accurately Captures Liquids and Surfaces Moving in Synergy Berkeley Lab Mathematics ...

  3. Texas CO2 Capture Demonstration Project Hits Three Million Metric...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Texas CO2 Capture Demonstration Project Hits Three Million Metric Ton Milestone Texas CO2 Capture Demonstration Project Hits Three Million Metric Ton Milestone June 30, 2016 - ...

  4. First-of-its-Kind Carbon Capture and Conversion Demonstration...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    First-of-its-Kind Carbon Capture and Conversion Demonstration Technology Opening in Texas First-of-its-Kind Carbon Capture and Conversion Demonstration Technology Opening in Texas ...

  5. A Demonstration Project for Capturing Geothermal Energy from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Demonstration Project for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT A Demonstration Project for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, ...

  6. Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory...

  7. Capturing the Benefits of Integrated Resource Management for...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Capturing the Benefits of Integrated Resource Management for Water & Electricity Utilities and their Partners Capturing the Benefits of Integrated Resource Management for Water & ...

  8. The Water-Energy Nexus: Capturing the Benefits of Integrated...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The Water-Energy Nexus: Capturing the Benefits of Integrated Resource Management for Water & Electricity Utilities and their Partners The Water-Energy Nexus: Capturing the Benefits ...

  9. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Citation Details In-Document Search Title: CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate You are accessing a document ...

  10. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Citation Details In-Document Search Title: CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate You are ...

  11. NETL emphasizes CO{sub 2} capture from existing plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-04-01

    This paper gives brief description of several carbon dioxide capture projects that were directed toward a broader range of capture technologies.

  12. Energy Department Sponsored Project Captures One Millionth Metric...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... | Photo courtesy of Air Products and Chemicals Inc. Energy Department Project Captures and Stores more than One Million Metric Tons of CO2 Carbon Pollution Being Captured, ...

  13. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Shaber, Eric L.; DuPont, John N.; Robino, Charles V.; Williams, David B.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is drawn to new classes of advanced neutron absorbing structural materials for use in spent nuclear fuel applications requiring structural strength, weldability, and long term corrosion resistance. Particularly, an austenitic stainless steel alloy containing gadolinium and less than 5% of a ferrite content is disclosed. Additionally, a nickel-based alloy containing gadolinium and greater than 50% nickel is also disclosed.

  14. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELDING

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borst, L.B.

    1961-07-11

    A special hydrogenous concrete shielding for reactors is described. In addition to Portland cement and water, the concrete essentially comprises 30 to 60% by weight barytes aggregate for enhanced attenuation of fast neutrons. The biological shields of AEC's Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor and Materials Testing Reactor are particular embodiments.

  15. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL ELEMENT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beaver, R.J.; Leitten, C.F. Jr.

    1962-04-17

    A boron-10 containing reactor control element wherein the boron-10 is dispersed in a matrix material is describeri. The concentration of boron-10 in the matrix varies transversely across the element from a minimum at the surface to a maximum at the center of the element, prior to exposure to neutrons. (AEC)

  16. Neutronic reactor thermal shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wende, Charles W. J.

    1976-06-15

    1. The method of operating a water-cooled neutronic reactor having a graphite moderator which comprises flowing a gaseous mixture of carbon dioxide and helium, in which the helium comprises 40-60 volume percent of the mixture, in contact with the graphite moderator.

  17. NEUTRONIC REACTOR STRUCTURE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinberg, A.M.; Vernon, H.C.

    1961-05-30

    A neutronic reactor is described. It has a core consisting of natural uranium and heavy water and having a K-factor greater than unity which is surrounded by a reflector consisting of natural uranium and ordinary water having a Kfactor less than unity.

  18. Neutronic Reactor Structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vernon, H. C.; Weinberg, A. M.

    1961-05-30

    The neutronic reactor is comprised of a core consisting of natural uranium and heavy water with a K-factor greater than unity. The core is surrounded by a reflector consisting of natural uranium and ordinary water with a Kfactor less than unity. (AEC)

  19. Dose-equivalent neutron dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffith, R.V.; Hankins, D.E.; Tomasino, L.; Gomaa, M.A.M.

    1981-01-07

    A neutron dosimeter is disclosed which provides a single measurement indicating the amount of potential biological damage resulting from the neutron exposure of the wearer, for a wide range of neutron energies. The dosimeter includes a detecting sheet of track etch detecting material such as a carbonate plastic, for detecting higher energy neutrons, and a radiator layer contaning conversion material such as /sup 6/Li and /sup 10/B lying adjacent to the detecting sheet for converting moderate energy neutrons to alpha particles that produce tracks in the adjacent detecting sheet.

  20. The Brief Lives of Neutrons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Brief Lives of Neutrons 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:July 2016 past issues All Issues » submit The Brief Lives of Neutrons A unique experiment to pin down the neutron's surprisingly elusive half-life July 21, 2016 Most neutrons inside atoms are stable. But get one on its own, and it will disintegrate in about ten minutes. Most neutrons inside atoms are stable. But get one on its own, and it will disintegrate in about ten minutes. Beam and bottle experiments

  1. Solid state neutron detector array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seidel, John G. (Pittsburgh, PA); Ruddy, Frank H. (Monroeville, PA); Brandt, Charles D. (Mount Lebanon, PA); Dulloo, Abdul R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Lott, Randy G. (Pittsburgh, PA); Sirianni, Ernest (Monroeville, PA); Wilson, Randall O. (Greensburg, PA)

    1999-01-01

    A neutron detector array is capable of measuring a wide range of neutron fluxes. The array includes multiple semiconductor neutron detectors. Each detector has a semiconductor active region that is resistant to radiation damage. In one embodiment, the array preferably has a relatively small size, making it possible to place the array in confined locations. The ability of the array to detect a wide range of neutron fluxes is highly advantageous for many applications such as detecting neutron flux during start up, ramp up and full power of nuclear reactors.

  2. Solid state neutron detector array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seidel, J.G.; Ruddy, F.H.; Brandt, C.D.; Dulloo, A.R.; Lott, R.G.; Sirianni, E.; Wilson, R.O.

    1999-08-17

    A neutron detector array is capable of measuring a wide range of neutron fluxes. The array includes multiple semiconductor neutron detectors. Each detector has a semiconductor active region that is resistant to radiation damage. In one embodiment, the array preferably has a relatively small size, making it possible to place the array in confined locations. The ability of the array to detect a wide range of neutron fluxes is highly advantageous for many applications such as detecting neutron flux during start up, ramp up and full power of nuclear reactors. 7 figs.

  3. Call issued for Lujan Neutron Scattering Center proposals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (polarized and unpolarized) Inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy Small angle neutron scattering Neutron radiographytomography The Lujan instruments webpage...

  4. Real Time Telemetry Data Capture and Storage

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-05-14

    This program is used to capture telemetry data from remote instrumentation systems. The data can be captured at the rate of 1M bit per second. The data can come in one of several formats, NRZ, RZ, and Bi-Phase. The DECOM software takes the serial data stream and locks on to a unique code word. By tracking the code word the software can strip out the information. Thus the program can display the incoming data realmore » time while saving the data to disk.« less

  5. Systematic muon capture rates in PQRPA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samana, A. R.; Sande, D.; Krmpoti?, F.

    2015-05-15

    In this work we performed a systematic study of the inclusive muon capture rates for several nuclei with A < 60 using the Projected Random Quasi-particle Phase Approximation (PQRPA) as nuclear model, because it is the only RPA model that treats the Pauli Principle correctly. We reckon that the comparison between theory and data for the inclusive muon capture is not a fully satisfactory test on the nuclear model that is used. The exclusive muon transitions are more robust for such a purpose.

  6. Weigh-In-Motion Waveform Capture Systems

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-09-01

    Input data is generated from multiple weight sensor signals embedded in a thin weighing pad. This information is then reduced to total weight and position of a wheel rolling over the pad. This produces a signal which includes both the wheel weight and it inertial effects due to vehicle bounce, engine noise, and other mechanical vibrations. In order to extract accurate weight information of the wheel from the extraneous information, it is necessary to firstmore » capture the waveform and then perform a form of modal analysis. This program captures the above data and formats it into a useable form for analysis.« less

  7. Coated Fiber Neutron Detector Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lintereur, Azaree T.; Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Stromswold, David C.

    2009-10-23

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Reported here are the results of tests of the 6Li/ZnS(Ag)-coated non-scintillating plastic fibers option. This testing measured the required performance for neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a system manufactured by Innovative American Technology (IAT).

  8. Updated flux information for neutron scattering and irradiation facilities at the BNL High Flux Beam Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden, N.E.; Hu, J.P.; Reciniello, R.N.; Sengupta, S.; Greenwood, L.R.; Farrell, K.

    1997-08-01

    The HFBR is a heavy water, D{sub 2}O, cooled and moderated reactor with twenty-eight fuel elements containing a maximum of 9.8 kilograms of {sup 235}U. While most reactors attempt to minimize the escape of neutrons from the core, the HFBR`s D{sub 2}O design allows the thermal neutron flux to peak in the reflector region and maximizes the number of thermal neutrons available to nine horizontal external beams, H-1 to H-9, used for neutron scattering and capture reactions, supporting physics, chemistry and biology experiments. All horizontal beam tubes were built tangential to the direction of the emerging neutrons, except for the H-2 beam tube, which looks directly at the core and has been used for neutron cross section measurements utilizing fast neutrons and for the TRISTAN fission product studies. In recent years, there have been some beam modifications and new instrumentation introduced at the HFBR. A high resolution neutron powder diffractometer instrument is now operating with a resolution of 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} at horizontal beam line H-1. To study scattering from liquid surfaces, a neutron reflection spectrometer was introduced on the CNF beam line at H-9. In the past year, a fourth beam line has been added to the CNF line at H-9. The existing beam plug at the H-6 beam line has recently been removed and a new plug, which will feature super mirrored surfaces, is now being installed. Last year, the vertical beam thimble, V-13, a fixed port filled with thirty year old samples used for HFBR material surveillance studies was replaced by a new thimble and charging station at the core edge creating an irradiation facility to substitute for the original V-13. A neutron dosimetry program has begun to measure and calculate the energy dependent neutron and gamma ray flux densities and/or dose rates at horizontal beam lines and vertical irradiation thimbles.

  9. Industrial Carbon Capture Project Selections | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industrial Carbon Capture Project Selections Industrial Carbon Capture Project Selections Industrial Carbon Capture Project Selections September 2, 2010 These projects have been selected for negotiation of awards; final award amounts may vary. Industrial Carbon Capture Project Selections (71.28 KB) More Documents & Publications ICCS_Project_Selections.pdf CCSTF - Final Report Before the Subcommittee on Energy -- House Science, Space, and Technology Committee

  10. Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) and the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is hosting a Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration (BECCS) Workshop on Monday, May 18, 2015 in Washington, DC.

  11. Synthesis of optimal adsorptive carbon capture processes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    chang, Y.; Cozad, A.; Kim, H.; Lee, A.; Vouzis, P.; Konda, M.; Simon, A.; Sahinidis, N.; Miller, D.

    2011-01-01

    Solid sorbent carbon capture systems have the potential to require significantly lower regeneration energy compared to aqueous monoethanol amine (MEA) systems. To date, the majority of work on solid sorbents has focused on developing the sorbent materials themselves. In order to advance these technologies, it is necessary to design systems that can exploit the full potential and unique characteristics of these materials. The Department of Energy (DOE) recently initiated the Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) to develop computational tools to accelerate the commercialization of carbon capture technology. Solid sorbents is the first Industry Challenge Problem considered under this initiative. An early goal of the initiative is to demonstrate a superstructure-based framework to synthesize an optimal solid sorbent carbon capture process. For a given solid sorbent, there are a number of potential reactors and reactor configurations consisting of various fluidized bed reactors, moving bed reactors, and fixed bed reactors. Detailed process models for these reactors have been modeled using Aspen Custom Modeler; however, such models are computationally intractable for large optimization-based process synthesis. Thus, in order to facilitate the use of these models for process synthesis, we have developed an approach for generating simple algebraic surrogate models that can be used in an optimization formulation. This presentation will describe the superstructure formulation which uses these surrogate models to choose among various process alternatives and will describe the resulting optimal process configuration.

  12. Preparative scale separation of thulium from erbium for neutron capture cross section measurements - Part: Preparative scale

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Birnbaum, Eva R.; Bene, Balazs J.; Taylor, Wayne Allen; Sudowe, Ralf

    2016-06-04

    Here, this paper discusses the development of a separation method for isolation of 171Tm from a half-gram irradiated erbium target in support of stockpile stewardship and astrophysics research. The developed procedure is based on cation exchange separation using alpha-hydroxyisobutyric acid (α-HIBA) as chelating agent. It is able to achieve either a decontamination factor of 1.4(4) × 105 with 68.9(3) % recovery or 95.4(3) % recovery with a decontamination factor of 5.82(7) × 103 for a mock 500-mg target containing 17.9 mg thulium in a single pass-through at room temperature.

  13. Direct thermal-neutron capture by {sup 30}Si (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States) Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States) Publication Date: ...

  14. On the capture of dark matter by neutron stars (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The potential exclusion region for dark matter self-interaction cross sections is many orders of magnitude stronger than the current Bullet Cluster limit. For example, for highmore ...

  15. Validating (d,pγ) as a surrogate for neutron capture (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Lister, C. J. 11 ; Manning, B. 1 ; O'Donnell, John M. 4 ; Peters, W. A. 12 ; Ross, T. J. 8 ; Scielzo, N. D. 3 ; Seweryniak, D. 7 ; Zhu, S. 7 less + Show ...

  16. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCE ANALYSIS OF A NEUTRON-CAPTURE ENHANCED RED GIANT IN THE BULGE PLAUT FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Christian I.; Rich, R. Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, 430 Portola Plaza, Box 951547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, 430 Portola Plaza, Box 951547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); McWilliam, Andrew, E-mail: cijohnson@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: rmr@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: cjohnson@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: andy@obs.carnegiescience.edu [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)] [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2013-09-20

    We present chemical abundances for 27 elements ranging from oxygen to erbium in the metal-poor ([Fe/H] = 1.67) bulge red giant branch star 2MASS 18174532-3353235. The results are based on equivalent width and spectrum synthesis analyses of a high-resolution (R ? 30, 000) spectrum obtained with the Magellan-MIKE spectrograph. While the light (Z ?< 30) element abundance patterns match those of similar metallicity bulge and halo stars, the strongly enhanced heavy element abundances are more similar to 'r-II' halo stars (e.g., CS 22892-052) typically found at [Fe/H] ?< 2.5. We find that the heaviest elements (Z ? 56) closely follow the scaled-solar r-process abundance pattern. We do not find evidence supporting significant s-process contributions; however, the intermediate mass elements (e.g., Y and Zr) appear to have been produced through a different process than the heaviest elements. The light and heavy element abundance patterns of 2MASS 18174532-3353235 are in good agreement with the more metal-poor r-process enhanced stars CS 22892-052 and BD +17{sup o}3248. 2MASS 18174532-3353235 also shares many chemical characteristics with the similar metallicity but comparatively ?-poor Ursa Minor dwarf galaxy giant COS 82. Interestingly, the Mo and Ru abundances of 2MASS 18174532-3353235 are also strongly enhanced and follow a similar trend recently found to be common in moderately metal-poor main-sequence turn-off halo stars.

  17. Annual Report: Carbon Capture (30 September 2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luebke, David; Morreale, Bryan; Richards, George; Syamlal, Madhava

    2014-04-16

    Capture of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is a critical component in reducing greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel-based processes. The Carbon Capture research to be performed is aimed at accelerating the development of efficient, cost-effective technologies which meet the post-combustion programmatic goal of capture of 90% of the CO{sub 2} produced from an existing coal-fired power plant with less than a 35% increase in the cost of electricity (COE), and the pre-combustion goal of 90% CO{sub 2} capture with less than a 10% increase in COE. The specific objective of this work is to develop innovative materials and approaches for the economic and efficient capture of CO{sub 2} from coal-based processes, and ultimately assess the performance of promising technologies at conditions representative of field application (i.e., slip stream evaluation). The Carbon Capture research includes seven core technical research areas: post-combustion solvents, sorbents, and membranes; pre-combustion solvents, sorbents, and membranes; and oxygen (O{sub 2}) production. The goal of each of these tasks is to develop advanced materials and processes that are able to reduce the energy penalty and cost of CO{sub 2} (or O{sub 2}) separation over conventional technologies. In the first year of development, materials will be examined by molecular modeling, and then synthesized and experimentally characterized at lab scale. In the second year, they will be tested further under ideal conditions. In the third year, they will be tested under realistic conditions. The most promising materials will be tested at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) using actual flue or fuel gas. Systems analyses will be used to determine whether or not materials developed are likely to meet the Department of Energy (DOE) COE targets. Materials which perform well and appear likely to improve in performance will be licensed for further development outside of the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL

  18. Novel Large Area High Resolution Neutron Detector for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L

    2009-05-22

    Neutron scattering is a powerful technique that is critically important for materials science and structural biology applications. The knowledge gained from past developments has resulted in far-reaching advances in engineering, pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, to name a few. New facilities for neutron generation at much higher flux, such as the SNS at Oak Ridge, TN, will greatly enhance the capabilities of neutron scattering, with benefits that extend to many fields and include, for example, development of improved drug therapies and materials that are stronger, longer-lasting, and more impact-resistant. In order to fully realize this enhanced potential, however, higher neutron rates must be met with improved detection capabilities, particularly higher count rate capability in large size detectors, while maintaining practicality. We have developed a neutron detector with the technical and economic advantages to accomplish this goal. This new detector has a large sensitive area, offers 3D spatial resolution, high sensitivity and high count rate capability, and it is economical and practical to produce. The proposed detector technology is based on B-10 thin film conversion of neutrons in long straw-like gas detectors. A stack of many such detectors, each 1 meter in length, and 4 mm in diameter, has a stopping power that exceeds that of He-3 gas, contained at practical pressures within an area detector. With simple electronic readout methods, straw detector arrays can provide spatial resolution of 4 mm FWHM or better, and since an array detector of such form consists of several thousand individual elements per square meter, count rates in a 1 m^2 detector can reach 2?10^7 cps. Moreover, each individual event can be timetagged with a time resolution of less than 0.1 ?sec, allowing accurate identification of neutron energy by time of flight. Considering basic elemental cost, this novel neutron imaging detector can be commercially produced economically

  19. Neutron and gamma detector using an ionization chamber with an integrated body and moderator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Lestone, John Paul

    2006-07-18

    A detector for detecting neutrons and gamma radiation includes a cathode that defines an interior surface and an interior volume. A conductive neutron-capturing layer is disposed on the interior surface of the cathode and a plastic housing surrounds the cathode. A plastic lid is attached to the housing and encloses the interior volume of the cathode forming an ionization chamber, into the center of which an anode extends from the plastic lid. A working gas is disposed within the ionization chamber and a high biasing voltage is connected to the cathode. Processing electronics are coupled to the anode and process current pulses which are converted into Gaussian pulses, which are either counted as neutrons or integrated as gammas, in response to whether pulse amplitude crosses a neutron threshold. The detector according to the invention may be readily fabricated into single or multilayer detector arrays.

  20. FAST NEUTRON SPECTROMETER

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, F.J.; Hurst, G.S.; Reinhardt, P.W.

    1959-08-18

    An improved proton recoil spectrometer for determining the energy spectrum of a fast neutron beam is described. Instead of discriminating against and thereby"throwing away" the many recoil protons other than those traveling parallel to the neutron beam axis as do conventional spectrometers, this device utilizes protons scattered over a very wide solid angle. An ovoidal gas-filled recoil chamber is coated on the inside with a scintillator. The ovoidal shape of the sensitive portion of the wall defining the chamber conforms to the envelope of the range of the proton recoils from the radiator disposed within the chamber. A photomultiplier monitors the output of the scintillator, and a counter counts the pulses caused by protons of energy just sufficient to reach the scintillator.

  1. COMPOSITE NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Menke, J.R.

    1963-06-11

    This patent relates to a reactor having a core which comprises an inner active region and an outer active region, each region separately having a k effective less than one and a k infinity greater than one. The inner and outer regions in combination have a k effective at least equal to one and each region contributes substantially to the k effective of the reactor core. The inner region has a low moderator to fuel ratio such that the majority of fissions occurring therein are induced by neutrons having energies greater than thermal. The outer region has a high moderator to fuel ratio such that the majority of fissions occurring therein are induced by thermal neutrons. (AEC)

  2. Scintillation neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Two basic types of scintillation area neutron detectors are reviewed. The first is the prompt detector which uses photomultipliers to convert the neutron scintillations to electrical pulses. These signals are combined in weighting or encoding circuits to give event location. Several embodiments of the weighted and coded scintillator approach are mentioned. The second type of scintillation detector is based on television techniques and has a delayed readout. In this method all the light (or as much as possible) is either focused with a fast lens or is coupled by being put in direct contact with the fiber-optic faceplate of an image intensifier tube. The light from the phosphor screen is intensified and coupled to a television camera tube instead of a photomultiplier, and further amplification is produced in the camera tube by accelerating the photoelectrons in order to produce secondary electrons. (LEW)

  3. Porous material neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diawara, Yacouba; Kocsis, Menyhert

    2012-04-10

    A neutron detector employs a porous material layer including pores between nanoparticles. The composition of the nanoparticles is selected to cause emission of electrons upon detection of a neutron. The nanoparticles have a maximum dimension that is in the range from 0.1 micron to 1 millimeter, and can be sintered with pores thereamongst. A passing radiation generates electrons at one or more nanoparticles, some of which are scattered into a pore and directed toward a direction opposite to the applied electrical field. These electrons travel through the pore and collide with additional nanoparticles, which generate more electrons. The electrons are amplified in a cascade reaction that occurs along the pores behind the initial detection point. An electron amplification device may be placed behind the porous material layer to further amplify the electrons exiting the porous material layer.

  4. High intensity, pulsed thermal neutron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1973-12-11

    This invention relates to a high intensity, pulsed thermal neutron source comprising a neutron-producing source which emits pulses of fast neutrons, a moderator block adjacent to the last neutron source, a reflector block which encases the fast neutron source and the moderator block and has a thermal neutron exit port extending therethrough from the moderator block, and a neutron energy- dependent decoupling reflector liner covering the interior surfaces of the thermal neutron exit port and surrounding all surfaces of the moderator block except the surface viewed by the thermal neutron exit port. (Official Gazette)

  5. Carbon Capture R&D | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Capture R&D Carbon Capture R&D DOE's Carbon Capture Program, administered by the Office of Fossil Energy and the National Energy Technology Laboratory, is conducting research and development activities on Second Generation and Transformational carbon capture technologies that have the potential to provide step-change reductions in both cost and energy penalty as compared to currently available First Generation technologies. The Carbon Capture Program consists of two core research

  6. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SYSTEM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goett, J.J.

    1961-01-24

    A system is described which includes a neutronic reactor containing a dispersion of fissionable material in a liquid moderator as fuel and a conveyor to which a portion of the dispersion may be passed and wherein the self heat of the slurry evaporates the moderator. Means are provided for condensing the liquid moderator and returning it to the reactor and for conveying the dried fissionable material away from the reactor.

  7. THERMAL NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spinrad, B.I.

    1960-01-12

    A novel thermal reactor was designed in which a first reflector formed from a high atomic weight, nonmoderating material is disposed immediately adjacent to the reactor core. A second reflector composed of a moderating material is disposed outwardly of the first reflector. The advantage of this novel reflector arrangement is that the first reflector provides a high slow neutron flux in the second reflector, where irradiation experiments may be conducted with a small effect on reactor reactivity.

  8. European Neutron Activation System.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-01-11

    Version 03 EASY-2010 (European Activation System) consists of a wide range of codes, data and documentation all aimed at satisfying the objective of calculating the response of materials irradiated in a neutron flux. The main difference from the previous version is the upper energy limit, which has increased from 20 to 60 MeV. It is designed to investigate both fusion devices and accelerator based materials test facilities that will act as intense sources of high-energymore » neutrons causing significant activation of the surrounding materials. The very general nature of the calculational method and the data libraries means that it is applicable (with some reservations) to all situations (e.g. fission reactors or neutron sources) where materials are exposed to neutrons below 60 MeV. EASY can be divided into two parts: data and code development tools and user tools and data. The former are required to develop the latter, but EASY users only need to be able to use the inventory code FISPACT and be aware of the contents of the EAF library (the data source). The complete EASY package contains the FISPACT-2007 inventory code, the EAF-2003, EAF-2005, EAF-2007 and EAF-2010 libraries, and the EASY User Interface for the Window version. The activation package EASY-2010 is the result of significant development to extend the upper energy range from 20 to 60 MeV so that it is capable of being used for IFMIF calculations. The EAF-2010 library contains 66,256 reactions, almost five times more than in EAF-2003 (12,617). Deuteron-induced and proton-induced cross section libraries are also included, and can be used with EASY to enable calculations of the activation due to deuterons and proton [2].« less

  9. Neutron Science and Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Neutron Science and Technology From a mountaintop in Mexico where we investigate gamma rays, to underground laboratories where we study the behavior of plutonium under extreme conditions, our research spans the spectrum from fundamental to applied. Contact Us Group Leader Frank Merrill Email Deputy Group Leader David Oro Email Deputy Group Leader Keith Rielage Email Group Office Email Inner workings of a wristwatch that was imaged by a new proton microscope At right, a wristwatch was one of

  10. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CORE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomson, W.B.; Corbin, A. Jr.

    1961-07-18

    An improved core for a gas-cooled power reactor which admits gas coolant at high temperatures while affording strong integral supporting structure and efficient moderation of neutrons is described. The multiplicities of fuel elements constituting the critical amassment of fissionable material are supported and confined by a matrix of metallic structure which is interspersed therebetween. Thermal insulation is interposed between substantially all of the metallic matrix and the fuel elements; the insulation then defines the principal conduit system for conducting the coolant gas in heat-transfer relationship with the fuel elements. The metallic matrix itseif comprises a system of ducts through which an externally-cooled hydrogeneous liquid, such as water, is circulated to serve as the principal neutron moderant for the core and conjointly as the principal coolant for the insulated metallic structure. In this way, use of substantially neutron transparent metals, such as aluminum, becomes possible for the supporting structure, despite the high temperatures of the proximate gas. The Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion program's "R-1" reactor design is a preferred embodiment.

  11. Neutron instrumentation for biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, S.A.

    1994-12-31

    In the October 1994 round of proposals at the ILL, the external biology review sub- committee was asked to allocate neutron beam time to a wide range of experiments, on almost half the total number of scheduled neutron instruments: on 3 diffractometers, on 3 small angle scattering instruments, and on some 6 inelastic scattering spectrometers. In the 3.5 years since the temporary reactor shutdown, the ILL`s management structure has been optimized, budgets and staff have been trimmed, the ILL reactor has been re-built, and many of the instruments up-graded, many powerful (mainly Unix) workstations have been introduced, and the neighboring European Synchrotron Radiation Facility has established itself as the leading synchrotron radiation source and has started its official user program. The ILL reactor remains the world`s most intense dedicated neutron source. In this challenging context, it is of interest to review briefly the park of ILL instruments used to study the structure and energetics of small and large biological systems. A brief summary will be made of each class of experiments actually proposed in the latest ILL proposal round.

  12. Fast neutron imaging device and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Popov, Vladimir; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Musatov, Igor V.

    2014-02-11

    A fast neutron imaging apparatus and method of constructing fast neutron radiography images, the apparatus including a neutron source and a detector that provides event-by-event acquisition of position and energy deposition, and optionally timing and pulse shape for each individual neutron event detected by the detector. The method for constructing fast neutron radiography images utilizes the apparatus of the invention.

  13. Proton recoil scintillator neutron rem meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olsher, Richard H.; Seagraves, David T.

    2003-01-01

    A neutron rem meter utilizing proton recoil and thermal neutron scintillators to provide neutron detection and dose measurement. In using both fast scintillators and a thermal neutron scintillator the meter provides a wide range of sensitivity, uniform directional response, and uniform dose response. The scintillators output light to a photomultiplier tube that produces an electrical signal to an external neutron counter.

  14. Review of Non-Neutron and Neutron Nuclear Data, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden, Norman E.

    2005-05-24

    Review articles are in preparation for the 2004 edition of the CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics dealing with the evaluation of both non-neutron and neutron nuclear data. Data on the discovery of element 110, Darmstadtium, and element 111 have been officially accepted, while data on element 118 have been withdrawn. Data to be presented include revised values for very short-lived nuclides, long-lived nuclides, and beta-beta decay measurements. There has been a reassessment of the spontaneous fission (sf) half-lives, which distinguishes between sf decay half-lives and cluster decay half-lives, and with cluster-fission decay. New measurements of isotopic abundance values for many elements will be discussed with an emphasis on the minor isotopes of interest for use in neutron activation analysis measurements. Neutron resonance integrals will be discussed emphasizing the differences between the calculated values obtained from the analytical integration over neutron resonances and the measured values in a neutron reactor-spectrum, which does not quite conform to the assumed 1/E neutron energy spectrum. The method used to determine the neutron resonance integral from measurement, using neutron activation analysis, will be discussed.

  15. REVIEW OF NON-NEUTRON AND NEUTRON NUCLEAR DATA, 2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2004-09-26

    Review articles are in preparation for the 2004 edition of the CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics dealing with the evaluation of both non-neutron and neutron nuclear data. Data on the discovery of element 110, Darmstadtium, and element 111 have been officially accepted, while data on element 11 8 have been withdrawn. Data to be presented include revised values for very short-lived nuclides, long-lived nuclides and beta-beta decay measurements. There has been a reassessment of the spontaneous fission (sf) half-lives, which distinguishes between sf decay half-lives and cluster decay half-lives and with cluster-fission decay. New measurements of isotopic abundance values for many elements will be discussed with an emphasis on the minor isotopes of interest for use in neutron activation analysis measurements. Neutron resonance integrals will be discussed emphasizing the differences between the calculated values obtained from the analytical integration over neutron resonances and the measured values in a neutron reactor-spectrum, which does not quite conform to the assumed 1/E neutron energy spectrum. The method used to determine the neutron resonance integral from measurement, using neutron activation analysis, will be discussed.

  16. 2010 Neutron Review: ORNL Neutron Sciences Progress Report (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... (6) Changing the World of Data Acquisition - Researchers at SNS are starting to ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: neutron science; ...

  17. Exploiting the neutronization burst of a galactic supernova

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kachelriess, M.; Tomas, R.; Buras, R.; Janka, H.-Th.; Marek, A.; Rampp, M.

    2005-03-15

    One of the robust features found in simulations of core-collapse supernovae (SNe) is the prompt neutronization burst, i.e., the first {approx}25 milliseconds after bounce when the SN emits with very high luminosity mainly {nu}{sub e} neutrinos. We examine the dependence of this burst on variations in the input of current SN models and find that recent improvements of the electron capture rates as well as uncertainties in the nuclear equation of state or a variation of the progenitor mass have only little effect on the signature of the neutronization peak in a megaton water Cherenkov detector for different neutrino mixing schemes. We show that exploiting the time structure of the neutronization peak allows one to identify the case of a normal mass hierarchy and large 13-mixing angle {theta}{sub 13}, where the peak is absent. The robustness of the predicted total event number in the neutronization burst makes a measurement of the distance to the SN feasible with a precision of about 5%, even in the likely case that the SN is optically obscured.

  18. Realistic fission models, new beta-decay half-lives and the r-process in neutron star mergers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shibagaki, S.; Kajino, T. [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan and National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Chiba, S. [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 152-8850 (Japan); Lorusso, G.; Nishimura, S. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Mathews, G. J. [Center for Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2014-05-02

    Almost half of heavy nuclei beyond iron are considered to be produced by rapid neutron capture process (r-process). This process occurs in the neutron-rich environment such as core-collapse supernovae or neutron star mergers, but the main production site is still unknown. In the r-process of neutron star mergers, nuclear fission reactions play an important role. Also beta-decay half-lives of magic nuclei are crucial for the r-process. We have carried out r-process nucleosynthesis calculations based upon new theoretical estimates of fission fragment distributions and new beta-decay half-lives for N=82 nuclei measured at RIBF-RIKEN. We investigate the effect of nuclear fission on abundance patterns in the matter ejected from neutron star mergers with two different fission fragment mass distributions. We also discuss how the new experimental beta-decay half-lives affect the r-process.

  19. Neutron scattering and absorption properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden, N.E.

    1993-12-01

    The Table in this report presents an evaluated set of values for the experimental quantities, which characterize the properties for scattering and absorption of neutrons. The neutron cross section is given for room temperature neutrons, 20.43{degree}C, corresponds to a thermal neutron energy of 0.0253 electron volts (eV) or a neutron velocity of 2200 meters/second. The neutron resonance integral is defined over the energy range from 0.5 eV to 0.1 {times} 10{sup 6} eV, or 0.1 MeV. A list of the major references used is given below. The literature cutoff data is October 1993. Uncertainties are given in parentheses. Parentheses with two or more numbers indicate values to the excited states(s) and to the ground state of the product nucleus.

  20. APPARATUS FOR CONTROLLING NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietrich, J.R.; Harrer, J.M.

    1958-09-16

    A device is described for rapidly cortrolling the reactivity of an active portion of a reactor. The inveniion consists of coaxially disposed members each having circumferenital sections of material having dlfferent neutron absorbing characteristics and means fur moving the members rotatably and translatably relative to each other within the active portion to vary the neutron flux therein. The angular and translational movements of any member change the neutron flux shadowing effect of that member upon the other member.

  1. Portable neutron spectrometer and dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waechter, David A. (Los Alamos, NM); Erkkila, Bruce H. (Los Alamos, NM); Vasilik, Dennis G. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1985-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a battery operated neutron spectrometer/dosimeter utilizing a microprocessor, a built-in tissue equivalent LET neutron detector, and a 128-channel pulse height analyzer with integral liquid crystal display. The apparatus calculates doses and dose rates from neutrons incident on the detector and displays a spectrum of rad or rem as a function of keV per micron of equivalent tissue and also calculates and displays accumulated dose in millirads and millirem as well as neutron dose rates in millirads per hour and millirem per hour.

  2. Portable neutron spectrometer and dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waechter, D.A.; Erkkila, B.H.; Vasilik, D.G.

    The disclosure relates to a battery operated neutron spectrometer/dosimeter utilizing a microprocessor, a built-in tissue equivalent LET neutron detector, and a 128-channel pulse height analyzer with integral liquid crystal display. The apparatus calculates doses and dose rates from neutrons incident on the detector and displays a spectrum of rad or rem as a function of keV per micron of equivalent tissue and also calculates and displays accumulated dose in millirads and millirem as well as neutron dose rates in millirads per hour and millirem per hour.

  3. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J.H.; Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Peretz, F.J.

    1991-02-01

    This report discusses the research and development, design and safety of the Advanced Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. (LSP)

  4. NEUTRON IMAGING, RADIOGRAPHY AND TOMOGRAPHY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SMITH,G.C.

    2002-03-01

    Neutrons are an invaluable probe in a wide range of scientific, medical and commercial endeavors. Many of these applications require the recording of an image of the neutron signal, either in one-dimension or in two-dimensions. We summarize the reactions of neutrons with the most important elements that are used for their detection. A description is then given of the major techniques used in neutron imaging, with emphasis on the detection media and position readout principle. Important characteristics such as position resolution, linearity, counting rate capability and sensitivity to gamma-background are discussed. Finally, the application of a subset of these instruments in radiology and tomography is described.

  5. Layered solid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Bingyun; Jiang, Bingbing; Gray, McMahan L; Fauth, Daniel J; Pennline, Henry W; Richards, George A

    2014-11-18

    A solid sorbent for the capture and the transport of carbon dioxide gas is provided having at least one first layer of a positively charged material that is polyethylenimine or poly(allylamine hydrochloride), that captures at least a portion of the gas, and at least one second layer of a negatively charged material that is polystyrenesulfonate or poly(acryclic acid), that transports the gas, wherein the second layer of material is in juxtaposition to, attached to, or crosslinked with the first layer for forming at least one bilayer, and a solid substrate support having a porous surface, wherein one or more of the bilayers is/are deposited on the surface of and/or within the solid substrate. A method of preparing and using the solid sorbent is provided.

  6. Data Capture Technique for High Speed Signaling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barrett, Wayne Melvin; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul William; Gara, Alan Gene; Jackson, Rory; Kopcsay, Gerard Vincent; Nathanson, Ben Jesse; Vranas, Paylos Michael; Takken, Todd E.

    2008-08-26

    A data capture technique for high speed signaling to allow for optimal sampling of an asynchronous data stream. This technique allows for extremely high data rates and does not require that a clock be sent with the data as is done in source synchronous systems. The present invention also provides a hardware mechanism for automatically adjusting transmission delays for optimal two-bit simultaneous bi-directional (SiBiDi) signaling.

  7. LOW ENERGY PROTON CAPTURE STUDY OF THE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LOW ENERGY PROTON CAPTURE STUDY OF THE 14 N(p, γ) 15 O REACTION Stephen Michael Daigle A dissertation submitted to the faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the Depart- ment of Physics and Astronomy. Chapel Hill 2013 Approved by: Arthur E. Champagne Gerald Cecil Jonathan Engel Reyco Henning Christian Iliadis c 2013 Stephen Michael Daigle ALL RIGHTS RESERVED ii ABSTRACT Stephen Michael

  8. How Carbon Capture Works | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Program Peer Exchange Call: How Can the Network Meet Your Needs? Call Slides and Meeting Summary, February 27, 2014. Call Slides and Meeting Summary (1.02 MB) More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Key Opportunities and Challenges for Program Sustainability Better Buildings Residential Network Membership Form

    4 likes How Carbon Capture Works Nearly 70 percent of America's electricity is generated from fossil fuels like coal, oil and natural gas. And

  9. Metazen – metadata capture for metagenomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bischof, Jared; Harrison, Travis; Paczian, Tobias; Glass, Elizabeth; Wilke, Andreas; Meyer, Folker

    2014-12-08

    Background: As the impact and prevalence of large-scale metagenomic surveys grow, so does the acute need for more complete and standards compliant metadata. Metadata (data describing data) provides an essential complement to experimental data, helping to answer questions about its source, mode of collection, and reliability. Metadata collection and interpretation have become vital to the genomics and metagenomics communities, but considerable challenges remain, including exchange, curation, and distribution. Currently, tools are available for capturing basic field metadata during sampling, and for storing, updating and viewing it. These tools are not specifically designed for metagenomic surveys; in particular, they lack the appropriate metadata collection templates, a centralized storage repository, and a unique ID linking system that can be used to easily port complete and compatible metagenomic metadata into widely used assembly and sequence analysis tools. Results: Metazen was developed as a comprehensive framework designed to enable metadata capture for metagenomic sequencing projects. Specifically, Metazen provides a rapid, easy-to-use portal to encourage early deposition of project and sample metadata. Conclusion: Metazen is an interactive tool that aids users in recording their metadata in a complete and valid format. A defined set of mandatory fields captures vital information, while the option to add fields provides flexibility.

  10. Metazen – metadata capture for metagenomes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bischof, Jared; Harrison, Travis; Paczian, Tobias; Glass, Elizabeth; Wilke, Andreas; Meyer, Folker

    2014-12-08

    Background: As the impact and prevalence of large-scale metagenomic surveys grow, so does the acute need for more complete and standards compliant metadata. Metadata (data describing data) provides an essential complement to experimental data, helping to answer questions about its source, mode of collection, and reliability. Metadata collection and interpretation have become vital to the genomics and metagenomics communities, but considerable challenges remain, including exchange, curation, and distribution. Currently, tools are available for capturing basic field metadata during sampling, and for storing, updating and viewing it. These tools are not specifically designed for metagenomic surveys; in particular, they lack themore » appropriate metadata collection templates, a centralized storage repository, and a unique ID linking system that can be used to easily port complete and compatible metagenomic metadata into widely used assembly and sequence analysis tools. Results: Metazen was developed as a comprehensive framework designed to enable metadata capture for metagenomic sequencing projects. Specifically, Metazen provides a rapid, easy-to-use portal to encourage early deposition of project and sample metadata. Conclusion: Metazen is an interactive tool that aids users in recording their metadata in a complete and valid format. A defined set of mandatory fields captures vital information, while the option to add fields provides flexibility.« less

  11. Capturing the benefits of distributed generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, L.R.

    1999-11-01

    Existing and future distributed generation (DG) can provide significant benefits to customers, utilities and other service providers. For the customer, these benefits could include improved reliability, better power quality and lower costs. For the utility distribution company, these benefits could include deferral of costly distribution upgrades and local voltage support. For the region`s generation and transmission suppliers, DG can provide dependable capacity supply, relief from transmission constraints, and ancillary transmission services such as reactive supply and supplemental reserves. The promise of DG technologies is strong. The technical hurdles to capturing these benefits are being met with improved generators and with enhanced command, control, and communications technologies. However, institutional and regulatory hurdles to capturing these distributed generation benefits appear to be significant. Restructuring for retail access and the delamination of utilities into wires companies and generation companies may make it difficult to capture many of the multiple benefits of DG. Policy-makers should be aware of these factors and strive to craft policies and rules that give DG a fair change to deliver these strong benefits.

  12. Electroweak bremsstrahlung from neutron-neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Yi; Liou, M. K.; Schreiber, W. M.

    2009-09-15

    Background: Nucleon-nucleon (NN) bremsstrahlung processes NN{gamma} (nn{gamma}, np{gamma}, and pp{gamma}) have been extensively investigated. Neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung processes from nucleon-nucleon scattering NN{nu}{nu} (nn{nu}{nu}, np{nu}{nu}, and pp{nu}{nu}) have recently attracted attention in studies of neutrino emission in neutron stars. The calculated NN{nu}{nu} cross sections (or emissivities) are found to be sensitive to the two-nucleon dynamical model used in the calculations. Purpose and Method: A realistic one-boson-exchange (ROBE) model for NN interactions is used to construct the electroweak bremsstrahlung amplitudes using the well-known nucleon electromagnetic and weak interaction vertices. The constructed nn{gamma} and nn{nu}{nu} amplitudes are investigated by applying them to calculate nn{gamma} and nn{nu}{nu} cross sections, respectively. Results: (i) The 190-MeV ROBE nn{gamma} cross sections agree well with those calculated using the TuTts amplitude, but they are in disagreement with those calculated using the Low amplitude. (ii) The calculated nn{nu}{nu} cross sections using the ROBE amplitude at the neutrino-pair energy {omega} = 1 MeV are in quantitative agreement with those calculated by Timmermans et al.[Phys. Rev. C 65, 064007 (2002)], who used the leading-order term of the soft neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung amplitude. Conclusions: The nn{gamma} amplitude in the ROBE approach, which obeys the soft-photon theorem, has a predictive power similar to that of the TuTts amplitude. The nn{nu}{nu} amplitude in the ROBE approach, which is consistent with the soft neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung theorem, has a predictive power similar to that of the soft neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung amplitude of Timmermans et al. in the low neutrino-pair energy region.

  13. co2 capture meeting | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2012 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting July 9 - 12, 2012 Proceedings of the 2012 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Table of Contents Presentations Monday, July 9 Opening/Overview Post-Combustion Membrane-Based Capture Post-Combustion Sorbent-Based Capture Tuesday, July 10 Post-Combustion Solvent-Based Capture Wednesday, July 11 Oxy-Combustion and Oxygen Production Chemical Looping Process CO2 Compression ARPA-e Capture Projects System Studies and Modeling Thursday, July 12 FutureGen 2.0,

  14. Neutron multiplicity ,easurements With 3He alternative: Straw neutron detectors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Wolff, Ronald S.; Meade, John A.; Detweiler, Ryan; Maurer, Richard J.; Mitchell, Stephen E.; Guss, Paul P.; Lacy, Jeffrey L.; Sun, Liang; Athanasiades, Athanasios

    2015-01-27

    Counting neutrons emitted by special nuclear material (SNM) and differentiating them from the background neutrons of various origins is the most effective passive means of detecting SNM. Unfortunately, neutron detection, counting, and partitioning in a maritime environment are complex due to the presence of high-multiplicity spallation neutrons (commonly known as “ship effect”) and to the complicated nature of the neutron scattering in that environment. In this study, a prototype neutron detector was built using 10B as the converter in a special form factor called “straws” that would address the above problems by looking into the details of multiplicity distributions ofmore » neutrons originating from a fissioning source. This paper describes the straw neutron multiplicity counter (NMC) and assesses the performance with those of a commercially available fission meter. The prototype straw neutron detector provides a large-area, efficient, lightweight, more granular (than fission meter) neutron-responsive detection surface (to facilitate imaging) to enhance the ease of application of fission meters. Presented here are the results of preliminary investigations, modeling, and engineering considerations leading to the construction of this prototype. This design is capable of multiplicity and Feynman variance measurements. This prototype may lead to a near-term solution to the crisis that has arisen from the global scarcity of 3He by offering a viable alternative to fission meters. This paper describes the work performed during a 2-year site-directed research and development (SDRD) project that incorporated straw detectors for neutron multiplicity counting. The NMC is a two-panel detector system. We used 10B (in the form of enriched boron carbide: 10B4C) for neutron detection instead of 3He. In the first year, the project worked with a panel of straw neutron detectors, investigated its characteristics, and developed a data acquisition (DAQ) system to collect

  15. Measurements of Neutron Induced Cross Sections at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guber, K.H.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Koehler, P.E.; Leal, L.C.; Sayer, R.O.; Spencer, R.R.

    1999-09-20

    We have used the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) to measure neutron total and the fission cross sections of 233U in the energy range from 0.36 eV to ~700 keV. We report average fission and total cross sections. Also, we measured the neutron total cross sections of 27Al and Natural chlorine as well as the capture cross section of Al over an energy range from 100 eV up to about 400 keV.

  16. SciTech Connect: "neutron scattering"

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    neutron scattering" Find + Advanced Search Term Search Semantic Search Advanced Search All Fields: "neutron scattering" Semantic Semantic Term Title: Full Text: Bibliographic...

  17. High energy neutron Computed Tomography developed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    objects. May 9, 2014 Neutron tomography horizontal "slice" of a tungsten and polyethylene test object containing tungsten carbide BBs. Neutron tomography horizontal "slice"...

  18. Efficiency measurements using tagged neutrons (Conference) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Efficiency measurements using tagged neutrons Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Efficiency measurements using tagged neutrons Authors: Taddeucci, Terry N 1 + Show Author ...

  19. Efficiency measurements using tagged neutrons (Conference) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Efficiency measurements using tagged neutrons Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Efficiency measurements using tagged neutrons You are accessing a document from the ...

  20. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONSTRUCTION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vernon, H.C.; Goett, J.J.

    1958-09-01

    A cover device is described for the fuel element receiving tube of a neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, water cooled type wherein said tubes are arranged in a moderator with their longitudinal axes vertical. The cover is provided with means to support a rod-type fuel element from the bottom thereof and means to lock the cover in place, the latter being adapted for remote operation. This cover device is easily removable and seals the opening in the upper end of the fuel tube against leakage of coolant.

  1. Neutrons for technology and science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aeppli, G.

    1995-10-01

    We reviewed recent work using neutrons generated at nuclear reactors an accelerator-based spallation sources. Provided that large new sources become available, neutron beams will continue to have as great an impact on technology and science as in the past.

  2. Fission fragment driven neutron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Lowell G.; Young, Robert C.; Brugger, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    Fissionable uranium formed into a foil is bombarded with thermal neutrons in the presence of deuterium-tritium gas. The resulting fission fragments impart energy to accelerate deuterium and tritium particles which in turn provide approximately 14 MeV neutrons by the reactions t(d,n).sup.4 He and d(t,n).sup.4 He.

  3. Maintenance neutron coincidence counter manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krick, M.S.; Polk, P.J.; Atencio, J.D.

    1989-09-01

    A compact thermal-neutron coincidence counter has been constructed specifically for use by the International Atomic Energy Agency as a reference neutron detector for maintenance activities. The counter is designed for use only with {sup 252}Cf sources in SR-CF-100 capsules. This manual describes the detector's mechanical and electrical components and its operating characteristics. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  4. High power neutron production targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wender, S.

    1996-06-01

    The author describes issues of concern in the design of targets and associated systems for high power neutron production facilities. The facilities include uses for neutron scattering, accelerator driven transmutation, accelerator production of tritium, short pulse spallation sources, and long pulse spallation sources. Each of these applications requires a source with different design needs and consequently different implementation in practise.

  5. Measuring neutron spectra in radiotherapy using the nested neutron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maglieri, Robert Evans, Michael; Seuntjens, Jan; Kildea, John; Licea, Angel

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Out-of-field neutron doses resulting from photonuclear interactions in the head of a linear accelerator pose an iatrogenic risk to patients and an occupational risk to personnel during radiotherapy. To quantify neutron production, in-room measurements have traditionally been carried out using Bonner sphere systems (BSS) with activation foils and TLDs. In this work, a recently developed active detector, the nested neutron spectrometer (NNS), was tested in radiotherapy bunkers. Methods: The NNS is designed for easy handling and is more practical than the traditional BSS. Operated in current-mode, the problem of pulse pileup due to high dose-rates is overcome by measuring current, similar to an ionization chamber. In a bunker housing a Varian Clinac 21EX, the performance of the NNS was evaluated in terms of reproducibility, linearity, and dose-rate effects. Using a custom maximum-likelihood expectation–maximization algorithm, measured neutron spectra at various locations inside the bunker were then compared to Monte Carlo simulations of an identical setup. In terms of dose, neutron ambient dose equivalents were calculated from the measured spectra and compared to bubble detector neutron dose equivalent measurements. Results: The NNS-measured spectra for neutrons at various locations in a treatment room were found to be consistent with expectations for both relative shape and absolute magnitude. Neutron fluence-rate decreased with distance from the source and the shape of the spectrum changed from a dominant fast neutron peak near the Linac head to a dominant thermal neutron peak in the moderating conditions of the maze. Monte Carlo data and NNS-measured spectra agreed within 30% at all locations except in the maze where the deviation was a maximum of 40%. Neutron ambient dose equivalents calculated from the authors’ measured spectra were consistent (one standard deviation) with bubble detector measurements in the treatment room. Conclusions: The NNS may

  6. Fast neutron environments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchheit, Thomas Edward; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Lu, Ping; Brewer, Luke N.; Goods, Steven Howard; Foiles, Stephen Martin; Puskar, Joseph David; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Doyle, Barney Lee; Boyce, Brad Lee; Clark, Blythe G.

    2011-10-01

    The goal of this LDRD project is to develop a rapid first-order experimental procedure for the testing of advanced cladding materials that may be considered for generation IV nuclear reactors. In order to investigate this, a technique was developed to expose the coupons of potential materials to high displacement damage at elevated temperatures to simulate the neutron environment expected in Generation IV reactors. This was completed through a high temperature high-energy heavy-ion implantation. The mechanical properties of the ion irradiated region were tested by either micropillar compression or nanoindentation to determine the local properties, as a function of the implantation dose and exposure temperature. In order to directly compare the microstructural evolution and property degradation from the accelerated testing and classical neutron testing, 316L, 409, and 420 stainless steels were tested. In addition, two sets of diffusion couples from 316L and HT9 stainless steels with various refractory metals. This study has shown that if the ion irradiation size scale is taken into consideration when developing and analyzing the mechanical property data, significant insight into the structural properties of the potential cladding materials can be gained in about a week.

  7. New Funding Boosts Carbon Capture, Solar Energy and High Gas...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Boosts Carbon Capture, Solar Energy and High Gas Mileage Cars and Trucks New Funding Boosts Carbon Capture, Solar Energy and High Gas Mileage Cars and Trucks June 11, 2009 - ...

  8. Recent advances in carbon dioxide capture with metal-organic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recent advances in carbon dioxide capture with metal-organic frameworks Previous Next List ... Great progress in MOF materials for CO2 capture has been made in the past and reviewed ...

  9. A2BE Carbon Capture LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Logo: A2BE Carbon Capture LLC Name: A2BE Carbon Capture LLC Address: 2301 Panorama Ave Place: Boulder, Colorado Zip: 80304 Region: Rockies Area Sector: Biofuels Product:...

  10. GE Awarded DOE Funding to Pilot Carbon Capture Technology | GE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Awarded DOE Project to Pilot CO2 Capture Technology for Power Plants Click to email this ... GE Awarded DOE Project to Pilot CO2 Capture Technology for Power Plants Same class of ...

  11. CO2 Capture Poject CCP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CO2 Capture Poject CCP Jump to: navigation, search Name: CO2 Capture Poject (CCP) Place: United Kingdom Sector: Carbon Product: CCP is a partnership of energy companies and...

  12. Models from Big Molecules Captured in a Flash

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Models from Big Molecules Captured in a Flash Models from Big Molecules Captured in a Flash Print Sunday, 26 May 2013 00:00 The structures of most of the two million proteins in...

  13. Capturing the Sun, Creating a Clean Energy Future (Brochure)...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Capturing the Sun, Creating a Clean Energy Future (Brochure), SunShot, Solar Energy Technologies Program (SETP), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Capturing the Sun, Creating a Clean ...

  14. Today: Live from the Carbon Capture and Storage Forum | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Today: Live from the Carbon Capture and Storage Forum Today: Live from the Carbon Capture and Storage Forum September 8, 2010 - 10:10am Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former ...

  15. Energy Department Advances Carbon Capture and Storage Research...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon Capture and Storage Research on Two Fronts Energy Department Advances Carbon Capture and Storage Research on Two Fronts September 16, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - ...

  16. Capturing Waste Gas: Saves Energy, Lower Costs - Case Study,...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Capturing Waste Gas: Saves Energy, Lower Costs - Case Study, 2013 Capturing Waste Gas: Saves Energy, Lower Costs - Case Study, 2013 ArcelorMittal USA, Inc.'s Indiana Harbor steel ...

  17. Secretary Chu Announces $3 Billion Investment for Carbon Capture...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... retrofit a CO2 capture plant on a 160 megawatt flue gas stream at an existing coal-fired power plant, Alabama Power's Plant Barry, located north of Mobile, AL. The captured CO2 ...

  18. 2015 CO2 Capture Technology Meeting | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Wednesday, June 24, 2015 POST-COMBUSTION SOLVENT-BASED CAPTURE An Advanced Catalytic Solvent for Lower Cost Post-Combustion CO2 Capture in a Coal Fired Power Plant Cameron Lippert, ...

  19. Breakthrough Large-Scale Industrial Project Begins Carbon Capture and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Utilization | Department of Energy Breakthrough Large-Scale Industrial Project Begins Carbon Capture and Utilization Breakthrough Large-Scale Industrial Project Begins Carbon Capture and Utilization January 25, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A breakthrough carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) project in Texas has begun capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) and piping it to an oilfield for use in enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Read the project factsheet The project at Air Products

  20. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory--Capture and Sequestration Support Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - Capture and Sequestration Support Services Background The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is helping to develop technologies to capture, separate, and store carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to reduce green-house gas (GHG) emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS)-the capture of CO 2 from large point sources and subsequent injection into deep

  1. DOE Selects 16 Transformational Carbon Capture Technologies Projects for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Funding | Department of Energy 16 Transformational Carbon Capture Technologies Projects for Funding DOE Selects 16 Transformational Carbon Capture Technologies Projects for Funding August 13, 2015 - 9:59am Addthis The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has selected 16 projects to receive funding through NETL's Carbon Capture Program. The program funds development and testing of transformational carbon dioxide (CO2) capture systems for new and existing

  2. Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction August 24, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Construction activities have begun at an Illinois ethanol plant that will demonstrate carbon capture and storage. The project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy, is the first large-scale integrated carbon capture and storage (CCS) demonstration

  3. Capture of carbon dioxide by hybrid sorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srinivasachar, Srivats

    2014-09-23

    A composition, process and system for capturing carbon dioxide from a combustion gas stream. The composition has a particulate porous support medium that has a high volume of pores, an alkaline component distributed within the pores and on the surface of the support medium, and water adsorbed on the alkaline component, wherein the proportion of water in the composition is between about 5% and about 35% by weight of the composition. The process and system contemplates contacting the sorbent and the flowing gas stream together at a temperature and for a time such that some water remains adsorbed in the alkaline component when the contact of the sorbent with the flowing gas ceases.

  4. Wyoming Carbon Capture and Storage Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nealon, Teresa

    2014-06-30

    This report outlines the accomplishments of the Wyoming Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Technology Institute (WCTI), including creating a website and online course catalog, sponsoring technology transfer workshops, reaching out to interested parties via news briefs and engaging in marketing activities, i.e., advertising and participating in tradeshows. We conclude that the success of WCTI was hampered by the lack of a market. Because there were no supporting financial incentives to store carbon, the private sector had no reason to incur the extra expense of training their staff to implement carbon storage. ii

  5. Neutron and X-ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carini, Gabriella; Denes, Peter; Gruener, Sol; Lessner, Elianne

    2012-08-01

    (and two computing hurdles that result from the corresponding increase in data volume) for the detector community to overcome in order to realize the full potential of BES neutron and X-ray facilities. Resolving these detector impediments will improve scientific productivity both by enabling new types of experiments, which will expand the scientific breadth at the X-ray and neutron facilities, and by potentially reducing the beam time required for a given experiment. These research priorities are summarized in the table below. Note that multiple, simultaneous detector improvements are often required to take full advantage of brighter sources. High-efficiency hard X-ray sensors: The fraction of incident particles that are actually detected defines detector efficiency. Silicon, the most common direct-detection X-ray sensor material, is (for typical sensor thicknesses) 100% efficient at 8 keV, 25%efficient at 20 keV, and only 3% efficient at 50 keV. Other materials are needed for hard X-rays. Replacement for 3He for neutron detectors: 3He has long been the neutron detection medium of choice because of its high cross section over a wide neutron energy range for the reaction 3He + n —> 3H + 1H + 0.764 MeV. 3He stockpiles are rapidly dwindling, and what is available can be had only at prohibitively high prices. Doped scintillators hold promise as ways to capture neutrons and convert them into light, although work is needed on brighter, more efficient scintillator solutions. Neutron detectors also require advances in speed and resolution. Fast-framing X-ray detectors: Today’s brighter X-ray sources make time-resolved studies possible. For example, hybrid X-ray pixel detectors, initially developed for particle physics, are becoming fairly mature X-ray detectors, with considerable development in Europe. To truly enable time-resolved studies, higher frame rates and dynamic range are required, and smaller pixel sizes are desirable. High-speed spectroscopic X-ray detectors

  6. Fine-grid calculations for stellar electron and positron capture rates on Fe isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Tawfik, Abdel Nasser

    2013-03-15

    The acquisition of precise and reliable nuclear data is a prerequisite to success for stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis studies. Core-collapse simulators find it challenging to generate an explosion from the collapse of the core of massive stars. It is believed that a better understanding of the microphysics of core-collapse can lead to successful results. The weak interaction processes are able to trigger the collapse and control the lepton-to-baryon ratio (Y{sub e}) of the corematerial. It is suggested that the temporal variation of Y{sub e} within the core of a massive star has a pivotal role to play in the stellar evolution and a fine-tuning of this parameter at various stages of presupernova evolution is the key to generate an explosion. During the presupernova evolution of massive stars, isotopes of iron, mainly {sup 54-56}Fe, are considered to be key players in controlling Y{sub e} ratio via electron capture on these nuclides. Recently an improved microscopic calculation of weak-interaction-mediated rates for iron isotopes was introduced using the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase-approximation (pn-QRPA) theory. The pn-QRPA theory allows a microscopic state-by-state calculation of stellar capture rates which greatly increases the reliability of calculated rates. The results were suggestive of some fine-tuning of the Y{sub e} ratio during various phases of stellar evolution. Here we present for the first time the fine-grid calculation of the electron and positron capture rates on {sup 54-56}Fe. The sensitivity of the pn-QRPA calculated capture rates to the deformation parameter is also studied in this work. Core-collapse simulators may find this calculation suitable for interpolation purposes and for necessary incorporation in the stellar evolution codes.

  7. Capturing CO2 via reactions in nanopores.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Kevin; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Tang, Z; Dong, J. H.

    2008-10-01

    This one-year exploratory LDRD aims to provide fundamental understanding of the mechanism of CO2 scrubbing platforms that will reduce green house gas emission and mitigate the effect of climate change. The project builds on the team member's expertise developed in previous LDRD projects to study the capture or preferential retention of CO2 in nanoporous membranes and on metal oxide surfaces. We apply Density Functional Theory and ab initio molecular dynamics techniques to model the binding of CO2 on MgO and CaO (100) surfaces and inside water-filled, amine group functionalized silica nanopores. The results elucidate the mechanisms of CO2 trapping and clarify some confusion in the literature. Our work identifies key future calculations that will have the greatest impact on CO2 capture technologies, and provides guidance to science-based design of platforms that can separate the green house gas CO2 from power plant exhaust or even from the atmosphere. Experimentally, we modify commercial MFI zeolite membranes and find that they preferentially transmit H2 over CO2 by a factor of 34. Since zeolite has potential catalytic capability to crack hydrocarbons into CO2 and H2, this finding paves the way for zeolite membranes that can convert biofuel into H2 and separate the products all in one step.

  8. Boron nitride solid state neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doty, F. Patrick

    2004-04-27

    The present invention describes an apparatus useful for detecting neutrons, and particularly for detecting thermal neutrons, while remaining insensitive to gamma radiation. Neutrons are detected by direct measurement of current pulses produced by an interaction of the neutrons with hexagonal pyrolytic boron nitride.

  9. AN INTEGRAL REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT TO INFER ACTINIDE CAPTURE CROSS-SECTIONS FROM THORIUM TO CALIFORNIUM WITH ACCELERATOR MASS SPECTROMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Youinou; M. Salvatores; M. Paul; R. Pardo; G. Palmiotti; F. Kondev; G. Imel

    2010-04-01

    The principle of the proposed experiment is to irradiate very pure actinide samples in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INL and, after a given time, determine the amount of the different transmutation products. The determination of the nuclide densities before and after neutron irradiation will allow inference of effective neutron capture cross-sections. This approach has been used in the past and the novelty of this experiment is that the atom densities of the different transmutation products will be determined using the Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy (AMS) technique at the ATLAS facility located at ANL. It is currently planned to irradiate the following isotopes: 232Th, 235U, 236U, 238U, 237Np, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu, 241Am, 243Am and 248Cm.

  10. Los Alamos devices capture 'Oscars of Invention' awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos devices capture 'Oscars of Invention' awards Los Alamos devices capture 'Oscars of Invention' awards Safire oil-well measurement and AWS laser-based spectrometer for materials inspection capture R&D Magazine's "R&D 100s" July 3, 2014 Los Alamos devices capture 'Oscars of Invention' awards Safire oil-well measurement and AWS laser-based spectrometer for materials inspection capture R&D Magazine's "R&D 100s" Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications

  11. Neutron Imaging Developments at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Ronald Owen; Hunter, James F.; Schirato, Richard C.; Vogel, Sven C.; Swift, Alicia L.; Ickes, Timothy Lee; Ward, William Carl; Losko, Adrian Simon; Tremsin, Anton; Sevanto, Sanna Annika; Espy, Michelle A.; Dickman, Lee Thoresen; Malone, Michael

    2015-10-29

    Thermal, epithermal, and high-energy neutrons are available from two spallation sources at the 800 MeV proton accelerator. Improvements in detectors and computing have enabled new capabilities that use the pulsed beam properties at LANSCE; these include amorphous Si (aSi) detectors, intensified charge-coupled device cameras, and micro-channel plates. Applications include water flow in living specimens, inclusions and fission products in uranium oxide, and high-energy neutron imaging using an aSi flat panel with ZnS(Ag) scintillator screen. images of a metal/plastic cylinder from photons, low-energy and high-energy neutrons are compared.

  12. The nuclear physics of neutron stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piekarewicz, J.

    2014-05-09

    We explore the unique and fascinating structure of neutron stars. Although neutron stars are of interest in many areas of Physics, our aim is to provide an intellectual bridge between Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics. We argue against the naive perception of a neutron star as a uniform assembly of neutrons packed to enormous densities. Rather, by focusing on the many exotic phases that are speculated to exist in a neutron star, we show how the reality is different and far more interesting.

  13. High energy neutron Computed Tomography developed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High energy neutron Computed Tomography developed High energy neutron Computed Tomography developed LANSCE now has a high-energy neutron imaging capability that can be deployed on WNR flight paths for unclassified and classified objects. May 9, 2014 Neutron tomography horizontal "slice" of a tungsten and polyethylene test object containing tungsten carbide BBs. Neutron tomography horizontal "slice" of a tungsten and polyethylene test object containing tungsten carbide BBs.

  14. Capture process heat during VOC destruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    To avoid problems with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during the manufacture or use of coatings, sealants or adhesives, many operators would rather switch to water-based products and systems than install costly emission-control equipment. However, for some, this option is not always available. The Hoell Co. (Langenfeld, Germany), a manufacturer of aluminum and laminated tubes, recently adopted an innovative process to fold and seal its tubes. The new technique uses a thin coat of hot varnish instead of the standard latex sealant. To cope with organic vapors created by the sealing technique, the company installed an air purification system from LTG Lufttechnische GmbH (Stuttgart, Germany). The thermal regenerative oxidizer, which consists of a combustion chamber and three ceramic heat storage chambers, not only destroys vapor-phase organic pollutants, but captures the heat of oxidation to generate process heat and produce hot water for tube washing. This helps to offset operating costs at the facility.

  15. Excision methods for high resolution shock capturing schemes applied to general relativistic hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawke, Ian; Loeffler, Frank; Nerozzi, Andrea

    2005-05-15

    We present a simple method for applying excision boundary conditions for the relativistic Euler equations. This method depends on the use of reconstruction-evolution methods, a standard class of high-resolution shock-capturing methods. We test three different reconstruction schemes, namely, total variation diminishing, piecewise parabolic method (PPM) and essentially nonoscillatory. The method does not require that the coordinate system is adapted to the excision boundary. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method using tests containing discontinuities, static test fluid solutions with black holes, and full dynamical collapse of a neutron star to a black hole. A modified PPM scheme is introduced because of problems arisen when matching excision with the original PPM reconstruction scheme.

  16. Portable Neutron Sensors for Emergency Response Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ,

    2012-06-24

    This article presents the experimental work performed in the area of neutron detector development at the Remote Sensing Laboratory–Andrews Operations (RSL-AO) sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in the last four years. During the 1950s neutron detectors were developed mostly to characterize nuclear reactors where the neutron flux is high. Due to the indirect nature of neutron detection via interaction with other particles, neutron counting and neutron energy measurements have never been as precise as gamma-ray counting measurements and gamma-ray spectroscopy. This indirect nature is intrinsic to all neutron measurement endeavors (except perhaps for neutron spin-related experiments, viz. neutron spin-echo measurements where one obtains μeV energy resolution). In emergency response situations generally the count rates are low, and neutrons may be scattered around in inhomogeneous intervening materials. It is also true that neutron sensors are most efficient for the lowest energy neutrons, so it is not as easy to detect and count energetic neutrons. Most of the emergency response neutron detectors are offshoots of nuclear device diagnostics tools and special nuclear materials characterization equipment, because that is what is available commercially. These instruments mostly are laboratory equipment, and not field-deployable gear suited for mobile teams. Our goal is to design and prototype field-deployable, ruggedized, lightweight, efficient neutron detectors.

  17. Ion chamber based neutron detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derzon, Mark S; Galambos, Paul C; Renzi, Ronald F

    2014-12-16

    A neutron detector with monolithically integrated readout circuitry, including: a bonded semiconductor die; an ion chamber formed in the bonded semiconductor die; a first electrode and a second electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; and the readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the first and second electrodes. The bonded semiconductor die includes an etched semiconductor substrate bonded to an active semiconductor substrate. The readout circuitry is formed in a portion of the active semiconductor substrate. The ion chamber has a substantially planar first surface on which the first electrode is formed and a substantially planar second surface, parallel to the first surface, on which the second electrode is formed. The distance between the first electrode and the second electrode may be equal to or less than the 50% attenuation length for neutrons in the neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber.

  18. DETERMINATION OF SPECIFIC NEUTRONIC REACTIVITY

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dessauer, G.

    1960-05-10

    A method is given for production-line determination of the specific neutronic reactivity of such objects as individual nuclear fuel or neutron absorber elements and is notable for rapidity and apparatus simplicity. The object is incorporated in a slightly sub-critical chain fission reactive assembly having a discrete neutron source, thereby establishing a K/sub eff/ within the crucial range of 0.95 to 0.995. The range was found to afford, uniquely, flux- transient damped response in a niatter of seconds simultaneously with acceptable analytical sensitivity. The resulting neutron flux measured at a situs spaced from both object and source within the assembly serves as a calibrable indication of said reactivity.

  19. Rotation of Nuclei as Observed in Ternary Fission of the Reaction 235U(nth,f) Induced by Polarized Neutron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goennenwein, F.; Gagarski, A.; Guseva, I.; Petrov, G.; Sokolov, V.; Zavarukhkina, T.; Mutterer, M.; Nesvizhevski, V.; Bunakov, V.; Kadmensky, S.

    2007-05-22

    Ternary fission of the standard reaction 235U(nth,f) induced by cold polarized neutrons has been investigated. Fission fragments and light charged particles were recorded in coincidence. Following cold neutron capture the compound nucleus 236U* has spin 3- or 4-. At the saddle point of the fissioning 236U* nucleus these states are collective. They are expected to retain a sizable collectivity down to the scission point. In fact, a collective rotation has been sensed by the shift in the angular distribution of the light charged particles which depends on the orientation of neutron polarization. Direct observation of the rotation of 236U* excited in a cold neutron reaction is reported here for the first time. It is proposed to call the new phenomenon the 'ROT-effect'.

  20. Parity nonconservation in {sup 106}Pd and {sup 108}Pd neutron resonances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, B.E.; Roberson, N.R. [Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina 27708-0308 (United States)] [Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina 27708-0308 (United States); Bowman, J.D.; Knudson, J.N.; Penttilae, S.I.; Seestrom, S.J.; Yuan, V.W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Delheij, P.P. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (CANADA)] [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (CANADA); Haseyama, T.; Masaike, A.; Matsuda, Y. [Physics Department, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-01 (Japan)] [Physics Department, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-01 (Japan); Lowie, L.Y.; Mitchell, G.E.; Stephenson, S.L. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina 27708-0308 (United States)] [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina 27708-0308 (United States); Postma, H. [Delft University of Technology, Delft, 2629 JB (The Netherlands)] [Delft University of Technology, Delft, 2629 JB (The Netherlands); Sharapov, E.I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russia)] [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russia)

    1999-11-01

    Parity nonconservation (PNC) has been studied in the neutron {ital p}-wave resonances of {sup 106}Pd and {sup 108}Pd in the energy range of 20 to 2000 eV. Longitudinal asymmetries in {ital p}-wave capture cross sections are measured using longitudinally polarized neutrons incident on {approximately}20-g metal-powder targets at LANSCE. A CsI {gamma}-ray detector array measures capture cross section asymmetries as a function of neutron energy which is determined by the neutron time-of-flight method. A total of 21 {ital p}-wave resonances in {sup 106}Pd and 21 {ital p}-wave resonances in {sup 108}Pd were studied. One statistically significant PNC effect was observed in {sup 106}Pd, and no effects were observed in {sup 108}Pd. For {sup 106}Pd a weak spreading width of {Gamma}{sub w}=34{sub {minus}28}{sup +47}{times}10{sup {minus}7} eV was obtained. For {sup 108}Pd an upper limit on the weak spreading width of {Gamma}{sub w}{lt}12{times}10{sup {minus}7} eV was determined at the 68{percent} confidence level. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Sustaining knowledge in the neutron generator community and benchmarking study. Phase II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huff, Tameka B.; Stubblefield, William Anthony; Cole, Benjamin Holland, II; Baldonado, Esther

    2010-08-01

    This report documents the second phase of work under the Sustainable Knowledge Management (SKM) project for the Neutron Generator organization at Sandia National Laboratories. Previous work under this project is documented in SAND2008-1777, Sustaining Knowledge in the Neutron Generator Community and Benchmarking Study. Knowledge management (KM) systems are necessary to preserve critical knowledge within organizations. A successful KM program should focus on people and the process for sharing, capturing, and applying knowledge. The Neutron Generator organization is developing KM systems to ensure knowledge is not lost. A benchmarking study involving site visits to outside industry plus additional resource research was conducted during this phase of the SKM project. The findings presented in this report are recommendations for making an SKM program successful. The recommendations are activities that promote sharing, capturing, and applying knowledge. The benchmarking effort, including the site visits to Toyota and Halliburton, provided valuable information on how the SEA KM team could incorporate a KM solution for not just the neutron generators (NG) community but the entire laboratory. The laboratory needs a KM program that allows members of the workforce to access, share, analyze, manage, and apply knowledge. KM activities, such as communities of practice (COP) and sharing best practices, provide a solution towards creating an enabling environment for KM. As more and more people leave organizations through retirement and job transfer, the need to preserve knowledge is essential. Creating an environment for the effective use of knowledge is vital to achieving the laboratory's mission.

  2. CONTROL MEANS FOR NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tonks, L.

    1962-08-01

    A control device surrounding the active portion of a nuclear reactor is described. The control device consists of a plurality of contiguous cylinders partly filled with a neutron absorbing material and partly filled with a neutron reflecting material, each cylinder having a longitudinal reentrant surface into which a portion of an adjacent cylinder extends, one of the cylinders having two re-entrant surfaces, and means for rotating the cylinders one at a time. (AEC)

  3. Alternative Neutron Detection Testing Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Erikson, Luke E.; Kernan, Warnick J.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Stromswold, David C.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-04-08

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. Most currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large area neutron detector. This type of neutron detector is used in the TSA and other RPMs installed in international locations and in the Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation RPMs deployed primarily for domestic applications. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world and, thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. These technologies are: 1) Boron trifluoride-filled proportional counters, 2) Boron-lined proportional counters, 3) Lithium-loaded glass fibers, and 4) Coated wavelength-shifting plastic fibers. Reported here is a summary of the testing carried out at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on these technologies to date, as well as measurements on 3He tubes at various pressures. Details on these measurements are available in the referenced reports. Sponsors of these tests include the Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and the Department of Defense (DoD), as well as internal Pacific Northwest National Laboratory funds.

  4. Neutron detectors comprising boron powder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhehui; Morris, Christopher; Bacon, Jeffrey Darnell; Makela, Mark F; Spaulding, Randy Jay

    2013-05-21

    High-efficiency neutron detector substrate assemblies comprising a first conductive substrate, wherein a first side of the substrate is in direct contact with a first layer of a powder material comprising .sup.10boron, .sup.10boron carbide or combinations thereof, and wherein a conductive material is in proximity to the first layer of powder material; and processes of making said neutron detector substrate assemblies.

  5. The 209Bi(nth,{gamma})210Bi and 209Bi(nth,{gamma})210m,gBi Cross Sections Determined at the Budapest Neutron Centre

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borella, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Molnar, G.; Belgya, T.; Revay, Zs.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Berthoumieux, E.; Gunsing, F.; Letourneau, A.; Marie, F.

    2005-05-24

    The neutron total capture cross section of 209Bi together with the cross sections to the ground state and the isomeric state were determined at the cold neutron beam PGAA-NIPS facilities at the Budapest Neutron Centre. For the measurements we used a coaxial HPGe detector with Compton suppression. The partial {gamma}-ray production cross sections were deduced relative to the partial capture cross section for the 4055 keV transition following 209Bi(n,{gamma}). This partial cross section was measured with a bismuth nitrate sample with respect to nitrogen as a comparator. The total capture cross section resulting from the primary transitions is lower than the one deduced from the transitions feeding the isomeric and the ground state. Since the multipolarity of the main transition feeding the ground state is not known, the uncertainty on the capture cross section to the ground state is rather large. We also compare the total capture thermal cross section with the value deduced from resonance parameters and discuss the impact of the branching ratio on the analysis of prompt capture cross section measurements using the total energy detection principle.

  6. J lich Neutron Spin Echo Instrument Inaugurated (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    J lich Neutron Spin Echo Instrument Inaugurated Citation Details In-Document Search Title: J lich Neutron Spin Echo Instrument Inaugurated The neutron spin echo (NSE) spectrometer ...

  7. DOE Science Showcase - Neutron Science Research from DOE Databases...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Neutron Science Research from DOE Databases Additional neutron science research in DOE Databases Information Bridge Neutron scattering research was pioneered in 1946 by ORNL's ...

  8. NUCLEAR ENERGY UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS Improved Fission Neutron Data...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NUCLEAR ENERGY UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS Improved Fission Neutron Data Base for Active ... the detection of neutrons from fission induced by fast neutrons or high-energy gamma rays. ...

  9. LOS ALAMOS NEUTRON SCIENCE CENTER CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF FUTURE POWER REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GAVRON, VICTOR I.; HILL, TONY S.; PITCHER, ERIC J.; TOVESSON, FREDERIK K.

    2007-01-09

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a large spallation neutron complex centered around an 800 MeV high-currently proton accelerator. Existing facilities include a highly-moderated neutron facility (Lujan Center) where neutrons between thermal and keV energies are produced, and the Weapons Neutron Research Center (WNR), where a bare spallation target produces neutrons between 0.1 and several hundred MeV.The LANSCE facility offers a unique capability to provide high precision nuclear data over a large energy region, including that for fast reactor systems. In an ongoing experimental program the fission and capture cross sections are being measured for a number of minor actinides relevant for Generation-IV reactors and transmutation technology. Fission experiments makes use of both the highly moderated spallation neutron spectrum at the Lujan Center, and the unmoderated high energy spectrum at WNR. By combininb measurements at these two facilities the differential fission cross section is measured relative to the {sup 235}U(n,f) standard from subthermal energies up to about 200 MeV. An elaborate data acquisition system is designed to deal with all the different types of background present when spanning 10 energy decades. The first isotope to be measured was {sup 237}Np, and the results were used to improve the current ENDF/B-VII evaluation. Partial results have also been obtained for {sup 240}Pu and {sup 242}Pu, and the final results are expected shortly. Capture cross sections are measured at LANSCE using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE). This unique instrument is highly efficient in detecting radiative capture events, and can thus handle radioactive samples of half-lives as low as 100 years. A number of capture cross sections important to fast reaction applications have been measured with DANCE. The first measurement was on {sup 237}Np(n,{gamma}), and the results have been submitted for publication. Other capture

  10. Radiogenic lead with dominant content of {sup 208}Pb: New coolant and neutron moderator for innovative nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shmelev, A. N.; Kulikov, G. G.; Kryuchkov, E. F.; Apse, V. A.; Kulikov, E. G.

    2012-07-01

    The advantages of radiogenic lead with dominant content of {sup 208}Pb as a reactor coolant with respect to natural lead are caused by unique nuclear properties of {sup 208}Pb which is a double-magic nucleus with closed proton and neutron shells. This results in significantly lower micro cross section and resonance integral of radiative neutron capture by {sup 208}Pb than those for numerous light neutron moderators. The extremely weak ability of {sup 208}Pb to absorb neutrons results in the following effects. Firstly, neutron moderating factor (ratio of scattering to capture cross sections) is larger than that for graphite and light water. Secondly, age and diffusion length of thermal neutrons are larger than those for graphite, light and heavy water. Thirdly, neutron lifetime in {sup 208}Pb is comparable with that for graphite, beryllium and heavy water what could be important for safe reactor operation. The paper presents some results obtained in neutronics and thermal-hydraulics evaluations of the benefits from the use of radiogenic lead with dominant content of {sup 208}Pb instead of natural lead as a coolant of fast breeder reactors. The paper demonstrates that substitution of radiogenic lead for natural lead can offer the following benefits for operation of fast breeder reactors. Firstly, improvement of the reactor safety thanks to the better values of coolant temperature reactivity coefficient and, secondly, improvement of some thermal-hydraulic reactor parameters. Radiogenic lead can be extracted from thorium sludge without isotope separation as {sup 208}Pb is a final isotope in the decay chain of {sup 232}Th. (authors)

  11. The EOS of neutron matter, and the effect of Lambda hyperons to neutron star structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gandolfi, Stefano

    2015-01-13

    The following topics are addressed: the model and the method; equation of state of neutron matter, role of three-neutron force; symmetry energy; ?-hypernuclei; ?-neutron matter; and neutron star structure. In summary, quantum Monte Carlo methods are useful to study nuclear systems in a coherent framework; the three-neutron force is the bridge between Esym and neutron star structure; and neutron star observations are becoming competitive with experiments. ?-nucleon data are very limited, but ?NN is very important. The role of ? in neutron stars is far from understood; more ?N data are needed. The author's conclusion: We cannot conclude anything with present models.

  12. Ab initio calculation of the $$np \\to d ³$$ radiative capture process

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Beane, Silas R.; Chang, Emmanuel; Detmold, William; Orginos, Kostas; Parreño, Assumpta; Savage, Martin J.; Tiburzi, Brian C.

    2015-09-24

    In this study, lattice QCD calculations of two-nucleon systems are used to isolate the short-distance two-body electromagnetic contributions to the radiative capture processmore » $$np \\to d\\gamma$$, and the photo-disintegration processes $$\\gamma^{(\\ast)} d \\to np$$. In nuclear potential models, such contributions are described by phenomenological meson-exchange currents, while in the present work, they are determined directly from the quark and gluon interactions of QCD. Calculations of neutron-proton energy levels in multiple background magnetic fields are performed at two values of the quark masses, corresponding to pion masses of $$m_\\pi \\sim 450$$ and 806 MeV, and are combined with pionless nuclear effective field theory to determine these low-energy inelastic processes. Extrapolating to the physical pion mass, a cross section of $$\\sigma^{lqcd}(np\\to d\\gamma)=332.4({\\tiny \\begin{array}{l}+5.4 \\\\ - 4.7\\end{array}})\\ mb$$ is obtained at an incident neutron speed of $$v=2,200\\ m/s$$, consistent with the experimental value of $$\\sigma^{expt}(np \\to d\\gamma) = 334.2(0.5)\\ mb$$.« less

  13. Neutron Resonance Parameters of 238U and the Calculated Cross Sections from the Reich-Moore Analysis of Experimental Data in the Neutron Energy Range from 0 keV to 20 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derrien, H

    2005-12-05

    The neutron resonance parameters of {sup 238}U were obtained from a SAMMY analysis of high-resolution neutron transmission measurements and high-resolution capture cross section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) in the years 1970-1990, and from more recent transmission and capture cross section measurements performed at the Geel Linear Accelerator (GELINA). Compared with previous evaluations, the energy range for this resonance analysis was extended from 10 to 20 keV, taking advantage of the high resolution of the most recent ORELA transmission measurements. The experimental database and the method of analysis are described in this report. The neutron transmissions and the capture cross sections calculated with the resonance parameters are compared with the experimental data. A description is given of the statistical properties of the resonance parameters and of the recommended values of the average parameters. The new evaluation results in a slight decrease of the effective capture resonance integral and improves the prediction of integral thermal benchmarks by 70 pcm to 200 pcm.

  14. New Mathematics Accurately Captures Liquids and Surfaces Moving in Synergy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mathematics Accurately Captures Liquids and Surfaces Moving in Synergy New Mathematics Accurately Captures Liquids and Surfaces Moving in Synergy Berkeley Lab Mathematics Captures Fluid Interface Dynamics in Unprecedented Detail June 10, 2016 Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510.495.2402 Gas bubbles in a glass of champagne, thin films rupturing into tiny liquid droplets, blood flowing through a pumping heart and crashing ocean waves-although seemingly unrelated, these phenomena have something in

  15. New Recovery Act Funding Boosts Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research and Development | Department of Energy Recovery Act Funding Boosts Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Research and Development New Recovery Act Funding Boosts Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Research and Development September 7, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced the selection of 22 projects that will accelerate carbon capture and storage research and development for industrial sources. Funded with more than $575

  16. World's Largest Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Project Begins

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Construction | Department of Energy World's Largest Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Project Begins Construction World's Largest Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Project Begins Construction July 15, 2014 - 9:55am Addthis News Media Contact 202-586-4940 Department of Energy Supported Project Will Capture 1.4 Million Tons of CO2 Annually Washington, D.C. - Today, the Department of Energy - in partnership with NRG Energy Inc. and JX Nippon - announced that construction has begun on the first

  17. Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Studies | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Y , M A D E N V E R , M A Y 5 , 2 0 1 5 CAPTURING THE GOVERNMENT TAX BASE CAPTURING TAX INCENTIVES * Support for tribal government services * Fire protection, roads, environmental, water, security * Property tax, Sales tax, Possessory interest * "Pickle Rule" and tribal governments, ITC * Value of tax incentives to project * ITC/PTC + Accelerated Depreciation can be more than 50% CAPTURING PROPERTY TAX * Definitions * Personal Property, fixed & mobile assets * Possessory Interest *

  18. New Recovery Act Funding Boosts Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research and Development | Department of Energy Recovery Act Funding Boosts Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Research and Development New Recovery Act Funding Boosts Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Research and Development September 7, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced the selection of 22 projects that will accelerate carbon capture and storage research and development for industrial sources. Funded with more than $575 million

  19. Secretary Chu Announces $3 Billion Investment for Carbon Capture and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sequestration | Department of Energy Billion Investment for Carbon Capture and Sequestration Secretary Chu Announces $3 Billion Investment for Carbon Capture and Sequestration December 4, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - US Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today the selection of three new projects with a value of $3.18 billion to accelerate the development of advanced coal technologies with carbon capture and storage at commercial-scale. Secretary Chu made today's announcement

  20. Secretary Chu Announces Carbon Capture and Storage Simulation Initiative |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Secretary Chu Announces Carbon Capture and Storage Simulation Initiative Secretary Chu Announces Carbon Capture and Storage Simulation Initiative September 8, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu announced today the creation of the Carbon Capture and Storage Simulation Initiative with an investment of up to $40 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The partnership announced today will bring together national

  1. DOE Approves Field Test for Promising Carbon Capture Technology |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Approves Field Test for Promising Carbon Capture Technology DOE Approves Field Test for Promising Carbon Capture Technology November 20, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A promising post combustion membrane technology that can separate and capture 90 percent of the carbon dioxide (CO2) from a pulverized coal plant has been successfully demonstrated and received Department of Energy (DOE) approval to advance to a larger-scale field test. In an $18.75 million

  2. Ionic Liquid Sorbents for Carbon Capture - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Ionic Liquid Sorbents for Carbon Capture Ionic liquids for carbon capture and gas separation National Energy Technology Laboratory Contact NETL About This Technology Ionic liquids Ionic liquids Technology Marketing Summary Research is active on technologies for application of ionic liquids to carbon capture or other separation processes in energy systems. The technologies consist of materials and methods that promise to

  3. Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning The Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for the disposition of a vast number of facilities at numerous sites around the country which have been declared excess to current mission needs. Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning (252.61 KB) More Documents & Publications

  4. Department of Energy Announces $67 Million Investment for Carbon Capture

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development | Department of Energy 7 Million Investment for Carbon Capture Development Department of Energy Announces $67 Million Investment for Carbon Capture Development July 7, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The US Department of Energy announced today the selection of ten projects aimed at developing advanced technologies for capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal combustion. The projects, valued at up to $67 million over three years, focus on reducing the energy and

  5. DOE Science Showcase - Carbon Capture research in DOE Databases | OSTI,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information DOE Science Showcase - Carbon Capture research in DOE Databases Information Bridge : Natural materials for carbon capture. ... Realistic costs of carbon capture ... Technology and international climate policy Energy Citations Database : What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions ... Effects of warming on the structure and function of a boreal black spruce forest ... ScienceCinema

  6. Carbon Capture and Storage Poster | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Storage Poster Carbon Capture and Storage Poster Educational poster graphically displaying the key components of carbon capture and storage technology. Teachers: If you would like hard copies of this poster sent to you, please contact the FE Office of Communications. Carbon Capture and Storage - In Depth (poster) (55.94 MB) More Documents & Publications Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program Training Awards EA-1626: Final Environmental

  7. Evaluation of cation-exchanged zeolite adsorbents for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bae, TH; Hudson, MR; Mason, JA; Queen, WL; Dutton, JJ; Sumida, K; Micklash, KJ; Kaye, SS; Brown, CM; Long, JR

    2013-01-01

    A series of zeolite adsorbents has been evaluated for potential application in post-combustion CO2 capture using a new high-throughput gas adsorption instrument capable of measuring 28 samples in parallel. Among the zeolites tested, Ca-A exhibits the highest CO2 uptake (3.72 mmol g(-1) and 5.63 mmol cm(-3)) together with an excellent CO2 selectivity over N-2 under conditions relevant to capture from the dry flue gas stream of a coal-fired power plant. The large initial isosteric heat of adsorption of -58 kJ mol(-1) indicates the presence of strong interactions between CO2 and the Ca-A framework. Neutron and X-ray powder diffraction studies reveal the precise location of the adsorption sites for CO2 in Ca-A and Mg-A. A detailed study of CO2 adsorption kinetics further shows that the performance of Ca-A is not limited by slow CO2 diffusion within the pores. Significantly, Ca-A exhibited a higher volumetric CO2 uptake and CO2/N-2 selectivity than Mg-2(dobdc) (dobdc(4-) = 1,4-dioxido-2,5-benzenedicarboxylate; Mg-MOF-74, CPO-27-Mg), one of the best performing adsorbents. The exceptional performance of Ca-A was maintained in CO2 breakthrough simulations.

  8. Thermodynamic Complexity of Carbon Capture in Alkylamine-Functionalize...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermodynamic Complexity of Carbon Capture in Alkylamine-Functionalized Metal-Organic ... of CO2 on an alkylamine-appended MOF, mmen-Mg2(dobpdc) employing gas ...

  9. Progress and new developments in carbon capture and storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plasynski, S.I.; Litynski, J.T.; McIlvried, H.G.; Srivastava, R.D.

    2009-07-01

    Growing concern over the impact on global climate change of the buildup of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere has resulted in proposals to capture carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) at large point sources and store it in geologic formations, such as oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal seams, and saline formations, referred to as carbon capture and storage (CCS). There are three options for capturing CO{sub 2} from point sources: post-combustion capture, pre-combustion capture, and oxy-combustion. Several processes are available to capture CO{sub 2}, and new or improved processes are under development. However, CO{sub 2} capture is the most expensive part of CCS, typically accounting for 75% of overall cost. CCS will benefit significantly from the development of a lower cost post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture process that can be retrofitted to existing power plants. Once captured, the CO{sub 2} is compressed to about 150 atm and pipelined at supercritical conditions to a suitable storage site. Oil and gas reservoirs, because they have assured seals and are well characterized, are promising early opportunity sites. Saline formations are much more extensive and have a huge potential storage capacity, but are much less characterized. Several commercial and a number of pilot CCS projects are underway around the world.

  10. FE Carbon Capture and Storage News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engineer Earns Presidential Award for R&D That Could Help Meet DOE Carbon Capture Goals A Carnegie Mellon University professor who worked with the National Energy Technology...

  11. Carbon Capture and Storage in Southern Africa | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    assessment of the rationale, possibilities and capacity needs to enable CO2 capture and storage in Botswana, Mozambique and Namibia AgencyCompany Organization Energy Research...

  12. Strategic Analysis of the Global Status of Carbon Capture and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Strategic Analysis of the Global Status of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS): Country Studies, United Arab Emirates Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy...

  13. Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Demonstration in Developing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Demonstration in Developing Countries: Analysis of Key Policy Issues and Barriers...

  14. Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) and Community Engagement | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Engagement Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) and Community Engagement Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy Topics: Best...

  15. A Global Technology Roadmap on Carbon Capture and Storage in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    industry sectors, and complements ongoing technology road-mapping exercises for other key energy technologies." References "A Global Technology Roadmap on Carbon Capture and...

  16. Energy Department Invests to Drive Down Costs of Carbon Capture...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Projects will conduct carbon capture research for two different fossil power generation processes. For traditional, combustion-based power plants - like most coal-fired plants ...

  17. The National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    States' energy security through reliable, clean, and affordable energy produced from coal. ... of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived syngas and flue gas in industrial settings. ...

  18. FE Carbon Capture and Storage News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    large-scale industrial carbon capture and storage demonstration project. The Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM) marked the progress made on construction on the project's...

  19. FE Carbon Capture and Storage News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    September 7, 2010 New Recovery Act Funding Boosts Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Research and Development U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced the selection of...

  20. Carbon Capture Turned Upside Down: High-Temperature Adsorption...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Capture Turned Upside Down: High-Temperature Adsorption & Low-Temperature Desorption (HALD) Previous Next List Joos, Lennart; Lejaeghere, Kurt; Huck, Johanna M.; Van...

  1. Chiral effective field theory predictions for muon capture on...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Chiral effective field theory predictions for muon capture on deuteron and 3He Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chiral effective field theory...

  2. Evaluating different classes of porous materials for carbon capture...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    emission from power plants. In particular, amongst several separation strategies, adsorption by nano-porous materials is regarded as a potential means to efficiently capture CO2...

  3. Secretary Moniz Tours Kemper Carbon Capture and Storage Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On Friday, Nov. 8, 2013, Secretary Moniz and international energy officials toured Kemper, the nation's largest carbon capture and storage facility, in Liberty, Mississippi.

  4. DOE Signs Cooperative Agreement for Carbon Capture Project | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Carbon Capture Project DOE Signs Cooperative Agreement for Carbon Capture Project June 18, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy has signed a cooperative agreement with NRG Energy Inc. (NRG) for the Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project to design, construct, and operate a system that will capture and store approximately 400,000 tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) per year. The project, which will be managed by the Office of Fossil

  5. Sandia Energy - The CRF's Turbulent Combustion Lab (TCL) Captures...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CRF's Turbulent Combustion Lab (TCL) Captures the Moment of Hydrogen Ignition Home Energy Transportation Energy CRF Facilities News News & Events Research & Capabilities The CRF's...

  6. capture quantum correlations Qasimi, Asma Al-; James, Daniel...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A7 (Canada) 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ALGORITHMS; CAPTURE; ENTROPY; MIXED STATES; PURE STATES; QUANTUM...

  7. Synthesis, Structure, and Carbon Dioxide Capture Properties of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synthesis, Structure, and Carbon Dioxide Capture Properties of Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks Previous Next List Anh Phan, Christian J. Doonan, Fernando J. Uribe-Romo, Carolyn B....

  8. BAG (Continuous Round Robin Packet Capture)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-03-10

    Bag is a miniature pcap filter which takes pcap input (or input off the wire) using a bpf filter, if specified, and then writes the output to stdout or a file (in pcap format). It depends for some aspects of its functionality on a libpcap library which uses a shared memory packet capture ring bugger. There are two build in modules: chcksum and session. the build in chcksum modules is used to anonymize the ipmore » addresses and repair any checksums in the stream. % bag -r /tmp/*.pcap -Cchucksum, 128.1 65: 10.10 The session module generates sessions which are defined as a series of packets that have two things in common. the first is a unique five-tuple composed oi an IP protocol, IP source address, IP source port, IP destination address, and IP destination port. The second is that if the originating packet is associated with a bi-directional service such as ftpltcp, characteristics and data will be kept for both flows involved with the service. The only protocols evaluated beyond the IP header are ICMP, TCP and UDP. A session can last for as long as bag is running. However, under normal conditions, sessions are generated every time they appear to have closed down. There is a man page included with the distribution which goes into more detail.« less

  9. BAG (Continuous Round Robin Packet Capture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, C. Philip

    2006-03-10

    Bag is a miniature pcap filter which takes pcap input (or input off the wire) using a bpf filter, if specified, and then writes the output to stdout or a file (in pcap format). It depends for some aspects of its functionality on a libpcap library which uses a shared memory packet capture ring bugger. There are two build in modules: chcksum and session. the build in chcksum modules is used to anonymize the ip addresses and repair any checksums in the stream. % bag -r /tmp/*.pcap -Cchucksum, 128.1 65: 10.10 The session module generates sessions which are defined as a series of packets that have two things in common. the first is a unique five-tuple composed oi an IP protocol, IP source address, IP source port, IP destination address, and IP destination port. The second is that if the originating packet is associated with a bi-directional service such as ftpltcp, characteristics and data will be kept for both flows involved with the service. The only protocols evaluated beyond the IP header are ICMP, TCP and UDP. A session can last for as long as bag is running. However, under normal conditions, sessions are generated every time they appear to have closed down. There is a man page included with the distribution which goes into more detail.

  10. Simultaneous neutron and x-ray imaging of inertial confinement fusion experiments along a single line of sight at Omega

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Danly, C. R.; Day, T. H.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Herrmann, H.; Izumi, N.; Kim, Y. H.; Martinez, J. I.; Merrill, F. E.; Schmidt, D. W.; Simpson, R. A.; et al

    2015-04-16

    Neutron and x-ray imaging provide critical information about the geometry and hydrodynamics of inertial confinement fusion implosions. However, existing diagnostics at Omega and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) cannot produce images in both neutrons and x-rays along the same line of sight. This leads to difficulty comparing these images, which capture different parts of the plasma geometry, for the asymmetric implosions seen in present experiments. Further, even when opposing port neutron and x-ray images are available, they use different detectors and cannot provide positive information about the relative positions of the neutron and x-ray sources. A technique has been demonstratedmore » on implosions at Omega that can capture x-ray images along the same line of sight as the neutron images. Thus, the technique is described, and data from a set of experiments are presented, along with a discussion of techniques for coregistration of the various images. It is concluded that the technique is viable and could provide valuable information if implemented on NIF in the near future.« less

  11. 2013 Review of Neutron and Non-Neutron Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden, N. E.

    2014-05-23

    The results of a review and evaluation of neutron and non-neutron nuclear data published in the scientific literature over the past three years since the ISRD-14 Symposium has been performed and the highlights are presented. Included in the data review are the status of new chemical elements, new measurements of the isotopic composition for many chemical elements and the resulting change in the atomic weight values. New half-life measurements for both short-lived and longlived nuclides, some alpha decay and double beta decay measurements for quasistable nuclides are discussed. The latest evaluation of atomic masses has been published. Data from new measurements on the very heavy (trans-meitnerium) elements are discussed and tabulated. Data on various recent neutron cross section and resonance integral measurements are discussed and tabulated.

  12. Neutronic fuel element fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korton, George

    2004-02-24

    This disclosure describes a method for metallurgically bonding a complete leak-tight enclosure to a matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant channels. Coolant tubes containing solid filler pins are disposed in the coolant channels. A leak-tight metal enclosure is then formed about the entire assembly of fuel matrix, coolant tubes and pins. The completely enclosed and sealed assembly is exposed to a high temperature and pressure gas environment to effect a metallurgical bond between all contacting surfaces therein. The ends of the assembly are then machined away to expose the pin ends which are chemically leached from the coolant tubes to leave the coolant tubes with internal coolant passageways. The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. It relates generally to fuel elements for neutronic reactors and more particularly to a method for providing a leak-tight metal enclosure for a high-performance matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant tubes. The planned utilization of nuclear energy in high-performance, compact-propulsion and mobile power-generation systems has necessitated the development of fuel elements capable of operating at high power densities. High power densities in turn require fuel elements having high thermal conductivities and good fuel retention capabilities at high temperatures. A metal clad fuel element containing a ceramic phase of fuel intimately mixed with and bonded to a continuous refractory metal matrix has been found to satisfy the above requirements. Metal coolant tubes penetrate the matrix to afford internal cooling to the fuel element while providing positive fuel retention and containment of fission products generated within the fuel matrix. Metal header plates are bonded to the coolant tubes at each end of the fuel element and a metal cladding or can completes the fuel-matrix enclosure

  13. BF3 Neutron Detector Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2009-12-09

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world; thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and detection capabilities are being investigated. Reported here are the results of tests of the efficiency of BF3 tubes at a pressure of 800 torr. These measurements were made partially to validate models of the RPM system that have been modified to simulate the performance of BF3-filled tubes. While BF3 could be a potential replacement for 3He, there are limitations to its use in deployed systems.

  14. Effect of driver impedance on dense plasma focus Z-pinch neutron yield

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sears, Jason E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Link, Anthony E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Schmidt, Andrea E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Welch, Dale

    2014-12-15

    The Z-pinch phase of a dense plasma focus (DPF) heats the plasma by rapid compression and accelerates ions across its intense electric fields, producing neutrons through both thermonuclear and beam-target fusion. Driver characteristics have empirically been shown to affect performance, as measured by neutron yield per unit of stored energy. We are exploring the effect of driver characteristics on DPF performance using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of a kJ scale DPF. In this work, our PIC simulations are fluid for the run-down phase and transition to fully kinetic for the pinch phase, capturing kinetic instabilities, anomalous resistivity, and beam formation during the pinch. The anode-cathode boundary is driven by a circuit model of the capacitive driver, including system inductance, the load of the railgap switches, the guard resistors, and the coaxial transmission line parameters. It is known that the driver impedance plays an important role in the neutron yield: first, it sets the peak current achieved at pinch time; and second, it affects how much current continues to flow through the pinch when the pinch inductance and resistance suddenly increase. Here we show from fully kinetic simulations how total neutron yield depends on the impedance of the driver and the distributed parameters of the transmission circuit. Direct comparisons between the experiment and simulations enhance our understanding of these plasmas and provide predictive design capability for neutron source applications.

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    boron neutron capture therapy (1) lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks (1) logistics (1) oral cancer (1) Filter by Author William Bauer (2) Amber Hoover (1) Amber Miller...

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Software0 Filter Results Filter by Subject applied life sciences (4) accelerators (3) boron (3) neutron capture therapy (3) particle accelerators (3) prostate (3) radiology and...

  17. 10th LANSCE School on Neutron Scattering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10th LANSCE School on Neutron Scattering LANSCE 10th LANSCE School on Neutron Scattering Home Abstract Lecturers Hands-On Experiments Free Day About the School Sponsors FAQ's...

  18. Neutron coincidence detectors employing heterogeneous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Czirr, J. Bartley (Mapleton, UT); Jensen, Gary L. (Orem, UT)

    1993-07-27

    A neutron detector relies upon optical separation of different scintillators to measure the total energy and/or number of neutrons from a neutron source. In pulse mode embodiments of the invention, neutrons are detected in a first detector which surrounds the neutron source and in a second detector surrounding the first detector. An electronic circuit insures that only events are measured which correspond to neutrons first detected in the first detector followed by subsequent detection in the second detector. In spectrometer embodiments of the invention, neutrons are thermalized in the second detector which is formed by a scintillator-moderator and neutron energy is measured from the summed signals from the first and second detectors.

  19. Supplement to Theory of Neutron Chain Reactions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Weinberg, Alvin M.; Noderer, L. C.

    1952-05-26

    General discussions are given of the theory of neutron chain reactions. These include observations on exponential experiments, the general reactor with resonance fission, microscopic pile theory, and homogeneous slow neutron reactors. (B.J.H.)

  20. Neutron skin thickness and neutron star equations of state: a strong relationship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menezes, D. P.; Avancini, S. S.; Marinelli, J. R.; Watanabe de Moraes, M. M.; Providencia, C.

    2007-10-26

    A density dependent hadronic model and a common parametrization of the non-linear Walecka model are used to obtain the lead neutron skin thickness through its proton and neutron density profiles. The neutron skin thickness is known to reflect the equation of state properties. A direct correlation between the neutron skin thickness and the slope of the symmetry energy is found.