Sample records for neutrino astrophysics division

  1. Birth of Neutrino Astrophysics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Based mainly on the results of two experiments, KamiokaNDE and Super-KamiokaNDE, the birth of neutrino astrophysics will be described. At the end, the result of the third generation Kamioka experiment, KamLAND, will be discussed together with the future possibilities.Organiser(s): Daniel Treille / EP DivisionNote: * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00 hrs. Please note unusual day.

  2. Neutrino astrophysics : recent advances and open issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volpe, Cristina

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We highlight recent advances in neutrino astrophysics, the open issues and the interplay with neutrino properties. We emphasize the important progress in our understanding of neutrino flavor conversion in media. We discuss the case of solar neutrinos, of core-collapse supernova neutrinos and of SN1987A, and of the recently discovered ultra-high energy neutrinos whose origin is to be determined.

  3. Neutrinos in Physics and Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Raffelt

    2003-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The observed flavor oscillations of solar and atmospheric neutrinos determine several elements of the leptonic mixing matrix, but leave open the small mixing angle Theta_13, a possible CP-violating phase, the mass ordering, the absolute mass scale m_nu, and the Dirac vs. Majorana property. Progress will be made by long-baseline, tritium endpoint, and 2-beta decay experiments. The best constraint on m_nu obtains from cosmological precision observables, implying that neutrinos contribute very little to the dark matter. However, massive Majorana neutrinos may well be responsible for ordinary matter by virtue of the leptogenesis mechanism for creating the baryon asymmetry of the universe. In future, neutrinos could play an important role as astrophysical messengers if point sources are discovered in high-energy neutrino telescopes. In the low-energy range, a high-statistics observation of a galactic supernova would allow one to observe directly the dynamics of stellar collapse and perhaps to discriminate between certain mixing scenarios. An observation of the relic neutrinos from all past supernovae has come within reach.

  4. Neutrinos in physics, astrophysics, and cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Dolgov

    2000-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review of neutrino anomalies in particle physics and of the role played by neutrinos in cosmology and astrophysics is presented. The main part of the talk is dedicated to the impact of neutrinos and in particular of neutrino oscillations on BBN and to a possible spatial variation of primordial abundances.

  5. Probing New Physics with Astrophysical Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicole F. Bell

    2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the prospects for probing new physics with neutrino astrophysics. High energy neutrinos provide an important means of accessing physics beyond the electroweak scale. Neutrinos have a number of advantages over conventional astronomy and, in particular, carry information encoded in their flavor degree of freedom which could reveal a variety of exotic neutrino properties. We also outline ways in which neutrino astrophysics can be used to constrain dark matter properties, and explain how neutrino-based limits lead to a strong general bound on the dark matter total annihilation cross-section.

  6. Firewall Phenomenology with Astrophysical Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afshordi, Niayesh

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most fundamental features of a black hole in general relativity is its event horizon: a boundary from which nothing can escape. There has been a recent surge of interest in the nature of these event horizons and their local neighbourhoods. In an attempt to resolve black hole information paradox(es), and more generally, to better understand the path towards quantum gravity, firewalls have been proposed as an alternative to black hole event horizons. In this letter, we explore the phenomenological implications of black holes possessing a surface or firewall. We predict a potentially detectable signature of these firewalls in the form of a high energy astrophysical neutrino flux. We compute the spectrum of this neutrino flux in different models and show that it is a possible candidate for the source of the PeV neutrinos recently detected by IceCube. We further show that, independent of the generation mechanism, IceCube data can be explained (at $1\\sigma$ confidence level) by conversion of accretion on...

  7. Neutrino Mixing and Oscillations in Astrophysical Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Balantekin

    2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review of the current status of neutrino mixing and oscillations in astrophysical environments, with particular emphasis on the Sun and core-collapse supernovae, is given. Implications of the existence of sterile states which mix with the active neutrinos are discussed.

  8. Neutrino mixing and oscillations in astrophysical environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balantekin, A. B. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706 (United States)

    2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review of the current status of neutrino mixing and oscillations in astrophysical environments, with particular emphasis on the Sun and core-collapse supernovae, is given. Implications of the existence of sterile states which mix with the active neutrinos are discussed.

  9. Megaton Water Cerenkov Detectors and Astrophysical Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maury Goodman

    2005-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Although formal proposals have not yet been made, the UNO and Hyper-Kamiokande projects are being developed to follow-up the tremendously successful program at Super-Kamiokande using a detector that is 20-50 times larger. The potential of such a detector to continue the study of astrophysical neutrinos is considered and contrasted with the program for cubic kilometer neutrino observatories.

  10. Neutrinos, Rare Isotopes of Exotic Nuclei and Nuclear Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Balantekin

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The connection between neutrino physics, nucleosynthesis of elements in astrophysical sites, laboratory measurements with rare exotic nuclei and astronomical observations is discussed. The key role played by neutrinos is emphasized and the close connection between neutrino physics and nucleosynthesis is highlighted.

  11. Technology development for a neutrino astrophysical observatory. Letter of intent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaloupka, V.; Cole, T.; Crawford, H.J. [and others

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors propose a set of technology developments relevant to the design of an optimized Cerenkov detector for the study of neutrino interactions of astrophysical interest. Emphasis is placed on signal processing innovations that enhance significantly the quality of primary data. These technical advances, combined with field experience from a follow-on test deployment, are intended to provide a basis for the engineering design for a kilometer-scale Neutrino Astrophysical Observatory.

  12. Technology Development for a Neutrino AstrophysicalObservatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaloupka, V.; Cole, T.; Crawford, H.J.; He, Y.D.; Jackson, S.; Kleinfelder, S.; Lai, K.W.; Learned, J.; Ling, J.; Liu, D.; Lowder, D.; Moorhead, M.; Morookian, J.M.; Nygren, D.R.; Price, P.B.; Richards, A.; Shapiro, G.; Shen, B.; Smoot, George F.; Stokstad, R.G.; VanDalen, G.; Wilkes, J.; Wright, F.; Young, K.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a set of technology developments relevant to the design of an optimized Cerenkov detector for the study of neutrino interactions of astrophysical interest. Emphasis is placed on signal processing innovations that enhance significantly the quality of primary data. These technical advances, combined with field experience from a follow-on test deployment, are intended to provide a basis for the engineering design for a kilometer-scale Neutrino Astrophysical Observatory.

  13. A Search for Astrophysical Burst Signals at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Aharmim; S. N. Ahmed; A. E. Anthony; N. Barros; E. W. Beier; A. Bellerive; B. Beltran; M. Bergevin; S. D. Biller; K. Boudjemline; M. G. Boulay; B. Cai; Y. D. Chan; D. Chauhan; M. Chen; B. T. Cleveland; G. A. Cox; X. Dai; H. Deng; J. A. Detwiler; M. DiMarco; M. D. Diamond; P. J. Doe; G. Doucas; P. -L. Drouin; F. A. Duncan; M. Dunford; E. D. Earle; S. R. Elliott; H. C. Evans; G. T. Ewan; J. Farine; H. Fergani; F. Fleurot; R. J. Ford; J. A. Formaggio; N. Gagnon; J. TM. Goon; K. Graham; E. Guillian; S. Habib; R. L. Hahn; A. L. Hallin; E. D. Hallman; P. J. Harvey; R. Hazama; W. J. Heintzelman; J. Heise; R. L. Helmer; A. Hime; C. Howard; M. Huang; P. Jagam; B. Jamieson; N. A. Jelley; M. Jerkins; K. J. Keeter; J. R. Klein; L. L. Kormos; M. Kos; C. Kraus; C. B. Krauss; A. Krueger; T. Kutter; C. C. M. Kyba; R. Lange; J. Law; I. T. Lawson; K. T. Lesko; J. R. Leslie; I. Levine; J. C. Loach; R. MacLellan; S. Majerus; H. B. Mak; J. Maneira; R. Martin; N. McCauley; A. B. McDonald; S. R. McGee; M. L. Miller; B. Monreal; J. Monroe; B. G. Nickel; A. J. Noble; H. M. O'Keeffe; N. S. Oblath; R. W. Ollerhead; G. D. Orebi Gann; S. M. Oser; R. A. Ott; S. J. M. Peeters; A. W. P. Poon; G. Prior; S. D. Reitzner; K. Rielage; B. C. Robertson; R. G. H. Robertson; M. H. Schwendener; J. A. Secrest; S. R. Seibert; O. Simard; J. J. Simpson; D. Sinclair; P. Skensved; T. J. Sonley; L. C. Stonehill; G. Tesic; N. Tolich; T. Tsui; R. Van Berg; B. A. VanDevender; C. J. Virtue; B. L. Wall; D. Waller; H. Wan Chan Tseung; D. L. Wark; P. J. S. Watson; J. Wendland; N. West; J. F. Wilkerson; J. R. Wilson; J. M. Wouters; A. Wright; M. Yeh; F. Zhang; K. Zuber

    2013-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) has confirmed the standard solar model and neutrino oscillations through the observation of neutrinos from the solar core. In this paper we present a search for neutrinos associated with sources other than the solar core, such as gamma-ray bursters and solar flares. We present a new method for looking for temporal coincidences between neutrino events and astrophysical bursts of widely varying intensity. No correlations were found between neutrinos detected in SNO and such astrophysical sources.

  14. A Search for Astrophysical Neutrino Point Sources with Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    A Search for Astrophysical Neutrino Point Sources with Super-Kamiokande Eric Thrane A dissertation Abstract A Search for Astrophysical Neutrino Point Sources with Super-Kamiokande Eric Thrane Chair to the upward-going muon dataset at Super-Kamiokande. We find interesting signals from two sources: RX J1713

  15. High Energy Neutrinos as a Probe for New Physics and Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. V. Bugaev

    2005-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the recent achievements in high energy neutrino physics and, partly, neutrino astrophysics is presented. It is argued that experiments with high energy neutrinos of natural origin can be used for a search of new physics effects beyond the electroweak scale.

  16. NASA/TM-2013-217509 Goddard's Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    : NASAAccess Help Desk NASA Center for AeroSpace Information 7115 Standard Drive Hanover, MD 21076 #12;NASA Royal Road Hanover, MD 21076-1320 Springfield, VA 22161 #12;Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report

  17. Falling through spacetime : four studies in neutrino astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kishimoto, Chad T.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 Neutrino Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.1Experimental neutrino physics and observational cosmologyExperiments in neutrino physics have not only discerned that

  18. astrophysics science division: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robert Fefferman, Dean Chemistry Websites Summary: & Astrophysics, Chemistry, Computer Science, Geophysical Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, and Statistics. It also Astronomyand...

  19. LongBaseline Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics Institute for Nuclear Theory Summer Program 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    LongBaseline Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics Institute for Nuclear Theory Summer Program 2010 for Nuclear Theory Summer Program 2010 Robert J. Wilson 8/11/2010Page 2 Wednesday August 11th Session 6 PWG C520 14:00 Solar, Geo, and Reactor Neutrinos N. Tolich (Washington) 14:30 Q&A Guests/PWG Session 8

  20. A Search for Astrophysical Point Sources of Neutrinos with Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    A Search for Astrophysical Point Sources of Neutrinos with Super-Kamiokande Andrew Lawrence of Neutrinos with Super-Kamiokande Andrew Lawrence Stachyra Chair of Supervisory Committee: Professor R. Je#11;rey Wilkes Department of Physics Using a data sample of 2037 upward-going muons gathered by the Super-Kamiokande

  1. Search for Diffuse Astrophysical Neutrino Flux Using Ultra-High-Energy Upward-Going Muons in Super-Kamiokande I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration; :; M. E. C. Swanson

    2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Many astrophysical models predict a diffuse flux of high-energy neutrinos from active galactic nuclei and other extra-galactic sources. At muon energies above 1 TeV, the upward-going muon flux induced by neutrinos from active galactic nuclei is expected to exceed the flux due to atmospheric neutrinos. We have performed a search for this astrophysical neutrino flux by looking for upward-going muons in the highest energy data sample from the Super-Kamiokande detector using 1679.6 live days of data. We found one extremely high energy upward-going muon event, compared with an expected atmospheric neutrino background of 0.46 plus or minus 0.23 events. Using this result, we set an upper limit on the diffuse flux of upward-going muons due to neutrinos from astrophysical sources in the muon energy range 3.16-100 TeV.

  2. Flavor Ratio of Astrophysical Neutrinos above 35 TeV in IceCube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IceCube Collaboration; M. G. Aartsen; M. Ackermann; J. Adams; J. A. Aguilar; M. Ahlers; M. Ahrens; D. Altmann; T. Anderson; C. Arguelles; T. C. Arlen; J. Auffenberg; X. Bai; S. W. Barwick; V. Baum; R. Bay; J. J. Beatty; J. Becker Tjus; K. -H. Becker; S. BenZvi; P. Berghaus; D. Berley; E. Bernardini; A. Bernhard; D. Z. Besson; G. Binder; D. Bindig; M. Bissok; E. Blaufuss; J. Blumenthal; D. J. Boersma; C. Bohm; F. Bos; D. Bose; S. Böser; O. Botner; L. Brayeur; H. -P. Bretz; A. M. Brown; N. Buzinsky; J. Casey; M. Casier; E. Cheung; D. Chirkin; A. Christov; B. Christy; K. Clark; L. Classen; F. Clevermann; S. Coenders; D. F. Cowen; A. H. Cruz Silva; J. Daughhetee; J. C. Davis; M. Day; J. P. A. M. de André; C. De Clercq; H. Dembinski; S. De Ridder; P. Desiati; K. D. de Vries; M. de With; T. DeYoung; J. C. Díaz-Vélez; J. P. Dumm; M. Dunkman; R. Eagan; B. Eberhardt; T. Ehrhardt; B. Eichmann; J. Eisch; S. Euler; P. A. Evenson; O. Fadiran; A. R. Fazely; A. Fedynitch; J. Feintzeig; J. Felde; K. Filimonov; C. Finley; T. Fischer-Wasels; S. Flis; K. Frantzen; T. Fuchs; T. K. Gaisser; R. Gaior; J. Gallagher; L. Gerhardt; D. Gier; L. Gladstone; T. Glüsenkamp; A. Goldschmidt; G. Golup; J. G. Gonzalez; J. A. Goodman; D. Góra; D. Grant; P. Gretskov; J. C. Groh; A. Groß; C. Ha; C. Haack; A. Haj Ismail; P. Hallen; A. Hallgren; F. Halzen; K. Hanson; D. Hebecker; D. Heereman; D. Heinen; K. Helbing; R. Hellauer; D. Hellwig; S. Hickford; G. C. Hill; K. D. Hoffman; R. Hoffmann; A. Homeier; K. Hoshina; F. Huang; W. Huelsnitz; P. O. Hulth; K. Hultqvist; A. Ishihara; E. Jacobi; J. Jacobsen; G. S. Japaridze; K. Jero; M. Jurkovic; B. Kaminsky; A. Kappes; T. Karg; A. Karle; M. Kauer; A. Keivani; J. L. Kelley; A. Kheirandish; J. Kiryluk; J. Kläs; S. R. Klein; J. -H. Köhne; G. Kohnen; H. Kolanoski; A. Koob; L. Köpke; C. Kopper; S. Kopper; D. J. Koskinen; M. Kowalski; A. Kriesten; K. Krings; G. Kroll; M. Kroll; J. Kunnen; N. Kurahashi; T. Kuwabara; M. Labare; J. L. Lanfranchi; D. T. Larsen; M. J. Larson; M. Lesiak-Bzdak; M. Leuermann; J. Lünemann; J. Madsen; G. Maggi; R. Maruyama; K. Mase; H. S. Matis; R. Maunu; F. McNally; K. Meagher; M. Medici; A. Meli; T. Meures; S. Miarecki; E. Middell; E. Middlemas; N. Milke; J. Miller; L. Mohrmann; T. Montaruli; R. Morse; R. Nahnhauer; U. Naumann; H. Niederhausen; S. C. Nowicki; D. R. Nygren; A. Obertacke; A. Olivas; A. Omairat; A. O'Murchadha; T. Palczewski; L. Paul; Ö. Penek; J. A. Pepper; C. Pérez de los Heros; C. Pfendner; D. Pieloth; E. Pinat; J. Posselt; P. B. Price; G. T. Przybylski; J. Pütz; M. Quinnan; L. Rädel; M. Rameez; K. Rawlins; P. Redl; I. Rees; R. Reimann; M. Relich; E. Resconi; W. Rhode; M. Richman; B. Riedel; S. Robertson; J. P. Rodrigues; M. Rongen; C. Rott; T. Ruhe; B. Ruzybayev; D. Ryckbosch; S. M. Saba; H. -G. Sander; J. Sandroos; M. Santander; S. Sarkar; K. Schatto; F. Scheriau; T. Schmidt; M. Schmitz; S. Schoenen; S. Schöneberg; A. Schönwald; A. Schukraft; L. Schulte; O. Schulz; D. Seckel; Y. Sestayo; S. Seunarine; R. Shanidze; M. W. E. Smith; D. Soldin; G. M. Spiczak; C. Spiering; M. Stamatikos; T. Stanev; N. A. Stanisha; A. Stasik; T. Stezelberger; R. G. Stokstad; A. Stößl; E. A. Strahler; R. Ström; N. L. Strotjohann; G. W. Sullivan; M. Sutherland; H. Taavola; I. Taboada; A. Tamburro; S. Ter-Antonyan; A. Terliuk; G. Teši?; S. Tilav; P. A. Toale; M. N. Tobin; D. Tosi; M. Tselengidou; E. Unger; M. Usner; S. Vallecorsa; N. van Eijndhoven; J. Vandenbroucke; J. van Santen; S. Vanheule; M. Vehring; M. Voge; M. Vraeghe; C. Walck; M. Wallraff; Ch. Weaver; M. Wellons; C. Wendt; S. Westerhoff; B. J. Whelan; N. Whitehorn; C. Wichary; K. Wiebe; C. H. Wiebusch; D. R. Williams; H. Wissing; M. Wolf; T. R. Wood; K. Woschnagg; D. L. Xu; X. W. Xu; Y. Xu; J. P. Yanez; G. Yodh; S. Yoshida; P. Zarzhitsky; J. Ziemann; M. Zoll

    2015-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A diffuse flux of astrophysical neutrinos above $100\\,\\mathrm{TeV}$ has been observed at the IceCube Neutrino Observatory. Here we extend this analysis to probe the astrophysical flux down to $35\\,\\mathrm{TeV}$ and analyze its flavor composition by classifying events as showers or tracks. Taking advantage of lower atmospheric backgrounds for shower-like events, we obtain a shower-biased sample containing 129 showers and 8 tracks collected in three years from 2010 to 2013. We demonstrate consistency with the $(f_e:f_{\\mu}:f_\\tau)_\\oplus\\approx(1:1:1)_\\oplus$ flavor ratio at Earth commonly expected from the averaged oscillations of neutrinos produced by pion decay in distant astrophysical sources. Limits are placed on non-standard flavor compositions that cannot be produced by averaged neutrino oscillations but could arise in exotic physics scenarios. A maximally track-like composition of $(0:1:0)_\\oplus$ is excluded at $3.3\\sigma$, and a purely shower-like composition of $(1:0:0)_\\oplus$ is excluded at $2.3\\sigma$.

  3. Giant Liquid Argon Observatory for Proton Decay, Neutrino Astrophysics and CP-violation in the Lepton Sector (GLACIER)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Badertscher, A; Degunda, U; Epprecht, L; Horikawa, S; Knecht, L; Lazzaro, C; Lussi, D; Marchionni, A; Natterer, G; Otiougova, P; Resnati, F; Rubbia, A; Strabel, C; Ulbricht, J; Viant, T

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GLACIER (Giant Liquid Argon Charge Imaging ExpeRiment) is a large underground observatory for proton decay search, neutrino astrophysics and CP-violation studies in the lepton sector. Possible underground sites are studied within the FP7 LAGUNA project (Europe) and along the JPARC neutrino beam in collaboration with KEK (Japan). The concept is scalable to very large masses.

  4. astrophysics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    neutrino cooling and associated limits on neutrino properties; and high-energy astrophysical neutrinos. W. C. Haxton 2012-09-17 3 Nuclear astrophysics CiteSeer...

  5. Dark Matter vs. Neutrinos: The effect of astrophysical uncertainties and timing information on the neutrino floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan H. Davis

    2015-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Future multi-tonne Direct Detection experiments will be sensitive to solar neutrino induced nuclear recoils which form an irreducible background to light Dark Matter searches. Indeed for masses around 6 GeV the spectra of neutrinos and Dark Matter are so similar that experiments will run into a neutrino floor, for which sensitivity increases only marginally with exposure past a certain cross section. In this work we show that this floor can be overcome using the different annual modulation expected from solar neutrinos and Dark Matter. Specifically for cross sections below the neutrino floor the DM signal is observable through a phase shift and a smaller amplitude for the time-dependent event rate. This allows the exclusion power to be improved by up to an order of magnitude for large exposures. In addition we demonstrate that the neutrino floor exists over a wider mass range than has been previously shown, since the large uncertainties in the Dark Matter velocity distribution make the signal spectrum harder to distinguish from the neutrino background. However for most velocity distributions the neutrino floor can still be surpassed using timing information, though certain velocity streams may prove problematic.

  6. Dark Matter vs. Neutrinos: The effect of astrophysical uncertainties and timing information on the neutrino floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan H. Davis

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Future multi-tonne Direct Detection experiments will be sensitive to solar neutrino induced nuclear recoils which form an irreducible background to light Dark Matter searches. Indeed for masses around 6 GeV the spectra of neutrinos and Dark Matter are so similar that experiments will run into a neutrino floor, for which sensitivity increases only marginally with exposure past a certain cross section. In this work we show that this floor can be overcome using the different annual modulation expected from solar neutrinos and Dark Matter. Specifically for cross sections below the neutrino floor the DM signal is observable through a phase shift and a smaller amplitude for the time-dependent event rate. This allows the exclusion power to be improved by up to an order of magnitude for large exposures. In addition we demonstrate that the neutrino floor exists over a wider mass range than has been previously shown, since the large uncertainties in the Dark Matter velocity distribution make the signal spectrum harder to distinguish from the neutrino background. However for most velocity distributions the neutrino floor can still be surpassed using timing information, though certain velocity streams may prove problematic.

  7. Observation of High-Energy Astrophysical Neutrinos in Three Years of IceCube Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. G. Aartsen; M. Ackermann; J. Adams; J. A. Aguilar; M. Ahlers; M. Ahrens; D. Altmann; T. Anderson; C. Arguelles; T. C. Arlen; J. Auffenberg; X. Bai; S. W. Barwick; V. Baum; J. J. Beatty; J. Becker Tjus; K. -H. Becker; S. BenZvi; P. Berghaus; D. Berley; E. Bernardini; A. Bernhard; D. Z. Besson; G. Binder; D. Bindig; M. Bissok; E. Blaufuss; J. Blumenthal; D. J. Boersma; C. Bohm; D. Bose; S. Böser; O. Botner; L. Brayeur; H. -P. Bretz; A. M. Brown; J. Casey; M. Casier; D. Chirkin; A. Christov; B. Christy; K. Clark; L. Classen; F. Clevermann; S. Coenders; D. F. Cowen; A. H. Cruz Silva; M. Danninger; J. Daughhetee; J. C. Davis; M. Day; J. P. A. M. de André; C. De Clercq; S. De Ridder; P. Desiati; K. D. de Vries; M. de With; T. DeYoung; J. C. D\\'\\iaz-Vélez; M. Dunkman; R. Eagan; B. Eberhardt; B. Eichmann; J. Eisch; S. Euler; P. A. Evenson; O. Fadiran; A. R. Fazely; A. Fedynitch; J. Feintzeig; J. Felde; T. Feusels; K. Filimonov; C. Finley; T. Fischer-Wasels; S. Flis; A. Franckowiak; K. Frantzen; T. Fuchs; T. K. Gaisser; J. Gallagher; L. Gerhardt; D. Gier; L. Gladstone; T. Glüsenkamp; A. Goldschmidt; G. Golup; J. G. Gonzalez; J. A. Goodman; D. Góra; D. T. Grandmont; D. Grant; P. Gretskov; J. C. Groh; A. Groß; C. Ha; C. Haack; A. Haj Ismail; P. Hallen; A. Hallgren; F. Halzen; K. Hanson; D. Hebecker; D. Heereman; D. Heinen; K. Helbing; R. Hellauer; D. Hellwig; S. Hickford; G. C. Hill; K. D. Hoffman; R. Hoffmann; A. Homeier; K. Hoshina; F. Huang; W. Huelsnitz; P. O. Hulth; K. Hultqvist; S. Hussain; A. Ishihara; E. Jacobi; J. Jacobsen; K. Jagielski; G. S. Japaridze; K. Jero; O. Jlelati; M. Jurkovic; B. Kaminsky; A. Kappes; T. Karg; A. Karle; M. Kauer; J. L. Kelley; A. Kheirandish; J. Kiryluk; J. Kläs; S. R. Klein; J. -H. Köhne; G. Kohnen; H. Kolanoski; A. Koob; L. Köpke; C. Kopper; S. Kopper; D. J. Koskinen; M. Kowalski; A. Kriesten; K. Krings; G. Kroll; J. Kunnen; N. Kurahashi; T. Kuwabara; M. Labare; D. T. Larsen; M. J. Larson; M. Lesiak-Bzdak; M. Leuermann; J. Leute; J. Lünemann; O. Mac\\'\\ias; J. Madsen; G. Maggi; R. Maruyama; K. Mase; H. S. Matis; F. McNally; K. Meagher; A. Meli; T. Meures; S. Miarecki; E. Middell; E. Middlemas; N. Milke; J. Miller; L. Mohrmann; T. Montaruli; R. Morse; R. Nahnhauer; U. Naumann; H. Niederhausen; S. C. Nowicki; D. R. Nygren; A. Obertacke; S. Odrowski; A. Olivas; A. Omairat; A. O'Murchadha; T. Palczewski; L. Paul; Ö. Penek; J. A. Pepper; C. Pérez de los Heros; C. Pfendner; D. Pieloth; E. Pinat; J. Posselt; P. B. Price; G. T. Przybylski; J. Pütz; M. Quinnan; L. Rädel; M. Rameez; K. Rawlins; P. Redl; I. Rees; R. Reimann; E. Resconi; W. Rhode; M. Richman; B. Riedel; S. Robertson; J. P. Rodrigues; M. Rongen; C. Rott; T. Ruhe; B. Ruzybayev; D. Ryckbosch; S. M. Saba; H. -G. Sander; M. Santander; S. Sarkar; K. Schatto; F. Scheriau; T. Schmidt; M. Schmitz; S. Schoenen; S. Schöneberg; A. Schönwald; A. Schukraft; L. Schulte; O. Schulz; D. Seckel; Y. Sestayo; S. Seunarine; R. Shanidze; C. Sheremata; M. W. E. Smith; D. Soldin; G. M. Spiczak; C. Spiering; M. Stamatikos; T. Stanev; N. A. Stanisha; A. Stasik; T. Stezelberger; R. G. Stokstad; A. Stößl; E. A. Strahler; R. Ström; N. L. Strotjohann; G. W. Sullivan; H. Taavola; I. Taboada; A. Tamburro; A. Tepe; S. Ter-Antonyan; A. Terliuk; G. Teši?; S. Tilav; P. A. Toale; M. N. Tobin; D. Tosi; M. Tselengidou; E. Unger; M. Usner; S. Vallecorsa; N. van Eijndhoven; J. Vandenbroucke; J. van Santen; M. Vehring; M. Voge; M. Vraeghe; C. Walck; M. Wallraff; Ch. Weaver; M. Wellons; C. Wendt; S. Westerhoff; B. J. Whelan; N. Whitehorn; C. Wichary; K. Wiebe; C. H. Wiebusch; D. R. Williams; H. Wissing; M. Wolf; T. R. Wood; K. Woschnagg; D. L. Xu; X. W. Xu; J. P. Yanez; G. Yodh; S. Yoshida; P. Zarzhitsky; J. Ziemann; S. Zierke; M. Zoll

    2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for high-energy neutrinos interacting within the IceCube detector between 2010 and 2012 provided the first evidence for a high-energy neutrino flux of extraterrestrial origin. Results from an analysis using the same methods with a third year (2012-2013) of data from the complete IceCube detector are consistent with the previously reported astrophysical flux in the 100 TeV - PeV range at the level of $10^{-8}\\, \\mathrm{GeV}\\, \\mathrm{cm}^{-2}\\, \\mathrm{s}^{-1}\\, \\mathrm{sr}^{-1}$ per flavor and reject a purely atmospheric explanation for the combined 3-year data at $5.7 \\sigma$. The data are consistent with expectations for equal fluxes of all three neutrino flavors and with isotropic arrival directions, suggesting either numerous or spatially extended sources. The three-year dataset, with a livetime of 988 days, contains a total of 37 neutrino candidate events with deposited energies ranging from 30 to 2000 TeV. The 2000 TeV event is the highest-energy neutrino interaction ever observed.

  8. Are both BL Lacs and pulsar wind nebulae the astrophysical counterparts of IceCube neutrino events?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Padovani; E. Resconi

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    IceCube has recently reported the discovery of high-energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin, opening up the PeV (10^15 eV) sky. Because of their large positional uncertainties, these events have not yet been associated to any astrophysical source. We have found plausible astronomical counterparts in the GeV -- TeV bands by looking for sources in the available large area high-energy gamma-ray catalogues within the error circles of the IceCube events. We then built the spectral energy distribution of these sources and compared it with the energy and flux of the corresponding neutrino. Likely counterparts include mostly BL Lacs and two Galactic pulsar wind nebulae. On the one hand many objects, including the starburst galaxy NGC 253 and Centaurus A, despite being spatially coincident with neutrino events, are too weak to be reconciled with the neutrino flux. On the other hand, various GeV powerful objects cannot be assessed as possible counterparts due to their lack of TeV data. The definitive association between high-energy astrophysical neutrinos and our candidates will be significantly helped by new TeV observations but will be confirmed or disproved only by further IceCube data. Either way, this will have momentous implications for blazar jets, high-energy astrophysics, and cosmic-ray and neutrino astronomy.

  9. Dark Matter vs. Neutrinos: The effect of astrophysical uncertainties and timing information on the neutrino floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Jonathan H

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future multi-tonne Direct Detection experiments will be sensitive to solar neutrino induced nuclear recoils which form an irreducible background to light Dark Matter searches. Indeed for masses around 6 GeV the spectra of neutrinos and Dark Matter are so similar that experiments will run into a neutrino floor, for which sensitivity increases only marginally with exposure past a certain cross section. In this work we show that this floor can be overcome using the different annual modulation expected from solar neutrinos and Dark Matter. Specifically for cross sections below the neutrino floor the DM signal is observable through a phase shift and a smaller amplitude for the time-dependent event rate. This allows the exclusion power to be improved by up to an order of magnitude for large exposures. In addition we demonstrate that the neutrino floor exists over a wider mass range than has been previously shown, since the large uncertainties in the Dark Matter velocity distribution make the signal spectrum harder ...

  10. Dark Matter vs. Neutrinos: The effect of astrophysical uncertainties and timing information on the neutrino floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Jonathan H

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future multi-tonne Direct Detection experiments will be sensitive to solar neutrino induced nuclear recoils which form an irreducible background to light Dark Matter searches. Indeed for masses around 6 GeV the spectra of neutrinos and Dark Matter are so similar that experiments will run into a neutrino floor, for which sensitivity increases only marginally with exposure past a certain cross section. In this work we show that this floor can be overcome using the different annual modulation expected from solar neutrinos and Dark Matter. Specifically for cross sections below the neutrino floor the DM signal is observable through a phase shift and a smaller amplitude for the time-dependent event rate. This allows the exclusion power to be improved by up to an order of magnitude for large exposures. In addition we demonstrate that the neutrino floor exists over a wider mass range than has been previously shown, since the large uncertainties in the Dark Matter velocity distribution make the signal spectrum harder ...

  11. Potential of a Neutrino Detector in the ANDES Underground Laboratory for Geophysics and Astrophysics of Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. N. Machado; T. Mühlbeier; H. Nunokawa; R. Zukanovich Funchal

    2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of the Agua Negra tunnels that will link Argentina and Chile under the Andes, the world longest mountain range, opens the possibility to build the first deep underground labo- ratory in the Southern Hemisphere. This laboratory has the acronym ANDES (Agua Negra Deep Experiment Site) and its overburden could be as large as \\sim 1.7 km of rock, or 4500 mwe, providing an excellent low background environment to study physics of rare events like the ones induced by neutrinos and/or dark matter. In this paper we investigate the physics potential of a few kiloton size liquid scintillator detector, which could be constructed in the ANDES laboratory as one of its possible scientific programs. In particular, we evaluate the impact of such a detector for the studies of geoneutrinos and galactic supernova neutrinos assuming a fiducial volume of 3 kilotons as a reference size. We emphasize the complementary roles of such a detector to the ones in the Northern Hemisphere neutrino facilities through some advantages due to its geographical location.

  12. First calculation of cosmic-ray muon spallation backgrounds for MeV astrophysical neutrino signals in Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Shirley Weishi

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When muons travel through matter, their energy losses lead to nuclear breakup ("spallation") processes. The delayed decays of unstable daughter nuclei produced by cosmic-ray muons are important backgrounds for low-energy astrophysical neutrino experiments, e.g., those seeking to detect solar neutrino or Diffuse Supernova Neutrino Background (DSNB) signals. Even though Super-Kamiokande has strong general cuts to reduce these spallation-induced backgrounds, the remaining rate before additional cuts for specific signals is much larger than the signal rates for kinetic energies of about 6 -- 18 MeV. Surprisingly, there is no published calculation of the production and properties of these backgrounds in water, though there are such studies for scintillator. Using the simulation code FLUKA and theoretical insights, we detail how muons lose energy in water, produce secondary particles, how and where these secondaries produce isotopes, and the properties of the backgrounds from their decays. We reproduce Super-Kamiok...

  13. astrophysical 8lid t7li: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    neutrino cooling and associated limits on neutrino properties; and high-energy astrophysical neutrinos. W. C. Haxton 2012-09-17 3 Nuclear astrophysics CiteSeer...

  14. Possible explanation for the low flux of high energy astrophysical muon neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pakvasa, Sandip [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    I consider the possibility that some exotic neutrino property is responsible for reducing the muon neutrino flux at high energies from distant sources; specifically, (i) neutrino decay and (ii) neutrinos being pseudo-Dirac particles. This would provide a mechanism for the lack of high energy muon events in the Icecube detector.

  15. High energy astrophysical processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todor Stanev

    2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly review the high energy astrophysical processes that are related to the production of high energy $\\gamma$-ray and neutrino signals and are likely to be important for the energy loss of high and ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. We also give examples for neutrino fluxes generated by different astrophysical objects and describe the cosmological link provided by cosmogenic neutrinos.

  16. Cosmic neutrino cascades from secret neutrino interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenny C. Y. Ng; John F. Beacom

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first detection of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos by IceCube provides new opportunities for tests of neutrino properties. The long baseline through the Cosmic Neutrino Background (C$\

  17. First calculation of cosmic-ray muon spallation backgrounds for MeV astrophysical neutrino signals in Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirley Weishi Li; John F. Beacom

    2014-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    When muons travel through matter, their energy losses lead to nuclear breakup ("spallation") processes. The delayed decays of unstable daughter nuclei produced by cosmic-ray muons are important backgrounds for low-energy astrophysical neutrino experiments, e.g., those seeking to detect solar neutrino or Diffuse Supernova Neutrino Background (DSNB) signals. Even though Super-Kamiokande has strong general cuts to reduce these spallation-induced backgrounds, the remaining rate before additional cuts for specific signals is much larger than the signal rates for kinetic energies of about 6 -- 18 MeV. Surprisingly, there is no published calculation of the production and properties of these backgrounds in water, though there are such studies for scintillator. Using the simulation code FLUKA and theoretical insights, we detail how muons lose energy in water, produce secondary particles, how and where these secondaries produce isotopes, and the properties of the backgrounds from their decays. We reproduce Super-Kamiokande measurements of the total background to within a factor of 2, which is good given that the isotope yields vary by orders of magnitude and that some details of the experiment are unknown to us at this level. Our results break aggregate data into component isotopes, reveal their separate production mechanisms, and preserve correlations between them. We outline how to implement more effective background rejection techniques using this information. Reducing backgrounds in solar and DSNB studies by even a factor of a few could help lead to important new discoveries.

  18. A cost-Effective Design for a Neutrino Factory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berg, J.S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    experiments. The physics case for a Neutrino Factory willsurprises, the physics case for a Neutrino Factory willAstrophysics, Physics of Beams (2004). [6] The Neutrino

  19. Neutrino masses from clustering of red and blue galaxies: a test of astrophysical uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molly E. C. Swanson; Will J. Percival; Ofer Lahav

    2010-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Combining measurements of the galaxy power spectrum and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is a powerful means of constraining the summed mass of neutrino species sum(m_nu), but is subject to systematic uncertainties due to non-linear structure formation, redshift-space distortions and galaxy bias. We empirically test the robustness of neutrino mass results to these effects by separately analyzing power spectra of red and blue galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-II) Data Release 7 (DR7), combined with the CMB five-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP5) data. We consider fitting for a range of maximum wavenumber k using twelve different galaxy bias models. For example, using a new model based on perturbation theory and including redshift space distortions (Saito et al. 2009), the all-galaxy power spectrum combined with WMAP5 for a wavenumber range of kblue galaxy power spectra give 0.41 and 0.63 eV respectively for this model. Using mock catalogues, we find the expected difference in these limits assuming a true neutrino mass of zero is 0.10 + or - 0.14 eV. Thus the difference of 0.22 eV between upper limits on neutrino mass for red and blue galaxies is approximately 1 sigma from the expected value. We find similar results for the other models and k ranges tested. This indicates good agreement for current data but hints at possible issues for next-generation surveys. Being able to perform such systematic tests is advantageous, and future surveys would benefit by including broad galaxy populations and luminosities that enable such a decomposition.

  20. Neutrino Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlo Giunti; Marco Laveder

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this review we present the main features of the current status of neutrino physics. After a review of the theory of neutrino mixing and oscillations, we discuss the current status of solar and atmospheric neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that the current data can be nicely accommodated in the framework of three-neutrino mixing. We discuss also the problem of the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale through Tritium beta-decay experiments and astrophysical observations, and the exploration of the Majorana nature of massive neutrinos through neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. Finally, future prospects are briefly discussed.

  1. Atmospheric neutrino oscillations and tau neutrinos in ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerardo Giordano; Olga Mena; Irina Mocioiu

    2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of the IceCube Deep Core Array is to search for neutrinos of astrophysical origins. Atmospheric neutrinos are commonly considered as a background for these searches. We show here that cascade measurements in the Ice Cube Deep Core Array can provide strong evidence for tau neutrino appearance in atmospheric neutrino oscillations. A careful study of these tau neutrinos is crucial, since they constitute an irreducible background for astrophysical neutrino detection.

  2. Muons and Neutrinos 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is the written version of the rapporteur talk on Section HE-2, muons and neutrinos, presented at the 30th International Cosmic Ray Conference, Merida, Yucatan, July 11, 2007. Topics include atmospheric muons and neutrinos, solar neutrinos and astrophysical neutrinos as well as calculations and instrumentation related to these topics.

  3. Neutrinos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011 at3, Issue 30NeutrinoNeutrinos from the

  4. Neutrino

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011 at3, Issue 30Neutrino cross section

  5. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Adams; J. R. Alonso; A. M. Ankowski; J. A. Asaadi; J. Ashenfelter; S. N. Axani; K. Babu; C. Backhouse; H. R. Band; P. S. Barbeau; N. Barros; A. Bernstein; M. Betancourt; M. Bishai; E. Blucher; J. Bouffard; N. Bowden; S. Brice; C. Bryan; L. Camilleri; J. Cao; J. Carlson; R. E. Carr; A. Chatterjee; M. Chen; S. Chen; M. Chiu; E. D. Church; J. I. Collar; G. Collin; J. M. Conrad; M. R. Convery; R. L. Cooper; D. Cowen; H. Davoudiasl; A. De Gouvea; D. J. Dean; G. Deichert; F. Descamps; T. DeYoung; M. V. Diwan; Z. Djurcic; M. J. Dolinski; J. Dolph; B. Donnelly; D. A. Dwyer; S. Dytman; Y. Efremenko; L. L. Everett; A. Fava; E. Figueroa-Feliciano; B. Fleming; A. Friedland; B. K. Fujikawa; T. K. Gaisser; M. Galeazzi; D. C. Galehouse; A. Galindo-Uribarri; G. T. Garvey; S. Gautam; K. E. Gilje; M. Gonzalez-Garcia; M. C. Goodman; H. Gordon; E. Gramellini; M. P. Green; A. Guglielmi; R. W. Hackenburg; A. Hackenburg; F. Halzen; K. Han; S. Hans; D. Harris; K. M. Heeger; M. Herman; R. Hill; A. Holin; P. Huber; D. E. Jaffe; R. A. Johnson; J. Joshi; G. Karagiorgi; L. J. Kaufman; B. Kayser; S. H. Kettell; B. J. Kirby; J. R. Klein; Yu. G. Kolomensky; R. M. Kriske; C. E. Lane; T. J. Langford; A. Lankford; K. Lau; J. G. Learned; J. Ling; J. M. Link; D. Lissauer; L. Littenberg; B. R. Littlejohn; S. Lockwitz; M. Lokajicek; W. C. Louis; K. Luk; J. Lykken; W. J. Marciano; J. Maricic; D. M. Markoff; D. A. Martinez Caicedo; C. Mauger; K. Mavrokoridis; E. McCluskey; D. McKeen; R. McKeown; G. Mills; I. Mocioiu; B. Monreal; M. R. Mooney; J. G. Morfin; P. Mumm; J. Napolitano; R. Neilson; J. K. Nelson; M. Nessi; D. Norcini; F. Nova; D. R. Nygren; G. D. Orebi Gann; O. Palamara; Z. Parsa; R. Patterson; P. Paul; A. Pocar; X. Qian; J. L. Raaf; R. Rameika; G. Ranucci; H. Ray; D. Reyna; G. C. Rich; P. Rodrigues; E. Romero Romero; R. Rosero; S. D. Rountree; B. Rybolt; M. C. Sanchez; G. Santucci; D. Schmitz; K. Scholberg; D. Seckel; M. Shaevitz; R. Shrock; M. B. Smy; M. Soderberg; A. Sonzogni; A. B. Sousa; J. Spitz; J. M. St. John; J. Stewart; J. B. Strait; G. Sullivan; R. Svoboda; A. M. Szelc; R. Tayloe; M. A. Thomson; M. Toups; A. Vacheret; M. Vagins; R. G. Van de Water; R. B. Vogelaar; M. Weber; W. Weng; M. Wetstein; C. White; B. R. White; L. Whitehead; D. W. Whittington; M. J. Wilking; R. J. Wilson; P. Wilson; D. Winklehner; D. R. Winn; E. Worcester; L. Yang; M. Yeh; Z. W. Yokley; J. Yoo; B. Yu; J. Yu; C. Zhang

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summarizes discussion and conclusions from the workshop.

  6. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, C; Ankowski, A M; Asaadi, J A; Ashenfelter, J; Axani, S N; Babu, K; Backhouse, C; Band, H R; Barbeau, P S; Barros, N; Bernstein, A; Betancourt, M; Bishai, M; Blucher, E; Bouffard, J; Bowden, N; Brice, S; Bryan, C; Camilleri, L; Cao, J; Carlson, J; Carr, R E; Chatterjee, A; Chen, M; Chen, S; Chiu, M; Church, E D; Collar, J I; Collin, G; Conrad, J M; Convery, M R; Cooper, R L; Cowen, D; Davoudiasl, H; De Gouvea, A; Dean, D J; Deichert, G; Descamps, F; DeYoung, T; Diwan, M V; Djurcic, Z; Dolinski, M J; Dolph, J; Donnelly, B; Dwyer, D A; Dytman, S; Efremenko, Y; Everett, L L; Fava, A; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Fleming, B; Friedland, A; Fujikawa, B K; Gaisser, T K; Galeazzi, M; Galehouse, D C; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Garvey, G T; Gautam, S; Gilje, K E; Gonzalez-Garcia, M; Goodman, M C; Gordon, H; Gramellini, E; Green, M P; Guglielmi, A; Hackenburg, R W; Hackenburg, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hans, S; Harris, D; Heeger, K M; Herman, M; Hill, R; Holin, A; Huber, P; Jaffe, D E; Johnson, R A; Joshi, J; Karagiorgi, G; Kaufman, L J; Kayser, B; Kettell, S H; Kirby, B J; Klein, J R; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kriske, R M; Lane, C E; Langford, T J; Lankford, A; Lau, K; Learned, J G; Ling, J; Link, J M; Lissauer, D; Littenberg, L; Littlejohn, B R; Lockwitz, S; Lokajicek, M; Louis, W C; Luk, K; Lykken, J; Marciano, W J; Maricic, J; Markoff, D M; Caicedo, D A Martinez; Mauger, C; Mavrokoridis, K; McCluskey, E; McKeen, D; McKeown, R; Mills, G; Mocioiu, I; Monreal, B; Mooney, M R; Morfin, J G; Mumm, P; Napolitano, J; Neilson, R; Nelson, J K; Nessi, M; Norcini, D; Nova, F; Nygren, D R; Gann, G D Orebi; Palamara, O; Parsa, Z; Patterson, R; Paul, P; Pocar, A; Qian, X; Raaf, J L; Rameika, R; Ranucci, G; Ray, H; Reyna, D; Rich, G C; Rodrigues, P; Romero, E Romero; Rosero, R; Rountree, S D; Rybolt, B; Sanchez, M C; Santucci, G; Schmitz, D; Scholberg, K; Seckel, D; Shaevitz, M; Shrock, R; Smy, M B; Soderberg, M; Sonzogni, A; Sousa, A B; Spitz, J; John, J M St; Stewart, J; Strait, J B; Sullivan, G; Svoboda, R; Szelc, A M; Tayloe, R; Thomson, M A; Toups, M; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Van de Water, R G; Vogelaar, R B; Weber, M; Weng, W; Wetstein, M; White, C; White, B R; Whitehead, L; Whittington, D W; Wilking, M J; Wilson, R J; Wilson, P; Winklehner, D; Winn, D R; Worcester, E; Yang, L; Yeh, M; Yokley, Z W; Yoo, J; Yu, B; Yu, J; Zhang, C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summ...

  7. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division. Annual report, January 1-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birge, R.W.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research in the physics, computer science, and mathematics division is described for the year 1980. While the division's major effort remains in high energy particle physics, there is a continually growing program in computer science and applied mathematics. Experimental programs are reported in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, muon and neutrino reactions at FNAL, search for effects of a right-handed gauge boson, limits on neutrino oscillations from muon-decay neutrinos, strong interaction experiments at FNAL, strong interaction experiments at BNL, particle data center, Barrelet moment analysis of ..pi..N scattering data, astrophysics and astronomy, earth sciences, and instrument development and engineering for high energy physics. In theoretical physics research, studies included particle physics and accelerator physics. Computer science and mathematics research included analytical and numerical methods, information analysis techniques, advanced computer concepts, and environmental and epidemiological studies. (GHT)

  8. SEARCH FOR TIME-INDEPENDENT NEUTRINO EMISSION FROM ASTROPHYSICAL SOURCES WITH 3 yr OF IceCube DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aartsen, M. G.; Besson, David Zeke

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    figures 1. INTRODUCTION The origin of cosmic rays (CRs) is an unresolved puzzle. The prevailing model of CR acceleration assumes that charged particles receive their very high energies via repeated scattering across strong astrophysical shocks, the so...-called first-order Fermi acceleration. Candidate sources of Galactic CRs are supernova explosions and their remnant shocks, which may accelerate charged particles via diffuse shock acceleration up to the CR “knee” (?3 × 1015 eV). At higher energies...

  9. Solar Neutrinos: Models, Observations, and New Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. C. Haxton

    2007-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss the development and resolution of the solar neutrino problem, as well as opportunities now open to us to extend our knowledge of main-sequence stellar evolution and neutrino astrophysics.

  10. Neutrino Physics and Astronomy with MACRO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Bernardini

    2002-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    MACRO experiment operated in the Gran Sasso underground laboratory. Neutrino events collected by this detector are used in order to study the atmospheric neutrino flux. Different measurements in different energy samples are in full agreement and show evidence of neutrino oscillation phenomenon. Also the search for neutrino astrophysical sources is reported.

  11. DNP / DPF / DAP / DPB JOINT STUDY ON THE FUTURE OF NEUTRINO PHYSICS The Neutrino Matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DNP / DPF / DAP / DPB JOINT STUDY ON THE FUTURE OF NEUTRINO PHYSICS The Neutrino Matrix #12;#12;THE The Neutrino Matrix * Please see Appendices A and B · APS American Physical Society · DNP Division of Nuclear MATRIX Contents #12;NEUTRINOS AND THE UNEXPECTED : Neutrino physics has been marked by "anomalous

  12. Baryogenesis via neutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Kh. Akhmedov; V. A. Rubakov; A. Yu. Smirnov

    1998-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new mechanism of leptogenesis in which the asymmetries in lepton numbers are produced through the CP-violating oscillations of ``sterile'' (electroweak singlet) neutrinos. The asymmetry is communicated from singlet neutrinos to ordinary leptons through their Yukawa couplings. The lepton asymmetry is then reprocessed into baryon asymmetry by electroweak sphalerons. We show that the observed value of baryon asymmetry can be generated in this way, and the masses of ordinary neutrinos induced by the seesaw mechanism are in the astrophysically and cosmologically interesting range. Except for singlet neutrinos, no physics beyond the Standard Model is required.

  13. The Status and future of ground-based TeV gamma-ray astronomy. A White Paper prepared for the Division of Astrophysics of the American Physical Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckley, J; Dingus, B; Falcone, A; Kaaret, Philip; Krawzcynski, H; Pohl, M; Vasilev, V; Williams, D A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, ground-based TeV gamma-ray observatories have made spectacular discoveries including imaging spectroscopy observations of galactic sources of different classes, and the discovery of rapid gamma-ray flares from radio galaxies and active galactic nuclei containing supermassive black holes. These discoveries, and the fact that gamma-ray astronomy has the potential to map the radiation from dark matter annihilation in our Galaxy and in extragalactic systems, have attracted the attention of the wider scientific community. The Division of Astrophysics of the American Physical Society requested the preparation of a white paper on the status and future of ground-based gamma-ray astronomy to define the science goals of a future observatory, to determine the performance specifications, to identify the areas of necessary technology development, and to lay out a clear path for proceeding beyond the near term. The white paper was written with broad community input, including discussions on several dedicat...

  14. Neutrino Oscillation Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kayser, Boris

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To complement the neutrino-physics lectures given at the 2011 International School on Astro Particle Physics devoted to Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (ISAPP 2011; Varenna, Italy), at the 2011 European School of High Energy Physics (ESHEP 2011; Cheila Gradistei, Romania), and, in modified form, at other summer schools, we present here a written description of the physics of neutrino oscillation. This description is centered on a new way of deriving the oscillation probability. We also provide a brief guide to references relevant to topics other than neutrino oscillation that were covered in the lectures. Neutrinos and photons are by far the most abundant elementary particles in the universe. Thus, if we would like to comprehend the universe, we must understand the neutrinos. Of course, studying the neutrinos is challenging, since the only known forces through which these electrically-neutral leptons interact are the weak force and gravity. Consequently, interactions of neutrinos in a detector are very rare events, so that very large detectors and intense neutrino sources are needed to make experiments feasible. Nevertheless, we have confirmed that the weak interactions of neutrinos are correctly described by the Standard Model (SM) of elementary particle physics. Moreover, in the last 14 years, we have discovered that neutrinos have nonzero masses, and that leptons mix. These discoveries have been based on the observation that neutrinos can change from one 'flavor' to another - the phenomenon known as neutrino oscillation. We shall explain the physics of neutrino oscillation, deriving the probability of oscillation in a new way. We shall also provide a very brief guide to references that can be used to study some major neutrino-physics topics other than neutrino oscillation.

  15. Neutrino Flavor Ratios Modified by Cosmic Ray Re-acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawanaka, Norita

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Re-acceleration of $\\pi$'s and $\\mu$'s modifies the flavor ratio at Earth (at astrophysical sources) of neutrinos produced by $\\pi$ decay, $\

  16. Spectroscopy of Solar Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Wurm; Franz von Feilitzsch; Marianne Goeger-Neff; Tobias Lachenmaier; Timo Lewke; Quirin Meindl; Randoplh Moellenberg; Lothar Oberauer; Walter Potzel; Marc Tippmann; Christoph Traunsteiner; Juergen Winter

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last years, liquid-scintillator detectors have opened a new window for the observation of low-energetic astrophysical neutrino sources. In 2007, the solar neutrino experiment Borexino began its data-taking in the Gran Sasso underground laboratory. High energy resolution and excellent radioactive background conditions in the detector allow the first-time spectroscopic measurement of solar neutrinos in the sub-MeV energy regime. The experimental results of the Beryllium-7 neutrino flux measurements as well as the prospects for the detection of solar Boron-8, pep and CNO neutrinos are presented in the context of the currently discussed ambiguities in solar metallicity. In addition, the potential of the future SNO+ and LENA experiments for high-precision solar neutrino spectroscopy will be outlined.

  17. ANTARES deep sea neutrino telescope results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mangano, Salvatore [IFIC - Instituto de Física Corpuscular, Edificio Institutos de Investigatión, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Collaboration: ANTARES Collaboration

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ANTARES experiment is currently the largest underwater neutrino telescope in the Northern Hemisphere. It is taking high quality data since 2007. Its main scientific goal is to search for high energy neutrinos that are expected from the acceleration of cosmic rays from astrophysical sources. This contribution reviews the status of the detector and presents several analyses carried out on atmospheric muons and neutrinos. For example it shows the results from the measurement of atmospheric muon neutrino spectrum and of atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters as well as searches for neutrinos from steady cosmic point-like sources, for neutrinos from gamma ray bursts and for relativistic magnetic monopoles.

  18. Advancements in solar neutrino physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vito Antonelli; Lino Miramonti

    2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the results of solar neutrino physics, with particular attention to the data obtained and the analyses performed in the last decades, which were determinant to solve the solar neutrino problem (SNP), proving that neutrinos are massive and oscillating particles and contributing to refine the solar models. We also discuss the perspectives of the presently running experiments in this sector and of the ones planned for the near future and the impact they can have on elementary particle physics and astrophysics.

  19. The Status and future of ground-based TeV gamma-ray astronomy. A White Paper prepared for the Division of Astrophysics of the American Physical Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Buckley; K. Byrum; B. Dingus; A. Falcone; P. Kaaret; H. Krawzcynski; M. Pohl; V. Vassiliev; D. A. Williams

    2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, ground-based TeV gamma-ray observatories have made spectacular discoveries including imaging spectroscopy observations of galactic sources of different classes, and the discovery of rapid gamma-ray flares from radio galaxies and active galactic nuclei containing supermassive black holes. These discoveries, and the fact that gamma-ray astronomy has the potential to map the radiation from dark matter annihilation in our Galaxy and in extragalactic systems, have attracted the attention of the wider scientific community. The Division of Astrophysics of the American Physical Society requested the preparation of a white paper on the status and future of ground-based gamma-ray astronomy to define the science goals of a future observatory, to determine the performance specifications, to identify the areas of necessary technology development, and to lay out a clear path for proceeding beyond the near term. The white paper was written with broad community input, including discussions on several dedicated open meetings, and a number of APS or other conferences. It contains an executive summary, detailed reports from the science working groups, and appendices with supplementary material including the full author lists for the different sections of the white paper and a glossary.

  20. High energy neutrino telescopes as a probe of the neutrino mass mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kfir Blum; Anson Hook; Kohta Murase

    2014-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that measurements of the spectral shape and flavor ratios of high energy astrophysical neutrinos at neutrino telescopes can be sensitive to the details of the neutrino mass mechanism. We propose a simple model for Majorana neutrino mass generation that realizes the relevant parameter space, in which small explicit lepton number violation is mediated to the Standard Model through the interactions of a light scalar. IceCube, with about ten years of exposure time, could reveal the presence of anomalous neutrino self-interactions. Precision electroweak and lepton flavor laboratory experiments and a determination of the total neutrino mass from cosmology would provide consistency checks on the interpretation of a signal.

  1. Neutrino-2008: Where are we? Where are we going?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexei Yu. Smirnov

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Our present knowledge of neutrinos can be summarized in terms of the "standard neutrino scenario". Phenomenology of this scenario as well as attempts to uncover physics behind neutrino mass and mixing are described. Goals of future studies include complete reconstruction of the neutrino mass and flavor spectrum, further test of the standard scenario and search for new physics beyond it. Developments of new experimental techniques may lead to construction of new neutrino detectors from table-top to multi-Megaton scales which will open new horizons in the field. With detection of neutrino bursts from the Galactic supernova and high energy cosmic neutrinos neutrino astrophysics will enter qualitatively new phase. Neutrinos and LHC (and future colliders), neutrino astronomy, neutrino structure of the Universe, and probably, neutrino technologies will be among leading topics of research.

  2. Neutrino-2008: Where are we? Where are we going?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smirnov, Alexei Yu

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our present knowledge of neutrinos can be summarized in terms of the "standard neutrino scenario". Phenomenology of this scenario as well as attempts to uncover physics behind neutrino mass and mixing are described. Goals of future studies include complete reconstruction of the neutrino mass and flavor spectrum, further test of the standard scenario and search for new physics beyond it. Developments of new experimental techniques may lead to construction of new neutrino detectors from table-top to multi-Megaton scales which will open new horizons in the field. With detection of neutrino bursts from the Galactic supernova and high energy cosmic neutrinos neutrino astrophysics will enter qualitatively new phase. Neutrinos and LHC (and future colliders), neutrino astronomy, neutrino structure of the Universe, and probably, neutrino technologies will be among leading topics of research.

  3. Pseudo-Dirac Neutrinos, a Challenge for Neutrino Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John F. Beacom; Nicole F. Bell; Dan Hooper; John G. Learned; Sandip Pakvasa; Thomas J. Weiler

    2004-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinos may be pseudo-Dirac states, such that each generation is actually composed of two maximally-mixed Majorana neutrinos separated by a tiny mass difference. The usual active neutrino oscillation phenomenology would be unaltered if the pseudo-Dirac splittings are $\\delta m^2 \\alt 10^{-12}$ eV$^2$; in addition, neutrinoless double beta decay would be highly suppressed. However, it may be possible to distinguish pseudo-Dirac from Dirac neutrinos using high-energy astrophysical neutrinos. By measuring flavor ratios as a function of $L/E$, mass-squared differences down to $\\delta m^2 \\sim 10^{-18}$ eV$^2$ can be reached. We comment on the possibility of probing cosmological parameters with neutrinos.

  4. TeV Particle Astrophysics II: Summary comments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A unifying theme of this conference was the use of different approaches to understand astrophysical sources of energetic particles in the TeV range and above. In this summary I review how gamma-ray astronomy, neutrino astronomy and (to some extent) gravitational wave astronomy provide complementary avenues to understanding the origin and role of high-energy particles in energetic astrophysical sources.

  5. Neutrino Physics with the IceCube Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Kiryluk; for the IceCube Collaboration

    2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    IceCube is a cubic kilometer neutrino telescope under construction at the South Pole. The primary goal is to discover astrophysical sources of high energy neutrinos. We describe the detector and present results on atmospheric muon neutrinos from 2006 data collected with nine detector strings.

  6. Frontiers of Astrophysics - Workshop Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heino Falcke; Peter L. Biermann

    1997-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize recent results presented in the astrophysics session during a conference on ``Frontiers of Contemporary Physics''. We will discuss three main fields (High-Energy Astrophysics, Relativistic Astrophysics, and Cosmology), where Astrophysicists are pushing the limits of our knowledge of the physics of the universe to new frontiers. Since the highlights of early 1997 were the first detection of a redshift and the optical and X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts, as well as the first well-documented flares of TeV-Blazars across a large fraction of the electromagnetic spectrum, we will concentrate on these topics. Other topics covered are black holes and relativistic jets, high-energy cosmic rays, Neutrino-Astronomy, extragalactic magnetic fields, and cosmological models.

  7. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, Joachim [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), IEKP, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2{beta}) searches, single {beta}-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy.Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium {beta}-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope ({sup 137}Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R and D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2{beta} decay and single {beta}-decay.

  8. Physics division annual report 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glover, J.; Physics

    2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report highlights the activities of the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory in 2006. The Division's programs include the operation as a national user facility of ATLAS, the Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System, research in nuclear structure and reactions, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear theory, investigations in medium-energy nuclear physics as well as research and development in accelerator technology. The mission of nuclear physics is to understand the origin, evolution and structure of baryonic matter in the universe--the core of matter, the fuel of stars, and the basic constituent of life itself. The Division's research focuses on innovative new ways to address this mission.

  9. Constraints on Neutrino Oscillations from Big Bang Nucleosynethesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Shi; D. N. Schramm; B. D. Fields

    1993-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss in detail the effect of neutrino oscillations in Big Bang nucleosynthesis, between active and sterile neutrinos, as well as between active and active neutrinos. We calculate the constraints on mixings between active and sterile neutrinos from the present observation of the primordial helium abundance and discuss the potential implications on various astrophysical and cosmological problems of such oscillations. In particular, we show that large angle sterile neutrino mixing seems to be excluded as a MSW solution to the solar neutrino situation or a solution to the atmospheric neutrino mixing hinted at in some underground experiments. We show how with this constraint, the next generation of solar neutrino experiments should be able to determine the resolution of the solar neutrino problem. It is also shown how sterile neutrinos remain a viable dark matter candidate.

  10. IceCube-Gen2: A Vision for the Future of Neutrino Astronomy in Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IceCube-Gen2 Collaboration; :; M. G. Aartsen; M. Ackermann; J. Adams; J. A. Aguilar; M. Ahlers; M. Ahrens; D. Altmann; T. Anderson; G. Anton; C. Arguelles; T. C. Arlen; J. Auffenberg; S. Axani; X. Bai; I. Bartos; S. W. Barwick; V. Baum; R. Bay; J. J. Beatty; J. Becker Tjus; K. -H. Becker; S. BenZvi; P. Berghaus; D. Berley; E. Bernardini; A. Bernhard; D. Z. Besson; G. Binder; D. Bindig; M. Bissok; E. Blaufuss; J. Blumenthal; D. J. Boersma; C. Bohm; F. Bos; D. Bose; S. Böser; O. Botner; L. Brayeur; H. -P. Bretz; A. M. Brown; N. Buzinsky; J. Casey; M. Casier; E. Cheung; D. Chirkin; A. Christov; B. Christy; K. Clark; L. Classen; F. Clevermann; S. Coenders; G. H. Collin; J. M. Conrad; D. F. Cowen; A. H. Cruz Silva; J. Daughhetee; J. C. Davis; M. Day; J. P. A. M. de André; C. De Clercq; S. De Ridder; P. Desiati; K. D. de Vries; M. de With; T. DeYoung; J. C. Dí andaz-Vélez; M. Dunkman; R. Eagan; B. Eberhardt; T. Ehrhardt; B. Eichmann; J. Eisch; S. Euler; J. J. Evans; P. A. Evenson; O. Fadiran; A. R. Fazely; A. Fedynitch; J. Feintzeig; J. Felde; K. Filimonov; C. Finley; T. Fischer-Wasels; S. Flis; K. Frantzen; T. Fuchs; T. K. Gaisser; R. Gaior; J. Gallagher; L. Gerhardt; D. Gier; L. Gladstone; T. Glüsenkamp; A. Goldschmidt; G. Golup; J. G. Gonzalez; J. A. Goodman; D. Góra; D. Grant; P. Gretskov; J. C. Groh; A. Groß; C. Ha; C. Haack; A. Haj Ismail; P. Hallen; A. Hallgren; F. Halzen; K. Hanson; J. Haugen; D. Hebecker; D. Heereman; D. Heinen; K. Helbing; R. Hellauer; D. Hellwig; S. Hickford; J. Hignight; G. C. Hill; K. D. Hoffman; R. Hoffmann; A. Homeier; K. Hoshina; F. Huang; W. Huelsnitz; P. O. Hulth; K. Hultqvist; A. Ishihara; E. Jacobi; J. Jacobsen; G. S. Japaridze; K. Jero; O. Jlelati; B. J. P. Jones; M. Jurkovic; O. Kalekin; A. Kappes; T. Karg; A. Karle; T. Katori; U. F. Katz; M. Kauer; A. Keivani; J. L. Kelley; A. Kheirandish; J. Kiryluk; J. Kläs; S. R. Klein; J. -H. Köhne; G. Kohnen; H. Kolanoski; A. Koob; L. Köpke; C. Kopper; S. Kopper; D. J. Koskinen; M. Kowalski; C. B. Krauss; A. Kriesten; K. Krings; G. Kroll; M. Kroll; J. Kunnen; N. Kurahashi; T. Kuwabara; M. Labare; J. L. Lanfranchi; D. T. Larsen; M. J. Larson; M. Lesiak-Bzdak; M. Leuermann; J. LoSecco; J. Lünemann; J. Madsen; G. Maggi; K. B. M. Mahn; S. Marka; Z. Marka; R. Maruyama; K. Mase; H. S. Matis; R. Maunu; F. McNally; K. Meagher; M. Medici; A. Meli; T. Meures; S. Miarecki; E. Middell; E. Middlemas; N. Milke; J. Miller; L. Mohrmann; T. Montaruli; R. W. Moore; R. Morse; R. Nahnhauer; U. Naumann; H. Niederhausen; S. C. Nowicki; D. R. Nygren; A. Obertacke; S. Odrowski; A. Olivas; A. Omairat; A. O'Murchadha; T. Palczewski; L. Paul; Ö. Penek; J. A. Pepper; C. Pérez de los Heros; C. Pfendner; D. Pieloth; E. Pinat; J. L. Pinfold; J. Posselt; P. B. Price; G. T. Przybylski; J. Pütz; M. Quinnan; L. Rädel; M. Rameez; K. Rawlins; P. Redl; I. Rees; R. Reimann; M. Relich; E. Resconi; W. Rhode; M. Richman; B. Riedel; S. Robertson; J. P. Rodrigues; M. Rongen; C. Rott; T. Ruhe; B. Ruzybayev; D. Ryckbosch; S. M. Saba; H. -G. Sander; J. Sandroos; P. Sandstrom; M. Santander; S. Sarkar; K. Schatto; F. Scheriau; T. Schmidt; M. Schmitz; S. Schoenen; S. Schöneberg; A. Schönwald; A. Schukraft; L. Schulte; O. Schulz; D. Seckel; Y. Sestayo; S. Seunarine; M. H. Shaevitz; R. Shanidze; M. W. E. Smith; D. Soldin; S. Söldner-Rembold; G. M. Spiczak; C. Spiering; M. Stamatikos; T. Stanev; N. A. Stanisha; A. Stasik; T. Stezelberger; R. G. Stokstad; A. Stöß andl; E. A. Strahler; R. Ström; N. L. Strotjohann; G. W. Sullivan; H. Taavola; I. Taboada; A. Taketa; A. Tamburro; H. K. M. Tanaka; A. Tepe; S. Ter-Antonyan; A. Terliuk; G. Teš; andi?; S. Tilav; P. A. Toale; M. N. Tobin; D. Tosi; M. Tselengidou; E. Unger; M. Usner; S. Vallecorsa; N. van Eijndhoven; J. Vandenbroucke; J. van Santen; S. Vanheule; M. Vehring; M. Voge; M. Vraeghe; C. Walck; M. Wallraff; Ch. Weaver; M. Wellons; C. Wendt; S. Westerhoff; B. J. Whelan; N. Whitehorn; C. Wichary; K. Wiebe; C. H. Wiebusch; D. R. Williams; H. Wissing; M. Wolf; T. R. Wood; K. Woschnagg; S. Wren; D. L. Xu; X. W. Xu; Y. Xu; J. P. Yanez; G. Yodh; S. Yoshida; P. Zarzhitsky; J. Ziemann; M. Zoll

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent observation by the IceCube neutrino observatory of an astrophysical flux of neutrinos represents the "first light" in the nascent field of neutrino astronomy. The observed diffuse neutrino flux seems to suggest a much larger level of hadronic activity in the non-thermal universe than previously thought and suggests a rich discovery potential for a larger neutrino observatory. This document presents a vision for an substantial expansion of the current IceCube detector, IceCube-Gen2, including the aim of instrumenting a $10\\,\\mathrm{km}^3$ volume of clear glacial ice at the South Pole to deliver substantial increases in the astrophysical neutrino sample for all flavors. A detector of this size would have a rich physics program with the goal to resolve the sources of these astrophysical neutrinos, discover GZK neutrinos, and be a leading observatory in future multi-messenger astronomy programs.

  11. Collective neutrino oscillations and spontaneous symmetry breaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duan, Huaiyu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino oscillations in a hot and dense astrophysical environment such as a core-collapse supernova pose a challenging, seven-dimensional flavor transport problem. To make the problem even more difficult (and interesting), neutrinos can experience collective oscillations through nonlinear refraction in the dense neutrino medium in this environment. Significant progress has been made in the last decade towards the understanding of collective neutrino oscillations in various simplified neutrino gas models with imposed symmetries and reduced dimensions. However, a series of recent studies seem to have "reset" this progress by showing that these models may not be compatible with collective neutrino oscillations because the latter can break the symmetries spontaneously if they are not imposed. We review some of the key concepts of collective neutrino oscillations by using a few simple toy models. We also elucidate the breaking of spatial and directional symmetries in these models because of collective oscillation...

  12. Progress in the physics of massive neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Barger; D. Marfatia; K. Whisnant

    2003-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The current status of the physics of massive neutrinos is reviewed with a forward-looking emphasis. The article begins with the general phenomenology of neutrino oscillations in vacuum and matter and documents the experimental evidence for oscillations of solar, reactor, atmospheric and accelerator neutrinos. Both active and sterile oscillation possibilities are considered. The impact of cosmology (BBN, CMB, leptogenesis) and astrophysics (supernovae, highest energy cosmic rays) on neutrino observables and vice versa, is evaluated. The predictions of grand unified, radiative and other models of neutrino mass are discussed. Ways of determining the unknown parameters of three-neutrino oscillations are assessed, taking into account eight-fold degeneracies in parameters that yield the same oscillation probabilities, as well as ways to determine the absolute neutrino mass scale (from beta-decay, neutrinoless double-beta decay, large scale structure and Z-bursts). Critical unknowns at present are the amplitude of \

  13. Detecting the invisible universe with neutrinos and dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaboth, Asher C. (Asher Cunningham)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent work in astrophysics has show that most of the matter in the universe is non-luminous. This work investigates two searches for non-luminous matter: hot dark matter formed from cosmic relic neutrinos from the Big ...

  14. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a brief overview of the theory and experimental data of atmospheric neutrino production at the fiftieth anniversary of the experimental discovery of neutrinos.

  15. Neutrino Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gil-Botella, I

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental properties of neutrinos are reviewed in these lectures. The first part is focused on the basic characteristics of neutrinos in the Standard Model and how neutrinos are detected. Neutrino masses and oscillations are introduced and a summary of the most important experimental results on neutrino oscillations to date is provided. Then, present and future experimental proposals are discussed, including new precision reactor and accelerator experiments. Finally, different approaches for measuring the neutrino mass and the nature (Majorana or Dirac) of neutrinos are reviewed. The detection of neutrinos from supernovae explosions and the information that this measurement can provide are also summarized at the end.

  16. Particle Astrophysics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPO WebsitePalms Village Resort BParticle Astrophysics

  17. Neutrino oscillations and supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. V. Ahluwalia-Khalilova

    2004-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In a 1996 JRO Fellowship Research Proposal (Los Alamos), the author suggested that neutrino oscillations may provide a powerful indirect energy transport mechanism to supernovae explosions. The principal aim of this addendum is to present the relevant unedited text of Section 1 of that proposal. We then briefly remind, (a) of an early suggestion of Mazurek on vacuum neutrino oscillations and their relevance to supernovae explosion, and (b) Wolfenstein's result on suppression of the effect by matter effects. We conclude that whether or not neutrino oscillations play a significant role in supernovae explosions shall depend if there are shells/regions of space in stellar collapse where matter effects play no essential role. Should such regions exist in actual astrophysical situations, the final outcome of neutrino oscillations on supernovae explosions shall depend, in part, on whether or not the LNSD signal is confirmed. Importantly, the reader is reminded that neutrino oscillations form a set of flavor-oscillation clocks and these clock suffer gravitational redshift which can be as large as 20 percent. This effect must be incorporated fully into any calculation of supernova explosion.

  18. Unruh effect for neutrinos interacting with accelerated matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dvornikov, Maxim

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the evolution of neutrinos in a background matter moving with a linear acceleration. The Dirac equation for a massive neutrino electroweakly interacting with background fermions is obtained in a comoving frame where matter is at rest. We solve this Dirac equation for ultrarelativistic neutrinos. The neutrino quantum states in matter moving with a linear acceleration are obtained. We demonstrate that the neutrino electroweak interaction with an accelerated matter leads to the vacuum instability which results in the neutrino-antineutrino pairs creation. We rederive the temperature of the Unruh radiation and find the correction to the Unruh effect due to the specific neutrino interaction with background fermions. As a possible application of the obtained results we discuss the neutrino pairs creation in a core collapsing supernova. The astrophysical upper limit on the neutrino masses is obtained.

  19. High-Energy Astrophysics and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Ellis

    2002-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Interfaces between high-energy physics, astrophysics and cosmology are reviewed, with particular emphasis on the important roles played by high-energy cosmic-ray physics. These include the understanding of atmospheric neutrinos, the search for massive cold dark matter particles and possible tests of models of quantum gravity. In return, experiments at the LHC may be useful for refining models of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, and thereby contributing indirectly to understanding their origin. Only future experiments will be able to tell whether these are due to some bottom-up astrophysical mechanism or some top-down cosmological mechanism.

  20. Summary of nuclear and particle astrophysics sessions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkes, R.J. [Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    1995-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Astrophysics is gaining increased attention from the particle and nuclear physics communities, as budget cuts, delays, and cancellations limit opportunities for breakthrough research at accelerator laboratories. Observations of cosmic rays (protons and nuclei), gamma rays and neutrinos present a variety of puzzles whose eventual solution will shed light on many issues ranging from the nature of fundamental interactions at extreme energies to the mechanisms of astrophysical sources. Several important detectors are just beginning full-scale operation and others are beginning construction. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  1. Neutrino-Argon Interaction with GENIE Event Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chesneanu, Daniela [Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest, Bucharest (Romania); National Institute for Nuclear Physics and Engineering 'Horia Hulubei' Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinos are very special particles, have only weak interactions, except gravity, and are produced in very different processes in Nuclear and Particle Physics. Neutrinos are, also, messengers from astrophysical objects, as well as relics from Early Universe. Therefore, its can give us information on processes happening in the Universe, during its evolution, which cannot be studied otherwise. The underground instrumentation including a variety of large and very large detectors, thanks to technical breakthroughs, have achieved new fundamental results like the solution of the solar neutrino puzzle and the evidence for Physics beyond the Standard Model of elementary interactions in the neutrino sector with non-vanishing neutrino masses and lepton flavour violation.Two of the LAGUNA(Large Apparatus studying Grand Unification and Neutrino Astrophysics) detectors, namely: GLACIER (Giant Liquid Argon Charge Imaging ExpeRiment) and LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astrophysics) could be emplaced in 'Unirea' salt mine from Slanic-Prahova, Romania. A detailed analysis of the conditions and advantages is necessary. A few results have been presented previously. In the present work, we propose to generate events and compute the cross sections for interactions between neutrino and Argon-40, to estimate possible detection performances and event types. For doing this, we use the code GENIE(G lowbar enerates E lowbar vents for N lowbar eutrino I lowbar nteraction E lowbar xperiments). GENIE Code is an Object-Oriented Neutrino MC Generator supported and developed by an international collaboration of neutrino interaction experts.

  2. Overview of the present status and challenges of neutrino oscillation physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mocioiu, Irina [Pennsylvania State University, 104 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an overview of the current status of neutrino oscillation physics, including atmospheric, solar, reactor and accelerator neutrino experiments. After summarizing our present understanding of all data, I discuss the open questions and how they might be addressed in the future. I also discuss how neutrinos can be used to learn about new physics and astrophysics.

  3. Nuclear Astrophysics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Astrophysics One of the great scientific challenges is

  4. Weak interaction processes in nuclei involving neutrinos and CDM candidates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosmas, T. S.; Tsakstara, V. [Theoretical Physics Section, University of Ioannina, GR 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Divari, P. C. [Department of Physical Sciences, Hellenic Army Academy, Vari 16673, Attica (Greece); Sinatkas, J. [Department of Informatics and Computer Technology, TEI of Western Macedonia, GR-52100 Kastoria (Greece)

    2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we concentrate on the nuclear physics aspects of low-energy neutrinos and in particular on problems related to neutrino detection by terrestrial experiments, neutrino astrophysics and neutrino-nucleus interactions. The detection of low-flux neutrinos, feasible by measuring the energy recoil of the recoiling nucleus with gaseous-detectors having very-low threshold-energy, is carried out in conjunction with direct-detection of cold dark matter events and nonstandard physics searches like the neutrinoless double beta decay.

  5. MACRO as a Telescope for Neutrino Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Montaruli for The MACRO Collaboration; M. Ambrosio et al

    1999-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a sample of 990 upward-going muons, induced primarily by atmospheric neutrinos, to search for neutrinos of astrophysical origin. No evidence has been found using the event direction information. Flux limits of the order of 10^-15 cm^-2 s^-1 are imposed on current models for candidate point-sources. A space-time correlation search has been undertaken between 2328 BATSE gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and MACRO upward-going muons.

  6. High Energy Neutrino Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. D. Hoffman

    2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a review of the history, motivation and current status of high energy neutrino telescopes. Many years after these detectors were first conceived, the operation of kilometer-cubed scale detectors is finally on the horizon at both the South Pole and in the Mediterranean Sea. These new detectors will perhaps provide us the first view of high energy astrophysical objects with a new messenger particle and provide us with our first real glimpse of the distant universe at energies above those accessible by gamma-ray instruments. Some of the topics that can be addressed by these new instruments include the origin of cosmic rays, the nature of dark matter, and the mechanisms at work in high energy astrophysical objects such as gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, pulsar wind nebula and supernova remnants.

  7. Charge exchange reactions and applications to astrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Ha, Eunja; Kajino, T. [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul, 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8589 (Japan) and Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino-induced reactions have been known to play important roles as the neutrino process on the nucleosynthesis in core collapsing supernovae (SNe) explosions because expected neutrino flux and energy are sufficiently high enough to excite many relevant nuclei in spite of small cross sections of the weak interaction. However, we do not have enough data for the neutrino reaction to be exploited in the network calculation. Only a sparse data in the relevant energy range is known, in specific, for {sup 12}C. Therefore we have to rely on theoretical estimation of the reaction, which has two different modes, charge current (CC) and neutral current (NC). In particular, CC reactions are closely related to charge exchange reactions (CEXRs) which are feasible in the experiment, such as, (p,n) or (n,p) reactions. These CEXRs are usually dominated by the Gamow-Teller (GT) transition in the lower energy region. In this respect, any theoretical approaches for the neutrino reaction should be investigated for the CEXR because we have and expect more useful experimental data. After confirming our models to the GT strength deduced from the CEXR, we calculated neutrino-induced reactions in the energy range below the quasielastic region for nuclei of astrophysical importance. Our calculations are carried out with the Quasi-particle Random Phase Approximation (QRPA), which successfully described the nuclear beta decays of relevant nuclei. To describe neutrino-nucleus reactions, general multipole transitions by the weak interaction are considered for CC and NC reactions. Both reactions are described in a theoretical framework. Our results are shown to well reproduce the data from CEXRs and the sparse experimental data related to the neutrino-induced reaction, and further extended for neutrino reactions on various nuclear targets. Parts of the results are reported in this talk.

  8. Physics Division activities report, 1986--1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the research activities of the Physics Division for the years 1986 and 1987. Areas of research discussed in this paper are: research on e/sup +/e/sup /minus// interactions; research on p/bar p/ interactions; experiment at TRIUMF; double beta decay; high energy astrophysics; interdisciplinary research; and advanced technology development and the SSC.

  9. Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geer, Steve; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture and accelerate O(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This prepares the way for a Neutrino Factory (NF) in which high energy muons decay within the straight sections of a storage ring to produce a beam of neutrinos and anti-neutrinos. The NF concept was proposed in 1997 at a time when the discovery that the three known types of neutrino ({nu}{sub e}, {nu}{sub {mu}}, {nu}{sub {tau}}) can change their flavor as they propagate through space (neutrino oscillations) was providing a first glimpse of physics beyond the Standard Model. This development prepares the way for a new type of neutrino source: a Neutrino Factory. This article reviews the motivation, design and R&D for a Neutrino Factory.

  10. Observations of high energy neutrinos with water/ice neutrino telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karle, A

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The search for high energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin is being conducted today with two water/ice Cherenkov experiments. New instruments of higher performance are now in construction and more are in the R&D phase. No sources have been found to date. Upper limits on neutrino fluxes are approaching model predictions. Results are reported on the search for point sources, diffuse fluxes, gamma ray bursts, dark matter and other sources.

  11. Observations of high energy neutrinos with water/ice neutrino telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albrecht Karle

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The search for high energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin is being conducted today with two water/ice Cherenkov experiments. New instruments of higher performance are now in construction and more are in the R&D phase. No sources have been found to date. Upper limits on neutrino fluxes are approaching model predictions. Results are reported on the search for point sources, diffuse fluxes, gamma ray bursts, dark matter and other sources.

  12. Flavor instabilities in the neutrino line model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huaiyu Duan; Shashank Shalgar

    2015-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A dense neutrino medium can experience collective flavor oscillations through nonlinear neutrino-neutrino refraction. To make this multi-dimensional flavor transport problem more tractable, all existing studies have assumed certain symmetries (e.g., the spatial homogeneity and directional isotropy in the early universe) to reduce the dimensionality of the problem. In this work we show that, if both the directional and spatial symmetries are not enforced in the neutrino line model, collective oscillations can develop in the physical regimes where the symmetry-preserving oscillation modes are stable. Our results suggest that collective neutrino oscillations in real astrophysical environments (such as core-collapse supernovae and black-hole accretion discs) can be qualitatively different from the predictions based on existing models in which spatial and directional symmetries are artificially imposed.

  13. Evidence for Neutrino Oscillations I: Solar and Reactor Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. McDonald

    2004-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses evidence for neutrino oscillations obtained from measurements with solar neutrinos and reactor neutrinos.

  14. High-energy neutrinos in the context of multimessenger physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julia K. Becker

    2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The field of astroparticle physics is currently developing rapidly, since new experiments challenge our understanding of the investigated processes. Three messengers can be used to extract information on the properties of astrophysical sources: photons, charged Cosmic Rays and neutrinos. This review focuses on high-energy neutrinos (E>100 GeV) with the main topics as follows. The production mechanism of high-energy neutrinos in astrophysical shocks. The connection between the observed photon spectra and charged Cosmic Rays is described and the source properties as they are known from photon observations and from charged Cosmic Rays are presented. High-energy neutrino detection. Current detection methods are described and the status of the next generation neutrino telescopes are reviewed. In particular, water and ice Cherenkov detectors as well as radio measurements in ice and with balloon experiments are presented. In addition, future perspectives for optical, radio and acoustic detection of neutrinos are reviewed. Sources of neutrino emission. The main source classes are reviewed, i.e. galactic sources, Active Galactic Nuclei, starburst galaxies and Gamma Ray Bursts. The interaction of high energy protons with the cosmic microwave background implies the production of neutrinos, referred to as GZK neutrinos. Implications of neutrino flux limits. Recent limits given by the AMANDA experiment and their implications regarding the physics of the sources are presented.

  15. Neutrino Magnetic Moment, CP Violation and Flavor Oscillations in Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pehlivan, Y; Kajino, Toshitaka

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider collective oscillations of neutrinos, which are emergent nonlinear flavor evolution phenomena instigated by neutrino-neutrino interactions in astrophysical environments with sufficiently high neutrino densities. We investigate the symmetries of the problem in the full three flavor mixing scheme and in the exact many-body formulation by including the effects of CP violation and neutrino magnetic moment. We show that, similar to the two flavor scheme, several dynamical symmetries exist for three flavors in the single-angle approximation if the net electron background in the environment and the effects of the neutrino magnetic moment are negligible. Moreover, we show that these dynamical symmetries are present even when the CP symmetry is violated in neutrino oscillations. We explicitly write down the constants of motion through which these dynamical symmetries manifest themselves in terms of the generators of the SU(3) flavor transformations. We also show that the effects due to the CP-violating Dir...

  16. Optical simulation of neutrino oscillations in binary waveguide arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marini, Andrea; Biancalana, Fabio

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically propose and investigate an optical analogue of neutrino oscillations in a pair of vertically displaced binary waveguide arrays with longitudinally modulated effective refractive index. Optical propagation is modelled through coupled-mode equations, which in the continuous limit lead to two coupled Dirac equations for fermionic particles with different mass states, i.e. neutrinos. We demonstrate that neutrino oscillations can be quenched by nonlinear effects, and we predict the existence of neutrino solitons. Incidentally, these phenomena are expected to play an important role in massive supernova stars. Our results pave the way for using binary waveguide arrays as a classical laboratory for predicting exotic effects in particle physics and astrophysics.

  17. Optical simulation of neutrino oscillations in binary waveguide arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Marini; Stefano Longhi; Fabio Biancalana

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically propose and investigate an optical analogue of neutrino oscillations in a pair of vertically displaced binary waveguide arrays with longitudinally modulated effective refractive index. Optical propagation is modelled through coupled-mode equations, which in the continuous limit lead to two coupled Dirac equations for fermionic particles with different mass states, i.e. neutrinos. We demonstrate that neutrino oscillations can be quenched by nonlinear effects, and we predict the existence of neutrino solitons. Incidentally, these phenomena are expected to play an important role in massive supernova stars. Our results pave the way for using binary waveguide arrays as a classical laboratory for predicting exotic effects in particle physics and astrophysics.

  18. Heavy Sterile Neutrinos and Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Bamert; C. P. Burgess; R. N. Mohapatra

    1994-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the possibility of producing neutrinoless double beta decay without having an electron neutrino with a mass in the vicinity of 1 eV. We do so by having a much lighter electron neutrino mix with a much heavier (m > 1 GeV) sterile neutrino. We study the constraints on the masses and mixings of such heavy sterile neutrinos from existing laboratory, astrophysical and cosmological information, and discuss the properties it would require in order to produce a detectable signal in current searches for neutrinoless double beta decay.

  19. Neutrino-antineutrino correlations in dense anisotropic media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien Serreau; Cristina Volpe

    2015-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the most general evolution equations describing in-medium (anti)neutrino propagation in the mean-field approximation. In particular, we consider various types of neutrino-antineutrino mixing, for both Dirac and Majorana fields, resulting either from nontrivial pair correlations or from helicity coherence due to the nonvanishing neutrino masses. We show that, unless the medium is spatially homogeneous and isotropic, these correlations are sourced by the usual neutrino and antineutrino densities. This may be of importance in astrophysical environments such as core-collapse supernovae.

  20. Neutrino Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Weinheimer; Kai Zuber

    2013-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The various experiments on neutrino oscillation evidenced that neutrinos have indeed non-zero masses but cannot tell us the absolute neutrino mass scale. This scale of neutrino masses is very important for understanding the evolution and the structure formation of the universe as well as for nuclear and particle physics beyond the present Standard Model. Complementary to deducing constraints on the sum of all neutrino masses from cosmological observations two different methods to determine the neutrino mass scale in the laboratory are pursued: the search for neutrinoless double $\\beta$-decay and the direct neutrino mass search by investigating single $\\beta$-decays or electron captures. The former method is not only sensitive to neutrino masses but also probes the Majorana character of neutrinos and thus lepton number violation with high sensitivity. Currently quite a few experiments with different techniques are being constructed, commissioned or are even running, which aim for a sensitivity on the neutrino mass of {\\cal O}(100) meV. The principle methods and these experiments will be discussed in this short review.

  1. Neutrino Properties Before and After KamLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Pakvasa; J. W. F. Valle

    2003-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We review neutrino oscillation physics, including the determination of mass splittings and mixings from current solar, atmospheric, reactor and accelerator neutrino data. A brief discussion is given of cosmological and astrophysical implications. Non-oscillation phenomena such as neutrinoless double beta decay would, if discovered, probe the absolute scale of neutrino mass and also reveal their Majorana nature. Non-oscillation descriptions in terms of spin-flavor precession (SFP) and non-standard neutrino interactions (NSI) currently provide an excellent fit of the solar data. However they are at odds with the first results from the KamLAND experiment which imply that, despite their theoretical interest, non-standard mechanisms can only play a sub-leading role in the solar neutrino anomaly. Accepting the LMA-MSW solution, one can use the current solar neutrino data to place important restrictions on non-standard neutrino properties, such as neutrino magnetic moments. Both solar and atmospheric neutrino data can also be used to place constraints on neutrino instability as well as the more exotic possibility of $CPT$ and Lorentz Violation. Weillustrate the potential of future data from experiments such as KamLAND, Borexino and the upcoming neutrino factories in constraining non-standard neutrino properties.

  2. Radio Cherenkov signals from the Moon: neutrinos and cosmic rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu Seon Jeong; Mary Hall Reno; Ina Sarcevic

    2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino production of radio Cherenkov signals in the Moon is the object of radio telescope observations. Depending on the energy range and detection parameters, the dominant contribution to the neutrino signal may come from interactions of the neutrino on the Moon facing the telescope, rather than neutrinos that have traversed a portion of the Moon. Using the approximate analytic expression of the effective lunar aperture from a recent paper by Gayley, Mutel and Jaeger, we evaluate the background from cosmic ray interactions in the lunar regolith. We also consider the modifications to the effective lunar aperture from generic non-standard model neutrino interactions. A background to neutrino signals are radio Cherenkov signals from cosmic ray interactions. For cosmogenic neutrino fluxes, neutrino signals will be difficult to observe because of low neutrino flux at the high energy end and large cosmic ray background in the lower energy range considered here. We show that lunar radio detection of neutrino interactions is best suited to constrain or measure neutrinos from astrophysical sources and probe non-standard neutrino-nucleon interactions such as microscopic black hole production.

  3. Science and Technology of BOREXINO: A Real Time Detector for Low Energy Solar Neutrinos SOLAR NEUTRINOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borexino Collaboration; G. Alimonti

    2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    BOREXINO, a real-time device for low energy neutrino spectroscopy is nearing completion of construction in the underground laboratories at Gran Sasso, Italy (LNGS). The experiment's goal is the direct measurement of the flux of 7Be solar neutrinos of all flavors via neutrino-electron scattering in an ultra-pure scintillation liquid. Seeded by a series of innovations which were brought to fruition by large scale operation of a 4-ton test detector at LNGS, a new technology has been developed for BOREXINO. It enables sub-MeV solar neutrino spectroscopy for the first time. This paper describes the design of BOREXINO, the various facilities essential to its operation, its spectroscopic and background suppression capabilities and a prognosis of the impact of its results towards resolving the solar neutrino problem. BOREXINO will also address several other frontier questions in particle physics, astrophysics and geophysics.

  4. Neutrino masses and solar neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfenstein, L.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been pointed out by Bahcall and Bethe and others that all solar neutrino data can be explained by MSW oscillations with m([nu][sub [mu

  5. Absolute Values of Neutrino Masses: Status and Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Bilenky; C. Giunti; J. A. Grifols; E. Masso

    2003-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Compelling evidences in favor of neutrino masses and mixing obtained in the last years in Super-Kamiokande, SNO, KamLAND and other neutrino experiments made the physics of massive and mixed neutrinos a frontier field of research in particle physics and astrophysics. There are many open problems in this new field. In this review we consider the problem of the absolute values of neutrino masses, which apparently is the most difficult one from the experimental point of view. We discuss the present limits and the future prospects of beta-decay neutrino mass measurements and neutrinoless double-beta decay. We consider the important problem of the calculation of nuclear matrix elements of neutrinoless double-beta decay and discuss the possibility to check the results of different model calculations of the nuclear matrix elements through their comparison with the experimental data. We discuss the upper bound of the total mass of neutrinos that was obtained recently from the data of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey and other cosmological data and we discuss future prospects of the cosmological measurements of the total mass of neutrinos. We discuss also the possibility to obtain information on neutrino masses from the observation of the ultra high-energy cosmic rays (beyond the GZK cutoff). Finally, we review the main aspects of the physics of core-collapse supernovae, the limits on the absolute values of neutrino masses from the observation of SN1987A neutrinos and the future prospects of supernova neutrino detection.

  6. Double Beta Decay, Majorana Neutrinos, and Neutrino Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank T. Avignone III; Steven R. Elliott; Jonathan Engel

    2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The theoretical and experimental issues relevant to neutrinoless double-beta decay are reviewed. The impact that a direct observation of this exotic process would have on elementary particle physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics and cosmology is profound. Now that neutrinos are known to have mass and experiments are becoming more sensitive, even the non-observation of neutrinoless double-beta decay will be useful. If the process is actually observed, we will immediately learn much about the neutrino. The status and discovery potential of proposed experiments are reviewed in this context, with significant emphasis on proposals favored by recent panel reviews. The importance of and challenges in the calculation of nuclear matrix elements that govern the decay are considered in detail. The increasing sensitivity of experiments and improvements in nuclear theory make the future exciting for this field at the interface of nuclear and particle physics.

  7. Double beta decay, Majorana neutrinos, and neutrino mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avignone, Frank T. III; Elliott, Steven R.; Engel, Jonathan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3255 (United States)

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The theoretical and experimental issues relevant to neutrinoless double beta decay are reviewed. The impact that a direct observation of this exotic process would have on elementary particle physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, and cosmology is profound. Now that neutrinos are known to have mass and experiments are becoming more sensitive, even the nonobservation of neutrinoless double beta decay will be useful. If the process is actually observed, we will immediately learn much about the neutrino. The status and discovery potential of proposed experiments are reviewed in this context, with significant emphasis on proposals favored by recent panel reviews. The importance of and challenges in the calculation of nuclear matrix elements that govern the decay are considered in detail. The increasing sensitivity of experiments and improvements in nuclear theory make the future exciting for this field at the interface of nuclear and particle physics.

  8. Division of Finance Division of Finance Alignment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Division of Finance Division of Finance Alignment September 11, 2014 1 #12;Division of Finance of Finance Goal of the DF Alignment Project The internal and external alignment of the Division of Finance of Finance The Process We Followed 17 Meetings17 Meetings 120+ Pages of Data 103 Themes 12 Meta Themes Goals

  9. High-Energy Neutrino Astronomy with the Super-Kamiokande Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Habig

    2005-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Super-Kamiokande experiment has collected a large sample of high-energy neutrino events. These are primarily atmospheric neutrinos, but a bright enough astrophysical source could also be visible. The data have been examined for possible point and bursting neutrino sources, as well as possible WIMP annihilation signatures. No significant evidence for such sources have been found, and the resulting flux limits have been calculated.

  10. Recent Results in Neutrino Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. V. L. Sarma

    1994-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a survey of the current experimental information on some of the interesting issues in neutrino physics: neutrino species, neutrino masses, neutrino magnetic moments, solar neutrinos, and the atmospheric neutrino anomaly.

  11. Neutrino Physics, Superbeams, and the Neutrino Factory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boris Kayser

    2003-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize what has been learned about the neutrino mass spectrum and neutrino mixing, identify interesting open questions that can be answered by accelerator neutrino facilities of the future, and discuss the importance and physics of answering them.

  12. Neutrino Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    operators in the Lagrangian (Majorana mass terms), or both. The ongoing neutrinoless double-beta decay searches may be able to shine light on the matter. But the neutrino sector...

  13. Four-Way Neutrino Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Barger; T. J. Weiler; K. Whisnant

    1997-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a four-neutrino model with three active neutrinos and one sterile neutrino which naturally has maximal $\

  14. Phenomenology of Neutrino Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Bilenky; C. Giunti; W. Grimus

    1999-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This review is focused on neutrino mixing and neutrino oscillations in the light of the recent experimental developments. After discussing possible types of neutrino mixing for Dirac and Majorana neutrinos and considering in detail the phenomenology of neutrino oscillations in vacuum and matter, we review all existing evidence and indications in favour of neutrino oscillations that have been obtained in the atmospheric, solar and LSND experiments. We present the results of the analyses of the neutrino oscillation data in the framework of mixing of three and four massive neutrinos and investigate possibilities to test the different neutrino mass and mixing schemes obtained in this way. We also discuss briefly future neutrino oscillation experiments.

  15. Nuclear Astrophysics Animations from the Nuclear Astrophysics Group at Clemson University

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Meyer, Bradley; The, Lih-Sin

    The animations are organized into three sections. The r-Process Movies demonstrate r-Process network calculations from the paper "Neutrino Capture and the R-Process" Meyer, McLaughlin, and Fuller, Phys. Rev. C, 58, 3696-3710 (1998). The Alpha-Rich Freezeout Movies are related to the reference: Standard alpha-rich freezeout calculation from The, Clayton, Jin, and Meyer 1998, Astrophysical Journal, "Reaction Rates Governing the Synthesis of 44Ti" At the current writing, the category for Low Metallicity s-Process Movies has only one item called n, p, 13C, 14N, 54Fe, and 88Sr Time evolution in convective zone.

  16. Superconducting Magnet Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Superconducting Magnet Division DOE NP Program Review - July 06 1 Brookhaven Magnet Division - Nuclear Physics Program Support Activities Superconducting Magnet Program RHIC Operations Support Spin Summary Peter Wanderer, DOE review, July 25, 2006 Acting Head, Superconducting Magnet Division #12

  17. Type IIn supernovae as sources of high energy neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zirakashvili, V N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that high-energy astrophysical neutrinos observed in the IceCube experiment can be produced by protons accelerated in extragalactic Type IIn supernova remnants by shocks propagating in the dense circumstellar medium. The nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration model is used for description of particle acceleration.

  18. Methods for point source analysis in high energy neutrino telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jim Braun; Jon Dumm; Francesco De Palma; Chad Finley; Albrecht Karle; Teresa Montaruli

    2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino telescopes are moving steadily toward the goal of detecting astrophysical neutrinos from the most powerful galactic and extragalactic sources. Here we describe analysis methods to search for high energy point-like neutrino sources using detectors deep in the ice or sea. We simulate an ideal cubic kilometer detector based on real world performance of existing detectors such as AMANDA, IceCube, and ANTARES. An unbinned likelihood ratio method is applied, making use of the point spread function and energy distribution of simulated neutrino signal events to separate them from the background of atmospheric neutrinos produced by cosmic ray showers. The unbinned point source analyses are shown to perform better than binned searches and, depending on the source spectral index, the use of energy information is shown to improve discovery potential by almost a factor of two.

  19. Finance Division Employee Status Form Finance Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crews, Stephen

    Finance Division Employee Status Form Finance Division CB 1225, 104 Airport Drive Chapel Hill, NC Phone: 919-962-7242 finance.unc.edu Failure to Follow Instructions Below Will Delay Processing Today information in five areas: 1. Division-wide emergency call tree 2. Finance Web site contacts 3. Departmental

  20. Neutrino-driven wind simulations and nucleosynthesis of heavy elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Arcones; F. -K. Thielemann

    2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino-driven winds, which follow core-collapse supernova explosions, present a fascinating nuclear astrophysics problem that requires understanding advanced astrophysics simulations, the properties of matter and neutrino interactions under extreme conditions, the structure and reactions of exotic nuclei, and comparisons against forefront astronomical observations. The neutrino-driven wind has attracted vast attention over the last 20 years as it was suggested to be a candidate for the astrophysics site where half of the heavy elements are produced via the r-process. In this review, we summarize our present understanding of neutrino-driven winds from the dynamical and nucleosynthesis perspectives. Rapid progress has been made during recent years in understanding the wind with improved simulations and better micro physics. The current status of the fields is that hydrodynamical simulations do not reach the extreme conditions necessary for the r-process and the proton or neutron richness of the wind remains to be investigated in more detail. However, nucleosynthesis studies and observations point already to neutrino-driven winds to explain the origin of lighter heavy elements, such as Sr, Y, Zr.

  1. Solar Neutrinos and the Decaying Neutrino Hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffrey M. Berryman; Andre de Gouvea; Daniel Hernandez

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore, mostly using data from solar neutrino experiments, the hypothesis that the neutrino mass eigenstates are unstable. We find that, by combining $^8$B solar neutrino data with those on $^7$Be and lower-energy solar neutrinos, one obtains a mostly model-independent bound on both the $\

  2. Astrophysical Models, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wargelin, Bradford J.

    correspondientes, faltantes los modelos. Nuestras medidas tambiâ??en permiten determinar la exactitud c astrophysically relevant L­shell x­ray spectra because these emanate from colder regions the plasma

  3. Solar Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. G. H. Robertson

    2006-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental work with solar neutrinos has illuminated the properties of neutrinos and tested models of how the sun produces its energy. Three experiments continue to take data, and at least seven are in various stages of planning or construction. In this review, the current experimental status is summarized, and future directions explored with a focus on the effects of a non-zero theta-13 and the interesting possibility of directly testing the luminosity constraint. Such a confrontation at the few-percent level would provide a prediction of the solar irradiance tens of thousands of years in the future for comparison with the present-day irradiance. A model-independent analysis of existing low-energy data shows good agreement between the neutrino and electromagnetic luminosities at the +/- 20 % level.

  4. Neutrino Magnetic Moment, CP Violation and Flavor Oscillations in Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Pehlivan; A. B. Balantekin; Toshitaka Kajino

    2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider collective oscillations of neutrinos, which are emergent nonlinear flavor evolution phenomena instigated by neutrino-neutrino interactions in astrophysical environments with sufficiently high neutrino densities. We investigate the symmetries of the problem in the full three flavor mixing scheme and in the exact many-body formulation by including the effects of CP violation and neutrino magnetic moment. We show that, similar to the two flavor scheme, several dynamical symmetries exist for three flavors in the single-angle approximation if the net electron background in the environment and the effects of the neutrino magnetic moment are negligible. Moreover, we show that these dynamical symmetries are present even when the CP symmetry is violated in neutrino oscillations. We explicitly write down the constants of motion through which these dynamical symmetries manifest themselves in terms of the generators of the SU(3) flavor transformations. We also show that the effects due to the CP-violating Dirac phase factor out of the many-body evolution operator and evolve independently of nonlinear flavor transformations if neutrino electromagnetic interactions are ignored. In the presence of a strong magnetic field, CP-violating effects can still be considered independently provided that an effective definition for neutrino magnetic moment is used.

  5. Fast Neutrino Decay in the Minimal Seesaw Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anjans S. Joshipura; Saurabh D. Rindani

    1992-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino decay in the minimal seesaw model containing three right handed neutrinos and a complex $SU(2)\\times U(1)$ singlet Higgs in addition to the standard model fields is considered. A global horizontal symmetry $U(1)_H$ is imposed, which on spontaneous breaking gives rise to a Goldstone boson. This symmetry is chosen in a way that makes a) the contribution of heavy ($\\leq$ MeV) majorana neutrinos to the neutrinoless double beta decay amplitude vanish and b) allows the heavy neutrino to decay to a lighter neutrino and the Goldstone boson. It is shown that this decay can occur at a rate much faster than in the original Majoron model even if one does not introduce any additional Higgs fields as is done in the literature. Possibility of describing the 17 keV neutrino in this minimal seesaw model is investigated. While most of the cosmological and astrophysical constraints on the 17 keV neutrino can be satisfied in this model, the laboratory limits coming from the neutrino oscillations cannot be easily met. An extension which removes this inadequacy and offers a consistent description of the 17 keV neutrino is discussed.

  6. Neutrino Physics: Fundamentals of Neutrino Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. W. Kim

    1996-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In this lecture we review some of the basic properties of neutrinos, in particular their mass and the oscillation behavior. First we discuss how to describe the neutrino mass. Then, under the assumption that neutrinos are massive and mixed, the fundamentals of the neutrino oscillations are discussed with emphasis on subtle aspects which have been overlooked in the past. We then review the terrestrial neutrino oscillation experiments in the framework of three generations of neutrinos with the standard mass hierarchy. Finally, a brief summary of the current status of the solar and atmospheric neutrino problems will be given.

  7. Large neutrino asymmetries from neutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Foot; M. J. Thomson; R. R. Volkas

    1995-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We re-examine neutrino oscillations in the early universe. Contrary to previous studies, we show that large neutrino asymmetries can arise due to oscillations between ordinary neutrinos and sterile neutrinos. This means that the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) bounds on the mass and mixing of ordinary neutrinos with sterile neutrinos can be evaded. Also, it is possible that the neutrino asymmetries can be large (i.e. $\\stackrel{>}{\\sim} 10\\%$), and hence have a significant effect on BBN through nuclear reaction rates.

  8. Secret of Neutrino Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitry Zhuridov

    2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The new effect of partial and full destruction of the neutrino oscillation pattern due to the neutrino wave packets separation in the transverse plane to the direction of the neutrino propagation is investigated. It is shown that this effect is significant in the real oscillation data, in particular, for the solar neutrinos, and dramatically changes the extracted physical properties of neutrinos.

  9. MiniBooNE Results and Neutrino Schemes with 2 sterile Neutrinos: Possible Mass Orderings and Observables related to Neutrino Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srubabati Goswami; Werner Rodejohann

    2007-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The MiniBooNE and LSND experiments are compatible with each other when two sterile neutrinos are added to the three active ones. In this case there are eight possible mass orderings. In two of them both sterile neutrinos are heavier than the three active ones. In the next two scenarios both sterile neutrinos are lighter than the three active ones. The remaining four scenarios have one sterile neutrino heavier and another lighter than the three active ones. We analyze all scenarios with respect to their predictions for mass-related observables. These are the sum of neutrino masses as constrained by cosmological observations, the kinematic mass parameter as measurable in the KATRIN experiment, and the effective mass governing neutrinoless double beta decay. It is investigated how these non-oscillation probes can distinguish between the eight scenarios. Six of the eight possible mass orderings predict positive signals in the KATRIN and future neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. We also remark on scenarios with three sterile neutrinos. In addition we make some comments on the possibility of using decays of high energy astrophysical neutrinos to discriminate between the mass orderings in presence of two sterile neutrinos.

  10. RESEARCH UPDATE Ecology Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 RESEARCH UPDATE Ecology Division Biotype has changed its name to Ecotype! Following the re-organisation of Forest Research into five science Divisions and three Support Divisions, the former Woodland Ecology Branches to form the new Ecology Division. We decided to give the divisional newsletter a new name (and

  11. Search for Prompt Neutrino Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with IceCube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aartsen, M G; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D; Anderson, T; Arguelles, C; Arlen, T C; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; BenZvi, S; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bos, F; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H -P; Brown, A M; Buzinsky, N; Casey, J; Casier, M; Cheung, E; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Christy, B; Clark, K; Classen, L; Clevermann, F; Coenders, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Day, M; de André, J P A M; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Ehrhardt, T; Eichmann, B; Eisch, J; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Felde, J; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gaior, R; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gier, D; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Gretskov, P; Groh, J C; Groß, A; Ha, C; Haack, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallen, P; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Hebecker, D; Heereman, D; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hellwig, D; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huang, F; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jlelati, O; Jurkovic, M; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kauer, M; Keivani, A; Kelley, J L; Kheirandish, A; Kiryluk, J; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Koob, A; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kriesten, A; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kroll, M; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lanfranchi, J L; Larsen, D T; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Maunu, R; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Medici, M; Meli, A; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Middlemas, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Omairat, A; O'Murchadha, A; Palczewski, T; Paul, L; Penek, Ö; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Pütz, J; Quinnan, M; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Rees, I; Reimann, R; Relich, M; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Robertson, S; Rodrigues, J P; Rongen, M; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Sander, H -G; Sandroos, J; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Shanidze, R; Smith, M W E; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stanisha, N A; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Strotjohann, N L; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Terliuk, A; Teši?, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Tobin, M N; Tosi, D; Tselengidou, M; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vallecorsa, S; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; van Santen, J; Vanheule, S; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Wallraff, M; Weaver, Ch; Wellons, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Whitehorn, N; Wichary, C; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Xu, Y; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zoll, M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present constraints derived from a search of four years of IceCube data for a prompt neutrino flux from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). A single low-significance neutrino was found in coincidence with one of the 506 observed bursts, consistent with the expectation from atmospheric backgrounds. Although GRBs have been proposed as candidate sources for ultra-high energy cosmic rays, our limits on the neutrino flux disfavor much of the parameter space for the latest models. We also find that no more than $\\sim1\\%$ of the recently observed astrophysical neutrino flux consists of prompt emission from GRBs that are potentially observable by existing satellites.

  12. Neutrino masses and solar neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfenstein, L.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been pointed out by Bahcall and Bethe and others that all solar neutrino data can be explained by MSW oscillations with m({nu}{sub {mu}}) {approximately} 10{sup {minus}3} eV consistent with ideas grand unified theories (GUTS). There is a second possibility consistent with GUTS ideas with m({nu}{sub {tau}}) {approximately} 10{sup {minus}2} eV and m({nu} {sub {mu}}) {approximately} 10 {sup {minus}4} eV. The two cases can be distinguished by a measurement of the solar neutrinos from {sup {tau}}Be.

  13. Astrophysical Axion Bounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georg G. Raffelt

    2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Axion emission by hot and dense plasmas is a new energy-loss channel for stars. Observational consequences include a modification of the solar sound-speed profile, an increase of the solar neutrino flux, a reduction of the helium-burning lifetime of globular-cluster stars, accelerated white-dwarf cooling, and a reduction of the supernova SN 1987A neutrino burst duration. We review and update these arguments and summarize the resulting axion constraints.

  14. Theory of Neutrinos: a White Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohapatra, R.N.; Antusch, S.; Babu, K.S.; Barenboim, G.; Chen, Mu-Chun; Davidson, S.; de Gouvea, A.; de Holanda, P.; Dutta, Bhaskar; Grossman, Y.; Joshipura, A.; Kayser,; Kersten, J.; Keum, Y.Y.; King, S.F.; Langacker, P.; Lindner, M.; Loinaz, W.; Masina, I.; Mocioiu, I.; Mohanty, S.; /Maryland U. /Madrid, Autonoma U. /Southampton U. /Oklahoma

    2006-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    During 2004, four divisions of the American Physical Society commissioned a study of neutrino physics to take stock of where the field is at the moment and where it is going in the near and far future. Several working groups looked at various aspects of this vast field. The summary was published as a main report entitled ''The Neutrino Matrix'' accompanied by short 50 page versions of the report of each working group. Theoretical research in this field has been quite extensive and touches many areas and the short 50 page report [1] provided only a brief summary and overview of few of the important points. The theory discussion group felt that it may be of value to the community to publish the entire study as a white paper and the result is the current article. After a brief overview of the present knowledge of neutrino masses and mixing and some popular ways to probe the new physics implied by recent data, the white paper summarizes what can be learned about physics beyond the Standard Model from the various proposed neutrino experiments. It also comments on the impact of the experiments on our understanding of the origin of the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe and the basic nature of neutrino interactions as well as the existence of possible additional neutrinos. Extensive references to original literature are provided.

  15. Theory of neutrinos: A White paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohapatra, R.N.; Antusch, S.; Babu, K.S.; Barenboim, G.; Chen, Mu-Chun; Davidson, S.; de Gouvea, A.; de Holanda, P.; Dutta, Bhaskar; Grossman, Y.; Joshipura, A.; Kayser,; Kersten, J.; Keum, Y.Y.; King, S.F.; Langacker, P.; Lindner, M.; Loinaz, W.; Masina, I.; Mocioiu, I.; Mohanty, S.; /Maryland U. /Madrid, Autonoma U. /Southampton U. /Oklahoma

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 2004, four divisions of the American Physical Society commissioned a study of neutrino physics to take stock of where the field is at the moment and where it is going in the near and far future. Several working groups looked at various aspects of this vast field. The summary was published as a main report entitled ''The Neutrino Matrix'' accompanied by short 50 page versions of the report of each working group. Theoretical research in this field has been quite extensive and touches many areas and the short 50 page report [1] provided only a brief summary and overview of few of the important points. The theory discussion group felt that it may be of value to the community to publish the entire study as a white paper and the result is the current article. After a brief overview of the present knowledge of neutrino masses and mixing and some popular ways to probe the new physics implied by recent data, the white paper summarizes what can be learned about physics beyond the Standard Model from the various proposed neutrino experiments. It also comments on the impact of the experiments on our understanding of the origin of the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe and the basic nature of neutrino interactions as well as the existence of possible additional neutrinos. Extensive references to original literature are provided.

  16. Theory of Neutrinos: A White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. N. Mohapatra; S. Antusch; K. S. Babu; G. Barenboim; M. -C. Chen; S. Davidson; A. de Gouvea; P. de Holanda; B. Dutta; Y. Grossman; A. Joshipura; B. Kayser; J. Kersten; Y. Y. Keum; S. F. King; P. Langacker; M. Lindner; W. Loinaz; I. Masina; I. Mocioiu; S. Mohanty; H. Murayama; S. Pascoli; S. T. Petcov; A. Pilaftsis; P. Ramond; M. Ratz; W. Rodejohann; R. Shrock; T. Takeuchi; T. Underwood; L. Wolfenstein

    2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    During 2004, four divisions of the American Physical Society commissioned a study of neutrino physics to take stock of where the field is at the moment and where it is going in the near and far future. Several working groups looked at various aspects of this vast field. The summary was published as a main report entitled ``The Neutrino Matrix'' accompanied by short 50 page versions of the report of each working group. Theoretical research in this field has been quite extensive and touches many areas and the short 50 page report provided only a brief summary and overview of few of the important points. The theory discussion group felt that it may be of value to the community to publish the entire study as a white paper and the result is the current article. After a brief overview of the present knowledge of neutrino masses and mixing and some popular ways to probe the new physics implied by recent data, the white paper summarizes what can be learned about physics beyond the Standard Model from the various proposed neutrino experiments. It also comments on the impact of the experiments on our understanding of the origin of the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe and the basic nature of neutrino interactions as well as the existence of possible additional neutrinos. Extensive references to original literature are provided.

  17. Neutrinos: Theory and Phenomenology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parke, Stephen

    2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory and phenomenology of neutrinos will be addressed, especially that relating to the observation of neutrino flavor transformations. The current status and implications for future experiments will be discussed with special emphasis on the experiments that will determine the neutrino mass ordering, the dominant flavor content of the neutrino mass eigenstate with the smallest electron neutrino content and the size of CP violation in the neutrino sector. Beyond the neutrino Standard Model, the evidence for and a possible definitive experiment to confirm or refute the existence of light sterile neutrinos will be briefly discussed.

  18. Neutrino Factory Downstream Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino Factory Downstream Systems Michael S. Zisman*Factory accelerator systems downstream from the target andthe Neutrino Factory systems downstream of the target and

  19. Sterile neutrinos: direct mixing effects versus induced mass matrix of active neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexei Yu. Smirnov; Renata Zukanovich Funchal

    2006-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixing of active neutrinos with sterile ones generate ``induced'' contributions to the mass matrix of active neutrinos $\\sim m_S \\sin^2\\theta_{aS}$, where $m_S$ is the Majorana mass of the sterile neutrino and $\\theta_{aS}$ is the active-sterile mixing angle. We study possible effects of the induced matrix which can modify substantially the implications of neutrino oscillation results. We have identified the regions of $m_S$ and $\\sin^2\\theta_{aS}$ where the induced matrix (i) provides the dominant structures, (ii) gives the sub-dominant effects and (iii) where its effects can be neglected. The induced matrix can be responsible for peculiar properties of the lepton mixing and neutrino mass spectrum, in particular, it can generate the tri-bimaximal mixing. We update and discuss bounds on the induced masses from laboratory measurements, astrophysics and cosmology. We find that substantial impact of the induced matrix is possible if $m_S \\sim 0.1-1$ eV and $\\sin^2\\theta_{aS} \\sim 10^{-3} - 10^{-2}$ or $m_S \\geq 200$ MeV and $\\sin^2\\theta_{aS} \\leq 10^{-9}$. The bounds can be relaxed in cosmological scenarios with low reheating temperature, if sterile neutrinos decay sufficiently fast, or their masses change with time.

  20. Nuclear & Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Cosmology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear & Particle Physics science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Nuclear & Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Cosmology National security depends on science and...

  1. 13. Neutrino mixing 1 13. NEUTRINO MASS, MIXING, AND OSCILLATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    13. Neutrino mixing 1 13. NEUTRINO MASS, MIXING, AND OSCILLATIONS Updated October 2011 by K compelling evidences for oscillations of neutrinos caused by nonzero neutrino masses and neutrino mixing. The data imply the existence of 3-neutrino mixing in vacuum. We review the theory of neutrino oscillations

  2. 13. Neutrino mixing 1 13. NEUTRINO MASS, MIXING, AND OSCILLATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    13. Neutrino mixing 1 13. NEUTRINO MASS, MIXING, AND OSCILLATIONS Written May 2010 by K. Nakamura for oscillations of neutrinos caused by nonzero neutrino masses and neutrino mixing. The data imply the existence of 3-neutrino mixing in vacuum. We review the theory of neutrino oscillations, the phenomenology

  3. Physics division annual report 2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glover, J.; Physics

    2007-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report highlights the research performed in 2005 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory, medium energy nuclear research and accelerator research and development. The mission of Nuclear Physics is to understand the origin, evolution and structure of baryonic matter in the universe--the matter that makes up stars, planets and human life itself. The Division's research focuses on innovative new ways to address this mission and 2005 was a year of great progress. One of the most exciting developments is the initiation of the Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade, CARIBU. By combining a Cf-252 fission source, the gas catcher technology developed for rare isotope beams, a high-resolution isobar separator, and charge breeding ECR technology, CARIBU will make hundreds of new neutron-rich isotope beams available for research. The cover illustration shows the anticipated intensities of low-energy beams that become available for low-energy experiments and for injection into ATLAS for reacceleration. CARIBU will be completed in early 2009 and provide us with considerable experience in many of the technologies developed for a future high intensity exotic beam facility. Notable results in research at ATLAS include a measurement of the isomeric states in {sup 252}No that helps pin down the single particle structure expected for superheavy elements, and a new low-background measurement of {sup 16}N beta-decay to determine the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction rate that is so important in astrophysical environments. Precise mass measurements shed new light on the unitarity of the quark weak-mixing matrix in the search for physics beyond the standard model. ATLAS operated for 4686 hours of research in FY2005 while achieving 95% efficiency of beam delivery for experiments. In Medium-Energy Physics, radium isotopes were trapped in an atom trap for the first time, a major milestone in an innovative search for the violation of time-reversal symmetry. New results from HERMES establish that strange quarks carry little of the spin of the proton and precise results have been obtained at JLAB on the changes in quark distributions in light nuclei. New theoretical results reveal that the nature of the surfaces of strange quark stars. Green's function Monte Carlo techniques have been extended to scattering problems and show great promise for the accurate calculation, from first principles, of important astrophysical reactions. Flame propagation in type 1A supernova has been simulated, a numerical process that requires considering length scales that vary by factors of eight to twelve orders of magnitude. Argonne continues to lead in the development and exploitation of the new technical concepts that will truly make an advanced exotic beam facility, in the words of NSAC, 'the world-leading facility for research in nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics'. Our science and our technology continue to point the way to this major advance. It is a tremendously exciting time in science for these new capabilities hold the keys to unlocking important secrets of nature. The great progress that has been made in meeting the exciting intellectual challenges of modern nuclear physics reflects the talents and dedication of the Physics Division staff and the visitors, guests and students who bring so much to the research.

  4. Ultra High Energy Neutrino Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Berezinsky

    2005-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The short review of theoretical aspects of ultra high energy (UHE) neutrinos and superGZK neutrinos. The sources and diffuse fluxes of UHE neutrinos are discussed. Much attention is given to comparison of the cascade and cosmic ray upper bounds for diffuse neutrino fluxes. Cosmogenic neutrinos and neutrinos from the mirror mater are considered as superGZK neutrinos.

  5. High-Energy Neutrinos in Light of Fermi-LAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahlers, Markus

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The production of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos is tightly linked to the emission of hadronic gamma-rays. I will discuss the recent observation of TeV to PeV neutrinos by the IceCube Cherenkov telescope in the context of gamma-ray astronomy. The corresponding energy range of hadronic gamma-rays is not directly accessible by extragalactic gamma-ray astronomy due to interactions with cosmic radiation backgrounds. Nevertheless, the isotropic sub-TeV gamma-ray background observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) contains indirect information from secondary emission produced in electromagnetic cascades and constrains hadronic emission scenarios. On the other hand, observation of PeV gamma-rays would provide a smoking-gun signal for Galactic emission. In general, the cross-correlation of neutrino emission with (extended) Galactic and extragalactic gamma-ray sources will serve as the most sensitive probe for a future identification of neutrino sources.

  6. Effects of quantum space time foam in the neutrino sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus; H. Päs; U. Sarkar

    2000-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss violations of CPT and quantum mechanics due to interactions of neutrinos with space-time quantum foam. Neutrinoless double beta decay and oscillations of neutrinos from astrophysical sources (supernovae, active galactic nuclei) are analysed. It is found that the propagation distance is the crucial quantity entering any bounds on EHNS parameters. Thus, while the bounds from neutrinoless double beta decay are not significant, the data of the supernova 1987a imply a bound being several orders of magnitude more stringent than the ones known from the literature. Even more stringent limits may be obtained from the investigation of neutrino oscillations from active galactic nuclei sources, which have an impressive potential for the search of quantum foam interactions in the neutrino sector.

  7. Indirect Dark Matter search with large neutrino telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermani, Paolo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dark matter is one of the main goals of neutrino astronomy. At present, there are two big neutrino telescopes based on the Cherenkov technique in ice and water: IceCube at the South Pole and ANTARES in the northern hemisphere. Both telescopes are performing an indirect search for Dark Matter by looking for a statistical excess of neutrinos coming from astrophysical massive objects. This excess could be an evidence of the possible annihilation of dark matter particles in the centre of these objects. In one of the most popular scenarios the Dark Matter is composed of WIMP particles. The analysis and results of the ANTARES neutrino telescope for the indirect detection of Dark Matter fluxes from the Sun are here presented, as well as the latest IceCube published sensitivity results, for different Dark Matter models.

  8. Neutrino spin oscillations in matter under the influence of gravitational and electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dvornikov, Maxim, E-mail: maxim.dvornikov@usp.br [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, CP 66318, CEP 05315-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the new quasi-classical equation for the description of the spin evolution of a neutrino propagating in a curved space-time and interacting with a background matter and an external electromagnetic field. This equation is used to analyze neutrino spin oscillations in these external backgrounds. We obtain the effective Hamiltonian and the transition probability for oscillations of neutrinos when they move in the vicinity of a rotating black hole, surrounded by an accretion disk, and interact with an external magnetic field. The appearance of new resonances in neutrino spin oscillations in this system is considered. The approximate treatment of spin oscillations of radially propagating ultra high energy neutrinos is developed. We also discuss the applications of our results to the description of neutrino spin oscillations in realistic astrophysical media.

  9. Searches for Time Dependent Neutrino Sources with IceCube Data from 2008 to 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aartsen, M G; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D; Anderson, T; Arguelles, C; Arlen, T C; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; BenZvi, S; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bos, F; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H -P; Brown, A M; Buzinsky, N; Casey, J; Casier, M; Cheung, E; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Christy, B; Clark, K; Classen, L; Clevermann, F; Coenders, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Day, M; de André, J P A M; De Clercq, C; Dembinski, H; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de Wasseige, G; de With, M; DeYoung, T; D\\'\\iaz-Vélez, J C; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Ehrhardt, T; Eichmann, B; Eisch, J; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Felde, J; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gaior, R; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gier, D; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Gretskov, P; Groh, J C; Groß, A; Ha, C; Haack, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallen, P; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Hebecker, D; Heereman, D; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hellwig, D; Hickford, S; Hignight, J; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huang, F; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; In, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jurkovic, M; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kauer, M; Keivani, A; Kelley, J L; Kheirandish, A; Kiryluk, J; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Koob, A; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kriesten, A; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kroll, M; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lanfranchi, J L; Larsen, D T; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Mahn, K B M; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Maunu, R; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Medici, M; Meli, A; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Middlemas, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Olivas, A; Omairat, A; O'Murchadha, A; Palczewski, T; Paul, L; Penek, Ö; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Pütz, J; Quinnan, M; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Rees, I; Reimann, R; Relich, M; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Robertson, S; Rodrigues, J P; Rongen, M; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Sander, H -G; Sandroos, J; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Shanidze, R; Smith, M W E; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stanisha, N A; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Strotjohann, N L; Sullivan, G W; Sutherland, M; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Terliuk, A; Teši?, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Tobin, M N; Tosi, D; Tselengidou, M; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vallecorsa, S; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; van Santen, J; Vanheule, S; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Wallraff, M; Weaver, Ch; Wellons, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Whitehorn, N; Wichary, C; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Xu, Y; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zoll, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper searches for flaring astrophysical neutrino sources and sources with periodic emission with the IceCube neutrino telescope are presented. In contrast to time integrated searches, where steady emission is assumed, the analyses presented here look for a time dependent signal of neutrinos using the information from the neutrino arrival times to enhance the discovery potential. A search was performed for correlations between neutrino arrival times and directions as well as neutrino emission following time dependent lightcurves, sporadic emission or periodicities of candidate sources. These include active galactic nuclei, soft $\\gamma$-ray repeaters, supernova remnants hosting pulsars, micro-quasars and X-ray binaries. The work presented here updates and extends previously published results to a longer period that covers four years of data from 2008 April 5 to 2012 May 16 including the first year of operation of the completed 86-string detector. The analyses did not find any significant time dependen...

  10. Primordial nucleosynthesis and neutrino physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Christel Johanna

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Brief History of and Introduction to Neutrino Physics . 13Nucleosynthesis and Neutrino Physics A dissertationdensity depend on new neutrino physics in di?erent ways. In

  11. Working group report: Neutrino physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Working group report: Neutrino physics Acknowledgements TheWorking group report: Neutrino physics Coordinators: SANDHYAthe report of the neutrino physics working group at WHEPP-X.

  12. Neutrino physics at accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrique Fernandez

    2006-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Present and future neutrino experiments at accelerators are mainly concerned with understanding the neutrino oscillation phenomenon and its implications. Here a brief account of neutrino oscillations is given together with a description of the supporting data. Some current and planned accelerator neutrino experiments are also explained.

  13. Propagation of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays and the Production of Cosmogenic Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aloisio, R; di Matteo, A; Grillo, A F; Petrera, S; Salamida, F

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an updated version of the {\\it SimProp} Monte Carlo code to study the propagation of ultra high energy cosmic rays in astrophysical backgrounds computing the cosmogenic neutrino fluxes expected on earth. The study of secondary neutrinos provides a powerful tool to constrain the source models of these extremely energetic particles. We will show how the newly detected IceCube neutrino events at PeV energies together with the the latest experimental results of the Pierre Auger Observatory and Telescope Array experiment are almost at the level of excluding several hypothesis on the astrophysical sources of ultra high energy cosmic rays. Results presented here can be also used to evaluate the discovery capabilities of future high energy cosmic rays and neutrino detectors.

  14. Division of Agriculture,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, David

    DAFVM Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary M e d i c i n e Visit us online at www to the Mississippi State University Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine. Discrimination based-3-14) Mississippi State University's Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine, or DAFVM

  15. DIVISION OF GRADUATE STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    recipients at the time of their graduation to monitor and project the scientific workforce. Between 1961DIVISION OF GRADUATE STUDIES 2012-2013 ACADEMIC YEAR REpORT Excellence in Action Division of Graduate Studies #12;Division of Graduate Studies Kent State University 2012 - 2013 Academic Year Report

  16. Neutrinos in Nuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. D. McKeown

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the discovery of nuclear beta decay, nuclear physicists have studied the weak interaction and the nature of neutrinos. Many recent and current experiments have been focused on the elucidation of neutrino oscillations and neutrino mass. The quest for the absolute value of neutrino mass continues with higher precision studies of the tritium beta decay spectrum near the endpoint. Neutrino oscillations are studied through measurements of reactor neutrinos as a function of baseline and energy. And experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay seek to discover violation of lepton number and establish the Majorana nature of neutrino masses.

  17. Neutrinos in Nuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKeown, R D

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the discovery of nuclear beta decay, nuclear physicists have studied the weak interaction and the nature of neutrinos. Many recent and current experiments have been focused on the elucidation of neutrino oscillations and neutrino mass. The quest for the absolute value of neutrino mass continues with higher precision studies of the tritium beta decay spectrum near the endpoint. Neutrino oscillations are studied through measurements of reactor neutrinos as a function of baseline and energy. And experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay seek to discover violation of lepton number and establish the Majorana nature of neutrino masses.

  18. Neutrino Physics with JUNO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An, Fengpeng; An, Qi; Antonelli, Vito; Baussan, Eric; Beacom, John; Bezrukov, Leonid; Blyth, Simon; Brugnera, Riccardo; Avanzini, Margherita Buizza; Busto, Jose; Cabrera, Anatael; Cai, Hao; Cai, Xiao; Cammi, Antonio; Cao, Guofu; Cao, Jun; Chang, Yun; Chen, Shaomin; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Yixue; Chiesa, Davide; Clemenza, Massimiliano; Clerbaux, Barbara; Conrad, Janet; D'Angelo, Davide; De Kerret, Herve; Deng, Zhi; Deng, Ziyan; Ding, Yayun; Djurcic, Zelimir; Dornic, Damien; Dracos, Marcos; Drapier, Olivier; Dusini, Stefano; Dye, Stephen; Enqvist, Timo; Fan, Donghua; Fang, Jian; Favart, Laurent; Ford, Richard; Goger-Neff, Marianne; Gan, Haonan; Garfagnini, Alberto; Giammarchi, Marco; Gonchar, Maxim; Gong, Guanghua; Gong, Hui; Gonin, Michel; Grassi, Marco; Grewing, Christian; Guan, Mengyun; Guarino, Vic; Guo, Gang; Guo, Wanlei; Guo, Xin-Heng; Hagner, Caren; Han, Ran; He, Miao; Heng, Yuekun; Hsiung, Yee; Hu, Jun; Hu, Shouyang; Hu, Tao; Huang, Hanxiong; Huang, Xingtao; Huo, Lei; Ioannisian, Ara; Jeitler, Manfred; Ji, Xiangdong; Jiang, Xiaoshan; Jollet, Cecile; Kang, Li; Karagounis, Michael; Kazarian, Narine; Krumshteyn, Zinovy; Kruth, Andre; Kuusiniemi, Pasi; Lachenmaier, Tobias; Leitner, Rupert; Li, Chao; Li, Jiaxing; Li, Weidong; Li, Weiguo; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Xiaonan; Li, Yi; Li, Yufeng; Li, Zhi-Bing; Liang, Hao; Lin, Guey-Lin; Lin, Tao; Lin, Yen-Hsun; Ling, Jiajie; Lippi, Ivano; Liu, Dawei; Liu, Hongbang; Liu, Hu; Liu, Jianglai; Liu, Jianli; Liu, Jinchang; Liu, Qian; Liu, Shubin; Liu, Shulin; Lombardi, Paolo; Long, Yongbing; Lu, Haoqi; Lu, Jiashu; Lu, Jingbin; Lu, Junguang; Lubsandorzhiev, Bayarto; Ludhova, Livia; Luo, Shu; Lyashuk, Vladimir; Mollenberg, Randolph; Ma, Xubo; Mantovani, Fabio; Mao, Yajun; Mari, Stefano M; McDonough, William F; Meng, Guang; Meregaglia, Anselmo; Meroni, Emanuela; Mezzetto, Mauro; Miramonti, Lino; Mueller, Thomas; Naumov, Dmitry; Oberauer, Lothar; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Olshevskiy, Alexander; Ortica, Fausto; Paoloni, Alessandro; Peng, Haiping; Peng, Jen-Chieh; Previtali, Ezio; Qi, Ming; Qian, Sen; Qian, Xin; Qian, Yongzhong; Qin, Zhonghua; Raffelt, Georg; Ranucci, Gioacchino; Ricci, Barbara; Robens, Markus; Romani, Aldo; Ruan, Xiangdong; Ruan, Xichao; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Shaevitz, Mike; Sinev, Valery; Sirignano, Chiara; Sisti, Monica; Smirnov, Oleg; Soiron, Michael; Stahl, Achim; Stanco, Luca; Steinmann, Jochen; Sun, Xilei; Sun, Yongjie; Taichenachev, Dmitriy; Tang, Jian; Tkachev, Igor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw; van Waasen, Stefan; Volpe, Cristina; Vorobel, Vit; Votano, Lucia; Wang, Chung-Hsiang; Wang, Guoli; Wang, Hao; Wang, Meng; Wang, Ruiguang; Wang, Siguang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yifang; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Zhimin; Wei, Wei; Wen, Liangjian; Wiebusch, Christopher; Wonsak, Bjorn; Wu, Qun; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Wurm, Michael; Xi, Yufei; Xia, Dongmei; Xie, Yuguang; Xing, Zhi-zhong; Xu, Jilei; Yan, Baojun; Yang, Changgen; Yang, Chaowen; Yang, Guang; Yang, Lei; Yang, Yifan; Yao, Yu; Yegin, Ugur; Yermia, Frederic; You, Zhengyun; Yu, Boxiang; Yu, Chunxu; Yu, Zeyuan; Zavatarelli, Sandra; Zhan, Liang; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Hong-Hao; Zhang, Jiawen; Zhang, Jingbo; Zhang, Qingmin; Zhang, Yu-Mei; Zhang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Zhenghua; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhong, Weili; Zhou, Guorong; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Rong; Zhou, Shun; Zhou, Wenxiong; Zhou, Xiang; Zhou, Yeling; Zhou, Yufeng; Zou, Jiaheng

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO), a 20 kton multi-purpose underground liquid scintillator detector, was proposed with the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy as a primary physics goal. It is also capable of observing neutrinos from terrestrial and extra-terrestrial sources, including supernova burst neutrinos, diffuse supernova neutrino background, geoneutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, solar neutrinos, as well as exotic searches such as nucleon decays, dark matter, sterile neutrinos, etc. We present the physics motivations and the anticipated performance of the JUNO detector for various proposed measurements. By detecting reactor antineutrinos from two power plants at 53-km distance, JUNO will determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at a 3-4 sigma significance with six years of running. The measurement of antineutrino spectrum will also lead to the precise determination of three out of the six oscillation parameters to an accuracy of better than 1\\%. Neutrino burst from a typical cor...

  19. Measuring Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations with Neutrino Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivone F. M. Albuquerque; George F. Smoot

    2001-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino telescopes with large detection volumes can demonstrate that the current indications of neutrino oscillation are correct or if a better description can be achieved with non-standard alternatives. Observations of contained muons produced by atmospheric neutrinos can better constrain the allowed region for oscillations or determine the relevant parameters of non-standard models. We analyze the possibility of neutrino telescopes measuring atmospheric neutrino oscillations. We suggest adjustments to improve this potential. An addition of four densely-instrumented strings to the AMANDA II detector makes observations feasible. Such a configuration is competitive with current and proposed experiments.

  20. Neutral Current Coherent Cross Sections- Implications on Gaseous Spherical TPC's for detecting SN and Earth neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. D. Vergados

    2011-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection of galactic supernova (SN) neutrinos represents one of the future frontiers of low-energy neutrino physics and astrophysics. The neutron coherence of neutral currents (NC) allows quite large cross sections in the case of neutron rich targets, which can be exploited in detecting earth and sky neutrinos by measuring nuclear recoils. A core-collapse supernova represents one of the most powerful source of (anti)neutrinos in the Universe. These (NC) cross sections are not dependent on flavor conversions and, thus, their measurement will provide useful information about the neutrino source. In particular the case of SN they will yield information about the primary neutrino fluxes, i.e. before flavor conversions in neutrino sphere. The advantages of large gaseous low threshold and high resolution time projection counters (TPC) detectors TPC detectors will be discussed. These are especially promising since they are expected to be relatively cheap and easy to maintain. The information thus obtained can also be useful to other flavor sensitive detectors, e.g. the large liquid scintillation detectors like LENA. All together such detectors will provide invaluable information on the astrophysics of core-collapse explosion and on the neutrino mixing parameters. In particular, neutrino flavor transitions in SN envelope might be sensitive to the value of theta-{13} and to the unknown neutrino mass hierarchy. Till a real SN explosion is detected, one can use available earth neutrino sources with similar energy spectra to test the behavior of these detectors. Among them, the ORNL Neutron Spallation source (SNS) and boosted radioactive neutrino beams are good candidates.

  1. Neutrino Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011 at3, Issue 30Neutrino crossN/SΒ ν

  2. Physics Division: Annual report, 1 January-31 December 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the research programs of the Physics Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during calendar 1985. The Division's principal activities are research in theoretical and experimental high energy physics, and the development of tools such as sophisticated detectors to carry out that research. The physics activity also includes a program in astrophysics, and the efforts of the Particle Data Group whose compilations serve the worldwide high energy physics community. Finally, in addition to the physics program, there is a smaller but highly significant research effort in applied mathematics. Some specific topics included in this report are: Research on e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, superconducting super collider, double beta decay, high energy astrophysics and interdisciplinary experiments, detector research and development, electroweak interactions, strong interaction, quantum field theory, superstrings and quantum gravity, vortex methods and turbulence and computational mathematics.

  3. Reducing cosmological small scale structure via a large dark matter-neutrino interaction: constraints and consequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bridget Bertoni; Seyda Ipek; David McKeen; Ann E. Nelson

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Cold dark matter explains a wide range of data on cosmological scales. However, there has been a steady accumulation of evidence for discrepancies between simulations and observations at scales smaller than galaxy clusters. Solutions to these small scale structure problems may indicate that simulations need to improve how they include feedback from baryonic matter, or may imply that dark matter properties differ from the standard cold, noninteracting scenario. One promising way to affect structure formation on small scales is a relatively strong coupling of dark matter to neutrinos. We construct an experimentally viable, simple, renormalizable, model with new interactions between neutrinos and dark matter. We show that addressing the small scale structure problems requires dark matter with a mass that is tens of MeV, and a present-day density determined by an initial particle-antiparticle asymmetry in the dark sector. Generating a sufficiently large dark matter-neutrino coupling requires a new heavy neutrino with a mass around 100 MeV. The heavy neutrino is mostly sterile but has a substantial $\\tau$ neutrino component, while the three nearly massless neutrinos are partly sterile. We provide the first discussion of how such dark matter-neutrino interactions affect neutrino (especially $\\tau$ neutrino) phenomenology. This model can be tested by future astrophysical, particle physics, and neutrino oscillation data. A feature in the neutrino energy spectrum and flavor content from a future nearby supernova would provide strong evidence of neutrino-dark matter interactions. Promising signatures include anomalous matter effects in neutrino oscillations due to nonstandard interactions and a component of the $\\tau$ neutrino with mass around 100 MeV.

  4. 13. Neutrino mixing 1 13. NEUTRINO MASS, MIXING, AND OSCILLATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    13. Neutrino mixing 1 13. NEUTRINO MASS, MIXING, AND OSCILLATIONS Updated May 2012 by K. Nakamura have provided compelling evidences for oscillations of neutrinos caused by nonzero neutrino masses of neutrino oscillations, the phenomenology of neutrino mixing, the problem of the nature - Dirac or Majorana

  5. Booster Neutrino Experiment - About Neutrinos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Site MapSolarAbout Neutrinos General Information

  6. Constraints on a general 3-generation neutrino mass matrix from neutrino data: application to the MSSM with R-parity violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Abada; M. Losada

    2000-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a general symmetric $(3\\times 3)$ mass matrix for three generations of neutrinos. Imposing the constraints, from the atmospheric neutrino and solar neutrino anomalies as well as from the CHOOZ experiment, on the mass squared differences and on the mixing angles, we identify the ranges of allowed inputs for the 6 matrix elements. We apply our results to Majorana left-handed neutrino masses generated at tree level and through fermion--sfermion loop diagrams in the MSSM with R-parity violation. The present experimental results on neutrinos from laboratories, cosmology and astrophysics are implemented to either put bounds on trilinear ($\\lambda_{ijk}, \\lambda'_{ijk}$) and bilinear ($\\mu_{e,\\mu,\\tau}$) R-parity-violating couplings or constrain combinations of products of these couplings.

  7. Strangeness in Relativistic Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jurgen Schaffner-Bielich; Stefan Schramm; Horst Stocker

    2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In these lecture notes, the role of strangeness in relativistic astrophysics of compact stars is addressed. The appearance of strange particles, as hyperons, kaons, and strange quarks, in the core of compact stars is examined and common features as well as differences are presented. Impacts on the global properties of compact stars and signals of the presence of exotic matter are outlined for the various strange phases which can appear in the interior at high densities.

  8. arXiv:0802.3463v1[nucl-th]23Feb2008 Nuclear astrophysics from direct reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    , and energy production in stars. A. Nuclear reaction rates Low energy nuclear astrophysics requires the knowl Be(p, ) 8 B plays a major role for the production of high energy neutrinos from the -decay of 8 B Department of Physics, Texas A&M University, Commerce, TX 75429, USA Accurate nuclear reaction rates

  9. Experimental Neutrino Physics: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Charles E.; Maricic, Jelena

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental studies of neutrino properties, with particular emphasis on neutrino oscillation, mass and mixing parameters. This research was pursued by means of underground detectors for reactor anti-neutrinos, measuring the flux and energy spectra of the neutrinos. More recent investigations have been aimed and developing detector technologies for a long-baseline neutrino experiment (LBNE) using a neutrino beam from Fermilab.

  10. Neutrino Physics at Fermilab

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Niki Saoulidou

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino oscillations provide the first evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. I will briefly overview the neutrino "hi-story", describing key discoveries over the past decades that shaped our understanding of neutrinos and their behavior. Fermilab was, is and hopefully will be at the forefront of the accelerator neutrino experiments.  NuMI, the most powerful accelerator neutrino beam in the world has ushered us into the era of precise measurements. Its further upgrades may give a chance to tackle the remaining mysteries of the neutrino mass hierarchy and possible CP violation.

  11. Astrophysics Visual Analytics at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Our current understanding of dark energy comes primarily from the study of supernovae. The Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory) is an international astrophysics...

  12. What physics and astronomy courses Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Essentials What physics and astronomy courses are there? MPhys Astrophysics Physics Physics (research placement) Physics with Astrophysics Theoretical Physics BSc Physics Physics with Astrophysics Theoretical Physics Foundation year for UK and EU students Physics and Astronomy degrees (with a foundation

  13. Neutrino-nucleus scattering of {sup 95,97}Mo and {sup 116}Cd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ydrefors, E. [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Alba Nova University Center, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden and Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland); Almosly, W.; Suhonen, J. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland)

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate knowledge about the nuclear responses to supernova neutrinos for relevant nuclear targets is important both for neutrino detection and for astrophysical applications. In this paper we discuss the cross sections for the charged-current neutrino-nucleus scatterings off {sup 95,97}Mo and {sup 116}Cd. The microscopic quasiparticle-phonon model is adopted for the odd-even nuclei {sup 95,97}Mo. In the case of {sup 116}Cd we present cross sections both for the Bonn one-boson-exchange potential and self-consistent calculations based on modern Skyrme interactions.

  14. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATLAS Operations personnel, and to various experimental instrument specialists in the Physics Division. The PAC members will review each proposal for scientific merit and...

  15. Nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology (NPAC) capability review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redondo, Antonio [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present document represents a summary self-assessment of the status of the Nuclear and Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology (NPAC) capability across Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). For the purpose of this review, we have divided the capability into four theme areas: Nuclear Physics, Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology, and Applied Physics. For each theme area we have given a general but brief description of the activities under the area, a list of the Laboratory divisions involved in the work, connections to the goals and mission of the Laboratory, a brief description of progress over the last three years, our opinion of the overall status of the theme area, and challenges and issues.

  16. Non standard neutrino interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miranda, O G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino oscillations have become well-known phenomenon; the measurements of neutrino mixing angles and mass squared differences are continuously improving. Future oscillation experiments will eventually determine the remaining unknown neutrino parameters, namely, the mass ordering, normal or inverted, and the CP-violating phase. On the other hand, the absolute mass scale of neutrinos could be probed by cosmological observations, single beta decay as well as by neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. Furthermore, the last one may shed light on the nature of neutrinos, Dirac or Majorana, by measuring the effective Majorana mass of neutrinos. However, the neutrino mass generation mechanism remains unknown. A well-motivated phenomenological approach to search for new physics, in the neutrino sector, is that of non-standard interactions. In this short review, the current constraints in this picture, as well as the perspectives from future experiments, are discussed.

  17. Quantum Gravity effect on neutrino oscillations in a strong gravitational field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan Miller; Roman Pasechnik

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of quantum field theory, a graviton interacts locally with a quantum state having definite mass, i.e. the gravitational mass eigenstate, while a weak boson interacts with a state having definite flavor, i.e. the flavor eigenstate. An interaction of a neutrino with an energetic graviton may trigger the collapse of the neutrino to a definite mass eigenstate with probability expressed in terms of PMNS mixing matrix elements. Thus, gravitons would induce quantum decoherence of a coherent neutrino flavor state similarly to how weak bosons induce quantum decoherence of a neutrino in a definite mass state. We demonstrate that such an essentially quantum gravity effect may have strong consequences for neutrino oscillation phenomena in astrophysics due to relatively large scattering cross sections of relativistic neutrinos undergoing large-angle radiation of energetic gravitons in gravitational field of a classical massive source (i.e. the quasi-classical case of gravitational Bethe-Heitler scattering). This graviton-induced {\\em decoherence} is compared to {\\em decoherence} due to propagation in the presence of the Earth matter effect. Based on this study, we propose a new technique for the indirect detection of energetic gravitons by measuring the flavor composition of astrophysical neutrinos.

  18. Oscillations of Mossbauer neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evgeny Kh. Akhmedov; Joachim Kopp; Manfred Lindner

    2008-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the probability of recoilless emission and detection of neutrinos (Mossbauer effect with neutrinos) taking into account the boundedness of the parent and daughter nuclei in the neutrino source and detector as well as the leptonic mixing. We show that, in spite of their near monochromaticity, the recoillessly emitted and captured neutrinos oscillate. After a qualitative discussion of this issue, we corroborate and extend our results by computing the combined rate of $\\bar{\

  19. Introduction to Neutrino Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linares, Edgar Casimiro [Division de Ciencias e Ingenierias Campus Leon, Loma del Bosque 103 Col. Lomas del Campestre, C.P. 37150 Leon (Mexico) and Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Av. Complutense, 22, C.P. 28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    I present a basic introduction to the physics of the neutrino, with emphasis on experimental results and developments.

  20. Solar neutrinos - Eclipse effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan Narayan; G. Rajasekaran; Rahul Sinha

    1997-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    It is pointed out that the enhancement of the solar neutrino rate in a real time detector like Super-Kamioka, SNO or Borexino due to neutrino oscillations in the moon during a partial or total solar eclipse may be observable. The enhancement is calculated as a function of the neutrino parameters in the case of three flavor mixing. This enhancement if seen, can further help to determine the neutrino parameters.

  1. Nuclear Masses in Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christine Weber; Klaus Blaum; Hendrik Schatz

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Among all nuclear ground-state properties, atomic masses are highly specific for each particular combination of N and Z and the data obtained apply to a variety of physics topics. One of the most crucial questions to be addressed in mass spectrometry of unstable radionuclides is the one of understanding the processes of element formation in the Universe. To this end, accurate atomic mass values of a large number of exotic nuclei participating in nucleosynthesis are among the key input data in large-scale reaction network calculations. In this paper, a review on the latest achievements in mass spectrometry for nuclear astrophysics is given.

  2. Astrophysics at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About BecomeTechnologiesVehicle PartsAnnualAstrophysics

  3. The temporal coincidence of neutrino counts with photons from GRBs is of great help for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruck, Jehoshua (Shuki)

    @clemson.edu 1. Vedrenne, G. & Atteia, J.-L. Gamma Ray Bursts (Springer, 2009). 2. Abbasi, R. et al. Phys. Rev-messenger astrophysics. Cosmic ray, -ray and neutrino astronomy are closely connected in this story. Absence of evidence evidence10 for an emerging class of very energetic bursts (a tenfold larger energy output than

  4. A note on the neutrino decay line and the possibilities of its detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srdjan Samurovic; Vladan Celebonovic

    1995-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Using simple physical reasoning we have estimated the wavelengths and line-widths of spectral lines arising from the decays of massive neutrinos. We have, also, to some extent, discussed the possible consequences of these decays in observable astrophysical settings. We have compared our conclusions with the predictions of the decaying dark matter (DDM) model and cold + hot dark matter (${\\rm C\

  5. Current Status of the Solar Neutrino Problem with Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hisakazu Minakata; Hiroshi Nunokawa

    1998-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform an updated model-independent analysis using the latest solar neutrino data obtained by $^{37}$Cl and $^{71}$Ga radiochemical experiments, and most notably by a large water-Cherenkov detector SuperKamiokande with their 504 days of data taking. We confirm that the astrophysical solutions to the solar neutrino problem are extremely disfavored by the data and a low-temperature modification of the standard solar model is excluded by more than 5 $\\sigma$. We also propose a new way of illuminating the suppression pattern of various solar neutrino flux without invoking detailed flavor conversion mechanisms. It indicates that the strong suppression of $^7$Be neutrinos is no more true when the neutrino flavor conversion is taken into account.

  6. B-L Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahill, K E

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino masses and mixings are analyzed in terms of left-handed fields and a 6x6 complex symmetric mass matrix whose singular values are the neutrino masses. An angle theta_nu characterizes the kind of the neutrinos, with theta_nu=0 for Dirac neutrinos and theta_nu=pi/2 for Majorana neutrinos. At theta_nu = 0 baryon-minus-lepton number is conserved. If theta_nu is approximately zero, the six neutrino masses coalesce into three nearly degenerate pairs. Thus the tiny mass differences exhibited in the solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments are naturally explained by the approximate conservation of B-L. Neutrinos are nearly Dirac fermions. This B-L model leads to these predictions: neutrinos oscillate mainly between flavor eigenfields and sterile eigenfields, and so neither KARMEN, nor SNO, nor BooNE will detect the appearance of neutrinos or antineutrinos; neutrinos may well be of cosmological importance; in principle the disappearance of the tau neutrino should be observable; and neutrinoless double-beta d...

  7. B-L Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin Cahill

    2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino masses and mixings are analyzed in terms of left-handed fields and a 6x6 complex symmetric mass matrix whose singular values are the neutrino masses. An angle theta_nu characterizes the kind of the neutrinos, with theta_nu=0 for Dirac neutrinos and theta_nu=pi/2 for Majorana neutrinos. At theta_nu = 0 baryon-minus-lepton number is conserved. If theta_nu is approximately zero, the six neutrino masses coalesce into three nearly degenerate pairs. Thus the tiny mass differences exhibited in the solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments are naturally explained by the approximate conservation of B-L. Neutrinos are nearly Dirac fermions. This B-L model leads to these predictions: neutrinos oscillate mainly between flavor eigenfields and sterile eigenfields, and so the appearance of neutrinos and antineutrinos is suppressed; neutrinos may well be of cosmological importance; in principle the disappearance of the tau neutrino should be observable; and neutrinoless double-beta decay is suppressed by an extra factor of 10^(-5) and so will not be seen in the Heidelberg/Moscow, IGEX, GENIUS, or CUORE experiments.

  8. A prototype station for ARIANNA: a detector for cosmic neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisa Gerhardt; Spencer R. Klein; Thorsten Stezelberger; Steve Barwick; Kamlesh Dookayka; Jordan Hanson; Ryan Nichol

    2010-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Antarctic Ross Iceshelf Antenna Neutrino Array (ARIANNA) is a proposed detector for ultra-high energy astrophysical neutrinos. It will detect coherent radio Cherenkov emission from the particle showers produced by neutrinos with energies above about 10^17 eV. ARIANNA will be built on the Ross Ice Shelf just off the coast of Antarctica, where it will eventually cover about 900 km^2 in surface area. There, the ice-water interface below the shelf reflects radio waves, giving ARIANNA sensitivity to downward going neutrinos and improving its sensitivity to horizontally incident neutrinos. ARIANNA detector stations will each contain 4-8 antennas which search for brief pulses of 50 MHz to 1 GHz radio emission from neutrino interactions. We describe a prototype station for ARIANNA which was deployed in Moore's Bay on the Ross Ice Shelf in December 2009, discuss the design and deployment, and present some initial figures on performance. The ice shelf thickness was measured to be 572 +/- 6 m at the deployment site.

  9. A prototype station for ARIANNA: a detector for cosmic neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhardt, L.; Klein, S.; Stezelberger, T.; Barwick, S.; Dookayka, K.; Hanson, J.; Nichol, R.

    2010-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Antarctic Ross Iceshelf Antenna Neutrino Array (ARIANNA) is a proposed detector for ultra-high energy astrophysical neutrinos. It will detect coherent radio Cherenkov emission from the particle showers produced by neutrinos with energies above about 1017 eV. ARIANNA will be built on the Ross Ice Shelf just off the coast of Antarctica, where it will eventually cover about 900 km2 in surface area. There, the ice-water interface below the shelf reflects radio waves, giving ARIANNA sensitivity to downward going neutrinos and improving its sensitivity to horizontally incident neutrinos. ARIANNA detector stations will each contain 4-8 antennas which search for brief pulses of 50 MHz to 1 GHz radio emission from neutrino interactions. We describe a prototype station for ARIANNA which was deployed in Moore's Bay on the Ross Ice Shelf in December 2009, discuss the design and deployment, and present some initial figures on performance. The ice shelf thickness was measured to be 572 +- 6 m at the deployment site.

  10. Solar weak currents, neutrino oscillations, and time variations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haxton, W.C.; Zhang, W. (Institute for Nuclear Theory, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (USA) Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (USA))

    1991-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effective neutrino mass in the presence of matter depends on both the charge and three-current weak densities. The effect of solar current loops on neutrino conversion need not be small if the scale of the eddies'' is comparable to the local oscillation length. This would seem to offer a mechanism for temporal variations in the neutrino flux that requires neither neutrino magnetic moments nor large solar density fluctuations. The effect of sinusoidally varying currents (or, alternatively, density fluctuations) is explored analytically and numerically. The analytic result we develop is based on the uniform approximation, and reduces to the adiabatic and Landau-Zener results in the appropriate limits. Despite the very interesting effects that may arise, we conclude that this mechanism for temporal variations in the solar-neutrino flux, like others suggested before, appears to require somewhat contrived solar conditions. However, it is quite likely that the influence of currents on neutrino effective masses is important and natural in other astrophysical settings, such as supernovas.

  11. Nuclear Science Division 1994 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, W.D. [ed.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the period of January 1, 1994, to December 31, 1994. This was a time of significant accomplishment for all of the programs in the Division. Assembly of the solar neutrino detector at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory is well under way. All of the components fabricated by LBL were shipped to Sudbury early in the year and our efforts are now divided between assisting the assembly of the detector and preparing software for data analysis once the detector is operational in 1996. Much of the activity at the 88-Inch Cyclotron centered on Gammasphere. The {open_quotes}early implementation{close_quotes} phase of the detector ended in September. This phase was extremely successful, involving over 60 experiments with nearly 200 users from 37 institutions worldwide. The mechanical structure was installed and the final electronic system is expected to operate in March 1995. The Division concurrently hosted a conference on physics for large {gamma}-ray detector arrays at the Clark Kerr Campus at UC Berkeley in August. This was a very successful meeting, reflecting the enthusiasm for this field worldwide. Also at the Cyclotron, the progress toward weak interaction experiments using ultra-thin sources passed a major milestone with the trapping of radioactive {sup 21}Na atoms. We are now engaged in a major upgrade of the experimental area and the outlook is very promising for these novel experiments. Another highlight of research at the Cyclotron was the confirmation of element 106. This development allowed the original LLNL/LBL discovery team to move forward with their proposal to name this element seaborgium.

  12. Superconducting Magnet Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Ramesh

    Superconducting Magnet Division Permanent Magnet Designs with Large Variations in Field Strength the residual field of the magnetized bricks by concentrating flux lines at the iron pole. Low Field Design Medium Field Design Superconducting Magnet Division Dipole and Quadrupole Magnets for RHIC e

  13. Hypertension Research Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Hypertension & Vascular Research Division Department of Internal Medicine Jeffrey L. Garvin, Ph.D. ­ Division Head #12;Prevalence of Hypertension in U.S. Men by Age and Ethnicity 18 ­ 29 30 ­ 39 40 ­ 49 50 Prevalence of High BP Adapted from Burt et al. Hypertension 1995;25:305. 25 50 75 #12;Introduction

  14. Superconducting Magnet Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Superconducting Magnet Division Ramesh Gupta 20T Target Solenoid with HTS Insert Solenoid Capture Laboratory New York, USA http://www.bnl.gov/magnets/staff/gupta #12;Superconducting Magnet Division Ramesh of HTS may significantly reduce the amount of Tungsten shielding · Summary #12;Superconducting Magnet

  15. Physics Division annual report 2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glover, J.

    2006-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report highlights the research performed in 2004 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory, medium energy nuclear research and accelerator research and development. The intellectual challenges of this research represent some of the most fundamental challenges in modern science, shaping our understanding of both tiny objects at the center of the atom and some of the largest structures in the universe. A great strength of these efforts is the critical interplay of theory and experiment. Notable results in research at ATLAS include a measurement of the charge radius of He-6 in an atom trap and its explanation in ab-initio calculations of nuclear structure. Precise mass measurements on critical waiting point nuclei in the rapid-proton-capture process set the time scale for this important path in nucleosynthesis. An abrupt fall-off was identified in the subbarrier fusion of several heavy-ion systems. ATLAS operated for 5559 hours of research in FY2004 while achieving 96% efficiency of beam delivery for experiments. In Medium Energy Physics, substantial progress was made on a long-term experiment to search for the violation of time-reversal invariance using trapped Ra atoms. New results from HERMES reveal the influence of quark angular momentum. Experiments at JLAB search for evidence of color transparency in rho-meson production and study the EMC effect in helium isotopes. New theoretical results include a Poincare covariant description of baryons as composites of confined quarks and non-point-like diquarks. Green's function Monte Carlo techniques give accurate descriptions of the excited states of light nuclei and these techniques been extended to scattering states for astrophysics studies. A theoretical description of the phenomena of proton radioactivity has been extended to triaxial nuclei. Argonne continues to lead in the development and exploitation of the new technical concepts that will truly make RIA, in the words of NSAC, ''the world-leading facility for research in nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics''. The performance standards for new classes of superconducting cavities continue to increase. Driver linac transients and faults have been analyzed to understand reliability issues and failure modes. Liquid-lithium targets were shown to successfully survive the full-power deposition of a RIA beam. Our science and our technology continue to point the way to this major advance. It is a tremendously exciting time in science for RIA holds the keys to unlocking important secrets of nature. The work described here shows how far we have come and makes it clear we know the path to meet these intellectual challenges. The great progress that has been made in meeting the exciting intellectual challenges of modern nuclear physics reflects the talents and dedication of the Physics Division staff and the visitors, guests and students who bring so much to the research.

  16. Constraining Sterile Neutrinos Using Reactor Neutrino Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivan Girardi; Davide Meloni; Tommy Ohlsson; He Zhang; Shun Zhou

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Models of neutrino mixing involving one or more sterile neutrinos have resurrected their importance in the light of recent cosmological data. In this case, reactor antineutrino experiments offer an ideal place to look for signatures of sterile neutrinos due to their impact on neutrino flavor transitions. In this work, we show that the high-precision data of the Daya Bay experi\\-ment constrain the 3+1 neutrino scenario imposing upper bounds on the relevant active-sterile mixing angle $\\sin^2 2 \\theta_{14} \\lesssim 0.06$ at 3$\\sigma$ confidence level for the mass-squared difference $\\Delta m^2_{41}$ in the range $(10^{-3},10^{-1}) \\, {\\rm eV^2}$. The latter bound can be improved by six years of running of the JUNO experiment, $\\sin^22\\theta_{14} \\lesssim 0.016$, although in the smaller mass range $ \\Delta m^2_{41} \\in (10^{-4} ,10^{-3}) \\, {\\rm eV}^2$. We have also investigated the impact of sterile neutrinos on precision measurements of the standard neutrino oscillation parameters $\\theta_{13}$ and $\\Delta m^2_{31}$ (at Daya Bay and JUNO), $\\theta_{12}$ and $\\Delta m^2_{21}$ (at JUNO), and most importantly, the neutrino mass hierarchy (at JUNO). We find that, except for the obvious situation where $\\Delta m^2_{41}\\sim \\Delta m^2_{31}$, sterile states do not affect these measurements substantially.

  17. Neutrino Oscillations and the Solar Neutrino Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. C. Haxton

    2000-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    I describe the current status of the solar neutrino problem, summarizing the arguments that its resolution will require new particle physics. The phenomenon of matter-enhanced neutrino oscillations is reviewed. I consider the implications of current experiments -- including the SuperKamiokande atmospheric and LSND measurements -- and the need for additional constraints from SNO and other new detectors.

  18. Neutrino Observations from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. W. P. Poon; for the SNO Collaboration

    2001-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a water imaging Cherenkov detector. Its usage of 1000 metric tons of D$_{2}$O as target allows the SNO detector to make a solar-model independent test of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis by simultaneously measuring the solar $\

  19. Neutrino Nuclear Responses For Neutrino Studies In Nuclear Femto Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ejiri, H. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047, Japan and Nuclear Science, Czech Technical University, Brehova, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinos are key particles for particle and astro-nuclear physics. Majorana neutrino masses and phases, solar and supernova neutrino productions and oscillations, and neutrino nuclear synthesis and fundamental weak interactions are well studied in nuclei as femto laboratories. Here neutrino nuclear responses are crucial for the neutrino studies. This reports briefly experimental studies of neutrino nuclear responses, charge exchange reactions on Ga to study nuclear responses for solar and {sup 51}Cr neutrinos, and {beta}{sup +} neutrino responses for {beta}{beta}-{nu} matrix elements and astro {nu} interactions by photon and muon probes.

  20. Status of Neutrino Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. F. Valle

    2001-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar and atmospheric neutrino data require physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. The simplest, most generic, but not yet unique, interpretation of the data is in terms of neutrino oscillations. I summarize the results of the latest three-neutrino oscillation global fit of the data, in particular the bounds on the angle $\\theta_{13}$ probed in reactor experiments. Even though not implied by the data, bi-maximal neutrino mixing emerges as an attractive possibility either in hierarchical or quasi-degenerate neutrino scenarios.

  1. LSND neutrino oscillation results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis, W.C.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past several years, a number of experiments have searched for neutrino oscillations, where a neutrino of one type (say {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}) spontaneously transforms into a neutrino of another type (say {bar {nu}}{sub e}). For this phenomenon to occur, neutrinos must be massive and the apparent conservation law of lepton families must be violated. In 1995 the LSND experiment published data showing candidate events that are consistent with {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} oscillations. Additional data are reported here which provide stronger evidence for neutrino oscillations.

  2. PHYSICS DIVISION CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    PHYSICS DIVISION CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN 2008 Prepared by _________________________________________________ T. Mullen Physics Division Chemical Hygiene Officer Reviewed by ___________________________________________________ J. Woodring Site Chemical Hygiene Officer Approved

  3. High Energy Astrophysics: Overview 1/47 High Energy Astrophysics in Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bicknell, Geoff

    High Energy Astrophysics: Overview 1/47 High Energy Astrophysics in Context 1 Some references The following set of volumes is an outstanding summary of the field of High Energy Astrophysics and its relation to the rest of Astrophysics High Energy Astrophysics, Vols. 1,2 and 3. M.S. Longair, Cam- bridge University

  4. Democratic Neutrino Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitry Zhuridov

    2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    New theory of neutrino masses and mixing is introduced. This theory is based on a simple S_3 symmetric democratic neutrino mass matrix, and predicts the neutrino mass spectrum of normal ordering. Taking into account the matter effect and proper averaging of the oscillations, this theory agrees with the variety of atmospheric, solar and accelerator neutrino data. Moreover, the absolute scale of the neutrino masses m of 0.03 eV is determined in this theory, using the atmospheric neutrino oscillation data. In case of tiny perturbations in the democratic mass matrix only one this scale parameter m allows to explain the mentioned above neutrino results, and the theory has huge predictive power.

  5. Measurement of the atmospheric neutrino energy spectrum from 100 GeV to 400 TeV with IceCube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IceCube Collaboration; R. Abbasi; Y. Abdou; T. Abu-Zayyad; J. Adams; J. A. Aguilar; M. Ahlers; K. Andeen; J. Auffenberg; X. Bai; M. Baker; S. W. Barwick; R. Bay; J. L. Bazo Alba; K. Beattie; J. J. Beatty; S. Bechet; J. K. Becker; K. -H. Becker; M. L. Benabderrahmane; S. BenZvi; J. Berdermann; P. Berghaus; D. Berley; E. Bernardini; D. Bertrand; D. Z. Besson; M. Bissok; E. Blaufuss; J. Blumenthal; D. J. Boersma; C. Bohm; D. Bose; S. Böser; O. Botner; J. Braun; S. Buitink; M. Carson; D. Chirkin; B. Christy; J. Clem; F. Clevermann; S. Cohen; C. Colnard; D. F. Cowen; M. V. D'Agostino; M. Danninger; J. C. Davis; C. De Clercq; L. Demirörs; O. Depaepe; F. Descamps; P. Desiati; G. de Vries-Uiterweerd; T. DeYoung; J. C. Díaz-Vélez; M. Dierckxsens; J. Dreyer; J. P. Dumm; M. R. Duvoort; R. Ehrlich; J. Eisch; R. W. Ellsworth; O. Engdegård; S. Euler; P. A. Evenson; O. Fadiran; A. R. Fazely; A. Fedynitch; T. Feusels; K. Filimonov; C. Finley; M. M. Foerster; B. D. Fox; A. Franckowiak; R. Franke; T. K. Gaisser; J. Gallagher; M. Geisler; L. Gerhardt; L. Gladstone; T. Glüsenkamp; A. Goldschmidt; J. A. Goodman; D. Grant; T. Griesel; A. Groß; S. Grullon; M. Gurtner; C. Ha; A. Hallgren; F. Halzen; K. Han; K. Hanson; K. Helbing; P. Herquet; S. Hickford; G. C. Hill; K. D. Hoffman; A. Homeier; K. Hoshina; D. Hubert; W. Huelsnitz; J. -P. Hülß; P. O. Hulth; K. Hultqvist; S. Hussain; A. Ishihara; J. Jacobsen; G. S. Japaridze; H. Johansson; J. M. Joseph; K. -H. Kampert; T. Karg; A. Karle; J. L. Kelley; N. Kemming; P. Kenny; J. Kiryluk; F. Kislat; S. R. Klein; J. -H. Köhne; G. Kohnen; H. Kolanoski; L. Köpke; D. J. Koskinen; M. Kowalski; T. Kowarik; M. Krasberg; T. Krings; G. Kroll; K. Kuehn; T. Kuwabara; M. Labare; S. Lafebre; K. Laihem; H. Landsman; M. J. Larson; R. Lauer; R. Lehmann; J. Lünemann; J. Madsen; P. Majumdar; A. Marotta; R. Maruyama; K. Mase; H. S. Matis; M. Matusik; K. Meagher; M. Merck; P. Mészáros; T. Meures; E. Middell; N. Milke; J. Miller; T. Montaruli; A. R. Morse; S. M. Movit; R. Nahnhauer; J. W. Nam; U. Naumann; P. Nießen; D. R. Nygren; S. Odrowski; A. Olivas; M. Olivo; A. O'Murchadha; M. Ono; S. Panknin; L. Paul; C. Pérez de los Heros; J. Petrovic; A. Piegsa; D. Pieloth; R. Porrata; J. Posselt; P. B. Price; M. Prikockis; G. T. Przybylski; K. Rawlins; P. Redl; E. Resconi; W. Rhode; M. Ribordy; A. Rizzo; J. P. Rodrigues; P. Roth; F. Rothmaier; C. Rott; T. Ruhe; D. Rutledge; B. Ruzybayev; D. Ryckbosch; H. -G. Sander; M. Santander; S. Sarkar; K. Schatto; S. Schlenstedt; T. Schmidt; A. Schukraft; A. Schultes; O. Schulz; M. Schunck; D. Seckel; B. Semburg; S. H. Seo; Y. Sestayo; S. Seunarine; A. Silvestri; K. Singh; A. Slipak; G. M. Spiczak; C. Spiering; M. Stamatikos; B. T. Stanev; G. Stephens; T. Stezelberger; R. G. Stokstad; S. Stoyanov; E. A. Strahler; T. Straszheim; G. W. Sullivan; Q. Swillens; H. Taavola; I. Taboada; A. Tamburro; O. Tarasova; A. Tepe; S. Ter-Antonyan; S. Tilav; P. A. Toale; S. Toscano; D. Tosi; D. Tur?an; N. van Eijndhoven; J. Vandenbroucke; A. Van Overloop; J. van Santen; M. Voge; B. Voigt; C. Walck; T. Waldenmaier; M. Wallraff; M. Walter; Ch. Weaver; C. Wendt; S. Westerhoff; N. Whitehorn; K. Wiebe; C. H. Wiebusch; G. Wikström; D. R. Williams; R. Wischnewski; H. Wissing; M. Wolf; K. Woschnagg; C. Xu; X. W. Xu; G. Yodh; S. Yoshida; P. Zarzhitsky

    2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of the atmospheric muon neutrino energy spectrum from 100 GeV to 400 TeV was performed using a data sample of about 18,000 up-going atmospheric muon neutrino events in IceCube. Boosted decision trees were used for event selection to reject mis-reconstructed atmospheric muons and obtain a sample of up-going muon neutrino events. Background contamination in the final event sample is less than one percent. This is the first measurement of atmospheric neutrinos up to 400 TeV, and is fundamental to understanding the impact of this neutrino background on astrophysical neutrino observations with IceCube. The measured spectrum is consistent with predictions for the atmospheric muon neutrino plus muon antineutrino flux.

  6. SMITHSONIAN ASTROPHYSICAL OBSERVATORY VISITING COMMITTEE REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's greatest strengths is its high-energy astrophysics group. While the Chandra satellite will likely continue of astrophysics research and prioritize SAO's major new initiatives (e.g., playing a major role in GMT). The VC. Scientific Research Program High Energy Astrophysics The high-energy astrophysics group at CfA is arguably

  7. Neutrino Oscillations Physics 135c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golwala, Sunil

    Neutrino Oscillations Gary Cheng Physics 135c 6/1/07 #12;Introduction: Theory Neutrinos have mass neutrinos are produced. The difference between the mass eigenstates and the flavor eigenstates of neutrinos is what causes neutrino oscillations. #12;Introduction: Theory 2 The mass eigenstates 1, 2, 3

  8. Collective neutrino oscillations in supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duan, Huaiyu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In a dense neutrino medium neutrinos can experience collective flavor transformation through the neutrino-neutrino forward scattering. In this talk we present some basic features of collective neutrino flavor transformation in the context in core-collapse supernovae. We also give some qualitative arguments for why and when this interesting phenomenon may occur and how it may affect supernova nucleosynthesis.

  9. A New Neutrino Oscillation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting in the late 1960s, neutrino detectors began to see signs that neutrinos, now known to come in the flavors electron ({nu}{sub e}), muon ({nu}{sub {mu}}), and tau ({nu}{sub {tau}}), could transform from one flavor to another. The findings implied that neutrinos must have mass, since massless particles travel at the speed of light and their clocks, so to speak, don't tick, thus they cannot change. What has since been discovered is that neutrinos oscillate at two distinct scales, 500 km/GeV and 15,000 km/GeV, which are defined by the baseline (L) of the experiment (the distance the neutrino travels) divided by the neutrino energy (E). Neutrinos of one flavor can oscillate into neutrinos of another flavor at both L/E scales, but the amplitude of these oscillations is different for the two scales and depends on the initial and final flavor of the neutrinos. The neutrino states that propogate unchanged in time, the mass eigenstates {nu}1, {nu}2, {nu}3, are quantum mechanical mixtures of the electron, muon, and tau neutrino flavors, and the fraction of each flavor in a given mass eigenstate is controlled by three mixing angles and a complex phase. Two of these mixing angles are known with reasonable precision. An upper bound exists for the third angle, called {theta}{sub 13}, which controls the size of the muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillation at an L/E of 500 km/GeV. The phase is completely unknown. The existence of this phase has important implications for the asymmetry between matter and antimatter we observe in the universe today. Experiments around the world have steadily assembled this picture of neutrino oscillation, but evidence of muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillation at 500 km/GeV has remained elusive. Now, a paper from the T2K (Tokai to Kamioka) experiment in Japan, reports the first possible observation of muon neutrinos oscillating into electron neutrinos at 500 km/GeV. They see 6 candidate signal events, above an expected background of 1.5 events. The probability that the 6 events are all background is only about 0.7%. Stated differently, this is a 2.7{sigma} indication that the parameter that controls the oscillation, the neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 13}, is nonzero, just shy of the 3{sigma} requirement to claim 'evidence for.' Nevertheless, this experiment provides the strongest indication to date that this oscillation actually occurs in nature.

  10. Theoretical Particle Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamionkowski, Marc

    2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: Theoretical Particle Astrophysics The research carried out under this grant encompassed work on the early Universe, dark matter, and dark energy. We developed CMB probes for primordial baryon inhomogeneities, primordial non-Gaussianity, cosmic birefringence, gravitational lensing by density perturbations and gravitational waves, and departures from statistical isotropy. We studied the detectability of wiggles in the inflation potential in string-inspired inflation models. We studied novel dark-matter candidates and their phenomenology. This work helped advance the DoE's Cosmic Frontier (and also Energy and Intensity Frontiers) by finding synergies between a variety of different experimental efforts, by developing new searches, science targets, and analyses for existing/forthcoming experiments, and by generating ideas for new next-generation experiments.

  11. Photoneutron reactions in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varlamov, V. V., E-mail: Varlamov@depni.sinp.msu.ru; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Orlin, V. N.; Peskov, N. N.; Stopani, K. A. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Among key problems in nuclear astrophysics, that of obtaining deeper insight into the mechanism of synthesis of chemical elements is of paramount importance. The majority of heavy elements existing in nature are produced in stars via radiative neutron capture in so-called s- and r processes, which are, respectively, slow and fast, in relation to competing ?{sup ?}-decay processes. At the same time, we know 35 neutron-deficient so-called bypassed p-nuclei that lie between {sup 74}Se and {sup 196}Hg and which cannot originate from the aforementioned s- and r-processes. Their production is possible in (?, n), (?, p), or (?, ?) photonuclear reactions. In view of this, data on photoneutron reactions play an important role in predicting and describing processes leading to the production of p-nuclei. Interest in determining cross sections for photoneutron reactions in the threshold energy region, which is of particular importance for astrophysics, has grown substantially in recent years. The use of modern sources of quasimonoenergetic photons obtained in processes of inverse Compton laser-radiation scattering on relativistic electronsmakes it possible to reveal rather interesting special features of respective cross sections, manifestations of pygmy E1 and M1 resonances, or the production of nuclei in isomeric states, on one hand, and to revisit the problem of systematic discrepancies between data on reaction cross sections from experiments of different types, on the other hand. Data obtained on the basis of our new experimental-theoretical approach to evaluating cross sections for partial photoneutron reactions are invoked in considering these problems.

  12. Experimental Neutrino Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher W. Walter

    2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    It's been a remarkable decade in neutrino physics. Ten years ago this summer, at the 1998 neutrino conference in Takayama, the Super-Kamiokande collaboration reported the observation of neutrinos changing flavor, thereby establishing the existence of neutrino mass. A few years later, the SNO experiment solved the long-standing solar neutrino problem demonstrating that it too was due to neutrino oscillation. Just a few years after that, these effects were confirmed and the oscillation parameters were measured with man-made neutrino sources. Now, just in this last year, the same neutrinos which were the source of the 30 year old solar neutrino problem were measured for the first time in a real-time experiment. In this talk, I will explain how a set of experiments, especially ones in the last few years, have established a consistent framework of neutrino physics and also explain some outstanding questions. Finally, I will cover how a set of upcoming experiments hope to address these questions in the coming decade.

  13. SuperGZK neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Berezinsky

    2005-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The sources and fluxes of superGZK neutrinos, $E>10^{20}$ eV, are discussed. The fluxes of {\\em cosmogenic neutrinos}, i.e. those produced by ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) interacting with CMB photons, are calculated in the models, which give the good fit to the observed flux of UHECR. The best fit given in no-evolutionary model with maximum acceleration energy $E_{\\rm max}=1\\times 10^{21}$ eV results in very low flux of superGZK neutrinos an order of magnitude lower than the observed flux of UHECR. The predicted neutrino flux becomes larger and observable by next generation detectors at energies $10^{20} - 10^{21}$ eV in the evolutionary models with $E_{\\rm max}=1\\times 10^{23}$ eV. The largest cosmogenic neutrino flux is given in models with very flat generation spectrum, e.g. $\\propto E^{-2}$. The neutrino energies are naturally high in the models of {\\em superheavy dark matter and topological defects}. Their fluxes can also be higher than those of cosmogenic neutrinos. The largest fluxes are given by {\\em mirror neutrinos}, oscillating into ordinary neutrinos. Their fluxes obey some theoretical upper limit which is very weak, and in practice these fluxes are most efficiently limited now by observations of radio emission from neutrino-induced showers.

  14. MINOS Sterile Neutrino Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koskinen, David Jason; /University Coll. London

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment designed to measure properties of neutrino oscillation. Using a high intensity muon neutrino beam, produced by the Neutrinos at Main Injector (NuMI) complex at Fermilab, MINOS makes two measurements of neutrino interactions. The first measurement is made using the Near Detector situated at Fermilab and the second is made using the Far Detector located in the Soudan Underground laboratory in northern Minnesota. The primary goal of MINOS is to verify, and measure the properties of, neutrino oscillation between the two detectors using the {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} V{sub {tau}} transition. A complementary measurement can be made to search for the existence of sterile neutrinos; an oft theorized, but experimentally unvalidated particle. The following thesis will show the results of a sterile neutrino search using MINOS RunI and RunII data totaling {approx}2.5 x 10{sup 20} protons on target. Due to the theoretical nature of sterile neutrinos, complete formalism that covers transition probabilities for the three known active states with the addition of a sterile state is also presented.

  15. On the origin of IceCube's PeV neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cholis, Ilias; Hooper, Dan, E-mail: cholis@fnal.gov, E-mail: dhooper@fnal.gov [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The IceCube collaboration has recently reported the observation of two events with energies in excess of 1 PeV. While an atmospheric origin of these events cannot be ruled out at this time, this pair of showers may potentially represent the first observation of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos. In this paper, we argue that if these events are neutrino-induced, then the neutrinos are very likely to have been produced via photo-meson interactions taking place in the same class of astrophysical objects that are responsible for the acceleration of the ? 10{sup 17} eV cosmic ray spectrum. Among the proposed sources of such cosmic rays, gamma-ray bursts stand out as particularly capable of generating PeV neutrinos at the level implied by IceCube's two events. In contrast, the radiation fields in typical active galactic nuclei models are likely dominated by lower energy (UV) photons, and thus feature higher energy thresholds for pion production, leading to neutrino spectra which peak at EeV rather than PeV energies (models with significant densities of x-ray emission, however, could evade this problem). Cosmogenic neutrinos generated from the propagation of ultra-high energy cosmic rays similarly peak at energies that are much higher than those of the events reported by IceCube.

  16. EA-1943: Long Baseline Neutrino Facility/Deep Underground Neutrino...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DUNE) at Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois and the Sanford Underground Research Facility, Lead, South Dakota EA-1943: Long Baseline Neutrino FacilityDeep Underground Neutrino...

  17. Acquiring information about neutrino parameters by detecting supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Ming-Yang; Guo, Xin-Heng [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Young, Bing-Lin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 5001 (United States); Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the supernova shock effects, the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effects, the collective effects, and the Earth matter effects in the detection of type II supernova neutrinos on the Earth. It is found that the event number of supernova neutrinos depends on the neutrino mass hierarchy, the neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 13}, and neutrino masses. Therefore, we propose possible methods to identify the mass hierarchy and acquire information about {theta}{sub 13} and neutrino masses by detecting supernova neutrinos. We apply these methods to some current neutrino experiments.

  18. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    call 911 on the internal phones (or 252-1911 on cell phones) Safety Tom Mullen, Physics Division Safety Engineer. Please Note: If you have any comments or concerns regarding...

  19. Director, Division of Investigations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is looking for an experienced, highly skilled executive to serve as Director of the Division of Investigations (DOI) in the Office of Enforcement (OE). The...

  20. Division Student Liaisons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    None Fire Protection (FP-DO) Robert J. Farris (Rob) 667-9045 sirraf@lanl.gov K493 Nuclear Criticality Safety None Operations Support Division (OS-DO) None Radiological...

  1. Guidance Systems Division ,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Oockec No. 10-0772 22 OCT 1981 Bcndlx CorporaLion ' Guidance Systems Division , ATTN: Mr. Wf 11 la,,, Hnrr,,or Manngar, PlanL Englne0rtny Teterboro, New Jersey 07608 uwm STATES...

  2. Neutrino Decay and Solar Neutrino Seasonal Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Picoreti, R; de Holanda, P C; Peres, O L G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the possibility of solar neutrino decay as a sub-leading effect on their propagation between production and detection. Using current oscillation data, we set a new lower bound to the $\

  3. Physics of Massive Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. F. Valle

    2004-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    I summarize the present status of global analyses of neutrino oscillations, including the most recent KamLAND and K2K data, as well as the latest solar and atmospheric neutrino fluxes. I give the allowed ranges of the three--flavour oscillation parameters from the current worlds' global neutrino data sample, their best fit values and discuss the small parameters DeltaM_solar/DeltaM_atm and sin^2 theta_13, which characterize the strength of CP violation in neutrino oscillations. I briefly discuss neutrinoless double beta decay and the LSND neutrino oscillation hint, as well as the robustness of the neutrino oscillation results in the presence of non-standard physics.

  4. Massive neutrinos and cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien Lesgourgues; Sergio Pastor

    2006-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present experimental results on neutrino flavour oscillations provide evidence for non-zero neutrino masses, but give no hint on their absolute mass scale, which is the target of beta decay and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. Crucial complementary information on neutrino masses can be obtained from the analysis of data on cosmological observables, such as the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background or the distribution of large-scale structure. In this review we describe in detail how free-streaming massive neutrinos affect the evolution of cosmological perturbations. We summarize the current bounds on the sum of neutrino masses that can be derived from various combinations of cosmological data, including the most recent analysis by the WMAP team. We also discuss how future cosmological experiments are expected to be sensitive to neutrino masses well into the sub-eV range.

  5. Solar neutrino detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lino Miramonti

    2009-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 40 years ago, neutrinos where conceived as a way to test the validity of the solar models which tell us that stars are powered by nuclear fusion reactions. The first measurement of the neutrino flux, in 1968 in the Homestake mine in South Dakota, detected only one third of the expected value, originating what has been known as the Solar Neutrino Problem. Different experiments were built in order to understand the origin of this discrepancy. Now we know that neutrinos undergo oscillation phenomenon changing their nature traveling from the core of the Sun to our detectors. In the work the 40 year long saga of the neutrino detection is presented; from the first proposals to test the solar models to last real time measurements of the low energy part of the neutrino spectrum.

  6. Neutrino mass matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strobel, E.L.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Given the many conflicting experimental results, examination is made of the neutrino mass matrix in order to determine possible masses and mixings. It is assumed that the Dirac mass matrix for the electron, muon, and tau neutrinos is similar in form to those of the quarks and charged leptons, and that the smallness of the observed neutrino masses results from the Gell-Mann-Ramond-Slansky mechanism. Analysis of masses and mixings for the neutrinos is performed using general structures for the Majorana mass matrix. It is shown that if certain tentative experimental results concerning the neutrino masses and mixing angles are confirmed, significant limitations may be placed on the Majorana mass matrix. The most satisfactory simple assumption concerning the Majorana mass matrix is that it is approximately proportional to the Dirac mass matrix. A very recent experimental neutrino mass result and its implications are discussed. Some general properties of matrices with structure similar to the Dirac mass matrices are discussed.

  7. Neutrinos and Collider Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank F. Deppisch; P. S. Bhupal Dev; Apostolos Pilaftsis

    2015-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the collider phenomenology of neutrino physics and the synergetic aspects at energy, intensity and cosmic frontiers to test the new physics behind the neutrino mass mechanism. In particular, we focus on seesaw models within the minimal setup as well as with extended gauge and/or Higgs sectors, and on supersymmetric neutrino mass models with seesaw mechanism and with $R$-parity violation. In the simplest Type-I seesaw scenario with sterile neutrinos, we summarize and update the current experimental constraints on the sterile neutrino mass and its mixing with the active neutrinos. We also discuss the future experimental prospects of testing the seesaw mechanism at colliders and in related low-energy searches for rare processes, such as lepton flavor violation and neutrinoless double beta decay. The implications of the discovery of lepton number violation at the LHC for leptogenesis are also studied.

  8. Neutrinos and Collider Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deppisch, Frank F; Pilaftsis, Apostolos

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the collider phenomenology of neutrino physics and the synergetic aspects at energy, intensity and cosmic frontiers to test the new physics behind the neutrino mass mechanism. In particular, we focus on seesaw models within the minimal setup as well as with extended gauge and/or Higgs sectors, and on supersymmetric neutrino mass models with seesaw mechanism and with $R$-parity violation. In the simplest Type-I seesaw scenario with sterile neutrinos, we summarize and update the current experimental constraints on the sterile neutrino mass and its mixing with the active neutrinos. We also discuss the future experimental prospects of testing the seesaw mechanism at colliders and in related low-energy searches for rare processes, such as lepton flavor violation and neutrinoless double beta decay. The implications of the discovery of lepton number violation at the LHC for leptogenesis are also studied.

  9. Neutrino Oscillation Studies with Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petr Vogel; Liangjian Wen; Chao Zhang

    2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective, and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavors are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

  10. Neutrino Oscillation Studies with Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petr Vogel; Liangjian Wen; Chao Zhang

    2015-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective, and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavors are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

  11. Neutrino Oscillation Studies with Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Petr; Zhang, Chao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective, and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavors are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

  12. Neutrinos from Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen; G. Jaczko

    1996-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the detection of neutrinos from a typical gamma ray burst requires a kilometer-scale detector. We argue that large bursts should be visible with the neutrino telescopes under construction. We emphasize the 3 techniques by which neutrino telescopes can perform this search: by triggering on i) bursts of muons from muon neutrinos, ii) muons from air cascades initiated by high energy gamma rays and iii) showers made by relatively low energy ($\\simeq 100\\,\\mev$) electron neutrinos. Timing of neutrino-photon coincidences may yield a measurement of the neutrino mass to order $10^{-5}$~eV, an interesting range in light of the solar neutrino anomaly.

  13. Neutrino oscillation studies with reactors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vogel, P. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States). Kellog Radiation Lab.; Wen, L.J. [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics (IHEP); Zhang, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavours are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades, reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle ?13. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

  14. Neutrinos: Nature's Ghosts?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Dr. Don Lincoln introduces one of the most fascinating inhabitants of the subatomic realm: the neutrino. Neutrinos are ghosts of the microworld, almost not interacting at all. In this video, he describes some of their properties and how they were discovered. Studies of neutrinos are expected to be performed at many laboratories across the world and to form one of the cornerstones of the Fermilab research program for the next decade or more.

  15. Neutrinos: Nature's Ghosts?

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Dr. Don Lincoln introduces one of the most fascinating inhabitants of the subatomic realm: the neutrino. Neutrinos are ghosts of the microworld, almost not interacting at all. In this video, he describes some of their properties and how they were discovered. Studies of neutrinos are expected to be performed at many laboratories across the world and to form one of the cornerstones of the Fermilab research program for the next decade or more.

  16. High Energy Neutrino Astronomy: Towards Kilometer-Scale Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    2001-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Of all high-energy particles, only neutrinos can directly convey astronomical information from the edge of the universe---and from deep inside the most cataclysmic high-energy processes. Copiously produced in high-energy collisions, travelling at the velocity of light, and not deflected by magnetic fields, neutrinos meet the basic requirements for astronomy. Their unique advantage arises from a fundamental property: they are affected only by the weakest of nature's forces (but for gravity) and are therefore essentially unabsorbed as they travel cosmological distances between their origin and us. Many of the outstanding mysteries of astrophysics may be hidden from our sight at all wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum because of absorption by matter and radiation between us and the source. For example, the hot dense regions that form the central engines of stars and galaxies are opaque to photons. In other cases, such as supernova remnants, gamma ray bursters, and active galaxies, all of which may involve compact objects or black holes at their cores, the precise origin of the high-energy photons emerging from their surface regions is uncertain. Therefore, data obtained through a variety of observational windows---and especially through direct observations with neutrinos---may be of cardinal importance. In this talk, the scientific goals of high energy neutrino astronomy and the technical aspects of water and ice Cherenkov detectors are examined, and future experimental possibilities, including a kilometer-square deep ice neutrino telescope, are explored.

  17. Progress in ultra high energy neutrino experiments using radio techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Jiali [Physics department, Kunming University, Kunming, 650214 (China); Tiedt, Douglas [Physics department, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD, 57701-3995 (United States)

    2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Studying the source of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) can provide important clues on the understanding of UHE particle physics, astrophysics, and other extremely energetic phenomena in the universe. However, charged CR particles are deflected by magnetic fields and can not point back to the source. Furthermore, UHECR charged particles above the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) cutoff (about 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} eV) suffer severe energy loss due to the interaction with the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR). Consequently almost all the information carried by CR particles about their origin is lost. Neutrinos, which are neutral particles and have extremely weak interactions with other materials can arrive at the earth without deflection and absorption. Therefore UHE neutrinos can be traced back to the place where they are produced. Due to their weak interaction and ultra high energies (thus extremely low flux) the detection of UHE neutrinos requires a large collecting area and massive amounts of material. Cherenkov detection at radio frequency, which has long attenuation lengths and can travel freely in natural dense medium (ice, rock and salt et al), can fulfill the detection requirement. Many UHE neutrino experiments are being performed by radio techniques using natural ice, lunar, and salt as detection mediums. These experiments have obtained much data about radio production, propagation and detection, and the upper limit of UHE neutrino flux.

  18. Dynamics of low-energy nuclear forces and Solar Neutrino Problems in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model of light nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. N. Ivanov; H. Oberhummer; N. I. Troitskaya; M. Faber

    2000-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Neutrino Problems (SNP's) are analysed in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model of light nuclei. In this model a possible clue to the solution of the SNP's is in the reduction of the solar neutrino fluxes relative to the predicted by the Standard Solar Model through the decrease of the solar core temperature. The former can be realized through the enhancement of the astrophysical factor for the solar proton burning. The enhancement the upper bound of which is restricted by the helioseismological data goes dynamically via the contribution of the nucleon tensor current coupled to the deuteron. The agreement of the reduced solar neutrino fluxes with the experimental data can be reached within a scenario of vacuum two-flavour neutrino oscillations without a fine tuning of the neutrino-flavour oscillation parameters. In the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model of light nuclei an enhancement of the astrophysical factor for the solar proton burning entails a change of the cross sections for neutrino and anti-neutrino disintegration of the deuteron at low energies. This provides a theoretical foundation for a new check of a value of the astrophysical factor in terrestrial laboratories.

  19. On the Solar Neutrino Problems, SNO experimental data and low-energy nuclear forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. N. Ivanov; H. Oberhummer; N. I. Troitskaya

    2002-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Neutrino Problems (SNP's) are analysed within the Standard Solar Model (BP2000) supplemented by the reduction of the solar neutrino fluxes through the decrease of the solar core temperature. The former can be realized through the enhancement of the astrophysical factor for solar proton burning. The enhancement, the upper bound of which is restricted by the helioseismological data, goes dynamically due to low-energy nuclear forces described at the quantum field theoretic level. The agreement of the reduced solar neutrino fluxes with the experimental data is obtained within the scenario of vacuum two-flavour neutrino oscillations. We show that by fitting the mean value of the solar neutrino flux measured by HOMESTAKE Collaboration we predict the high energy solar neutrino flux measured by SNO Collaboration Phi(SNO(Boron))_th = 1.84 X 10^6 cm^(-2) s^(-1) in good agreement with the experimental value Phi(SNO(Boron))_exp = 1.75(0.14) X 10^6 cm^(-2) s^(-1) obtained via the measurement of the rate of reaction nu_e + D -> p + p + electron produced by boron solar neutrinos. The theoretical flux for low-energy neutrino flux measured by GALLIUM (GALLEX, GNO and SAGE) Collaborations S(Ga)_th = 65 SNU agrees with the experimental data averaged over experiments S(Ga)_exp = 75.6(4.8) SNU.

  20. Neutrino Data from IceCube and its Predecessor at the South Pole, the Antarctic Muon and Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Abbasi, R.

    IceCube is a neutrino observatory for astrophysics with parts buried below the surface of the ice at the South Pole and an air-shower detector array exposed above. The international group of sponsors, led by the National Science Foundation (NSF), that designed and implemented the experiment intends for IceCube to operate and provide data for 20 years. IceCube records the interactions produced by astrophysical neutrinos with energies above 100 GeV, observing the Cherenkov radiation from charged particles produced in neutrino interactions. Its goal is to discover the sources of high-energy cosmic rays. These sources may be active galactic nuclei (AGNs) or massive, collapsed stars where black holes have formed.[Taken from http://www.icecube.wisc.edu/] The data from IceCube's predecessor experiment and detector, AMANDA, IceCube’s predecessor detector and experiment is also available at this website. AMANDA pioneered neutrino detection in ice. Over a period of years in the 1990s, detecting “strings” were buried and activated and by 2000, AMANDA was successfully recording an average of 1,000 neutrino events per year. This site also makes available many images and video from the two experiments.

  1. Kinetics of Oscillating Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Strack

    2005-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In the context of core-collapse supernovae, Strack and Burrows (Phys. Rev. D 71, 093004 (2005)) have recently developed an extension of the classical Boltzmann kinetic formalism that retains all the standard neutrino oscillation phenomenology, including resonant flavor conversion (the MSW effect), neutrino self-interactions, and the interplay between neutrino-matter coupling and flavor oscillations. In this thesis, I extend the Strack & Burrows formalism to incorporate general relativity, spin degrees of freedom, and a possible neutrino magnetic-moment/magnetic-field interaction.

  2. Neutrino-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallagher, H.; /Tufts U.; Garvey, G.; /Los Alamos; Zeller, G.P.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of neutrino oscillations has necessitated a new generation of neutrino experiments that are exploring neutrino-nuclear scattering processes. We focus in particular on charged-current quasi-elastic scattering, a particularly important channel that has been extensively investigated both in the bubble-chamber era and by current experiments. Recent results have led to theoretical reexamination of this process. We review the standard picture of quasi-elastic scattering as developed in electron scattering, review and discuss experimental results, and discuss additional nuclear effects such as exchange currents and short-range correlations that may play a significant role in neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  3. Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting with an historical review, I summarize the status of calculations of the flux of atmospheric neutrinos and how they compare to measurements.

  4. Composite Dirac Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuval Grossman; Dean J Robinson

    2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a mechanism that naturally produces light Dirac neutrinos. The basic idea is that the right-handed neutrinos are composite. Any realistic composite model must involve `hidden flavor' chiral symmetries. In general some of these symmetries may survive confinement, and in particular, one of them manifests itself at low energy as an exact $B-L$ symmetry. Dirac neutrinos are therefore produced. The neutrinos are naturally light due to compositeness. In general, sterile states are present in the model, some of them can naturally be warm dark matter candidates.

  5. Astrophysical thermonuclear functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William J. Anderson; Hans J. Haubold; Arak Mathai Mathai

    1993-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Stars are gravitationally stabilized fusion reactors changing their chemical composition while transforming light atomic nuclei into heavy ones. The atomic nuclei are supposed to be in thermal equilibrium with the ambient plasma. The majority of reactions among nuclei leading to a nuclear transformation are inhibited by the necessity for the charged participants to tunnel through their mutual Coulomb barrier. As theoretical knowledge and experimental verification of nuclear cross sections increases it becomes possible to refine analytic representations for nuclear reaction rates. Over the years various approaches have been made to derive closed-form representations of thermonuclear reaction rates (Critchfield 1972, Haubold and John 1978, Haubold, Mathai and Anderson 1987). They show that the reaction rate contains the astrophysical cross section factor and its derivatives which has to be determined experimentally, and an integral part of the thermonuclear reaction rate independent from experimental results which can be treated by closed-form representation techniques in terms of generalized hypergeometric functions. In this paper mathematical/statistical techniques for deriving closed-form representations of thermonuclear functions will be summarized and numerical results for them will be given. The separation of thermonuclear functions from thermonuclear reaction rates is our preferred result. The purpose of the paper is also to compare numerical results for approximate and closed-form representations of thermonuclear functions. This paper completes the work of Haubold, Mathai, and Anderson (1987).

  6. Neutrino and anti-neutrino transport in accretion disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhen Pan; Ye-Fei Yuan

    2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We numerically solve the one dimensional Boltzmann equation of the neutrino and anti-neutrino transport in accretion disks and obtain the fully energy dependent and direction dependent neutrino and anti-neutrino emitting spectra, under condition that the distribution of the mass density,temperature and chemical components are given. Then, we apply the resulting neutrino and anti-neutrino emitting spectra to calculate the corresponding annihilation rate of neutrino pairs above the neutrino dominated accretion disk and find that the released energy resulting from the annihilation of neutrino pairs can not provide sufficient energy for the most energetic short gamma ray bursts whose isotropic luminosity can be as high as $10^{52}$ ergs/s unless the high temperature zone where the temperature is beyond 10 MeV can stretch over 200 km in the disk. We also compare the resulting luminosity of neutrinos and anti-neutrinos with the results from the two commonly used approximate treatment of the neutrino and anti-neutrino luminosity: the Fermi-Dirac black body limit and a simplified model of neutrino transport, i.e., the gray body model, and find that both of them overestimate the neutrino/anti-neutrino luminosity and their annihilation rate greatly. Additionally, as did in Sawyer (2003), we also check the validity of the two stream approximation, and find that it is a good approximation to high accuracy.

  7. Cosmological Neutrino Mass Detection: The Best Probe of Neutrino Lifetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serpico, Pasquale D. [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510-0500 (United States)

    2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Future cosmological data may be sensitive to the effects of a finite sum of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a cosmological detection of neutrino mass at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence, on neutrino secret interactions with (quasi)massless particles as in Majoron models. On the other hand, neutrino decay may provide a way out to explain a discrepancy < or approx. 0.1 eV between cosmic neutrino bounds and lab data.

  8. Cosmological neutrino mass detection: The Best probe of neutrino lifetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future cosmological data may be sensitive to the effects of a finite sum of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a cosmological detection of neutrino mass at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence on neutrino secret interactions with (quasi-)massless particles as in majoron models. On the other hand, neutrino decay may provide a way-out to explain a discrepancy {approx}< 0.1 eV between cosmic neutrino bounds and Lab data.

  9. Neutrino oscillations: another physics?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. N. Vergeles

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the neutrino oscillations phenomenon may be attributed to the Wilson fermion doubling phenomenon. The Wilson fermion doubling exists only on the lattices, both periodic and non-periodic (simplicial complexes). Just the last case plays a key role here. Thereby, the neutrino oscillations may show for the existence of a space-time granularity.

  10. Neutrino Oscillations and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Dolgov

    2000-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Phenomenology of neutrino oscillations in vacuum and in cosmological plasma is considered. Neutrino oscillations in vacuum are usually described in plane wave approximation. In this formalism there is an ambiguity if one should assume $\\delta p =0$ and correspondingly $\\delta E\

  11. Neutrino oscillations: another physics?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vergeles, S N

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the neutrino oscillations phenomenon may be attributed to the Wilson fermion doubling phenomenon. The Wilson fermion doubling exists only on the lattices, both periodic and non-periodic (simplicial complexes). Just the last case plays a key role here. Thereby, the neutrino oscillations may show for the existence of a space-time granularity.

  12. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hime, A.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A report is given on the status of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, presently under construction in the Creighton nickel mine near Sudbury, Ontario in Canada. Focus is upon the technical factors involving a measurement of the charged-current and neutral-current interactions of solar neutrinos on deuterium.

  13. Reactor Monitoring with Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Cribier

    2007-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental knowledge on neutrinos acquired in the recent years open the possibility of applied neutrino physics. Among it the automatic and non intrusive monitoring of nuclear reactor by its antineutrino signal could be very valuable to IAEA in charge of the control of nuclear power plants. Several efforts worldwide have already started.

  14. Impact of Neutrino Oscillation Measurements on Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was an amazing year in neutrino physics. Before March, thetheorists have a very good track record in neutrino physics.results from neutrino oscillation physics had surprised

  15. Mass Hierarchy via Mossbauer and Reactor Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen Parke; Hisakazu Minakata; Hiroshi Nunokawa; Renata Zukanovich Funchal

    2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how one could determine the neutrino mass hierarchy with Mossbauer neutrinos and also revisit the question of whether the hierarchy can be determined with reactor neutrinos.

  16. Mass Hierarchy via Mossbauer and Reactor Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parke, Stephen; Nunokawa, Hiroshi; Funchal, Renata Zukanovich

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how one could determine the neutrino mass hierarchy with Mossbauer neutrinos and also revisit the question of whether the hierarchy can be determined with reactor neutrinos.

  17. Neutrino oscillations and dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Zuber

    1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The significance of light massive neutrinos as hot dark matter is outlined. The power of neutrino oscillation experiments with respect to detect such neutrinos in the eV-region is discussed. Present hints for neutrino oscillations in solar, atmospheric and LSND data are reviewed as well as future experiments and their potential.

  18. The ANTARES Neutrino Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perrina, Chiara

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At about 40 km off the coast of Toulon (France), anchored at 2475 m deep in the Mediterranean Sea, there is ANTARES: the first undersea neutrino telescope and the only one currently operating. The detector consists of 885 photomultiplier tubes arranged into 12 strings of 450-metres high, with the aim to detect the Cherenkov light induced by the charged superluminal interaction products of neutrinos. Its main scientific target is the search for high-energy (TeV and beyond) neutrinos from cosmic accelerators, as predicted by hadronic interaction models, and the measurement of the cosmic neutrino diffuse flux, focusing in particular on events coming from below the horizon (up-going events) in order to significantly reduce the atmospheric muons background. Thanks to the development of a strategy for the identification of neutrinos coming from above the horizon (down-going events) the field of view of the telescope will be extended.

  19. Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Cao

    2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

  20. Physics & Astrophysics press.princeton.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    Physics & Astrophysics 2013 press.princeton.edu #12;in a nutshell 1 in a nutshell 2 princeton frontiers in physics 3 textbooks 7 astronomy & astrophysics 10 princeton series in astrophysics 12 physics 15 princeton series in physics 16 quantum physics 17 condensed matter 18 mathematics, mathematical

  1. nuclear data for astrophysics resources, challenges, strategies,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    nuclear data for astrophysics resources, challenges, strategies, michael smith, eric lingerfelt tytler univ. california san diego san diego, california, usa #12;·nuclear astrophysics is an exciting Observation [RXTE GS1826-24] ·understanding of many fascinating astrophysical phenomena rely on input nuclear

  2. Nuclear astrophysics and electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwenk, A. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt, Germany and ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron beams provide important probes and constraints for nuclear astrophysics. This is especially exciting at energies within the regime of chiral effective field theory (EFT), which provides a systematic expansion for nuclear forces and electroweak operators based on quantum chromodynamics. This talk discusses some recent highlights and future directions based on chiral EFT, including nuclear structure and reactions for astrophysics, the neutron skin and constraints for the properties of neutron-rich matter in neutron stars and core-collapse supernovae, and the dark matter response of nuclei.

  3. Warp propagation in astrophysical discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Chris

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Astrophysical discs are often warped, that is, their orbital planes change with radius. This occurs whenever there is a non-axisymmetric force acting on the disc, for example the Lense-Thirring precession induced by a misaligned spinning black hole, or the gravitational pull of a misaligned companion. Such misalignments appear to be generic in astrophysics. The wide range of systems that can harbour warped discs - protostars, X-ray binaries, tidal disruption events, quasars and others - allows for a rich variety in the disc's response. Here we review the basic physics of warped discs and its implications.

  4. Neutrino-neutrino interactions in a supernova and their effect on neutrino flavor conversions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dighe, Amol [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutrino-neutrino interactions inside a supernova core give rise to nonlinear collective effects that significantly influence the neutrino flavor conversions inside the star. I shall describe these interactions, the new oscillation phenomena they generate, and their effect on the neutrino fluxes arriving at the earth.

  5. Chemistry Division Department of Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    1 Chemistry Division Department of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Illinois Institute-13 Chemistry Division invites nominations for Kilpatrick Fellowship for the academic year 2012's Chemistry Department from 1947­1960. Mary Kilpatrick was a chemistry faculty member from 1947

  6. Superconducting Magnet Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Superconducting Magnet Division MAGNETIC DESIGN OF E-LENS SOLENOID AND CORRECTOR SYSTEM FOR RHIC* R.6 A gun collectors gun Combined Horizontal and Vertical Corrector Design Both types of dipole correctors. Gupta, M. Anerella, W. Fischer, G. Ganetis, X. Gu, A. Ghosh, A. Jain, P. Kovach, A. Marone, S. Plate, A

  7. Solid State Division

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M. (eds.)

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains brief discussions on work done in the Solid State Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The topics covered are: Theoretical Solid State Physics; Neutron scattering; Physical properties of materials; The synthesis and characterization of materials; Ion beam and laser processing; and Structure of solids and surfaces. (LSP)

  8. integration division Human Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    integration division Human Systems Eye-Movement Metrics: Non-Intrusive Quantitative Tools for Monitoring Human Visual Performance Objective Approach Impact A reliable quantitative yet non-intrusive methodologies that provide quantitative yet non-intrusive measures of human visual performance for use

  9. IceCube - A New Detector for Neutrino Astronomy and Particle Astrosphysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKay, Timothy (University of Michigan) [University of Michigan

    2008-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    IceCube, currently under construction at the South Pole, will be a gigaton detector for high-energy neutrinos and muons. Half of the 5000 optical modules that make up IceCube are now installed in the ice and taking data. The main goal is to find high-energy neutrinos from distant astrophysical sources such as active galactic nuclei and exploding massive stars. I will describe how the detector works, show some current results and discuss status and future plans for the project.

  10. Security Division 2007 Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computer Security Division 2007 Annual Report #12;TAble of ConTenTS Welcome Division Organization The Computer Security Division Responds to the Federal Information Security Management Act of 2002 Security Information Technology 15 Security Testing and Metrics 17 Validation Programs and Laboratory Accreditation 17

  11. Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences Division

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computing CCS Division Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences Division Computational physics, computer science, applied mathematics, statistics and the integration of...

  12. Underwater Acoustic Detection of Ultra High Energy Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Niess; V. Bertin

    2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the acoustic detection method of 10^18-20 eV neutrinos in a Mediterranean Sea environment. The acoustic signal is re-evaluated according to dedicated cascade simulations and a complex phase dependant absorption model, and compared to previous studies. We detail the evolution of the acoustic signal as function of the primary shower characteristics and of the acoustic propagation range. The effective volume of detection for a single hydrophone is given taking into account the limitations due to sea bed and surface boundaries as well as refraction effects. For this 'benchmark detector' we present sensitivity limits to astrophysical neutrino fluxes, from which sensitivity bounds for a larger acoustic detector can be derived. Results suggest that with a limited instrumentation the acoustic method would be more efficient at extreme energies, above 10^20 eV.

  13. Neutrinos: Nature's Identity Thieves?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The oscillation of neutrinos from one variety to another has long been suspected, but was confirmed only about 15 years ago. In order for these oscillations to occur, neutrinos must have a mass, no matter how slight. Since neutrinos have long been thought to be massless, in a very real way, this phenomena is a clear signal of physics beyond the known. In this video, Fermilab's Dr Don Lincoln explains how we know it occurs and hints at the rich experimental program at several international laboratories designed to understand this complex mystery.

  14. Neutrinos: Nature's Identity Thieves?

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The oscillation of neutrinos from one variety to another has long been suspected, but was confirmed only about 15 years ago. In order for these oscillations to occur, neutrinos must have a mass, no matter how slight. Since neutrinos have long been thought to be massless, in a very real way, this phenomena is a clear signal of physics beyond the known. In this video, Fermilab's Dr Don Lincoln explains how we know it occurs and hints at the rich experimental program at several international laboratories designed to understand this complex mystery.

  15. Neutrinos: Nature's Identity Thieves?

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dr. Don Lincoln

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The oscillation of neutrinos from one variety to another has long been suspected, but was confirmed only about 15 years ago. In order for these oscillations to occur, neutrinos must have a mass, no matter how slight. Since neutrinos have long been thought to be massless, in a very real way, this phenomena is a clear signal of physics beyond the known. In this video, Fermilab's Dr Don Lincoln explains how we know it occurs and hints at the rich experimental program at several international laboratories designed to understand this complex mystery.

  16. Reactor Neutrino Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Cao

    2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Precisely measuring $\\theta_{13}$ is one of the highest priority in neutrino oscillation study. Reactor experiments can cleanly determine $\\theta_{13}$. Past reactor neutrino experiments are reviewed and status of next precision $\\theta_{13}$ experiments are presented. Daya Bay is designed to measure $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}$ to better than 0.01 and Double Chooz and RENO are designed to measure it to 0.02-0.03. All are heading to full operation in 2010. Recent improvements in neutrino moment measurement are also briefed.

  17. Majorana neutrino superfluidity and stability of neutrino dark energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhatt, Jitesh R.; Sarkar, Utpal [Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad 380009 (India)

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that Majorana neutrinos can form Cooper pairs due to long-range attractive forces and show BCS superfluidity in a class of mass varying neutrino dark energy models. We describe the condensates for Majorana neutrinos and estimate the value of the gap, critical temperature, and Pippard coherence length for a simple neutrino dark energy model. In the strong coupling regime bosonic degree of freedom can become important, and Bose-Einstein condensate may govern the dynamics for the mass varying neutrino models. Formation of the condensates can significantly alter the instability scenario in the mass varying neutrino models.

  18. Neutrino Masses in Astroparticle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Raffelt

    2002-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The case for small neutrino mass differences from atmospheric and solar neutrino oscillation experiments has become compelling, but leaves the overall neutrino mass scale m_nu undetermined. The most restrictive limit of m_nu neutrinos. If solar neutrino oscillations indeed correspond to the favored large mixing angle MSW solution, then big-bang nucleosynthesis gives us a restrictive limit on all neutrino chemical potentials, removing the previous uncertainty of n_nu. Therefore, a possible future measurement of m_nu will directly establish the cosmic neutrino mass fraction Omega_nu. Cosmological neutrinos with sub-eV masses can play an interesting role for producing the highest-energy cosmic rays (Z-burst scenario). Sub-eV masses also relate naturally to leptogenesis scenarios of the cosmic baryon asymmetry. Unfortunately, the time-of-flight dispersion of a galactic or local-group supernova neutrino burst is not sensitive in the sub-eV range.

  19. Berry Phase in Neutrino Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao-Gang He; Xue-Qian Li; Bruce H. J. McKellar; Yue Zhang

    2005-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the Berry phase in neutrino oscillations for both Dirac and Majorana neutrinos. In order to have a Berry phase, the neutrino oscillations must occur in a varying medium, the neutrino-background interactions must depend on at least two independent densities, and also there must be CP violation if the neutrino interactions with matter are mediated only by the standard model W and Z boson exchanges which implies that there must be at least three generations of neutrinos. The CP violating Majorana phases do not play a role in generating a Berry phase. We show that a natural way to satisfy the conditions for the generation of a Berry phase is to have sterile neutrinos with active-sterile neutrino mixing, in which case at least two active and one sterile neutrinos are required. If there are additional new CP violating flavor changing interactions, it is also possible to have a non-zero Berry phase with just two generations.

  20. Neutrino Emission from Gamma-Ray Burst Fireballs, Revised

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svenja Hümmer; Philipp Baerwald; Walter Winter

    2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the neutrino flux from gamma-ray bursts, which is estimated from gamma-ray observations and used for the interpretation of recent IceCube data, from a particle physics perspective. We numerically calculate the neutrino flux for the same astrophysical assumptions as the analytical fireball neutrino model, including the dominant pion and kaon production modes, flavor mixing, and magnetic field effects on the secondary muons, pions, and kaons. We demonstrate that taking into account the full energy dependencies of all spectra, the normalization of the expected neutrino flux reduces by about one order of magnitude and the spectrum shifts to higher energies, where we can pin down the exact origin of the discrepancies by the re-computation of the analytical models. We also reproduce the IceCube-40 analysis for exactly the same bursts and same assumptions and illustrate the impact of uncertainties. We conclude that the baryonic loading of the fireballs, which is an important control parameter for the emission of cosmic rays, can be constrained significantly with the full-scale experiment after about ten years.

  1. Constraining the neutrino magnetic dipole moment from white dwarf pulsations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Córsico, Alejandro H; Bertolami, Marcelo M Miller; Kepler, S O; García-Berro, Enrique

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulsating white dwarf stars can be used as astrophysical laboratories to constrain the properties of weakly interacting particles. Comparing the cooling rates of these stars with the expected values from theoretical models allows us to search for additional sources of cooling due to the emission of axions, neutralinos, or neutrinos with magnetic dipole moment. In this work, we derive an upper bound to the neutrino magnetic dipole moment using an estimate of the rate of period change of the pulsating DB white dwarf star PG 1351+489. By comparing the theoretical rate of change of period expected for this star with the rate of change of period with time of PG 1351+489, we assess the possible existence of additional cooling by neutrinos with magnetic dipole moment. Our models suggest the existence of some additional cooling in this pulsating DB white dwarf, consistent with a non-zero magnetic dipole moment. Our upper limit for the neutrino magnetic dipole moment is somewhat less restrictive than, but still compat...

  2. Neutrino oscillations refitted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forero, D V; Valle, J W F

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we update our previous global fit of neutrino oscillations by including the recent results which have appeared since the Neutrino-2012 conference. These include the measurements of reactor anti-neutrino disappearance reported by Daya Bay and RENO, together with latest T2K and MINOS data including both disappearance and appearance channels. We also include the revised results from the third solar phase of Super-Kamiokande, SK-III, as well as new solar results from the fourth phase of Super-Kamiokande, SK-IV. We find that the preferred global determination of the atmospheric angle $\\theta_{23}$ is consistent with maximal mixing. We also determine the impact of the new data upon all the other neutrino oscillation parameters with emphasis on the increasing sensitivity to the CP phase, thanks to the interplay between accelerator and reactor data.

  3. WMAPping out Neutrino Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaron Pierce; Hitoshi Murayama

    2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent data from from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) place important bounds on the neutrino sector. The precise determination of the baryon number in the universe puts a strong constraint on the number of relativistic species during Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis. WMAP data, when combined with the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS), also directly constrain the absolute mass scale of neutrinos. These results impinge upon a neutrino oscillation interpretation of the result from the Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector (LSND). We also note that the Heidelberg--Moscow evidence for neutrinoless double beta decay is only consistent with the WMAP+2dFGRS data for the largest values of the nuclear matrix element.

  4. Two Questions About Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kayser, Boris

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explain why the see-saw picture and leptogenesis make it particularly interesting to find out whether neutrinos are their own antiparticles, and whether their oscillations violate CP.

  5. Electromagnetic properties of massive neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobrynina, A. A., E-mail: aleksandradobrynina@rambler.ru; Mikheev, N. V.; Narynskaya, E. N. [Demidov Yaroslavl State University (Russian Federation)] [Demidov Yaroslavl State University (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The vertex function for a virtual massive neutrino is calculated in the limit of soft real photons. A method based on employing the neutrino self-energy operator in a weak external electromagnetic field in the approximation linear in the field is developed in order to render this calculation of the vertex function convenient. It is shown that the electric charge and the electric dipole moment of the real neutrino are zero; only the magnetic moment is nonzero for massive neutrinos. A fourth-generation heavy neutrino of mass not less than half of the Z-boson mass is considered as a massive neutrino.

  6. Pulsar kicks from neutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Kusenko

    2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino oscillations in a core-collapse supernova may be responsible for the observed rapid motions of pulsars. Given the present bounds on the neutrino masses, the pulsar kicks require a sterile neutrino with mass 2-20 keV and a small mixing with active neutrinos. The same particle can be the cosmological dark matter. Its existence can be confirmed the by the X-ray telescopes if they detect a 1-10 keV photon line from the decays of the relic sterile neutrinos. In addition, one may be able to detect gravity waves from a pulsar being accelerated by neutrinos in the event of a nearby supernova.

  7. Radiochemical solar neutrino experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. N. Gavrin; B. T. Cleveland

    2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiochemical experiments have been crucial to solar neutrino research. Even today, they provide the only direct measurement of the rate of the proton-proton fusion reaction, p + p --> d + e^+ + nu_e, which generates most of the Sun's energy. We first give a little history of radiochemical solar neutrino experiments with emphasis on the gallium experiment SAGE -- the only currently operating detector of this type. The combined result of all data from the Ga experiments is a capture rate of 67.6 +/- 3.7 SNU. For comparison to theory, we use the calculated flux at the Sun from a standard solar model, take into account neutrino propagation from the Sun to the Earth and the results of neutrino source experiments with Ga, and obtain 67.3 ^{+3.9}_{-3.5} SNU. Using the data from all solar neutrino experiments we calculate an electron neutrino pp flux at the earth of (3.41 ^{+0.76}_{-0.77}) x 10^{10}/(cm^2-s), which agrees well with the prediction from a detailed solar model of (3.30 ^{+0.13} _{-0.14}) x 10^{10}/(cm^2-s). Four tests of the Ga experiments have been carried out with very intense reactor-produced neutrino sources and the ratio of observed to calculated rates is 0.88 +/- 0.05. One explanation for this unexpectedly low result is that the cross section for neutrino capture by the two lowest-lying excited states in 71Ge has been overestimated. We end with consideration of possible time variation in the Ga experiments and an enumeration of other possible radiochemical experiments that might have been.

  8. Cosmological and supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kajino, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Aoki, W. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Balantekin, A. B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Cheoun, M.-K. [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Hayakawa, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakara-Shirane 2-4, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hidaka, J. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan and Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kusakabe, M. [School of Liberal Arts and Science, Korea Aerospace University, Goyang 412-791 (Korea, Republic of); Mathews, G. J. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Nakamura, K. [Waseda University, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Pehlivan, Y. [Mimar Sinan GSÜ, Department of Physics, ?i?li, ?stanbul 34380 (Turkey); Suzuki, T. [Nihon University, Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan)

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies are the pillars of modern cosmology. It has recently been suggested that axion which is a dark matter candidate in the framework of the standard model could condensate in the early universe and induce photon cooling before the epoch of the photon last scattering. Although this may render a solution to the overproduction problem of primordial {sup 7}Li abundance, there arises another serious difficulty of overproducing D abundance. We propose a hybrid dark matter model with both axions and relic supersymmetric (SUSY) particles to solve both overproduction problems of the primordial D and {sup 7}Li abundances simultaneously. The BBN also serves to constrain the nature of neutrinos. Considering non-thermal photons produced in the decay of the heavy sterile neutrinos due to the magnetic moment, we explore the cosmological constraint on the strength of neutrino magnetic moment consistent with the observed light element abundances. Core-collapse supernovae eject huge flux of energetic neutrinos which affect explosive nucleosynthesis of rare isotopes like {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta and r-process elements. Several isotopes depend strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. Combining the recent experimental constraints on ?{sub 13} with predicted and observed supernova-produced abundance ratio {sup 11}B/{sup 7}Li encapsulated in the presolar grains from the Murchison meteorite, we show a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. We also discuss supernova relic neutrinos (SRN) that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter and adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  9. Neutrino Interactions with Nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitner, T.; Buss, O.; Mosel, U. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen (Germany); Alvarez-Ruso, L. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Universidad de Valencia-CSIC (Spain)

    2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate neutrino-nucleus collisions at intermediate energies incorporating quasielastic scattering and the excitation of 13 resonances as elementary processes, taking into account medium effects such as Fermi motion, Pauli blocking, mean-field potentials and in-medium spectral functions. A coupled-channel treatment of final state interactions is achieved with the GiBUU transport model. Results for inclusive reactions, neutrino- and electron-induced, as well as for pion production and nucleon knockout are presented.

  10. Neutrino oscillations refitted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. V. Forero; M. Tortola; J. W. F. Valle

    2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we update our previous global fit of neutrino oscillations by including the recent results which have appeared since the Neutrino-2012 conference. These include the measurements of reactor anti-neutrino disappearance reported by Daya Bay and RENO, together with latest T2K and MINOS data including both disappearance and appearance channels. We also include the revised results from the third solar phase of Super-Kamiokande, SK-III, as well as new solar results from the fourth phase of Super-Kamiokande, SK-IV. We find that the preferred global determination of the atmospheric angle $\\theta_{23}$ is consistent with maximal mixing. We also determine the impact of the new data upon all the other neutrino oscillation parameters with emphasis on the increasing sensitivity to the CP phase, thanks to the interplay between accelerator and reactor data. In the appendix we present the updated results obtained after the inclusion of new reactor data presented at the Neutrino 2014 conference. We discuss their impact on the global neutrino analysis.

  11. Physics division annual report 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thayer, K., ed.; Physics

    2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the research performed in the past year in the Argonne Physics Division. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national heavy-ion user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research with beams of heavy ions, accelerator research and development especially in superconducting radio frequency technology, nuclear theory and medium energy nuclear physics. The Division took significant strides forward in its science and its initiatives for the future in the past year. Major progress was made in developing the concept and the technology for the future advanced facility of beams of short-lived nuclei, the Rare Isotope Accelerator. The scientific program capitalized on important instrumentation initiatives with key advances in nuclear science. In 1999, the nuclear science community adopted the Argonne concept for a multi-beam superconducting linear accelerator driver as the design of choice for the next major facility in the field a Rare Isotope Accelerator (WA) as recommended by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 1996 Long Range Plan. Argonne has made significant R&D progress on almost all aspects of the design concept including the fast gas catcher (to allow fast fragmentation beams to be stopped and reaccelerated) that in large part defined the RIA concept the superconducting rf technology for the driver accelerator, the multiple-charge-state concept (to permit the facility to meet the design intensity goals with existing ion-source technology), and designs and tests of high-power target concepts to effectively deal with the full beam power of the driver linac. An NSAC subcommittee recommended the Argonne concept and set as tie design goal Uranium beams of 100-kwatt power at 400 MeV/u. Argonne demonstrated that this goal can be met with an innovative, but technically in-hand, design. The heavy-ion research program focused on GammaSphere, the premier facility for nuclear structure gamma-ray studies. One example of the ground-breaking research with Garnmasphere was the first study of the limits of stability with angular momentum in the shell stabilized nobelium isotopes. It was found that these heaviest nuclei could be formed at surprisingly high angular momentum, providing important new insight into the production mechanisms for super-heavy elements. Another focus continues to be experiments with short-lived beams for critical nuclear astrophysics applications. Measurements revealed that {sup 44}Ti is more readily destroyed in supernovae than was expected. Major progress was made in collecting and storing unstable ions in the Canadian Penning Trap. The technique of stopping and rapidly extracting ions from a helium gas cell led directly to the new paradigm in the production of rare isotope beams that became RIA. ATLAS provided a record 6046 hours of beam use for experiments in FY99. The facility pressed hard to support the heavy demands of the GammaSphere Research program but maintained an operational reliability of 93%. Of the 29 different isotopes provided as beams in FY99, radioactive beams of {sup 44}Ti and {sup 17}F comprised 6% of the beam time. The theoretical efforts in the Division made dramatic new strides in such topics as quantum Monte Carlo calculations of light nuclei to understand microscopic many-body forces in nuclei; QCD calculations based on the Dyson-Schwinger approach which were extended to baryon systems and finite temperatures and densities; the structure of heavy nuclei; and proton decay modes of nuclei far from stability. The medium-energy program continues to focus on new techniques to understand how the quark-gluon structure of matter impacts the structure of nuclei. The HERMES experiment began making measurements of the fraction of the spin of the nucleon carried by the glue. Drell-Yan experiments study the flavor composition of the sea of the proton. Experiments at Jefferson lab search for clues of QCD dynamics at the hadronic level. A major advance in trace isotope analysis was realized with pioneering work on Atom Trap Trace Analysis, exploitin

  12. Sterile Neutrino Fits to Short-Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, J. M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews short-baseline oscillation experiments as interpreted within the context of one, two, and three sterile neutrino models associated with additional neutrino mass states in the ~1?eV range. Appearance and ...

  13. GENIUS project, neutrino oscillations and Cosmology: neutrinos reveal their nature?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Czakon; J. Studnik; M. Zralek; J. Gluza

    2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutrinoless double beta decay as well as any other laboratory experiment has not been able to answer the question of the neutrino's nature. Hints on the answer are available when neutrino oscillations and $(\\beta\\beta)_{0 \

  14. The Neutrino Eye: A Megaton Low Energy Neutrino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Learned, John

    from WIMPS and gamma ray bursts, and upon real time counting of solar neutrinos, are all from sensi­ tivity, and conduct a watch for for neutrino correlates to sporadic phenomenon such as gamma ray bursts. The main thrust would be to detect actual muon neutrino appearance as well as disappearance

  15. Particle Acceleration in Astrophysical Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amato, Elena

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Astrophysical sources are extremely efficient accelerators. Some sources emit photons up to multi-TeV energies, a signature of the presence, within them, of particles with energies much higher than those achievable with the largest accelerators on Earth. Even more compelling evidence comes from the study of Cosmic Rays, charged relativistic particles that reach the Earth with incredibly high energies: at the highest energy end of their spectrum, these subatomic particles are carrying a macroscopic energy, up to a few Joules. Here I will address the best candidate sources and mechanisms as cosmic particle accelerators. I will mainly focus on Galactic sources such as Supernova Remnants and Pulsar Wind Nebulae, which being close and bright, are the best studied among astrophysical accelerators. These sources are held responsible for most of the energy that is put in relativistic particles in the Universe, but they are not thought to accelerate particles up to the highest individual energies, $\\approx 10^{20}$ eV...

  16. Inverted mass hierarchy from scaling in the neutrino mass matrix: Low and high energy phenomenology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blum, A.; Rodejohann, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Postfach 10 39 80, D-69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Mohapatra, R. N. [Department of Physics and Maryland Center for Fundamental Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States) and Sektion Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Theresienstrasse 37a, D-80333 Munich (Germany) and Physik-Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Best-fit values of recent global analyses of neutrino data imply large solar neutrino mixing, vanishing U{sub e3}, and a nonmaximal atmospheric neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 23}. We show that these values emerge naturally by the hypothesis of scaling in the Majorana neutrino mass matrix, which states that the ratios of its elements are equal. It also predicts an inverted hierarchy for the neutrino masses. We point out several advantages and distinguishing tests of the scaling hypothesis compared to the L{sub e}-L{sub {mu}}-L{sub {tau}} flavor symmetry, which is usually assumed to provide an understanding of the inverted hierarchy. Scenarios which have initially vanishing U{sub e3} and maximal atmospheric neutrino mixing are shown to be unlikely to lead to nonmaximal {theta}{sub 23} while simultaneously keeping U{sub e3} zero. We find a peculiar ratio of the branching ratios {mu}{yields}e{gamma} and {tau}{yields}e{gamma} in supersymmetric seesaw frameworks, which only depends on atmospheric neutrino mixing and results in {tau}{yields}e{gamma} being unobservable. The consequences of the scaling hypothesis for high energy astrophysical neutrinos at neutrino telescopes are also investigated. Then we analyze a seesaw model based on the discrete symmetry D{sub 4}xZ{sub 2} leading to scaling in the low energy mass matrix and being capable of generating the baryon asymmetry of the Universe via leptogenesis. The relevant CP phase is identical to the low energy Majorana phase, and successful leptogenesis requires an effective mass for neutrinoless double beta decay larger than 0.045 eV.

  17. Neutrino oscillations beyond two flavours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Kh. Akhmedov

    2002-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    I review some theoretical aspects of neutrino oscillations in the case when more than two neutrino flavours are involved. These include: approximate analytic solutions for 3-flavour (3f) oscillations in matter; matter effects in nu_mu - nu_tau oscillations; 3f effects in oscillations of solar, atmospheric, reactor and supernova neutrinos and in accelerator long-baseline experiments; CP and T violation in neutrino oscillations in vacuum and in matter; the problem of U_{e3}; 4f oscillations.

  18. Neutrino dispersion in magnetized plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. V. Mikheev; E. N. Narynskaya

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutrino dispersion in the charge symmetric magnetized plasma is investigated. We have studied the plasma contribution into the additional energy of neutrino and obtained the simple expression for it. We consider in detail the neutrino self-energy under physical conditions of weak field, moderate field and strong field limits. It is shown that our result for neutrino dispersion in moderate magnetic field differ substantially from the previous one in the literature.

  19. Determining the neutrino mass hierarchy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this proceedings I review the physics that future experiments will use to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  20. Perspectives on neutrino telescopes 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab /Karlsruhe U., TTP

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Remarks at the roundtable on plans for the future at the XIII International Workshop on Neutrino Telescopes.

  1. Neutrino oscillations: theory and phenomenology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Kh. Akhmedov

    2006-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief overview of selected topics in the theory and phenomenology of neutrino oscillations is given. These include: oscillations in vacuum and in matter; phenomenology of 3-flavour neutrino oscillations and effective 2-flavour approximations; CP and T violation in neutrino oscillations in vacuum and in matter; matter effects on \

  2. Supernova Neutrinos Detection On Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin-Heng Guo; Ming-Yang Huang; Bing-Lin Young

    2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we first discuss the detection of supernova neutrino on Earth. Then we propose a possible method to acquire information about $\\theta_{13}$ smaller than $1.5^\\circ$ by detecting the ratio of the event numbers of different flavor supernova neutrinos. Such an sensitivity cannot yet be achieved by the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment.

  3. Solar Neutrino Matter Effects Redux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Balantekin; A. Malkus

    2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Following recent low-threshold analysis of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory and asymmetry measurements of the BOREXINO Collaboration of the solar neutrino flux, we revisit the analysis of the matter effects in the Sun. We show that solar neutrino data constrains the mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ poorly and that subdominant Standard Model effects can mimic the effects of the physics beyond the Standard Model.

  4. The Role and Detectability of the Charm Contribution to Ultra High Energy Neutrino Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raj Gandhi; Abhijit Samanta; Atsushi Watanabe

    2009-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    It is widely believed that charm meson production and decay may play an important role in high energy astrophysical sources of neutrinos, especially those that are baryon-rich, providing an environment conducive to pp interactions. Using slow-jet supernovae (SJS) as an example of such a source, we study the detectability of high-energy neutrinos, paying particular attention to those produced from charmed-mesons. We highlight important distinguishing features in the ultra-high energy neutrino flux which would act as markers for the role of charm in the source. In particular, charm leads to significant event rates at higher energies, after the conventional (pi, K) neutrino fluxes fall off. We calculate event rates both for a nearby single source and for diffuse SJS fluxes for an IceCube-like detector. By comparing muon event rates for the conventional and prompt fluxes in different energy bins, we demonstrate the striking energy dependence in the rates induced by the presence of charm. We also show that it leads to an energy dependant flux ratio of shower to muon events, providing an additional important diagnostic tool for the presence of prompt neutrinos. Motivated by the infusion of high energy anti-electron neutrinos into the flux by charm decay, we also study the detectability of the Glashow resonance due to these sources.

  5. Mission | APS Engineering Support Division

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    APS Engineering Support Division (AES) Search Button About Welcome Overview Visiting the APS Mission & Goals Find People Organization Charts Committees Job Openings User...

  6. Neutrino oscillations: brief history and present status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilenky, S M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review of the problem of neutrino masses and oscillations is given. In the beginning we present an early history of neutrino masses, mixing and oscillations. Then we discuss all possibilities of neutrino masses and mixing (neutrino mass terms). The phenomenology of neutrino oscillations in vacuum is considered in some details. We present also the neutrino oscillation data and the seesaw mechanism of the neutrino mass generation.

  7. Optimisation of future long baseline neutrino experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olga Mena

    2008-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this talk is to review near and far future long baseline neutrino experiments as superbeams, beta-Beams and neutrino factories, comparing their sensitivities to the unknown parameters in the neutrino oscillation sector. We focus on the extraction of the neutrino mass hierarchy, exploring alternatives to the commonly used neutrino-antineutrino comparison. Special attention to a new concept of neutrino factory design, the low energy neutrino factory, is given.

  8. Laser-Compton backscattering for nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Utsunomiya, Hiroaki [Department of Physics, Konan University, 8-9-1, Okamoto, Higashinada, Kobe 658-85-1, Japan and The Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Using ?-ray beams for experimental nucleosynthesis study forms a new branch of nuclear astrophysics. I introduce typical experimental investigations and give a future prospect of this branch.

  9. Microsoft Word - Nuclear_Astrophysics_Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    work and other H. Y. Lee (LANL): Improving neutron capture rate predictions using Apollo + HELIOS N. Scielzo (LBNL): Neutron spectroscopy with ion traps for astrophysics...

  10. Calibration in High-Energy Astrophysics Statistical Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dyk, David

    Calibration in High-Energy Astrophysics Statistical Methods Statistical Computation Empirical Illustrations Accounting for Calibration Uncertainty: High Energy Astrophysics and the PCG Sampler David A. van Dyk Accounting for Calibration Uncertainty #12;Calibration in High-Energy Astrophysics Statistical

  11. Plasmon decay to a neutrino pair via neutrino electromagnetic moments in a strongly magnetized medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Borisov; P. E. Sizin

    2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the neutrino luminosity of a degenerate electron gas in a strong magnetic field via plasmon decay to a neutrino pair due to neutrino electromagnetic moments and obtain the relative upper bounds on the effective neutrino magnetic moment.

  12. Probing Late Neutrino Mass Properties With SupernovaNeutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Joseph; Goldberg, Haim; Perez, Gilad; Sarcevic, Ina

    2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Models of late-time neutrino mass generation contain new interactions of the cosmic background neutrinos with supernova relic neutrinos (SRNs). Exchange of an on-shell light scalar may lead to significant modification of the differential SRN flux observed at earth. We consider an Abelian U(1) model for generating neutrino masses at low scales, and show that there are cases for which the changes induced in the flux allow one to distinguish the Majorana or Dirac nature of neutrinos, as well as the type of neutrino mass hierarchy (normal or inverted or quasi-degenerate). In some region of parameter space the determination of the absolute values of the neutrino masses is also conceivable. Measurements of the presence of these effects may be possible at the next-generation water Cerenkov detectors enriched with Gadolinium, or a 100 kton liquid argon detector.

  13. The neutrino signal at HALO: learning about the primary supernova neutrino fluxes and neutrino properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Väänänen, Daavid; Volpe, Cristina, E-mail: vaananen@ipno.in2p3.fr, E-mail: volpe@ipno.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, F-91406 Orsay cedex, CNRS/IN2P3 and University of Paris-XI (France)

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Core-collapse supernova neutrinos undergo a variety of phenomena when they travel from the high neutrino density region and large matter densities to the Earth. We perform analytical calculations of the supernova neutrino fluxes including collective effects due to the neutrino-neutrino interactions, the Mikheev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect due to the neutrino interactions with the background matter and decoherence of the wave packets as they propagate in space. We predict the numbers of one- and two-neutron charged and neutral-current electron-neutrino scattering on lead events. We show that, due to the energy thresholds, the ratios of one- to two-neutron events are sensitive to the pinching parameters of neutrino fluxes at the neutrinosphere, almost independently of the presently unknown neutrino properties. Besides, such events have an interesting sensitivity to the spectral split features that depend upon the presence/absence of energy equipartition among neutrino flavors. Our calculations show that a lead-based observatory like the Helium And Lead Observatory (HALO) has the potential to pin down important characteristics of the neutrino fluxes at the neutrinosphere, and provide us with information on the neutrino transport in the supernova core.

  14. Entanglement in neutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massimo Blasone; Fabio Dell'Anno; Silvio De Siena; Fabrizio Illuminati

    2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Flavor oscillations in elementary particle physics are related to multi-mode entanglement of single-particle states. We show that mode entanglement can be expressed in terms of flavor transition probabilities, and therefore that single-particle entangled states acquire a precise operational characterization in the context of particle mixing. We treat in detail the physically relevant cases of two- and three-flavor neutrino oscillations, including the effective measure of CP violation. We discuss experimental schemes for the transfer of the quantum information encoded in single-neutrino states to spatially delocalized two-flavor charged lepton states, thus showing, at least in principle, that single-particle entangled states of neutrino mixing are legitimate physical resources for quantum information tasks.

  15. Neutrino Oscillations and Blazars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karl Mannheim

    1999-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Three independent predictions follow from postulating the existence of protons co-accelerated with electrons in extragalactic jets (i) multi-TeV gamma ray emission from nearby blazars, (ii) extragalactic cosmic ray protons up to 10^20 eV, and (iii) extragalactic neutrinos up to 5 10^18 eV. Recent gamma ray observations of Mrk 421 and Mrk 501 employing the air-Cerenkov technique are consistent with the predicted gamma ray spectrum, if one corrects for pair attenuation on the infrared background. Prediction (ii) is consistent with cosmic ray data, if one requires that jets are responsible for at least a sizable fraction of the extragalactic gamma ray background. With kubic kilometer neutrino telescopes, it will be possible to test (iii), although the muon event rates are rather low. Neutrino oscillations can increase the event rate by inducing tau-cascades removing the Earth shadowing effect.

  16. Short Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katori, Teppei

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Series of short baseline neutrino oscillation experiments provided unexpected results, and now they are called short baseline anomalies, and all indicates an existence of sterile neutrinos with a mass scale around 1~eV. The signals of short baseline anomalies are reported from 4 different classes of experiments. However, at this moment, there is no convincing theoretical model to explain such sterile neutrinos, and a single experiment to confirm 1~eV sterile neutrinos may be challenging. In this short note, we describe classes of short baseline neutrino oscillation experiments and their goals.

  17. Riddle of the Neutrino Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smirnov, A Yu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss some known approaches and results as well as few new ideas concerning origins and nature of neutrino mass. The key issues include (i) connections of neutrino and charged fermions masses, relation between masses and mixing, energy scale of new physics behind neutrino mass where possibilities spread from the Planck and GUT masses down to a sub-eV scale. The data hint two different new physics involved in generation of neutrino mass. Determination of the CP phase as well as mass hierarchy can play important role in identification of new physics. It may happen that sterile neutrinos provide the key to resolve the riddle.

  18. Are neutrinos their own antiparticles?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kayser, Boris; /Fermilab

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explain the relationship between Majorana neutrinos, which are their own antiparticles, and Majorana neutrino masses. We point out that Majorana masses would make the neutrinos very distinctive particles, and explain why many theorists strongly suspect that neutrinos do have Majorana masses. The promising approach to confirming this suspicion is to seek neutrinoless double beta decay. We introduce a toy model that illustrates why this decay requires nonzero neutrino masses, even when there are both right-handed and left-handed weak currents.

  19. TIME-INTEGRATED SEARCHES FOR POINT-LIKE SOURCES OF NEUTRINOS WITH THE 40-STRING IceCube DETECTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbasi, R.; Aguilar, J. A.; Andeen, K.; Baker, M.; BenZvi, S. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Abdou, Y. [Department of Subatomic and Radiation Physics, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Abu-Zayyad, T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, River Falls, WI 54022 (United States); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Ahlers, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Auffenberg, J.; Becker, K.-H. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Bai, X. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Alba, J. L. Bazo; Benabderrahmane, M. L. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Beattie, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beatty, J. J. [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bechet, S. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Science Faculty CP230, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Becker, J. K. [Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of time-integrated searches for astrophysical neutrino sources in both the northern and southern skies. Data were collected using the partially completed IceCube detector in the 40-string configuration recorded between 2008 April 5 and 2009 May 20, totaling 375.5 days livetime. An unbinned maximum likelihood ratio method is used to search for astrophysical signals. The data sample contains 36,900 events: 14,121 from the northern sky, mostly muons induced by atmospheric neutrinos, and 22,779 from the southern sky, mostly high-energy atmospheric muons. The analysis includes searches for individual point sources and stacked searches for sources in a common class, sometimes including a spatial extent. While this analysis is sensitive to TeV-PeV energy neutrinos in the northern sky, it is primarily sensitive to neutrinos with energy greater than about 1 PeV in the southern sky. No evidence for a signal is found in any of the searches. Limits are set for neutrino fluxes from astrophysical sources over the entire sky and compared to predictions. The sensitivity is at least a factor of two better than previous searches (depending on declination), with 90% confidence level muon neutrino flux upper limits being between E {sup 2} d{Phi}/dE {approx} 2-200 x 10{sup -12} TeV cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} in the northern sky and between 3-700 x 10{sup -12} TeV cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} in the southern sky. The stacked source searches provide the best limits to specific source classes. The full IceCube detector is expected to improve the sensitivity to d{Phi}/dE{proportional_to}E {sup -2} sources by another factor of two in the first year of operation.

  20. astrophysical thermonuclear reactions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    well as experimental investigations are motivated. T. Rauscher 1998-10-15 4 Astrophysical thermonuclear functions Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: Stars are gravitationally stabilized...

  1. astrophysics magnet facility: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    there are magnetic helicity fluxes. A Brandenburg; P J Kpyl 2007-05-24 19 High energy astrophysics with the next generation of radio astronomy facilities Astrophysics...

  2. Workshop on Thermonuclear Reaction Rates for Astrophysics Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Workshop on Thermonuclear Reaction Rates for Astrophysics Applications 24-25 November 2011, Athensrd and final circular for the Workshop on Thermonuclear Reaction Rates for Astrophysics Applications

  3. Neutrino Physics: A Selective Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott M. Oser

    2006-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinos in the Standard Model of particle physics are massless, neutral fermions that seemingly do little more than conserve 4-momentum, angular momentum, lepton number, and lepton flavour in weak interactions. In the last decade conclusive evidence has demonstrated that the Standard Model's description of neutrinos does not match reality. We now know that neutrinos undergo flavour oscillations, violating lepton flavour conservation and implying that neutrinos have non-zero mass. A rich oscillation phenomenology then becomes possible, including matter-enhanced oscillation and possibly CP violation in the neutrino sector. Extending the Standard Model to include neutrino masses requires the addition of new fields and mass terms, and possibly new methods of mass generation. In this review article I will discuss the evidence that has established the existence of neutrino oscillation, and then highlight unresolved issues in neutrino physics, such as the nature of three-generational mixing (including CP-violating effects), the origins of neutrino mass, the possible existence of light sterile neutrinos, and the difficult question of measuring the absolute mass scale of neutrinos.

  4. Symmetries in collective neutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huaiyu Duan; George M. Fuller; Yong-Zhong Qian

    2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the relationship between a symmetry in the neutrino flavour evolution equations and neutrino flavour oscillations in the collective precession mode. This collective precession mode can give rise to spectral swaps (splits) when conditions can be approximated as homogeneous and isotropic. Multi-angle numerical simulations of supernova neutrino flavour transformation show that when this approximation breaks down, non-collective neutrino oscillation modes decohere kinematically, but the collective precession mode still is expected to stand out. We provide a criterion for significant flavour transformation to occur if neutrinos participate in a collective precession mode. This criterion can be used to understand the suppression of collective neutrino oscillations in anisotropic environments in the presence of a high matter density. This criterion is also useful in understanding the breakdown of the collective precession mode when neutrino densities are small.

  5. Real Oscillations of Virtual Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Grimus; P. Stockinger

    1996-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the conditions for neutrino oscillations in a field theoretical approach by taking into account that only the neutrino production and detection processes, which are localized in space around the coordinates $\\vec{x}_P$ and $\\vec{x}_D$, respectively, can be manipulated. In this sense the neutrinos whose oscillations are investigated appear as virtual lines connecting production with detection in the total Feynman graph and all neutrino fields or states to be found in the discussion are mass eigenfields or eigenstates. We perform a thorough examination of the integral over the spatial components of the inner neutrino momentum and show that in the asymptotic limit $L=|\\vec{x}_D - \\vec{x}_P| \\rightarrow \\infty$ the virtual neutrinos become ``real'' and under certain conditions the usual picture of neutrino oscillations emerges without ambiguities.

  6. Real oscillations of virtual neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grimus, Walter

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the conditions for neutrino oscillations in a field theoretical approach by taking into account that only the neutrino production and detection processes, which are localized in space around the coordinates \\vec{x}_P and \\vec{x}_D, respectively, can be manipulated. In this sense the neutrinos whose oscillations are investigated appear as virtual lines connecting production with detection in the total Feynman graph and all neutrino fields or states to be found in the discussion are mass eigenfields or eigenstates. We perform a thorough examination of the integral over the spatial components of the inner neutrino momentum and show that in the asymptotic limit L=|\\vec{x}_D - \\vec{x}_P| \\rightarrow \\infty the virtual neutrinos become ``real'' and under certain conditions the usual picture of neutrino oscillations emerges without ambiguities.

  7. Systems Division NO. REV. NO.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Conditioning Unit (PCU) is compatible with a solar panel array. The Solar Panel Simulator and the PCU Test SetAerospace Systems Division NO. REV. NO. EATM-17 PCU - SOLAR PANEL SIMULATOR TEST REPORT:' Courtois ~ll~K. Hsi #12;MO. REV. MO. EATM-17 ~ Systems Division PCU - Solar Panel Simulator Test Report

  8. NEUTRINO ANALYSIS OF THE 2010 SEPTEMBER CRAB NEBULA FLARE AND TIME-INTEGRATED CONSTRAINTS ON NEUTRINO EMISSION FROM THE CRAB USING ICECUBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbasi, R.; Aguilar, J. A.; Andeen, K.; Baker, M. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Abdou, Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Abu-Zayyad, T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, River Falls, WI 54022 (United States); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Ahlers, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Altmann, D. [III. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Auffenberg, J.; Becker, K.-H. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Bai, X. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bazo Alba, J. L.; Benabderrahmane, M. L. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Beattie, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beatty, J. J. [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bechet, S. [Science Faculty CP230, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Becker, J. K. [Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); and others

    2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a search for high-energy muon neutrinos with the IceCube detector in coincidence with the Crab Nebula flare reported on 2010 September by various experiments. Due to the unusual flaring state of the otherwise steady source we performed a prompt analysis of the 79-string configuration data to search for neutrinos that might be emitted along with the observed {gamma}-rays. We performed two different and complementary data selections of neutrino events in the time window of 10 days around the flare. One event selection is optimized for discovery of E{sup -2}{sub {nu}} neutrino spectrum typical of first-order Fermi acceleration. A similar event selection has also been applied to the 40-string data to derive the time-integrated limits to the neutrino emission from the Crab. The other event selection was optimized for discovery of neutrino spectra with softer spectral index and TeV energy cutoffs as observed for various Galactic sources in {gamma}-rays. The 90% confidence level (CL) best upper limits on the Crab flux during the 10 day flare are 4.73 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} TeV{sup -1} for an E{sup -2}{sub {nu}} neutrino spectrum and 2.50 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} TeV{sup -1} for a softer neutrino spectra of E{sup -2.7}{sub {nu}}, as indicated by Fermi measurements during the flare. In this paper, we also illustrate the impact of the time-integrated limit on the Crab neutrino steady emission. The limit obtained using 375.5 days of the 40-string configuration is compared to existing models of neutrino production from the Crab and its impact on astrophysical parameters is discussed. The most optimistic predictions of some models are already rejected by the IceCube neutrino telescope with more than 90% CL.

  9. Neutrino Oscillation Search Neutrino Oscillation Search

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011 at3, Issue 30Neutrino crossN uEPS HEP

  10. INTRODUCTION TO THE NEUTRINO PROPERTIES LISTINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of neutrino oscillation searches show that the mixing matrix contains two large mixing angles. We cannot is determined and the study of neutrino oscillations provides us with the values of all neutrino mass neutrino oscillation experiments can be consistently described using three active neutrino flavors, i

  11. Nonstandard neutrino interactions and transition magnetic moments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Healey, Kristopher J.; Petrov, Alexey A.; Zhuridov, Dmitry

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We constrain generic nonstandard neutrino interactions with existing experimental data on neutrino transition magnetic moments and derive strong bounds on tensorial couplings of neutrinos to charged fermions. We also discuss how some of these tensorial couplings can be constrained by other experiments, e.g., on neutrino-electron and neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  12. Neutrinoless double beta decay and neutrino physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Werner Rodejohann

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The connection of neutrino physics with neutrinoless double beta decay is reviewed. After presenting the current status of the PMNS matrix and the theoretical background of neutrino mass and lepton mixing, we will summarize the various implications of neutrino physics for double beta decay. The influence of light sterile neutrinos and other exotic modifications of the three neutrino picture is also discussed.

  13. $?$-cluster ANCs for nuclear astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. L Avila; G. V. Roachev; E. Koshchiy; L. T. Baby; J. Belarge; K. W. Kemper; A. N. Kuchera; D. Santiago-Gonzalez

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Background. Many important $\\alpha$-particle induced reactions for nuclear astrophysics may only be measured using indirect techniques due to small cross sections at the energy of interest. One of such indirect technique, is to determine the Asymptotic Normalization Coefficients (ANC) for near threshold resonances extracted from sub-Coulomb $\\alpha$-transfer reactions. This approach provides a very valuable tool for studies of astrophysically important reaction rates since the results are practically model independent. However, the validity of the method has not been directly verified. Purpose. The aim of this letter is to verify the technique using the $^{16}$O($^6$Li,$d$)$^{20}$Ne reaction as a benchmark. The $^{20}$Ne nucleus has a well known $1^-$ state at excitation energy of 5.79 MeV with a width of 28 eV. Reproducing the known value with this technique is an ideal opportunity to verify the method. Method. The 1$^-$ state at 5.79 MeV is studied using the $\\alpha$-transfer reaction $^{16}$O($^6$Li,$d$)$^{20}$Ne at sub-Coulomb energies. Results. The partial $\\alpha$ width for the $1^-$ state at excitation energy of 5.79 MeV is extracted and compared with the known value, allowing the accuracy of the method to be evaluated. Conclusions. This study demonstrates that extracting the Asymptotic Normalization Coefficients using sub-Coulomb $\\alpha$-transfer reactions is a powerful tool that can be used to determine the partial $\\alpha$ width of near threshold states that may dominate astrophysically important nuclear reaction rates. \\end{description}

  14. Neutrinos Are Nearly Dirac Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin Cahill

    2000-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino masses and mixings are analyzed in terms of left-handed fields and a 6x6 complex symmetric mass matrix whose singular values are the neutrino masses. An angle x_nu characterizes the kind of the neutrinos, with x_nu = 0 for Dirac neutrinos and x_nu = pi/2 for Majorana neutrinos. If x_nu = 0, then baryon-minus-lepton number is conserved. When x_nu is approximately zero, the six neutrino masses coalesce into three nearly degenerate pairs. Thus the smallness of the differences in neutrino masses exhibited in the solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments and the stringent limits on neutrinoless double beta decay are naturally explained if B-L is approximately conserved and neutrinos are nearly Dirac fermions. If one sets sin(x_nu) = 0.003, suppresses inter-generational mixing, and imposes a quark-like mass hierarchy, then one may fit the essential features of the solar, reactor, and atmospheric neutrino experiments with otherwise random mass matrices in the eV range. This B-L model leads to these predictions: neutrinos oscillate mainly between flavor eigenfields and sterile eigenfields, and so the probabilities of the appearance of neutrinos or antineutrinos are very small; neutrinos may well be of cosmological importance; in principle the disappearance of the tau neutrino should be observable; and neutrinoless double beta decay is suppressed by an extra factor of < 10^(-5) and hence will not be seen in the Heidelberg/Moscow, IGEX, GENIUS, or CUORE experiments.

  15. Canadian Nuclear Astrophysics Institute Letter of Intent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herwig, Falk

    nuclear physics data as well as astronomical observations, both of which are critically needed in order 1 Canadian Nuclear Astrophysics Institute Letter of Intent Final version April 29, 2011), astrophysics and nuclear physics theory and computational simulation (TC) as well as nuclear physics

  16. Physics & Astrophysics press.princeton.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    Physics & Astrophysics 2010 press.princeton.edu #12;1 Textbooks 4 Astronomy & Astrophysics 10 at Princeton University Press. In these difficult times, we are delighted to be seeing record-breaking sales avoid) fraud wherever it may arise. Bracing reading, this short book is a perfect fit for courses

  17. ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, E.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Population Impacts of Geothermal Energy Development in thethe DOE Division of Geothermal Energy. S. L. Phillips and E.to DOE Division of Geothermal Energy, January 30, 1980.

  18. EARTH SCIENCES DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Energy's Division of Geothermal Energy has undertaken aand Ghormley, E. L. , 1976. Geothermal energy conversion andof the Division of Geothermal Energy, and is compatible with

  19. Constraining Big Bang lithium production with recent solar neutrino data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takács, Marcell P; Szücs, Tamás; Zuber, Kai

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 3He({\\alpha},{\\gamma})7Be reaction affects not only the production of 7Li in Big Bang nucleosynthesis, but also the fluxes of 7Be and 8B neutrinos from the Sun. This double role is exploited here to constrain the former by the latter. A number of recent experiments on 3He({\\alpha},{\\gamma})7Be provide precise cross section data at E = 0.5-1.0 MeV center-of-mass energy. However, there is a scarcity of precise data at Big Bang energies, 0.1-0.5 MeV, and below. This problem can be alleviated, based on precisely calibrated 7Be and 8B neutrino fluxes from the Sun that are now available, assuming the neutrino flavour oscillation framework to be correct. These fluxes and the standard solar model are used here to determine the 3He(alpha,gamma)7Be astrophysical S-factor at the solar Gamow peak, S(23+6-5 keV) = 0.548+/-0.054 keVb. This new data point is then included in a re-evaluation of the 3He({\\alpha},{\\gamma})7Be S-factor at Big Bang energies, following an approach recently developed for this reaction in the c...

  20. Experimental Neutrino Physics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chris Walter

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk, I will review how a set of experiments in the last decade has given us our current understanding of neutrino properties.  I will show how experiments in the last year or two have clarified this picture, and will discuss how new experiments about to start will address remaining questions.  I will particularly emphasize the relationship between various experimental techniques.

  1. Neutrino and it's lepton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Quznetsov

    2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper I cite p.p. 100-117 of book G. Quznetsov, Probabilistic Treatment of Gauge Theories, in series Contemporary Fundamental Physics,ed. V. Dvoeglazov, Nova Sci. Publ., NY (2007). There I research a bound between neutrino and it's lepton.

  2. Neutrino Factory Downstream Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the Neutrino Factory accelerator systems downstream from the target and capture area. These include the bunching and phase rotation, cooling, acceleration, and decay ring systems. We also briefly discuss the R&D program under way to develop these systems, and indicate areas where help from CERN would be invaluable.

  3. Neutrino Factory Mercury Vessel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Neutrino Factory Mercury Vessel: Initial Cooling Calculations V. Graves Target Studies Nov 15, 2012 #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Cooling Calculations 15 Nov 2012 Target · Separates functionality, provides double mercury containment, simplifies design and remote handling · Each

  4. Neutrinos Are Nearly Dirac Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahill, K E

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino masses and mixings are analyzed in terms of left-handed fields and a 6x6 complex symmetric mass matrix whose singular values are the neutrino masses. An angle theta_nu characterizes the kind of the neutrinos, with theta_nu = 0 for Dirac neutrinos and theta_nu = pi/2 for Majorana neutrinos. If theta_nu = 0, then baryon-minus-lepton number is conserved. When theta_nu is approximately zero, the six neutrino masses coalesce into three nearly degenerate pairs. Thus the smallness of the differences in neutrino masses exhibited in the solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments and the stringent limits on neutrinoless double-beta decay are naturally explained if B-L is approximately conserved and neutrinos are nearly Dirac fermions. If one sets theta_nu = 0.0005, suppresses inter-generational mixing, and imposes a quark-like mass hierarchy, then one may fit the essential features of the solar, reactor, and atmospheric neutrino experiments with otherwise random mass matrices in the eV range. This B-L model le...

  5. Physics Prospects with an Intense Neutrino Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Solomey

    2000-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    With new forthcoming intense neutrino beams, for the study of neutrino oscillations, it is possible to consider other physics experiments that can be done with these extreme neutrino fluxes available close to the source.

  6. Solar mass-varying neutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marfatia, Danny; Huber, P.; Barger, V.

    2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose that the solar neutrino deficit may be due to oscillations of mass-varying neutrinos (MaVaNs). This scenario elucidates solar neutrino data beautifully while remaining comfortably compatible with atmospheric ...

  7. High Rate Physics at Neutrino Factories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce J. King

    1999-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Both muon colliders and non-colliding muon storage rings using muon collider technology have the potential to become the first true ``neutrino factories'', with uniquely intense and precisely characterized neutrino beams that could usher in a new era of high rate and long baseline neutrino physics studies at accelerators. This paper gives an overview of the predicted capabilities of neutrino factories for high rate neutrino physics analyses that will use huge event samples collected with novel, high performance neutrino detectors.

  8. Neutrino Oscillations and the Early Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. P. Kirilova

    2003-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The observational and theoretical status of neutrino oscillations in connection with solar and atmospheric neutrino anomalies is presented in brief. The effect of neutrino oscillations on the early Universe evolution is discussed in detail. A short review is given of the standard Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and the influence of resonant and nonresonant neutrino oscillations on active neutrinos and on primordial nucleosynthesis of He-4. BBN cosmological constraints on neutrino oscillation parameters are discussed.

  9. Measuring the Neutrino Mass Hierarchy with Atmospheric Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. F. Cowen; T. DeYoung; D. Grant; D. A. Dwyer; S. R. Klein; K. B. Luk; D. R. Williams; for the IceCube/PINGU Collaboration

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed PINGU experiment to measure the neutrino mass hierarchy is presented, in the context of long-range planning by the U.S. nuclear physics community.

  10. Non-unitary neutrino propagation from neutrino decay

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Berryman, Jeffrey M.; de Gouvêa, André; Hernández, Daniel; Oliveira, Roberto L.N.

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino propagation in space–time is not constrained to be unitary if very light states – lighter than the active neutrinos – exist into which neutrinos may decay. If this is the case, neutrino flavor-change is governed by a handful of extra mixing and “oscillation” parameters, including new sources of CP-invariance violation. We compute the transition probabilities in the two- and three-flavor scenarios and discuss the different phenomenological consequences of the new physics. These are qualitatively different from other sources of unitarity violation discussed in the literature.

  11. Gauge Trimming of Neutrino Masses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Mu-Chun; /Fermilab /UC, Irvine; de Gouvea, Andre; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; /Fermilab

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that under a new U(1) gauge symmetry, which is non-anomalous in the presence of one ''right-handed neutrino'' per generation and consistent with the standard model Yukawa couplings, the most general fermion charges are determined in terms of four rational parameters. This generalization of the B-L symmetry with generation-dependent lepton charges leads to neutrino masses induced by operators of high dimensionality. Neutrino masses are thus naturally small without invoking physics at energies above the TeV scale, whether neutrinos are Majorana or Dirac fermions. This ''Leptocratic'' Model predicts the existence of light quasi-sterile neutrinos with consequences for cosmology, and implies that collider experiments may reveal the origin of neutrino masses.

  12. Neutrino Physics from the Cosmic Microwave Background and Large Scale Structure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Slosar, A.; Arnold, K.; Austermann, J.; Benson, B. A.; Bischoff, C.; Bock, J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Calabrese, E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Carvalho, C. S.; Chang, C. L.; Chiang, H. C.; Church, S.; Cooray, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Dawson, K. S.; Das, S.; Devlin, M. J.; Dobbs, M.; Dodelson, S.; Dore, O.; Dunkley, J.; Errard, J.; Fraisse, A.; Gallicchio, J.; Halverson, N. W.; Hanany, S.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hincks, A.; Hlozek, R.; Holder, G.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; Hu, W.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K.; Jones, W. C.; Kamionkowski, M.; Keating, B.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Komatsu, E.; Kovac, J.; Lawrence, C.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E.; Linder, E.; Lubin, P.; McMahon, J.; Miller, A.; Newburgh, L.; Niemack, M. D.; Nguyen, H.; Nguyen, H. T.; Page, L.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Ruhl, J. E.; Sehgal, N.; Seljak, U.; Sievers, J.; Silverstein, E.; Smith, K. M.; Spergel, D.; Staggs, S. T.; Stark, A.; Stompor, R.; Vieregg, A. G.; Wang, G.; Watson, S.; Wollack, E. J.; Wu, W. L.K.; Yoon, K. W.; Zahn, O.; Kuo, C. -L.

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report on the status and prospects of the quantification of neutrino properties through the cosmological neutrino background for the Cosmic Frontier of the Division of Particles and Fields Community Summer Study long-term planning exercise. Experiments planned and underway are prepared to study the cosmological neutrino background in detail via its influence on distance-redshift relations and the growth of structure. The program for the next decade described in this document, including upcoming spectroscopic galaxy surveys eBOSS and DESI and a new Stage-IV CMB polarization experiment CMB-S4, will achieve ? (?mv) = 16 meV and ? (Neff)(Neff) = 0.020. Such a mass measurement will produce a high significance detection of non-zero ?m??m?, whose lower bound derived from atmospheric and solar neutrino oscillation data is about 58 meV. If neutrinos have a minimal normal mass hierarchy, this measurement will definitively rule out the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy, shedding light on one of the most puzzling aspects of the Standard Model of particle physics — the origin of mass. This precise a measurement of Neff will allow for high sensitivity to any light and dark degrees of freedom produced in the big bang and a precision test of the standard cosmological model prediction that Neff = 3.046.

  13. Neutrino Physics from the Cosmic Microwave Background and Large Scale Structure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Slosar, A.; Arnold, K.; Austermann, J.; Benson, B. A.; Bischoff, C.; Bock, J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Calabrese, E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; et al

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report on the status and prospects of the quantification of neutrino properties through the cosmological neutrino background for the Cosmic Frontier of the Division of Particles and Fields Community Summer Study long-term planning exercise. Experiments planned and underway are prepared to study the cosmological neutrino background in detail via its influence on distance-redshift relations and the growth of structure. The program for the next decade described in this document, including upcoming spectroscopic galaxy surveys eBOSS and DESI and a new Stage-IV CMB polarization experiment CMB-S4, will achieve ? (?mv) = 16 meV and ? (Neff)(Neff) = 0.020.more »Such a mass measurement will produce a high significance detection of non-zero ?m??m?, whose lower bound derived from atmospheric and solar neutrino oscillation data is about 58 meV. If neutrinos have a minimal normal mass hierarchy, this measurement will definitively rule out the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy, shedding light on one of the most puzzling aspects of the Standard Model of particle physics — the origin of mass. This precise a measurement of Neff will allow for high sensitivity to any light and dark degrees of freedom produced in the big bang and a precision test of the standard cosmological model prediction that Neff = 3.046.« less

  14. The Baikal Neutrino Telescope: Selected Physics Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Wischnewski; for the BAIKAL Collaboration

    2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results on searches for exotic particles (relativistic magnetic monopoles and WIMPs) and for UHE neutrinos, obtained with the Baikal neutrino telescope NT200.

  15. Low-energy solar anti-neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. B. Semikoz; S. Pastor; J. W. F. Valle

    1998-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    If neutrino conversions within the Sun result in partial polarization of initial solar neutrino fluxes, then a new opportunity arises to observe the anti-\

  16. Neutrino Masses and Flavor Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yifang Wang; Zhi-zhong Xing

    2015-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This essay is intended to provide a brief description of the peculiar properties of neutrinos within and beyond the standard theory of weak interactions. The focus is on the flavor oscillations of massive neutrinos, from which one has achieved some striking knowledge about their mass spectrum and flavor mixing pattern. The experimental prospects towards probing the absolute neutrino mass scale, possible Majorana nature and CP-violating effects will also be addressed.

  17. Neutrino Masses and Flavor Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yifang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This essay is intended to provide a brief description of the peculiar properties of neutrinos within and beyond the standard theory of weak interactions. The focus is on the flavor oscillations of massive neutrinos, from which one has achieved some striking knowledge about their mass spectrum and flavor mixing pattern. The experimental prospects towards probing the absolute neutrino mass scale, possible Majorana nature and CP-violating effects will also be addressed.

  18. Neutrino Masses and Flavor Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritzsch, Harald

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the neutrino oscillations, using texture zero mass matrices for the leptons. The reactor mixing angle $\\theta^{}_{l}$ is calculated. The ratio of the masses of two neutrinos is determined by the solar mixing angle. We can calculate the masses of the three neutrinos: $m_1$ $\\approx$ 0.003 eV - $m_2$ $\\approx$ 0.012 eV - $m_3$ $\\approx$ 0.048 eV.

  19. Neutrino Masses and Flavor Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harald Fritzsch

    2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the neutrino oscillations, using texture zero mass matrices for the leptons. The reactor mixing angle $\\theta^{}_{l}$ is calculated. The ratio of the masses of two neutrinos is determined by the solar mixing angle. We can calculate the masses of the three neutrinos: $m_1$ $\\approx$ 0.003 eV - $m_2$ $\\approx$ 0.012 eV - $m_3$ $\\approx$ 0.048 eV.

  20. High energy neutrino cross sections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. H. Reno

    2004-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The theoretical status of the neutrino-nucleon cross section is reviewed for incident neutrino energies up to E_nu=10^12 GeV, including different approaches to high energy extrapolations. Nonstandard model physics may play a role at ultrahigh energies. The cases of mini-black hole production and electroweak instanton contributions are discussed as examples in the context of ultrahigh energy neutrino scattering.

  1. Physics Division computer facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cyborski, D.R.; Teh, K.M.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Physics Division maintains several computer systems for data analysis, general-purpose computing, and word processing. While the VMS VAX clusters are still used, this past year saw a greater shift to the Unix Cluster with the addition of more RISC-based Unix workstations. The main Divisional VAX cluster which consists of two VAX 3300s configured as a dual-host system serves as boot nodes and disk servers to seven other satellite nodes consisting of two VAXstation 3200s, three VAXstation 3100 machines, a VAX-11/750, and a MicroVAX II. There are three 6250/1600 bpi 9-track tape drives, six 8-mm tapes and about 9.1 GB of disk storage served to the cluster by the various satellites. Also, two of the satellites (the MicroVAX and VAX-11/750) have DAPHNE front-end interfaces for data acquisition. Since the tape drives are accessible cluster-wide via a software package, they are, in addition to replay, used for tape-to-tape copies. There is however, a satellite node outfitted with two 8 mm drives available for this purpose. Although not part of the main cluster, a DEC 3000 Alpha machine obtained for data acquisition is also available for data replay. In one case, users reported a performance increase by a factor of 10 when using this machine.

  2. DIVISION 16 -ELECTRICAL 16000 GENERAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIVISION 16 - ELECTRICAL _____________________________________________________________ 16000 GENERAL A. Design Considerations 1. All drawing, specifications and construction shall conform to the following: National Electrical Code National Electrical Safety Code National Fire Protection Association

  3. Division 1137 property control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastor, D.J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An automated data processing property control system was developed by Mobile and Remote Range Division 1137. This report describes the operation of the system and examines ways of using it in operational planning and control.

  4. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Engineering Division Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /4867399 DMAttia@lbl.gov Administrative Staff Glenda Fish Division Office Administrator 510/4867123 GJFish

  5. Neutrino Physics: Status and Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Scholberg

    2003-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This pedagogical overview will cover the current status of neutrino physics from an experimentalist's point of view, focusing primarily on oscillation studies. The evidence for neutrino oscillations will be presented, along with the prospects for further refinement of observations in each of the indicated regions of two-flavor oscillation parameter space. The next steps in oscillation physics will then be covered (under the assumption of three-flavor mixing): the quest for $\\theta_{13}$, mass hierarchy and, eventually, leptonic CP violation. Prospects for non-oscillation aspects of neutrino physics, such as kinematic tests for absolute neutrino mass and double beta decay searches, will also be discussed briefly.

  6. Lorentz Invariance of Neutrino Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Giunti

    2003-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that, in spite of the appearances, the standard expression for the oscillation probability of ultrarelativistic neutrinos is Lorentz invariant.

  7. Gravitational Correction in Neutrino Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasufumi Kojima

    1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the quantum mechanical oscillations of neutrinos propagating in weak gravitational field. The correction to the result in the flat space-time is derived.

  8. Proton and Neutrino Extragalactic Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Lipari

    2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of extragalactic sources of high energy radiation via the direct measurement of the proton and neutrino fluxes that they are likely to emit is one of the main goals for the future observations of the recently developed air showers detectors and neutrino telescopes. In this work we discuss the relation between the inclusive proton and neutrino signals from the ensemble of all sources in the universe, and the resolved signals from the closest and brightest objects. We also compare the sensitivities of proton and neutrino telescopes and comment on the relation between these two new astronomies.

  9. Supernova neutrinos and explosive nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kajino, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan and Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Aoki, W. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Cheoun, M.-K. [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Hayakawa, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakara-Shirane 2-4, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hidaka, J.; Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Mathews, G. J. [Center for Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Nakamura, K. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Suzuki, T. [Department of Physics, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Core-collapse supernovae eject huge amount of flux of energetic neutrinos. We studied the explosive nucleosyn-thesis in supernovae and found that several isotopes {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta as well as r-process nuclei are affected by the neutrino interactions. The abundance of these isotopes therefore depends strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. We discuss first how to determine the neutrino temperatures in order to explain the observed solar system abundances of these isotopes, combined with Galactic chemical evolution of the light nuclei and the heavy r-process elements. We then study the effects of neutrino oscillation on their abundances, and propose a novel method to determine the still unknown neutrino oscillation parameters, mass hierarchy and ?{sub 13}, simultaneously. There is recent evidence that SiC X grains from the Murchison meteorite may contain supernova-produced light elements {sup 11}B and {sup 7}Li encapsulated in the presolar grains. Combining the recent experimental constraints on ?{sub 13}, we show that our method sug-gests at a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. Finally, we discuss supernova relic neutrinos that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter as well as adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  10. Reconciling Nuclear and Astrophysical Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dexheimer, V; Schramm, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In view of new constraints put forth by recent observations and measurements in the realm of astrophysics and nuclear physics, we update the non-linear realization of the sigma model as to reflect such constraints. By doing this, we obtain new equations of state that may be used to describe neutron stars. Such equations of state are obtained by investigating different ways by which the vector mesons self-interact. Furthermore, we also investigate the role played by the delta mesons in the model. As a result, we are able to develop equations of state that are in better agreement with data, such as nuclear compressibility and slope of the symmetry energy at saturation, star masses, radii, and cooling profiles.

  11. Neutrinos in the Electron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. L. Koschmieder

    2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We will show that one half of the rest mass of the electron is equal to the sum of the rest masses of electron neutrinos and that the other half of the rest mass of the electron is given by the energy in the sum of electric oscillations. With this composition we can explain the rest mass, the electric charge, the spin and the magnetic moment of the electron.

  12. Sterile Neutrino Oscillations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900Steep Slope Calculator EstimatesSterile Neutrino

  13. Neutrino self-energy operator and neutrino magnetic moment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobrynina, A. A., E-mail: elenan@uniyar.ac.ru; Mikheev, N. V.; Narynskaya, E. N. [Yaroslavl State University (Russian Federation)] [Yaroslavl State University (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple method for calculating the magnetic moment of a massive neutrino on the basis of its self-energy operator is presented. An expression for the magnetic moment of a massive neutrino in an external electromagnetic field is obtained in the R{sub {xi}} gauge for the case of an arbitrary ratio of the lepton and W-boson masses.

  14. ON SOLAR NEUTRINO PROBLEM TIAN MA AND SHOUHONG WANG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ON SOLAR NEUTRINO PROBLEM TIAN MA AND SHOUHONG WANG Abstract. The current neutrino oscillation an alternative resolution to the solar neutrino loss problem. Contents 1. Introduction 1 2. Discrepancy of Solar, there are three flavors of neutrinos: the electron neutrino e, the tau neutrino and the mu neutrino µ. The solar

  15. A New Technique for Detection of PeV Neutrinos Using a Phased Radio Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. G. Vieregg; K. Bechtol; A. Romero-Wolf

    2015-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection of high energy neutrinos ($10^{15}-10^{20}$ eV or $1-10^{5}$ PeV) is an important step toward understanding the most energetic cosmic accelerators and would enable tests of fundamental physics at energy scales that cannot easily be achieved on Earth. In this energy range, there are two expected populations of neutrinos: the astrophysical flux observed with IceCube at lower energies ($\\sim1$ PeV) and the predicted cosmogenic flux at higher energies ($\\sim10^{18}$ eV). Radio detector arrays such as RICE, ANITA, ARA, and ARIANNA exploit the Askaryan effect and the radio transparency of glacial ice, which together enable enormous volumes of ice to be monitored with sparse instrumentation. We describe here the design for a phased radio array that would lower the energy threshold of radio techniques to the PeV scale, allowing measurement of the astrophysical flux observed with IceCube over an extended energy range. Meaningful energy overlap with optical Cherenkov telescopes could be used for energy calibration. The phased radio array design would also provide more efficient coverage of the large effective volume required to discover cosmogenic neutrinos.

  16. Indian Institute of Astrophysics Bangalore 560034

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

    of galaxies, active-galactic nuclei, quasars, gamma-ray bursts. Theoretical Astrophysics and related Physics satellite link. A recent addition is the High Altitude GAmma Ray (HAGAR) array comprising of seven

  17. SKA Organisation Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Weidong

    SKA Organisation Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics Room 3.116 Alan Turing Building. The SKA Organisation is based in the Alan Turing Building, The University of Manchester and will move

  18. ccsd-00016511,version1-5Jan2006 Neutrino Physics/Physique des neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ccsd-00016511,version1-5Jan2006 Neutrino Physics/Physique des neutrinos Reactor Neutrinos Thierry the possibility of doing "neutrino physics". This opened the door to the use of neutrinos as a sensitive probe of Physics and Astronomy, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-4575, USA

  19. Study of the neutrino mass hierarchy with the atmospheric neutrino data observed in Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    Study of the neutrino mass hierarchy with the atmospheric neutrino data observed in Super-Kamiokande analysis carried out with Super- Kamiokande atmospheric neutrino data in order to obtain information-neutrino enriched event samples from the Super-Kamiokande atmospheric neutrino data. Super-Kamiokande is a 50 kton

  20. Double beta decays and solar neutrinos with 100 MOON(Mo Observatory Of Neutrinos)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    nuclear laboratory for spectroscopic studies of neutrinos Neutrinos are key particles for new frontiers) are sensitive and realistic experiments for studying the Majorana nature of the neutrino and the absolute massDouble beta decays and solar neutrinos with 100 Mo ­MOON(Mo Observatory Of Neutrinos)­ May 24, 2005

  1. Reactor Neutrino Physics -- An Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felix Boehm

    1999-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the status and the results of reactor neutrino experiments. Long baseline oscillation experiments at Palo Verde and Chooz have provided limits for the oscillation parameters while the recently proposed Kamland experiment at a baseline of more than 100km is now in the planning stage. We also describe the status of neutrino magnetic moment experiments at reactors.

  2. The Phase of Neutrino Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Giunti

    2002-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Using an analogy with the well-known double-slit experiment, we show that the standard phase of neutrino oscillations is correct, refuting recent claims of a factor of two correction. We also improve the wave packet treatment of neutrino oscillations taking into account explicitly the finite coherence time of the detection process.

  3. Lepton textures and neutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verma, Rohit

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systematic analyses of the textures arising in lepton mass matrices have been carried out using unitary transformations and condition of naturalness for the Dirac and Majorana neutrino possibilities. It is observed that the recent three neutrino oscillation data together with the effective mass in neutrinoless double beta decay provide vital clues in predicting the general structures of these lepton mass matrices.

  4. Pulsar kicks from neutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Kusenko; Gino Segre

    1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino oscillations can explain the observed motion of pulsars. We show that two different models of neutrino emission from a cooling neutron star are in good quantitative agreement and predict the same order of magnitude for the pulsar kick velocity, consistent with the data.

  5. Off-shell OPERA neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tim R. Morris

    2011-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In the OPERA experiment, superluminal propagation of neutrinos can occur if one of the neutrino masses is extremely small. However the effect only has appreciable amplitude at energies of order this mass and thus has negligible overlap with the multi-GeV scale of the experiment.

  6. Lepton textures and neutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohit Verma

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Systematic analyses of the textures arising in lepton mass matrices have been carried out using unitary transformations and condition of naturalness for the Dirac and Majorana neutrino possibilities. It is observed that the recent three neutrino oscillation data together with the effective mass in neutrinoless double beta decay provide vital clues in predicting the general structures of these lepton mass matrices.

  7. Neutrino flavor transformation in core-collapse supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherry, John F.; Cherry, John F.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    unconstrained sectors of neutrino physics. Likewise, shouldinsight into fundamental neutrino physics. We have chosen tostill fundamental neutrino mixing physics unknowns, e.g. ,

  8. IceCube: An Instrument for Neutrino Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halzen, F.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    numerous discussions on neutrino physics. We thank Evelyncollapse and of neutrino physics, including the possibleof new physics, a measurement of the neutrino cross-section

  9. Five Years of Neutrino Physics with Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. B. Smy

    2002-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Using data from both solar and atmospheric neutrinos, Super-Kamiokande has provided fundamental information on neutrino flavor mixing and neutrino mass square differences.

  10. Neutrino flavor transformation in core-collapse supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherry, John F.; Cherry, John F.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the corresponding Neutrino Bulb (1 %) safety criteria fromof the neutrino- bulb halo neutrino Hamiltonian, | H |+|H |, to the contribution from bulb the neutrinosphere | H

  11. Small entries of neutrino mass matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Kh. Akhmedov

    1999-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider phenomenologically allowed structures of the neutrino mass matrix in the case of three light neutrino species. Constraints from the solar, atmospheric and reactor neutrino experiments as well as those from the neutrinoless double beta decay are taken into account. Both hierarchical and quasi-degenerate neutrino mass cases are studied. Assuming maximal $\

  12. Solar Neutrinos and the Eclipse Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan Narayan; G. Rajasekaran; Rahul Sinha; C. P. Burgess

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar neutrino counting rate in a real time detector like Super--Kamiokanda, SNO, or Borexino is enhanced due to neutrino oscillations in the Moon during a partial or total solar eclipse. The enhancement is calculated as a function of the neutrino parameters in the case of three flavor mixing. This enhancement, if seen, can further help to determine the neutrino parameters.

  13. Oscillations of solar atmosphere neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; A. Mirizzi; D. Montanino; P. D. Serpico

    2006-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sun is a source of high energy neutrinos (E > 10 GeV) produced by cosmic ray interactions in the solar atmosphere. We study the impact of three-flavor oscillations (in vacuum and in matter) on solar atmosphere neutrinos, and calculate their observable fluxes at Earth, as well as their event rates in a kilometer-scale detector in water or ice. We find that peculiar three-flavor oscillation effects in matter, which can occur in the energy range probed by solar atmosphere neutrinos, are significantly suppressed by averaging over the production region and over the neutrino and antineutrino components. In particular, we find that the relation between the neutrino fluxes at the Sun and at the Earth can be approximately expressed in terms of phase-averaged ``vacuum'' oscillations, dominated by a single mixing parameter (the angle theta_23).

  14. Constraints on Neutrino Velocities Revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yunjie Huo; Tianjun Li; Yi Liao; Dimitri V. Nanopoulos; Yonghui Qi

    2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    With a minimally modified dispersion relation for neutrinos, we reconsider the constraints on superluminal neutrino velocities from bremsstrahlung effects in the laboratory frame. Employing both the direct calculation approach and the virtual Z-boson approach, we obtain the generic decay width and energy loss rate of a superluminal neutrino with general energy. The Cohen-Glashow's analytical results for neutrinos with a relatively low energy are confirmed in both approaches. We employ the survival probability instead of the terminal energy to assess whether a neutrino with a given energy is observable or not in the OPERA experiment. Moreover, using our general results we perform systematical analyses on the constraints arising from the Super-Kamiokande and IceCube experiments.

  15. 2004 TASI Lectures on Neutrino Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre de Gouvea

    2004-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss, in a semi-pedagogical way, our current understanding of neutrino physics. I present a brief history of how the neutrino came to be ``invented'' and observed, and discuss the evidence that led to the recent discovery that neutrinos change flavor. I then spend some time presenting mass-induced neutrino flavor change (neutrino oscillation), and how it pieces all the neutrino puzzles except for the LSND anomaly, which is also briefly discussed. I conclude by highlighting the importance of determining the nature of the neutrinos, i.e., are they Dirac or Majorana fermions.

  16. Collective neutrino oscillations in turbulent backgrounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, Giles; Adams, Jenni; Seunarine, Suruj [University of Canterbury, Christchurch (New Zealand); University of the West Indies, Bridgetown (Barbados)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a Kolmogorov turbulence model, we investigate the effects of fluctuations in matter and neutrino density in the region near a supernova core on the flavor oscillations of neutrinos emitted in the core collapse in a single-angle, two-flavor approximation. Deviation from a smooth background neutrino density causes significant alterations in the final flavor state of the neutrino ensemble after 400 km, but even very large fluctuations in the matter density do not strongly affect the state of the neutrinos after the collective phase. In both cases, there is a strong effect on the neutrino flavor evolution at intermediate radii, with the flavor evolution becoming much more chaotic. The effect of fluctuations also depends strongly on the initial neutrino spectra. We conclude that the true neutrino fluxes arriving at Earth from core-collapse supernova could differ considerably from predictions of neutrino fluxes based on approximate models with smoothly decreasing matter and neutrino densities.

  17. Light Sterile Neutrinos and Short Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JiJi Fan; Paul Langacker

    2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We study two possible explanations for short baseline neutrino oscillation anomalies, such as the LSND and MiniBooNE anti-neutrino data, and for the reactor anomaly. The first scenario is the mini-seesaw mechanism with two eV-scale sterile neutrinos. We present both analytic formulas and numerical results showing that this scenario could account for the short baseline and reactor anomalies and is consistent with the observed masses and mixings of the three active neutrinos. We also show that this scenario could arise naturally from an effective theory containing a TeV-scale VEV, which could be related to other TeV-scale physics. The minimal version of the mini-seesaw relates the active-sterile mixings to five real parameters and favors an inverted hierarchy. It has the interesting property that the effective Majorana mass for neutrinoless double beta decay vanishes, while the effective masses relevant to tritium beta decay and to cosmology are respectively around 0.2 and 2.4 eV. The second scenario contains only one eV-scale sterile neutrino but with an effective non-unitary mixing matrix between the light sterile and active neutrinos. We find that though this may explain the anomalies, if the non-unitarity originates from a heavy sterile neutrino with a large (fine-tuned) mixing angle, this scenario is highly constrained by cosmological and laboratory observations.

  18. Computer Sciences and Mathematics Division | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computer Sciences and Mathematics Division SHARE Computer Sciences and Mathematics Division The Computer Science and Mathematics Division (CSMD) is ORNL's premier source of basic...

  19. Computational Sciences and Engineering Division | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computational Sciences and Engineering Division SHARE Computational Sciences and Engineering Division The Computational Sciences and Engineering Division is a major research...

  20. Neutrino Oscillations With Recently Measured Sterile-Active Neutrino Mixing Angle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard S. Kisslinger

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This brief report is an extension of a prediction of neutrino oscillation with a sterile neutrino using parameters of the sterile neutrino mass and mixing angle recently extracted from experiment.

  1. Neutrino Oscillations With Recently Measured Sterile-Active Neutrino Mixing Angle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kisslinger, Leonard S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brief report is an extension of a prediction of neutrino oscillation with a sterile neutrino using parameters of the sterile neutrino mass and mixing angle recently extracted from experiment.

  2. Energy Dependence of Solar Neutrino Suppression and Bounds on the Neutrino Magnetic Moment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joao Pulido; Ana M. Mourao

    1998-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of neutrino electron scattering as applied to the SuperKamiokande solar neutrino experiment with the data from the Homestake experiment leads to an upper bound on the neutrino magnetic moment in the range $\\mu_{\

  3. The Sun Asphericities: Astrophysical Relevance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J-P. Rozelot; S. Pireaux; S. Lefebvre; T. Corbard

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Of all the fundamental parameters of the Sun (diameter, mass, temperature...), the gravitational multipole moments (of degree l and order m) that determine the solar moments of inertia, are still poorly known. However, at the first order (l=2), the quadrupole moment is relevant to many astrophysical applications. It indeed contributes to the relativistic perihelion advance of planets, together with the post-Newtonian (PN) parameters; or to the precession of the orbital plane about the Sun polar axis, the latter being unaffected by the purely relativistic PN contribution. Hence, a precise knowledge of the quadrupole moment is necessary for accurate orbit determination, and alternatively, to obtain constraints on the PN parameters. Moreover, the successive gravitational multipole moments have a physical meaning: they describe deviations from a purely spherical mass distribution. Thus, their precise determination gives indications on the solar internal structure. Here, we explain why it is difficult to compute these parameters, how to derive the best values, and how they will be determined in a near future by means of space experiments.

  4. Field-theoretical treatment of neutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grimus, Walter; Stockinger, P

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the field-theoretical approach to neutrino oscillations. This approach includes the neutrino source and detector processes and allows to obtain the neutrino transition or survival probabilities as cross sections derived from the Feynman diagram of the combined source -- detection process. In this context, the neutrinos which are supposed to oscillate appear as propagators of the neutrino mass eigenfields, connecting the source and detection processes.

  5. Field-theoretical treatment of neutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Grimus; S. Mohanty; P. Stockinger

    1999-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the field-theoretical approach to neutrino oscillations. This approach includes the neutrino source and detector processes and allows to obtain the neutrino transition or survival probabilities as cross sections derived from the Feynman diagram of the combined source -- detection process. In this context, the neutrinos which are supposed to oscillate appear as propagators of the neutrino mass eigenfields, connecting the source and detection processes.

  6. Neutrino mass matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capps, R.H.; Strobel, E.L.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is assumed that the Dirac mass matrix for the neutrinos (..nu../sub e/,..nu../sub ..mu../,..nu../sub tau/) is similar in form to those for the quarks and charged leptons, and that the smallness of the observed ..nu.. masses results from the Gell-Mann--Ramond--Slansky mechanism. It is shown that if certain tentative experimental results concerning the ..nu.. masses and mixing angles are confirmed, significant limitations may be placed on the Majorana mass matrix. The most satisfactory simple assumption concerning the Majorana mass matrix is that it is approximately proportional to the Dirac mass matrix. Some general properties of the Dirac matrices are discussed.

  7. Neutrinos and duality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lalakulich, O.; Leitner, T.; Buss, O.; Mosel, U. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen, Giessen (Germany); Praet, Ch.; Jachowicz, N.; Ryckebusch, J. [Department of Subatomic and Radiation Physics, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium)

    2009-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A phenomenological study of Bloom-Gilman duality is performed in electron and neutrino scattering on nuclei. In the resonance region the structure functions are calculated within the phenomenological models of Ghent and Giessen groups, where only the resonance contribution is taken into account, and the background one is neglected. Structure functions F{sub 2} in the resonance region are compared with the DIS ones, extracted directly from the experimental data. The results show, that within the models considered the Bloom-Gilman duality does not work well for nuclei: the integrated strength in the resonance region is considerably lower than in the DIS one.

  8. Neutrino Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011 at3, Issue 30Neutrino cross

  9. Neutrino Nucleon Elastic Scattering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011 at3, Issue 30Neutrino crossN u F a

  10. Neutrino Nucleon Elastic Scattering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011 at3, Issue 30Neutrino crossN u F

  11. Neutrino Scattering Results from

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011 at3, Issue 30Neutrino crossN/SΒ ν

  12. Booster Neutrino Experiment - Introduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Site MapSolarAbout Neutrinos General Informationclose

  13. Short Baseline Neutrino

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9 SeptemberSetting theSheldon Datz,ShiftNeutrino

  14. Neutrino and Anti-neutrino Cross Sections at MiniBooNE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dharmapalan, Ranjan [University of Alabama Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tuscaloosa, AL-35487 (United States)

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The MiniBooNE experiment has reported a number of high statistics neutrino and anti-neutrino cross sections -among which are the charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) and neutral current elastic (NCE) neutrino scattering on mineral oil (CH{sub 2}). Recently a study of the neutrino contamination of the anti-neutrino beam has concluded and the analysis of the anti-neutrino CCQE and NCE scattering is ongoing.

  15. Double-beta-decay mass constraints on 17-keV neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haxton, W.C. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (USA))

    1991-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Attempts to reconcile a 17-keV neutrino with constraints from astrophysics and double beta decay have led to model Majorana neutrino mass matrices with vanishing (or nearly vanishing) electron-electron components. A simple parametrization is presented of the higher-order mass effects on the intermediate-state propagator through which 0{nu} {beta}{beta} decay can still occur. For light-mass eigenstates, the 0{nu} and 2{nu} rates are proportional, with the ratio depending on a weighted sum over mass eigenstates {l angle}{ital m}{sub {nu}}{sup 3}{r angle}{sub {ital L}{ital L}}{sup Maj}. Thus, model 0{nu} {beta}{beta} decay rates can be predicted with confidence.

  16. NASA/TM-2014-217523 Goddard's Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    ..................................................................................................................................................1 2013 Year in Review ..............................................................................................

  17. NASA/TM2009214182 The Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    ....................................................................................................................................1 I. 2008: Year in Review

  18. Quasivacuum solar neutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; D. Montanino; A. Palazzo

    2000-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss in detail solar neutrino oscillations with \\delta m^2/E in the range [10^-10,10^-7] eV^2/MeV. In this range, which interpolates smoothly between the so-called ``just-so'' and ``Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein'' oscillation regimes, neutrino flavor transitions are increasingly affected by matter effects as \\delta m^2/E increases. As a consequence, the usual vacuum approximation has to be improved through the matter-induced corrections, leading to a ``quasi-vacuum'' oscillation regime. We perform accurate numerical calculations of such corrections, using both the true solar density profile and its exponential approximation. Matter effects are shown to be somewhat overestimated in the latter case. We also discuss the role of Earth crossing and of energy smearing. Prescriptions are given to implement the leading corrections in the quasi-vacuum oscillation range. Finally, the results are applied to a global analysis of solar nu data in a three-flavor framework.

  19. LSND neutrino oscillation results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis, W.C.; LSND Collaboration

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LSND (Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector) experiment at Los Alamos has conducted a search for muon antineutrino {r_arrow} electron antineutrino oscillations using muon neutrinos from antimuon decay at rest. The electron antineutrinos are detected via the reaction electron antineutrino + proton {r_arrow} positron + neutron, correlated with the 2.2-MeV gamma from neutron + proton {r_arrow} deuteron + gamma. The use of tight cuts to identify positron events with correlated gamma rays yields 22 events with positron energy between 36 and 60 MeV and only 4.6 {+-} 0.6 background events. The probability that this excess is due entirely to a statistical fluctuation is 4.1 {times} 10{sup -8}. A chi-squared fit to the entire positron sample results in a total excess of 51.8 {sup +18.7}{sub -16.9} {+-} 8.0 events with positron energy between 20 and 60 MeV. If attributed to muon antineutrino {r_arrow} electron antineutrino oscillations, this corresponds to an oscillation probability (averaged over the experimental energy and spatial acceptance) of (0.31 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.05){percent}. 10 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  20. DIVISION 6 -WOOD AND PLASTICS 06000 GENERAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIVISION 6 - WOOD AND PLASTICS ________________________________________________________________________ 06000 GENERAL 1. For both woods and plastics, special attention is called to matters of flame spread-dried. 3. For exterior wood or plastic framed structures, see Division 4 for dimensions of Sample Panel

  1. Textures for neutrino mass matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leontaris, G.K.; Lola, S.; Scheich, C.; Vergados, J.D. [Theoretical Physics Division, Ioannina University, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece)] [Theoretical Physics Division, Ioannina University, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Univerisitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049, Madrid (Spain); [Department of Natural Sciences, University of Cyprus, Nicosia (Cyprus)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a classification of heavy Majorana neutrino mass matrices with up to three texture zeros, assuming the Dirac masses of the neutrinos to be of the same form as the ones of the up quarks in the five texture zero solutions for the quark matrices. This is the case for many unified and partially unified models. We find that it is possible to have solutions which account for the solar and atmospheric neutrino problems as well as the COBE observations simultaneously, and we motivate the existence of such solutions from symmetries. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. Neutrino Physics with Thermal Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nucciotti, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano Bicocca and INFN Sezione di Milano-Bicocca Piazza della Scienza, 3, 20126 Milano (Italy)

    2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The investigation of fundamental neutrino properties like its mass and its nature calls for the design of a new generation of experiments. High sensitivity, high energy resolution, and versatility together with the possibility of a simple multiplexing scheme are the key features of future detectors for these experiments. Thermal detectors can combine all these features. This paper reviews the status and the perspectives for what concerns the application of this type of detectors to neutrino physics, focusing on direct neutrino mass measurements and neutrinoless double beta decay searches.

  3. Registration of atmospheric neutrinos with the Baikal neutrino telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baikal Collaboration; V. A. Balkanov et al

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present first neutrino induced events observed with a deep underwater neutrino telescope. Data from 70 days effective life time of the BAIKAL prototype telescope NT-96 have been analyzed with two different methods. With the standard track reconstruction method, 9 clear upward muon candidates have been identified, in good agreement with 8.7 events expected from Monte Carlo calculations for atmospheric neutrinos. The second analysis is tailored to muons coming from close to the opposite zenith. It yields 4 events, compared to 3.5 from Monte Carlo expectations. From this we derive a 90 % upper flux limit of 1.1 * 10^-13 cm^-2 sec^-1 for muons in excess of those expected from atmospheric neutrinos with zenith angle > 150 degrees and energy > 10GeV.

  4. Education Strategy Team Policy Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Education Strategy Team Policy Division DFID 1 Palace Street London SW1E 5HE 30 October 2009 TEL fellowships in India under the Wellcome Trust/DBT India Alliance2 . We believe that such investment is vital/Global-health-research/WTX055734.htm 2 Wellcome Trust/DBT India Alliance: http://www.wellcomedbt.org/index.htm #12;to support

  5. Publishing Division The Edinburgh Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberger, Alfred H.

    Publishing Division The Edinburgh Building Shaftesbury Road Cambridge CB2 2RU, UK TELEPHONE 01223 Building, Cambridge CB2 2RU, UK 40 West 20th Street, New York NY 10011-4211, USA 477 Williamstown Road Record [1] walter carl hartwig 2 The origin of primates [5] david tab rasmussen The earliest primates

  6. Solar neutrinos, helicity effects and new affine gravity with torsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diego Julio Cirilo-Lombardo; BLTP-JINR

    2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    New f(R,T) model of gravitation, introduced previously by the author, is considered. It is based on an affine geometrical construction in which the torsion is a dynamical field, the coupling is minimal and the theory is Lorentz invariant by construction. It was shown that the Dirac equation emerges from the same space time and acquires a modification (coupling-like) of the form {\\gamma}^{{\\alpha}}j((1-d)/d){\\gamma}h_{{\\alpha}}, with h_{{\\alpha}} the torsion axial vector, j a parameter of pure geometrical nature and d, the spacetime dimension. In the present work it is shown that this interaction produces a mechanism of spin (helicity) flipping, with its consequent weak symmetry violation. The cross section of this process is explicitly calculated and a logaritmical energy dependence (even at high energies) is found. This behavior is reminiscent of similar computations made by Hans Bethe in the context of neutrino astrophysics. These results are applied to the solar neutrino case and compared with similar results coming from a gravitational model with torsion of string theory type and within the standard model context respectively.

  7. The Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment: Exploring Fundamental Symmetries of the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNE Collaboration; Corey Adams; David Adams; Tarek Akiri; Tyler Alion; Kris Anderson; Costas Andreopoulos; Mike Andrews; Ioana Anghel; João Carlos Costa dos Anjos; Maddalena Antonello; Enrique Arrieta-Diaz; Marina Artuso; Jonathan Asaadi; Xinhua Bai; Bagdat Baibussinov; Michael Baird; Baha Balantekin; Bruce Baller; Brian Baptista; D'Ann Barker; Gary Barker; William A. Barletta; Giles Barr; Larry Bartoszek; Amit Bashyal; Matt Bass; Vincenzo Bellini; Pietro Angelo Benetti; Bruce E. Berger; Marc Bergevin; Eileen Berman; Hans-Gerd Berns; Adam Bernstein; Robert Bernstein; Babu Bhandari; Vipin Bhatnagar; Bipul Bhuyan; Jianming Bian; Mary Bishai; Andrew Blake; Flor Blaszczyk; Erik Blaufuss; Bruce Bleakley; Edward Blucher; Steve Blusk; Virgil Bocean; F. Boffelli; Jan Boissevain; Timothy Bolton; Maurizio Bonesini; Steve Boyd; Andrew Brandt; Richard Breedon; Carl Bromberg; Ralph Brown; Giullia Brunetti; Norman Buchanan; Bill Bugg; Jerome Busenitz; E. Calligarich; Leslie Camilleri; Giada Carminati; Rachel Carr; Cesar Castromonte; Flavio Cavanna; Sandro Centro; Alex Chen; Hucheng Chen; Kai Chen; Daniel Cherdack; Cheng-Yi Chi; Sam Childress; Brajesh Chandra Choudhary; Georgios Christodoulou; Cabot-Ann Christofferson; Eric Church; David Cline; Thomas Coan; Alfredo Cocco; Joao Coelho; Stephen Coleman; Janet M. Conrad; Mark Convery; Robert Corey; Luke Corwin; Jack Cranshaw; Daniel Cronin-Hennessy; A. Curioni; Helio da Motta; Tristan Davenne; Gavin S. Davies; Steven Dazeley; Kaushik De; Andre de Gouvea; Jeffrey K. de Jong; David Demuth; Chris Densham; Milind Diwan; Zelimir Djurcic; R. Dolfini; Jeffrey Dolph; Gary Drake; Stephen Dye; Hongue Dyuang; Daniel Edmunds; Steven Elliott; Muhammad Elnimr; Sarah Eno; Sanshiro Enomoto; Carlos O. Escobar; Justin Evans; A. Falcone; Lisa Falk; Amir Farbin; Christian Farnese; Angela Fava; John Felde; S. Fernandes; Fernando Ferroni; Farshid Feyzi; Laura Fields; Alex Finch; Mike Fitton; Bonnie Fleming; Jack Fowler; Walt Fox; Alex Friedland; Stu Fuess; Brian Fujikawa; Hugh Gallagher; Raj Gandhi; Gerald Garvey; Victor M. Gehman; Gianluigi de Geronimo; Daniele Gibin; Ronald Gill; Ricardo A. Gomes; Maury C. Goodman; Jason Goon; Nicholas Graf; Mathew Graham; Rik Gran; Christopher Grant; Nick Grant; Herbert Greenlee; Leland Greenler; Sean Grullon; Elena Guardincerri; Victor Guarino; Evan Guarnaccia; Germano Guedes; Roxanne Guenette; Alberto Guglielmi; Marcelo M. Guzzo; Alec T. Habig; Robert W. Hackenburg; Haleh Hadavand; Alan Hahn; Martin Haigh; Todd Haines; Thomas Handler; Sunej Hans; Jeff Hartnell; John Harton; Robert Hatcher; Athans Hatzikoutelis; Steven Hays; Eric Hazen; Mike Headley; Anne Heavey; Karsten Heeger; Jaret Heise; Robert Hellauer; Jeremy Hewes; Alexander Himmel; Matthew Hogan; Pedro Holanda; Anna Holin; Glenn Horton-Smith; Joe Howell; Patrick Hurh; Joey Huston; James Hylen; Richard Imlay; Jonathan Insler; G. Introzzi; Zeynep Isvan; Chris Jackson; John Jacobsen; David E. Jaffe; Cat James; Chun-Min Jen; Marvin Johnson; Randy Johnson; Robert Johnson; Scott Johnson; William Johnston; John Johnstone; Ben J. P. Jones; H. Jostlein; Thomas Junk; Richard Kadel; Karl Kaess; Georgia Karagiorgi; Jarek Kaspar; Teppei Katori; Boris Kayser; Edward Kearns; Paul Keener; Ernesto Kemp; Steve H. Kettell; Mike Kirby; Joshua Klein; Gordon Koizumi; Sacha Kopp; Laura Kormos; William Kropp; Vitaly A. Kudryavtsev; Ashok Kumar; Jason Kumar; Thomas Kutter; Franco La Zia; Kenneth Lande; Charles Lane; Karol Lang; Francesco Lanni; Richard Lanza; Tony Latorre; John Learned; David Lee; Kevin Lee; Qizhong Li; Shaorui Li; Yichen Li; Zepeng Li; Jiang Libo; Steve Linden; Jiajie Ling; Jonathan Link; Laurence Littenberg; Hu Liu; Qiuguang Liu; Tiankuan Liu; John Losecco; William Louis; Byron Lundberg; Tracy Lundin; Jay Lundy; Ana Amelia Machado; Cara Maesano; Steve Magill; George Mahler; David Malon; Stephen Malys; Francesco Mammoliti; Samit Kumar Mandal; Anthony Mann; Paul Mantsch; Alberto Marchionni; William Marciano; Camillo Mariani; Jelena Maricic; Alysia Marino; Marvin Marshak; John Marshall; Shiegenobu Matsuno; Christopher Mauger; Konstantinos Mavrokoridis; Nate Mayer; Neil McCauley; Elaine McCluskey; Kirk McDonald; Kevin McFarland; David McKee; Robert McKeown; Robert McTaggart; Rashid Mehdiyev; Dongming Mei; A. Menegolli; Guang Meng; Yixiong Meng; David Mertins; Mark Messier; William Metcalf; Radovan Milincic; William Miller; Geoff Mills; Sanjib R. Mishra; Nikolai Mokhov; Claudio Montanari; David Montanari; Craig Moore; Jorge Morfin; Ben Morgan; William Morse; Zander Moss; Célio A. Moura; Stuart Mufson; David Muller; Jim Musser; Donna Naples; Jim Napolitano; Mitch Newcomer; Ryan Nichol; Tim Nicholls; Evan Niner; Barry Norris

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The preponderance of matter over antimatter in the early Universe, the dynamics of the supernova bursts that produced the heavy elements necessary for life and whether protons eventually decay --- these mysteries at the forefront of particle physics and astrophysics are key to understanding the early evolution of our Universe, its current state and its eventual fate. The Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) represents an extensively developed plan for a world-class experiment dedicated to addressing these questions. LBNE is conceived around three central components: (1) a new, high-intensity neutrino source generated from a megawatt-class proton accelerator at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, (2) a near neutrino detector just downstream of the source, and (3) a massive liquid argon time-projection chamber deployed as a far detector deep underground at the Sanford Underground Research Facility. This facility, located at the site of the former Homestake Mine in Lead, South Dakota, is approximately 1,300 km from the neutrino source at Fermilab -- a distance (baseline) that delivers optimal sensitivity to neutrino charge-parity symmetry violation and mass ordering effects. This ambitious yet cost-effective design incorporates scalability and flexibility and can accommodate a variety of upgrades and contributions. With its exceptional combination of experimental configuration, technical capabilities, and potential for transformative discoveries, LBNE promises to be a vital facility for the field of particle physics worldwide, providing physicists from around the globe with opportunities to collaborate in a twenty to thirty year program of exciting science. In this document we provide a comprehensive overview of LBNE's scientific objectives, its place in the landscape of neutrino physics worldwide, the technologies it will incorporate and the capabilities it will possess.

  8. astrophysical scenarios pushing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for an Astrophysical Scenario Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: In some models of gamma-ray bursts super-strong electric fields (Esim 1014 rm statvolt cm-1) have...

  9. Biosciences Division Media Mentions | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biosciences Division Publications Newsletters Organizational Charts Research Highlights Media Mentions Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Supporting...

  10. Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Radiological Condition of the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories Cheswick, Pennsylvania -. -, -- AGENCY: Office of Operational Safety, Department...

  11. Neutrino mass hierarchy extraction using atmospheric neutrinos in ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olga Mena; Irina Mocioiu; Soebur Razzaque

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the measurements of 10 GeV atmospheric neutrinos by an upcoming array of densely packed phototubes buried deep inside the IceCube detector at the South Pole can be used to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy for values of sin^2(2theta13) close to the present bound, if the hierarchy is normal. These results are obtained for an exposure of 100 Mton years and systematic uncertainties up to 10%.

  12. Relic neutrino decoupling including flavour oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gianpiero Mangano; Gennaro Miele; Sergio Pastor; Teguayco Pinto; Ofelia Pisanti; Pasquale D. Serpico

    2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In the early universe, neutrinos are slightly coupled when electron-positron pairs annihilate transferring their entropy to photons. This process originates non-thermal distortions on the neutrino spectra which depend on neutrino flavour, larger for nu_e than for nu_mu or nu_tau. We study the effect of three-neutrino flavour oscillations on the process of neutrino decoupling by solving the momentum-dependent kinetic equations for the neutrino spectra. We find that oscillations do not essentially modify the total change in the neutrino energy density, giving N_eff=3.046 in terms of the effective number of neutrinos, while the small effect over the production of primordial 4He is increased by O(20%), up to 2.1 x 10^{-4}. These results are stable within the presently favoured region of neutrino mixing parameters.

  13. Constrains on Dark Matter sterile neutrino resonant production in the light of Planck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popa, L A; Tonoiu, D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Few independent detections of a weak X-ray emission line at an energy of ~3.5 keV seen toward a number of astrophysical sites have been reported. If this signal will be confirmed to be the signature of decaying DM sterile neutrino with a mass of ~7.1 keV, then the cosmological observables should be consistent with its properties. We compute the radiation and matter perturbations including the full resonance sweep solution for active - sterile neutrino flavor conversion and place constraints on the cosmological parameters and sterile neutrino properties by using most of the present cosmological measurements. We find the sterile neutrino upper limits for mass and mixing angle of 7.86 keV (equivalent to 2.54 keV thermal mass) and 9.41 x 10^{-9} (at 95% CL) respectively, for a lepton number per flavor of 0.0042, that is significantly higher than that inferred in Abazajian (2014) from the linear large scale structure constraints. This reflects the sensitivity of the high precision CMB anisotropies to the helium ab...

  14. Super-Kamiokande hep neutrino best fit: a possible signal of nonmaxwellian solar plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massimo Coraddu; Marcello Lissia; Giuseppe Mezzorani; Piero Quarati

    2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Super-Kamiokande best global fit, which includes data from SNO, Gallium and Chlorine experiments, results in a hep neutrino contribution to the signals that, even after oscillation, is greater than the SSM prediction. The solar hep neutrino flux that would yield this contribution is four times larger than the one predicted by the SSM. Recent detailed calculations exclude that the astrophysical factor S_{hep}(0) could be wrong by such a large factor. Given the reliability of the temperature and densities profiles inside the Sun, this experimental result indicates that plasma effects are important for this reaction. We show that a slight enhancement of the high-energy tail, enhancement that is of the order of the deviations from the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution expected in the solar core plasma, produces an increment of the hep rate of the magnitude required. We verified that the other neutrino fluxes remain compatible with experimental signals and SSM predictions. Better measurements of the high-energy tail of the neutrino spectrum would improve our understanding of reaction rates in the solar plasma.

  15. The Role and Detectability of the Charm Contribution to Ultra High Energy Neutrino Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gandhi, Raj; Watanabe, Atsushi

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is widely believed that charm meson production and decay may play an important role in high energy astrophysical sources of neutrinos, especially those that are baryon-rich, providing an environment conducive to pp interactions. Using slow-jet supernovae (SJS) as an example of such a source, we study the detectability of high-energy neutrinos, paying particular attention to those produced from charmed-mesons. We highlight important distinguishing features in the ultra-high energy neutrino flux which would act as markers for the role of charm in the source. In particular, charm leads to significant event rates at higher energies, after the conventional (pi, K) neutrino fluxes fall off. We calculate event rates both for a nearby single source and for diffuse SJS fluxes for an IceCube-like detector. By comparing muon event rates for the conventional and prompt fluxes in different energy bins, we demonstrate the striking energy dependence in the rates induced by the presence of charm. We also show that it lead...

  16. Finance Division EXTRA MILE AWARD PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crews, Stephen

    Finance Division EXTRA MILE AWARD PROGRAM Nomination Form Instructions Any fulltime or parttime permanent or temporary SPA employee within the Finance Division who works 20 or more provided. The seven major departments within the Finance Division to choose from are described below

  17. Analytical Chemistry Division's sample transaction system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanton, J.S.; Tilson, P.A.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Analytical Chemistry Division uses the DECsystem-10 computer for a wide range of tasks: sample management, timekeeping, quality assurance, and data calculation. This document describes the features and operating characteristics of many of the computer programs used by the Division. The descriptions are divided into chapters which cover all of the information about one aspect of the Analytical Chemistry Division's computer processing.

  18. EARTH SCIENCES Lower-Division Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constable, Steve

    2012-2013 EARTH SCIENCES Lower-Division Requirements Math 20A_____ 20B_____ 20C_____ 20D (BILD 3) _____ SIO 50* _____ Group A: Earth Science Upper-Division Core Requirements (all courses _____ Introduction to Geophysics SIO 104 _____ Paleobiology and History of Life* Group B: Upper-Division Earth

  19. Computer Security Division 2008 Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computer Security Division 2008 Annual Report #12;TAble of ConTenTS Welcome 1 Division Organization 2 The Computer Security Division Responds to the Federal Information Security Management Act of 2002 3 Security Management and Assistance Group (SMA) 4 FISMA Implementation Project 4 Publications

  20. The Cosmic Battery in Astrophysical Accretion Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contopoulos, Ioannis; Katsanikas, Matthaios

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aberrated radiation pressure at the inner edge of the accretion disk around an astrophysical black hole imparts a relative azimuthal velocity on the electrons with respect to the ions which gives rise to a ring electric current that generates large scale poloidal magnetic field loops. This is the Cosmic Battery established by Contopoulos and Kazanas in 1998. In the present work we perform realistic numerical simulations of this important astrophysical mechanism in advection-dominated accretion flows-ADAF. We confirm the original prediction that the inner parts of the loops are continuously advected toward the central black hole and contribute to the growth of the large scale magnetic field, whereas the outer parts of the loops are continuously diffusing outward through the turbulent accretion flow. This process of inward advection of the axial field and outward diffusion of the return field proceeds all the way to equipartition, thus generating astrophysically significant magnetic fields on astrophysicall...

  1. ASTROPHYSICAL FLUID DYNAMICS VIA DIRECT STATISTICAL SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobias, S. M. [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Dagon, K.; Marston, J. B., E-mail: smt@maths.leeds.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912-1843 (United States)

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we introduce the concept of direct statistical simulation for astrophysical flows. This technique may be appropriate for problems in astrophysical fluids where the instantaneous dynamics of the flows are of secondary importance to their statistical properties. We give examples of such problems including mixing and transport in planets, stars, and disks. The method is described for a general set of evolution equations, before we consider the specific case of a spectral method optimized for problems on a spherical surface. The method is illustrated for the simplest non-trivial example of hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics on a rotating spherical surface. We then discuss possible extensions of the method both in terms of computational methods and the range of astrophysical problems that are of interest.

  2. MATERIALS AND MOLECULAR RESEARCH DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT 1980

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Searcy, Alan W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of trans­ uranium organometallic chemistry, particularlyfor Uranium Isotope Separation," Chemistry Division, IsotopeOlander, "Uranium Enrichment by Laser," Chemistry Division,

  3. analytical sciences division: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Division Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division Director Assoc Director Ops Assoc Director Science Yates...

  4. MATERIALS AND MOLECULAR RESEARCH DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT 1980

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Searcy, Alan W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Uranium Isotope Separation," Chemistry Division, Isotopeof trans­ uranium organometallic chemistry, particularlyOlander, "Uranium Enrichment by Laser," Chemistry Division,

  5. Quantum Mechanics of Neutrino Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Giunti; C. W. Kim

    2000-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a simple but general treatment of neutrino oscillations in the framework of quantum mechanics using plane waves and intuitive wave packet principles when necessary. We attempt to clarify some confusing statements that have recently appeared in the literature.

  6. High-Energy Neutrino Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    2004-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Kilometer-scale neutrino detectors such as IceCube are discovery instruments covering nuclear and particle physics, cosmology and astronomy. Examples of their multidisciplinary missions include the search for the particle nature of dark matter and for additional small dimensions of space. In the end, their conceptual design is very much anchored to the observational fact that Nature accelerates protons and photons to energies in excess of $10^{20}$ and $10^{13}$ eV, respectively. The cosmic ray connection sets the scale of cosmic neutrino fluxes. In this context, we discuss the first results of the completed AMANDA detector and the reach of its extension, IceCube. Similar experiments are under construction in the Mediterranean. Neutrino astronomy is also expanding in new directions with efforts to detect air showers, acoustic and radio signals initiated by super-EeV neutrinos.

  7. High-Energy Neutrino Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    2005-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Kilometer-scale neutrino detectors such as IceCube are discovery instruments covering nuclear and particle physics, cosmology and astronomy. Examples of their multidisciplinary missions include the search for the particle nature of dark matter and for additional small dimensions of space. In the end, their conceptual design is very much anchored to the observational fact that Nature accelerates protons and photons to energies in excess of 10^{20} and 10^{13} eV, respectively. The cosmic ray connection sets the scale of cosmic neutrino fluxes. In this context, we discuss the first results of the completed AMANDA detector and the reach of its extension, IceCube. Similar experiments are under construction in the Mediterranean. Neutrino astronomy is also expanding in new directions with efforts to detect air showers, acoustic and radio signals initiated by neutrinos with energies similar to those of the highest energy cosmic rays.

  8. Neutrino capital of the world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Carolyn Y., 1980-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinos are ubiquitous particles, but they don't like to mingle. Each second, billions of them pass through our bodies, slicing imperceptibly through our delicate internal organs. They can barrel through the sun, stars, ...

  9. Research in Neutrino Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busenitz, Jerome [The University of Alabama

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Research in Neutrino Physics We describe here the recent activities of our two groups over the first year of this award (effectively November 2010 through January 2012) and our proposed activities and associated budgets for the coming grant year. Both of our groups are collaborating on the Double Chooz reactor neutrino experiment and are playing major roles in calibration and analysis. A major milestone was reached recently: the collaboration obtained the first result on the search for 13 based on 100 days of data from the far detector. Our data indicates that 13 is not zero; specifically the best fit of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis to our data gives sin2 (2 13) = 0.086 ± 0.041 (stat) ± 0.030 (syst) The null oscillation hypothesis is excluded at the 94.6% C.L. This result1 has been submitted to Physical Review Letters. As we continue to take data with the far detector in the coming year, in parallel with completing the construction of the near lab and installing the near detector, we expect the precision of our measurement to improve as we gather significantly more statistics, gain better control of backgrounds through use of partial power data and improved event selection, and better understand the detector energy scale and detection efficiency from calibration data. With both detectors taking data starting in the second half of 2013, we expect to further drive down the uncertainty on our measurement of sin2 (2 13) to less than 0.02. Stancu’s group is also collaborating on the MiniBooNE experiment. Data taking is scheduled to continue through April, by which time 1.18 × 1021 POT is projected. The UA group is playing a leading role in the measurement of antineutrino cross sections, which should be the subject of a publication later this year as well as of Ranjan Dharmapalan’s Ph.D. thesis, which he is expected to defend by the end of this year. It is time to begin working on projects which will eventually succeed Double Chooz and MiniBooNE as the main foci of our efforts. The Stancu group plans to become re–involved in LBNE and possibly also to join NO A, and the Busenitz group has begun to explore joining a direct dark matter search.

  10. MPhys (Hons) in Astrophysics MPhys (Hons) in Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Essentials Courses MPhys (Hons) in Astrophysics MPhys (Hons) in Physics BSc (Hons) in Physics MPhys (Hons) in Physics (research placement) MPhys (Hons) in Physics with Astrophysics BSc (Hons) in Physics with Astrophysics MPhys (Hons) in Theoretical Physics BSc (Hons) in Theoretical Physics Foundation year for UK

  11. Calibration in High-Energy Astrophysics Statistical Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dyk, David

    Calibration in High-Energy Astrophysics Statistical Methods Empirical Illustrations Accounting for Calibration Uncertainty in High Energy Astrophysics David A. van Dyk1 Vinay Kashyap2 Taeyoung Park3 Jin Xu4 David A. van Dyk Accounting for Calibration Uncertainty #12;Calibration in High-Energy Astrophysics

  12. Computational aspects of astrophysical MHD and turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axel Brandenburg

    2001-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The advantages of high-order finite difference scheme for astrophysical MHD and turbulence simulations are highlighted. A number of one-dimensional test cases are presented ranging from various shock tests to Parker-type wind solutions. Applications to magnetized accretion discs and their associated outflows are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the possibility of dynamo action in three-dimensional turbulent convection and shear flows, which is relevant to stars and astrophysical discs. The generation of large scale fields is discussed in terms of an inverse magnetic cascade and the consequences imposed by magnetic helicity conservation are reviewed with particular emphasis on the issue of alpha-quenching.

  13. Astrophysics experiments with radioactive beams at ATLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Back, B. B.; Clark, J. A.; Pardo, R. C.; Rehm, K. E., E-mail: rehm@anl.gov; Savard, G. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)] [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactions involving short-lived nuclei play an important role in nuclear astrophysics, especially in explosive scenarios which occur in novae, supernovae or X-ray bursts. This article describes the nuclear astrophysics program with radioactive ion beams at the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Laboratory. The CARIBU facility as well as recent improvements for the in-flight technique are discussed. New detectors which are important for studies of the rapid proton or the rapid neutron-capture processes are described. At the end we briefly mention plans for future upgrades to enhance the intensity, purity and the range of in-flight and CARIBU beams.

  14. A New Spin on Neutrino Quantum Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincenzo Cirigliano; George M. Fuller; Alexey Vlasenko

    2015-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have demonstrated that in anisotropic environments a coherent spin-flip term arises in the Quantum Kinetic Equations (QKEs) which govern the evolution of neutrino flavor and spin in hot and dense media. This term can mediate neutrino-antineutrino transformation for Majorana neutrinos and active-sterile transformation for Dirac neutrinos. We discuss the physical origin of the coherent spin-flip term and provide explicit expressions for the QKEs in a two-flavor model with spherical geometry. In this context, we demonstrate that coherent neutrino spin transformation depends on the absolute neutrino mass and Majorana phases.

  15. Solar mass-varying neutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Barger; Patrick Huber; Danny Marfatia

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose that the solar neutrino deficit may be due to oscillations of mass-varying neutrinos (MaVaNs). This scenario elucidates solar neutrino data beautifully while remaining comfortably compatible with atmospheric neutrino and K2K data and with reactor antineutrino data at short and long baselines (from CHOOZ and KamLAND). We find that the survival probability of solar MaVaNs is independent of how the suppression of neutrino mass caused by the acceleron-matter couplings varies with density. Measurements of MeV and lower energy solar neutrinos will provide a rigorous test of the idea.

  16. Variations on Four-Neutrino Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Barger; S. Pakvasa; T. J. Weiler; K. Whisnant

    1998-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We make a model-independent analysis of all available data that indicate neutrino oscillations. Using probability diagrams, we confirm that a mass spectrum with two nearly degenerate pairs of neutrinos separated by a mass gap of $\\simeq1$ eV is preferred over a spectrum with one mass eigenstate separated from the others. We derive some new relations among the four-neutrino mixing matrix elements. We design four-neutrino mass matrices with three active neutrinos and one sterile neutrino that naturally incorporate maximal oscillations of atmospheric $\

  17. Probing supernova physics with neutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Minakata; H. Nunokawa; R. Tomas; J. W. F. Valle

    2002-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We point out that solar neutrino oscillations with large mixing angle as evidenced in current solar neutrino data have a strong impact on strategies for diagnosing collapse-driven supernova (SN) through neutrino observations. Such oscillations induce a significant deformation of the energy spectra of neutrinos, thereby allowing us to obtain otherwise inaccessible features of SN neutrino spectra. We demonstrate that one can determine temperatures and luminosities of non-electron flavor neutrinos by observing bar{nu}_{e} from galactic SN in massive water Cherenkov detectors by the charged current reactions on protons.

  18. Are solar neutrino oscillations robust?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. G. Miranda; M. A. Tortola; J. W. F. Valle

    2006-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The robustness of the large mixing angle (LMA) oscillation (OSC) interpretation of the solar neutrino data is considered in a more general framework where non-standard neutrino interactions (NSI) are present. Such interactions may be regarded as a generic feature of models of neutrino mass. The 766.3 ton-yr data sample of the KamLAND collaboration are included in the analysis, paying attention to the background from the reaction ^13C(\\alpha,n) ^16O. Similarly, the latest solar neutrino fluxes from the SNO collaboration are included. In addition to the solution which holds in the absence of NSI (LMA-I) there is a 'dark-side' solution (LMA-D) with sin^2 theta_Sol = 0.70, essentially degenerate with the former, and another light-side solution (LMA-0) allowed only at 97% CL. More precise KamLAND reactor measurements will not resolve the ambiguity in the determination of the solar neutrino mixing angle theta_Sol, as they are expected to constrain mainly Delta m^2. We comment on the complementary role of atmospheric, laboratory (e.g. CHARM) and future solar neutrino experiments in lifting the degeneracy between the LMA-I and LMA-D solutions. In particular, we show how the LMA-D solution induced by the simplest NSI between neutrinos and down-type-quarks-only is in conflict with the combination of current atmospheric data and data of the CHARM experiment. We also mention that establishing the issue of robustness of the oscillation picture in the most general case will require further experiments, such as those involving low energy solar neutrinos.

  19. Neutrino factories: realization and physics potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab; Zisman, M.S.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino Factories offer an exciting option for the long-term neutrino physics program. This new type of neutrino facility will provide beams with unique properties. Low systematic uncertainties at a Neutrino Factory, together with a unique and precisely known neutrino flavor content, will enable neutrino oscillation measurements to be made with unprecedented sensitivity and precision. Over recent years, the resulting neutrino factory physics potential has been discussed extensively in the literature. In addition, over the last six years the R&D necessary to realize a Neutrino Factory has been progressing, and has developed into a significant international activity. It is expected that, within about five more years, the initial phase of this R&D program will be complete and, if the community chooses to build this new type of neutrino source within the following decade, neutrino factory technology will be ready for the final R&D phase prior to construction. In this paper (1) an overview is given of the technical ingredients needed for a Neutrino Factory, (2) beam properties are described, (3) the resulting neutrino oscillation physics potential is summarized, (4) a more detailed description is given for one representative Neutrino Factory design, and (5) the ongoing R&D program is summarized, and future plans briefly described.

  20. Neutrino Physics Neutrinos rarely interact despite their vast abundance in nature. To give a sense of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 1 Neutrino Physics Neutrinos rarely interact despite their vast abundance in nature later in 1933, Enrico Fermi devised a theory for beta decays which 1 #12;Chapter 1: Neutrino Physics 2 indicated oscillations [6]. This chapter will describe neutrino physics and some of the experiments

  1. 45. Neutrino Cross Section Measurements 1 45. Neutrino Cross Section Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for such information in the interpretation of neutrino oscillation data. Scattering results on both charged current (CC, analysis techniques, and detector technologies. With the advent of intense neutrino sources for oscillation45. Neutrino Cross Section Measurements 1 45. Neutrino Cross Section Measurements Written in April

  2. Study of Non-Standard Neutrino Interactions with Atmospheric Neutrino Data in Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    Study of Non-Standard Neutrino Interactions with Atmospheric Neutrino Data in Super-Kamiokande Gaku- standard interactions using large number of atmospheric neutrino data in Super-Kamiokande. The analysis. As a result of the analyses with the atmospheric neutrino data from the Super-Kamiokande-I (1996

  3. Super-Kamiokande Atmospheric Neutrino Analysis of Matter-Dependent Neutrino Oscillation Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    Super-Kamiokande Atmospheric Neutrino Analysis of Matter-Dependent Neutrino Oscillation Models microform." Signature Date #12;University of Washington Abstract Super-Kamiokande Atmospheric Neutrino of the matter a neutrino passes through. Using the data from Super-Kamiokande-I, µ - oscillation models whose

  4. Astrophysical Sources of Cosmic Rays and Related Measurements with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Correlation of the highest energy cosmic rays with nearby extragalactic objects in Pierre Auger Observatory data; (2) Discriminating potential astrophysical sources of the highest energy cosmic rays with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (3) Intrinsic anisotropy of the UHECR from the Pierre Auger Observatory; (4) Ultra-high energy photon studies with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (5) Limits on the flux of diffuse ultra high energy neutrinos set using the Pierre Auger Observatory; (6) Search for sidereal modulation of the arrival directions of events recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory; (7) Cosmic Ray Solar Modulation Studies in the Pierre Auger Observatory; (8) Investigation of the Displacement Angle of the Highest Energy Cosmic Rays Caused by the Galactic Magnetic Field; (9) Search for coincidences with astrophysical transients in Pierre Auger Observatory data; and (10) An alternative method for determining the energy of hybrid events at the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  5. Health, Safety, and Environment Division

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade, C [comp.] [comp.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environmental (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environmental protection. These activities are designed to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. Meeting these responsibilities requires expertise in many disciplines, including radiation protection, industrial hygiene, safety, occupational medicine, environmental science and engineering, analytical chemistry, epidemiology, and waste management. New and challenging health, safety, and environmental problems occasionally arise from the diverse research and development work of the Laboratory, and research programs in HSE Division often stem from these applied needs. These programs continue but are also extended, as needed, to study specific problems for the Department of Energy. The results of these programs help develop better practices in occupational health and safety, radiation protection, and environmental science.

  6. Los Alamos Science, Number 25 -- 1997: Celebrating the neutrino

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, N.G. [ed.] [ed.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue is devoted to the neutrino and its remaining mysteries. It is divided into the following areas: (1) The Reines-Cowan experiment -- detecting the poltergeist; (2) The oscillating neutrino -- an introduction to neutrino masses and mixing; (3) A brief history of neutrino experiments at LAMPF; (4) A thousand eyes -- the story of LSND (Los Alamos neutrino oscillation experiment); (5) The evidence for oscillations; (6) The nature of neutrinos in muon decay and physics beyond the Standard Model; (7) Exorcising ghosts -- in pursuit of the missing solar neutrinos; (8) MSW -- a possible solution to the solar neutrino problem; (8) Neutrinos and supernovae; and (9) Dark matter and massive neutrinos.

  7. How Uncertain Are Solar Neutrino Predictions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John N. Bahcall; Sarbani Basu; M. H. Pinsonneault

    1998-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar neutrino fluxes and sound speeds are calculated using a systematic reevaluation of nuclear fusion rates. The largest uncertainties are identified and their effects on the solar neutrino fluxes are estimated.

  8. Massless neutrino oscillations via quantum tunneling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hai-Long

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order for different kinds of neutrino to transform into each other, the eigenvalues of energy of neutrino must be different. In the present theory of neutrino oscillations, this is guaranteed by the mass differences between the different eigenstates of neutrino. Thus neutrino cannot oscillate if it is massless. We suggest an explanation for neutrino oscillations by analogy with the oscillation of quantum two-state system, where the flipping of one state into the other may be regarded as a process of quantum tunneling and the required energy difference between the two eigenstates comes from the barrier potential energy. So neutrino with vanishing mass can also oscillate. One of the advantages of the explanation is that neutrino can still be described with Weyl equation within the framework of standard model.

  9. Massless neutrino oscillations via quantum tunneling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hai-Long Zhao

    2015-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In order for different kinds of neutrino to transform into each other, the eigenvalues of energy of neutrino must be different. In the present theory of neutrino oscillations, this is guaranteed by the mass differences between the different eigenstates of neutrino. Thus neutrino cannot oscillate if it is massless. We suggest an explanation for neutrino oscillations by analogy with the oscillation of quantum two-state system, where the flipping of one state into the other may be regarded as a process of quantum tunneling and the required energy difference between the two eigenstates comes from the barrier potential energy. So neutrino with vanishing mass can also oscillate. One of the advantages of the explanation is that neutrino can still be described with Weyl equation within the framework of standard model.

  10. Four-Neutrino Oscillations at SNO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. C. Gonzalez-Garcia; C. Peña-Garay

    2001-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the potential of SNO to constraint the four-neutrino mixing schemes favoured by the results of all neutrino oscillations experiments. These schemes allow simultaneous transitions of solar $\

  11. Super Kamiokande results: atmospheric and solar neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ishitsuka; for the Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

    2004-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric neutrino and solar neutrino data from the first phase of Super-Kamiokande (SK-I) are presented. The observed data are used to study atmospheric and solar neutrino oscillations. Zenith angle distributions from various atmospheric neutrino data samples are used to estimate the neutrino oscillation parameter region. In addition, a new result of the $L/E$ measurement is presented. A dip in the $L/E$ distribution was observed in the data, as predicted from the sinusoidal flavor transition probability of neutrino oscillation. The energy spectrum and the time variation such as day/night and seasonal differences of solar neutrino flux are measured in Super-Kamiokande. The neutrino oscillation parameters are strongly constrained from those measurements.

  12. Annual modulation of cosmic relic neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safdi, Benjamin R.

    The cosmic neutrino background (C?B), produced about one second after the big bang, permeates the Universe today. New technological advancements make neutrino capture on beta-decaying nuclei (NCB) a clear path forward ...

  13. Neutrino mixing, flavor states and dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Blasone; A. Capolupo; S. Capozziello; G. Vitiello

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We shortly summarize the quantum field theory formalism for the neutrino mixing and report on recent results showing that the vacuum condensate induced by neutrino mixing can be interpreted as a dark energy component of the Universe.

  14. Neutrinos and cosmology: a lifetime relationship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the example of neutrino decays to illustrate the profound relation between laboratory neutrino physics and cosmology. Two case studies are presented: In the first one, we show how the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the FIRAS instrument on board of COBE, when combined with Lab data, have greatly changed bounds on the radiative neutrino lifetime. In the second case, we speculate on the consequence for neutrino physics of the cosmological detection of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a detection at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence on some models of neutrino secret interactions.

  15. Probing the absolute mass scale of neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Formaggio, Joseph A.

    The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment is the next generation tritium beta decay experiment with sub-eV sensitivity to make a direct, model independent measurement of the neutrino mass. The principle of the ...

  16. Detectability of the Supernova Relic Neutrinos and Neutrino Oscillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Ando; K. Sato; T. Totani

    2002-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the flux and the event rate of the supernova relic neutrino background (SRN) at the SuperKamiokande detector for various neutrino oscillation models with parameters inferred from recent experimental results. A realistic model of neutrino emission from supernova explosions and several models of the cosmic star formation history are adopted in the calculation. The number flux over entire energy range is found to be $11-15 \\mathrm{cm^{-2}s^{-1}}$. We discuss the detection possibility of SRN at SuperKamiokande, comparing this SRN flux with other background neutrinos in more detail than previous studies. Even though there is no energy window in which SRN is dominant, we might detect it as the distortion of the other background event. We found in the energy range $17-25 \\mathrm{MeV}$ the expected event rate at SuperKamiokande $0.4-0.8 ~\\mathrm{yr^{-1}}$. In this range, ten-year observation might enable us to detect SRN signal (at one sigma level) in the case of LMA solar neutrino solution. We also investigate event rate at SNO and KamLAND. Although we can find energy window, the expected event rate is rather small (0.03 yr$^{-1}$ for SNO, 0.1 yr$^{-1}$ for KamLAND).

  17. Sensitivity of Core-Collapse Supernovae to Neutrino Luminosity in Cases of Anisotropic Neutrino Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuko Motizuki; Hideki Madokoro; Tetsuya Shimizu

    2003-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the importance of anisotropic neutrino radiation in the mechanism of core-collapse supernova explosions. Through a new parameter study with a fixed radiation field of neutrinos, we show that global anisotropy of the neutrino radiation is the most effective mechanism of increasing the explosion energy when the total neutrino luminosity is given. We discuss the reason why, and demonstrate how sensitively the success of a supernova explosion depends on the neutrino luminosity.

  18. Do the Kamiokande results need neutrino oscillations?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baillon, Paul

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino oscillations are a delicate and important subject. One needs to be sure that every aspect of it is well understood. The recent results of the Kamiokande experiment [1], indicate the possibility of -- neutrino oscillations. The period of oscillation observed by Kamiokande is not compatible with what one may deduce from the solar neutrino experiments [2]. In this letter, we examine if another mechanism could fake neutrino oscillations and could be measurement dependent

  19. Bimetric Relativity and the Opera Neutrino Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffat, J W

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the possibility of explaining the propagation of neutrinos measured by the OPERA experiment with $\\delta v_\

  20. Earth Matter Effect on Democratic Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitry Zhuridov

    2014-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutrino propagation through the Earth is investigated in the framework of the democratic neutrino theory. In this theory the neutrino mixing angle theta-1-3 is approximately determined, which allows one to make a well defined neutrino oscillogram driven by the 1-3 mixing in the matter of the Earth. Significant differences in this oscillogram from the case of models with relatively small theta-1-3 are discussed.

  1. A New Spin on Neutrino Quantum Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincenzo Cirigliano; George M. Fuller; Alexey Vlasenko

    2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present and discuss the quantum kinetic equations (QKEs) which govern neutrino flavor and spin evolution in hot, dense, and anisotropic media. A novel feature of these QKEs is the presence of a coherent spin-flip term which can mediate neutrino-antineutrino transformation for Majorana neutrinos and active-sterile transformation for Dirac neutrinos. We provide an alternative derivation of this term based on a standard effective Hamiltonian.

  2. Atmospheric neutrino flux at INO site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honda, Morihiro [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    To illustrate the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux, we briefly explain our calculation scheme and important components, such as primary cosmic ray spectra, interaction model, and geomagnetic model. Then, we calculate the atmospheric neutrino flux at INO site in our calculation scheme. We compare the calculated atmospheric neutrino fluxes predicted at INO with those at other major neutrino detector sites, especially that at SK site.

  3. Neutrino magnetic moment in a magnetized plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. V. Mikheev; E. N. Narynskaya

    2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The contribution of a magnetized plasma to the neutrino magnetic moment is calculated. It is shown that only part of the additional neutrino energy in magnetized plasma connecting with its spin and magnetic field strength defines the neutrino magnetic moment. It is found that the presence of magnetized plasma does not lead to the considerable increase of the neutrino magnetic moment in contrast to the results presented in literature previously.

  4. European Strategy for Future Neutrino Physics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A workshop to discuss the possibilities for future neutrino investigations in Europe and the links to CERN.

  5. Mass hierarchies and the seesaw neutrino mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuo, T. K. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Wu, Guo-Hong [Institute of Theoretical Science, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403 (United States)] [Institute of Theoretical Science, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403 (United States); Mansour, Sadek W. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a general analysis of neutrino mixing in the seesaw mechanism with three flavors. Assuming that the Dirac and u-quark mass matrices are similar, we establish simple relations between the neutrino parameters and individual Majorana masses. They are shown to depend rather strongly on the physical neutrino mixing angles. We calculate explicitly the implied Majorana mass hierarchies for parameter sets corresponding to different solutions to the solar neutrino problem. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  6. Solar Neutrinos with Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael B Smy

    1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The discrepancy of the measured solar neutrino flux compared to the predictions of the standard solar model may be explained by the neutrino flavor oscillation hypothesis. A more direct and less model-dependent test of this hypothesis is a measurement of the distortion of the shape of the solar neutrino energy spectrum. Super-Kamiokande studies the energy spectrum of recoil electrons from solar neutrino scattering in water above 5.5 MeV.

  7. The Gran Sasso Laboratory and Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bettini, Alessandro [University of Padua-G. Galilei Physics Department- and INFN. Via Marzolo 8 35131 Padova (Italy); Laboratorio Subterraneo de Canfranc. Canfranc, Huesca (Spain)

    2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    After a brief survey of the experimental programme of the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory, I summarize the status of neutrino physics. I then focus on two frontier challenges. 1. The possible solution of the mass spectrum hierarchy problem with the observation of neutrinos from a supernova explosion; 2. The establishment of the nature of neutrinos, whether they are Dirac or Majorana particles, with neutrino-less double-beta decay.

  8. From Neutrino Factory to Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories require a muon source capable of producing and capturing {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This paper reviews the similarities and differences between Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider accelerator complexes, the ongoing R&D needed for a Muon Collider that goes beyond Neutrino Factory R&D, and some thoughts about how a Neutrino Factory on the CERN site might eventually be upgraded to a Muon Collider.

  9. Dark energy induced by neutrino mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio Capolupo; Salvatore Capozziello; Giuseppe Vitiello

    2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy content of the vacuum condensate induced by the neutrino mixing is interpreted as dynamically evolving dark energy.

  10. Neutrino mass limit from tritium beta decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. W. Otten; C. Weinheimer

    2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reviews recent experiments on tritium beta spectroscopy searching for the absolute value of the electron neutrino mass $m(\

  11. Improved Theory of Neutrino Oscillations in Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard S. Kisslinger

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This is revision of the S-Matrix theory of neutrino oscillations used for many years. We evaluate the transition probability of a $\\mu$ to $e$ neutrino without an approximation used for many theoretical studies, and find important differences which could improve the extraction of neutrino parameters from experimental data in the future.

  12. Multipole expansion method for supernova neutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duan, Huaiyu

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a multipole expansion method to calculate collective neutrino oscillations in supernovae using the neutrino bulb model. We show that it is much more efficient to solve multi-angle neutrino oscillations in multipole basis than in angle basis. The multipole expansion method also provides interesting insights into multi-angle calculations that were accomplished previously in angle basis.

  13. INTRODUCTION TO THE NEUTRINO PROPERTIES LISTINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of neutrino oscillation searches show that the mixing matrix contains two large mixing angles. We cannot oscillations provides us with the values of all neutrino mass-squared differences m2 ij m2 i - m2 j be determined. All confirmed neutrino oscillation experiments using solar, reactor, atmospheric and accelerator

  14. INTRODUCTION TO THE NEUTRINO PROPERTIES LISTINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of neutrino oscillation searches show that the mixing matrix contains two large mixing angles. We cannot oscillations provides us with the values of all neutrino mass-squared differences m2 ij m2 i - m2 j be determined. So far solar, reactor, atmospheric and accelerator neutrino oscillation experiments can

  15. SOME ASPECTS OF NEUTRINO MIXING AND OSCILLATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    SOME ASPECTS OF NEUTRINO MIXING AND OSCILLATIONS THESIS SUBMITTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF CALCUTTA into the fascinating world of neutrinos and for being an excellent teacher and a perfect guide. I convey my regards everything I know about neutrino phenomenology, I owe to him. I consider myself very fortunate to have him

  16. Improved Theory of Neutrino Oscillations in Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kisslinger, Leonard S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is revision of the S-Matrix theory of neutrino oscillations used for many years. We evaluate the transition probability of a $\\mu$ to $e$ neutrino without an approximation used for many theoretical studies, and find important differences which could improve the extraction of neutrino parameters from experimental data in the future.

  17. Multipole expansion method for supernova neutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huaiyu Duan; Shashank Shalgar

    2014-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a multipole expansion method to calculate collective neutrino oscillations in supernovae using the neutrino bulb model. We show that it is much more efficient to solve multi-angle neutrino oscillations in multipole basis than in angle basis. The multipole expansion method also provides interesting insights into multi-angle calculations that were accomplished previously in angle basis.

  18. Lectures on Neutrino Astronomy: Theory and Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    1998-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Overview of neutrino astronomy: multidisciplinary science. 2. Cosmic accelerators: the highest energy cosmic rays. 3. Neutrino beam dumps: supermassive black holes and gamma ray bursts. 4. Neutrino telescopes: water and ice. 5. Indirect dark matter detection. 6. Towards kilometer-scale detectors.

  19. Phase Space Constraints on Neutrino Luminosities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun; Samartha C A

    2007-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    While the importance of phase space constraints for gravitational clustering of neutrinos (which are fermions) is well recognized, the explicit use of such constraints to limit neutrino emission from ultra energetic sources has not been stressed. Special and general relativistic phase space constraints are shown to limit neutrino luminosities in compact sources in various situations.

  20. Neutrino oscillations: Current status and prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Schwetz

    2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    I summarize the status of neutrino oscillations from world neutrino oscillation data with date of October 2005. The results of a global analysis within the three-flavour framework are presented. Furthermore, a prospect on where we could stand in neutrino oscillations in ten years from now is given, based on a simulation of upcoming long-baseline accelerator and reactor experiments.