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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "net electricity unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Valley Electric Association- Net Metering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Board of Directors for Valley Electric Association (VEA) approved net metering in April 2008. The rules apply to systems up to 30 kW, though owners of larger systems may be able to negotiate...

2

Ashland Electric- Net Metering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In 1996, Ashland adopted a net-metering program that includes simple interconnection guidelines. The program encourages the adoption of renewable-energy systems by committing the city to purchase,...

3

Scotia Energy Electricity - Net Metering Program (Nova Scotia, Canada) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Scotia Energy Electricity - Net Metering Program (Nova Scotia, Scotia Energy Electricity - Net Metering Program (Nova Scotia, Canada) Scotia Energy Electricity - Net Metering Program (Nova Scotia, Canada) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Schools Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Nova Scotia Program Type Net Metering Provider Nova Scotia Power, Inc Nova Scotia Power Inc. Net Metering allows residential and commercial customers to connect small, renewable energy generating units to the provincial power grid. Generating units that produce renewable energy such as wind, solar, small hydro or biomass can be added to homes or businesses with the addition of a bi-directional meter. This meter monitors the electricity generated by the

4

Table E13.1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998;" 1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " ",," "," ",," " ,,,,"Sales and","Net Demand","RSE" "Economic",,,"Total Onsite","Transfers","for","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Purchases","Transfers In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States"

5

Electricity Net Generation From Renewable Energy by Energy Use...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Net Generation From Renewable Energy by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 Provides annual net electricity generation (thousand kilowatt-hours) from...

6

Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by Industry and Energy Source, 2008 Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial...

7

Annual Renewable Electricity Net Generation by Country (1980...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Net Generation by Country (1980 - 2009) Total annual renewable electricity net generation by country, 1980 to 2009 (available in Billion Kilowatt-hours or as Quadrillion Btu)....

8

Table 11.2 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010; 2 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Electricity Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Sales and Net Demand Economic Total Onsite Transfers for Characteristic(a) Purchases Transfers In(b) Generation(c) Offsite Electricity(d) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 91,909 Q 1,406 194 93,319 20-49 86,795 81 2,466 282 89,060 50-99 90,115 215 2,593 1,115 91,808 100-249 124,827 347 11,375 5,225 131,324 250-499 116,631 2,402 24,079 5,595 137,516 500 and Over 225,242 6,485 91,741 20,770 302,699 Total 735,520 9,728 133,661 33,181 845,727 Employment Size Under 50

9

Table 11.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010; 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total Sales and Net Demand NAICS Transfers Onsite Transfers for Code(a) Subsector and Industry Purchases In(b) Generation(c) Offsite Electricity(d) Total United States 311 Food 75,652 21 5,666 347 80,993 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 16,620 0 3,494 142 19,972 311221 Wet Corn Milling 7,481 0 3,213 14 10,680 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 1,264 0 1,382 109 2,537 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 9,258 0 336 66 9,528 3115 Dairy Products 9,585 2 38 22 9,602 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 20,121 15 19 0 20,155 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

10

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

11

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)","Row"

12

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

13

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Row"

14

Farmington Electric Utility System - Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Farmington Electric Utility System - Net Metering Farmington Electric Utility System - Net Metering Farmington Electric Utility System - Net Metering < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Energy Sources Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Water Wind Program Info State New Mexico Program Type Net Metering Provider Farmington Electric Utility System Net metering rules developed by the New Mexico Public Regulation Commission (PRC) apply to the state's investor-owned utilities and electric cooperatives. Municipal utilities, which are not regulated by the commission, are exempt from the PRC rules but authorized to develop their own net metering programs. Farmington Electric, a municipal utility, offers net metering to residential customers with systems up to 10 kilowatts (kW) in capacity.

15

Montana Electric Cooperatives - Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Cooperatives - Net Metering Electric Cooperatives - Net Metering Montana Electric Cooperatives - Net Metering < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Net Metering Provider Montana Electric Cooperatives' Association The Montana Electric Cooperatives' Association (MECA) adopted model interconnection guidelines in 2001 and a revised net-metering policy in September 2008. Net metering is available in whole or part by most of the 26 electric cooperatives in Montana. A map of the service areas of each of member cooperative is available on the MECA web site. To determine if a specific cooperative offers net metering, view the MECA

16

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

17

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

18

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

19

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

20

Electricity Net Generation From Renewable Energy by Energy Use Sector and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Net Generation From Renewable Energy by Energy Use Sector and Net Generation From Renewable Energy by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 Dataset Summary Description Provides annual net electricity generation (thousand kilowatt-hours) from renewable energy in the United States by energy use sector (commercial, industrial, electric power) and by energy source (e.g. biomas, solar thermal/pv). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2004 2008 Electricity net generation renewable energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2008_RE.net_.generation_EIA.Aug_.2010.xls (xls, 16.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2004 - 2008 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "net electricity unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Ashland Electric - Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

adopted a net-metering program that includes simple interconnection guidelines. The program encourages the adoption of renewable-energy systems by committing the city to...

22

U.S. Electric Net Summer Capacity, 2004 - 2008 | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Net Summer Capacity, 2004 - 2008 Net Summer Capacity, 2004 - 2008 Dataset Summary Description Provides total annual net electric summer capacity (in megawatts) for the United States, broken down by renewable energy source (e.g. biomass, solar thermal/pv) and the nonrenewable total. Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biomass Electric Capacity geothermal PV solar thermal Summer wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2008_Net.Summer.Elec_.Capacity_EIA.Aug_.2010.xls (xls, 11.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2004 - 2008 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset

23

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

24

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process 773,574 10 9 2,709 10 19 Process Heating

25

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process

26

Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

47 47 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281847 Varnish cache server Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by Industry and Energy Source, 2008 Dataset Summary Description Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial sector by industry and energy source in 2008. This data is published and compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords 2008 biomass consumption industrial sector Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon industrial_biomass_energy_consumption_and_electricity_2008.xls (xls, 27.6 KiB)

27

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fue -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487 32 345 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 206 * 1 32 * * -- Machine Drive

28

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- -- 62 6 838 1 417 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487

29

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

30

All electric homes in the United States  

SciTech Connect

This report presents information on the average annual costs for representative amounts of electricity to consumers in homes utilizing electricity exclusively for all purposes. Average annual electric bills, average charges per kilowatt-hour and average kilowatt-hour consumption for these homes are shown on a nationwide basis and for each State and individual communities throughout the United States.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Electric trade in the United States 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric Trade in the United States 1990 (ELECTRA) is the third in a series of reports on wholesale power transactions prepared by the Electric Data Systems Branch, Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA). The electric trade data are published biennially. The first report presented 1986 data. The second report contained data for 1988. This report provides information on the industry during 1990.

Not Available

1992-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

32

A Bicycle Electric Assist Unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The BEAU is an electric-assist bicycle system that is completely self-contained within the rear wheel. The purpose of approaching a electric-assist bicycle in this manner is two-fold: simplifying the device and opening the ...

Petron, Arthur J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Renewable Electricity Generation in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the use of renewable energy sources to generate electricity in the United States and a critical analysis of the federal and state policies that have supported the deployment of renewable ...

Schmalensee, Richard

34

Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Activities in the United States Electricity Grid Electricity Advisory Committee Energy Storage Technologies Subcommittee Members Ralph Masiello, Subcommittee Chair Senior...

35

Unit Cost Electricity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8 8 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281518 Varnish cache server Unit Cost Electricity Dataset Summary Description Provides annual energy usage for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage (kWh), natural gas usage (Mcf), associated costs. Also provides water consumption for 2005 through 2010. Source University of Texas (UT) at Austin, Utilities & Energy Management Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Electricity Consumption Natural Gas Texas Unit Cost Electricity Unit Cost Natural Gas University Water Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Energy and Water Use Data for UT-Austin (xls, 32.8 KiB) Quality Metrics

36

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - United States...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category.
...

37

Electric trade in the United States 1994  

SciTech Connect

Wholesale trade in electricity plays an important role for the US electric utility industry. Wholesale, or bulk power, transactions allow electric utilities to reduce power costs, increase power supply options, and improve reliability. In 1994, the wholesale trade market totaled 1.9 trillion kilowatthours, about 66% of total sales to ultimate consumers. This publication, Electric Trade in the United States 1994 (ELECTRA), is the fifth in a series of reports on wholesale power transactions prepared by the Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA). The electric trade data are published biennially. The first report presented 1986 data, and this report provides information on the electric power industry during 1994.

NONE

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Electricity markets in the western United States  

SciTech Connect

This article introduces the use of rigorous econometric tools to understand the geographic scope of the market for generation services. These tools are applied to data from the current wholesale electricity market in the western United States. The behavior of the current wholesale electricity market and the methods used to assess the expanse of the geographic market in the current wholesale electricity market can go a long way toward informing the discussion of pricing behavior and performance in a restructured electricity industry. First, the current wholesale electricity market is already effectively unregulated and suffers from the same technical complexities that face a retail electricity market. Consequently, understanding the supply and demand conditions that cause the extent of the geographic market for generation services to narrow in the current wholesale electricity market can shed light on which times the geographic expanse of the market may narrow in a restructures electricity market. Second, the techniques developed in this paper to assess the extent of the current wholesale electricity market can be applied readily to a restructured electricity market. Finally, because market conditions in the electricity industry are likely to change significantly in the next few years, as the structure of the electricity sector changes dramatically, this analysis of the geographic expanse of the market can provide a useful benchmark against which to compare post-restructuring wholesale price relationships.

Bailey, E.M.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Electric trade in the United States, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wholesale trade in electricity plays an important role for the US electric utility industry. Wholesale, or bulk power, transactions allow electric utilities to reduce power costs, increase power supply options, and improve reliability. In 1996, the wholesale trade market totaled 2.3 trillion kilowatthours, over 73% of total sales to ultimate consumers. This publication, Electric Trade in the United States 1996 (ELECTRA), is the sixth in a series of reports on wholesale power transactions prepared by the Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA). The electric trade data are published biennially. The first report presented 1986 data, and this report provides information on the electric power industry during 1996. The electric trade data collected and presented in this report furnish important information on the wholesale structure found within the US electric power industry. The patterns of interutility trade in the report support analyses of wholesale power transactions and provide input for a broader understanding of bulk power market issues that define the emerging national electric energy policies. The report includes information on the quantity of power purchased, sold, exchanged, and wheeled; the geographical locations of transactions and ownership classes involved; and the revenues and costs. 1 fig., 43 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Indoor unit for electric heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An indoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided in modular form including a refrigeration module, an air mover module, and a resistance heat package module, the refrigeration module including all of the indoor refrigerant circuit components including the compressor in a space adjacent the heat exchanger, the modules being adapted to be connected to air flow communication in several different ways as shown to accommodate placement of the unit in various orientations. 9 figs.

Draper, R.; Lackey, R.S.; Fagan, T.J. Jr.; Veyo, S.E.; Humphrey, J.R.

1984-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "net electricity unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3

42

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

43

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - United States | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 95, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power projections United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - United States- Reference Case (xls, 260.9 KiB) Quality Metrics

44

Maritime Electric- Net Metering (Prince Edward Island, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In December 2005 The Renewable Energy Act and associated Regulations came into effect. A Government policy objective incorporated in the Act was the introduction of net metering for...

45

Participation in electric net-metering programs increased ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook ... Search EIA.gov. A-Z Index; ... they can usually enter into a net-metering agreement with their utility.

46

Participation in electric net-metering programs increased sharply ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook ... Search EIA.gov. A-Z Index; ... they can usually enter into a net-metering agreement with their utility.

47

Energy Analysis Department Electricity Markets and Policy Group The Impact of Rate Design and Net  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Analysis Department Electricity Markets and Policy Group The Impact of Rate Design and Net of Energy #12;Energy Analysis Department Electricity Markets and Policy Group 2 Project Overview Context alternative compensation mechanisms #12;Energy Analysis Department Electricity Markets and Policy Group 3

48

Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue of this report. Provides detailed statistics on existing generating units operated by electric utilities as of December 31, 2000, and certain summary statistics about new generators planned for operation by electric utilities during the next 5 years.

Information Center

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Electric Wholesale Market Regimes in the United States: Implications...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regimes in the United States: Implications for Investment PowerPoint presentation to the Electricity Advisory Committee by Charles Whitmore, Senior Market Advisor at the Federal...

50

United Parcel Service Evaluates Hybrid Electric Delivery Vans...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel economy than comparable conventional vans. United Parcel Service Evaluates Hybrid Electric Delivery Vans Advanced Vehicle Testing This project is part of a series of...

51

Seasonal variability of wind electric potential in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Seasonal wind electric potential has been estimated for the contiguous United States based on the methods previously used to estimate the annual average wind electric potential. National maps show estimates of the seasonal wind electric potential averaged over the state as a whole, and gridded maps show the distribution of the seasonal wind electric potential within a state. The seasons of winter and spring have highest wind electric potential for most windy areas in the United States. Summer is the season with the least potential for most of the contiguous United States. Wind electric potential patterns in autumn generally resemble the annual average potential map. Excellent matches between seasonal wind electric potential and electric energy use occur during winter for the northern parts of the nation. California has a good match between summer wind potential and electric use.

Schwartz, M.N.; Elliott, D.L.; Gower, G.L.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

World Net Electricity Consumption, by Region, 1990-2020  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electricity consumption worldwide increases by 76 percent in the reference case, from 12 trillion kilowatthours in 1997 to 22 trillion kilowatthours in 2020.

53

Electric trade in the United States 1992  

SciTech Connect

This publication, Electric Trade in the US 1992 (ELECTRA), is the fourth in a series of reports on wholesale power transactions prepared by the Electric Data Systems Branch, Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA). The electric trade data are published biennially. The first report presented 1986 data, and this report provides information on the electric power industry during 1992. The electric trade data collected and presented in this report furnish important information on the wholesale structure found within the US electric power industry. The patterns of interutility trade in the report support analyses of wholesale power transactions and provide input for a broader understanding of bulk power market issues that define the emerging national electric energy policies. The report includes information on the quantity of power purchased, sold, exchanged, and wheeled; the geographical locations of transactions and ownership classes involved; and the revenues and costs. Information on the physical transmission system are being included for the first time in this publication. Transmission data covering investor-owned electric utilities were shifted from the Financial Statistics of Selected Investor-Owned Electric Utilities to the ELECTRA publication. Some of the prominent features of this year`s report include information and data not published before on transmission lines for publicly owned utilities and transmission lines added during 1992 by investor-owned electric utilities.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Chiller-heater unit nets building 2-yr payback  

SciTech Connect

A 500-ton double-absorption Hitachi Paraflow chiller-heater that switches from purchased steam to natural gas will reduce a Manhattan office building's energy costs by 55% and achieve a two-year payback. The new system replaces a steam-powered, single-stage absorption chiller. By reusing heat in a second-stage generator, the Hitachi unit uses only half as many Btus per ton as a conventional chiller. (DCK)

Duffy, J.

1983-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

55

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATIONPHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TRANSPORTATIONPHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

56

Renewable Electricity Futures: Exploration of Up to 80% Renewable Electricity Penetration in the United States (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Hand, M.; DeMeo, E.; Hostick, D.; Mai, T.; Schlosser, C. A.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Electric trade in the United States 1990. [Contains glossary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric Trade in the United States 1990 (ELECTRA) is the third in a series of reports on wholesale power transactions prepared by the Electric Data Systems Branch, Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA). The electric trade data are published biennially. The first report presented 1986 data. The second report contained data for 1988. This report provides information on the industry during 1990.

Not Available

1992-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

58

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998;" 1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,,,," " " "," ",,,,"Sales and","Net Demand","RSE" "NAICS"," ",,,"Total Onsite","Transfers","for","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","Transfers In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

59

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2002;" 1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,,,," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand","RSE" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases"," In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

60

OpenEI - Unit Cost Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

at University of Texas at Austin http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode62

Provides annual energy usage for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "net electricity unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Regional Per Capita Solar Electric Footprint for the United States  

SciTech Connect

In this report, we quantify the state-by-state per-capita 'solar electric footprint' for the United States. We use state-level data on population, electricity consumption, economic activity and solar insolation, along with solar photovoltaic (PV) array packing density data to develop a range of estimates of the solar electric footprint. We find that the solar electric footprint, defined as the land area required to supply all end-use electricity from solar photovoltaics, is about 181 m2 per person in the United States. Two key factors that influence the magnitude of the state-level solar electric footprint include how industrial energy is allocated (based on location of use vs. where goods are consumed) and the assumed distribution of PV configurations (flat rooftop vs. fixed tilt vs. tracking). The solar electric footprint is about 0.6% of the total land area of the United States with state-level estimates ranging from less than 0.1% for Wyoming to about 9% for New Jersey. We also compare the solar electric footprint to a number of other land uses. For example, we find that the solar electric footprint is equal to less than 2% of the land dedicated to cropland and grazing in the United States.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Regional Per Capita Solar Electric Footprint for the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this report, we quantify the state-by-state per-capita 'solar electric footprint' for the United States. We use state-level data on population, electricity consumption, economic activity and solar insolation, along with solar photovoltaic (PV) array packing density data to develop a range of estimates of the solar electric footprint. We find that the solar electric footprint, defined as the land area required to supply all end-use electricity from solar photovoltaics, is about 181 m2 per person in the United States. Two key factors that influence the magnitude of the state-level solar electric footprint include how industrial energy is allocated (based on location of use vs. where goods are consumed) and the assumed distribution of PV configurations (flat rooftop vs. fixed tilt vs. tracking). The solar electric footprint is about 0.6% of the total land area of the United States with state-level estimates ranging from less than 0.1% for Wyoming to about 9% for New Jersey. We also compare the solar electric footprint to a number of other land uses. For example, we find that the solar electric footprint is equal to less than 2% of the land dedicated to cropland and grazing in the United States.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Table 8.11c Electric Net Summer Capacity: Electric Power Sector by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

(Breakout of Table 8.11b; Kilowatts) Year: Fossil Fuels: Nuclear Electric Power: Hydro-electric Pumped Storage: Renewable Energy: Other 8: Total: Coal 1: Petroleum 2 ...

64

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. This project utilized GridViewTM, an electric grid dispatch software package, to estimate hourly emission factors for all of the eGRID subregions in the continental United States. These factors took into account electricity imports and exports

65

Economic Assessment of Electric-Drive Vehicle Operation in California and the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity rates in California and across the United States (STATES ABSTRACT This study examines the relative economics of electric vehicle operation in the context of current electricity rates

Lidicker, Jeffrey R.; Lipman, Timothy E.; Shaheen, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Outdoor unit construction for an electric heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The outdoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided with an upper portion 10 containing propeller fan means 14 for drawing air through the lower portion 12 containing refrigerant coil means 16 in the form of four discrete coils connected together in a subassembly forming a W shape, the unit being provided with four adjustable legs 64 which are retracted in shipment, and are adjusted on site to elevate the unit to a particular height suitable for the particular location in which the unit is installed.

Draper, Robert (Pittsburgh, PA); Lackey, Robert S. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Outdoor unit construction for an electric heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The outdoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided with an upper portion containing propeller fan means for drawing air through the lower portion containing refrigerant coil means in the form of four discrete coils connected together in a subassembly forming a W shape, the unit being provided with four adjustable legs which are retracted in shipment, and are adjusted on site to elevate the unit to a particular height suitable for the particular location in which the unit is installed. 4 figs.

Draper, R.; Lackey, R.S.

1984-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

68

Electricity in the United States - Energy Explained, Your Guide To  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Secondary Sources > Electricity > Electricity in the U.S. Secondary Sources > Electricity > Electricity in the U.S. Energy Explained - Home What Is Energy? Forms of Energy Sources of Energy Laws of Energy Units and Calculators Energy Conversion Calculators British Thermal Units (Btu) Degree-Days U.S. Energy Facts State and U.S. Territory Data Use of Energy In Industry For Transportation In Homes In Commercial Buildings Efficiency and Conservation Energy and the Environment Greenhouse Gases Effect on the Climate Where Emissions Come From Outlook for Future Emissions Recycling and Energy Nonrenewable Sources Oil and Petroleum Products Refining Crude Oil Where Our Oil Comes From Imports and Exports Offshore Oil and Gas Use of Oil Prices and Outlook Oil and the Environment Gasoline Where Our Gasoline Comes From Use of Gasoline

69

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Net Metering Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Net Metering Provider Public Utilities Regulatory Authority Connecticut's two investor-owned utilities -- Connecticut Light and Power Company (CL&P) and United Illuminating Company (UI) -- are required to provide net metering to customers that generate electricity using "Class I" renewable-energy resources, which include solar, wind, landfill gas, fuel

70

Table 8.11c Electric Net Summer Capacity: Electric Power Sector by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

7 Solar thermal and photovoltaic (PV) energy. Sources: - 1989-1997-U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric

71

Table 8.11b Electric Net Summer Capacity: Electric Power ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power: Hydro-electric Pumped Storage: Renewable Energy: Other 9: Total: Coal 1: Petroleum 2: Natural Gas 3: Other Gases 4: Total: Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 ...

72

Table 8.2c Electricity Net Generation: Electric Power Sector ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power: Hydro-electric Pumped Storage 5: Renewable Energy: Other 10: Total: Coal 1: Petroleum 2: Natural Gas 3: Other Gases 4: Total: Conventional Hydroelectric Power ...

73

Table 8.2b Electricity Net Generation: Electric Power Sector ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power: Hydro-electric Pumped Storage 5: Renewable Energy: Other 10: Total: Coal 1: Petroleum 2: Natural Gas 3: Other Gases 4: Total: Conventional Hydroelectric Power ...

74

United Parcel Service Evaluates Hybrid Electric Delivery Vans (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes how the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Fleet Test and Evaluation team evaluated the 12-month, in-service performance of six Class 4 hybrid electric delivery vans - fueled by regular diesel - and six comparable conventional diesel vans operated by the United Parcel Service.

Not Available

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Electrical Methods I 51 A = H/ B = H/ Unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical Methods I 51 Table 1. A = H/ B = H/ Unit ? Mean val. (J Mean val. (J IZxxl V2/2 0.70 0 Technique A/an G. lanes, Energy, Mines and Resources Canada: and Harlmul lodicke, Westfalen Wilhelms Univ consideration. Re- cently, several techniques were proposed in the field of magnetoteJluric (MT) data analysis

Jones, Alan G.

76

EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of construction and startup of the proposed Units 3 and 4 at the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, Georgia. DOE adopted two Nuclear Regulatory Commission EISs associated with this project (i.e., NUREG-1872, issued 8/2008, and NUREG-1947, issued 3/2011).

77

Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is comprised of power plants, electric utilities, electrical transformers, transmission and distribution infrastructure, etc. We conceptualize the system as a transportation network with resources (electricity

Hall, Sharon J.

78

Waste electronics and electrical equipment disassembly and recycling using Petri net analysis: Considering the economic value and environmental impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Industry Council for Electronic Equipment Recycling (ICER) has published estimates of waste generation based on both assumptions and analysis regarding the relationship between the market sales of Electrical and Electronic Equipment (EEE) in a given ... Keywords: Disassembly, Hazardous substances, Petri net disassembly tree, Recycling, Waste electric and electronic equipment

Tsai C. Kuo

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

United Electric Coop, Inc (Pennsylvania) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United Electric Coop, Inc United Electric Coop, Inc Place Pennsylvania Utility Id 40219 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service - Multi-Phase - Unbundled Commercial General Service - Single Phase - Unbundled Commercial General Service Multi- Phase Commercial General Service Single Phase Commercial Home Comfort Service Commercial Large Power Service - Unbundled Industrial Large Power Sevice Industrial Residential Service - Unbundled Residential Residential Single-Phase Residential

80

United Electric Co-op, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United Electric Co-op, Inc United Electric Co-op, Inc Place Idaho Utility Id 19502 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png AUTOMATIC OUTDOOR LIGHTING (100W HPS WITHOUT POLE) Lighting AUTOMATIC OUTDOOR LIGHTING(100W HPS WITH POLE) Lighting GENERAL SERVICE(SINGLE PHASE RATE) Commercial GENERAL SERVICE(THREE PHASE RATE) Commercial IRRIGATION RATE Commercial LARGE COMMERCIAL (500-1,000 KW) Commercial MUNICIPAL STREET LIGHTING (100 W HPS-CITY OF ACEQUIA) Lighting MUNICIPAL STREET LIGHTING(100W HPS-CITY OF PAUL) Lighting

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "net electricity unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Electric vehicle fleet operations in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is actively supporting the development and commercialization of advanced electric vehicles, and advanced batteries and propulsion systems. As part of this effort, the DOE Field Operations Program is performing commercial validation of electric vehicles. These efforts have included on-board data acquisition of electric vehicle operations and baseline performance testing. The baseline performance tests focus on parameters such as range, acceleration, and battery charging. This testing, performed in conjunction with EV America, has included the baseline performance testing of 14 electric vehicles will also be baseline performance tested. The baseline performance testing has documented annual improvements in performance. This and additional information is made available to the public via the internet homepage (http://ev.inel.gov). The Field Operations Program continues to support the development of electric vehicles and infrastructure in conjunction with its new qualified vehicle test partners: Electric Transportation Application of Phoenix, and Southern California Edison. The Field Operations Program is managed by the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company, at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. 4 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Francfort, J.E. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); O`Hara, D. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States 2000  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0095(2000) Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States 2000 March 2002 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric

83

net generation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

net generation net generation Dataset Summary Description Provides annual net electricity generation (thousand kilowatt-hours) from renewable energy in the United States by energy use sector (commercial, industrial, electric power) and by energy source (e.g. biomas, solar thermal/pv). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2004 2008 Electricity net generation renewable energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2008_RE.net_.generation_EIA.Aug_.2010.xls (xls, 16.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2004 - 2008 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset

84

Effects of Net Metering on the Use of Small-Scale Wind Systems in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Factors such as technological advancements, steadily decreasing costs, consumer demand, and state and federal policies are combining to make wind energy the world's fastest growing energy source. State and federal policies are facilitating the growth of the domestic, large-scale wind power market; however, small-scale wind projects (those with a capacity of less than 100 kilowatts[kW]) still face challenges in many states. Net metering, also referred to as net billing, is one particular policy that states are implementing to encourage the use of small renewable energy systems. Net metering allows individual, grid-tied customers who generate electricity using a small renewable energy system to receive credit from their utility for any excess power they generate beyond what they consume. Under most state rules, residential, commercial, and industrial customers are eligible for net metering; however, some states restrict eligibility to particular customer classes. This paper illustrates how net metering programs in certain states vary considerably in terms of how customers are credited for excess power they generate; the type and size of eligible technologies and whether the utility; the state, or some other entity administers the program. This paper focuses on10 particular states where net metering policies are in place. It analyzes how the different versions of these programs affect the use of small-scale wind technologies and whether some versions are more favorable to this technology than others. The choice of citizens in some states to net meter with photovoltaics is also examined.

Forsyth, T. L.; Pedden, M.; Gagliano, T.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Net Interchange Schedule Forecasting of Electric Power Exchange for RTO/ISOs  

SciTech Connect

Neighboring independent system operators (ISOs) exchange electric power to enable efficient and reliable operation of the grid. Net interchange (NI) schedule is the sum of the transactions (in MW) between an ISO and its neighbors. Effective forecasting of the amount of actual NI can improve grid operation efficiency. This paper presents results of a preliminary investigation into various methods of prediction that may result in improved prediction accuracy. The methods studied are linear regression, forward regression, stepwise regression, and support vector machine (SVM) regression. The work to date is not yet conclusive. The hope is to explore the effectiveness of other prediction methods and apply all methods to at least one new data set. This should enable more confidence in the conclusions.

Ferryman, Thomas A.; Haglin, David J.; Vlachopoulou, Maria; Yin, Jian; Shen, Chao; Tuffner, Francis K.; Lin, Guang; Zhou, Ning; Tong, Jianzhong

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

86

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006;" 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",73242,309,4563,111,78003

87

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;" 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",75652,21,5666,347,80993

88

United Electric Coop Service Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name United Electric Coop Service Inc Place Texas Utility Id 19490 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location TRE NERC ERCOT Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Area and Street Light-175 w Mercury Vapor Lighting Area and Street Light-400 w Mercury Vapor Lighting Area and Street Light-Dark Sky Complaint-100 w HPS Lighting Area and Street Light-Dark Sky Complaint-250 w HPS Lighting Area and Street Light-Standard-100 w HPS Lighting Area and Street Light-Standard-1000 w HPS Directional Lighting

89

University of California Davis West Village: The Largest Planned Net Zero Energy Community in the United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UC Davis West Village UC Davis West Village The largest planned "zero net energy" community in the United States CRED Webinar October 16, 2012 CENTRAL SOUTH WEST WEST VILLAGE Program Phase 1 Phase 2 Total Acres 130 acres 75 acres 205 acres Faculty/Staff Housing 343 units 132 units 475 units Student Housing Beds (including beds over mixed use) 1,980 beds 1,158 beds 3,000 beds Retail/Office Space up to 42,500 sf 0 up to 45,000 sf Los Rios Community College District 20,000 sf 0 60,000 sf Recreation Fields 7.61 acres 14.29 acres 21.90 acres Phasing Plan For-sale Faculty/Staff Housing (343 homes) Student Housing (1,980 beds) Mixed-Use (45,000 sf retail + apartment units above) Community College (60,000 sf) Site for Day Care/Preschool Water management & open space

90

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States Coal (thousand st/d) .................... 2,361 2,207 2,586 2,287 2,421 2,237 2,720 2,365 2,391 2,174 2,622 2,286 2,361 2,437 2,369 Natural Gas (million cf/d) ............. 20,952 21,902 28,751 21,535 20,291 22,193 28,174 20,227 20,829 22,857 29,506 21,248 23,302 22,736 23,627 Petroleum (thousand b/d) ........... 128 127 144 127 135 128 135 119 131 124 134 117 131 129 127 Residual Fuel Oil ...................... 38 28 36 29 30 31 33 29 31 30 34 27 33 31 30 Distillate Fuel Oil ....................... 26 24 27 28 35 30 30 26 31 26 28 25 26 30 28 Petroleum Coke (a) .................. 59 72 78 66 63 63 66 59 62 63 67 60 69 63 63 Other Petroleum Liquids (b) ..... 5 3 4 4 7 5 5 5 7 5 5 5 4 6 6 Northeast Census Region Coal (thousand st/d) ....................

91

A SODIUM-GRAPHITE REACTOR STEAM-ELECTRIC STATION FOR 75 MEGAWATTS NET GENERATION  

SciTech Connect

The major design features, nuclear characteristics and performance data for a nuclear fueled central station power plant of 75,000 kw net capacity are presented. The heat source is a Na cooled graphite moderated reactor. The design of the reactor takes full advantage of the experience gained to date on the Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE); the plant described here is a straightforward extension of the smaller experimental SRE, which is now under construction. The fuel elements are made up of rod clusters and the moderator is in the form of Zr canned graphite elements. The performance of the reactor has been based on conservative temperatures and coolant flow velocities which result in a plant with "built-in reserve." Thus, as experience is gained and anticipated improvements in reactor fuel elements and construction materials are proven, the performance of the plant can be increased accordingly. Two reactor designs are described, one for operation with slightly enriched U fuel elements and the other for operation with Th--U fuel elements. The associated heat exchangers, pumps, steam, and electrical generating equipment are identical for either reactor design. An analysis of turbine cycles describes the particular cycle chosen for initial operation and discusses a method by which modern central station performance can be initially obtained. The design and performance data which are required to enable reliable estimates of the plant construction and operating costs to be made are established. (auth)

Weisner, E.F.; Sybert, W.M.

1955-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

92

How much electricity is used for cooling in the United States ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much electricity is used for cooling in the United States? In 2011, EIA estimates that about 440 billion kilowatt-hours ... tariff, and demand charge data?

93

A Hybrid Unit Based on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells for Electricity and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Series connection of two types of cells leads to a hybrid unit capable of delivering electricity and clean hydrogen. The role of electrodes on the operation of the ...

94

Tampa Electric Company Polk Power Station Unit Number 1. Annual report, January--December, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report satisfies the requirements of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-91MC27363, novated as of March 5, 1992, to provide an annual update report on the year`s activities associated with Tampa Electric Company`s 250 MW IGCC demonstration project for the year 1993. Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project will use a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,000 tons per day of coal (dry basis) coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Approximately 50% of the raw, hot syngas is cooled to 900 F and passed through a moving bed of zinc-based sorbent which removes sulfur containing compounds from the syngas. The remaining portion of the raw, hot syngas is cooled to 400 F for conventional acid gas removal. Sulfur-bearing compounds from both cleanup systems are sent to a conventional sulfuric acid plant to produce a marketable, high-purity sulfuric acid by-product. The cleaned medium-BTU syngas from these processes is routed to the combined cycle power generation system where it is mixed with air and burned in the combustion section of the combustion turbine. Heat is extracted from the expanded exhaust gases in a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) to produce steam at three pressure levels for use throughout the integrated process. A highly modular, microprocessor-based distributed control system (DCS) is being developed to provide continuous and sequential control for most of the equipment on PPS-1.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Inventory of Nonutility Electric Power Plants in the United States  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue of this report. Provides annual aggregate statistics on generating units operated by nonutilities in the United States and the District of Columbia. Provides a 5-year outlook for generating unit additions and changes.

Information Center

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Net Metering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Montana's net-metering law, enacted in July 1999, applies to all customers of investor-owned utilities. Systems up to 50 kilowatts (kW) in capacity that generate electricity using solar, wind or...

97

Net Metering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

[http://nebraskalegislature.gov/FloorDocs/101/PDF/Final/LB436.pdf LB 436], signed in May 2009, established statewide net metering rules for all electric utilities in Nebraska. The rules apply to...

98

Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

default electricity rate in the United States, especiallystates, including Washington, Louisiana, or Arkansas, have total residential electricity ratesStates are often compensated at the customer’s underlying retail electricity rate

Darghouth, Naim Richard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Table 8.11d Electric Net Summer Capacity: Commercial and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

(Subset of Table 8.11a; Kilowatts) Year: Fossil Fuels: Nuclear Electric Power: Hydro-electric Pumped Storage: Renewable Energy: Other 8: Total: Coal 1: Petroleum 2 ...

100

EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

76: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 76: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of construction and startup of the proposed Units 3 and 4 at the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, Georgia. DOE adopted two Nuclear Regulatory Commission EISs associated with this project (i.e., NUREG-1872, issued 8/2008, and NUREG-1947, issued 3/2011). Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download February 17, 2012 EIS-0476: Notice of Adoption of Final Environmental Impact Statement Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4, Issuance of a Loan Guarantee to Support Funding for Construction, Burke County, GA

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "net electricity unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 Energy storage technologies offer cost-effective flexibility and ancillary services needed by the U.S power grid. As policy reforms and decreasing technology costs facilitate market penetration, energy storage technologies offer increasingly competitive alternative means for utilities to engage these ancillary services. This report prepared by the Electricity Advisory Committee summarizes energy storage technology activities and projects in the U.S. electric power grid as of May 2011. Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 More Documents & Publications Fact Sheet: Tehachapi Wind Energy Storage Project (October 2012)

102

Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 Energy storage technologies offer cost-effective flexibility and ancillary services needed by the U.S power grid. As policy reforms and decreasing technology costs facilitate market penetration, energy storage technologies offer increasingly competitive alternative means for utilities to engage these ancillary services. This report prepared by the Electricity Advisory Committee summarizes energy storage technology activities and projects in the U.S. electric power grid as of May 2011. Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 More Documents & Publications Fact Sheet: Tehachapi Wind Energy Storage Project (October 2012)

103

Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid Electricity Advisory Committee Energy Storage Technologies Subcommittee Members Ralph Masiello, Subcommittee Chair Senior Vice President, Transmission KEMA Honorable Lauren Azar Commissioner Wisconsin Public Utilities Commission Frederick Butler President & Chief Executive Officer Butler Advisory Services Richard Cowart Principal Regulatory Assistance Project and Chair, Electricity Advisory Committee Roger Duncan General Manager (Ret.) Austin Energy Robert Gramlich Senior Vice President, Public Policy American Wind Energy Association Brad Roberts Chairman Electricity Storage Association Honorable Tom Sloan Representative Kansas House of Representatives Wanda Reder Vice President

104

Electric vehicle fleet operations in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is actively supporting the development and commercialization of advanced electric vehicles, batteries, and propulsion systems. As part of this effort, the DOE Field Operations Program is performing commercial validation testing of electric vehicles and supporting the development of an electric vehicle infrastructure. These efforts include the evaluation of electric vehicles in baseline performance, accelerated reliability, and fleet operations testing. The baseline performance testing focuses on parameters such as range, acceleration, and battery charging. This testing, performed in conjunction with EV America, has included the baseline performance testing of 16 electric vehicle models from 1994 through 1997. During 1997, the Chevrolet S10 and Ford Ranger electric vehicles were tested. During 1998, several additional electric vehicles from original equipment manufacturers will also be baseline performance tested. This and additional information is made available to the public via the Program`s web page (http://ev.inel.gov/sop). In conjunction with industry and other groups, the Program also supports the Infrastructure Working Council in its development of electric vehicle communications, charging, health and safety, and power quality standards. The Field Operations Program continues to support the development of electric vehicles and infrastructure in conjunction with its qualified vehicle test partners: Electric Transportation Applications, and Southern California Edison. The Field Operations Program is managed by the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory.

Francfort, J.E. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.; O`Hara, D. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Advancing Net-Zero Energy Commercial Buildings; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet provides an overview of the research the National Renewable Energy Laboratory is conducting to achieve net-zero energy buildings (NZEBs). It also includes key definitions of NZEBs and inforamtion about an NZEB database that captures information about projects around the world.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Wholesale electricity prices rose across the United States - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Average on-peak, day-ahead wholesale electricity prices rose in every region of the Lower 48 states in first-half 2013 compared to first-half 2012.

107

Prospects for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles in the United States : a general equilibrium analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) could significantly contribute to reductions in carbon dioxide emissions from personal vehicle transportation in the United States over the next century, depending on the ...

Karplus, Valerie Jean

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Electricity transmission investment in the United States : an investigation of adequacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is a prevailing sentiment that the United States is underinvested in its electric transmission infrastructure. The standard claim is that poor regulation has caused insufficient levels of capital to be devoted to the ...

Kwok, Peter Jordan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Modeling Water Withdrawal and Consumption for Electricity Generation in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water withdrawals for thermoelectric cooling account for a significant portion of total water use in the United States. Any change in electrical energy generation policy and technologies has the potential to have a major ...

Strzepek, Kenneth M.

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

Table 8.11d Electric Net Summer Capacity: Commercial and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

9 Commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. ... other biomass. For all years, also includes non-renewable waste ...

111

Table 8.2a Electricity Net Generation: Total (All Sectors ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power: Hydro-electric Pumped Storage 5: Renewable Energy: Other 10: Total: Coal 1: Petroleum 2: Natural Gas 3: Other Gases 4: Total: Conventional Hydroelectric Power ...

112

Highway vehicle electric drive in the United States : 2009 status and issues.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The status of electric drive technology in the United States as of early 2010 is documented. Rapidly evolving electric drive technologies discussed include hybrid electric vehicles, multiple types of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and battery electric vehicles. Recent trends for hybrids are quantified. Various plug-in vehicles entering the market in the near term are examined. The technical and economic requirements for electric drive to more broadly succeed in a wider range of highway vehicle applications are described, and implications for the most promising new markets are provided. Federal and selected state government policy measures promoting and preparing for electric drive are discussed. Taking these into account, judgment on areas where increased Clean Cities funds might be most productively focused over the next five years are provided. In closing, the request by Clean Cities for opinion on the broad range of research needs providing near-term support to electric drive is fulfilled.

Santini, D. J.; Energy Systems

2011-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

113

Electrical Energy Storage Activities in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spurred by increased public and private sector investment as well as policy initiatives, electrical energy storage project activities are on the upswing worldwide. The growing number of operating and planned initiatives demands that they be rigorously documented and evaluated to promote information sharing and collective learning. This report provides descriptive case studies on ten U.S.-based energy storage projects offering insight into their background, status, successes, shortcomings, and lessons lea...

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Electric power monthly  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM) for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source, consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ELECTRICITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monday, June 11, 2012 Monday, June 11, 2012 PARTICIPANTS: RICHARD COWART, Chair Regulatory Assistance Project IRWIN POPOWSKY, Vice Chair Pennsylvania Consumer Advocate WILLIAM BALL Southern Company MERWIN BROWN California Institute for Energy and Environment RALPH CAVANAGH Natural Resources Defense Council PAUL CENTOLELLA Public Utilities Commission of Ohio DAVID CRANE NRG Energy, Inc. ROBERT CURRY New York State Public Service Commission JOSE DELGADO American Transmission Company ROBERT GRAMLICH American Wind Energy Association MICHAEL HEYECK American Electric Power VAL JENSEN Commonwealth Edison JOSEPH KELLIHER NextEra Energy, Inc. PARTICIPANTS (CONT'D): SUSAN KELLY

116

Detection of Rooftop Cooling Unit Faults Based on Electrical Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Non-intrusive load monitoring (NILM) is accomplished by sampling voltage and current at high rates and reducing the resulting start transients or harmonic contents to concise ''signatures''. Changes in these signatures can be used to detect, and in many cases directly diagnose, equipment and component faults associated with roof-top cooling units. Use of the NILM for fault detection and diagnosis (FDD) is important because (1) it complements other FDD schemes that are based on thermo-fluid sensors and analyses and (2) it is minimally intrusive (one measuring point in the relatively protected confines of the control panel) and therefore inherently reliable. This paper describes changes in the power signatures of fans and compressors that were found, experimentally and theoretically, to be useful for fault detection.

Armstrong, Peter R.; Laughman, C R.; Leeb, S B.; Norford, L K.

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

117

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Metering Net Metering Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Energy Sources Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Net Metering Provider Department of Public Utilities In Massachusetts, the state's investor-owned utilities must offer net metering. Municipal utilities are not obligated to offer net metering, but they may do so voluntarily. (There are no electric cooperatives in Massachusetts.) Class I, Class II, Class III net metering facilities In Massachusetts, there are several categories of net-metering facilities.

118

Integration of photovoltaic units into electric utility grids: experiment information requirements and selected issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of investigations, including those conducted by The Aerospace Corporation and other contractors, have led to the recognition of technical, economic, and institutional issues relating to the interface between solar electric technologies and electric utility systems. These issues derive from three attributes of solar electric power concepts, including (1) the variability and unpredictability of the solar resources, (2) the dispersed nature of those resources which suggests the feasible deployment of small dispersed power units, and (3) a high initial capital cost coupled with relatively low operating costs. It is imperative that these integration issues be pursued in parallel with the development of each technology if the nation's electric utility systems are to effectively utilize these technologies in the near to intermediate term. Analyses of three of these issues are presented: utility information requirements, generation mix and production cost impacts, and rate structures in the context of photovoltaic units integrated into the utility system. (WHK)

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Generation of Electric Power in the United States 1998  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The President issued a directive on April 15, 1999, requiring an annual report summarizing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions produced by electricity generation in the United States, including both utilities and nonutilities. In response, this report is jointly submitted by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Information Center

1999-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Integration of photovoltaic units into electric utility grids: experiment information requirements and selected issues  

SciTech Connect

A number of investigations have led to the recognition of technical, economic, and institutional issues relating to the interface between solar electric technologies and electric utility systems. These issues derive from three attributes of solar electric power concepts, including (1) the variability and unpredictability of the solar resources, (2) the dispersed nature of those resources which suggest the deployment of small dispersed power units, and (3) a high initial capital cost coupled with relatively low operating costs. An important part of the DOE programs to develop new source technologies, in particular photovoltaic systems, is the experimental testing of complete or nearby complete power units. These experiments provide an opportunity to examine operational and integration issues which must be understood before widespread commercial deployment of these technologies can be achieved. Experiments may also be required to explicitly examine integration, operational, and control aspects of single and multiple new source technology power units within a utility system. An identification of utility information requirements, a review of planned experiments, and a preliminary determination of additional experimental needs and opportunities are presented. Other issues discussed include: (1) the impacts of on-site photovoltaic units on load duration curves and optimal generation mixes are considered; (2) the impacts of on-site photovoltaic units on utility production costs, with and without dedicated storage and with and without sellback, are analyzed; and (3) current utility rate structure experiments, rationales, policies, practices, and plans are reviewed.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "net electricity unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Supply Curves for Rooftop Solar PV-Generated Electricity for the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A0-44073 A0-44073 November 2008 Supply Curves for Rooftop Solar PV-Generated Electricity for the United States Paul Denholm and Robert Margolis Supply Curves for Rooftop Solar PV-Generated Electricity for the United States Paul Denholm and Robert Margolis Prepared under Task No. PVB7.6301 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A0-44073 November 2008 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

122

Developing a tool to estimate water withdrawal and consumption in electricity generation in the United States.  

SciTech Connect

Freshwater consumption for electricity generation is projected to increase dramatically in the next couple of decades in the United States. The increased demand is likely to further strain freshwater resources in regions where water has already become scarce. Meanwhile, the automotive industry has stepped up its research, development, and deployment efforts on electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Large-scale, escalated production of EVs and PHEVs nationwide would require increased electricity production, and so meeting the water demand becomes an even greater challenge. The goal of this study is to provide a baseline assessment of freshwater use in electricity generation in the United States and at the state level. Freshwater withdrawal and consumption requirements for power generated from fossil, nonfossil, and renewable sources via various technologies and by use of different cooling systems are examined. A data inventory has been developed that compiles data from government statistics, reports, and literature issued by major research institutes. A spreadsheet-based model has been developed to conduct the estimates by means of a transparent and interactive process. The model further allows us to project future water withdrawal and consumption in electricity production under the forecasted increases in demand. This tool is intended to provide decision makers with the means to make a quick comparison among various fuel, technology, and cooling system options. The model output can be used to address water resource sustainability when considering new projects or expansion of existing plants.

Wu, M.; Peng, J. (Energy Systems); ( NE)

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

123

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Metering Net Metering Net Metering < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Fed. Government Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Net Metering Provider Washington State University Washington's net-metering law applies to systems up to 100 kilowatts (kW) in capacity that generate electricity using solar, wind, hydro, biogas from animal waste, or combined heat and power technologies (including fuel cells). All customer classes are eligible, and all utilities -- including municipal utilities and electric cooperatives -- must offer net metering.

124

Toward a 20% Wind Electricity Supply in the United States: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated the Wind Powering America (WPA) program in 1999, installed wind power capacity in the United States has increased from 2,500 MW to more than 11,000 MW. In 1999, only four states had more than 100 MW of installed wind capacity; now 16 states have more than 100 MW installed. In addition to WPA's efforts to increase deployment, the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) is building a network of support across the country. In July 2005, AWEA launched the Wind Energy Works! Coalition, which is comprised of more than 70 organizations. In February 2006, the wind deployment vision was enhanced by President George W. Bush's Advanced Energy Initiative, which refers to a wind energy contribution of up to 20% of the electricity consumption of the United States. A 20% electricity contribution over the next 20 to 25 years represents 300 to 350 gigawatts (GW) of electricity. This paper provides a background of wind energy deployment in the United States and a history of the U.S. DOE's WPA program, as well as the program's approach to increasing deployment through removal of institutional and informational barriers to a 20% wind electricity future.

Flowers, L.; Dougherty, P.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Metering Net Metering Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Residential Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Net Metering Provider West Virginia Public Service Commission Net metering in West Virginia is available to all retail electricity customers. System capacity limits vary depending on the customer type and electric utility type, according to the following table. Customer Type IOUs with 30,000 customers or more IOUs with fewer than 30,000 customers, municipal utilities, electric cooperatives

126

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Metering Net Metering Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Missouri Program Type Net Metering Provider Missouri Public Service Commission Missouri enacted legislation in June 2007 (S.B. 54)* requiring all electric utilities -- investor-owned utilities, municipal utilities and electric cooperatives -- to offer net metering to customers with systems up to 100 kilowatts (kW) in capacity that generate electricity using wind energy, solar-thermal energy, hydroelectric energy, photovoltaics (PV), fuel cells

127

Tampa Electric Company, Polk Power Station Unit No. 1, preliminary public design report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This preliminary Public Design Report (PDR) provides design information about Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit No. 1, which will demonstrate in a commercial 250 MW unit the benefits of the integration of oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasification with advanced combined cycle technology. This project is partially funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under Round III of its Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program under the provisions of Cooperative Agreement between DOE and Tampa Electric Company, novated on March 5,1992. The project is highlighted by the inclusion of a new hot gas cleanup system. DOE`s project management is based at its Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) in West Virginia. This report is preliminary, and the information contained herein is subject to revision. Definitive information will be available in the final PDR, which will be published at the completion of detailed engineering.

NONE

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY Improving Performance of Federal ) 78 Fed Reg. 53,436 (Aug. 29, 2013) Permitting and Review of ) FR Doc 2013 -- 21098 Infrastructure Projects ) COMMENTS OF WIRES ON THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REQUEST FOR INFORMATION WIRES 1 respectfully submits these comments in response to the Request for Information ("RFI") issued by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability ("OEDER") of the Department of Energy ("DOE" or "the Department") in conjunction with the Member Agencies of the Steering Committee under the March 22, 2013 Executive Order of the President ("EO 13604"). The RFI concerns a draft proposed Integrated Interagency Pre-Application ("IIP")

129

Northeast United States U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of the Adequacy of Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Energy Infrastructure Modeling and Analysis Division November 2013 Northeast U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Adequacy Assessment, 2013 2 Preface In 2005-06, the U.S. DOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) conducted a study on the adequacy of interstate natural gas pipeline capacity serving the northeastern United States to meet natural gas demand in the event of a pipeline disruption. The study modeled gas demand for select market areas in the Northeast under a range of different weather conditions. The study then determined how interstate pipeline flow patterns could

130

Interim Project Results: United Parcel Service's Second-Generation Hybrid-Electric Delivery Vans (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the performance evaluation of United Parcel Service's second-generation hybrid-electric delivery vans. The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is evaluating the 18-month, in-service performance of 11 of these vans along with 11 comparable conventional diesel vans operating in Minneapolis, Minnesota. As a complement to the field study, the team recently completed fuel economy and emissions testing at NREL's Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) laboratory.

Not Available

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

132

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

133

Replacement energy costs for nuclear electricity-generating units in the United States: 1997--2001. Volume 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report updates previous estimates of replacement energy costs for potential short-term shutdowns of 109 US nuclear electricity-generating units. This information was developed to assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its regulatory impact analyses, specifically those that examine the impacts of proposed regulations requiring retrofitting of or safety modifications to nuclear reactors. Such actions might necessitate shutdowns of nuclear power plants while these changes are being implemented. The change in energy cost represents one factor that the NRC must consider when deciding to require a particular modification. Cost estimates were derived from probabilistic production cost simulations of pooled utility system operations. Factors affecting replacement energy costs, such as random unit failures, maintenance and refueling requirements, and load variations, are treated in the analysis. This report describes an abbreviated analytical approach as it was adopted to update the cost estimates published in NUREG/CR-4012, Vol. 3. The updates were made to extend the time frame of cost estimates and to account for recent changes in utility system conditions, such as change in fuel prices, construction and retirement schedules, and system demand projects.

VanKuiken, J.C.; Guziel, K.A.; Tompkins, M.M.; Buehring, W.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

SWN Nets as a Framework for the Specification and the Analysis of FT Techniques Adopted in Electric Plant Automation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of formal methods for specification and analysis of dependable systems is considered a promising opportunity to support the evaluation of critical issues since the early design phases. Stochastic Petri nets can play an important role not only ...

Lorenzo Capra; Rossano Gaeta; Oliver Botti

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Metering Net Metering Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Biofuels Alternative Fuel Vehicles Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Energy Sources Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Net Metering Provider New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission New Hampshire requires all utilities selling electricity in the state to offer net metering to customers who own or operate systems up to one megawatt (1 MW) in capacity that generate electricity using solar, wind, geothermal, hydro, tidal, wave, biomass, landfill gas, bio-oil or

136

Electric household equipment and electric fuel usage in the Tri-State Region and the United States: 1960-70. Working paper  

SciTech Connect

The possible impact of areawide residential location policy on future residential electricity usage in the Tri-State Metropolitan Region centering on New York City is investigated. This report is concerned with selected residential electric appliance usage in the Tri-State Region as compared with usage of these appliances across the United States between 1960 and 1970. Included are tabular representations of comparisons between residential air conditioner usage in the Tri-State Region and the United States. Tabular comparisons also are made with respect to residential appliance usage and electric fuel usage.

Hillman, B.

1973-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Electric power monthly, February 1998 with data for November 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 63 tabs.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Metering Net Metering Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government General Public/Consumer Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Wind Solar Home Weatherization Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Net Metering Provider Arkansas Economic Development Commission In April 2001, Arkansas enacted legislation (HB 2325) directing the Arkansas Public Service Commission (PSC) to establish net-metering rules for certain renewable-energy systems.* The PSC approved final rules for net metering in July 2002. Subsequent legislation enacted in April 2007 (HB 2334) expanded the availability of net metering; increased the capacity

139

Economic Consequences of Alternative Solution Methods for Centralized Unit Commitment in Day-Ahead Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

commitment in competitive electricity markets,” Util. Pol. ,of market design,” in Electricity Market Reform: Anrestructured competitive electricity markets. and variable

Sioshansi, Ramteen; O'Neill, Richard; Oren, Shmuel S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Wind Solar Home Weatherization Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Net Metering Provider Louisiana Public Service Commission '''''Note: Ongoing proceedings related to net metering can be found in Docket R-31417.''''' Louisiana enacted legislation in June 2003 establishing net metering. Modeled on Arkansas's law, Louisiana's law requires investor-owned utilities, municipal utilities and electric cooperatives to offer net metering to customers that generate electricity using solar, wind, hydropower, geothermal or biomass resources. Fuel cells and microturbines that generate electricity entirely derived from renewable resources are

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "net electricity unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

OpenEI - net generation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm610 en Electricity Net Generation From Renewable Energy by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 http:en.openei.org...

142

American Samoa- Net Metering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The American Samoa Power Authority (ASPA), a government-owned electric utility, is the only power provider in this U.S. territory of almost 70,000 people. ASPA's "Interconnection and Net Energy...

143

The potential for avoided emissions from photovoltaic electricity in the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

potential potential for avoided emissions from photovoltaic electricity in the United States Pei Zhai a, * , Peter Larsen a, b , Dev Millstein a , Surabi Menon a , Eric Masanet c a Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA b Management Science & Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA c McCormick School of Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 29 April 2012 Accepted 16 August 2012 Available online 29 September 2012 Keywords: Photovoltaics Emissions Energy model United States a b s t r a c t This study evaluates avoided emissions potential of CO 2 , SO 2 and NO x assuming a 10% penetration level of photovoltaics (PV) in ten selected U.S. states. We estimate avoided emissions using an hourly energy system simulation model, EnergyPLAN. Avoided

144

Net metering programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been a recent surge of interest from the renewable energy industry and environmental groups in net metering. The reason for this interest is that net metering is a simple, low-cost, and easily administered method to encourage direct customer investment in renewable energy technologies. The renewable energy industry supports net metering because it removes an economic disincentive for potential customers by increasing the value of the electricity generated by renewable energy technologies. Environmental groups support net metering because it promotes clean energy production. The concept of net metering programs is to allow the electric meters of customers with generating facilities to turn backwards when their generators are producing more energy than the customers` demand. Net metering allows customers to use their generation to offset their consumption over the entire billing period, not just instantaneously. This offset would enable customers with generating facilities to receive retail prices for more of the electricity they generate. Without a net metering program, utilities usually install a second meter to measure any electricity that flows back to the utility grid and purchase it at a rate that is much lower than the retail prices. There are various net metering programs in the country. Most are available to customer-owned small generating facilities only, some further restrict the eligibility to renewable energy technologies. This Topical Issues Brief discusses how these net metering programs have been implemented by different utilities an states, what the rationales are behind may net metering programs, and what the potential impact of net metering may be on the deployment of renewable energy technologies.

Wan, Y H

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Property:NetProdCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NetProdCapacity NetProdCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NetProdCapacity Property Type Quantity Description Sum of the property SummerPeakNetCpcty for all Energy Generation Facilities with properties: Sector: Geothermal Energy InGeothermalResourceArea: set to the the variable vName of the Geothermal Resource Area Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS

146

Net Metering (New Brunswick, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The NB Power Net Metering program provides customers with the option to connect their own environmentally sustainable generation unit to NB Power's distribution system. The program allows customers...

147

AMERICAN ELECTRIC POWER'S CONESVILLE POWER PLANT UNIT NO.5 CO2 CAPTURE RETROFIT STUDY  

SciTech Connect

ALSTOM Power Inc.'s Power Plant Laboratories (ALSTOM) has teamed with American Electric Power (AEP), ABB Lummus Global Inc. (ABB), the US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL), and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) to conduct a comprehensive study evaluating the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration technologies applied to an existing US coal-fired electric generation power plant. The motivation for this study was to provide input to potential US electric utility actions concerning GHG emissions reduction. If the US decides to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions, action would need to be taken to address existing power plants. Although fuel switching from coal to natural gas may be one scenario, it will not necessarily be a sufficient measure and some form of CO{sub 2} capture for use or disposal may also be required. The output of this CO{sub 2} capture study will enhance the public's understanding of control options and influence decisions and actions by government, regulators, and power plant owners in considering the costs of reducing greenhouse gas CO{sub 2} emissions. The total work breakdown structure is encompassed within three major reports, namely: (1) Literature Survey, (2) AEP's Conesville Unit No.5 Retrofit Study, and (3) Bench-Scale Testing and CFD Evaluation. The report on the literature survey results was issued earlier by Bozzuto, et al. (2000). Reports entitled ''AEP's Conesville Unit No.5 Retrofit Study'' and ''Bench-Scale Testing and CFD Evaluation'' are provided as companion volumes, denoted Volumes I and II, respectively, of the final report. The work performed, results obtained, and conclusions and recommendations derived therefrom are summarized.

Carl R. Bozzuto; Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; Mark Palkes; John L. Marion

2001-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

148

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Metering Net Metering Net Metering < Back Eligibility Commercial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Net Metering Provider Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals, and Energy '''''Note: In March 2011, Virginia enacted HB 1983, which increased the residential net-metering limit to 20 kW. However, residential facilities with a capacity of greater than 10 kW must pay a monthly standby charge. The Virginia State Corporation Commission approved standby charges for transmissions and distribution components as proposed by Virginia Electric and Power Company (Dominion Virginia Power) on November 3, 2011.'''''

149

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Metering Net Metering Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Net Metering Provider North Carolina Utilities Commission The North Carolina Utilities Commission (NCUC) requires the state's three investor-owned utilities -- Duke Energy, Progress Energy and Dominion North Carolina Power -- to make net metering available to customers that own and operate systems that generate electricity using solar energy, wind energy, hydropower, ocean or wave energy, biomass resources, combined heat and

150

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Metering Net Metering Net Metering < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Wind Solar Home Weatherization Program Info State Ohio Program Type Net Metering Provider Ohio Public Utilities Commission '''''Note: In July 2012, the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) opened a docket ([http://dis.puc.state.oh.us/CaseRecord.aspx?CaseNo=12-2050-EL-ORD Case 12-0250-EL-RDR]) to review the net metering rules for investor-owned utilities. Details will be posted as more information is available.''''' Ohio's net-metering law requires electric distribution utilities to offer net metering to customers who generate electricity using wind energy, solar energy, biomass, landfill gas, hydropower, fuel cells or microturbines.

151

Economic Assessment of Electric-Drive Vehicle Operation in California and the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the context of current electricity rates in specific utilityspecific utility EV electricity rates, in combination withrelated to the latest electricity rates in California and

Lidicker, Jeffrey R.; Lipman, Timothy E.; Shaheen, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Metering Net Metering Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Vermont Program Type Net Metering Provider Vermont Department of Public Service NOTE: Legislation enacted in May 2012 (HB475) further amends Vermont's net metering policy. Vermont's original net-metering legislation was enacted in 1998, and the law has been expanded several times subsequently. Any electric customer in Vermont may net meter after obtaining a Certificate of Public Good from the Vermont Public Service Board (PSB). Solar net metered systems 10 kilowatts

153

Maximizing Real-Time Distribution of Wind-Electricity to Electrical Thermal Storage Units for Residential Space Heating.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wind-electricity is unpredictable in both intensity and duration. This thesis presents the design and implementation of Client-pull and Server-push architectures for the distribution of wind-electricity… (more)

Barnes, Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

CO2 Capture Using Electric Fields: Low-Cost Electrochromic Film on Plastic for Net-Zero Energy Building  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Two faculty members at Lehigh University created a new technique called supercapacitive swing adsorption (SSA) that uses electrical charges to encourage materials to capture and release CO2. Current CO2 capture methods include expensive processes that involve changes in temperature or pressure. Lehigh University’s approach uses electric fields to improve the ability of inexpensive carbon sorbents to trap CO2. Because this process uses electric fields and not electric current, the overall energy consumption is projected to be much lower than conventional methods. Lehigh University is now optimizing the materials to maximize CO2 capture and minimize the energy needed for the process.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Electric power monthly, May 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Statistics by company and plant are published on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Electric Power Monthly with data for July 1997  

SciTech Connect

This publication provides monthly statistics at the state, census division, and U.S. levels for net generation; fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity, and quality of fossil fuels; cost of fossil fuels; electricity retail sales; associated revenue; and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council regions. Statistics on net generation are published by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The monthly update is summarized, and industry developments are briefly described. 57 tabs.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Electric power monthly with data for June 1997  

SciTech Connect

This publication provides monthly statistics at the state, census division, and U.S. levels for net generation; fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity, and quality of fossil fuels; cost of fossil fuels; electricity retail sales; associated revenue; and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity, and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council regions. Statistics on net generation by energy source and capability of new generating units by company and plant are also included. A section is included in the report which summarizes major industry developments. 1 fig., 64 tabs.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Economic Cost of Net-Metering in Maryland: Who Bears theDSIRE), 2010. Map of Net Metering Policies [WWW Document].documents/summarymaps/Net_Metering_map.ppt De Jonghe, C. ,

Darghouth, Naim Richard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Metering Net Metering Net Metering < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Wind Solar Home Weatherization Program Info State New Mexico Program Type Net Metering Provider New Mexico Public Regulation Commission Net metering is available to all "qualifying facilities" (QFs), as defined by the federal Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA)*, which pertains to systems up to 80 megawatts (MW) in capacity. Previously, net metering in New Mexico was limited to systems up to 10 kilowatts (kW) in capacity. Net-metered customers are credited or paid for any monthly net excess generation (NEG) at the utility's avoided-cost rate. If a customer has net

160

Highway Vehicle Electric Drive in the United States: 2009 Status and Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANL/ESD/10-9 ANL/ESD/10-9 Highway Vehicle Electric Drive in the United States: 2009 Status and Issues Energy Systems Division About Argonne National Laboratory Argonne is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357. The Laboratory's main facility is outside Chicago, at 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439. For information about Argonne and its pioneering science and technology programs, see www.anl.gov. Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available on paper to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, for a processing fee, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "net electricity unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Net Metering | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Metering Metering Jump to: navigation, search For electric customers who generate their own electricity, net metering allows for the flow of electricity both to and from the customer,– typically through a single, bi-directional meter. With net metering, when a customer’'s generation exceeds the customer’'s use, the customer's electricity flows back to the grid, offsetting electricity consumed by the customer at a different time. In effect, the customer uses excess generation to offset electricity that the customer otherwise would have to purchase at the utility’'s full retail rate. Net metering is required by law in most states, but some of these laws only apply to investor-owned utilities,– not to municipal utilities or electric cooperatives. [1] Net Metering Incentives

162

Estimation of Net Ecosystem Carbon Exchange for the Conterminous UnitedStates by Combining MODIS and AmeriFlux Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eddy covariance flux towers provide continuous measurements of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) for a wide range of climate and biome types. However, these measurements only represent the carbon fluxes at the scale of the tower footprint. To quantify the net exchange of carbon dioxide between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere for regions or continents, flux tower measurements need to be extrapolated to these large areas. Here we used remotely-sensed data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument on board NASA's Terra satellite to scale up AmeriFlux NEE measurements to the continental scale. We first combined MODIS and AmeriFlux data for representative U.S. ecosystems to develop a predictive NEE model using a regression tree approach. The predictive model was trained and validated using NEE data over the periods 2000-2004 and 2005-2006, respectively. We found that the model predicted NEE reasonably well at the site level. We then applied the model to the continental scale and estimated NEE for each 1 km x 1 km cell across the conterminous U.S. for each 8-day period in 2005 using spatially-explicit MODIS data. The model generally captured the expected spatial and seasonal patterns of NEE. Our study demonstrated that our empirical approach is effective for scaling up eddy flux NEE measurements to the continental scale and producing wall-to-wall NEE estimates across multiple biomes. Our estimates may provide an independent dataset from simulations with biogeochemical models and inverse modeling approaches for examining the spatiotemporal patterns of NEE and constraining terrestrial carbon budgets for large areas.

Xiao, Jingfeng; Zhuang, Qianlai; Baldocchi, Dennis D.; Law, Beverly E.; Richardson, Andrew D.; Chen, Jiquan; Oren, Ram; Starr, Gregory; Noormets, Asko; Ma, Siyan; Verma, Shashi B.; Wharton, Sonia; Wofsy, Steven C.; Bolstad, Paul V.; Burns, Sean P.; Cook, David R.; Curtis, Peter S.; Drake, Bert G.; Falk, Matthias; Fischer, Marc L.; Foster, David R.; Gu, Lianhong; Hadley, Julian L.; Hollinger, David Y.; Katul, Gabriel G.; Litvak, Marcy; Martin, Timothy A.; Matamala, Roser; McNulty, Steve; Meyers, Tilden P.; Monson, Russell K.; Munger, J. William; Oechel, Walter C.; U, Kyaw Tha Paw; Schmid, Hans Peter; Scott, Russell L.; Sun, Ge; Suyker, Andrew E.; Torn, Margaret S.

2009-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

163

Estimation of net ecosystem carbon exchange for the conterminous United States by combining MODIS and AmeriFlux data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eddy covariance flux towers provide continuous measurements of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) for a wide range of climate and biome types. However, these measurements only represent the carbon fluxes at the scale of the tower footprint. To quantify the net exchange of carbon dioxide between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere for regions or continents, flux tower measurements need to be extrapolated to these large areas. Here we used remotely sensed data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument on board the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Terra satellite to scale up AmeriFlux NEE measurements to the continental scale. We first combined MODIS and AmeriFlux data for representative U.S. ecosystems to develop a predictive NEE model using a modified regression tree approach. The predictive model was trained and validated using eddy flux NEE data over the periods 2000-2004 and 2005-2006, respectively. We found that the model predicted NEE well (r = 0.73, p < 0.001). We then applied the model to the continental scale and estimated NEE for each 1 km x 1 km cell across the conterminous U.S. for each 8-day interval in 2005 using spatially explicit MODIS data. The model generally captured the expected spatial and seasonal patterns of NEE as determined from measurements and the literature. Our study demonstrated that our empirical approach is effective for scaling up eddy flux NEE measurements to the continental scale and producing wall-to-wall NEE estimates across multiple biomes. Our estimates may provide an independent dataset from simulations with biogeochemical models and inverse modeling approaches for examining the spatiotemporal patterns of NEE and constraining terrestrial carbon budgets over large areas.

Xiao, Jingfeng; Zhuang, Qianlai; Baldocchi, Dennis D.; Bolstad, Paul V.; Burns, Sean P.; Chen, Jiquan; Cook, David R.; Curtis, Peter S.; Drake, Bert G.; Foster, David R.; Gu, Lianhong; Hadley, Julian L.; Hollinger, David Y.; Katul, Gabriel G.; Law, Beverly E.; Litvak, Marcy; Ma, Siyan; Martin, Timothy A.; Matamala, Roser; McNulty, Steve; Meyers, Tilden P.; Monson, Russell K.; Munger, J. William; Noormets, Asko; Oechel, Walter C.; Oren, Ram; Richardson, Andrew D.; Schmid, Hans Peter; Scott, Russell L.; Starr, Gregory; Sun, Ge; Suyker, Andrew E.; Torn, Margaret S.; Paw, Kyaw; Verma, Shashi B.; Wharton, Sonia; Wofsy, Steven C.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Metering Net Metering Net Metering < Back Eligibility Commercial General Public/Consumer Industrial Residential Fed. Government Local Government State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Net Metering Provider Oklahoma Corporation Commission Net metering has been available in Oklahoma since 1988 under Oklahoma Corporation Commission (OCC) Order 326195. The OCC's rules require investor-owned utilities and electric cooperatives under the commission's jurisdiction* to file net-metering tariffs for customer-owned renewable-energy systems and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) facilities up to 100 kilowatts (kW) in capacity. Net metering is available to all customer

165

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Net Metering Net Metering < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Local Government Residential State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Hawaii Program Type Net Metering Provider Hawaii Public Utilities Commission NOTE: Kauai Island Electric Cooperative's (KIUC) net metering program has reached its capacity and has implemented a Net Energy Metering Pilot Program. Hawaii's original net-metering law was enacted in 2001 and expanded in 2004 by HB 2048, which increased the eligible capacity limit of net-metered systems from 10 kilowatts (kW) to 50 kW. In 2005, the law was further amended by SB 1003, which authorized the Hawaii Public Utilities Commission

166

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Metering Net Metering Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Wind Solar Home Weatherization Water Program Info State New York Program Type Net Metering Provider New York State Department of Public Service Note: In October 2012 the New York Public Service Commission (PSC) issued an order directing Central Hudson Gas and Electric to file net metering tariff revisions tripling the aggregate net metering cap for most systems from 1% of 2005 peak demand (12 MW) to 3% of 2005 peak demand (36 MW). The PSC issued another order in June 2013 to raise the aggregate net metering cap

167

Economic Assessment of Electric-Drive Vehicle Operation in California and the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles, Chapter Nine incompetitive plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. Eviron. Res.of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles, Volume 1: Nationwide

Lidicker, Jeffrey R.; Lipman, Timothy E.; Shaheen, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Economic Assessment of Electric-Drive Vehicle Operation in California and the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles, Chapter Nine inD.B. (editor) Plug-In Electric Vehicles: What Role Forplug-in hybrid electric vehicles. Eviron. Res. Lett. 2008,

Lidicker, Jeffrey R.; Lipman, Timothy E.; Shaheen, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Estimated Value of Service Reliability for Electric Utility Customers in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Reliability of Electric Power. Power Symposium, 2006.of a Terrorist Attack on the Electric Power System of LosR. Windell. “The Cost of Electric Power Interruptions in the

Sullivan, M.J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Electric power monthly, May 1995 with data for February 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisiommakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuel, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

1995-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

171

Electric power monthly, December 1997 with data for September 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 63 tabs.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Project Overview: United Parcel Service's Second-Generation Hybrid-Electric Delivery Vans (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes UPS second generation hybrid-electric delivery vehicles as compared to conventional delivery vehicles. Medium-duty commercial vehicles such as moving trucks, beverage-delivery trucks, and package-delivery vans consume almost 2,000 gal of fuel per year on average. United Parcel Service (UPS) operates hybrid-electric package-delivery vans to reduce the fuel use and emissions of its fleet. In 2008, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Fleet Test and Evaluation Team evaluated the first generation of UPS' hybrid delivery vans. These hybrid vans demonstrated 29%-37% higher fuel economy than comparable conventional diesel vans, which contributed to UPS' decision to add second-generation hybrid vans to its fleet. The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team is now evaluating the 18-month, in-service performance of 11 second-generation hybrid vans and 11 comparable conventional diesel vans operated by UPS in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The evaluation also includes testing fuel economy and emissions at NREL's Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory and comparing diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration. In addition, a followup evaluation of UPS' first-generation hybrid vans will show how those vehicles performed over three years of operation. One goal of this project is to provide a consistent comparison of fuel economy and operating costs between the second-generation hybrid vans and comparable conventional vans. Additional goals include quantifying the effects of hybridization on DPF regeneration and helping UPS select delivery routes for its hybrid vans that maximize the benefits of hybrid technology. This document introduces the UPS second-generation hybrid evaluation project. Final results will be available in mid-2012.

Not Available

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agricultural Agricultural Commercial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Net Metering Provider Kentucky Public Service Commission In April 2008, Kentucky enacted legislation that expanded its net metering law by requiring utilities to offer net metering to customers that generate electricity with photovoltaic (PV), wind, biomass, biogas or hydroelectric systems up to 30 kilowatts (kW) in capacity. The Kentucky Public Service Commission (PSC) issued rules on January 8, 2009. Utilities had 90 days from that date to file tariffs that include all terms and conditions of their net metering programs, including interconnection.

174

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Net Metering Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Solar Home Weatherization Water Wind Program Info State Maryland Program Type Net Metering Provider Maryland Public Service Commission Note: The program web site listed above links to the Maryland Public Service Commission's Net Metering Working Group page, which contains a variety of information resources related to the ongoing implementation of net metering in Maryland, such as meeting agendas, minutes, and draft utility tariffs.

175

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Metering Net Metering Net Metering < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Wind Solar Home Weatherization Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Net Metering Provider DC Public Service Commission In the District of Columbia (DC), net metering is currently available to residential and commercial customer-generators with systems powered by renewable-energy sources, combined heat and power (CHP), fuel cells and microturbines, with a maximum capacity of 1 megawatt (MW). The term "renewable energy sources" is defined as solar, wind, tidal, geothermal, biomass, hydroelectric power and digester gas. In October 2008, the Clean

176

Economic Consequences of Alternative Solution Methods for Centralized Unit Commitment in Day-Ahead Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short-term scheduling of combined cycle units,” IEEE Trans.complex units such as combined-cycle com- bustion turbines (

Sioshansi, Ramteen; O'Neill, Richard; Oren, Shmuel S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: October 2013 Resource Use: October 2013 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at the resources used to produce electricity. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below, electricity generation output by fuel type and generator type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By fuel type By generator type Region map map showing electricity regions In October 2013, net generation in the United States increased 1.0 percent compared to the previous year. This increase in electricity generation occurred mainly in the Mid-Atlantic, Central, and Southeast regions, along

178

Electric Power Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 3.19. Net Generation from Geothermal by State, by Sector, 2011 and 2010 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric...

179

Electric Power Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7. Net Generation from Wind by State, by Sector, 2011 and 2010 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent...

180

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Fuel Vehicles Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Delaware Program Type Net Metering Provider Delaware Public Service Commission In Delaware, net metering is available to any customer that generates electricity using solar, wind or hydro resources, anaerobic digesters, or fuel cells capable of being powered by renewable fuels. Grid-interactive electric vehicles are also eligible for net metering treatment for electricity that they put on the grid, although these vehicles do not themselves generate electricity. The maximum capacity of a net-metered system is 25 kilowatts (kW) for residential customers; 100 kW for farm customers on residential rates; two megawatts (MW) per meter for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "net electricity unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Net Metering Net Metering < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Net Metering Provider Iowa Utilities Board Iowa's statutes do not explicitly authorize the Iowa Utilities Board (IUB) to mandate net metering, but this authority is implicit through the board's enforcement of PURPA and Iowa Code § 476.41 ''et seq.'' Iowa's net-metering subrule, adopted by the IUB in July 1984, applies to customers that generate electricity using alternate energy production facilities (AEPs). Net metering is available to all customer classes of Iowa's two investor-owned utilities -- MidAmerican Energy and Interstate Power and

182

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Metering Net Metering Net Metering < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Water Energy Sources Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Net Metering Provider Minnesota Department of Commerce '''''Note: H.F. 729, enacted in May 2013, includes many changes to Minnesota's net metering law. These changes are described above, but most will not take effect until rules are implemented at the PUC. The below summary reflects the current rules.''''' Minnesota's net-metering law, enacted in 1983, applies to all investor-owned utilities, municipal utilities and electric cooperatives. All "qualifying facilities" less than 40 kilowatts (kW) in capacity are

183

Net Energy Billing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Billing Energy Billing Net Energy Billing < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Maine Program Type Net Metering Provider Maine Public Utilities Commission All of Maine's electric utilities -- investor-owned utilities (IOUs), consumer-owned utilities (COUs), which include municipal utilities and electric cooperatives -- must offer net energy billing for individual customers. Furthermore IOUs are required to offer net metering for shared ownership customers, while COUs may offer net metering to shared ownership

184

Agent-based electrical power management model for houses equipped with storage battery and photovoltaic units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Smart grid systems have been actively discussed to realize a sustainable and a low-carbon society that efficiently consumes electric power and to introduce photovoltaic power generation, i.e., renewable energy or electric vehicles. In this study, we ...

Ryo Kanamori; Takayuki Ito; Nobuyasu Mizutani

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Electric power monthly, July 1999, with data for April 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM). This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 1 fig., 64 tabs.

NONE

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Electric power monthly, December 1996 with data for September 1996  

SciTech Connect

The report presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 57 tabs.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Commercial Nuclear Electric Power in the United States: Problems and Prospects  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article briefly reviews the origins of commercial nuclear electric power, the efforts to dispose of high-level nuclear waste, the costs of building and operating nuclear electric power plants, and other energy-related developments pertinent to the future of nuclear electric power.

Information Center

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Metering Net Metering Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Solar Water Wind Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Net Metering Provider New Jersey Board of Public Utilities New Jersey's net-metering rules apply to all residential, commercial and industrial customers of the state's investor-owned utilities and energy suppliers (and certain competitive municipal utilities and electric cooperatives). Systems that generate electricity using solar, wind, geothermal, wave, tidal, landfill gas or sustainable biomass resources, including fuel cells (all "Class I" technologies under the state RPS), are

189

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Metering Net Metering Net Metering < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Colorado Program Type Net Metering Provider Colorado Public Utilities Commission [http://www.leg.state.co.us/clics/clics2009a/csl.nsf/fsbillcont3/571064D8... Senate Bill 51] of April 2009 made several changes, effective September 1, 2009, to the state's net metering rules for investor-owned utilities, as they apply to solar-electric systems. These changes include converting the maximum system size for solar-electric systems from two megawatts (MW) to 120% of the annual consumption of the site; redefining a site to include

190

Current experience with net metering programs  

SciTech Connect

Net metering is a utility metering practice that encourages direct consumer investment in renewable energy technologies. Laws and regulations that establish net metering practices now exist in 22 states. Net metering enables electricity customers with small generators to receive a higher value for some or all of the electricity they generate. This is accomplished by allowing the electric meters of such customers to turn backward when there is more generation than demand. It effectively allows customers with small generators to use the electricity they generate to offset their usage over an entire billing period. This paper reports on the current status of net metering laws and rules in the US. In particular, the extent of the net metering authority in each state is highlighted. Differing requirements for grid-interconnection have introduced significant variations in the actual implementation of net metering programs. Interconnection requirements from specific utilities are collected to understand how net metering programs have been affected.

Wan, Y.H.; Green, H.J.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

metering. Independent systems with retail sales of less than 5,000,000 kilowatt-hours (kWh) are exempt from offering net metering. Utilities that generate 100% of electricity...

192

Analysis of drought impacts on electricity production in the Western and Texas interconnections of the United States.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electricity generation relies heavily on water resources and their availability. To examine the interdependence of energy and water in the electricity context, the impacts of a severe drought to assess the risk posed by drought to electricity generation within the western and Texas interconnections has been examined. The historical drought patterns in the western United States were analyzed, and the risk posed by drought to electricity generation within the region was evaluated. The results of this effort will be used to develop scenarios for medium- and long-term transmission modeling and planning efforts by the Western Electricity Coordination Council (WECC) and the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT). The study was performed in response to a request developed by the Western Governors Association in conjunction with the transmission modeling teams at the participating interconnections. It is part of a U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored, national laboratory-led research effort to develop tools related to the interdependency of energy and water as part of a larger interconnection-wide transmission planning project funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. This study accomplished three main objectives. It provided a thorough literature review of recent studies of drought and the potential implications for electricity generation. It analyzed historical drought patterns in the western United States and used the results to develop three design drought scenarios. Finally, it quantified the risk to electricity generation for each of eight basins for each of the three drought scenarios and considered the implications for transmission planning. Literature on drought impacts on electricity generation describes a number of examples where hydroelectric generation capacity has been limited because of drought but only a few examples of impact on thermoelectric generation. In all documented cases, shortfalls of generation were met by purchasing power from the market, albeit at higher prices. However, sufficient excess generation and transmission must be available for this strategy to work. Although power purchase was the most commonly discussed drought mitigation strategy, a total of 12 response strategies were identified in the literature, falling into four main categories: electricity supply, electricity demand response, alternative water supplies, and water demand response. Three hydrological drought scenarios were developed based on a literature review and historical data analysis. The literature review helped to identify key drought parameters and data on drought frequency and severity. Historical hydrological drought data were analyzed for the western United States to identify potential drought correlations and estimate drought parameters. The first scenario was a West-wide drought occurring in 1977; it represented a severe drought in five of the eight basins in the study area. A second drought scenario was artificially defined by selecting the conditions from the 10th-percentile drought year for each individual basin; this drought was defined in this way to allow more consistent analysis of risk to electricity generation in each basin. The final scenario was based upon the current low-flow hydro modeling scenario defined by WECC, which uses conditions from the year 2001. These scenarios were then used to quantify the risk to electricity generation in each basin. The risk calculations represent a first-order estimate of the maximum amount of electricity generation that might be lost from both hydroelectric and thermoelectric sources under a worst-case scenario. Even with the conservative methodology used, the majority of basins showed a limited amount of risk under most scenarios. The level of risk in these basins is likely to be amenable to mitigation by known strategies, combined with existing reserve generation and transmission capacity. However, the risks to the Pacific Northwest and Texas Basins require further study. The Pacific Northwest is vulnerable because of its heavy reliance on hydroelectri

Harto, C. B.; Yan, Y. E.; Demissie, Y. K.; Elcock, D.; Tidwell, V. C.; Hallett, K.; Macknick, J.; Wigmosta, M. S.; Tesfa, T. K. (Environmental Science Division); (Sandia National Laboratory); (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

193

Economic Assessment of Electric-Drive Vehicle Operation in California and the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in California. Electric Utility Rate and Gasoline Price Datacontribute to better utility rate understanding and inputsanalysis of national utility rates and their structures in

Lidicker, Jeffrey R.; Lipman, Timothy E.; Shaheen, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

How much electricity is used for lighting in the United States ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA estimates that in 2011, about 461 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh) of electricity were used for lighting by the residential and commercial sectors.

195

Wind energy as a significant source of electricity for the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses wind energy and its potential to significantly impact the generation of electricity within the US. The principles and the equipment used to convert wind energy to electricity are described, as is the status of current technology. Markets and production projections are given. There is discussion of the advances required to reduce the selling cost of electricity generated from the wind from today`s price of about $0.05 per kilowatt-hour to full cost-competitiveness with gas- and coal-based electricity.

Nix, R.G.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

" Electric Utilities",602076,"Florida","Rhode Island"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Highest","Lowest" Highest","Lowest" "United States" "Primary Energy Source","Coal" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",1039062,"Texas","District of Columbia" " Electric Utilities",602076,"Florida","Rhode Island" " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",436986,"Texas","Alaska" "Net Generation (megawatthours)",4125059899,"Texas","District of Columbia" " Electric Utilities",2471632103,"Florida","New Jersey" " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",1653427796,"Texas","District of Columbia" "Emissions (thousand metric tons)"

197

Units  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unidades Unidades Principal ESTOY PERDIDO!!! En la Aventura de la Partículas, usamos a menudo distintas unidades, sin explicar formalmente qué significan. Aquí le damos una breve sinopsis de las unidades más comunes en la física de partículas: Energía: en electrón-volts (eV). La energía ganada por un electrón que remonta una diferencia de potencial de un volt. 1 eV = 1.6 x 10^(-19) joules. Un MeV es un millón de electrón volts, y un GeV es un billón de electrón volts. Un GeV es aproximadamente 1/1000 de la energía cinética de un mosquito! Masa: en GeV/c2 (un billón de electrón volts dividido por la velocidad de la luz al cuadrado. La masa es medida en términos de energía, debido a que la masa es justamente una forma de energía -- recuerde .) 1 GeV es

198

Electric power monthly, January 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

Not Available

1994-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

199

Electric power monthly, October 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

Not Available

1993-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

200

Electric power monthly, February 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EMP) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

1994-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "net electricity unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights: October 2011 Highlights: October 2011 Mixed temperatures led to flat retail sales of electricity during October 2011. Coal-fired generation decreased or was flat across the United States except for the Central region when compared to October 2010. October's electric system load remained in the mid-to-low section of the annual range in many electric systems across the United States. Key Indicators Oct. 2011 % Change from Oct. 2010 Total Net Generation (Thousand MWh) 309,400 0.5% Residential Retail Price (cents/kWh) 12.12 2.2% Retail Sales (Thousand MWh) 285,156 -0.9% Heating Degree-Days 259 8.8% Natural Gas Price, Henry Hub ($/MMBtu) 3.68 4.0% Coal Stocks (Thousand Tons) 156,880 -10.7% Coal Consumption (Thousand Tons) 69,627 -1.8% Natural Gas Consumption (Mcf) 603,724 1.6%

202

Electric  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Average Retail Price of Electricity to ... Period Residential Commercial Industrial ... or usage falling within specified limits by rate ...

203

Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

varying retail electricity prices: Theory and practice.GENERATION ON WHOLESALE ELECTRICITY PRICES IN CALIFORNIA:4.4.1 Lower wholesale electricity price cap and volumetric

Darghouth, Naim Richard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Borenstein, S. , 2007. Electricity Rate Structures and theEnvironmentally-Sound Electricity Rates for the Twenty-FirstCap-and-Trade for Electricity Rate Design, with Examples

Darghouth, Naim Richard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.2.1.1 Current Residential Electricity Rates PG&E and SCEhave total residential electricity rates that are similar toElectricity Rates .. 164 Residential

Darghouth, Naim Richard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

77 CHAPTER 4 ELECTRICITY BILL SAVINGS FROM RESIDENTIALresidential load and electricity bill by TOU period. (in the customer’s electricity bills. The second chapter of

Darghouth, Naim Richard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005a. Time- varying retail electricity prices: Theory andpractice. Electricity Deregulation: Choices and Challenges.efficiency of real-time electricity pricing. Energy Journal

Darghouth, Naim Richard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Economic Consequences of Alternative Solution Methods for Centralized Unit Commitment in Day-Ahead Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

also because of different energy prices resulting from thesettles with a uniform energy price in each 3 Indeed, thereport calculations with energy prices based on the unit

Sioshansi, Ramteen; O'Neill, Richard; Oren, Shmuel S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Net metering has become a widespread policy mechanism in the U.S. for supporting customer adoption of distributed photovoltaics (PV), allowing customers with PV systems to… (more)

Darghouth, Naim Richard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Electric power monthly with data for December 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and U.S. levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Electric power monthly with data for January 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and U.S. levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Electric power monthly with data for October 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and U.S. levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Electric power monthly, June 1995 with data for March 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 68 tabs.

1995-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

214

Electric power monthly, September 1996, with data for June 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and U.S. levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Electricity Graphic Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Figure 52. Growth in World Electric Power Generation and Total Energy Consumption, 1990-2030 Figure 52 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 53. World Net Electric Power Generation, 1990-2030 Figure 53 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 54. World Electricity Generation by Fuel, 2005-2030 Figure 54 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 55. World Net Electricity Generation from Nuclear Power, 1980 and 2030 Figure 55 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 56. Net Electricity Generation in the United States and China, 1980-2030 Figure 56 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

216

Summary of three regional assessment studies of solar electric generation opportunities in the Southwest, Southeast, and Northeast United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Market opportunities for solar generation of electricity for utility and for residential/commercial/industrial applications in the Northeast, Southeast, and Southwest regions of the United States were evaluated in three studies (JBF 1979, Stone and Webster 1979a, 1979b) and are summarized. The evaluations were based on both economic analyses and user perception of what they would require to select or approve the use of solar electric generation for themselves or for their employers. Over 30 utilities and several industrial and commercial firms and homeowners were involved. Solar electric technologies considered included biomass, hybrid retrofit, OTEC, photovoltaic, solar thermal, and wind. The studies projected that solar electric technologies could account for several percent of the forecast generation in year 2000 in the Southeast and Southwest regions,and up to 10 to 20% in the Northeast region. No single solar electric technology or application (for utility or industrial/commercial/residential use) arrived earlier at economic breakeven than other technologies in the Southeast region, but wind generation for both utility and industrial applications predominated in the Northeast region. The Southwest region, in which only utility applications were considered, showed wind energy and retrofit hybrid (a solar adjunct to an existing fossil-fueled plant) to be the most likely early applications.

Watts, R.L.; Harty, H.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Metering Net Metering Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Residential Fed. Government General Public/Consumer Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Wind Program Info State California Program Type Net Metering Provider California Public Utilities Commission California's net-metering law originally took effect in 1996 and applies to all utilities with one exception*. The law has been amended numerous times since its enactment, most recently by AB 327 of 2013. '''Eligible Technologies''' The original law applied to wind-energy systems, solar-electric systems and hybrid (wind/solar) systems. In September 2002, legislation (AB 2228)

218

TacNet Tracker - Energy Innovation Portal  

Technology Marketing Summary The TacNet Tracker is designed to transport information securely via portable handheld units without the need for fixed ...

219

Electric power monthly, July 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels. Data on quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels lag data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the US, Census division, and State level tables. However, for purposes of comparison, plant-level data are presented for the earlier month.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Carbon Cap-and-Trade for Electricity Rate Design, withmeet cap-and- trade regulations in the electricity sector:

Darghouth, Naim Richard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "net electricity unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Metering Net Metering Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Wind Solar Home Weatherization Program Info State Illinois Program Type Net Metering Provider Illinois Commerce Commission '''''NOTE: Legislation enacted in 2011 and 2012 (S.B. 1652, H.B. 3036, and S.B. 3811) has changed several aspects of net metering in Illinois. For customers in competitive classes as of July 1, 2011, the law prescribes a dual metering and bill crediting system which does not meet the definition of net metering as the term is generally defined. Click here for information regarding competitive classes, and

222

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Metering Net Metering Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Energy Sources Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Net Metering Provider Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission Note: In March 2012 the Pennsylvania Public Utilities Commission (PUC) issued a Final Order (Docket M-2011-2249441) approving the use of third-party ownership models (i.e., system leases or retail power purchase agreements) in conjunction with net metering. The Order allows these types of arrangements for net metered systems, subject to a restriction that the

223

Idaho Power - Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Metering Net Metering Idaho Power - Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Idaho Program Type Net Metering Provider Idaho Power Company Idaho does not have a statewide net-metering policy. However, each of the state's three investor-owned utilities -- Avista Utilities, Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power -- has developed a net-metering tariff that has been approved by the Idaho Public Utilities Commission (PUC). The framework of the utilities' net-metering programs is similar, in that each utility: (1) offers net metering to customers that generate electricity using solar, wind, hydropower, biomass or fuel cells; (2) limits residential systems to

224

Avista Utilities - Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Avista Utilities - Net Metering Avista Utilities - Net Metering Avista Utilities - Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Idaho Program Type Net Metering Provider Avista Utilities Idaho does not have a statewide net-metering policy. However, each of the state's three investor-owned utilities -- Avista Utilities, Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power -- has developed a net-metering tariff that has been approved by the Idaho Public Utilities Commission (PUC). The framework of the utilities' net-metering programs is similar, in that each utility: (1) offers net metering to customers that generate electricity using solar,

225

SRP - Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRP - Net Metering SRP - Net Metering SRP - Net Metering < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State Arizona Program Type Net Metering Provider SRP Salt River Project (SRP) modified an existing net-metering program for residential and commercial customers in November 2013. Net metering is now available to customers who generate electricity using photovoltaic (PV), geothermal, or wind systems up to 300 kilowatts (kW) in AC peak capacity. The kilowatt-hours (kWh) delivered to SRP are subtracted from the kWh delivered from SRP for each billing cycle. If the kWh calculation is net positive for the billing cycle, SRP will bill the net kWh to the customer under the applicable price plan, Standard Price Plan E-21, E-23, E-26,

226

Cost of Power Interruptions to Electricity Consumers in the UnitedStates (U.S.)  

SciTech Connect

The massive electric power blackout in the northeastern U.S.and Canada on August 14-15, 2003 catalyzed discussions about modernizingthe U.S. electricity grid. Industry sources suggested that investments of$50 to $100 billion would be needed. This work seeks to better understandan important piece of information that has been missing from thesediscussions: What do power interruptions and fluctuations in powerquality (power-quality events) cost electricity consumers? We developed abottom-up approach for assessing the cost to U.S. electricity consumersof power interruptions and power-quality events (referred to collectivelyas "reliability events"). The approach can be used to help assess thepotential benefits of investments in improving the reliability of thegrid. We developed a new estimate based on publicly availableinformation, and assessed how uncertainties in these data affect thisestimate using sensitivity analysis.

Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Eto, Joseph H.

2006-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

227

Residential electricity rates for the United States for Solcost Data Bank cities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electricity rates are given for selected cities in each state, first of the Southern Solar Energy Center region and then of the rest of the US, for an average residence that uses 1000 kWh a month. (LEW)

Smith, L. E.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electricity is an essential part of modern life. The Energy Department is working to create technology solutions that will reduce our energy use and save Americans money.

229

Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

both electric?only units (microhydro, small?scale wind, and only electric power are: microhydro, small?scale wind, and 

Al-Beaini, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Pacific Gas and Electric Company preliminary staff review, Geysers Unit 16  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The existing documentation on the Geysers Unit 16 and Geysers to Lakeville transmission line projects is reviewed and data deficiencies and areas requiring clarification for filing a Notice of Intention on these projects are identified. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Technical evaluation of the adequacy of station electric-distribution-system voltages for the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the technical evaluation of the adequacy of the station electric distribution system voltages for the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1. The evaluation is to determine if the onsite distribution system in conjunction with the offsite power sources has sufficient capacity to automatically start and operate all Class 1E loads within the equipment voltage ratings under certain conditions established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The analyses demonstrated that for the worst case conditions established, the Class 1E equipment will automatically start and continue to operate within the equiment design voltage rating.

Selan, J.C.

1981-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

232

Electric Power | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Power Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 95, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power projections United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - United States- Reference Case (xls, 260.9 KiB) Quality Metrics

233

The Impact of Rate Design and Net Metering on the Bill Savings from Distributed PV for Residential Customers in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

details on the residential electricity rates offered by PG&Eis based on the residential retail electricity rates and net

Darghouth, Naim R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Industrial Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Water Energy Sources Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Net Metering Provider Public Service Commission of Wisconsin The Public Service Commission of Wisconsin (PSC) issued an order on January 26, 1982 requiring all regulated utilities to file tariffs allowing net metering to customers that generate electricity with systems up to 20 kilowatts (kW)* in capacity. The order applies to investor-owned utilities and municipal utilities, but not to electric cooperatives. All distributed-generation (DG) systems, including renewables and combined heat and power (CHP), are eligible. There is no limit on total enrollment.

235

Locational-based Coupling of Electricity Markets: Benefits from Coordinating Unit Commitment and Balancing Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Country 2 QD A B C D QC 6 Fig. 2 Sequence of decisions and calculations in models 2.1. Notation Sets indexes H Nodes h I All generators i hI Generators at node h i XI Electricity sinks (in...

van der Weijde, Adriaan Hendrik; Hobbs, Benjamin F.

236

HE ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY in the United States is facing a disquieting shortage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. "The power industry--both utilities and manufacturers--hires bright people [with college degrees] who & manufacturing technology 88 850 7 Signals & applications 87 000 8 Antennas & propagation 86 000 9 Signal of electric and hybrid vehicles. These activities are, in turn, leading to lecture top- ics and lab exercises

237

Estimated Value of Service Reliability for Electric Utility Customers in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Information on the value of reliable electricity service can be used to assess the economic efficiency of investments in generation, transmission and distribution systems, to strategically target investments to customer segments that receive the most benefit from system improvements, and to numerically quantify the risk associated with different operating, planning and investment strategies. This paper summarizes research designed to provide estimates of the value of service reliability for electricity customers in the US. These estimates were obtained by analyzing the results from 28 customer value of service reliability studies conducted by 10 major US electric utilities over the 16 year period from 1989 to 2005. Because these studies used nearly identical interruption cost estimation or willingness-to-pay/accept methods it was possible to integrate their results into a single meta-database describing the value of electric service reliability observed in all of them. Once the datasets from the various studies were combined, a two-part regression model was used to estimate customer damage functions that can be generally applied to calculate customer interruption costs per event by season, time of day, day of week, and geographical regions within the US for industrial, commercial, and residential customers. Estimated interruption costs for different types of customers and of different duration are provided. Finally, additional research and development designed to expand the usefulness of this powerful database and analysis are suggested.

Sullivan, M.J.; Mercurio, Matthew; Schellenberg, Josh

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Prospects for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles in the United States: A General Equilibrium Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, biofuels/ethanol) · Emission controls Water production, processing, distribution, and end-use requires capacity · Purchase of large amount of electricity on wholesale power market · Large-scale load sheddingConsumption (billiongallonsperday) Oil Shale Biofuels Traditional Refining 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1995 2005 2015 2025 2035 Year Water

239

Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

case of wind electricity in Spain. Energy Policy 36, 3345–case of wind electricity in Spain. Energy Policy 36, 3345–wind penetrations will affect investment incentives in the GB electricity sector. Energy Policy

Darghouth, Naim Richard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life-cycle modeling with GREET.

Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "net electricity unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Net Metering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In March 2008, the Florida Public Service Commission (PSC) adopted rules for net metering and interconnection for renewable-energy systems up to two megawatts (MW) in capacity. The PSC rules apply...

242

Getting to Net Zero  

SciTech Connect

Buildings have a significant impact on energy use and the environment. Commercial and residential buildings use almost 40% of the primary energy and approximately 70% of the electricity in the United States.

Crawley, D.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data In the contiguous United States, near normal temperatures were observed throughout the country during the month of September 2008. The only deviation from normal temperatures occurred in the southern United States as below average temperatures prevailed for the month, while the western United States experienced above average temperatures during September 2008. Accordingly, cooling degree days for the contiguous United States as a whole were 9.7 percent above the average for the month of September, and 11.0 percent below a warmer September 2007. Retail sales of electricity for the month of September 2008 decreased 3.0 percent compared to the warmer temperatures and subsequent higher demand for electricity observed in September 2007. The average U.S. retail price of electricity for September 2008 showed a 9.1-percent increase

244

Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Database of State Incentives for Renewable Energy (DSIRE),Database of State Incentives for Renewable Energy), 2013.states offered net metering voluntarily (Database of State Incentives for Renewable Energy (

Darghouth, Naim Richard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Program on Technology Innovation: Electric Field-Based Phasor Measurement Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The popularity of phasor measurement units (PMUs) comes from their ability to synchronize the voltage and current phasor measurements in interconnected power systems. Those synchronized phasor measurements are critical for wide area power system monitoring and control. However, the prevailing PMU technology was developed more than 20 years ago and is usually accompanied by high installation and maintenance costs.

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

246

Electric power monthly, June 1998, with data for March 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and Us levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 5 refs., 57 tabs.

NONE

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Progress Energy - Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Progress Energy - Net Metering Progress Energy - Net Metering Progress Energy - Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Bioenergy Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Net Metering Provider Progress Energy Carolinas In August 2009, the South Carolina Public Service Commission issued an order mandating net metering be made available by the regulated electric utilities; the order incorporates a net metering settlement signed by the individual interveners, the Office of Regulatory Staff and the three investor-owned utilities (IOUs). The order detailed the terms of net metering, including ownership of RECs, in South Carolina and standardized

248

Net Metering Webinar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Metering Webinar Net Metering Webinar Net Metering Webinar June 25, 2014 11:00AM MDT Attendees will become familiar with the services provided by utility net metering and their importance in making projects cost-effective. The speakers will provide information based on case histories of how facilities that generate their own electricity from renewable energy sources can feed electricity they do not use back into the grid. Many states have net-metering laws with which utilities must comply. In states without such legislation, utilities may offer net-metering programs voluntarily or as a result of regulatory decisions. The webinar will cover the general differences between states' legislation and implementation and how the net-metering benefits can vary widely for facilities in different areas of

249

Kansas - Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kansas - Net Metering Kansas - Net Metering Kansas - Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Kansas Program Type Net Metering Provider Kansas Corporation Commission Kansas adopted the Net Metering and Easy Connection Act in May 2009 (see K.S.A. 66-1263 through 66-1271), establishing net metering for customers of investor-owned utilities in Kansas. Net metering applies to systems that generate electricity using solar, wind, methane, biomass or hydro resources, and to fuel cells using hydrogen produced by an eligible

250

Net Metering Rules (Arkansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Metering Rules (Arkansas) Net Metering Rules (Arkansas) Net Metering Rules (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Net Metering Provider Arkansas Public Service Commission The Net Metering Rules are promulgated under the authority of the Arkansas Public Service Commission. These rules are created to establish rules for net energy metering and interconnection. These rules are developed pursuant to the Arkansas Renewable Energy Development Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 23-18-603). These rules apply to all electric utilities.

251

AMERICAN ELECTRIC POWER'S CONESVILLE POWER PLANT UNIT NO.5 CO2 CAPTURE RETROFIT STUDY  

SciTech Connect

ALSTOM Power Inc.'s Power Plant Laboratories (ALSTOM) has teamed with American Electric Power (AEP), ABB Lummus Global Inc. (ABB), the US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL), and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) to conduct a comprehensive study evaluating the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration technologies applied to an existing US coal-fired electric generation power plant. The motivation for this study was to provide input to potential US electric utility actions concerning GHG emissions reduction. If the US decides to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions, action would need to be taken to address existing power plants. Although fuel switching from coal to natural gas may be one scenario, it will not necessarily be a sufficient measure and some form of CO{sub 2} capture for use or disposal may also be required. The output of this CO{sub 2} capture study will enhance the public's understanding of control options and influence decisions and actions by government, regulators, and power plant owners in considering the costs of reducing greenhouse gas CO{sub 2} emissions. The total work breakdown structure is encompassed within three major reports, namely: (1) Literature Survey, (2) AEP's Conesville Unit No.5 Retrofit Study, and (3) Bench-Scale Testing and CFD Evaluation. The report on the literature survey results was issued earlier by Bozzuto, et al. (2000). Reports entitled ''AEP's Conesville Unit No.5 Retrofit Study'' and ''Bench-Scale Testing and CFD Evaluation'' are provided as companion volumes, denoted Volumes I and II, respectively, of the final report. The work performed, results obtained, and conclusions and recommendations derived therefrom are summarized.

Carl R. Bozzuto; Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; Mark Palkes; John L. Marion

2001-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

252

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Net Metering Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Michigan Program Type Net Metering Provider Michigan Public Service Commission '''''The MPSC is reviewing state interconnection and net metering policies in [http://efile.mpsc.state.mi.us/efile/viewcase.php?casenum=15919&submit.x=... Case U-15919].''''' In October 2008, Michigan enacted legislation (P.A. 295) requiring the Michigan Public Service Commission (PSC) to establish a statewide net metering program for renewable-energy systems within 180 days. On May 26, 2009 the Michigan Public Service Commission (PSC) issued an order formally

253

Decision on the Pacific Gas and Electric Company's application for certification for Geysers Unit 17  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The decision in favor of Geysers Unit 17 is presented. Included in the decisions are the findings, conclusions, and conditions on the following: need, socioeconomics, cultural resources, noise, hydrology and water resources, water quality, soils, biological resources, civil engineering, safety, transmission lines, geotechnical considerations, air quality, public health, and structural engineering and reliability. Provisions for monitoring compliance with applicable laws, regulations, and conditions are incorporated. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Land Use for Wind, Solar, and Geothermal Electricity Generation Facilities in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with utility-scale wind, photovoltaic (PV), concentrating solar power (CSP), and geothermal projects. The analysts evaluated 458 existing or proposed projects, representing (as of 2012 third quarter) 51% of installed wind capacity, 80% of PV and CSP capacity, and all known geothermal power plants in the United States. The report identifies two major land use classes: 1) direct area (land permanently or temporarily disturbed due to ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

Geothermal energy in the western United States and Hawaii: Resources and projected electricity generation supplies. [Contains glossary and address list of geothermal project developers and owners  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal energy comes from the internal heat of the Earth, and has been continuously exploited for the production of electricity in the United States since 1960. Currently, geothermal power is one of the ready-to-use baseload electricity generating technologies that is competing in the western United States with fossil fuel, nuclear and hydroelectric generation technologies to provide utilities and their customers with a reliable and economic source of electric power. Furthermore, the development of domestic geothermal resources, as an alternative to fossil fuel combustion technologies, has a number of associated environmental benefits. This report serves two functions. First, it provides a description of geothermal technology and a progress report on the commercial status of geothermal electric power generation. Second, it addresses the question of how much electricity might be competitively produced from the geothermal resource base. 19 figs., 15 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Electric power supply and demand 1979 to 1988 for the contiguous United States as projected by the Regional Electric Reliability Councils in their April 1, 1979 long-range coordinated planning reports to the Department of Energy  

SciTech Connect

Information concerning bulk electric power supply and demand is summarized and reviewed. Electric-utility power-supply systems are composed of power sources, transmission and distribution facilities, and users of electricity. In the United States there are three such systems of large geographic extent that together cover the entire country. Subjects covered are: energy forecasts, peak demand forecasts, generating-capacity forecasts, purchases and sales of capacity, and transmission. Extensive data are compiled in 17 tables. Information in two appendices includes a general description of the Regional Electric Reliability Councils and US generating capacity as of June 30, 1979. 3 figures, 17 tables.

Savage, N.; Graban, W.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA BEFORE THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY Northern Pass Transmission LLC OE Docket No. PP-371 Application for Presidential Permit COMMENTS OF CONSERVATION LAW FOUNDATION, APPALACHIAN MOUNTAIN CLUB, AND SOCIETY FOR THE PROTECTION OF NEW HAMPSHIRE FORESTS ON AMENDED APPLICATION In response to the Notice of Amended Application from the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"), dated August 19, 2013 (78 Fed. Reg. 50,405), Interveners Conservation Law Foundation, Appalachian Mountain Club, and Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests ("Environmental Interveners") file the following comments on the Amended Application ("Amended Application") of Northern Pass Transmission LLC ("Applicant") in the above-

258

Puerto Rico - Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Puerto Rico - Net Metering Puerto Rico - Net Metering Puerto Rico - Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Energy Sources Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info Program Type Net Metering Provider Autoridad de EnergĂ­a Electrica de Puerto Rico Puerto Rico enacted net-metering legislation in August 2007, allowing customers of Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) to use electricity generated by solar, wind or "other" renewable-energy resources to offset their electricity usage. This law applies to residential systems with a generating capacity of up to 25 kilowatts (kW) and non-residential systems up to one megawatt (MW) in capacity.*

259

Electric Technologies for Light-duty Vehicles in the United States Abstract  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is concerned with the present status and future projections for emerging technologies that can be utilized in light-duty vehicles in the next five to ten years to significantly reduce their CO2 emissions. The emerging technologies considered are modern clean diesel engines and hybrid-electric powertrains using batteries and/or ultracapacitors for energy storage. Throughout the study, six classes of vehicles –compact passenger cars to large SUVs-were considered. For each vehicle class, computer simulations (Advisor 2002) and cost analyses were performed for conventional ICE and mild and full parallel hybrids using port-fuel injected and lean burn gasoline engines and direct-injection turbo-charged diesel engines to determine the fuel economy and differential costs for the various vehicle designs using the conventional gasoline PFI engine vehicle as the baseline. CO2 emissions (gmCO2/mi) for each driveline and vehicle case were calculated from the fuel economy values. On a percentage or ratio basis, the analyses indicated that the fuel economy gains, CO2 emissions reductions, and cost/price increases due to the use of the advanced engines and hybrid-electric drivelines were essentially independent of vehicle class. This means that a regulation specifying the same fractional

United States; Andrew Burke; Ethan Abeles; Andrew Burke; Ethan Abeles

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

for Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2011 Actual, 2012-2016 Projected Net Energy (Thousands of Megawatthours) Eastern Interconnection ERCOT...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "net electricity unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Electric Power Annual 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.A. Summer net internal demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region" "1999 through 2011 actual, 2012-2016 projected"...

262

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT E-li, ( -,v? Cl -p4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson...

263

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Wyoming Program Type Net Metering Provider Wyoming Public Service Commission Wyoming enacted legislation in February 2001 that established statewide net metering. The law applies to investor-owned utilities, electric cooperatives and irrigation districts. Eligible technologies include solar, wind, biomass and hydropower systems up to 25 kilowatts (kW) in capacity. Systems must be intended primarily to offset part or all of the customer-generator's requirements for electricity. Net excess generation (NEG) is treated as a kilowatt-hour (kWh) credit or other compensation on the customer's following bill.* When an annual period ends, a utility will purchase unused credits at the utility's avoided-cost

264

Table ET1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates, Selected Years, 1970-2011, United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ET1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates, Selected Years, 1970-2011, United States ET1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates, Selected Years, 1970-2011, United States Year Primary Energy Electric Power Sector h,j Retail Electricity Total Energy g,h,i Coal Coal Coke Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass Total g,h,i,j Coking Coal Steam Coal Total Exports Imports Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste f,g Prices in Dollars per Million Btu 1970 0.45 0.36 0.38 1.27 0.93 0.59 1.16 0.73 1.43 2.85 0.42 1.38 1.71 0.18 1.29 1.08 0.32 4.98 1.65 1975 1.65 0.90 1.03 2.37 3.47 1.18 2.60 2.05 2.96 4.65 1.93 2.94 3.35 0.24 1.50 2.19 0.97 8.61 3.33 1980 2.10 1.38 1.46 2.54 3.19 2.86 6.70 6.36 5.64 9.84 3.88 7.04 7.40 0.43 2.26 4.57 1.77 13.95 6.89 1985 2.03 1.67 1.69 2.76 2.99 4.61 7.22 5.91 6.63 9.01 4.30 R 7.62 R 7.64 0.71 2.47 4.93 1.91 19.05

265

The United States Industrial Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment: Key Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the findings of the U. S. Industrial Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment. The Market Assessment was sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy. The project's principal objectives were to create a detailed portrait of the inventory of motor systems currently in use in US industrial facilities, estimate motor system energy use and potential for energy savings. The research and analysis to support these objectives consisted primarily of on-site motor system inventories of a probability sample of 254 manufacturing facilities nationwide. In addition to characterizing the motor systems in use, the research effort also gathered detailed information on motor system management and purchasing practices. This paper presents key findings from the Market Assessment in regard to patterns of motor energy use, saturation of energy efficiency measures such as efficient motors and adjustable speed drives, and motor system purchase and maintenance practices.

Rosenberg, M.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data For the second straight month, near normal temperatures were observed throughout the contiguous United States in October 2008. On the regional level, temperatures did deviate above normal in the western United States while parts of the South, Southeast, and Northeast experienced below average temperatures. Accordingly, heating degree days for the contiguous United States as a whole were 1.4 percent above the average for the month of October, and 63.4 percent above a much warmer October 2007. In October 2008, retail sales of electricity decreased 4.4 percent compared to October 2007, which had warmer temperatures and subsequent higher demand for electricity. The average U.S. retail price of electricity continued to show an upward trend in October 2008, increasing 9.3

267

Guide to Federal Regulation of Sales of Imported Electricity in Canada, Mexico and the United States - English Version  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GUIDE TO FEDERAL GUIDE TO FEDERAL REGULATION OF SALES OF IMPORTED ELECTRICITY IN CANADA, MEXICO, AND THE UNITED STATES A Publication of The North American Energy Working Group January 2005 1 The North American Energy Working Group The North American Energy Working Group (NAEWG) was established in spring of 2001 by the Canadian Minister of Natural Resources, the Mexican Secretary of Energy and the U.S. Secretary of Energy, to enhance North American energy cooperation. The NAEWG is led by officials from Natural Resources Canada, the Mexican Secretariat of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Energy. The goals of the NAEWG are to foster communication and cooperation among the governments and energy sectors of the three countries on energy-related matters of common interest, and to enhance North American energy trade and

268

Supply Curves for Solar PV-Generated Electricity for the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy supply curves attempt to estimate the relationship between the cost of an energy resource and the amount of energy available at or below that cost. In general, an energy supply curve is a series of step functions with each step representing a particular group or category of energy resource. The length of the step indicates how much of that resource is deployable or accessible at a given cost. Energy supply curves have been generated for a number of renewable energy sources including biomass fuels and geothermal, as well as conservation technologies. Generating a supply curve for solar photovoltaics (PV) has particular challenges due to the nature of the resource. The United States has a massive solar resource base -- many orders of magnitude greater than the total consumption of energy. In this report, we examine several possible methods for generating PV supply curves based exclusively on rooftop deployment.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A quantity of at lezst 5 grams would probably be sufficient for our purpose, and this was included in our 3@icntion for license to the Atonic Energy Coskqission.. This license has been approved, 2nd rre would Llp!Jreciate informztion as to how to ?r*oceed to obtain thit: m2teria.l.

270

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Institutional Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Arizona Program Type Net Metering Provider Arizona Corporation Commission Net metering is available to customers who generate electricity using solar, wind, hydroelectric, geothermal, biomass, biogas, combined heat and power (CHP) or fuel cell technologies. The ACC has not set a firm kilowatt-based limit on system size capacity; instead, systems must be sized to not exceed 125% of the customer's total connected load. If there is no available load data for the customer, the generating system may not

271

Designing Electricity Auctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

market performance in electricity auctions, it appears thatMcSorely (2001) “Regulating Electricity Markets: Experiencethe United Kingdom,” The Electricity Journal, December, 81-

Fabra, Natalia; von der Fehr, Nils-Henrik; Harbord, David

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Electric power monthly with data for August 1997  

SciTech Connect

This publication provides monthly statistics at the state, census division, and U.S. levels for net generation; fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity, and quality of fossil fuels; cost of fossil fuels; electricity retail sales; associated revenue; and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council regions. Statistics on net generation are published by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The monthly update is summarized, and industry developments are briefly described. 1 fig., 63 tabs.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Electric power monthly with data for October 1997  

SciTech Connect

This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and U.S. levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council regions. Statistics are published on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. A monthly utility update and summary of industry developments are also included. 63 tabs., 1 fig.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Use of GTE-65 gas turbine power units in the thermal configuration of steam-gas systems for the refitting of operating thermal electric power plants  

SciTech Connect

Thermal configurations for condensation, district heating, and discharge steam-gas systems (PGU) based on the GTE-65 gas turbine power unit are described. A comparative multivariant analysis of their thermodynamic efficiency is made. Based on some representative examples, it is shown that steam-gas systems with the GTE-65 and boiler-utilizer units can be effectively used and installed in existing main buildings during technical refitting of operating thermal electric power plants.

Lebedev, A. S.; Kovalevskii, V. P. ['Leningradskii Metallicheskii Zavod', branch of JSC 'Silovye mashiny' (Russian Federation); Getmanov, E. A.; Ermaikina, N. A. ['Institut Teploenergoproekt', branch of JSC 'Inzhenernyi tsentr EES' (Russian Federation)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Essays on empirical analysis of multi-unit auctions -- impacts of financial transmission rights on the restructured electricity industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation uses recently developed empirical methodologies for the study of multi-unit auctions to test the impacts of Financial Transmission Rights (FTRs) on the competitiveness of restructured electricity markets. FTRs are a special type of financial option that hedge against volatility in the cost of transporting electricity over the grid. Policy makers seek to use the prices of FTRs as market signals to incentivize efficient investment and utilization of transmission capacity. However, prices will not send the correct signals if market participants strategically use FTRs. This dissertation uses data from the Texas electricity market to test whether the prices of FTRs are efficient to achieve such goals. The auctions studied are multiunit, uniform-price, sealed-bid auctions. The first part of the dissertation studies the auctions on the spot market of the wholesale electricity industry. I derive structural empirical models to test theoretical predictions as to whether bidders fully internalize the effect of FTRs on profits into their bidding decisions. I find that bidders are learning as to how to optimally bid above marginal cost for their inframarginal capacities. The bidders also learn to bid to include FTRs into their profit maximization problem during the course of the first year. But starting from the second year, they deviated from optimal bidding that includes FTRs in the profit maximization problems. Counterfactual analysis show that the primary effect of FTRs on market outcomes is changing the level of prices rather than production efficiency. Finally, I find that in most months, the current allocations of FTRs are statistically equivalent to the optimal allocations. The second part of the dissertation studies the bidding behavior in the FTR auctions. I find that FTRs?? strategic impact on the FTR purchasing behavior is significant for large bidders ?? firms exercising market power in the FTR auctions. Second, trader forecasts future FTR credit very accurately while large generators?? forecasts of future FTR credit tends to be biased upward. Finally, The bid shading patterns are consistent with theoretical predictions and support the existence of common values.

Zang, Hailing

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Capacity (megawatts) 27,638 13 Electric Utilities 23,008 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,630 23 Net Generation (megawatthours) 125,180,739 11 Electric...

277

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Capacity (megawatts) 44,127 5 Electric Utilities 4,800 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 39,327 3 Net Generation (megawatthours) 201,351,872 5 Electric...

278

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Capacity (megawatts) 26,392 15 Electric Utilities 20,115 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 6,277 16 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,750,957 12 Electric...

279

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Capacity (megawatts) 36,636 7 Electric Utilities 26,639 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 9,998 11 Net Generation (megawatthours) 137,576,941 8 Electric...

280

Duke Energy - Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Duke Energy - Net Metering Duke Energy - Net Metering Duke Energy - Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Bioenergy Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Net Metering In August 2009, the South Carolina Public Service Commission issued an [http://dms.psc.sc.gov/pdf/matters/F05030FC-E19A-9225-B838F72EDF4557DC.pdf] order mandating net metering be made available by the regulating utilities; the order incorporates a net metering settlement signed by the individual interveners, the Office of Regulatory Staff and the three investor-owned utilities (IOUs). The order detailed the terms of net metering, including

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "net electricity unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

OpenEI - Electric Power  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Electric Power AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - United States http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/858 This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 95, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. License

Type of License: 

282

Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial Electric Utility Rate Structure Elements on1961. Principles of public utility rates, 2nd ed. ColumbiaPrinciples of Public Utility Rates, he cites the following

Darghouth, Naim Richard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

2007 NET SYSTEM POWER REPORT STAFFREPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-2007.......................................................................5 Figure 3: Natural Gas and Coal Shares of Net System Power Mix Become Larger 1999-2007.....7 List technologies used to generate electricity. Fuel types include coal, natural gas, nuclear, and other fuels of "unclaimed" coal and natural gas generation. Figure 2 illustrates the decrease in net system power between

284

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data Temperatures throughout the contiguous United States were near normal for the fourth straight month in December 2008. However, regional differences in temperature occurred as the western, northwest, and central United States experienced colder than normal temperatures while much of the Southeast experienced warmer than normal temperatures. Accordingly, heating degree days for the contiguous United States as a whole were 0.9 percent above the average for the month of December 2008 and 3.0 percent above a warmer December 2007. In December 2008, retail sales of electricity increased 0.7 percent compared to December 2007. For the 12-month period ending December 2008, retail sales of electricity decreased 0.3 percent when compared to the previous 12-month period ending December 2007. The average U.S. retail price of

285

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agricultural Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Oregon Program Type Net Metering Oregon has established separate net-metering programs for the state's primary investor-owned utilities (PGE and PacifiCorp), and for its municipal utilities and electric cooperatives. '''PGE and PacifiCorp Customers''' The Oregon Public Utilities Commission (PUC) adopted new rules for net metering for PGE and PacifiCorp customers in July 2007, raising the individual system limit from 25 kilowatts (kW) to two megawatts (MW) for non-residential applications. (The rules do not apply to customers of Idaho

286

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agricultural Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Wind Program Info State Indiana Program Type Net Metering Provider Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission The Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission (IURC) adopted rules for net metering in September 2004, requiring the state's investor-owned utilities (IOUs) to offer net metering to all electric customers. The rules, which apply to renewable energy resource projects [defined by IC 8-1-37-4(a)(1) - (8)] with a maximum capacity of 1 megawatt (MW), include the following

287

EnergyNet Student Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Activating EnergyNet<2> Saving Energy Matters Now and in the Future Remember this past July and how hot it was . . . the electric company had problems keeping up with the demand...

288

Electric power monthly, November 1998, with data for August 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 57 tabs.

NONE

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Electric power monthly, June 1999, with data for March 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 57 tabs.

NONE

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Electric power monthly, September 1998, with data for June 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Electric power monthly, April 1999 with data for January 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

NONE

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Electric power monthly: October 1995, with data for July 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

1995-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

293

Electric power monthly, October 1998, with data for July 1998  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 57 tabs.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights: February 2012 Highlights: February 2012 Warm temperatures across much of the U.S. led to lower retail sales of electricity during February 2012. Natural gas-fired generation increased in every region of the United States when compared to February 2011. Wholesale electricity prices remained in the low end of the annual range for most wholesale markets due to low demand and depressed natural gas prices Key Indicators Feb 2012 % Change from Feb. 2011 Total Net Generation (Thousand MWh) 310,298 -1.0% Residential Retail Price (cents/kWh) 11.55 3.9% Retail Sales (Thousand MWh) 285,684 -3.5% Heating Degree-Days 654 -12.0% Natural Gas Price, Henry Hub ($/MMBtu) 2.60 -38.1% Coal Stocks (Thousand Tons) 186,958 -13.6% Coal Consumption (Thousand Tons) 62,802 -14.6% Natural Gas Consumption

295

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights: November 2011 Highlights: November 2011 Warm temperatures across the Eastern half of the continental U.S. led to flat or lower retail sales of electricity during November 2011. Coal-fired generation decreased in every region of the United States when compared to November 2010. Wholesale electricity prices set annual lows across the East coast as well as in the ERCOT portion of Texas in November 2011. Key Indicators Nov. 2011 % Change from Nov. 2010 Total Net Generation (Thousand MWh) 304,268 -0.6% Residential Retail Price (cents/kWh) 11.88 2.2% Retail Sales (Thousand MWh) 273,053 -0.7% Heating Degree-Days 469 -10.3% Natural Gas Price, Henry Hub ($/MMBtu) 3.32 -13.8% Coal Stocks (Thousand Tons) 168,354 8.9% Coal Consumption (Thousand Tons) 66,789 -8.2% Natural Gas Consumption

296

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights: December 2011 Highlights: December 2011 Warm temperatures across the Eastern half of the continental U.S. led to lower retail sales of electricity during December 2011. Coal-fired generation decreased in every region of the United States when compared to December 2010. Electric system load ranged in the mid-to-low section of the annual range across all wholesale regions except the Bonneville Power Administration in the Northwest in December 2011. Key Indicators Dec. 2011 % Change from Dec. 2010 Total Net Generation (Thousand MWh) 336,419 -7.1% Residential Retail Price (cents/kWh) 11.52 4.2% Retail Sales (Thousand MWh) 299,421 -6.1% Heating Degree-Days 713 -20.6% Natural Gas Price, Henry Hub ($/MMBtu) 3.24 -25.7% Coal Stocks (Thousand Tons) 175,100 -0.1% Coal Consumption

297

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights: August 2011 Highlights: August 2011 Extreme heat in Texas, New Mexico, Colorado and Arizona drove significant increases in the retail sales of electricity in the Southwest. Wind generation increased in much of the United States, except the middle of the country where total generation declined. Bituminous coal stocks dropped 14% from August 2010. Key indicators Same Month 2010 Year to date Total Net Generation -1% 11% Residential Retail Price -6% 11% Cooling Degree-Days -3% 2% Natural Gas Price, Henry Hub -6% -9% Bituminous Coal Stocks -14% -14% Subbituminous Coal Stocks -10% -17% Heat wave drives record demand and wholesale prices in Texas A prolonged August heat wave in Texas stressed available generating capacity and produced very high wholesale prices in the Electric

298

Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the Economics of Solar PV: Could Mandatory Time-of-Usea Substantial Benefit of Solar PV. The Electricity JournalMRW and Associates, 2007. Solar PV and Retail Rate Design (

Darghouth, Naim Richard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Canada Week: Natural gas net imports from Canada continue to ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Net imports of natural gas from Canada have been falling for years. Rising shale gas production in the United States, especially in the Northeast, is ...

300

Prospects for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles in the United States and Japan: A General Equilibrium Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) may offer a potential near term, low carbon alternative to today's gasoline- and diesel-powered vehicles. A representative vehicle technology that runs on electricity in addition ...

Reilly, John M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "net electricity unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the additional procurement costs of wind energy, factored2009. The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review ofcost per unit of delivered energy among studies of transmission projects to deliver wind energy

Darghouth, Naim Richard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Guam - Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guam - Net Metering Guam - Net Metering Guam - Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Nonprofit Residential Schools Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Wind Solar Home Weatherization Program Info Program Type Net Metering Provider Guam Energy Office Guam's Public Utilities Commission (PUC) reviewed net metering and interconnection during a regular meeting in February 2009 (Docket 08-10). Please contact the [http://www.guampuc.com/ Guam PUC] for the results of that docket review. In 2004, Guam enacted legislation requiring the Guam Power Authority (GPA) to allow net metering for customers with fuel cells, microturbines, wind energy, biomass, hydroelectric, solar energy or hybrid systems of these

303

City of St. George - Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of St. George - Net Metering City of St. George - Net Metering City of St. George - Net Metering < Back Eligibility Commercial General Public/Consumer Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Utah Program Type Net Metering Provider City of St. George The St. George City Council adopted a [http://www.sgcity.org/wp/power/NetMeteringPolicy.pdf net-metering program for area utilities], including interconnection procedures, in October 2005.* The interconnection procedures include different requirements, based on system size, for systems up to 10 megawatts (MW). Net metering is available to residential and commercial customers that generate electricity using photovoltaic (PV) systems. The net metering agreements currently available on the utility's web site only pertain to

304

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data In March 2009, the contiguous United States experienced slightly above average temperatures. However, regional differences in temperature occurred as the Northwest experienced below average temperatures while the Southwest and Central regions observed above average temperatures. Heating degree days for the contiguous United States as a whole were 1.9 percent below the average for the month of March and 5.7 percent below a colder March 2008. Retail sales of electricity in March 2009 decreased 3.9 percent compared to March 2008. This decrease in March 2008-to-March 2009 retail sales was caused by the warmer weather observed in March 2009 and by the significant decline in industrial consumption as observed by the 12.7 percent decrease in industrial retail sales over the same period. The average U.S. retail price of electricity

305

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

July 2009 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data In July 2009, the contiguous United States as a whole experienced temperatures that were below normal. This occurred because many States in the central and eastern part of the country set new records for the coolest July ever in 115 years of record. Accordingly, cooling degree days for the contiguous United States were 8.4 percent below the average for the month of July and 12.0 percent below a warmer July 2008. Retail sales of electricity decreased 6.5 percent in July 2009 compared to July 2008. This decrease in retail sales was caused in part by the significant decline in industrial activity as observed by the 12.5-percent decrease in industrial retail sales over the same period. The average U.S. retail price of electricity decreased 2.9 percent in July 2009 compared to

306

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 2009 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States as a whole experienced temperatures that were below normal in August 2009, particularly many States in the Central and Upper Midwest. However, above normal temperatures dominated the higher populated regions of the Northeast and Southeast, so on balance, total population-weighted cooling degree days for the contiguous United States were 6.6 percent above the average for the month of August. In August 2009, retail sales of electricity decreased 2.3 percent compared to August 2008. This decrease in retail sales was caused in part by the significant decline in industrial activity as observed by the 7.7-percent decrease in industrial retail sales over the same period. The average U.S. retail price of electricity decreased 2.4 percent in August 2009

307

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 2009 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States as a whole experienced near normal temperatures in June 2009. However, regional differences in temperature occurred as the South, Southeast, and Northwest all experienced above normal temperatures while the rest of the United States experienced below normal temperatures. Cooling degree days for the contiguous United States were 4.2 percent above the average for the month of June and 15.9 percent below a much warmer June 2008. In June 2009, retail sales of electricity decreased 7.3 percent compared to June 2008. This decrease in retail sales was caused mainly by the significant decline in industrial consumption as observed by the 14.6-percent decrease in industrial retail

308

SaskPower Net Metering (Saskatchewan, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SaskPower Net Metering (Saskatchewan, Canada) SaskPower Net Metering (Saskatchewan, Canada) SaskPower Net Metering (Saskatchewan, Canada) < Back Eligibility Commercial Agricultural Industrial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info Funding Source SaskPower State Saskatchewan Program Type Net Metering Provider SaskPower Residents, farms and businesses with approved Environmental Preferred Technologies of up to 100 kilowatts (kW) of nominal (nameplate) generating capacity can deliver their excess electricity to our electrical grid. SaskPower will pay a one-time rebate, equivalent to 20% of eligible costs to a maximum payment of $20,000, for an approved and grid interconnected net metering project. The Net Metering Rebate is available to SaskPower, Saskatoon Light and Power and City of Swift Current electricity customers

309

Murray City Power - Net Metering Pilot Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Murray City Power - Net Metering Pilot Program Murray City Power - Net Metering Pilot Program Murray City Power - Net Metering Pilot Program < Back Eligibility Commercial General Public/Consumer Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Water Wind Program Info State Utah Program Type Net Metering Provider Murray City Power Under a pilot program, Murray City Power offers net metering to customers that generate electricity using photovoltaic (PV), wind-electric or hydroelectric systems with a maximum capacity of 10 kilowatts (kW).* The utility will install and maintain a revenue meter capable of registering the bi-directional flow of electricity at the customer's facility. Any customer net excess generation (NEG) is carried over to the customer's next bill as a kilowatt-hour credit. Each April, any remaining NEG credits are

310

Annual Electric Utility Data – EIA-906/920/923 Data File  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Net metering; Advanced metering; Final Data for 2011 Released: October 2, 2012. Contact: Electricity data experts ...

311

Strategic Activities to Address Material Sustainability Issues in the Electric Power Industry: Results of Research with Electric Power Companies and Stakeholders in the United States and Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses activities that electric utilities can take to address the 15 key “material” sustainability issues that were identified in Material Sustainability Issues for the North American Electric Power Industry (EPRI report 3002000920). This report adds insight to that previous analysis by considering activities and actions for addressing the 15 material sustainability issues. Overall, the research identified 145 possible activities across all 15 material issues, and ...

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

312

Electric Power Monthly August 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 1.6.A. Net Generation by State by Sector, May 2011 and 2010 (Thousand Megawatthours) Census Division and State Total (All Sectors) Electric ...

313

Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production (above the utility rate for  electricity sold local energy costs and utility rate  structures.   Net Zero 1: Base Case Inputs  The utility rates used should also be 

Al-Beaini, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Net Trans - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Net Trans ... RESERVE A CLASSIFIED · SUBSCRIPTIONS ... "Italia Online Offers Convenient USENET Access" (Net Trans), J.J. Robinson, March 1998, p. 11.

315

Data Quality Evaluation of Hazardous Air Pollutants Measurements for the US Environmental Protection Agency's Electric Utility Steam Generating Units Information Collection Request  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In December 2009, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued an Information Collection Request (ICR) to owners of fossil fuel-fired, electric steam generating units. Part III of the ICR required that almost 500 selected power plant stacks be tested for emissions of four groups of substances classified as hazardous air pollutants under the Clean Air Act: acid gases and hydrogen cyanide; metals; volatile and semivolatile organics; and polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, dibenzofurans, and polychlori...

2010-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

316

Framework to Evaluate Water Demands and Availability for Electrical Power Production Within Watersheds Across the United States: Dev elopment and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A framework to evaluate the water resources available to sustain present and projected electrical power production is under development and has been applied to four case studies around the United States. Those case studies are: the Lower Coosa River Basin (AL), the Muskingum River Basin (OH), the San Juan River Basin (CO, UT, AZ, NM), and the Platte River Basin (NE, CO, WY). The river basins were chosen for the case studies because of the difference among these basins, including climatic conditions, wate...

2005-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

317

Electric power monthly, August 1996, with data for May 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This publication presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and state agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. Purpose is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate, timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. EIA collected the information to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974. Statistics are presented in this publication on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

NONE

1996-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

318

Electric power monthly, May 1999, with data for February 1999  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 64 tabs.

NONE

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Electric power monthly: October 1996, with data for July 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. This report contains approximately 60 tables.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Table A19. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region and" Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," ","Sales/"," ","RSE" " "," ","Transfers","Onsite","Transfers"," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Net Demand(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.5,1.4,1.3,1.9,0.5 "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "net electricity unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Table A26. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Di  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, and" Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," ","Sales/"," ","RSE" " "," ","Transfers","Onsite","Transfers"," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Net Demand(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.5,2.1,1.2,2,0.4 "Value of Shipments and Receipts"

322

DOE KSU EV Site Operator Program. [United States Department of Energy (DOE) Kansas State University (KSU) Electric Vehicle (EV)  

SciTech Connect

Kansas State University, with funding from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the DOE Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Kansas State is demonstrating, testing, and evaluating electric of hybrid vehicle technology. This will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU proposes to purchase one (1) electric or hybrid van and four(4) electric cars during the first two years of this five-year program. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has initiated a procurement order to purchase two (2) Soleq 1992 Ford EVcort station wagons. This quarter's report describes ongoing public relations activities and meetings as well as presenting performance data for the electric vehicles. (GHH)

Hague, J.R.; Steinert, R.A.; Nissen-Pfrang, T.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

DOE KSU EV Site Operator Program. [United States Department of Energy (DOE) Kansas State University (KSU) Electric Vehicle (EV)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Kansas State University, with funding from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the DOE Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Kansas State is demonstrating, testing, and evaluating electric of hybrid vehicle technology. This will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU proposes to purchase one (1) electric or hybrid van and four(4) electric cars during the first two years of this five-year program. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has initiated a procurement order to purchase two (2) Soleq 1992 Ford EVcort station wagons. This quarter's report describes ongoing public relations activities and meetings as well as presenting performance data for the electric vehicles. (GHH)

Hague, J.R.; Steinert, R.A.; Nissen-Pfrang, T.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

SCE&G - Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SCE&G - Net Metering SCE&G - Net Metering SCE&G - Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Bioenergy Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Net Metering In August 2009, the South Carolina Public Service Commission issued an order mandating net metering be made available by the regulated electric utilities; the order incorporates a net metering settlement signed by the individual interveners, the Office of Regulatory Staff and the three investor-owned utilities (IOUs). The order detailed the terms of net metering, including ownership of RECs, in South Carolina and standardized

325

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BP Energy Company BP Energy Company OE Docket No. EA- 3 14 Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-3 14 February 22,2007 BP Energy Company Order No. EA-314 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(Q of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7 15 l(b), 7172(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.S24a(e)) . On May 22,2006, BP Energy Company (BP Energy) applied to DOE for an authorization to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico as a power marketer. BP Energy proposes to purchase surplus electric energy from electric utilities and other suppliers within the United States and to export that energy to ~Mexico. The cnergy

326

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

September 2009 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data In September 2009, the contiguous United States as a whole experienced temperatures that were above normal. This occurred because almost all western States experienced record or near record above average temperatures in September 2009. Total population-weighted cooling degree days for the contiguous United States were 7.1 percent above the average for the month of September, although they were 2.9 percent below September 2008. Accordingly, retail sales of electricity decreased by 3.9 percent compared to September 2008. This decrease in retail sales was caused in part by the significant decline in industrial activity as observed by the 7.6-percent decrease in industrial retail

327

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

April 2009 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States experienced near normal temperatures in April 2009. However, regional differences in temperature occurred as the Upper Midwest and parts of the Northwest experienced below average temperatures, while much of the Northeast experienced above average temperatures. Heating degree days for the contiguous United States as a whole were 0.3 percent above the average for the month of April and 8.5 percent above a much warmer April 2008. In April 2009, retail sales of electricity decreased 4.9 percent compared to April 2008. This decrease in retail sales was caused by the significant decline in industrial consumption as observed by the 13.6-percent decrease in industrial retail sales over the same period.

328

Washington City Power - Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washington City Power - Net Metering Washington City Power - Net Metering Washington City Power - Net Metering < Back Eligibility General Public/Consumer Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Program Info State Utah Program Type Net Metering Provider Washington City Washington City adopted a net-metering program, including interconnection procedures, in January 2008.* Net metering is available to residential and commercial customers that generate electricity using photovoltaic (PV) systems or wind-energy systems up to 10 kilowatts (kW) in capacity. At the customer's expense, the municipal utility will provide a single, bidirectional meter to measure the in-flow and out-flow of electricity at the customer's home. Systems are restricted to being sized to provide no more than 120% of the historic maximum monthly energy consumption of the

329

Table A11. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1" 1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,"Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","and Breeze)","Other(d)","Row" "End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","(billion cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors" ,,,,,,,,,,, ,"Total United States"

330

Definition: Net generation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Net generation Net generation Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Net generation Equal to gross generation less electrical energy consumed at the generating station(s).[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Related Terms Electricity generation, Gross generation, power, gross generation References ↑ http://www1.eere.energy.gov/site_administration/glossary.html#N ↑ http://205.254.135.24/tools/glossary/index.cfm?id=N Retrie LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Net_generation&oldid=480320" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

331

LADWP - Net Metering (California) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Metering (California) Net Metering (California) LADWP - Net Metering (California) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial General Public/Consumer Industrial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Program Info State California Program Type Net Metering Provider Los Angeles Department of Water and Power LADWP allows its customers to net meter their photovoltaic (PV), wind, and hybrid systems with a capacity of not more than one megawatt. LADWP will provide the necessary metering equipment unless an installation requires atypical metering equipment. In these cases the customer must cover the additional metering expenses. The customer must also pay any related interconnection fees. Excess kilowatt-hours (kWh) generated by the customer's system will be

332

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Electricity Graphic Data  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Figure 48. Growth in World Electric Power Generation and Total Energy Consumption, 1990-2030 Figure 49. World Net Electric Power Generation, 1980-2030 Figure 50. Non-OECD Net...

333

Material Sustainability Issues for the North American Electric Power Industry: Results of Research with Electric Power Companies and Stakeholders in the United States and Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents results of research regarding sustainability issues faced by the electric power industry. Specifically, the research effort was directed toward identifying which sustainability issues affecting the power companies in North America are considered to be the most relevant, or material, and gathering perspectives on those issues from the industry and its stakeholders.The research team collected information from three sources: direct interviews with utility managers and ...

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

334

Review of EMGC’s Recommendations for Net Metering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Electricity Marketplace Governance Committee (part of the Nova Scotia Energy Strategy) Second Interim Report focuses on renewables and renewable generation of electricity. One section of the Report makes a series of recommendations regarding net metering, a way for electrical customers to generate and supply electricity to themselves as well as electricity utilities and distributors. The Second Interim Report makes seven recommendations for net metering, none of which favour the customer who is generating electricity. This paper considers the recommendations, highlighting the limitations of each. A series of alternate recommendations are proposed. 1

Larry Hughes

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Rocky Mountain Power - Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rocky Mountain Power - Net Metering Rocky Mountain Power - Net Metering Rocky Mountain Power - Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Idaho Program Type Net Metering Provider Rocky Mountain Power Idaho does not have a statewide net-metering policy. However, each of the state's three investor-owned utilities -- Avista Utilities, Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power -- has a net-metering tariff on file with the Idaho Public Utilities Commission (PUC). The framework of the utilities' net-metering programs is similar, in that each utility: (1) offers net

336

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights: January 2012 Highlights: January 2012 Warm temperatures across much of the U.S. led to lower retail sales of electricity during January 2012. Coal-fired generation decreased in every region of the United States when compared to January 2011. Coal stocks recovered due to decreased consumption this January compared to the same month of 2011. Key Indicators Jan 2012 % Change from Jan. 2011 Total Net Generation (Thousand MWh) 340,743 -6.4% Residential Retail Price (cents/kWh) 11.43 4.4% Retail Sales (Thousand MWh) 310,859 -6.5% Heating Degree-Days 751 -21.4% Natural Gas Price, Henry Hub ($/MMBtu) 2.75 -40.3% Coal Stocks (Thousand Tons) 181,621 10.2% Coal Consumption (Thousand Tons) 70,595 -21.7% Natural Gas Consumption (Mcf) 676,045 19.9% Nuclear Outages (MW) 9,567 2.1%

337

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 2011 | Release Date: October 25, August 2011 | Release Date: October 25, 2011 | Next Release Date: November 21, 2011 Previous Issues Issue: November 2013 October 2013 September 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 November 2012 Previous issues Format: html xls Go Highlights: August 2011 Extreme heat in Texas, New Mexico, Colorado and Arizona drove significant increases in the retail sales of electricity in the Southwest. Wind generation increased in much of the United States, except the middle of the country where total generation declined. Bituminous coal stocks dropped 14% from August 2010. Key indicators Same Month 2010 Year to date Total Net Generation -1% 11% Residential Retail Price -6% 11% Cooling Degree-Days -3% 2%

338

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights: September 2011 Highlights: September 2011 Cooler temperatures drove down retail sales of electricity in the Southeast compared to September 2010. Fossil steam generation decreased in much of the United States, except in the ERCOT portion of Texas where total generation increased from September, 2010. Bituminous coal stocks dropped 18% from September 2010. Key Indicators Sept. 2011 % Change from Sept. 2010 Total Net Generation (Thousand MWh) 336,264 -3% Residential Retail Price (cents/Kwh) 12.26 2% Retail Sales (Thousand MWh) 324,357 -1% Cooling Degree-Days 184 -6% Natural Gas Price, Henry Hub ($/mmBtu) 4.04 0% Coal Stocks (Thousand Tons) 144,439 -11% Coal Consumption (Thousand Tons) 76,765 -3% Natural Gas Consumption (Mcf) 702,589 -2% Nuclear Outages (MW) 9,227 70%

339

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

January 2012 | Release Date: Mar. 27, January 2012 | Release Date: Mar. 27, 2012 | Next Release Date: Apr. 27, 2012 | Re-Release Date: November 28, 2012 (correction) Previous Issues Issue: November 2013 October 2013 September 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 November 2012 Previous issues Format: html xls Go Highlights: January 2012 Warm temperatures across much of the U.S. led to lower retail sales of electricity during January 2012. Coal-fired generation decreased in every region of the United States when compared to January 2011. Coal stocks recovered due to decreased consumption this January compared to the same month of 2011. Key Indicators Jan 2012 % Change from Jan. 2011 Total Net Generation (Thousand MWh) 340,743 -6.4%

340

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

September 2011 | Release Date: Nov. 21, September 2011 | Release Date: Nov. 21, 2011 | Next Release Date: Dec. 21, 2011  | Re-Release Date: November 28, 2012 (correction) Previous Issues Issue: November 2013 October 2013 September 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 November 2012 Previous issues Format: html xls Go Highlights: September 2011 Cooler temperatures drove down retail sales of electricity in the Southeast compared to September 2010. Fossil steam generation decreased in much of the United States, except in the ERCOT portion of Texas where total generation increased from September, 2010. Bituminous coal stocks dropped 18% from September 2010. Key Indicators Sept. 2011 % Change from Sept. 2010 Total Net Generation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "net electricity unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Vermont) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer...

342

The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1) Borenstein, S. , Electricity Rate Structures and thes underlying retail electricity rate through net metering.turn impact retail electricity rates, particularly as retail

Barbose, Galen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Arizona Electricity Restructuring Suspended  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This inactivity strongly suggests that electricity restructuring in Arizona has ... demand side management, environmental, ... United States Departmen ...

344

Examination of the Regional Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity in the United States through 2015: Projecting from 2009 through 2015 (Revised)  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the balance between the demand and supply of new renewable electricity in the United States on a regional basis through 2015. It expands on a 2007 NREL study that assessed the supply and demand balance on a national basis. As with the earlier study, this analysis relies on estimates of renewable energy supplies compared to demand for renewable energy generation needed to meet existing state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies in 28 states, as well as demand by consumers who voluntarily purchase renewable energy. However, it does not address demand by utilities that may procure cost-effective renewables through an integrated resource planning process or otherwise.

Bird, L.; Hurlbut, D.; Donohoo, P.; Cory, K.; Kreycik, C.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

VEE-0044 - In the Matter of Public Service Electric and Gas Company (New  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

44 - In the Matter of Public Service Electric and Gas Company 44 - In the Matter of Public Service Electric and Gas Company (New Jersey) VEE-0044 - In the Matter of Public Service Electric and Gas Company (New Jersey) On July 14, 1997, the Office of Hearings and Appeals received from the Energy Information Administration (EIA) a "letter of appeal" that had been filed with the EIA by the Public Service Electric and Gas Company of New Jersey (PSE&G). In the letter, PSE&G requested confidential treatment of several items of information that it provides to the EIA on Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." For each electrical generator of each generating plant that PSE&G operates, the items of information are: (1) the unit heat rate; (2) the winter and summer net capabilities; and (3) the unit retirement date. During the lengthy

346

Prospects for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles in the United States and Japan: A general equilibrium analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% of the total in recent trends and future projections (IEA, 2006). GHG emissions from transportation, mostly the transportation sector present a major chal- lenge to global climate change mitigation efforts. Worldwide, transportation ranks second after electric power as the largest source of emissions, contributing about 20

347

United States Government or any agency thereof. Assessment of Future Vehicle Transportation Options and Their Impact on the Electric Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed therein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the

Justin Adder

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Avista Utilities- Net Metering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Idaho does not have a statewide net-metering policy. However, each of the state's three investor-owned utilities -- Avista Utilities, Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power -- has developed a net...

349

NIST Net usage instructions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST. How to use the emulation package. Before running NIST Net, the kernel emulator module must be installed through ...

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

350

Net Zero Energy Communities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Indianapolis, IN Transportation CO2 Per Acre Transportation CO2 Per Household Net Zero Energy Communities Page 18. Housing ...

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

351

City of New Orleans - Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of New Orleans - Net Metering City of New Orleans - Net Metering City of New Orleans - Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Wind Solar Home Weatherization Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Net Metering Provider City Council Utilities Regulatory Office In May 2007, the New Orleans City Council adopted net-metering rules that are similar to rules adopted by the Louisiana Public Service Commission (PSC) in November 2005. The City Council's rules require Entergy New Orleans, an investor-owned utility regulated by the city, to offer net metering to customers with systems that generate electricity using solar energy, wind energy, hydropower, geothermal or biomass resources. Fuel

352

City of Brenham - Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Brenham - Net Metering City of Brenham - Net Metering City of Brenham - Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial General Public/Consumer Industrial Institutional Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Wind Buying & Making Electricity Energy Sources Solar Program Info State Texas Program Type Net Metering Provider City of Brenham In September 2010, the City of Brenham passed an ordinance adopting net metering and interconnection procedures. Customer generators up to 10 megawatts (MW) are eligible to participate, although customer generators with systems 20 kilowatts (kW) or less are eligible for a separate rider and expedited interconnection. The utility will install and maintain a meter capable of measuring flow of electricity in both directions. Any net

353

Dynamic performance analysis for the solar hybrid repowering of the El Paso Electric Company Newman Unit Number 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to aid in the investigation of the feasibility of solar repowering of the reheat turbine using existing technologies. The dynamic response of the system to various cloud shadow velocities and cloud sizes was investigated. This analysis indicated that acceptable control of the reheat unit could be achieved for the cloud caused transients. 1 ref.

Hofer, D.A.; Pierce, B.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

United States Department of Energy`s electric and hybrid vehicle site operator program. Final report, April 1991--September 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drivers in San Juan County, which, is comprised of islands making for short distances on rural (low speed limits) roads, found that present day electric vehicle technology can work in certain applications. An honest, accurate appraisal of the expectations of the vehicle is essential. When needs and capabilities are able to match up, then successful ownership and operation can occur. Today`s EV technology can accomplish certain driving tasks. Careful, honest analysis what is expected of the car can lead to a rewarding EV driving experience. Providing recharge locations in the community proved essential of the peace of mind of the EV driver. Since heating and air conditioning represent electric loads whose reduces range, a moderate to warm year round climate is best for today`s EV. Also, even limited solar recharging has been determined to improve battery pack life.

NONE

1997-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

355

Austin Energy - Net Metering (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Austin Energy - Net Metering (Texas) Austin Energy - Net Metering (Texas) Austin Energy - Net Metering (Texas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Bioenergy Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Water Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Net Metering Provider Austin Energy Austin Energy, the municipal utility of Austin Texas, offers net metering for renewable energy systems up to 20 kilowatts (kW) to its non-residential retail electricity customers. The definition of renewable includes solar*, wind, geothermal, hydroelectric, wave and tidal energy, biomass, and biomass-based waste products, including landfill gas. Systems must be used primarily to offset a portion or all of a customer's on-site electric load. Metering is accomplished using a single meter capable of registering the

356

Figure 9.1 Nuclear Generating Units - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Figure 9.1 Nuclear Generating Units Operable Units,1 1957-2011 Nuclear Net Summer Capacity Change, 1950-2011 Status of All Nuclear Generating Units, ...

357

Long Island Power Authority - Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Metering Net Metering Long Island Power Authority - Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Wind Solar Program Info State New York Program Type Net Metering Provider Long Island Power Authority : Note: In October 2012 the LIPA Board of Trustees adopted changes to the utility's net metering tariff that permit remote net metering for non-residential solar and wind energy systems, and farm-based biogas and wind energy systems. It also adopted a measure to increase the aggregate net metering cap for solar, agricultural biogas, residential micro-CHP and

358

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook - Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity International Energy Outlook 2010 Electricity World electricity generation increases by 87 percent from 2007 to 2035 in the IEO2010 Reference case. Non-OECD countries account for 61 percent of world electricity use in 2035. Figure 67. Growth in world electric power generation and total energy consumption, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 68. World net electricity generation by region, 1990-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 69. Non-OECD net electricity generation by region, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 70. World net electricity generation by fuel, 2006-2030. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 71. World net electricity generation from nuclear power by region, 2007-2030.

359

The Statewide Benefits Of Net-Metering In California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Statewide Benefits Of Net-Metering In California & the Consequences of Changes to the Program-Metering In California Net Metering is a policy that allows commercial and residential electricity customers to receive and to meeting the clean energy mandates under California's Global Warming Solutions Act, AB32. Under

Kammen, Daniel M.

360

EIA - Electricity Data - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 1.16.A. Net Generation from Other Energy Sources: by State, by Sector, October 2013 and 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector ; ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "net electricity unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

EIA - Electricity Data - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 1.6.A. Net Generation: by State, by Sector, September 2013 and 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector ; Census Division and State ...

362

EIA - Electricity Data - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 1.6.A. Net Generation: by State, by Sector, August 2013 and 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector ; Census Division and State All ...

363

Electric Power Monthly - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Net Generation; by; 1.1 Energy Source: Total - All Sectors: 1.1.A Other Renewables: Total - All Sectors: 1.2 Energy Source: Electric Utilities:

364

EIA - Electricity Data - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 1.13.A. Net Generation from Hydroelectric (Conventional) Power: by State, by Sector, September 2013 and 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric ...

365

Feasible Café Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C.J. , The Future of Hybrid- Electric Vehicles and FuelsWith the emergence of hybrid-electric vehicles from JapaneseTechnologies 2.1 Hybrid-electric vehicles Hybrid-electric

Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Feasible CAFE Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C.J. , The Future of Hybrid- Electric Vehicles and FuelsWith the emergence of hybrid-electric vehicles from JapaneseTechnologies 2.1 Hybrid-electric vehicles Hybrid-electric

Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

The Impact of Electric Passenger Transport Technology under an Economy-Wide Climate Policy in the United States: Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Coal Use, and Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have the potential to be an economic means of reducing direct (or tailpipe) carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the transportation sector. However, without a climate policy that places a limit on CO2 emissions from the electric generation sector, the net impact of widespread deployment of PHEVs on overall U.S. CO2 emissions is not as clear. A comprehensive analysis must consider jointly the transportation and electricity sectors, along with feedbacks to the rest of the energy system. In this paper, we use the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s MiniCAM model to perform an integrated economic analysis of the penetration of PHEVs and the resulting impact on total U.S. CO2 emissions.

Wise, Marshall A.; Kyle, G. Page; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

" Electricity Sales/Transfers Out",96,4  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" 4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" " by Selected Energy Sources, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,"RSE" ,,"Row" "Selected Energy Sources","Total","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factor:",1 "Coal ",2105,4 "Natural Gas",6835,3 "Net Electricity",2656,2 " Purchased Electricity",2689,1 " Transfers In",53,4 " Generation from Noncombustible",," " " Renewable Resources",10,10 " Electricity Sales/Transfers Out",96,4 "Coke and Breeze",449,8 "Residual Fuel Oil",490,3

369

Coal-fired electric generators continue to dominate electric ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

More than 60% of electricity in the central region of the United States comes from coal-fired electric generators, down from 80% in the early part of ...

370

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bangor Hydro-Electric Company Bangor Hydro-Electric Company OE Docket No. PP-89-1 Amendment to Presidential Permit Order No. PP-89-1 December 30,2005 PRESIDENTIAL PERMIT AMENDMENT Bangor Hydro-Electric Company Order No. PP-89-1 I. BACKGROUND The Department of Energy (DOE) has responsibility for implementing Executive Order (E.O.) 10485, as amended by E.O. 12038, which requires the issuance of a Presidential permit by DOE before electric trans~nission facilities may be constructed, operated, maintained, or connected at the borders of the United States. DOE may issue such a permit if it determines that the permit is in the public interest and after obtaining favorable recommendations from the U.S. Departments of State and Defense. On December 16, 1988, Bangor Hydro-Electric Company (BHE) applied to DOE

371

Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes  

SciTech Connect

A green building competition, to be known as the Energy Free Home Challenge (EFHC), is scheduled to be opened to teams around the world in 2010. This competition will encourage both design innovation and cost reduction, by requiring design entries to meet 'zero net energy' and 'zero net cost' criteria. For the purposes of this competition, a 'zero net energy' home produces at least as much energy as it purchases over the course of a year, regardless of the time and form of the energy (e.g., electricity, heat, or fuel) consumed or produced. A 'zero net cost' home is no more expensive than a traditional home of comparable size and comfort, when evaluated over the course of a 30-year mortgage. In other words, the 'green premium' must have a payback period less than 30 years, based on the value of energy saved. The overarching goal of the competition is to develop affordable, high-performance homes that can be mass-produced at a large scale, and are able to meet occupant needs in harsh climates (as can be found where the competition will be held in Illinois). This report outlines the goals of the competition, and gauges their feasibility using both modeling results and published data. To ensure that the established rules are challenging, yet reasonable, this report seeks to refine the competition goals after exploring their feasibility through case studies, cost projections, and energy modeling. The authors of this report conducted a survey of the most progressive home energy-efficiency practices expected to appear in competition design submittals. In Appendix A, a summary can be found of recent projects throughout the United States, Canada, Germany, Switzerland, Sweden and Japan, where some of the most progressive technologies have been implemented. As with past energy efficient home projects, EFHC competitors will incorporate a multitude of energy efficiency measures into their home designs. The authors believe that the cost of electricity generated by home generation technologies will continue to exceed the price of US grid electricity in almost all locations. Strategies to minimize whole-house energy demand generally involve some combination of the following measures: optimization of surface (area) to volume ratio; optimization of solar orientation; reduction of envelope loads; systems-based engineering of high efficiency HVAC components, and on-site power generation. A 'Base Case' home energy model was constructed, to enable the team to quantitatively evaluate the merits of various home energy efficiency measures. This Base Case home was designed to have an energy use profile typical of most newly constructed homes in the Champaign-Urbana, Illinois area, where the competition is scheduled to be held. The model was created with the EnergyGauge USA software package, a front-end for the DOE-2 building energy simulation tool; the home is a 2,000 square foot, two-story building with an unconditioned basement, gas heating, a gas hot-water heater, and a family of four. The model specifies the most significant details of a home that can impact its energy use, including location, insulation values, air leakage, heating/cooling systems, lighting, major appliances, hot water use, and other plug loads. EFHC contestants and judges should pay special attention to the Base Case model's defined 'service characteristics' of home amenities such as lighting and appliances. For example, a typical home refrigerator is assumed to have a built-in freezer, automatic (not manual) defrost, and an interior volume of 26 cubic feet. The Base Case home model is described in more detail in Section IV and Appendix B.

Al-Beaini, S.; Borgeson, S.; Coffery, B.; Gregory, D.; Konis, K.; Scown, C.; Simjanovic, J.; Stanley, J.; Strogen, B.; Walker, I.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes  

SciTech Connect

A green building competition, to be known as the Energy Free Home Challenge (EFHC), is scheduled to be opened to teams around the world in 2010. This competition will encourage both design innovation and cost reduction, by requiring design entries to meet 'zero net energy' and 'zero net cost' criteria. For the purposes of this competition, a 'zero net energy' home produces at least as much energy as it purchases over the course of a year, regardless of the time and form of the energy (e.g., electricity, heat, or fuel) consumed or produced. A 'zero net cost' home is no more expensive than a traditional home of comparable size and comfort, when evaluated over the course of a 30-year mortgage. In other words, the 'green premium' must have a payback period less than 30 years, based on the value of energy saved. The overarching goal of the competition is to develop affordable, high-performance homes that can be mass-produced at a large scale, and are able to meet occupant needs in harsh climates (as can be found where the competition will be held in Illinois). This report outlines the goals of the competition, and gauges their feasibility using both modeling results and published data. To ensure that the established rules are challenging, yet reasonable, this report seeks to refine the competition goals after exploring their feasibility through case studies, cost projections, and energy modeling. The authors of this report conducted a survey of the most progressive home energy-efficiency practices expected to appear in competition design submittals. In Appendix A, a summary can be found of recent projects throughout the United States, Canada, Germany, Switzerland, Sweden and Japan, where some of the most progressive technologies have been implemented. As with past energy efficient home projects, EFHC competitors will incorporate a multitude of energy efficiency measures into their home designs. The authors believe that the cost of electricity generated by home generation technologies will continue to exceed the price of US grid electricity in almost all locations. Strategies to minimize whole-house energy demand generally involve some combination of the following measures: optimization of surface (area) to volume ratio; optimization of solar orientation; reduction of envelope loads; systems-based engineering of high efficiency HVAC components, and on-site power generation. A 'Base Case' home energy model was constructed, to enable the team to quantitatively evaluate the merits of various home energy efficiency measures. This Base Case home was designed to have an energy use profile typical of most newly constructed homes in the Champaign-Urbana, Illinois area, where the competition is scheduled to be held. The model was created with the EnergyGauge USA software package, a front-end for the DOE-2 building energy simulation tool; the home is a 2,000 square foot, two-story building with an unconditioned basement, gas heating, a gas hot-water heater, and a family of four. The model specifies the most significant details of a home that can impact its energy use, including location, insulation values, air leakage, heating/cooling systems, lighting, major appliances, hot water use, and other plug loads. EFHC contestants and judges should pay special attention to the Base Case model's defined 'service characteristics' of home amenities such as lighting and appliances. For example, a typical home refrigerator is assumed to have a built-in freezer, automatic (not manual) defrost, and an interior volume of 26 cubic feet. The Base Case home model is described in more detail in Section IV and Appendix B.

Al-Beaini, S.; Borgeson, S.; Coffery, B.; Gregory, D.; Konis, K.; Scown, C.; Simjanovic, J.; Stanley, J.; Strogen, B.; Walker, I.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity International Energy Outlook 2006 Chapter 6: Electricity World electricity consumption doubles in the IEO2006 projections from 2003 to 2030. Non-OECD countries account for 71 percent of the projected growth, and OECD countries account for 29 percent. Figure 55. World Net Electricity Consumption, 2003-2030 (Billion Kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 56. World Net Electricity Consumption by Region, 1980-2030 (Billion Kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 57. Net Electricity Consumption in OECD Countries by End-Use Sector, 2003, 2015, and 2030 (Billion Kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

374

U.S. coal’s share of total net generation continues to ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Amid historically low natural gas prices and the warmest March ever recorded in much of the United States, coal's share of total net generation ...

375

U.S. coal’s share of total net generation continues to ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Amid historically low natural gas prices and the warmest March ever recorded in much of the United States, coal's share of total net generation dropped to 34%—the ...

376

Electric power monthly, April 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

Not Available

1993-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

377

Electric power monthly, May 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

Not Available

1993-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

378

Electricity transactions across international borders, 1984  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the electricity exchanges between the United States and Mexico and Canada during calendar year 1984. The construction, operation and maintenance of any electric transmission facility which crosses an international border of the United States requires a Presidential permit. These permits have been granted by DOE since its formation in 1977. During 1984, the US imported 42,219,259 MWh of electric energy at a cost of $1,070,046,345. Of this total, 42,034,392 MWh were imported from Canada and the remainder (184,867 MWh) were received from Mexico. During this same period, US exports of electric energy totaled 2,558,293 MWh with gross revenues of $21,795,733. Of this, 2,479,487 MWh representing $21,115,413 in revenues were delivered to Canada, and 78,806 MWh representing $680,320 in revenues were delivered to Mexico. On a net basis, the US was an importer of 39,660,966 MWh of electric energy. These 1984 values constitute an increase of 9.2% in gross imports and a decrease of 23.3% in gross exports compared to 1983 levels.

Not Available

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

U.S. Virgin Islands - Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Virgin Islands - Net Metering U.S. Virgin Islands - Net Metering U.S. Virgin Islands - Net Metering < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Institutional Local Government Residential Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Program Info Program Type Net Metering In February 2007, the U.S. Virgin Islands Public Services Commission approved a limited net-metering program for residential and commercial photovoltaic (PV), wind-energy or other renewable energy system up to 10 kilowatts (kW) in capacity. In July 2009, the legislature passed Act 7075 that raised the capacity limits to 20 kW for residential systems, 100 kW for commercial systems, and 500 kW for public (which includes government, schools, hospitals). The aggregate capacity limit of all net-metered systems is five megawatts

380

Grays Harbor PUD - Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Metering Net Metering Grays Harbor PUD - Net Metering < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Net Metering Provider Grays Harbor PUD Grays Harbor PUD's net-metering program differs slightly from what is required by Washington state law in that Grays Harbor PUD reimburses customers for net excess generation (NEG), at the end of each year, at 50% of the utility's retail rate. State law allows utilities to require customers to surrender NEG to the utility, without reimbursement, at the end of a 12-month billing cycle. Grays Harbor PUD has voluntarily gone

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "net electricity unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Postcards from the Net  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Publisher:Postcards from the Net is a travel book like no other. Fast and funny, it's a thirty-countries-in-thirty-days travel through the weird, wired and wonderful parallel universe of the World Wide Web. Postcards from the Net is not the ...

Jon Casimir

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

E-T Global Energy, LLC E-T Global Energy, LLC OE Docket No. EA-381 Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-381 June 10, 2011 I. BACKGROUND E-T Global Energy, LLC Order No. EA-381 Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(f) of the Department ofEnergy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7151(b), 7172(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) ofthe Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.824a(e)) 1 * On May 10,2011, DOE received an application from E-T Global Energy, LLC (E-T Global) for authority to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico for five years as a power marketer using existing international transmission facilities. E-

383

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. Th U.S. Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. Th information contained herein should be attributed to the U.S. Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy o the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Chris Cassar at 202-586-5448, or at Christopher.Cassar@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: October 2009 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States as a whole experienced temperatures that were significantly below normal in October 2009. The month ranked as the third coolest October on record with only Florida experiencing temperatures that were above normal.

384

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. Th U.S. Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. Th information contained herein should be attributed to the U.S. Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy o the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Chris Cassar at 202-586-5448, or at Christopher.Cassar@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: April 2010 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States as a whole experienced temperatures that were above average in April 2010. This occurred because almost all States east of the Rocky Mountains experienced significantly above average temperatures. Accordingly, total population-

385

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. Th U.S. Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. Th information contained herein should be attributed to the U.S. Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy o the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Chris Cassar at 202-586-5448, or at Christopher.Cassar@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: March 2010 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data In March 2010, the contiguous United States as a whole experienced temperatures that were above average. This occurred because almost all States in the Northeast, New England, and Upper Midwest experienced significantly above average

386

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. Th U.S. Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. Th information contained herein should be attributed to the U.S. Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy o the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Chris Cassar at 202-586-5448, or at Christopher.Cassar@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: February 2010 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States as a whole experienced temperatures that were below average in February 2010. This occurred because arctic air masses dominated much of the Nation during the month, creating temperatures that were

387

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. Th U.S. Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. Th information contained herein should be attributed to the U.S. Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy o the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Chris Cassar at 202-586-5448, or at Christopher.Cassar@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: January 2010 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data In January 2010, the contiguous United States as a whole experienced temperatures that were near average. This occurred because the cold, arctic air that dominated the country in late 2009, moderated by the middle of January 2010.

388

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. Th U.S. Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. Th information contained herein should be attributed to the U.S. Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy o the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Chris Cassar at 202-586-5448, or at Christopher.Cassar@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: May 2010 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data In May 2010, the heavily populated Northeast experienced temperatures that were significantly above average. The total population- weighted cooling degree days for the United States were 35.1 percent above the May average.

389

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. Th U.S. Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. Th information contained herein should be attributed to the U.S. Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy o the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Chris Cassar at 202-586-5448, or at Christopher.Cassar@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: November 2009 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data In November 2009, the contiguous United States as a whole experienced temperatures that were significantly above average. Based on preliminary temperature data, the month ranked as the third warmest November on record. All

390

Objective Bayesian nets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I present a formalism that combines two methodologies: objective Bayesianism and Bayesian nets. According to objective Bayesianism, an agent’s degrees of belief (i) ought to satisfy the axioms of probability, (ii) ought to satisfy constraints imposed by background knowledge, and (iii) should otherwise be as non-committal as possible (i.e. have maximum entropy). Bayesian nets offer an efficient way of representing and updating probability functions. An objective Bayesian net is a Bayesian net representation of the maximum entropy probability function. I show how objective Bayesian nets can be constructed, updated and combined, and how they can deal with cases in which the agent’s background knowledge includes knowledge of qualitative influence relationships, e.g. causal influences. I then sketch a number of applications of the resulting formalism, showing how it can shed light on probability logic, causal modelling, logical reasoning, semantic reasoning, argumentation

Jon Williamson

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Table A4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 " 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Coke"," "," " " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

392

Table A37. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1",,,,,,,"Coal" 1",,,,,,,"Coal" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)",,,,,,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal Coke" ,,"Net",,"Fuel Oil",,,"and" ,,"Electricity(a)","Residual","and Diesel","Natural Gas",,"Breeze)",,"RSE" ,"Total","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel","(billion","LPG","(1000 short","Other","Row" "End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

393

Table A36. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,,,,,"Coal" " Part 1",,,,,,,,"(excluding" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)",,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal Coke" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"and" ,,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel","Natural Gas",,"Breeze)",,"RSE" "SIC",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel","(billion","LPG","(1000 Short","Other","Row" "Code(a)","End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors",

394

Net-baryon-, net-proton-, and net-charge kurtosis in heavy-ion collisions within a relativistic transport approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the potential of net-baryon, net-proton and net-charge kurtosis measurements to investigate the properties of hot and dense matter created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Contrary to calculations in a grand canonical ensemble we explicitly take into account exact electric and baryon charge conservation on an event-by-event basis. This drastically limits the width of baryon fluctuations. A simple model to account for this is to assume a grand-canonical distribution with a sharp cut-off at the tails. We present baseline predictions of the energy dependence of the net-baryon, net-proton and net-charge kurtosis for central ($b\\leq 2.75$ fm) Pb+Pb/Au+Au collisions from $E_{lab}=2A$ GeV to $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV from the UrQMD model. While the net-charge kurtosis is compatible with values around zero, the net-baryon number decreases to large negative values with decreasing beam energy. The net-proton kurtosis becomes only slightly negative for low $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$.

Marlene Nahrgang; Tim Schuster; Michael Mitrovski; Reinhard Stock; Marcus Bleicher

2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

395

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Metering Net Metering June 25, 2014 11:00AM MDT Attendees will become familiar with the services provided by utility net metering and their importance in making projects...

396

From String Nets to Nonabelions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Les Houches 1988, Fields, Strings and Critical Phenomena.take: ?rst, cut the degrees of freedom to string nets, thenmake the string nets ?uctuate appropriately to gain isotopy

Fidkowski, Lukasz; Freedman, Michael; Nayak, Chetan; Walker, Kevin; Wang, Zhenghan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Hand, M. M.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "net electricity unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

International Electricity Regulation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

U.S. trade in electric energy with Canada and Mexico is rising, bringing economic and reliability benefits to the United States and its trading partners. Within the Office of Electricity Delivery ...

402

Spatial assessment of net mercury emissions from the use of fluorescent bulbs  

SciTech Connect

While fluorescent lighting is an important technology for reducing electrical energy demand, mercury used in the bulbs is an ongoing concern. Using state and country level data, net emissions of mercury from the marginal use of fluorescent lightbulbs are examined for a base year of 2004 for each of the 50 United States and 130 countries. Combustion of coal for electric power generation is generally the largest source of atmospheric mercury pollution; reduction in electricity demand from the substitution of incandescent bulbs with fluorescents leads to reduced mercury emissions during the use of the bulb. This analysis considers the local mix of power sources, coal quality, thermal conversion efficiencies, distribution losses, and any mercury control technologies that might be in place. Emissions of mercury from production and end-of-life treatment of the bulbs are also considered, providing a life-cycle perspective. Net reductions in mercury over the entire life cycle range from -1.2 to 97 mg per bulb depending on the country. The consequences for atmospheric mercury emissions of several policy scenarios are also discussed. 46 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Matthew J. Eckelman; Paul T. Anastas; Julie B. Zimmerman [Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006; 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total Sales and Net Demand NAICS Transfers Onsite Transfers for Code(a) Subsector and Industry Purchases In(b) Generation(c) Offsite Electricity(d) Total United States 311 Food 73,242 309 4,563 111 78,003 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 15,283 253 2,845 72 18,310 311221 Wet Corn Milling 6,753 48 2,396 55 9,142 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 920 54 951 7 1,919 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foo 9,720 1 268 13 9,976 3115 Dairy Products 10,079 0 44 0 10,123 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 17,545 0 17 0 17,562 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

404

Electric power monthly  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Additionally, statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, new generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Comparative analysis of net energy balance for satellite power systems (SPS) and other energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The net energy balance of seven electric energy systems is assessed: two coal-based, one nuclear, two terrestrial solar, and two solar power satellites, with principal emphasis on the latter two systems. Solar energy systems require much less operating energy per unit of electrical output. However, on the basis of the analysis used here, coal and nuclear systems are two to five times more efficient at extracting useful energy from the primary resource base than are the solar energy systems. The payback period for all systems is less than 1.5 years, except for the terrestrial photovoltaic (19.8 yr) and the solar power satellite system (6.4 yr), both of which rely on energy-intensive silicon cells.

Cirillo, R.R.; Cho, B.S.; Monarch, M.R.; Levine, E.P.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on RegionalAnalysis of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles, ANL/ESD/09-2,of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles, Volume 2: United States

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Monthly Flash Estimates of Electric Power Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6/24/2011 6/24/2011 Table of Contents 1. Commentary Page 1 2. Key Indicators of Generation, Consumption & Stocks Page 2 3. Month-to-Month Comparisons: Generation, Consumption and Stocks (Total) Page 3 4. Net Generation Trends Page 4 5. Fossil Fuel Consumption Trends Page 5 6. Fossil Fuel Stock Trends Page 6 7. Average Number of Days of Burn Non-Lignite Coal Page 7 8. Month-to-Month Comparisons: Electric Power Retail Sales and Average Prices Page 8 9. Retail Sales Trends Page 9 10. Average Retail Price Trends Page 10 11. Heating and Cooling Degree Days Page 11 12. Documentation Page 12 Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: April 2011 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States experienced temperatures that were above normal in April 2011.

408

Monthly Flash Estimates of Electric Power Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7/22/2011 7/22/2011 Table of Contents 1. Commentary Page 1 2. Key Indicators of Generation, Consumption & Stocks Page 2 3. Month-to-Month Comparisons: Generation, Consumption and Stocks (Total) Page 3 4. Net Generation Trends Page 4 5. Fossil Fuel Consumption Trends Page 5 6. Fossil Fuel Stock Trends Page 6 7. Average Number of Days of Burn Non-Lignite Coal Page 7 8. Month-to-Month Comparisons: Electric Power Retail Sales and Average Prices Page 8 9. Retail Sales Trends Page 9 10. Average Retail Price Trends Page 10 11. Heating and Cooling Degree Days Page 11 12. Documentation Page 12 Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: May 2011 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States experienced temperatures that were slightly below normal in May 2011.

409

Monthly Flash Estimates of Electric Power Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9/20/2011 9/20/2011 Table of Contents 1. Commentary Page 1 2. Key Indicators of Generation, Consumption & Stocks Page 2 3. Month-to-Month Comparisons: Generation, Consumption and Stocks (Total) Page 3 4. Net Generation Trends Page 4 5. Fossil Fuel Consumption Trends Page 5 6. Fossil Fuel Stock Trends Page 6 7. Average Number of Days of Burn Non-Lignite Coal Page 7 8. Month-to-Month Comparisons: Electric Power Retail Sales and Average Prices Page 8 9. Retail Sales Trends Page 9 10. Average Retail Price Trends Page 10 11. Heating and Cooling Degree Days Page 11 12. Documentation Page 12 Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: July 2011 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States experienced temperatures

410

Electric Vehicle Fleet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A98 0577 Electric Vehicle Fleet Operations in the United States Jim Francfort Presented to: 31st International Symposium on Automotive Technology and Automation Dusseldorf, Germany...

411

Phases Energy Services County Electric Power Assn A N Electric Coop  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alpena Power Co Alpena Power Co Altamaha Electric Member Corp Amana Society Service Co Ambit Energy L P Ambit En ergy L P Maryland Ambit Energy L P New York Ameren Energy Marketing Ameren Energy Marketing Illinois Ameren Illinois Company Ameren Illinois Company Illinois AmeriPower LLC American Electric Power Co Inc American Mun Power Ohio Inc American PowerNet American PowerNet District of Columbia American PowerNet Maine American PowerNet Maryland American PowerNet New Jersey American Samoa Power Authority American Transmission Systems Inc Amicalola Electric Member Corp Amigo Energy Anadarko Public Works Auth Anchorage Municipal Light and Power Aniak Light Power Co Inc Anoka Electric Coop Anthracite Power Light Anza Electric Coop Inc Appalachian Electric Coop

412

Phases Energy Services County Electric Power Assn A N Electric Coop  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alliant Energy Alliant Energy Alpena Power Co Altamaha Electric Member Corp Amana Society Service Co Ambit Energy L P Ambit Energy L P Maryland Ambit Energy L P New York Ameren Energy Marketing Ameren Energy Marketing Illinois Ameren Illinois Company Ameren Illinois Company Illinois AmeriPower LLC American Electric Power Co Inc American Mun Power Ohio Inc American PowerNet American PowerNet District of Columbia American PowerNet Maine American PowerNet Maryland American PowerNet New Jersey American Samoa Power Authority American Transmission Systems Inc Amicalola Electric Member Corp Amigo Energy Anadarko Public Works Auth Anchorage Municipal Light and Power Aniak Light Power Co Inc Anoka Electric Coop Anthracite Power Light Anza Electric Coop Inc Appalachian Electric Coop

413

Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working and Net Available Shell Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity November 2013 With Data as of September 30, 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity as of September 30, 2013 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or

414

Electrical engineering Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation Transmission Distribution · Electrical generators · Electric motors · High voltage engineering associated with the systems Electrical engineering · Electric power generation Transmission Distribution The electricity transported to load locations from a power station transmission subsystem The transmission system

Ă?nay, Devrim

415

QuarkNet Stories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Workforce Centers at 53 universities and labs 18 HEP experiments 475 high schools in 28 states 60 ,000 students per year The focus of QuarkNet is to involve teachers...

416

Net Primary Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 study sites, plus a worldwide data set, have been added to the global terrestrial Net Primary Production (NPP) reference database. The NPP database has been compiled by Dick...

417

QuarkNet Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beginning its 17th year, QuarkNet involves about 100,000 students from 500+ US high schools with opportunities to: Analyze real data online. Collaborate with students worldwide....

418

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CC-1-I Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives served through the facilities of Carolina Power & Light Company, Western Division (hereinafter called the Customers). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy available from the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Cheatham, Old Hickory, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereinafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and sold in wholesale quantities. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating

419

Current Experience With Net Metering Programs Yih-huei Wan, NREL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with small generators to use the electricity they generate to offset their usage over an entire billing states. Net metering enables electricity customers with small generators to receive a higher value for some or all of the electricity they generate. This is accomplished by allowing the electric meters

420

"Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)"," Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural","LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)"," Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2,3,6,2,4,9

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "net electricity unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Historical plant cost and annual production expenses for selected electric plants, 1982  

SciTech Connect

This publication is a composite of the two prior publications, Hydroelectric Plant Construction Cost and Annual Production Expenses and Thermal-Electric Plant Construction Cost and Annual Production Expenses. Beginning in 1979, Thermal-Electric Plant Construction Cost and Annual Production Expenses contained information on both steam-electric and gas-turbine electric plant construction cost and annual production expenses. The summarized historical plant cost described under Historical Plant Cost in this report is the net cumulative-to-date actual outlays or expenditures for land, structures, and equipment to the utility. Historical plant cost is the initial investment in plant (cumulative to the date of initial commercial operation) plus the costs of all additions to the plant, less the value of retirements. Thus, historical plant cost includes expenditures made over several years, as modifications are made to the plant. Power Production Expenses is the reporting year's plant operation and maintenance expenses, including fuel expenses. These expenses do not include annual fixed charges on plant cost (capital costs) such as interest on debt, depreciation or amortization expenses, and taxes. Consequently, total production expenses and the derived unit costs are not the total cost of producing electric power at the various plants. This publication contains data on installed generating capacity, net generation, net capability, historical plant cost, production expenses, fuel consumption, physical and operating plant characteristics, and other relevant statistical information for selected plants.

1984-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

422

Largest American Net Zero Energy Campus Community Embraces Clean Energy |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Largest American Net Zero Energy Campus Community Embraces Clean Largest American Net Zero Energy Campus Community Embraces Clean Energy Largest American Net Zero Energy Campus Community Embraces Clean Energy April 9, 2012 - 4:10pm Addthis Based on its sustainable design, UC Davis' new net zero energy community is designed to generate as much energy as it consumes. | Video courtesy of the University of California at Davis. Eric Escudero Eric Escudero Senior Public Affairs Specialist & Contractor, Golden Field Office What does this project do? UC Davis is planning to incorporate a biodigester -- a source of renewable energy -- into plans for its new housing development. The biodigester will turn organic waste into electricity. The organic waste is burned and produces biogas that a turbine converts into electricity. A new housing development on the University of California at Davis (UC

423

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins in the Contiguous United States (GW) Net Internal Capacity Capacity Demand (1) Resources (2) Margin (3) 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Note(s): Source(s): 778.5 980.3 20.6% 1) Net internal demand represents the system demand that is planned for by the electric power industry`s reliability authority and is equal to internal demand less direct control load management and interruptible demand. Direct control load management: Customer demand that can be interrupted at the time of the seasonal peak by direct control of the system operator by interrupting power supply to individual appliances or equipment on customer premises. This type of control usually reduces the demand of residential customers. Interruptible demand: Customer

424

THE INFLUENCE OF STATE-LEVEL RENEWABLE ENERGY POLICY INSTRUMENTS ON ELECTRICITY GENERATION IN THE UNITED STATES: A CROSS-SECTIONAL TIME SERIES ANALYSIS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Since the late 1990s, state governments in the U.S. have diversified policy instruments for encouraging the electric power industry to deploy renewable sources for electricity… (more)

Park, Sunjoo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Creating the wholesale market for electricity in Japan : what should Japan learn from major markets in the United States and Europe?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The movement of deregulation in Japan's electric power industry started in 1995 with the revision of the Electric Utility Industry Law. During these past over five years, levels of various discussions have been made in ...

Hori, Takahide

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 6,188 40 Electric Utilities 4,912 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,276 40 Net Generation (megawatthours) 34,739,542 39 Electric Utilities 31,343,796 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,395,746 41 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 116 17 Nitrogen Oxide 52 21 Carbon Dioxide 31,064 30 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 7.3 3 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 6 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,971 6 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 42 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 41

427

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

428

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Minnesota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,715 27 Electric Utilities 11,547 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,168 31 Net Generation (megawatthours) 53,670,227 29 Electric Utilities 45,428,599 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,241,628 32 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 57 27 Nitrogen Oxide 44 27 Carbon Dioxide 32,946 29 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 27 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 18 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,353 21 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 23 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 22

429

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

430

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New York) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 39,357 6 Electric Utilities 11,032 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 28,325 5 Net Generation (megawatthours) 136,961,654 9 Electric Utilities 34,633,335 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 102,328,319 5 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 62 25 Nitrogen Oxide 44 28 Carbon Dioxide 41,584 22 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 40 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 44 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 669 42 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,623,573 7 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 79,119,769 18

431

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,674 12 Electric Utilities 25,553 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,121 34 Net Generation (megawatthours) 128,678,483 10 Electric Utilities 121,251,138 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 7,427,345 34 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 131 14 Nitrogen Oxide 57 16 Carbon Dioxide 73,241 13 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,255 28 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 9 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 5

432

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

433

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

434

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Illinois) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 44,127 5 Electric Utilities 4,800 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 39,327 3 Net Generation (megawatthours) 201,351,872 5 Electric Utilities 12,418,332 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 188,933,540 3 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 232 9 Nitrogen Oxide 83 8 Carbon Dioxide 103,128 6 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 25 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 38 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,129 34 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,760,674 6 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 77,890,532 19

435

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,744 14 Electric Utilities 16,471 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 10,272 10 Net Generation (megawatthours) 102,884,940 16 Electric Utilities 51,680,682 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,204,258 8 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 126 15 Nitrogen Oxide 75 11 Carbon Dioxide 58,706 14 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 21 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 21 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,258 27 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 18 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 16

436

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 67,328 2 Electric Utilities 28,689 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 38,639 4 Net Generation (megawatthours) 204,125,596 4 Electric Utilities 96,939,535 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 107,186,061 4 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 47 Nitrogen Oxide 80 9 Carbon Dioxide 55,406 16 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 49 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 41 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 598 46 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 258,525,414 2 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 240,948,673 2

437

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,623 45 Electric Utilities 2,994 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 629 48 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,049,636 46 Electric Utilities 8,682,448 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,367,188 47 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 43 Nitrogen Oxide 12 43 Carbon Dioxide 3,611 47 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 23 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 8 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 792 41 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 46 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 42

438

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

439

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,697 31 Electric Utilities 937 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,760 8 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,804,824 34 Electric Utilities 802,906 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 42,001,918 10 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 35 31 Nitrogen Oxide 17 38 Carbon Dioxide 20,291 36 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 34 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 39 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,045 38 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,123,422 26 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 31,822,942 34

440

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nebraska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,857 38 Electric Utilities 7,647 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 210 50 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,630,006 36 Electric Utilities 36,242,921 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 387,085 50 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 65 24 Nitrogen Oxide 40 30 Carbon Dioxide 24,461 34 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.9 12 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 9 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 19 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 36 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 35

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "net electricity unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

442

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

443

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Texas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 108,258 1 Electric Utilities 26,533 4 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 81,724 1 Net Generation (megawatthours) 411,695,046 1 Electric Utilities 95,099,161 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 316,595,885 1 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 430 2 Nitrogen Oxide 204 1 Carbon Dioxide 251,409 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 28 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,346 22 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1

444

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

445

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

446

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

447

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

448

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Utah) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,497 39 Electric Utilities 6,648 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 849 44 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,249,355 35 Electric Utilities 39,522,124 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,727,231 43 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 25 34 Nitrogen Oxide 68 13 Carbon Dioxide 35,519 27 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 38 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 4 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,853 9 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 37 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 36

449

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

450

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

451

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nevada) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 11,421 34 Electric Utilities 8,713 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,708 33 Net Generation (megawatthours) 35,146,248 38 Electric Utilities 23,710,917 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,435,331 29 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 44 Nitrogen Oxide 15 40 Carbon Dioxide 17,020 38 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 46 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 37 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,068 37 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 33,772,595 33 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,348,879 32

452

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

453

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

454

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Texas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 108,258 1 Electric Utilities 26,533 4 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 81,724 1 Net Generation (megawatthours) 411,695,046 1 Electric Utilities 95,099,161 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 316,595,885 1 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 430 2 Nitrogen Oxide 204 1 Carbon Dioxide 251,409 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 28 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,346 22 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1

455

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indiana Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Indiana Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Indiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,638 13 Electric Utilities 23,008 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,630 23 Net Generation (megawatthours) 125,180,739 11 Electric Utilities 107,852,560 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,328,179 20 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 385 4 Nitrogen Oxide 120 4 Carbon Dioxide 116,283 5 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 6.8 4 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 12 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,048 4 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 105,994,376 11 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,994,376 8

456

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

457

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

458

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,990 44 Electric Utilities 3,035 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 955 42 Net Generation (megawatthours) 12,024,564 44 Electric Utilities 8,589,208 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,435,356 40 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 45 Nitrogen Oxide 4 48 Carbon Dioxide 1,213 49 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 39 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 43 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 222 50 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 38 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 37

459

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

460

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "net electricity unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

462

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Tennessee) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,417 19 Electric Utilities 20,968 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 450 49 Net Generation (megawatthours) 82,348,625 19 Electric Utilities 79,816,049 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,532,576 45 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 138 13 Nitrogen Oxide 33 31 Carbon Dioxide 48,196 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 14 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 40 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,290 26 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 13 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 10

463

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

464

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,392 15 Electric Utilities 20,115 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 6,277 16 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,750,957 12 Electric Utilities 91,232,664 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 20,518,293 17 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 33 33 Nitrogen Oxide 57 17 Carbon Dioxide 55,683 15 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 43 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 31 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,099 35 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 21 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 20

465

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

466

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

467

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

468

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

469

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

470

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

471

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

472

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

473

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

474

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

475

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

476

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

477

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

478

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

479

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

480

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "net electricity unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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481

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

482

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (West Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 16,495 24 Electric Utilities 11,719 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,775 19 Net Generation (megawatthours) 80,788,947 20 Electric Utilities 56,719,755 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 24,069,192 13 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 105 20 Nitrogen Oxide 49 23 Carbon Dioxide 74,283 12 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.9 20 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 25 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,027 5 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 34 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 33

483

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Vermont) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 1,128 50 Electric Utilities 260 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 868 43 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,619,990 49 Electric Utilities 720,853 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,899,137 35 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide * 51 Nitrogen Oxide 1 50 Carbon Dioxide 8 51 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 51 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 51 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3 51 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 51 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 48 Direct Use (megawatthours) 19,806 47

484

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

485

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Produce