National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for neshap national emission

  1. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Quality Assurance Project Plan for National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs), Subpart H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, L.; Biermann, A

    2000-06-27

    As a Department of Energy (DOE) Facility whose operations involve the use of radionuclides, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is subject to the requirements of 40 CFR 61, the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs). Subpart H of this Regulation establishes standards for exposure of the public to radionuclides (other than radon) released from DOE Facilities (Federal Register, 1989). These regulations limit the emission of radionuclides to ambient air from DOE facilities (see Section 2.0). Under the NESHAPs Subpart H Regulation (hereafter referred to as NESHAPs), DOE facilities are also required to establish a quality assurance program for radionuclide emission measurements; specific requirements for preparation of a Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) are given in Appendix B, Method 114 of 40 CFR 61. Throughout this QAPP, the specific Quality Assurance Method elements of 40 CFR 61 Subpart H addressed by a given section are identified. In addition, the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) (US EPA, 1994a) published draft requirements for QAPP's prepared in support of programs that develop environmental data. We have incorporated many of the technical elements specified in that document into this QAPP, specifically those identified as relating to measurement and data acquisition; assessment and oversight; and data validation and usability. This QAPP will be evaluated on an annual basis, and updated as appropriate.

  2. DOE Subpart H Report. Annual NESHAPS Meeting on Radiological Emissions |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Subpart H Report. Annual NESHAPS Meeting on Radiological Emissions DOE Subpart H Report. Annual NESHAPS Meeting on Radiological Emissions Gustavo Vazquez*, DOE; Sandra Snyder, PNNL Abstract: The National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H, (NESHAPs - Radioactive Air) meeting provides an opportunity for federal and state regulators, Department of Energy employees and contractors, standards developers, and industry representatives to work together

  3. 1996 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) -- Radionuclides. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ``National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,`` each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1996. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contact concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For calendar year 1996, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 3.14E-02 mrem (3.14E-07 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

  4. A reevaluation of the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - 40 CFR 61, Subpart H) program at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culp, T.A.; Hylko, J.M.

    1997-10-01

    The initial National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - 40 CFR 61, Subpart H) Program at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) required: (1) continuous air monitoring of sources if the calculated effective dose equivalent (EDE) to the maximum exposed individual (MEI) was > 0.1 mrem/yr; (2) the determination of emissions based on measurements or measured parameters if the EDE to the MEI was < 0.1 mrem/yr; and (3) the calculation of worst case releases when the expected air concentrations were below detection limits using standard monitoring equipment. This conservative interpretation of the regulation guided SNL/NM to model, track, and trend virtually all emission sources with the potential to include any radionuclides. The level of effort required to implement these activities was independent of the EDE contributing from individual sources. A recent programmatic review found the NESHAP program to be in excess of the legal requirements. A further review found that, in summation, 13 of 16 radionuclide sources had a negligible impact on the final calculated EDE to the MEI used to demonstrate compliance at 20 separate on-site receptor locations. A reevaluation was performed to meet the legal requirements of 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, and still be reasonable and appropriate under the existing circumstances.

  5. 1995 Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs): Radionuclides. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    Under Section 61.94 of 40 CFR 61, Subpart H (National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities), each DOE facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at INEL for CY 1995. For that year, airborne radionuclide emissions from INEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 1.80E-02 mrem (1.80E-07 Sievert), well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

  6. 1997 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) -- Radionuclides annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-06-01

    Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities, each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1997. Section 1 of this report provides an overview of the INEEL facilities and a brief description of the radioactive materials and processes at the facilities. Section 2 identifies radioactive air effluent release points and diffuse sources at the INEEL and actual releases during 1997. Section 2 also describes the effluent control systems for each potential release point. Section 3 provides the methodology and EDE calculations for 1997 INEEL radioactive emissions.

  7. Control of benzene waste NESHAP emissions from a petroleum refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truelove, R.D. )

    1992-02-01

    This paper discusses the control of benzene emissions from a petroleum refinery as regulated by the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAO) Subpart FF - National Standard for Benzene Waste Operations. This regulation is complex and confusing, but it provides flexibility to achieve compliance through various strategies to control benzene emissions. The first step to achieve compliance with the benzene waste NESHAP is understanding the regulation itself. Therefore, this paper summarizes the regulation to provide the reader with sufficient background to understand why specific controls are required for specific processes. The flexibility provided by the regulation to achieve compliance is not always readily apparent. This paper summarizes some of these subtleties. The author's involvement with an industry trade association in meetings with the Environmental Protection Agency during the development of the regulation allows some of EPA's expressions of their intent and internal interpretation to also be contained in the summary. The second step to achieve compliance with the benzene waste NESHAP is to actually design and operate a cost effective solution for a specific set of existing conditions within a refinery. This paper provides a case study of the equipment necessary to achieve compliance with the substantive requirements of the regulation at a large, integrated refinery. The retrofit requirements are very specific to the circumstances of this facility. Therefore, they will not be a universal, cost effective means of compliance for other refineries.

  8. U.S. Department of Energy NESHAP Annual Report for CY 2014 Sandia National Laboratories Tonopah Test Range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evelo, Stacie; Miller, Mark L.

    2015-05-01

    This National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) Annual Report has been prepared in a format to comply with the reporting requirements of 40 CFR 61.94 and the April 5, 1995 Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). According to the EPA approved NESHAP Monitoring Plan for the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), 40 CFR 61, subpart H, and the MOA, no additional monitoring or measurements are required at TTR in order to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP regulation.

  9. LLNL NESHAPs 2004 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrach, R; Gallegos, G; Peterson, R; Wilson, K; Harrach, R J; Gallegos, G M; Peterson, S R; Wilson, K R

    2005-06-27

    This annual report is prepared pursuant to the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs; Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61, Subpart H). Subpart H governs radionuclide emissions to air from Department of Energy (DOE) facilities.

  10. LLNL NESHAPs 1995 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, G.M.; Harrach, R.J.; Biermann, A.H.; Tate, P.J.

    1996-06-01

    This annual report is prepared pursuant to the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) 40 CFR Part 61, Subpart H; Subpart H governs radionuclide emissions to air from Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. NESHAPs limits the emission of radionuclides to the ambient air from DOE facilities to levels resulting in an effective dose equivalent (EDE) of 10 mrem to any member of the public. This document contains the EDEs for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) site-wide maximally exposed members of the public from 1995 operations.

  11. LLNL NESHAPs 2014 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, K.; Bertoldo, N.; Gallegos, G.; MacQueen, D.; Wegrecki, A.

    2015-07-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC operates facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H, which regulates radionuclide emissions to air from Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Specifically, NESHAPs limits the emission of radionuclides to the ambient air to levels resulting in an annual effective dose equivalent of 10 mrem (100 μSv) to any member of the public. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, LLNL personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, Version 4.0.1.17, to calculate the dose to the maximally exposed individual member of the public for the Livermore Site and Site 300.

  12. LLNL NESHAPs 2008 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertoldo, N; Gallegos, G; MacQueen, D; Wegrecki, A; Wilson, K

    2009-06-25

    Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC operates facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H, which regulates radionuclide emissions to air from Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Specifically, NESHAPs limits the emission of radionuclides to the ambient air to levels resulting in an annual effective dose equivalent of 10 mrem (100 {mu}Sv) to any member of the public. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, LLNL personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, Version 1.0, to calculate the dose to the maximally exposed individual for the Livermore site and Site 300. The dose for the LLNL site-wide maximally exposed members of the public from operations in 2008 are summarized here: {sm_bullet} Livermore site: 0.0013 mrem (0.013 {mu}Sv) (26% from point source emissions, 74% from diffuse source emissions). The point source emissions include gaseous tritium modeled as tritiated water vapor as directed by EPA Region IX; the resulting dose is used for compliance purposes. {sm_bullet} Site 300: 0.000000044 mrem (0.00000044 {mu}Sv) (100% from point source emissions).

  13. Tank farm stack NESHAP designation determinations. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crummel, G.M.

    1996-01-18

    This document provides a determination of the status of Tank Farm Exhausters as regulated by the ``National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants`` (NESHAP) specified in the 40 Series Code of Federal Regulations (CFRs), Part 61, Subpart H, ``National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.``

  14. LLNL NESHAPs 1996 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, G.M.

    1997-01-06

    This annual report is prepared pursuant to the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) 40 CFR Part 61, Subpart H; Subpart H governs radionuclide emissions to air from Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. NESHAPs limits the emission of radionuclides to the ambient air from DOE facilities to levels resulting in an annual effective dose equivalent (EDE) of 10 mrem (10 microsieverts) to any member of the public. The EDEs for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) site-wide maximally exposed members of the public from 1996 operations were (1) Livermore site: 0. 093 mrem (0.93 microsievert) (52% from point-source emissions, 48% from diffuse-source emissions); (2) Site 300: 0.033 mrem (0.33 microsievert) (99% from point-source, 1% from diffuse-source emissions). The EDEs were generally calculated using the EPA-approved CAP88-PC air-dispersion/dose-assessment model. Site-specific meteorological data, stack flow data, and emissions estimates based on radionuclide inventory data or continuous-monitoring systems data were the specific input to CAP88-PC for each modeled source. 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. LLNL NESHAPs project 1997 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, G.M.

    1998-06-01

    NESHAP`s limits the emission of radionuclides to the ambient air from DOE facilities to levels resulting in an annual effective dose equivalent (EDE) of 10 mrem (100 ({mu}Sv) to any member of the public The EDEs for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) site- wide maximally exposed members of the public from 1997 operations were Livermore site. 0 097 mrem (0 97 {mu}Sv) (80% from point-source emissions), 20% from diffuse-source emissions), Site 300 0 014 mrem (O 14 {mu}Sv) (38% from point-source emissions, 62% from diffuse-source emissions) The EDEs were generally calculated using the EPA-approved CAP88-PC air- dispersion/dose-assessment model Site-specific meteorological data, stack flow data, and emissions estimates based on radionuclide inventory data or continuous-monitoring systems data were the specific input to CAP88-PC for each modeled source.

  16. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- Environmental - NESHAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Publications > NESHAP NNSANFO ... on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). ... management and operating contractor for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear ...

  17. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.; Barnett, J. Matthew

    2011-05-13

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants ([NESHAP]; U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated off-site doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2010.

  18. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Barfuss, Brad C.; Gervais, Todd L.

    2008-01-01

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP – U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection – Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2007.

  19. National emission standards for hazardous air pollutants petroleum refineries. Background information for final standards. Summary of public comments and responses. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    National emission standards for hazardous air pollutants (NESHAP) are promulgated for the petroleum refinery industry under authority of section 112 of the Clean Air Act. This background information document provides technical information and analyses used in the development of the final NESHAP and Agency reponses to public comments on the proposed rule.

  20. LLNL NESHAPs, 1993 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrach, R.J.; Surano, K.A.; Biermann, A.H.; Gouveia, F.J.; Fields, B.C.; Tate, P.J.

    1994-06-01

    The standard defined in NESHAPSs CFR Part 61.92 limits the emission of radionuclides to the ambient air from DOE facilities to those that would cause any member of the public to receive in any year an effective dose equivalent of 10 mrem. In August 1993 DOE and EPA signed a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement which established a schedule of work for LLNL to perform to demonstrate compliance with NESHAPs, 40 CFR part 61, Subpart H. The progress in LLNL`s NESHAPs program - evaluations of all emission points for the Livermore site and Site 300, of collective EDEs for populations within 80 km of each site, status in reguard to continuous monitoring requirements and periodic confirmatory measurements, improvements in the sampling and monitoring systems and progress on a NESHAPs quality assurance program - is described in this annual report. In April 1994 the EPA notified DOE and LLNL that all requirements of the FFCA had been met, and that LLNL was in compliance with the NESHAPs regulations.

  1. Economic impact analysis for the petroleum refineries NESHAP. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    An economic analysis of the industries affected by the Petroleum Refineries National Emmissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) was completed in support of this standard. The industry for which economic impacts was computed was the petroleum refinery industry. Affected refineries must reduce HAP emissions by the level of control required in the standard. Several types of economic impacts, among them price product changes, output changes, job impacts, and effects on foriegn trade, were computed for the selected regulatory alternative.

  2. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants submittal -- 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, Y.E.; Black, S.C.

    1995-06-01

    This report focuses on air quality at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for 1994. A general description of the effluent sources are presented. Each potential source of NTS emissions was characterized by one of the following: (1) by monitoring methods and procedures previously developed at NTS; (2) by a yearly radionuclide inventory of the source, assuming that volatile radionuclides are released to the environment; (3) by the measurement of tritiated water concentration in liquid effluents discharged to containment ponds and assuming all the effluent evaporates over the course of the year to become an air emission; or (4) by using a combination of environmental measurements and CAP88-PC to calculate emissions. Appendices A through J describe the methods used to determine the emissions from the sources. These National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) emissions are very conservative, are used to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the Maximally Exposed Individual offsite, and exceed, in some cases, those reported in DOE`s Effluent Information System (EIS). The NESHAP`s worst-case emissions that exceed the EIS reported emissions are noted. Offsite environmental surveillance data are used to confirm that calculated emissions are, indeed, conservative.

  3. Regulatory impact analysis for the petroleum refineries neshap. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The report analyzes the regulatory impacts of the Petroleum Refinery National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), which is being promulgated under Section 112 of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CCA). This emission standard would regulate the emissions of certain hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from petroleum refineries. The petroleum refineries industry group includes any facility engaged in the production of motor gasoline, naphthas, kerosene, jet fuels, distillate fuel oils, residual fuel oils, lubricants, or other products made from crude oil or unfinished petroleum derivatives. The report analyzes the impact that regulatory action is likely to have on the petroleum refining industry.

  4. Microsoft Word - 2007 NESHAP Final with Signature page.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... According to 40 CFR 61.93 (b)(4)(ii) (CFR, 2002), no credit was taken for pollution control equipment in determining air emissions. The emissions for NESHAP reporting are listed in ...

  5. Economic impact analysis for the petroleum refineries NESHAP. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of this economic impact analysis (EIA) is to evaluate the effect of the control costs associated with the Petroleum Refining National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) on the behavior of the regulated petroleum refiners. The EIA was conducted based on the cost estimates for one hybrid regulatory option above the maximum achievable control technology (MACT) 'floor' (or minimum standard). This analysis compares the quantitative economic impacts of regulation to baseline industry conditions which would occur in the absence of regulation. The economic impacts of regulation are estimated for the industry, using costs which were supplied on both a national and a refinery level.

  6. Regulatory impact analysis for the petroleum refineries NESHAP. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    A regulatory impact analysis (RIA) of the industries affected by the Petroleum Refineries National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) was completed in support of this regulation. This (RIA) was required because the proposal is economically significant according to Executive Order 12866. The industry for which these impacts was computed was the petroleum refinery industry. Several different impact analyses were included in total or summarized in different chapters in the document. Those analyses were: the compliance cost analysis, the economic impact analysis, and the benefits analysis. Benefits and costs were then compared and discussed in the document`s last chapter.

  7. Environmental Protection Department LLNL NESHAPs 2007 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertoldo, N A; Larson, J M; Wilson, K R

    2008-06-25

    This annual report is prepared pursuant to the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs; Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61, Subpart H). Subpart H governs radionuclide emissions to air from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. NESHAPs limits the emission of radionuclides to the ambient air from DOE facilities to levels resulting in an annual effective dose equivalent (EDE) of 10 mrem (100 {micro}Sv) to any member of the public. The EDEs for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) site-wide maximally exposed members of the public from operations in 2007 are summarized here. Livermore site: 0.0031 mrem (0.031 {micro}Sv) (42% from point source emissions, 58% from diffuse source emissions). The point source emissions include gaseous tritium modeled as tritiated water vapor as directed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IX; the resulting dose is used for compliance purposes. Site 300: 0.0035 mrem (0.035 {micro}Sv) (90% from point source emissions, 10% from diffuse source emissions). The EDEs were calculated using the U.S. EPA-approved CAP88-PC air dispersion/dose-assessment model, except for doses for two diffuse sources that were estimated using measured radionuclide concentrations and dose calculations. Specific inputs to CAP88-PC for the modeled sources included site-specific meteorological data and source emissions data, the latter variously based on continuous stack effluent monitoring data, stack flow or other release-rate information, ambient air monitoring data, and facility knowledge.

  8. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants submittal -- 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, Y.E.; Black, S.C.

    1998-06-01

    Each potential source of Nevada Test Site (NTS) emissions was characterized by one of the following methods: (1) monitoring methods and procedures previously developed at the NTS; (2) a yearly radionuclide inventory of the source, assuming that volatile radionuclide are released to the environment; (3) the measurement of tritiated water (as HTO or T{sub 2}O) concentration in liquid effluents discharged to containment ponds and assuming all the effluent evaporates over the course of the year to become an air emission; or (4) using a combination of environmental measurements and CAP88-PC to calculate emissions. The emissions for National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) reporting are listed. They are very conservative and are used in Section 3 to calculate the EDE to the maximally exposed individual offsite. Offsite environmental surveillance data, where available, are used to confirm that calculated emissions are, indeed, conservative.

  9. Tritium emissions from 200 East Area Double-Shell Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachand, D.D.

    1994-11-28

    This document evaluates the need for tritium sampling of the emissions from the 200 East Area Double Shell Tanks based on the requirements of {open_quotes}National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants{close_quotes} (NESHAP). The NESHAP requirements are specified in 40 Code of Federal Regulation (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H; {open_quotes}National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities{close_quotes}.

  10. 1990 INEL national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency issued on December 15, 1989 final rules governing air emissions of radionuclides. Requirements concerning radionuclide emissions from Department of Energy Facilities are addressed under Title 40, Code Federal Regulations (CFR) 61, Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities.'' Section 61.94 of the regulations require that each DOE facility submit on an annual basis a report documenting compliance with the Subpart H requirements. This report addresses the section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for calendar year 1990. The Idaho Operations Office of the Department of Energy is the primary contact concerning NESHAPs compliance at the INEL.

  11. United States Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Sandia Field Office NESHAP Annual Report CY2014 for Sandia National Laboratories New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    evelo, stacie; Miller, Mark L.

    2015-05-01

    This report provides a summary of the radionuclide releases from the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration facilities at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) during Calendar Year (CY) 2014, including the data, calculations, and supporting documentation for demonstrating compliance with 40 Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) 61, Subpart H--NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR EMISSIONS OF RADIONUCLIDES OTHER THAN RADON FROM DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FACILITIES. A description is given of the sources and their contributions to the overall dose assessment. In addition, the maximally exposed individual (MEI) radiological dose calculation and the population dose to local and regional residents are discussed.

  12. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2006-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was operated as the nations site for nuclear weapons testing. The release of man-made radionuclides from the NTS as a result of testing activities has been monitored since the first decade of atmospheric testing. After 1962, when nuclear tests were conducted only underground, the radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS was greatly reduced. After the 1992 moratorium on nuclear testing, radiation monitoring on the NTS focused on detecting airborne radionuclides that are resuspended into the air (e.g., by winds, dust-devils) along with historically-contaminated soils on the NTS. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (40 Code of Federal Regulations 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent (EDE) to any member of the public. This is the dose limit established for someone living off of the NTS for inhaling radioactive particles that may be carried by wind off of the NTS. This limit assumes that members of the public surrounding the NTS may also inhale background levels or radioactive particles unrelated to NTS activities that come from naturally-occurring elements in the environment (e.g., radon gas from the earth or natural building materials) or from other man-made sources (e.g., cigarette smoke). The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires DOE facilities (e.g., the NTS) to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP dose limit by annually estimating the dose to a hypothetical member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI), or the member of the public who resides within an 80-kilometer (50-mile) radius

  13. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions Calendar Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Ecological and Environmental Monitoring

    2010-06-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NTS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NTS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium were also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NTS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy facility to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation not related to NTS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements or from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides. The NTS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on the NTS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NTS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no

  14. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions Calendar Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciucci, John

    2010-06-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NTS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NTS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium were also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NTS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy facility to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation not related to NTS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements or from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides. The NTS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on the NTS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NTS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no

  15. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions, Calendar Year 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Ecological and Environmental Monitoring

    2011-06-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly the Nevada Test Site) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR, 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as those from the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Because this report is intended to discuss radioactive air emissions during calendar year 2010, data on radionuclides in air from the 2011 Fukushima nuclear power plant releases are not presented but will be included in the report for calendar year 2011. The NNSS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP

  16. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Sula, Monte J.; Gervais, Todd L.; Shields, Keith D.; Edwards, Daniel R.

    2001-09-28

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Hanford Site. This report describes the inventory-based methods, and provides the results, for the assessment performed in 2001.

  17. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Sula, Monte J.; Gervais, Todd L.; Edwards, Daniel L.

    2003-12-05

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Hanford Site. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the assessment performed in 2003.

  18. Basis to demonstrate compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for the Stand-off Experiments Range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Sandvig

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the basis and the documentation to demonstrate general compliance with the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPS) 40 CFR 61 Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities, (the Standard) for outdoor linear accelerator operations at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Stand-off Experiments Range (SOX). The intent of this report is to inform and gain acceptance of this methodology from the governmental bodies regulating the INL.

  19. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, R.

    2014-06-04

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitations to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of legacy-related tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan in 2011. NNSA/NFO demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations on the NNSS (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and DOE 1995). This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001 (EPA 2001a) and has

  20. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions, Calendar Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Ecological and Environmental Monitoring

    2012-06-19

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of legacy-related tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Radionuclides from the Fukushima nuclear power plant were detected at the NNSS in March 2011 and are discussed further in Section III. The NNSS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the EPA for use on the

  1. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions Calendar Year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, R.

    2013-06-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of legacy-related tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan in 2011. NNSA/NFO demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations on the NNSS (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and DOE 1995). This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001 (EPA 2001a) and has

  2. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Facility Radionuclide Emission Points and Sampling Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barfuss, Brad C.; Barnett, J. M.; Ballinger, Marcel Y.

    2009-04-08

    BattellePacific Northwest Division operates numerous research and development laboratories in Richland, Washington, including those associated with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Department of Energys Hanford Site that have the potential for radionuclide air emissions. The National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP 40 CFR 61, Subparts H and I) requires an assessment of all effluent release points that have the potential for radionuclide emissions. Potential emissions are assessed annually. Sampling, monitoring, and other regulatory compliance requirements are designated based upon the potential-to-emit dose criteria found in the regulations. The purpose of this document is to describe the facility radionuclide air emission sampling program and provide current and historical facility emission point system performance, operation, and design information. A description of the buildings, exhaust points, control technologies, and sample extraction details is provided for each registered or deregistered facility emission point. Additionally, applicable stack sampler configuration drawings, figures, and photographs are provided.

  3. 1999 INEEL National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. W. Tkachyk

    2000-06-01

    Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emission of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,'' each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1999. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contract concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For CY 1999, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 7.92E-03 mrem (7.92E-08 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

  4. 1998 INEEL National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. W. Tkachyk

    1999-06-01

    Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emission of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,'' each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1998. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contract concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For CY 1998, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 7.92E-03 mrem (7.92E-08 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

  5. LLNL NESHAPs Project 1994 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Surano, K.A.; Biermann, A.H.; Harrach, R.J.

    1995-06-01

    The NESHAPs standared in 40 CFR part 61, Subpart H limites the emission of radionuclides to the ambient air from DOE facilities to levels resulting in an annual effective dose equivalent (EDE) of 10 mrem to any member of the public. The EDEs to the LLNL site-wide maximally exposed member of the public from 1994 operations were: Livermore 0.065 mrem; site 300 - 0.081 mrem. A complete LLNL-wide radionuclide-inventory update was conducted for 1994. Inventory and site-specific meteorological data, together with results from continuous-monitoring systems, were used as inputs to the EPA-approved CAP88-PC air-dispersion/dose-assessment model to calculate the reported EDEs.

  6. 1990 INEL national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants. Annual report, June 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency issued on December 15, 1989 final rules governing air emissions of radionuclides. Requirements concerning radionuclide emissions from Department of Energy Facilities are addressed under Title 40, Code Federal Regulations (CFR) 61, Subpart H, ``National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities.`` Section 61.94 of the regulations require that each DOE facility submit on an annual basis a report documenting compliance with the Subpart H requirements. This report addresses the section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for calendar year 1990. The Idaho Operations Office of the Department of Energy is the primary contact concerning NESHAPs compliance at the INEL.

  7. 20NESHAP.fnl.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2001 June 2002 June 2002 U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office Las Vegas, Nevada U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office Las Vegas, Nevada DOE/NV/11718--719 DOE/NV/11718--719 DISCLAIMER Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

  8. 2014 LANL Radionuclide Air Emissions Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuehne, David Patrick

    2015-07-21

    This report describes the emissions of airborne radionuclides from operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for calendar year 2014, and the resulting off-site dose from these emissions. This document fulfills the requirements established by the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H – Emissions of Radionuclides other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities, commonly referred to as the Radionuclide NESHAP or Rad-NESHAP. Compliance with this regulation and preparation of this document is the responsibility of LANL’s RadNESHAP compliance program, which is part of the Environmental Protection Division. The information in this report is required under the Clean Air Act and is being submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 6.

  9. Nevada Test Site National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Warren and Robert F. Grossman

    2009-06-30

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NTS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to under-ground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NTS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by winds) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium were also emitted to air at the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF), an NTS support complex in the city of North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR, 2008a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation not related to NTS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements or from other man-made sources such as medical treatments. The NTS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on the NTS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NTS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo

  10. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Campus Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Bisping, Lynn E.

    2014-06-01

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions that result in the highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The report has been prepared in compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection Air Emissions. The dose to the PNNL Site MEI due to routine major and minor point source emissions in 2013 from PNNL Site sources is 2E-05 mrem (2E-07 mSv) EDE. The dose from fugitive emissions (i.e., unmonitored sources) is 2E-6 mrem (2E-8 mSv) EDE. The dose from radon emissions is 1E-11 mrem (1E-13 mSv) EDE. No nonroutine emissions occurred in 2013. The total radiological dose for 2013 to the MEI from all PNNL Site radionuclide emissions, including fugitive emissions and radon, is 2E-5 mrem (2E-7 mSv) EDE, or 100,000 times smaller than the federal and state standard of 10 mrem/yr, to which the PNNL Site is in compliance

  11. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Bisping, Lynn E.

    2013-06-06

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions that result in the highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The report has been prepared in compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection Air Emissions. The dose to the PNNL Site MEI due to routine major and minor point source emissions in 2012 from PNNL Site sources is 9E-06 mrem (9E-08 mSv) EDE. The dose from fugitive emissions (i.e., unmonitored sources) is 1E-7 mrem (1E-9 mSv) EDE. The dose from radon emissions is 2E-6 mrem (2E-08 mSv) EDE. No nonroutine emissions occurred in 2012. The total radiological dose for 2012 to the MEI from all PNNL Site radionuclide emissions, including fugitive emissions and radon, is 1E-5 mrem (1E-7 mSv) EDE, or 100,000 times smaller than the federal and state standard of 10 mrem/yr, to which the PNNL Site is in compliance.

  12. National Emission Standards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... in-growth of Rn from the decay of Th in thorium 222 230 wastes would not exceed the ... RADON EMISSIONS FROM U AND Th SOURCES 238 232 In the past, material from Mound Applied ...

  13. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Edwards; KD Shields; MJ Sula; MY Ballinger

    1999-09-28

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP--US Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subpart H). In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the US Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (Pacific Northwest) on the Hanford Site. Two of the facilities evaluated, 325 Building Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, and 331 Building Life Sciences Laboratory met state and federal criteria for continuous sampling of airborne radionuclide emissions. One other building, the 3720 Environmental Sciences Laboratory, was recognized as being in transition with the potential for meeting the continuous sampling criteria.

  14. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Facility Radionuclide Emissions Units and Sampling Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, J. M.; Brown, Jason H.; Walker, Brian A.

    2012-04-01

    Battelle-Pacific Northwest Division operates numerous research and development (R and D) laboratories in Richland, WA, including those associated with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Hanford Site and PNNL Site that have the potential for radionuclide air emissions. The National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP 40 CFR 61, Subparts H and I) requires an assessment of all emission units that have the potential for radionuclide air emissions. Potential emissions are assessed annually by PNNL staff members. Sampling, monitoring, and other regulatory compliance requirements are designated based upon the potential-to-emit dose criteria found in the regulations. The purpose of this document is to describe the facility radionuclide air emission sampling program and provide current and historical facility emission unit system performance, operation, and design information. For sampled systems, a description of the buildings, exhaust units, control technologies, and sample extraction details is provided for each registered emission unit. Additionally, applicable stack sampler configuration drawings, figures, and photographs are provided. Deregistered emission unit details are provided as necessary for up to 5 years post closure.

  15. U.S. DOE 2004 LANL Radionuclide Air Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.W. Jacobson

    2005-08-12

    Amendments to the Clean Air Act, which added radionuclides to the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), went into effect in 1990. Specifically, a subpart (H) of 40 CFR 61 established an annual limit on the impact to the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides from U.S. Department of Energy facilities, such as the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). As part of the new NESHAP regulations, LANL must submit an annual report to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency headquarters and the regional office in Dallas by June 30. This report includes results of monitoring at LANL and the dose calculations for the calendar year 2004.

  16. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Bisping, Lynn E.

    2012-06-12

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions that result in the highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The report has been prepared in compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, Radiation ProtectionAir Emissions. The EDE to the PNNL Site MEI due to routine emissions in 2011 from PNNL Site sources was 1.7E 05 mrem (1.7E-7 mSv) EDE. No nonroutine emissions occurred in 2011. The total radiological dose for 2011 to the MEI from all PNNL Site radionuclide emissions was more than 10,000 times smaller than the federal and state standard of 10 mrem/yr, to which the PNNL Site is in compliance.

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: About Sandia: Environmental Responsibility:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Management: Environmental Programs Environmental Programs Air Quality Compliance Ecology Environmental Compliance Coordinators Facilities Energy Management Groundwater Monitoring Hazardous Waste Permitting and Compliance Environmental Life-Cycle Management Meteorological (MET) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Oil Storage Pollution Prevention Website Radiological National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) Safe Drinking Water Protection

  18. U.S. Department of Energy Report, 2005 LANL Radionuclide Air Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keith W. Jacobson, David P. Fuehne

    2006-09-01

    Amendments to the Clean Air Act, which added radionuclides to the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), went into effect in 1990. Specifically, a subpart (H) of 40 CFR 61 established an annual limit on the impact to the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides from U.S. Department of Energy facilities, such as the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). As part of the new NESHAP regulations, LANL must submit an annual report to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency headquarters and the regional office in Dallas by June 30. This report includes results of monitoring at LANL and the dose calculations for the calendar year 2006.

  19. G:NESHAP98.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Gamma Emitters 6 0.016 3.8 x 10 (c) -2 (a) Alpha emitters include thorium, uranium, and ... RADON EMISSIONS FROM U AND Th SOURCES 238 232 Material from Mound Applied Technologies was ...

  20. Microsoft Word - 2009_NESHAP_06152010.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge Available for a processing fee to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 Telephone: 865-576-8401 Fax: 865-576-5728 E-mail: reports@adonis.osti.gov National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions Calendar Year 2009 June 2010 Work Performed Under Contract No.

  1. LLNL NESHAPs project. 1992 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Surano, K.A.; Failor, R.A.; Biermann, A.H.; Berger, R.L.; Harrach, R.J.

    1993-05-01

    This report summarizes work conducted during FY 1992 for the Environmental Monitoring and Analysis Division of the Environmental Protection Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This document contains information regarding environmental monitoring of a wide variety of radioisotopes which are emitted to the atmosphere. These radioisotopes include transuranics, biomedical tracers, tritium, mixed fission products, and other radioisotopes used for general research and nuclear weapons research. Information regarding radionuclide air emissions for each of the 56 buildings at LLNL where radionuclides are used or activation products occur is given. Detailed information is included for all point source emissions from 43 LLNL site buildings. In addition, dose equivalents and dose assessment are evaluated. Reported annual releases are based on inventory data and unabated EPA potential release fractions for unmonitored sources, and on actual emission measurements for continuously monitored facilities.

  2. F:\GROUPS\ENVIROME\WP51DOC\NESHAP00\20NESHAP.PLY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2000 June 2001 June 2001 U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office Las Vegas, Nevada U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office Las Vegas, Nevada DOE/NV/11718--586 DOE/NV/11718--586 DISCLAIMER Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer,

  3. Reducing emissions to improve nuclear test detection | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Reducing emissions to improve nuclear test detection | National Nuclear Security ... Home NNSA Blog Reducing emissions to improve nuclear test detection Reducing emissions ...

  4. Ethiopia-National Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baseline Scenarios...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baseline Scenarios: Learning from Experiences in Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Name Ethiopia-National Greenhouse Gas Emissions...

  5. Nevada Test Site National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Grossman; Ronald Warren

    2008-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was operated as the nation's site for nuclear weapons testing. The release of man-made radionuclides from the NTS as a result of testing activities has been monitored since the first decade of atmospheric testing. After 1962, when nuclear tests were conducted only underground, the radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS was greatly reduced. After the 1992 moratorium on nuclear testing, radiation monitoring on the NTS focused on detecting airborne radionuclides which come from historically contaminated soils resuspended into the air (e.g., by winds) and tritium-contaminated soil moisture emitted to the air from soils through evapotranspiration. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This is the dose limit established for someone living off of the NTS from radionuclides emitted to air from the NTS. This limit does not include the radiation doses that members of the public may receive through the intake of radioactive particles unrelated to NTS activities, such as those that come from naturally occurring elements in the environment (e.g., naturally occurring radionuclides in soil or radon gas from the earth or natural building materials), or from other man-made sources (e.g., medical treatments). The NTS demonstrates compliance using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on the NTS in 2001 and has been the sole

  6. Microsoft Word - NESHAPs_rev0

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... National Climate Data Center (NCDC), 2009, http:lwf.ncdc.noaa.govoamppsearch.html. United States Census Bureau, Fact Finder web page (US Census Bureau), 2009, http:...

  7. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1999 Emission Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zohner, S.K.

    2000-05-30

    This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  8. Air emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: 1994 emissions report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    This report Presents the 1994 update of the Air Emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  9. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1998 Emissions Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. K. Zohner

    1999-10-01

    This report presents the 1998 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradiological emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  10. Microsoft Word - 2013_NESHAP_06.02.2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gov Front Cover: Digital elevation image of Yucca Flat. Craters are from historical underground tests of nuclear weapons. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions Calendar Year 2013 June 2014 Work Performed Under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office Prepared by: National Security Technologies, LLC P.O. Box 98521 Las Vegas, Nevada 89193-8521 DOE/NV/25946--2105 ii

  11. Quality assurance project plan for the radionuclide airborne emissions for the Plutonium Finishing Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristofzski, J.G.; Alison, D.

    1992-04-01

    The information provided in this document meets the quality assurance (QA) requirements for the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants'' (NESHAP) (EPA 1989a) radionuclide airborne emissions control program in accordance with the regulation's referenced stack monitoring method (i.e. Method 114) for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). At the Hanford Site, the operations personnel have primary responsibility for implementing the continuous radionuclide emission measurements in conformance with NESHAP. Continuous measurement is used to describe continuous sampling of the effluent stream withdrawn and subjected to radiochemical analysis, and monitoring of radionuclide particulate emissions for administrative control. This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) fully describes these PFP- implemented activities and the associated QA program as required by the NESHAP. The information is provided in the format specified in QAMS/005, Interim Guidelines and Specifications for Preparing Quality Assurance Project Plans (EPA 1983a). This QAPjP describes the QA program for only those activities that are the responsibility of the PFP: operation, calibration, and maintenance of the sampling systems. The QA requirements for laboratory services, data compilation, and data reporting are beyond the scope of this QAPjP.

  12. Quality assurance project plan for the radionuclide airborne emissions for the Plutonium Finishing Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristofzski, J.G.; Alison, D.

    1992-04-01

    The information provided in this document meets the quality assurance (QA) requirements for the ``National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants`` (NESHAP) (EPA 1989a) radionuclide airborne emissions control program in accordance with the regulation`s referenced stack monitoring method (i.e. Method 114) for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). At the Hanford Site, the operations personnel have primary responsibility for implementing the continuous radionuclide emission measurements in conformance with NESHAP. Continuous measurement is used to describe continuous sampling of the effluent stream withdrawn and subjected to radiochemical analysis, and monitoring of radionuclide particulate emissions for administrative control. This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) fully describes these PFP- implemented activities and the associated QA program as required by the NESHAP. The information is provided in the format specified in QAMS/005, Interim Guidelines and Specifications for Preparing Quality Assurance Project Plans (EPA 1983a). This QAPjP describes the QA program for only those activities that are the responsibility of the PFP: operation, calibration, and maintenance of the sampling systems. The QA requirements for laboratory services, data compilation, and data reporting are beyond the scope of this QAPjP.

  13. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, 1993 emissions report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report presents the 1993 update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of the Air Emission Inventory is to commence the preparation of the permit to operate application for the INEL, as required by the recently promulgated Title V regulations of the Clean Air Act. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL and provides emissions estimates for both mobile and stationary sources.

  14. Marine Sciences Laboratory Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. Matthew

    2015-05-04

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) has oversight and stewardship duties associated with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) located on Battelle Land – Sequim.This report is prepared to document compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities” and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, “Radiation Protection–Air Emissions.'' The EDE to the MSL MEI due to routine operations in 2014 was 9E-05 mrem (9E-07 mSv). No non-routine emissions occurred in 2014. The MSL is in compliance with the federal and state 10 mrem/yr standard.

  15. Marine Sciences Laboratory Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Ballinger, Marcel Y.

    2014-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) has oversight and stewardship duties associated with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) located on Battelle Land – Sequim (Sequim). This report is prepared to document compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, “National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities” and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, “Radiation Protection–Air Emissions.” The EDE to the Sequim MEI due to routine operations in 2013 was 5E-05 mrem (5E-07 mSv). No non-routine emissions occurred in 2013. The MSL is in compliance with the federal and state 10 mrem/yr standard.

  16. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: 1992 emissions report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stirrup, T.S.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents the 1992 Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Originally, this report was in response to the Environmental Oversight and Monitoring Agreement in 1989 between the State of Idaho and the Department of Energy Idaho Field Office, and a request from the Idaho Air Quality Bureau. The current purpose of the Air Emission Inventory is to provide the basis for the preparation of the INEL Permit-to-Operate (PTO) an Air Emission Source Application, as required by the recently promulgated Title V regulations of the Clean Air Act. This report includes emissions calculations from 1989 to 1992. The Air Emission Inventory System, an ORACLE-based database system, maintains the emissions inventory.

  17. Quality assurance program plan for radionuclide airborne emissions monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boom, R.J.

    1995-03-01

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan identifies quality assurance program requirements and addresses the various Westinghouse Hanford Company organizations and their particular responsibilities in regards to sample and data handling of airborne emissions. The Hanford Site radioactive airborne emissions requirements are defined in National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1991a). Reporting of the emissions to the US Department of Energy is performed in compliance with requirements of US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE-RL 1988). This Quality Assurance Program Plan is prepared in accordance with and to the requirements of QAMS-004/80, Guidelines and Specifications for Preparing Quality Assurance Program Plans (EPA 1983). Title 40 CFR Part 61, Appendix B, Method 114, Quality Assurance Methods (EPA 1991b) specifies the quality assurance requirements and that a program plan should be prepared to meet the requirements of this regulation. This Quality Assurance Program Plan identifies NESHAP responsibilities and how the Westinghouse Hanford Company Environmental, Safety, Health, and Quality Assurance Division will verify that the methods are properly implemented.

  18. Summary of radionuclide air emissions from Department of Energy facilities for CY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    Facilities owned or operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) handle and process radioactive materials in conjunction with their research, nuclear materials production, remediation, and waste disposal activities. During normal operations, some of these facilities have the potential to release small quantities of radionuclides to the environment. Radionuclide emissions to the atmosphere from DOE facilities are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the authority of Section 112 of the Clean Air Act. Subpart H of 40 CFR Part 61 of the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) sets standards for public exposure to airborne radioactive materials (other than radon) released by DOE facilities, DOE radon emissions are regulated by NESHAPs in Subparts Q and T. Subparts Q and T apply specifically to DOE storage and disposal facilities for radium-containing material. Airborne radionuclide emissions are also regulated by the Department of Energy under the authority provided by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, and the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977, as amended. This report summarizes air emissions subject to the EPA requirements and demonstrates that DOE facilities are in compliance with the required dose limits.

  19. 2006 LANL Radionuclide Air Emissions Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David P. Fuehne

    2007-06-30

    This report describes the impacts from emissions of radionuclides at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for calendar year 2006. This report fulfills the requirements established by the Radionuclide National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (Rad-NESHAP). This report is prepared by LANL's Rad-NESHAP compliance team, part of the Environmental Protection Division. The information in this report is required under the Clean Air Act and is being reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to an off-site member of the public was calculated using procedures specified by the EPA and described in this report. LANL's EDE was 0.47 mrem for 2006. The annual limit established by the EPA is 10 mrem per year. During calendar year 2006, LANL continuously monitored radionuclide emissions at 28 release points, or stacks. The Laboratory estimates emissions from an additional 58 release points using radionuclide usage source terms. Also, LANL uses a network of air samplers around the Laboratory perimeter to monitor ambient airborne levels of radionuclides. To provide data for dispersion modeling and dose assessment, LANL maintains and operates meteorological monitoring systems. From these measurement systems, a comprehensive evaluation is conducted to calculate the EDE for the Laboratory. The EDE is evaluated as any member of the public at any off-site location where there is a residence, school, business, or office. In 2006, this location was the Los Alamos Airport Terminal. The majority of this dose is due to ambient air sampling of plutonium emitted from 2006 clean-up activities at an environmental restoration site (73-002-99; ash pile). Doses reported to the EPA for the past 10 years are shown in Table E1.

  20. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants—Calendar Year 2010 INL Report for Radionuclides (2011)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Verdoorn; Tom Haney

    2011-06-01

    This report documents the calendar Year 2010 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, 'Protection of the Environment,' Part 61, 'National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,' Subpart H, 'National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.'

  1. Sequim Site Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Gervais, Todd L.

    2013-04-01

    This report is prepared to document compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities and ashington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection Air Emissions. This report meets the calendar year 2012 Sequim Site annual reporting requirement for its operations as a privately-owned facility as well as its federally-contracted status that began in October 2012. Compliance is indicated by comparing the estimated dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) with the 10 mrem/yr Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard. The MSL contains only sources classified as fugitive emissions. Despite the fact that the regulations are intended for application to point source emissions, fugitive emissions are included with regard to complying with the EPA standard. The dose to the Sequim Site MEI due to routine operations in 2012 was 9E-06 mrem (9E-08 mSv). No non-routine emissions occurred in 2012. The MSL is in compliance with the federal and state 10 mrem/yr standard.

  2. Microsoft Word - 2010_NESHAP_Draft Final_No Signature.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 June 2011 Work Performed Under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Prepared by: National Security Technologies, LLC P.O. Box 98521 Las Vegas, Nevada 89193-8521 DOE/NV/25946--1243 ii This page intentionally left blank National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions Calendar Year 2010 iii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2010 RADIOLOGICAL DOSE TO THE PUBLIC BELOW FEDERAL STANDARD The

  3. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants. Calendar Year 2012 INL Report for Radionuclides (2013)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verdoorn, Mark; Haney, Tom

    2013-06-01

    This report documents the calendar year 2011 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, ''Protection of the Environment,'' Part 61, ''National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,'' Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.'' The effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public was 4.58E-02 mrem per year, 0.46 percent of the 10 mrem standard.

  4. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants—Calendar Year 2011 INL Report for Radionuclides (2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Verdoorn; Tom Haney

    2012-06-01

    This report documents the calendar year 2011 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, 'Protection of the Environment,' Part 61, 'National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,' Subpart H, 'National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.' The effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public was 4.58E-02 mrem per year, 0.46 percent of the 10 mrem standard.

  5. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants. Calendar Year 2013 INL Report for Radionuclides [2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verdoorn, Mark; Haney, Tom

    2014-06-01

    This report documents the calendar year 2013 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, ''Protection of the Environment,'' Part 61, ''National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,'' Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.'' The effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public was 3.02 E-02 mrem per year, 0.30 percent of the 10 mrem standard.

  6. Low-Emission Development Strategies and National Appropriate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property. Low-Emission Development Strategies...

  7. 2010 Annual NESHAPs Radioactive Air Annual Meeting Hosted in conjunction with the 55th HPS Meeting June 29, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, J. M.; Vazquez, Gustavo A.; Anderson, Shauna V.

    2013-12-01

    This is a compilation of selected abstracts and presentations/posters from the 2010 Annual Health Physics Society (HPS) meeting held in Salt Lake City, UT and the presentations and information presented at the annual radioactive air NESHAP meeting held in conjunction with the HPS meeting. (CD-ROM)

  8. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Potential Impact Categories for Radiological Air Emission Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.; Barnett, J. M.

    2012-06-05

    In 2002, the EPA amended 40 CFR 61 Subpart H and 40 CFR 61 Appendix B Method 114 to include requirements from ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities for major emission points. Additionally, the WDOH amended the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247 Radiation protection-air emissions to include ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 requirements for major and minor emission points when new permitting actions are approved. A result of the amended regulations is the requirement to prepare a written technical basis for the radiological air emission sampling and monitoring program. A key component of the technical basis is the Potential Impact Category (PIC) assigned to an emission point. This paper discusses the PIC assignments for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Integrated Laboratory emission units; this revision includes five PIC categories.

  9. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Technical Services

    2007-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was operated as the nation's site for nuclear weapons testing. The release of man-made radionuclides from the NTS as a result of testing activities has been monitored since the first decade of atmospheric testing. After 1962, when nuclear tests were conducted only underground, the radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS was greatly reduced. After the 1992 moratorium on nuclear testing, radiation monitoring on the NTS focused on detecting airborne radionuclides which come from historically-contaminated soils resuspended into the air (e.g., by winds) and tritium-contaminated soil moisture emitted to the air from soils through evapotranspiration.

  10. Savannah River Site radionuclide air emissions annual report for national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, I.K.

    1993-12-31

    The radiological air emission sources at the SRS have been divided into three categories, Point, Grouped and Non-Point, for this report. Point sources, analyzed individually, are listed with a listing of the control devices, and the control device efficiency. The sources listed have been grouped together either for security reasons or where individual samples are composited for analytical purposes. For grouped sources the listed control devices may not be on all sources within a group. Point sources that did not have continuous effluent monitoring/sampling in 1993 are noted. The emissions from these sources was determined from Health Protection smear data, facility radionuclide content or other calculational methods, including process knowledge, utilizing existing analytical data. This report also contain sections on facility descriptions, dose assessment, and supplemental information.

  11. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. F. Grossman

    2000-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the US Department of Energy's Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) as the site for nuclear weapons testing, now limited to readiness activities and experiments in support of the national Stockpile Stewardship Management Program. It is located in Nye County, Nevada, with the southeast corner about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The NTS covers about 3,561 km{sup 2} (1,375 mi{sup 2}), an area larger than Rhode Island. Its size is about 46 to 56 km (28 to 35 mi) east to west and from 64 to 88 km (40 to 55 mi) north to south. The NTS is surrounded, except on the south side, by public exclusion areas (Nellis Air Force Range [NAFR]) that provide another 24 to 104 km (15 to 65 mi) between the NTS and public lands. The NTS is characterized by desert valley and Great Basin mountain topography, with a climate, flora, and fauna typical of the southwest deserts. Population density within 150 km (93 mi) of the NTS is only about 0.2 persons per square kilometer, excluding the Las Vegas area. Restricted access, low population density in the surrounding area, and extended wind transport times are advantageous factors for the activities conducted at the NTS. Surface waters are scarce on the NTS and there is great depth to slow-moving groundwater.

  12. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Submittal - 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart Black; Yvonne Townsend

    1999-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) as the site for nuclear weapons testing, now limited to readiness activities and experiments in support of the national Stockpile Stewardship Management Program. It is located in Nye County, Nevada, with the southeast corner about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The NTS covers about 3,500 km2 (1,350 mi2), an area larger than Rhode Island. Its size is about 46 to 56 km (28 to 35 mi) east to west and from 64 to 88 km (40 to 55 mi)north to south. The NTS is surrounded, except on the south side, by public exclusion areas (Nellis Air Force Range) that provide another 24 to 104 km (15 to 65 mi) between the NTS and public lands. The NTS is characterized by desert valley and Great Basin mountain topography, with a climate, flora, and fauna typical of the southwest deserts. Surface waters are scarce on the NTS and there is great depth to slow-moving groundwater.

  13. Construction and Operation of a Tritium Extraction Facility at...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... NESHAP National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants NFPA National Fire ...EIS-0271 Acronyms and Abbreviations March 1999 xii O 3 Ozone OSHA Occupational Safety and ...

  14. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, June 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert F. Grossman

    2005-06-01

    sections present a general description of the present sources on the NTS and at the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). At the NLVF, parts of Building A-1 were contaminated with tritium by a previous contractor in 1995. The incident involved the release of tritium as HTO. This unusual occurrence led to a very small potential exposure to an offsite person. The HTO emission has continued at lower levels (probably re-emanation from building materials), even after cleanup activities in November and December 1997. A description of the incident and the potential effective dose equivalent (EDE) for offsite exposure are set forth in Appendix A.

  15. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. E. Townsend

    2002-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) as the site for nuclear weapons testing, now limited to readiness activities, experiments in support of the national Stockpile Stewardship Program, and the activities listed below. Located in Nye County, Nevada, the site's southeast corner is about 88 km (55 mi) northwest of the major population center, Las Vegas, Nevada. The NTS covers about 3,561 km2 (1,375 mi2), an area larger than Rhode Island. Its size is 46 to 56 km (28 to 35 mi) east to west and from 64 to 88 km (40 to 55 mi) north to south. The NTS is surrounded, except on the south side, by public exclusion areas (Nellis Air Force Range [NAFR]) that provide another 24 to 104 km (15 to 65 mi) between the NTS and public lands (Figure 1.0). The NTS is characterized by desert valley and Great Basin mountain topography, with a climate, flora, and fauna typical of the southwest deserts. Population density within 150 km (93 mi) of the NTS is only about 0.2 persons per square kilometer, excluding the Las Vegas area. Restricted access, low population density in the surrounding area, and extended wind transport times are advantageous factors for the activities conducted at the NTS. Surface waters are scarce on the NTS, and slow-moving groundwater is present hundreds to thousands of feet below the land surface. The sources of radionuclides include current and previous activities conducted on the NTS (Figure 2.0). The NTS was the primary location for testing of nuclear explosives in the Continental U.S. between 1951 and 1992. Historical testing above or at ground surface has included (1) atmospheric testing in the 1950s and early 1960s, (2) earth-cratering experiments, and (3) open-air nuclear reactor and rocket engine testing. Since the mid-1950s, testing of nuclear explosive devices has occurred underground in drilled vertical holes or in mined tunnels (DOE 1996a

  16. Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2007-09-28

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department, Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. Modification Number 1 to this Title V Operating Permit was issued on June 15, 2006 (Permit No P-100M1) and includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semi-annual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semi-annual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2006. LANL's 2006 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

  17. Emissions inventory report summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for calendar year 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2009-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory’s potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department/Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This permit was modified and reissued on July 16, 2007. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100M2) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semiannual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semiannual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2008. LANL’s 2008 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

  18. Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Environmental Stewardship Group

    2010-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department/Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This permit was modified and reissued on July 16, 2007. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100M2) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semiannual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semiannual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2009. LANL's 2009 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

  19. Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Stockton

    2005-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), ''Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements''. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department, Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semi-annual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semi-annual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2004. LANL's 2004 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

  20. Inventory of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Kora, Angela R.; Shankle, Steve A.; Fowler, Kimberly M.

    2009-06-29

    The Carbon Management Strategic Initiative (CMSI) is a lab-wide initiative to position the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as a leader in science, technology and policy analysis required to understand, mitigate and adapt to global climate change as a nation. As part of an effort to walk the talk in the field of carbon management, PNNL conducted its first carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions inventory for the 2007 calendar year. The goal of this preliminary inventory is to provide PNNL staff and management with a sense for the relative impact different activities at PNNL have on the labs total carbon footprint.

  1. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Release Commercial Aircraft Propulsion and Energy Systems Research: Reducing Global Carbon Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine releases the Commercial Aircraft Propulsion and Energy Systems Research: Reducing Global Carbon Emissions report, which focuses on large (single- and twin-aisle) planes that transport more than 100 people. These aircraft account for more than 90% of greenhouse gas emissions from all commercial aircraft.

  2. Neutron time-of-flight and emission time diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, T. J.; Jimerson, J. L.; Berggren, R. R.; Faulkner, J. R.; Oertel, J. A.; Walsh, P. J.

    2001-01-01

    Current plans call for a system of current mode neutron detectors for the National Ignition Facility for extending the range of neutron yields below that of the neutron activation system, for ion-temperature measurements over a wide yield range, and for determining the average neutron emission time. The system will need to operate over a yield range of 10{sup 6} for the lowest-yield experiments to 10{sup 19} for high-yield ignited targets. The requirements will be satisfied using several detectors located at different distances from the target. This article presents a conceptual design for the NIF nToF system.

  3. Program management assessment of Federal Facility Compliance Agreement regarding CAA-40 C.F.R. Part 61, Subpart H at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    An assessment of Los Alamos National Laboratory`s management system related to facility compliance with an element of the Clean Air Act was performed under contract by a team from Northern Arizona University. More specifically, a Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (FFCA) was established in 1996 to bring the Laboratory into compliance with emissions standards of radionuclides, commonly referred to as Rad/NESHAP. In the fall of 1996, the four-person team of experienced environmental managers evaluated the adequacy of relevant management systems to implement the FFCA provisions. The assessment process utilized multiple procedures including document review, personnel interviews and re-interviews, and facility observations. The management system assessment was completed with a meeting among team members, Laboratory officials and others on November 1, 1996 and preparation of an assessment report.

  4. Integrated Evaluation of Cost, Emissions, and Resource Potential for Algal Biofuels at the National Scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Ryan; Fishman, Daniel; Frank, Edward D.; Johnson, Michael C.; Jones, Susanne B.; Kinchin, Christopher; Skaggs, Richard; Venteris, Erik R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2014-04-21

    Costs, emissions, and resource availability were modeled for the production of 5 billion gallons yr-1 (5 BGY) of renewable diesel in the United States from Chlorella biomass by hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). The HTL model utilized data from a continuous 1-L reactor including catalytic hydrothermal gasification of the aqueous phase, and catalytic hydrotreatment of the HTL oil. A biophysical algae growth model coupled with weather and pond simulations predicted biomass productivity from experimental growth parameters, allowing site-by-site and temporal prediction of biomass production. The 5 BGY scale required geographically and climatically distributed sites. Even though screening down to 5 BGY significantly reduced spatial and temporal variability, site-to-site, season-to-season, and inter-annual variations in productivity affected economic and environmental performance. Performance metrics based on annual average or peak productivity were inadequate; temporally and spatially explicit computations allowed more rigorous analysis of these dynamic systems. For example, 3-season operation with a winter shutdown was favored to avoid high greenhouse gas emissions, and economic performance was harmed by underutilized equipment during slow-growth periods. Thus, analysis of algal biofuel pathways must combine spatiotemporal resource assessment, economic analysis, and environmental analysis integrated over many sites when assessing national scale performance.

  5. 300 AREA PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY FACILITY RADIONUCLIDE EMISSION POINTS AND SAMPLING SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barfuss, Brad C.; Barnett, J. M.; Harbinson, L Jill

    2006-08-28

    Radionuclide emission points for 300 Area and Battelle Private facilities are presented herein. The sampling systems and associated emission specifics are detailed.

  6. RADIOLOGICAL EMISSIONS AND ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING FOR BROOKHAV EN NATIONAL LABORATORY, 1947 - 1961.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MEINHOLD,C.B.; MEINHOLD,A.F.

    2001-05-30

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has monitored its releases to the environment since its inception in 1947. From 1962 to 1966 and from 1971 to the present, annual reports,were published that recorded the emissions and releases to the environment from Laboratory operations. In 1998, a report was written to summarize the environmental data for the years 1967 to 1970. One of the purposes of the current report is to complete BNL's environmental history by covering the period from 1948 through 1961. The activities in 1947 were primarily organizational and there is no information on the use of radiation at the Laboratory before 1948. An additional objective of this report is to provide environmental data to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). The report does not provide an estimate of the doses associated with BNL operations. The report is comprised of two parts. The first part is a summary of emissions, releases, and environmental monitoring information including a discussion of the uncertainties in these data. Part two contains the detailed information on the approach taken to estimate the releases from the fuel cartridge failures at the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR). A series of appendices present more detailed information on these events in tabular form. The approach in this report is to be reasonable, conservative, (pessimistic), and transparent in estimating releases from fuel cartridge ruptures. Clearly, reactor stack monitoring records and more extensive records would have greatly improved this effort, but in accordance with Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) Appendix 0230 Annex C-9, many of the detailed records from this time were not retained.

  7. NETL-Developed Process for Capturing CO2 Emissions Wins National Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A process developed by researchers at the Office of Fossil Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory that improves the capture of carbon dioxide emissions from power plants while reducing the cost has been selected to receive a 2011 Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer.

  8. Emission

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emission intensities and line ratios from a fast neutral helium beam J-W. Ahn a͒ Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA D. Craig, b͒ G. Fiksel, and D. J. Den Hartog Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA and Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA J. K. Anderson Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA M. G.

  9. Projections of air toxic emissions from coal-fired utility combustion: Input for hazardous air pollutant regulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szpunar, C.B.

    1993-08-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is required by the 1990 CAAA to promulgate rules for all ``major`` sources of any of these HAPs. According to the HAPs section of the new Title III, any stationary source emitting 10 tons per year (TPY) of one HAP or 25 TPY of a combination of HAPs will be considered and designated a major source. In contrast to the original National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), which were designed to protect public health to ``an ample margin of safety,`` the new Title III, in its first phase, will regulate by industrial category those sources emitting HAPs in excess of the 10/25-TPY threshold levels, regardless of health risks. The trace elements normally associated with coal mineral matter and the various compounds formed during coal combustion have the potential to produce hazardous air toxic emissions from coal-fired electric utilities. Under Title III, the EPA is required to perform certain studies, prior to any regulation of electric utilities; these studies are currently underway. Also, the US Department of Energy (DOE) maintains a vested interest in addressing those energy policy questions affecting electric utility generation, coal mining, and steel producing critical to this country`s economic well-being, where balancing the costs to the producers and users of energy with the benefits of environmental protection to the workers and the general populace remains of significant concern.

  10. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LCA can help determine environmental burdens from "cradle to grave" and facilitate more consistent comparisons of energy technologies. Figure 1. Generalized life cycle stages for energy technologies Source: Sathaye et al. (2011) Life cycle GHG emissions from renewable electricity generation technologies are generally less than those from fossil fuel-based technologies, based on evidence assembled by this project. Further, the proportion of GHG emissions from each life cycle stage

  11. Hanford Site radionuclide national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants registered stack source assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, W.E.; Barnett, J.M.

    1994-07-01

    On February 3, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Division of the US Environmental Protection Agency,, Region 10. The Compliance Order requires the Richland Operations Office to evaluate all radionuclide emission points at the Hanford Site . The evaluation also determined if the effective dose equivalent from any of these stack emissions exceeded 0.1 mrem/yr, which will require the stack to have continuous monitoring. The result of this assessment identified a total of 16 stacks as having potential emissions that,would cause an effective dose equivalent greater than 0.1 mrem/yr.

  12. Methodology and emission scenarios employed in the development of the National Energy Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, R.E.

    1992-09-01

    This paper describes the steps taken to model the National Energy Strategy (NES). It provides an overview of the NES process including the models used for the project. The National Energy Strategy Environmental Analysis Model (NESEAM), which was used in analyzing environmental impacts, is discussed. The structure of NESEAM, as well as results and analyses are presented.

  13. Methodology and emission scenarios employed in the development of the National Energy Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the steps taken to model the National Energy Strategy (NES). It provides an overview of the NES process including the models used for the project. The National Energy Strategy Environmental Analysis Model (NESEAM), which was used in analyzing environmental impacts, is discussed. The structure of NESEAM, as well as results and analyses are presented.

  14. Summary of radionuclide air emissions from Department of Energy facilities for CY 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    DOE facilities submit annual reports to their respective EPA regional offices and to EPA headquarters describing their activities during the previous year, including estimates of atmospheric radionuclide emissions and the resulting dose to the maximally exposed member of the public. This report summarizes the information submitted to EPA by DOE facilities in their air emission reports for calendar year 1992. An overview of DOE facility compliance with the NESHAPs Subpart H dose standard is provided. In addition to the required compliance information, supplemental information on air emissions is discussed.

  15. Potential Emissions of Tritium in Air from Wells on the Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, R.

    2012-10-08

    This slide-show discusses the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and tritium in the groundwater. It describes the wells and boreholes and potential airflow from these sources. Monitoring of selected wells is discussed and preliminary results are presented.

  16. Estimates of global, regional, and national annual CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement production, and gas flaring: 1950--1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boden, T.A.; Marland, G.; Andres, R.J.

    1995-12-01

    This document describes the compilation, content, and format of the most comprehensive C0{sub 2}-emissions database currently available. The database includes global, regional, and national annual estimates of C0{sub 2} emissions resulting from fossil-fuel burning, cement manufacturing, and gas flaring in oil fields for 1950--92 as well as the energy production, consumption, and trade data used for these estimates. The methods of Marland and Rotty (1983) are used to calculate these emission estimates. For the first time, the methods and data used to calculate CO, emissions from gas flaring are presented. This C0{sub 2}-emissions database is useful for carbon-cycle research, provides estimates of the rate at which fossil-fuel combustion has released C0{sub 2} to the atmosphere, and offers baseline estimates for those countries compiling 1990 C0{sub 2}-emissions inventories.

  17. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Major Sources: Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers; Guidance for Calculating Emission Credits Resulting from Implementation of Energy Conservation Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, Daryl; Papar, Riyaz; Wright, Dr. Anthony

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for developing a consistent approach to documenting efficiency credits generated from energy conservation measures in the Implementation Plan for boilers covered by the Boiler MACT rule (i.e., subpart DDDDD of CFR part 63). This document divides Boiler System conservation opportunities into four functional areas: 1) the boiler itself, 2) the condensate recovery system, 3) the distribution system, and 4) the end uses of the steam. This document provides technical information for documenting emissions credits proposed in the Implementation Plan for functional areas 2) though 4). This document does not include efficiency improvements related to the Boiler tune-ups.

  18. Emissions from Medium-Duty Conventional and Diesel-Electric Hybrid Vehicles; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ragatz, A.; Duran, A.; Thornton, M.; Walkowicz, K.

    2014-04-02

    This presentation discusses the results of emissions testing for medium-duty conventional and diesel-electric hybrid vehicles. Testing was based on a field evaluation approach that utilized the Fleet DNA drive cycle database and NREL’s Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory chassis dynamometer. Vehicles tested included parcel delivery (Class 6 step vans), beverage delivery (Class 8 tractors), and parcel delivery (Class 7 box trucks) vehicles, all with intended service class medium/heavy heavy-duty diesel (MHDD).
    Results for fuel economy and tailpipe NOx emissions included: diesel hybrid electric vehicles showed an average fuel economy advantage on identified test cycles: Class 6 Step Vans: 26%; Class 7 Box Trucks: 24.7%; Class 8 Tractors: 17.3%. Vehicle miles traveled is an important factor in determining total petroleum and CO2 displacement. Higher NOx emissions were observed over some test cycles: highly drive cycle dependent; engine-out differences may result from different engine operating point; and selective catalyst reduction temperature may play a role, but does not explain the whole story.

  19. Air Emission Inventory for the INEEL -- 1999 Emission Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zohner, Steven K

    2000-05-01

    This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  20. Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with Comparisons to Other Source Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: National Environmental Respiratory Center

  1. Modeling of Lean Exhaust Emissions Control Systems | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lean Exhaust Emissions Control Systems Modeling of Lean Exhaust Emissions Control Systems 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: National Renewable Energy Laboratory ...

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Mowers Help National Park Cut

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Emissions Propane Mowers Help National Park Cut Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Mowers Help National Park Cut Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Mowers Help National Park Cut Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Mowers Help National Park Cut Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Mowers Help National Park Cut Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative

  3. Greenhouse Gas Emission Trends and Projections in Europe 2009...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Liechtenstein, Poland and Turkey provided updated information on emission projections and national programmes in 2009." References "Greenhouse Gas Emission Trends and...

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Emissions Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emissions Modeling: GREET Life Cycle Analysis Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Emissions Modeling: GREET Life Cycle Analysis Presentation given by Argonne National ...

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Emissions Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emissions Modeling: GREET Life Cycle Analysis Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Emissions Modeling: GREET Life Cycle Analysis Presentation given by Argonne National ...

  6. Air Monitoring of Emissions from the Fukushima Daiichi Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNaughton, Michael; Allen, Shannon P.; Archuleta, Debra C.; Brock, Burgandy; Coronado, Melissa A.; Dewart, Jean M.; Eisele, William F. Jr.; Fuehne, David P.; Gadd, Milan S.; Green, Andrew A.; Lujan, Joan J.; MacDonell, Carolyn; Whicker, Jeffrey J.

    2012-06-12

    In response to the disasters in Japan on March 11, 2011, and the subsequent emissions from Fukushima-Daiichi, we monitored the air near Los Alamos using four air-monitoring systems: the standard AIRNET samplers, the standard rad-NESHAP samplers, the NEWNET system, and high-volume air samplers. Each of these systems has advantages and disadvantages. In combination, they provide a comprehensive set of measurements of airborne radionuclides near Los Alamos during the weeks following March 11. We report air-monitoring measurements of the fission products released from the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear-power-plant accident in 2011. Clear gamma-spectrometry peaks were observed from Cs-134, Cs-136, Cs-137, I-131, I132, Te-132, and Te-129m. These data, together with measurements of other radionuclides, are adequate for an assessment and assure us that radionuclides from Fukushima Daiichi did not present a threat to human health at or near Los Alamos. The data demonstrate the capabilities of the Los Alamos air-monitoring systems.

  7. Microsoft Word - 03NESHAP-FINAL.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Standards Hazardous Air Pollutants DOE/NV/11718--929 June 2004 Calendar Year 2003 Prepared by: Bechtel Nevada Post Office Box 98521 Las Vegas, NV 89193-8521 for DISCLAIMER Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government or any agency thereof or its contractors or subcontractors. This report has been reproduced

  8. Microsoft Word - 2008 NESHAP_FINAL.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161-0002 Telephone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 E-mail: orders@ntis.gov Online ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.aspx Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge Available for a processing fee to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 Telephone: 865.576.8401 Fax: 865.576.5728 E-mail:

  9. Microsoft Word - 2008 NESHAP_FINAL.docx

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... 1179 Fairview Drive, Suite 201, Carson City, NV 89701-5405 Bureau Chief, Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Air Pollution Control, 901 South Stewart St. ...

  10. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Major Sources: Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers; Guidance for Calculating Efficiency Credits Resulting from Implementation of Energy Conservation Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, Daryl; Papar, Riyaz; Wright, Dr. Anthony

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for developing a consistent approach to documenting efficiency credits generated from energy conservation measures in the Implementation Plan for boilers covered by the Boiler MACT rule (i.e., subpart DDDDD of CFR part 63). This document divides Boiler System conservation opportunities into four functional areas: 1) the boiler itself, 2) the condensate recovery system, 3) the distribution system, and 4) the end uses of the steam. This document provides technical information for documenting emissions credits proposed in the Implementation Plan for functional areas 2) though 4). This document does not include efficiency improvements related to the Boiler tune-ups.

  11. Finalize Historic National Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gases...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    greenhouse gas emissions and improve fuel economy. EPA is finalizing the first-ever national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions standards under the Clean Air Act References...

  12. Applicability issues and compliance strategies for the proposed oil and gas industry hazardous air pollutant standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tandon, N.; Winborn, K.A.; Grygar, W.W. II

    1999-07-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) has targeted oil and natural gas transmission and storage facilities located across the United States for regulation under the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) program (proposed in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 63 [40 CFR 63], Subparts HH and HHH). The proposed NESHAP were published in the February 6, 1998 Federal Register and are expected to be promulgated in May 1999. These rules are intended to reduce Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP) emitted from oil and gas facilities. It is expected that these rules will require more than 400 major sources and more than 500 non-major sources (also referred to as area sources) to meet maximum achievable control technology (MACT) standards defined in the NESHAP. The rules would regulate HAP emission from glycol dehydration units, storage vessels and various fugitive leak sources. This technical paper addresses the applicability issues and compliance strategies related to the proposed NESHAP. The applicability criteria for both rules differ from those promulgated for other source categories under 40 CFR 63. For example, individual unit throughput and/or HAP emission thresholds may exempt specific units from the MACT standards in the NESHAP. The proposed Subpart HH would apply not only to major sources, but also to triethylene glycol (TEC) dehydration units at area sources located in urban areas. For both proposed NESHAP all 199 HAP must be considered for the major source determinations, but only 15 specific HAP are targeted for control under the proposed standards. An overview of the HAP control requirements, exemption criteria, as well as initial and continued compliance determination strategies are presented. Several industry examples are included to assist industry develop compliance strategies.

  13. 2008 LANL radionuclide air emissions report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuehne, David P.

    2009-06-01

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2008. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

  14. 2009 LANL radionuclide air emissions report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuehne, David P.

    2010-06-01

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2009. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

  15. 2010 LANL radionuclide air emissions report /

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuehne, David P.

    2011-06-01

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2010. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

  16. Air Emission, Liquid Effluent Inventory and Reporting

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-08-18

    The IES maintains an inventory of radiological air and liquid effluents released to the atmosphere. The IES utilizes the official stack numbers. Data may be entered by generators for any monitoring time period. Waste volumes released as well as their radiological constituents are tracked. The IES provides data to produce a report for NESHAPS as well as several administrative action/anomaly reports. These reports flag unusual occurences (releases) that are above normal range releases.

  17. Alamos National Laboratory] 71; ANISOTROPY; CHERENKOV COUNTERS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    National Laboratory 71; ANISOTROPY; CHERENKOV COUNTERS; COSMIC RADIATION; EMISSION; ENERGY; MODULATION; PHYSICS; TIME DEPENDENCE; WATER The Milagro gamma-ray observatory is a...

  18. Environmental Protection | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Protection Argonne's environmental stewardship leverages our R&D programs to help reduce our own electricity use, water consumption and environmental emissions. Environment Argonne National Laboratory is helping our nation build an economy based on renewable energy, a reduced carbon footprint and freedom from foreign oil. We continually monitor our energy use and emissions to minimize our environmental impact and improve our day-to-day operations. Our environmental stewardship

  19. Cleantech: Innovative Lab Partnership Reduces Emissions from Coal

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Learn how the National Energy Technology Laboratory is working to reduce the emission of pollutants from existing coal-fired power plants.

  20. Automated Vehicle Regulation: An Energy and Emissions Perspective...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy and Emissions Perspective Aaron Levine, Esq. Legal and Regulatory Analyst May 18, 2016 Automated Vehicle Policy ... Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 2015. ...

  1. Integrated Evaluation of Cost, Emissions, and Resource Potential...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Integrated Evaluation of Cost, Emissions, and Resource Potential for Algal Biofuels at the National Scale Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Integrated Evaluation of Cost, ...

  2. Survey of Emissions Models for Distributed Combined Heat and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In this 2007 document, Integrated Planning Model (IPM), Average Displaced Emissions Rate ... National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) models are addressed. surveyofemissionsmodels...

  3. New analyses reveal higher Four Corners methane emissions than...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environment Department's San Juan monitoring site, close to two coal-fired power plants. Los Alamos National Laboratory equipment measuring Four Corners area power plant emissions. ...

  4. Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies (EC...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (EC-LEDS): Distributed Generation AgencyCompany Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Topics: Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource...

  5. sandia national labs | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    sandia national labs

  6. Brookhaven National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

  7. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3. Methane Emissions 3.1. Total emissions The major sources of U.S. methane emissions are energy production, distribution, and use; agriculture; and waste management (Figure 17). U.S. methane emissions in 2009 totaled 731 MMTCO2e, 0.9 percent higher than the 2008 total of 724 MMTCO2e (Table 17). Methane emissions declined steadily from 1990 to 2001, as emissions from coal mining and landfills fell, then rose from 2002 to 2009 as a result of moderate increases in emissions related to energy,

  8. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Nitrous Oxide Emissions

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4. Nitrous Oxide Emissions 4.1 Total emissions U.S. nitrous oxide emissions in 2009 were 4 MMTCO2e (1.7 percent) below their 2008 total (Table 22). Sources of U.S. nitrous oxide emissions include agriculture, energy use, industrial processes, and waste management (Figure 22). The largest source is agriculture (73 percent), and the majority of agricultural emissions result from nitrogen fertilization of agricultural soils (87 percent of the agriculture total) and management of animal waste (13

  9. The National Renewable

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Alternative Fuels Utilization Program, which is widely known for its alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) emissions information, is also doing much to bring better alternative fuel vehicles to the field. Many of the AFVs of tomor- row will include components developed through NREL's research, which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Most of NREL's projects involve ethanol, methanol, natural gas, biodiesel, and propane, but researchers are

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho National Laboratory Dual-Fuel Buses

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Reduce Operating Costs and Emissions Idaho National Laboratory Dual-Fuel Buses Reduce Operating Costs and Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho National Laboratory Dual-Fuel Buses Reduce Operating Costs and Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho National Laboratory Dual-Fuel Buses Reduce Operating Costs and Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho National Laboratory Dual-Fuel Buses Reduce Operating

  11. Determination of a cost-effective air pollution control technology for the control of VOC and HAP emissions from a steroids processing plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamel, T.M.

    1997-12-31

    A steroids processing plant located in northeastern Puerto Rico emits a combined average of 342 lb/hr of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from various process operations. The approach that this facility used to implement maximum achievable control technology (MACT) may assist others who must contend with MACT for pharmaceutical or related manufacturing facilities. Federal air regulations define MACT standards for stationary sources emitting any of 189 HAPs. The MACT standards detailed in the NESHAPs are characterized by industry and type of emission control system or technology. It is anticipated that the standard will require HAP reductions of approximately 95%. The steroid plant`s emissions include the following pollutant loadings: VOC/HAP Emission Rate (lb/hr): Methanol 92.0; Acetone 35.0; Methylene chloride 126.0; Chloroform 25.0; Ethyl acetate 56.0; Tetrahydrofuran 5.00; and 1,4-Dioxane 3.00. The facility`s existing carbon adsorption control system was nearing the end of its useful life, and the operators sought to install an air pollution control system capable of meeting MACT requirements for the pharmaceutical industry. Several stand-alone and hybrid control technologies were considered for replacement of the carbon adsorption system at the facility. This paper examines the following technologies: carbon adsorption, membrane separation, thermal oxidation, membrane separation-carbon adsorption, and condensation-carbon adsorption. Each control technology is described; the advantages and disadvantages of utilizing each technology for the steroid processing plant are examined; and capital and operating costs associated with the implementation of each technology are presented. The rationale for the technology ultimately chosen to control VOC and HAP emissions is presented.

  12. National Competitiveness

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Competition National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition The National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition inspired nearly 300 university teams across the country to create new businesses to commercialize promising energy technologies developed at U.S. universities and the National Laboratories. After pitching their business plans to panels of judges at the regional semifinals and finals, six teams advanced to the national competition for a chance to compete in the popular vote and a grand

  13. Argonne National Laboratory Launches Bioenergy Assessment Tools |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Argonne National Laboratory Launches Bioenergy Assessment Tools Argonne National Laboratory Launches Bioenergy Assessment Tools September 30, 2013 - 4:00pm Addthis A researcher loads a biomass sample into spinning ring cup. Argonne National Laboratory has launched two online tools that assess the resource consumption and greenhouse gas emissions associated with biofuel production. | Photo courtesy of National Renewable Energy Laboratory A researcher loads a biomass

  14. US Department of Energy - Office of FreedomCar and Vehicle Technologies and US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Inter-Agency Agreement Research on "The Analysis of Genotoxic Activities of Exhaust Emissions from Mobile Natural Gas, Diesel, and Spark-Ignition Engines"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William E. Wallace

    2006-09-30

    The US Department of Energy-Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (now the DOE-Office of FreedomCar and Vehicle Technologies) signed an Interagency Agreement (IAA) with National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), No.01-15 DOE, 9/4/01, for 'The analysis of genotoxic activities of exhaust emissions from mobile natural gas, diesel, and spark-ignition engines'; subsequently modified on 3/27/02 (DOE IAG No.01-15-02M1); subsequently modified 9/02/03 (IAA Mod No. 01-15-03M1), as 'The analysis of genotoxic activities of exhaust emissions from mobile internal combustion engines: identification of engine design and operational parameters controlling exhaust genotoxicity'. The DOE Award/Contract number was DE-AI26-01CH11089. The IAA ended 9/30/06. This is the final summary technical report of National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health research performed with the US Department of Energy-Office of FreedomCar and Vehicle Technologies under that IAA: (A) NIOSH participation was requested by the DOE to provide in vitro genotoxicity assays of the organic solvent extracts of exhaust emissions from a suite of in-use diesel or spark-ignition vehicles; (B) research also was directed to develop and apply genotoxicity assays to the particulate phase of diesel exhaust, exploiting the NIOSH finding of genotoxicity expression by diesel exhaust particulate matter dispersed into the primary components of the surfactant coating the surface of the deep lung; (C) from the surfactant-dispersed DPM genotoxicity findings, the need for direct collection of DPM aerosols into surfactant for bioassay was recognized, and design and developmental testing of such samplers was initiated.

  15. Emissions trading - time to get serious

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitelli, A.

    2007-11-15

    The Kyoto Protocol's five year compliance period begins in 2008. Industrialized nations around the world have pledged to cut carbon emissions, but the job seems to get harder, not easier, as 2008 approaches. Can market mechanisms make the crucial difference? The article discloses recent initiatives and developments worldwide. It concludes that it is clear that the market is maintaining its central role in fighting climate change and that bringing emissions trading to developing countries and to the US can only reinforce that role.

  16. Diesel Emission Control Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reviews regulatory requirements and technology approaches for diesel emission control for heavy and light duty applications

  17. A computational study of x-ray emission from high-Z x-ray sources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    study of x-ray emission from high-Z x-ray sources on the National Ignition Facility laser Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A computational study of x-ray emission...

  18. Radionuclide air emissions report for the Hanford Site, calendar year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diediker, L.P.; Johnson, A.R.; Rhoads, K.; Klages, D.L.; Soldat, J.K.; Rokkan, D.J.

    1993-06-01

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1992 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to an member of the public. The report has been prepared and will be submitted in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, ``National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,`` Subpart H, ``National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.``

  19. Radionuclide air emissions report for the Hanford site, Calendar year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleckler, B.P.; Diediker, L.P.; Jette, S.J.; Rhoads, K.; Soldat, S.K.

    1995-06-01

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1994, and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed member of the public, referred to as the ``MEI.`` The report has been prepared and will be submitted in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, ``National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,`` Subpart H, ``National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.``

  20. Consent Order, Lawrence Livermore National National Security...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Lawrence Livermore National National Security, LLC - WCO-2010-01 Consent Order, Lawrence Livermore National National Security, LLC - WCO-2010-01 October 29, 2010 Issued to Lawrence ...

  1. Microsoft Word - NESHAP-Final- with cover.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... (grouping of meteorological data) Th thorium TRU transuranic (nuclides with atomic ... of radon-222 ( 222 Rn) from the decay of thorium-230 ( 230 Th) in thorium wastes would not ...

  2. Microsoft Word - 2007 NESHAP Final with Signature page.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2005 FOIA ANNUAL REPORT.doc Microsoft Word - 2005 FOIA ANNUAL REPORT.doc report2005.pdf Microsoft Word - 2005 FOIA ANNUAL REPORT.doc (45.24 KB) More Documents & Publications U.S. Department of Energy 2008 Annual FOIA Report Office of Information Resources (MA-90) ANNUAL FOIA REPORT FOR 2009

    trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. Available for sale to the

  3. LLNL NESHAPs 2015 Annual Report - June 2016 (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Close Cite: Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for ...

  4. Characterizing Test Methods and Emissions Reduction Performance of In-Use

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Retrofit Technologies from the National Clean Diesel Campaign | Department of Energy Test Methods and Emissions Reduction Performance of In-Use Diesel Retrofit Technologies from the National Clean Diesel Campaign Characterizing Test Methods and Emissions Reduction Performance of In-Use Diesel Retrofit Technologies from the National Clean Diesel Campaign Evaluation of in-use DPFs shows levels of reduction within in-use testing objectives: PM emission reductions >90%, elemental/black

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Emissions Control for Lean Gasoline Engines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about emissions...

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Emissions Modeling: GREET Life Cycle Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about emissions...

  7. ORNL Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center (FEERC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-12

    This video highlights the Vehicle Research Laboratory's capabilities at the Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center (FEERC). FEERC is a Department of Energy user facility located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  8. ORNL Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center (FEERC)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-26

    This video highlights the Vehicle Research Laboratory's capabilities at the Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center (FEERC). FEERC is a Department of Energy user facility located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  9. Energy Forecasting Framework and Emissions Consensus Tool (EFFECT...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tool (EFFECT) EFFECT is an open, Excel-based modeling tool used to forecast greenhouse gas emissions from a range of development scenarios at the regional and national levels....

  10. Carbon Emissions: Food Industry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct....

  11. Power plant emissions verified remotely at Four Corners sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power plant emissions verified remotely Power plant emissions verified remotely at Four Corners sites The study is the first to show that space-based techniques can successfully verify international regulations on fossil energy emissions. May 19, 2014 The Four Corners coal-fired power plant, near Farmington, N.M. is a major source of pollutants, with measurements confirmed by Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers. The Four Corners coal-fired power plant, near Farmington, N.M. is a major

  12. Los Alamos achieves 20-year low on radioactive air emissions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LANL achieves 20-year low on radioactive air emissions Los Alamos achieves 20-year low on radioactive air emissions The Lab measures air emissions through a comprehensive system of 40 air monitoring stations located at the Laboratory and in neighboring communities. September 11, 2014 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable

  13. CEQ Releases Final Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Effects of Climate Change in NEPA | Department of Energy CEQ Releases Final Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Effects of Climate Change in NEPA CEQ Releases Final Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Effects of Climate Change in NEPA August 3, 2016 - 1:58pm Addthis CEQ released its Final Guidance for Federal Departments and Agencies on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and the Effects of Climate Change in National Environmental Policy

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Emissions Modeling: GREET

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Life Cycle Analysis | Department of Energy Emissions Modeling: GREET Life Cycle Analysis Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Emissions Modeling: GREET Life Cycle Analysis Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about emissions modeling using the GREET life cycle analysis. van002_wang_2015_o.pdf (1.73 MB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle

  15. Novel Application of Air Separation Membranes Reduces NOx Emissions |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne National Laboratory Application of Air Separation Membranes Reduces NOx Emissions Technology available for licensing: Selective permeation of gases using an air separation membrane. Can be retrofitted to existing engines Significantly reduces NOx emissions (as much as 70%) with just a 2% nitrogen enrichment of intake air PDF icon air_separation_membranes

  16. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Solar Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that helps to clarify inconsistent and conflicting life cycle GHG emission estimates in the published literature and provide more precise estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from PV systems.

  17. Future Sulfur Dioxide Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Pitcher, Hugh M.; Wigley, Tom M.

    2005-12-01

    The importance of sulfur dioxide emissions for climate change is now established, although substantial uncertainties remain. This paper presents projections for future sulfur dioxide emissions using the MiniCAM integrated assessment model. A new income-based parameterization for future sulfur dioxide emissions controls is developed based on purchasing power parity (PPP) income estimates and historical trends related to the implementation of sulfur emissions limitations. This parameterization is then used to produce sulfur dioxide emissions trajectories for the set of scenarios developed for the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES). We use the SRES methodology to produce harmonized SRES scenarios using the latest version of the MiniCAM model. The implications, and requirements, for IA modeling of sulfur dioxide emissions are discussed. We find that sulfur emissions eventually decline over the next century under a wide set of assumptions. These emission reductions result from a combination of emission controls, the adoption of advanced electric technologies, and a shift away from the direct end use of coal with increasing income levels. Only under a scenario where incomes in developing regions increase slowly do global emission levels remain at close to present levels over the next century. Under a climate policy that limits emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide emissions fall in a relatively narrow range. In all cases, the relative climatic effect of sulfur dioxide emissions decreases dramatically to a point where sulfur dioxide is only a minor component of climate forcing by the end of the century. Ecological effects of sulfur dioxide, however, could be significant in some developing regions for many decades to come.

  18. National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supercomputing Challenge draws more than 200 students to Los Alamos National Laboratory April 16, 2015 NOTE TO EDITORS: Media are welcome to attend the awards ceremony from 9 a.m. to noon a.m., April 21 at the Church of Christ, 2323 Diamond Drive, Los Alamos. Student teams from around New Mexico showcase year-long research projects April 20-21 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., April 16, 2015-More than 200 New Mexico students and their teachers are at Los Alamos National Laboratory April 20-21 for the 25th

  19. National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community invited to learn about emerging technologies July 6, 2016 DisrupTech showcases innovation from Los Alamos National Laboratory LOS ALAMOS, N.M., July 6, 2016-New technologies emerging from Los Alamos National Laboratory that address everything from fusion energy to medical testing will be on display for members of the community, investors and business leaders at the DisrupTech showcase, Thursday, July 14, starting at 1:00 p.m. at the Los Alamos Golf Course Event Center. "We call it

  20. Methane emissions from MBT landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heyer, K.-U. Hupe, K.; Stegmann, R.

    2013-09-15

    ) model of the IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, 2006, was used to estimate the methane emissions from MBT landfills. Due to the calculation made by the authors emissions in the range of 60,000–135,000 t CO{sub 2-eq.}/a for all German MBT landfills can be expected. This wide range shows the uncertainties when the here used procedure and the limited available data are applied. It is therefore necessary to generate more data in the future in order to calculate more precise methane emission rates from MBT landfills. This is important for the overall calculation of the climate gas production in Germany which is required once a year by the German Government.

  1. A synthesis of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andres, Robert Joseph; Boden, Thomas A; Breon, F.-M.; Erickson, D; Gregg, J. S.; Jacobson, Andrew; Marland, Gregg; Miller, J.; Oda, T; Raupach, Michael; Rayner, P; Treanton, K.

    2012-01-01

    This synthesis discusses the emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil-fuel combustion and cement production. While much is known about these emissions, there is still much that is unknown about the details surrounding these emissions. This synthesis explores 5 our knowledge of these emissions in terms of why there is concern about them; how they are calculated; the major global efforts on inventorying them; their global, regional, and national totals at different spatial and temporal scales; how they are distributed on global grids (i.e. maps); how they are transported in models; and the uncertainties associated with these different aspects of the emissions. The magnitude of emissions 10 from the combustion of fossil fuels has been almost continuously increasing with time since fossil fuels were first used by humans. Despite events in some nations specifically designed to reduce emissions, or which have had emissions reduction as a byproduct of other events, global total emissions continue their general increase with time. Global total fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions are known to within 10% uncertainty (95% 15 confidence interval). Uncertainty on individual national total fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions range from a few percent to more than 50 %. The information discussed in this manuscript synthesizes global, regional and national fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions, their distributions, their transport, and the associated uncertainties.

  2. Documentation for Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    The Energy Policy Act of 1992 required the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) to prepare an inventory of aggregate U.S. national emissions of greenhouse gases for the period 1987-1990, with annual updates thereafter. This report documents the methodology for the seventeenth annual inventory, covering national emissions over the period 1990-2008.

  3. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  4. Carbon Emissions: Paper Industry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Btu Renewable Energy Sources (no net emissions): -- Pulping liquor: 882 trillion Btu -- Wood chips and bark: 389 trillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994...

  5. Secondary Emission Calorimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winn, David Roberts

    2015-03-24

    This report describes R&D on a new type of calorimeter using secondary emission to measure the energy of radiation, particularly high energy particles.

  6. Biological Air Emissions Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Air quality standards are becoming more stringent for the U.S. wood products industry. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) (including methanol,...

  7. National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  8. NATCARB Interactive Maps and the National Carbon Explorer: a National Look at Carbon Sequestration

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    NATCARB is a national look at carbon sequestration. The NATCARB home page, National Carbon Explorer (http://www.natcarb.org/) provides access to information and interactive maps on a national scale about climate change, DOE's carbon sequestration program and its partnerships, CO2 emissions, and sinks. This portal provides access to interactive maps based on the Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada.

  9. National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ignition Facility Former Army Ranger wins Sandia-sponsored student of the year award Former Army Ranger Damon Alcorn recently received the Sandia National Laboratories-Livermore Chamber of Commerce Student of the Year Award. Presented at the Chamber's State of the City Luncheon last month, the annual award highlights a Las Positas College student with exemplary academic... NNSA makers and hackers engage innovation and partnerships NNSA's labs change the world everyday through cutting-edge

  10. Historic Patterns of CO{sub 2} Emissions from Fossil Fuels: Implications for Stabilization of Emissions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Andres, R. J.; Marland, G.

    1994-06-01

    This paper examines the historical record of greenhouse gas emissions since 1950, reviews the prospects for emissions into the future, and projects what would be the short-term outcome if the stated targets of the FCCC were in fact achieved. The examination focuses on the most important of the greenhouse gases, CO{sub 2}. The extensive record of historic CO{sub 2} emissions is explored to ascertain if it is an adequate basis for useful extrapolation into the near future. Global carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel consumption have been documented. Emissions grew at 4.3% per year from 1950 until the time of the 1973 oil crisis. Another disruption in growth followed the oil price increases of 1979. Global total emissions have been increasing steadily since the 1982-1983 minimum and have grown by more than 20% since then. At present, emission Of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel burning is dominated by a few countries: the U.S., the former Soviet Union, China, the developed countries of Europe and Japan. Only 20 countries emit 84% of emissions from all countries. However, rates of growth in many of the developed countries are now very low. In contrast, energy use has grown rapidly over the last 20 years in some of the large, developing economies. Emissions from fossil fuel consumption are now nearly 4 times those from land use change and are the primary cause of measured increases in the atmospheric concentration of CO{sub 2}. The increasing concentration of atmospheric CO{sub 2} has led to rising concern about the possibility of impending changes in the global climate system. In an effort to limit or mitigate potential negative effects of global climate change, 154 countries signed the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) in Rio de Janeiro in June, 1992. The FCCC asks all countries to conduct an inventory of their current greenhouse gas emissions setting non-binding targets.

  11. U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis thumb_energyuse_loss_emissions_lg.gif How effectively is energy used in U.S. manufacturing? How much greenhouse gas (GHG) is emitted from combustion in manufacturing operations? The U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory traces energy from supply (fuel, electricity, and

  12. High Efficiency Low Emission Refrigeration System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Efficiency Low Emission Refrigeration System 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Brian Fricke, frickeba@ornl.gov Oak Ridge National Laboratory Project Summary Timeline: Start date: 1 October 2011 Planned end date: 30 September 2016 Key Milestones 1. Evaluate System Design Strategies; March 2013 2. Develop Prototype System; March 2013 3. Fabricate Prototype System; March 2014 Budget: Total DOE $ to date: $700k Total future DOE $: $1,000k Target Market/Audience: The primary market

  13. NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    N E W U T I L I T Y B U S I N E S S M O D E L S : Utility and Regulatory Models for the Modern Era Ronald Lehr former Public Utilities Commissioner A M E R I C A ' S POWER PLAN A m e r i c a ' s P o w e r P l a n Ralph Cavanagh, Natural Resources Defense Council Peter Fox-Penner, Brattle Group Tom King, National Grid Richard Sedano, Regulatory Assistance Project Alison Silverstein, former Federal Energy Regulatory Lisa Wood, Edison Foundation's Institute for Electric Efficiency We would like to

  14. X-ray area backlighter development at the National Ignition Facility...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the National Ignition Facility (invited) 1D spectral imaging was used to characterize the K-shell emission of Z 30-35 and Z 40-42 laser-irradiated foils at the National...

  15. Update on Status of SEP National Evaluation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Update for State Energy Advisory Board on Status of SEP National Evaluation Martin Schweitzer Oak Ridge National Laboratory June 26, 2012 Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy Introduction * Study is being performed by independent evaluation team (KEMA, Inc. and subcontractors) and managed by ORNL * Will quantify energy and cost savings, job creation, renewable energy generation, and carbon emissions reductions * Covers program year 2008 and ARRA period 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for

  16. DOE Announces Selection of National Laboratory Center for Solid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Mediated Emission from InGaN LEDs using Nano-patterned Metal Films Summary: This ... Recipient: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Title: Low-Cost Nano-engineered Transparent ...

  17. Partnerships in Sustainable Transportation: Mammoth Cave National Park

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This video takes a look at how the U.S. Department of Energy is helping to support a fleet of alternative fuel vehicles at Mammoth Cave National Park, reducing carbon emissions and preserving the park's natural beauty.

  18. Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and the Effects of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Climate Change in National Environmental Policy Act Reviews (CEQ, 2016) | Department of Energy on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and the Effects of Climate Change in National Environmental Policy Act Reviews (CEQ, 2016) Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and the Effects of Climate Change in National Environmental Policy Act Reviews (CEQ, 2016) The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) released its Final Guidance for Federal Departments and Agencies on

  19. Emission Abatement System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bromberg, Leslie; Cohn, Daniel R.; Rabinovich, Alexander

    2003-05-13

    Emission abatement system. The system includes a source of emissions and a catalyst for receiving the emissions. Suitable catalysts are absorber catalysts and selective catalytic reduction catalysts. A plasma fuel converter generates a reducing gas from a fuel source and is connected to deliver the reducing gas into contact with the absorber catalyst for regenerating the catalyst. A preferred reducing gas is a hydrogen rich gas and a preferred plasma fuel converter is a plasmatron. It is also preferred that the absorber catalyst be adapted for absorbing NO.sub.x.

  20. Potential options to reduce GHG emissions in Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereira, N.; Bonduki, Y.; Perdomo, M.

    1996-12-31

    The Government of Venezuela ratified the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in December, 1994. The Convention requires all parties to develop and publish national inventories of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) as well as national plans to reduce or control emissions, taking into account their common but differentiated responsibilities and their specific national and regional development priorities, objectives, and circumstances. Within this context, the Ministry of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources and the Ministry of Energy and Mines developed the `Venezuelan Case-Study to Address Climate Change`. The study was initiated in October 1993, with the financial and technical assistance of the Government of United States, through the U.S. Country Studies Program (USCSP), and the Global Environment Facility (GEF), through the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP).

  1. Estimated Carbon Dioxide Emissions in 2008: United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C A; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

    2011-04-01

    Flow charts depicting carbon dioxide emissions in the United States have been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of state-level energy use patterns. Approximately 5,800 million metric tons of carbon dioxide were emitted throughout the United States for use in power production, residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation applications in 2008. Carbon dioxide is emitted from the use of three major energy resources: natural gas, coal, and petroleum. The flow patterns are represented in a compact 'visual atlas' of 52 state-level (all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and one national) carbon dioxide flow charts representing a comprehensive systems view of national CO{sub 2} emissions. Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) has published flow charts (also referred to as 'Sankey Diagrams') of important national commodities since the early 1970s. The most widely recognized of these charts is the U.S. energy flow chart (http://flowcharts.llnl.gov). LLNL has also published charts depicting carbon (or carbon dioxide potential) flow and water flow at the national level as well as energy, carbon, and water flows at the international, state, municipal, and organizational (i.e. United States Air Force) level. Flow charts are valuable as single-page references that contain quantitative data about resource, commodity, and byproduct flows in a graphical form that also convey structural information about the system that manages those flows. Data on carbon dioxide emissions from the energy sector are reported on a national level. Because carbon dioxide emissions are not reported for individual states, the carbon dioxide emissions are estimated using published energy use information. Data on energy use is compiled by the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (U.S. EIA) in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). SEDS is updated annually and reports data from 2 years prior to the year of the update. SEDS contains data on primary

  2. Observing Emissions of Air Pollutants from Space | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to study the future turnover of vehicle fleets around the world and the likely effects on air pollution and climate. This project has used satellite data to monitor CO, CO2,...

  3. GBTL Workshop GHG Emissions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    emissions relative to petroleum. * DOE is interested in ... key role in helping the United States meet its continually ... the Average of U.S. Refineries Lower Life Cycle GHG ...

  4. Photon enhanced thermionic emission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwede, Jared; Melosh, Nicholas; Shen, Zhixun

    2014-10-07

    Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) is exploited to provide improved efficiency for radiant energy conversion. A hot (greater than 200.degree. C.) semiconductor cathode is illuminated such that it emits electrons. Because the cathode is hot, significantly more electrons are emitted than would be emitted from a room temperature (or colder) cathode under the same illumination conditions. As a result of this increased electron emission, the energy conversion efficiency can be significantly increased relative to a conventional photovoltaic device. In PETE, the cathode electrons can be (and typically are) thermalized with respect to the cathode. As a result, PETE does not rely on emission of non-thermalized electrons, and is significantly easier to implement than hot-carrier emission approaches.

  5. Field emission electron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter; Cohen, Marvin Lou

    2000-01-01

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  6. Combustion and Emissions Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Combustion and Emissions Modeling This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. - Computational Fluid Dynamics Project Leader Background Modern transportation engines are designed to use the available fuel resources efficiently and minimize harmful emissions. Optimization of these designs is based on a wealth of practical design, construction and operating experiences, and use of modern testing facilities and sophisticated analyses of the combustion

  7. National Security Science | Los National Alamos Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    this Issue (pdf) In 2012 NSS received an NNSA Defense Programs AWARD OF EXCELLENCE National Security Science Mail Stop A142 Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administratio...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    nuclear weapons Bay Area national labs team to tackle long-standing automotive hydrogen storage challenge Sandia National Laboratories chemist Mark Allendorf, shown here at...

  9. National System Templates: Building Sustainable National Inventory...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    System Templates: Building Sustainable National Inventory Management Systems Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: National System Templates: Building...

  10. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    "Green" supercomputer reduces energy footprint by 75% "Green" supercomputer reduces energy footprint by 75% Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National ...

  11. National Security Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science National Security Science Latest Issue:July 2015 past issues All Issues submit National Security Science Showcasing Los Alamos National Laboratory's work on nuclear...

  12. National Security Science Archive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science NSS Archive National Security Science Latest Issue:July 2015 past issues All Issues submit National Security Science Archive National Security Science magazine...

  13. National Laboratory Impact Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Laboratory Impact Initiative supports the relationship between the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy and the national laboratory enterprise.  The national laboratories...

  14. Real Time Tailpipe Emission Measurements | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Real Time Tailpipe Emission Measurements Real Time Tailpipe Emission Measurements 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Brookhaven National Laboratory 2002_deer_imre.pdf (1.23 MB) More Documents & Publications Real-Time Simultaneous Measurements of Size, Density, and Composition of Single Ultrafine Diesel Tailpipe Particles Microsoft PowerPoint - 4. ORNL- deer.ppt [Read-Only] Real-Time Measurement of Diesel Trap Efficiency

  15. Coordinating Low Emission Development in Columbia (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, A.; Butheau, M.; Sandor, D.

    2013-11-01

    Colombia's economy has grown more than 4 percent per year for a decade, but climate change is posing new risks to sustaining that development. With the nation's coastal areas, mountain ranges, rain forests, plains, and river basins vulnerable to changing weather patterns and growing seasons, Colombia is building resilience to climate change while working to curb emissions and pursue new options for low emission development.

  16. NREL: News - Hybrid Buses Operate With Lower Emissions, Greater Fuel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Efficiency Hybrid Buses Operate With Lower Emissions, Greater Fuel Efficiency Golden, Colo., August 1, 2002 A recently released study by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) concludes that hybrid buses operate with lower emissions and greater fuel efficiency than conventional diesel buses. The yearlong evaluation of 10 prototype diesel hybrid-electric buses in the Metropolitan Transportation Authority's New York City Transit (NYCT) fleet of

  17. Exploring Advanced Combustion Regimes for Efficiency and Emissions |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Exploring Advanced Combustion Regimes for Efficiency and Emissions Exploring Advanced Combustion Regimes for Efficiency and Emissions 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2003_deer_wagner.pdf (338.66 KB) More Documents & Publications Measurement and Characterization of NOx Adsorber Regeneration and Desulfation Simultaneously Low-Engine-Out NOx and PM with Highly Diluted Diesel Combustuion Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Use

  18. Preequilibrium Emission of Light Fragments in Spallation Reactions

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Preequilibrium Emission of Light Fragments in Spallation Reactions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Preequilibrium Emission of Light Fragments in Spallation Reactions No abstract prepared. Authors: Kerby, Leslie M. [1] ; Mashnik, Stepan G. [1] ; Sierk, Arnold John [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2012-08-17 OSTI Identifier: 1049321 Report Number(s): LA-UR-12-22825 TRN: US1204458 DOE Contract Number:

  19. Preliminary Results of Investigating Precompound Emission of Light

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fragments in Spallation Reactions, Summer 2012 (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Preliminary Results of Investigating Precompound Emission of Light Fragments in Spallation Reactions, Summer 2012 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Preliminary Results of Investigating Precompound Emission of Light Fragments in Spallation Reactions, Summer 2012 Authors: Kerby, Leslie M. [1] ; Mashnik, Stepan G. [1] ; Sierk, Arnold John [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory

  20. The Weekend Ozone Effect - The Weekly Ambient Emissions Control Experiment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy The Weekend Ozone Effect - The Weekly Ambient Emissions Control Experiment The Weekend Ozone Effect - The Weekly Ambient Emissions Control Experiment 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: National Renewable Energy Laboratory 2003_deer_lawson.pdf (335.4 KB) More Documents & Publications Weekend/Weekday Ozone Study in the South Coast Air Basin DOE's Studies of Weekday/Weekend Ozone Pollution in Southern California Real-World Studies of Ambient Ozone Formation as a

  1. Performance, Efficiency and Emissions Assessment of Natural Gas Direct

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Injection compared to Gasoline and Natural Gas Port-Fuel Injection in an Automotive Engine | Argonne National Laboratory Performance, Efficiency and Emissions Assessment of Natural Gas Direct Injection compared to Gasoline and Natural Gas Port-Fuel Injection in an Automotive Engine Title Performance, Efficiency and Emissions Assessment of Natural Gas Direct Injection compared to Gasoline and Natural Gas Port-Fuel Injection in an Automotive Engine Publication Type Journal Article Year of

  2. Emissions Tool Estimates the Impact of Emissions on Smart Grid

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure Investments | Department of Energy Emissions Tool Estimates the Impact of Emissions on Smart Grid Infrastructure Investments Emissions Tool Estimates the Impact of Emissions on Smart Grid Infrastructure Investments July 28, 2016 - 2:59pm Addthis In the face of extreme weather events, states, utilities, and other companies are increasingly seeking ways to boost resiliency while reducing their carbon footprint. The Emissions Quantification Tool (EQT), which was conceived of and

  3. U.S. Government Supports Low Emission Economic Growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-11-01

    Countries around the world face the challenge of maintaining long-term sustainable economic growth and development under the threat of climate change. By identifying and pursuing a sustainable development pathway now, they are better positioned to reach their economic growth goals while addressing climate change impacts and lowering greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Low emission development strategies - development plans that promote sustainable social and economic development while reducing long-term GHG emissions - provide a pathway to preparing for a global low emission future. Partner country governments are working with the U.S. government through the Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies (EC-LEDS) program to further their national development objectives.

  4. Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    This is the sixth annual report on aggregate US national emissions of greenhouse gases. It covers emissions over the period 1990--1996, with preliminary estimates of emissions for 1997. Chapter one summarizes some background information about global climate change and the greenhouse effect. Important recent developments in global climate change activities are discussed, especially the third Conference of the Parties to the Framework Convention on Climate Change, which was held in December of 1997 in Kyoto, Japan. Chapters two through five cover emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, halocarbons and related gases, respectively. Chapter six describes potential sequestration and emissions of greenhouse gases as a result of land use changes. Six appendices are included in the report. 96 refs., 38 tabs.

  5. Radionuclide air emission report for the Hanford Site Calendar Year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diediker, L.P.; Curn, B.L.; Rhoads, K.; Damberg, E.G.; Soldat, J.K.; Jette, S.J.

    1994-08-01

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1993 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. The report has been prepared and will be submitted in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, {open_quotes}National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,{close_quotes} Subpart H, {open_quotes}National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.{close_quotes}

  6. Climate Change Technology Scenarios: Energy, Emissions, and Economic Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Placet, Marylynn; Humphreys, Kenneth K.; Mahasenan, N Maha

    2004-08-15

    This report describes three advanced technology scenarios and various illustrative cases developed by staff of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program. These scenarios and illustrative cases explore the energy, emissions and economic implications of using advanced energy technologies and other climate change related technologies to reduce future emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs). The cases were modeled using the Mini Climate Assessment Model (MiniCAM) developed by PNNL. The report describes the scenarios, the specifications for the cases, and the results. The report also provides background information on current emissions of GHGs and issues associated with stabilizing GHG concentrations.

  7. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation Fact Sheet

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As clean energy increasingly becomes part of the national dialogue, lenders, utilities, and lawmakers need the most comprehensive and accurate information on GHG emissions from various sources of energy to inform policy, planning, and investment decisions. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that gives decision makers and investors more precise estimates of life cycle GHG emissions for renewable and conventional generation, clarifying inconsistent and conflicting estimates in the published literature, and reducing uncertainty.

  8. National Security Complex | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Completes W69 Dismantlement

  9. Infrastructure Security EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL INTEREST

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Automobile and truck transportation accounts for 71% of U.S. oil use and 33.5% of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. † A national energy goal is to reduce CO 2 emissions to 17% of 2005 levels by 2050. ‡ Assuming linear growth from today's population levels and energy-use activities, we must achieve over a factor of seven reduction in CO 2 emissions. Additionally, the nation would like to reduce petroleum usage for transportation by 17% at the end of this decade. ‡ Efficient transportation

  10. Santer of Lawrence Livermore National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 6/1/2011 6.28 Human Effects on Global Warming By themselves, droplets of sulfuric acid resulting from the burning of fossil fuels are of little consequence. But vast numbers of them form an aerosol haze that moderates and obscures the "greenhouse effect" caused by heat-trapping gases. In 1995, Benjamin Santer of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was the first to quantify and explain the link between fossil fuel emissions and climate change, including the role of greenhouse gases

  11. National Security Facility (NSF) | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Security Facility (NSF) National Security Facility (NSF) Argonne National Laboratory's National Security Facility (NSF) is a flexible, state-of-the-art secure user facility that contains multiple national security networks, video teleconference capability, high-resolution graphics support, a fully powered and cooled data center, multi-level training facilities, and conferencing facilities. The NSF provides tools and resources to enable and strengthen connections between government

  12. National Postdoctoral Association | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Postdoctoral Association The National Postdoctoral Association (NPA) is a member-driven organization that provides a unique, national voice for postdoctoral scholars. Since 2003, we have taken on the ambitious agenda to enhance the quality of the postdoctoral experience in the U.S. We have assumed a leadership role in addressing the many issues confronting the postdoctoral community that are national in scope and requiring action beyond the local level. Read more. Argonne National Lab

  13. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 3720 Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shields, K.D.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1999-04-02

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) has been prepared for the Environmental Science Laboratory (3720 Facility) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to meet the requirements in DOE Order 5400.1, ''General Environmental Protection Programs'' This FEMP has been prepared for the 3720 Facility primarily because it has a major (potential to emit >0.1 mrem/yr) emission point for radionuclide air emissions according to the annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) assessment performed. This section summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the inventory based NESHAP assessment for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements. The 3720 Facility provides office and laboratory space for PNNL scientific and engineering staff conducting multidisciplinary research in the areas of materials characterization and testing and waste management. The facility is designed to accommodate the use of radioactive and hazardous materials to conduct these activities. Radioactive material storage and usage occur throughout the facility and include a large number of isotopes. This material is in several forms, including solid, liquid, and dispersible particulate. The facility is in the process of being vacated for shutdown, but is considered a Major Emission Point as of the date of this document approval.

  14. Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States, 1987--1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-25

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 to prepare a report on aggregate US national emissions of greenhouse gases for the period 1987--1992, with annual updates thereafter. This is the third annual update report,covering national emissions over the period 1987--1993, with preliminary estimates of US carbon dioxide and halocarbon emissions for 1994. Calculating national aggregate emissions(or ``national inventories``) of greenhouse gases is a recently developed form of intellectual endeavor. Greenhouse gas emissions are rarely measured directly or reported to statistical agencies. Thus, to prepare emissions inventories usually requires inferring emissions indirectly from information collected for other purposes. Both the available information and the inferences drawn may be of varying reliability. Chapter 1 of this report briefly recapitulates some background information about global climate change and the greenhouse effect and discusses important recent developments in global climate change activities. Chapters 2 through 6 cover emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, halocarbons, and criteria pollutants, respectively. Chapter 7 describes potential sequestration and emissions of greenhouse gases as a result of land use changes.

  15. Emissions Benefits of Distributed Generation in the Texas Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, SW

    2005-06-16

    One potential benefit of distributed generation (DG) is a net reduction in air emissions. While DG will produce emissions, most notably carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides, the power it displaces might have produced more. This study used a system dispatch model developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to simulate the 2012 Texas power market with and without DG. This study compares the reduction in system emissions to the emissions from the DG to determine the net savings. Some of the major findings are that 85% of the electricity displaced by DG during peak hours will be simple cycle natural gas, either steam or combustion turbine. Even with DG running as baseload, 57% of electricity displaced will be simple cycle natural gas. Despite the retirement of some gas-fired steam units and the construction of many new gas turbine and combined cycle units, the marginal emissions from the system remain quite high (1.4 lb NO{sub x}/MWh on peak and 1.1 lb NO{sub x}/MWh baseload) compared to projected DG emissions. Consequently, additions of DG capacity will reduce emissions in Texas from power generation in 2012. Using the DG exhaust heat for combined heat and power provides an even greater benefit, since it eliminates further boiler emissions while adding none over what would be produced while generating electricity. Further studies are warranted concerning the robustness of the result with changes in fuel prices, demands, and mixes of power generating technology.

  16. Technology Opportunities to Reduce U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    National Lab Directors, . .

    2001-04-05

    The rise in greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel combustion and industrial and agricultural activities has aroused international concern about the possible impacts of these emissions on climate. Greenhouse gases--mostly carbon dioxide, some methane, nitrous oxide and other trace gases--are emitted to the atmosphere, enhancing an effect in which heat reflected from the earth's surface is kept from escaping into space, as in a greenhouse. Thus, there is concern that the earth's surface temperature may rise enough to cause global climate change. Approximately 90% of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic sources come from energy production and use, most of which are a byproduct of the combustion of fossil fuels. On a per capita basis, the United States is one of the world's largest sources of greenhouse gas emissions, comprising 4% of the world's population, yet emitting 23% of the world's greenhouse gases. Emissions in the United States are increasing at around 1.2% annually, and the Energy Information Administration forecasts that emissions levels will continue to increase at this rate in the years ahead if we proceed down the business-as-usual path. President Clinton has presented a two-part challenge for the United States: reduce greenhouse gas emissions and grow the economy. Meeting the challenge will mean that in doing tomorrow's work, we must use energy more efficiently and emit less carbon for the energy expended than we do today. To accomplish these goals, President Clinton proposed on June 26, 1997, that the United States ''invest more in the technologies of the future''. In this report to Secretary of Energy Pena, 47 technology pathways are described that have significant potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The present study was completed before the December 1997 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and is intended to provide a basis to evaluate technology feasibility and options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions

  17. National Ignition Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Ignition Facility Glass amplifiers in Laser Bay 2 at the National Ignition Facility. The construction of the 192-beam 1.8 MJ UV NIF, the world's most energetic laser, was ...

  18. Los Alamos National Lab: National Security Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    more.. Charlie McMillan, Director of Los Alamos National Laboratory 1:08 Charlie McMillan, Director of Los Alamos National Laboratory, describes how the Lab provides...

  19. National Laboratory]; Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chertkov, Michael Los Alamos National Laboratory Construction and Facility Engineering; Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization(32); Energy Planning, Policy, &...

  20. Chemist, Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Chemist, Sandia National Laboratories Jerilyn Timlin Jerilyn Timlin October 2009 National Institutes of Health (NIH) New Innovator Award Jerilyn Timlin, a chemist at Sandia National Laboratories, has been presented by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) with a New Innovator Award, one of 55 such awards granted by the NIH this year. The award encourages researchers to explore bold ideas that have the potential to catapult fields forward and speed the translation of

  1. Cognitive Informatics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Cognitive Informatics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Frank Greitzer Frank Greitzer Frank Greitzer was invited to be one of six "provocateurs," selected internationally by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), to participate in planning of, and present to a National Academies workshop on Usability, Security, and Privacy of Computer Systems Workshop held July 20-22, 2009 in

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: National Security Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Weapons Defense Systems International, Homeland, & Nuclear Security Energy and Climate Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Programs National Security Programs We strive to become the laboratory that the U.S. turns to first for technology solutions to the most challenging problems that threaten peace and freedom for our nation and the globe. At Sandia, national security is our business. We apply advanced science and engineering to help our nation and allies detect, repel, defeat, or

  3. National Security Photo Gallery | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Competition | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Solicitation National Security Campus Management and Operating (M&O) Contract Competition Contract Competition Home Page Welcome to the National Nuclear Security Administration's website for the National Security Campus (NSC) Management and Operating Contract Competition. The NSC in Kansas City, MO, is situated on approximately 177 acres. The facility is leased for the NNSA by the General Services Administration. Satellite

  4. An approach for verifying biogenic greenhouse gas emissions inventories with atmospheric CO 2 concentration data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ogle, Stephen; Davis, Kenneth J.; Lauvaux, Thomas; Schuh, Andrew E.; Cooley, Dan; West, Tristram O.; Heath, L.; Miles, Natasha; Richardson, S. J.; Breidt, F. Jay; et al

    2015-03-10

    Verifying national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventories is a critical step to ensure that reported emissions data to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) are accurate and representative of a country’s contribution to GHG concentrations in the atmosphere. Verification could include a variety of evidence, but arguably the most convincing verification would be confirmation of a change in GHG concentrations in the atmosphere that is consistent with reported emissions to the UNFCCC. We report here on a case study evaluating this option based on a prototype atmospheric CO2 measurement network deployed in the Mid-Continent Region of themore » conterminous United States. We found that the atmospheric CO2 measurement data did verify the accuracy of the emissions inventory within the confidence limits of the emissions estimates, suggesting that this technology could be further developed and deployed more widely in the future for verifying reported emissions.« less

  5. A computational study of x-ray emission from high-Z x-ray sources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A computational study of x-ray emission from high-Z x-ray sources on the National Ignition Facility laser Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A computational study of x-ray ...

  6. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration Berkeley National Laboratory NNSA engineer teaches young people STEM, makes mark on Livermore lab communities. Rick Roses Job: Federal fire protection engineer and explosives safety engineer Educational background: Bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering, University of California, Berkeley (1984) and a master's in national resource strategy, National Defense University (2010). Rick Roses,... Lab employees, officials, business leaders dedicate Livermore Solar Center

  7. Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 to prepare a report on aggregate US national emissions of greenhouse gases for the period 1987--1990, with annual updates thereafter. This report is the fifth annual update, covering national emissions over the period 1989--1995, with preliminary estimates of emissions for 1996. The estimates contained in this report have been revised from those in last year`s report. Emissions estimates for carbon dioxide are reported in metric tons of carbon; estimates for other gases are reported in metric tons of gas. Chapter 1 of this report briefly recapitulates some background information about global climate change and the greenhouse effect and discusses important recent developments in global climate change activities. Chapter 2 through 6 cover emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, halocarbons, and criteria pollutants, respectively. Chapter 7 describes potential sequestration and emissions of greenhouse gases as a result of land use changes. Five appendixes are included with this report. 216 refs., 11 figs., 38 tabs.

  8. User access to the MAP3S source emissions inventory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benkovitz, C M; Evans, V A

    1981-03-01

    An emissions inventory based on data obtained from the National Emissions Data System (NEDS), the Federal Power Commission (FPC), Environment Canada, and other agencies was compiled by the MAP3S Central Data Coordination at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Pertinent data was brought together, collated, and loaded into computerized data bases using SYSTEM 2000 as the data base management system. These data bases are available to interested users for interactive scanning or batch retrieval. The emissions inventory consists of two distinct sections: a point source inventory and an area source inventory. The point source inventory covers the continental US and Canada; information is kept at the individual source level. The area source inventory covers the continental US; information is kept on a county basis. Work is in progress to obtain a Canadian area source inventory based on census divisions.

  9. ELECTRON EMISSION REGULATING MEANS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brenholdt, I.R.

    1957-11-19

    >An electronic regulating system is described for controlling the electron emission of a cathode, for example, the cathode in a mass spectrometer. The system incorporates a transformer having a first secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding load by grid controlled vacuum tubes. A portion of the electron current emitted by the cathode is passed through a network which develops a feedback signal. The system arrangement is completed by using the feedback signal to control the vacuum tubes in the second secondary winding through a regulator tube. When a change in cathode emission occurs, the feedback signal acts to correct this change by adjusting the load on the transformer.

  10. Low emissions diesel fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Dorsey, G.F.; West, B.H.

    1998-05-05

    A method and matter of composition for controlling NO{sub x} emissions from existing diesel engines. The method is achieved by adding a small amount of material to the diesel fuel to decrease the amount of NO{sub x} produced during combustion. Specifically, small amounts, less than about 1%, of urea or a triazine compound (methylol melamines) are added to diesel fuel. Because urea and triazine compounds are generally insoluble in diesel fuel, microemulsion technology is used to suspend or dissolve the urea or triazine compound in the diesel fuel. A typical fuel formulation includes 5% t-butyl alcohol, 4.5% water, 0.5% urea or triazine compound, 9% oleic acid, and 1% ethanolamine. The subject invention provides improved emissions in heavy diesel engines without the need for major modifications.

  11. Low emissions diesel fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Compere, Alicia L.; Griffith, William L.; Dorsey, George F.; West, Brian H.

    1998-01-01

    A method and matter of composition for controlling NO.sub.x emissions from existing diesel engines. The method is achieved by adding a small amount of material to the diesel fuel to decrease the amount of NO.sub.x produced during combustion. Specifically, small amounts, less than about 1%, of urea or a triazine compound (methylol melamines) are added to diesel fuel. Because urea and triazine compounds are generally insoluble in diesel fuel, microemulsion technology is used to suspend or dissolve the urea or triazine compound in the diesel fuel. A typical fuel formulation includes 5% t-butyl alcohol, 4.5% water, 0.5% urea or triazine compound, 9% oleic acid, and 1% ethanolamine. The subject invention provides improved emissions in heavy diesel engines without the need for major modifications.

  12. Development of Remove Sensing Instrumentation for NOx and PM Emissions from

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heavy Duty Trucks | Department of Energy Remove Sensing Instrumentation for NOx and PM Emissions from Heavy Duty Trucks Development of Remove Sensing Instrumentation for NOx and PM Emissions from Heavy Duty Trucks 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2002_deer_mcgill.pdf (7.42 MB) More Documents & Publications Measurement of Real-World Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicles: The State-of-the-Art 21st Century Truck Partnership Roadmap Roadmap and Technical

  13. Fact #608: February 1, 2010 Changes in Greenhouse Gas Emissions since 1990

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy 8: February 1, 2010 Changes in Greenhouse Gas Emissions since 1990 Fact #608: February 1, 2010 Changes in Greenhouse Gas Emissions since 1990 In October of 2009, the United Nations (UN) released greenhouse gas inventory data for 1990 to 2007 for all countries that submitted data in accordance with the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Between 1990 and 2007, total aggregate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for all reporting countries declined by 3.9%

  14. Advanced Petroleum-Based fuels - Diesel Emissions Control (APBF-DEC)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activity | Department of Energy Petroleum-Based fuels - Diesel Emissions Control (APBF-DEC) Activity Advanced Petroleum-Based fuels - Diesel Emissions Control (APBF-DEC) Activity 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: National Renewable Energy Laboratory deer_2003_thornton.pdf (100.17 KB) More Documents & Publications Status of APBF-DEC NOx Adsorber/DPF Projects Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance of a NOx Adsorber and Diesel Particle Filter Equipped Passenger Car

  15. The Impact of Lubricant on Emissions from a Medium-Duty Diesel Engine |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy on Emissions from a Medium-Duty Diesel Engine The Impact of Lubricant on Emissions from a Medium-Duty Diesel Engine 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: National Renewable Energy Lab 2002_deer_whitacre.pdf (355.38 KB) More Documents & Publications Lubricant Formulation and Consumption Effects on Diesel Exhaust Ash Emissions: Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines and Fuel Cells: 2000 Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Fuel and Lubricant Technologies

  16. Heavy-Duty NOx Emissions Control: Reformer-Assisted vs. Plasma-Facilitated

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lean NOx Catalysis | Department of Energy NOx Emissions Control: Reformer-Assisted vs. Plasma-Facilitated Lean NOx Catalysis Heavy-Duty NOx Emissions Control: Reformer-Assisted vs. Plasma-Facilitated Lean NOx Catalysis 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 2003_deer_aardahl.pdf (962.36 KB) More Documents & Publications Plasma-Activated Lean NOx Catalysis for Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control Selective reduction of NOx in oxygen rich environments with

  17. Emission Testing of Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) Natural Gas and Diesel Transit Buses

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Emission Testing of Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) Natural Gas and Diesel Transit Buses M. Melendez, J. Taylor, and J. Zuboy National Renewable Energy Laboratory W.S. Wayne West Virginia University D. Smith U.S. Department of Energy Technical Report NREL/TP-540-36355 December 2005 Emission Testing of Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) Natural Gas and Diesel Transit Buses M. Melendez, J. Taylor, and J. Zuboy National Renewable Energy Laboratory W.S.

  18. Power plant emissions reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; Nagarjuna Reddy, Thirumala Reddy

    2015-10-20

    A system for improved emissions performance of a power plant generally includes an exhaust gas recirculation system having an exhaust gas compressor disposed downstream from the combustor, a condensation collection system at least partially disposed upstream from the exhaust gas compressor, and a mixing chamber in fluid communication with the exhaust gas compressor and the condensation collection system, where the mixing chamber is in fluid communication with the combustor.

  19. Particulate and Gaseous Emissions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Gaseous Emissions - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  20. Assessing the potential visibility benefits of Clean Air Act Title IV emission reductions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trexler, E.C. Jr.; Shannon, J.D.

    1995-06-01

    Assessments are made of the benefits of the 1990 Clean Air Act Title IV (COVE), Phase 2, SO2 and NOX reduction provisions, to the visibility in typical eastern and western Class 1 areas. Probable bands of visibility impairment distribution curves are developed for Shenandoah National Park, Smoky Mountain National Park and the Grand Canyon National Park, based on the existing emissions, ``Base Case``, and for the COVE emission reductions, ``CAAA Case``. Emission projections for 2010 are developed with improved versions of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program emission projection models. Source-receptor transfer matrices created with the Advanced Statistical Trajectory Regional Air Pollution (ASTRAP) model are used with existing emission inventories and with the emission projections to calculate atmospheric concentrations of sulfate and nitrate at the receptors of interest for existing and projected emission scenarios. The Visibility Assessment Scoping Model (VASM) is then used to develop distributions of visibility impairment. VASM combines statistics of observed concentrations of particulate species and relative humidity with ASTRAP calculations of the relative changes in atmospheric sulfate and nitrate particulate concentrations in a Monte Carlo approach to produce expected distributions of hourly particulate concentrations and RH. Light extinction relationships developed in theoretical and field studies are then used to calculate the resulting distribution of visibility impairment. Successive Monte Carlo studies are carried out to develop sets of visibility impairment distributions with and without the COVE emission reductions to gain insight into the detectability of expected visibility improvements.

  1. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that makes great strides in clarifying inconsistent and conflicting GHG emission estimates in the published literature while providing more precise estimates of GHG emissions from utility-scale CSP systems.

  2. Acoustic emission monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Romrell, Delwin M.

    1977-07-05

    Methods and apparatus for identifying the source location of acoustic emissions generated within an acoustically conductive medium. A plurality of acoustic receivers are communicably coupled to the surface of the medium at a corresponding number of spaced locations. The differences in the reception time of the respective sensors in response to a given acoustic event are measured among various sensor combinations prescribed by the monitoring mode employed. Acoustic reception response encountered subsequent to the reception by a predetermined number of the prescribed sensor combinations are inhibited from being communicated to the processing circuitry, while the time measurements obtained from the prescribed sensor combinations are translated into a position measurement representative of the location on the surface most proximate the source of the emission. The apparatus is programmable to function in six separate and five distinct operating modes employing either two, three or four sensory locations. In its preferred arrangement the apparatus of this invention will re-initiate a monitoring interval if the predetermined number of sensors do not respond to a particular emission within a given time period.

  3. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 325 Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shields, K.D.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1999-04-02

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) has been prepared for the 325 Building Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to meet the requirements in DOE Order 5400.1, ''General Environmental Protection Programs.'' This FEMP has been prepared for the RPL primarily because it has a ''major'' (potential to emit >0.1 mrem/yr) emission point for radionuclide air emissions according to the annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) assessment performed. This section summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the inventory based NESHAP assessment for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements. The RPL at PNNL houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and radioactive mixed waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities within the building include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed radioactive, low-level radioactive, and transuranic wastes generated by PNNL activities.

  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration | (NNSA) Los Alamos National Lab Performance Evaluations FY 2016 FY 2016 Performance Evaluation Plan, Los Alamos National Security, LLC FY 2015 FY 2015 Performance Evaluation Report, Los Alamos National Security, LLC FY 2015 Performance Evaluation Report, Fee Determination Letter, Los Alamos National Security, LLC FY 2015 Performance Evaluation Plan, Los Alamos National Security, LLC FY 2014 FY 2014 Performance Evaluation Report, Los Alamos National Security, LLC FY 2014

  5. Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Detailed Energy-Related Carbon Emissions All Industry Groups 1994 emissions Selected Industries Petroleum refining Chemicals Iron & Steel...

  6. GBTL Workshop GHG Emissions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GHG Emissions GBTL Workshop GHG Emissions EERE Presentation of Greenhouse Gas EmissionsResource Potential gbtlworkshopghgemissions.pdf (1.37 MB) More Documents & Publications ...

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions on ...

  8. Waste management activities and carbon emissions in Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couth, R.; Trois, C.

    2011-01-15

    This paper summarizes research into waste management activities and carbon emissions from territories in sub-Saharan Africa with the main objective of quantifying emission reductions (ERs) that can be gained through viable improvements to waste management in Africa. It demonstrates that data on waste and carbon emissions is poor and generally inadequate for prediction models. The paper shows that the amount of waste produced and its composition are linked to national Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Waste production per person is around half that in developed countries with a mean around 230 kg/hd/yr. Sub-Saharan territories produce waste with a biogenic carbon content of around 56% (+/-25%), which is approximately 40% greater than developed countries. This waste is disposed in uncontrolled dumps that produce large amounts of methane gas. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from waste will rise with increasing urbanization and can only be controlled through funding mechanisms from developed countries.

  9. Environmental Emissions Nonenergy Benefits Working Paper: ARRA Period

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, David; Bausch, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Weatherization reduces energy usage by low-income households, and thereby reduces the environmental impacts of the production and consumption of energy and reduces the social costs associated with those environmental impacts. The nonenergy benefits study conducted as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) evaluation focused on measuring the emissions reductions resulting from WAP program energy usage reductions and estimating the societal value of those emission reductions. While there are other environmental impacts associated with the WAP program, this study focused on emissions impacts because the 2010 National Research Council (NRC) report Hidden Costs of Energy: The Unpriced Consequences of Energy Production and Use recommended that Congress focus on emissions costs because they have the highest documented social impact costs

  10. National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Federal Equal ... A. Name and Address of Agency National Nuclear Security Administration Office of ...

  11. National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Federal Equal ... A. Name and Address of Agency National Nuclear Security Administration 1000 Independence ...

  12. National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    15 National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2013 PER Babcock & Wilcox Technical ... The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Production Office (NPO) took into ...

  13. National Science Bowl Finals

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01

    National Science Bowl finals and awards at the National Building Museum in Washington D.C. Monday 5/3/2010

  14. First National Technology Center

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    First National Technology First National Technology Center Center Electronic Equipment - manufactured to withstand 8 milliseconds of voltage disruption CBEMA Curve - Chips ...

  15. National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office . Environmental Management Operations February 2015 Nevada National Security ...

  16. Level: National Data;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Energy Sources and Shipments, ... (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Energy Sources and Shipments, ...

  17. 2015 Seminars Archive | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Seminars Archive Date Title December 16, 2015 11:00 am Bldg. 440, A105-106 "Quantum Optics of Carbon Nanotubes," Xuedan Ma,Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies Los Alamos National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories. Hosted by Gary Wiederrecht Because of their photoluminescence (PL) emission that spans over the 1.3 - 1.5 μm telecom spectral regime, individual semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been considered as ideal candidates for single photon

  18. Study Pinpoints Sources of Polluting Vehicle Emissions (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    Unburned lubricant produces 60%-90% of organic carbon emissions. While diesel fuel is often viewed as the most polluting of conventional petroleum-based fuels, emissions from gasoline engines can more significantly degrade air quality. Gasoline exhaust is at least as toxic on a per-unit-mass basis as diesel exhaust, and contributes up to 10 times more particulate matter (PM) to the emission inventory. Because emissions from both fuels can gravely impact health and the environment, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) launched a study to understand how these pollutants relate to fuels, lubricants, and engine operating conditions. NREL's Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE) project tested a variety of vehicles over different drive cycles at moderate (72 F) and cold (20 F) temperatures. Testing included: (1) Normal and high-emitting light-, medium-, and heavy-duty vehicles; (2) Gasoline, diesel, and compressed natural gas (CNG)-powered vehicles; (3) New and aged lubricants representative of those currently on the market; and (4) Gasoline containing no ethanol, E10, Texas-mandated low-emission diesel fuel, biodiesel, and CNG. The study confirmed that normally functioning emission control systems for gasoline light-duty vehicles are very effective at controlling organic carbon (OC) emissions. Diesel vehicles without aftertreatment emission control systems exhibited OC emissions approximately one order of magnitude higher than gasoline vehicles. High-emitter gasoline vehicles produced OC emissions similar to diesel vehicles without exhaust aftertreatment emission control. Exhaust catalysts combusted or converted more than 75% of lubricating oil components in the exhaust gases. Unburned crankcase lubricant made up 60%-90% of OC emissions. This OC represented 20%-50% of emitted PM in all but two of the vehicles. Three-way catalysts proved effective at reducing most of the OC. With high PM emitters or vehicles with deteriorated

  19. Engineer, Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Engineer, Sandia National Laboratories Clifford Ho Clifford Ho February 2010 Asian American Engineer of the Year Clifford Ho, a Sandia engineer, has been selected by the Chinese Institute of Engineers - USA to receive the Asian American Engineer of the Year Award. The honor is presented each year to the nation's most outstanding Asian American engineers and scientists who make significant, lasting and global contributions to the nation. Ho was recognized for his

  20. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory DE-AC52-07NA27344 Operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC BASIC Contract (Official) Modifications (Official) Funding Mods Available Upon Request Conformed Contract (Unofficial) LLNL Sec A (SF33) (pdf, 91KB) See Modifications Section under Conformed Contract Link LLNS Conformed Contract (weblink) LLNL Sec B-H (pdf, 306KB) LLNL Sec I pdf 687KB LLNL Sec J Appx A (pdf, 67KB) LLNL

  1. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration Pacific Northwest National Laboratory NNSA deputy visits PNNL to see radiochemistry and threat detection capabilities NNSA Principal Deputy Administrator Madelyn Creedon visited the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Washington this month to see the work it does for the agency, focusing on radiochemistry and threat detection. NNSA hosts international CTBT on-site inspection experts at Nevada National Security Site This month, NNSA hosted a Comprehensive

  2. national security | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    security Klotz visits Y-12 to see progress on new projects and ongoing work on NNSA's national security missions Last week, NNSA Administrator Lt. Gen. Frank Klotz (Ret.) visited the Y-12 National Security Complex to check on the status of ongoing projects like the Uranium Processing Facility as well as the site's continuing uranium operations. He also met with the Region 2 volunteers of the Radiogical... Managing the data deluge for national security analysts ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. - After a

  3. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a design laboratory that is responsible for the safety and reliability of the nuclear explosives package in nuclear weapons. It supports surveillance, assessment, and refurbishment of the nuclear weapons stockpile. LLNL also possesses unique high-energy-density physics capabilities and scientific computing assets. The lab is managed by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC and

  4. National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos National Security, LLC Fiscal Year 2014 Performance Evaluation Report (PER) NNSA Los Alamos Field Office Performance Period: October 2013 - September 2014 November 14, 2014 NA-LA November 14, 2014 Executive Summary This Performance Evaluation Report (PER) provides the assessment of Los Alamos National Security, LLC performance for the period of October 1, 2013 through September 30, 2014, as evaluated against the objectives defined in the Fiscal

  5. National Science Bowl | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Science Bowl Texas students win regional National Science Bowl competition, secure spot in finals in nation's capital More than 200 students from 37 from High schools across the Texas Panhandle gathered together with a few hundred volunteers for a meeting and competition of the minds: The Pantex Science Bowl 2016. Set up like a game show with buzzers, toss up and bonus questions, these groups of four students... Amarillo Students Win Regional National Science Bowl Competition, Secure Spot in

  6. sandia national laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    sandia national laboratory Sandia California celebrates 60 years On March 8, Sandia/California celebrates its 60th anniversary. The site, which began with a singular nuclear weapons mission, now supports all Sandia mission areas. Nuclear weapons still accounts for nearly half of the site's work, along with strong programs in homeland security, transportation... Managing the data deluge for national security analysts ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. - After a disaster or national tragedy, bits of information

  7. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  8. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carver, Donald W.; Whittaker, Jerry W.

    1980-01-01

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal.

  9. National Lab Impact Initiative

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lab Impact Initiative Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy EERE National Lab Impact Summit Driving American Energy Innovation and Competitiveness May 4, 2016 | 7:30 am-7:00 pm National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado EERE National Lab Impact Summit // i ` http://www.cyclotronroad.org/home TABLE OF CONTENTS Department of Energy National Lab Abbreviations .........................................................................................................ii Welcome Letter

  10. First National Technology Center

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Speaker presentation prepared by Dennis Hughes, a lead property manager with First National Buildings Inc.

  11. National Security Science | Los National Alamos Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LANSCE: Mission-Critical for National Security Nuclear Energy for Our Challenging Future The Invisible Neutron Threat Blasting Missiles Out of the Sky LANL and the Air Force: ...

  12. National Renewable Energy Laboratory | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory NNSA lab recognized for innovation to power electric ... Annual Merit Review Awards recognized significant achievements in the Department of Energy

  13. National Ignition Facility Reaches Milestone Early | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Reaches Milestone Early | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

  14. Previous Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home About Us Our Operations Acquisition and Project Management M & O Support Department Sandia National Laboratories ...

  15. Sandia National Laboratory Performance Evaluations | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Sandia National Laboratory Performance Evaluations FY 2016 FY 2016 Performance Evaluation Plan, Sandia Corporation FY 2015 FY 2015 Performance Evaluation Report, Sandia Corporation ...

  16. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Life Extension Program Bay Area national labs team to tackle long-standing automotive hydrogen storage challenge SOLAR POWER PURCHASE FOR DOE LABORATORIES More about LLNL...

  17. Manager, Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of New Mexico's Anderson School of Management's Hall of Fame Inductee Jim Novak from Sandia National Laboratories will be inducted into the University of New Mexico's ...

  18. sandia national lab | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    sandia national lab NNSA Researchers Advance Technology for Remote Reactor Monitoring NNSA's Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development Program drives the innovation ...

  19. national labs | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    and hackers engage innovation and partnerships NNSA's labs change the world everyday through cutting-edge developments in support of NNSA's critical national security missions. ...

  20. National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) National Nuclear Security Administration FY15 Year End Report Semi Annual Report FY14 Year End Report Semi Annual

  1. Researcher, Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratories Award: Fellow of the Institute of Electrical & Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Profile: Paul Dodd, a Sandia National Laboratories researcher, has been named a Fellow...

  2. California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards for Light-Duty Vehicles (Update) (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    The state of California was given authority under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90) to set emissions standards for light-duty vehicles that exceed federal standards. In addition, other states that do not comply with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) set by the Environmental Protection Agency under CAAA90 were given the option to adopt Californias light-duty vehicle emissions standards in order to achieve air quality compliance. CAAA90 specifically identifies hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, and NOx as vehicle-related air pollutants that can be regulated. California has led the nation in developing stricter vehicle emissions standards, and other states have adopted the California standards.

  3. Environment | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environment Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Summary Electric power plant environmental International emissions All environment data reports Analysis & Projections Major Topics Most popular Carbon/greenhouse gas emissions International Other environmental issues Projections Recurring All reports Browse by Tag Alphabetical Frequency Tag Cloud Current Issues & Trends See more › Energy-related CO2 emissions from natural gas surpass coal as fuel use patterns change natural

  4. Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from Advanced Technologies...

  5. National Security, Weapons Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Security, Weapons Science National Security, Weapons Science National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. CoMuEx» Explosives Center» Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT) The Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory is part of the DOE's stockpile stewardship

  6. Foreign-national Investigators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    foreign national investigators Foreign-national Investigators Foreign National Investigators must have access to B174 shown on their badge. Foreign National Investigators must notify Beth Mariotti by e-mail of their first intended presence in B174. By September 2009, it is expected that there will be no restrictions on computer use by Foreign National Investigators at JLF. However, LLNL prohibits the use of personally-owned computers on-site

  7. Elastic emission polishing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loewenthal, M.; Loseke, K.; Dow, T.A.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Elastic emission polishing, also called elastic emission machining (EEM), is a process where a stream of abrasive slurry is used to remove material from a substrate and produce damage free surfaces with controlled surface form. It is a noncontacting method utilizing a thick elasto-hydrodynamic film formed between a soft rotating ball and the workpiece to control the flow of the abrasive. An apparatus was built in the Center, which consists of a stationary spindle, a two-axis table for the workpiece, and a pump to circulate the working fluid. The process is controlled by a programmable computer numerical controller (CNC), which presently can operate the spindle speed and movement of the workpiece in one axis only. This apparatus has been used to determine material removal rates on different material samples as a function of time, utilizing zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) particles suspended in distilled water as the working fluid. By continuing a study of removal rates the process should become predictable, and thus create a new, effective, yet simple tool for ultra-precision mechanical machining of surfaces.

  8. Zero emission coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziock, H.; Lackner, K.

    2000-08-01

    We discuss a novel, emission-free process for producing hydrogen or electricity from coal. Even though we focus on coal, the basic design is compatible with any carbonaceous fuel. The process uses cyclical carbonation of calcium oxide to promote the production of hydrogen from carbon and water. The carbonation of the calcium oxide removes carbon dioxide from the reaction products and provides the additional energy necessary to complete hydrogen production without additional combustion of carbon. The calcination of the resulting calcium carbonate is accomplished using the high temperature waste heat from solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), which generate electricity from hydrogen fuel. Converting waste heat back to useful chemical energy allows the process to achieve very high conversion efficiency from fuel energy to electrical energy. As the process is essentially closed-loop, the process is able to achieve zero emissions if the concentrated exhaust stream of CO{sub 2} is sequestered. Carbon dioxide disposal is accomplished by the production of magnesium carbonate from ultramafic rock. The end products of the sequestration process are stable naturally occurring minerals. Sufficient rich ultramafic deposits exist to easily handle all the world's coal.

  9. A Community Emissions Data System (CEDS) for Historical Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Zhou, Yuyu; Kyle, G. Page; Wang, Hailong; Yu, Hongbin

    2015-04-21

    Historical emission estimates for anthropogenic aerosol and precursor compounds are key data needed for Earth system models, climate models, and atmospheric chemistry and transport models; both for general analysis and assessment and also for model validation through comparisons with observations. Current global emission data sets have a number of shortcomings, including timeliness and transparency. Satellite and other earth-system data are increasingly available in near real-time, but global emission estimates lag by 5-10 years. The CEDS project will construct a data-driven, open source framework to produce annually updated emission estimates. The basic methodologies to be used for this system have been used for SO2 (Smith et al. 2011, Klimont, Smith and Cofala 2013), and are designed to complement existing inventory efforts. The goal of this system is to consistently extend current emission estimates both forward in time to recent years and also back over the entire industrial era. The project will produce improved datasets for global and (potentially) regional model, allow analysis of trends across time, countries, and sectors of emissions and emission factors, and facilitate improved scientific analysis in general. Consistent estimation of uncertainty will be an integral part of this system. This effort will facilitate community evaluation of emissions and further emission-related research more generally.

  10. Maximum Achievable Control Technology for New Industrial Boilers (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    As part of Clean Air Act 90 (CAAA90, the EPA on February 26, 2004, issued a final rulethe National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) to reduce emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from industrial, commercial, and institutional boilers and process heaters. The rule requires industrial boilers and process heaters to meet limits on HAP emissions to comply with a Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) floor level of control that is the minimum level such sources must meet to comply with the rule. The major HAPs to be reduced are hydrochloric acid, hydrofluoric acid, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, and nickel. The EPA predicts that the boiler MACT rule will reduce those HAP emissions from existing sources by about 59,000 tons per year in 2005.

  11. Pacific Northwest Laboratory facilities radionuclide inventory assessment CY 1992-1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sula, M.J.; Jette, S.J.

    1994-09-01

    Assessments for evaluating compliance with airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subparts H and I) were performed for 33 buildings at the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Pacific Northwest Laboratory on the Hanford Site, and for five buildings owned and operated by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories in Richland, Washington. The assessments were performed using building radionuclide inventory data obtained in 1992 and 1993. Results of the assessments are summarized in Table S.1 for DOE-PNL buildings and in Table S.2 for Battelle-owned buildings. Based on the radionuclide inventory assessments, four DOE-PNL buildings (one with two emission points) require continuous sampling for radionuclides per 40 CFR 61. None of the Battelle-owned buildings require continuous emission sampling.

  12. Argonne National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Argonne National Laboratory First-of-its-Kind NNSA Capability to Support Study of Materials at Extreme Conditions for Stockpile Stewardship WASHINGTON - A new first-of-its-kind-worldwide research capability will help unravel the mysteries of material behavior at extreme conditions and short time scales in support of the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration's (DOE/NNSA's) vital

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia National Laboratories: Missions:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Defense Systems & Assessments: Accomplishments Accomplishments About Defense Systems & Assessments Program Areas Accomplishments Archives Cybersecurity Programs Accomplishments Protecting the nation Sandia lasers test and calibrate sensors on U.S. satellites Sandia's scientists and engineers have a significant impact on national security and continually deliver results, including these noteworthy successes from fiscal year 2012: AHW Launch Advanced Hypersonic Weapon test flight

  14. National Supplemental Screening Program | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Supplemental Screening Program The National Supplemental Screening Program (NSSP) offers medical screenings at no charge for former U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site workers who may have been exposed to hazardous substances at work. For more information, see the documents below. PDF icon Retiree_Benefits_NSSPbrochure.pdf PDF icon Retiree_Benefits_newtest.pdf PDF icon Retiree_Benefits_NSSPemployees

  15. sandia national labotartory | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    sandia national labotartory Sandia National Laboratory Sandia Field Office Contact the Field Office Contract Administration & Business Management Emergency Information Facilities & Projects Nuclear Operations Environment, Safety & Health Public Affairs Safeguards & Security Performance and Quality Assurance Programs NEPA Reading Room

  16. Quality Assurance Project Plan for radioactive airborne emissions data compilation and reporting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burris, S.A.; Thomas, S.P.

    1994-02-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for compiling data from radioactie aiborne emissions. These data will be reported to the US Environmental Protection Agency, the US Department of Energy, and the Washington State Department of Health. Hanford Site radioactive airborne emissions are reported to the US Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61, ``National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants , ``Subpart H, ``National Emissions Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities`` (EPA 1989a). Reporting to US Department of Energy is performed in compliance with requirements of US Department of Energy Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1988a).

  17. Radionuclide air emissions report for the Hanford site calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleckler, B.P., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-26

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1995, and the resulting effective dose equivalent (FDE) to the maximally exposed member of the public, referred to as the `MEI.` The report has been prepared and will be submitted in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, `National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,` Subpart H, `National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.` This report has also been prepared for and will be submitted in accordance with the reporting requirements of the Washington Administrative Code Chapter 246-247, `Radiation Protection-Air Emissions.`

  18. Power Plant Emission Reductions Using a Generation Performance Standard

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01

    In an earlier analysis completed in response to a request received from Representative David McIntosh, Chairman of the Subcommittee on National Economic Growth, Natural Resources, and Regulatory Affairs, the Energy Information Administration analyzed the impacts of power sector caps on nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and carbon dioxide emissions, assuming a policy instrument patterned after the sulfur dioxide allowance program created in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. This paper compares the results of that work with the results of an analysis that assumes the use of a dynamic generation performance standard as an instrument for reducing carbon dioxide emissions.

  19. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electricity suppliers and electricity companies must also provide a fuel mix report to customers twice annually, within the June and December billing cycles. Emissions information must be disclos...

  20. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fuel Disclosure: Virginia’s 1999 electric industry restructuring law requires the state's electricity providers to disclose -- "to the extent feasible" -- fuel mix and emissions data regarding...

  1. ADVANCED EMISSIONS CONTROL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.A. Farthing

    2001-02-06

    The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs, or air toxics) from coal-fired boilers. The project goal is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), fabric filters (baghouses), and wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) systems. Development work initially concentrated on the capture of trace metals, fine particulate, hydrogen chloride, and hydrogen fluoride. Recent work has focused almost exclusively on the control of mercury emissions.

  2. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. A. Farthing; G. T. Amrhein; G. A. Kudlac; D. A. Yurchison; D. K. McDonald; M. G. Milobowski

    2001-03-31

    The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs, or air toxics) from coal-fired boilers. This objective is being met by identifying ways to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), fabric filters (fabric filters), and wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD) systems. Development work initially concentrated on the capture of trace metals, hydrogen chloride, and hydrogen fluoride. Recent work has focused almost exclusively on the control of mercury emissions.

  3. Biodiesel and Pollutant Emissions (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, R.; Williams, A.; Ireland, J.; Hayes, B.

    2006-09-28

    Presents the results from three methods of testing--engine, chassis, and PEM--for testing nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from B20.

  4. Fugitive Emissions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fugitive emissions refers to the release of greenhouse gases (GHGs) from pressurized ... substitutes for high-impact fugitive greenhouse gases (GHGs) among the DOE sites. ...

  5. High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Refrigeration System | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency, Low-Emission Refrigeration System High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Refrigeration System Image of the compressor rack and system diagram for the CO2 refrigeration system.<br /> Credit: Oak Ridge National Lab Image of the compressor rack and system diagram for the CO2 refrigeration system. Credit: Oak Ridge National Lab Diagram of the compressor rack and system diagram for the CO2 refrigeration system.<br /> Credit: Oak Ridge National Lab Diagram of the compressor rack and

  6. Guide to Low-Emission Boiler and Combustion Equipment Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oland, CB

    2002-05-06

    Boiler owners and operators who need additional generating capacity face a number of legal, political, environmental, economic, and technical challenges. Their key to success requires selection of an adequately sized low-emission boiler and combustion equipment that can be operated in compliance with emission standards established by state and federal regulatory agencies. Recognizing that many issues are involved in making informed selection decisions, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) sponsored efforts at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop a guide for use in choosing low-emission boilers and combustion equipment. To ensure that the guide covers a broad range of technical and regulatory issues of particular interest to the commercial boiler industry, the guide was developed in cooperation with the American Boiler Manufacturers Association (ABMA), the Council of Industrial Boiler Owners (CIBO), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The guide presents topics pertaining to industrial, commercial, and institutional (ICI) boilers. Background information about various types of commercially available boilers is provided along with discussions about the fuels that they burn and the emissions that they produce. Also included are discussions about emissions standards and compliance issues, technical details related to emissions control techniques, and other important selection considerations. Although information in the guide is primarily applicable to new ICI boilers, it may also apply to existing boiler installations.

  7. Engineer, Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Engineer, Sandia National Laboratories Sandra Begay-Campbell Sandra Begay-Campbell Ely S. Parker Award Sandra Begay-Campbell, a Sandia National Laboratories engineer and a member of the Navajo Nation, was selected for the prestigious Ely S. Parker Award by the American Indian Science and Engineering Society at an honors banquet Oct. 31 in Portland, Ore. Begay-Campbell, who has worked at Sandia for 17 years and is a principal member of the technical staff, received the

  8. National Energy Education Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Energy Education Summit is organized by the Council of Energy Research and Education Leaders (CEREL) and will serve as a first-of-its-kind national forum for energy educators, subject...

  9. Sandia National Laboratories

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    feet underground.

    Bay Area national labs team to tackle long-standing automotive hydrogen storage challenge http:www.nnsa.energy.govblogbay-area-national-labs-team-tackle-...

  10. Nevada National Security Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 24, 2014 Cultural Artifacts Cross Eras at the Nevada National Security Site It is well known that the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) is home to many artifacts from the ...

  11. Nevada National Security Site

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    HISTORYIn 1950, President Truman established what is now known as the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) to perform nuclear weapons testing activities.  In support of national defense initiatives...

  12. National Geothermal Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Geothermal Energy Association (GEA) will be holding it’s fifth annual National Geothermal Summit on June 3-4 at the Grand Sierra Resort and Casino in Reno, NV. The National Geothermal Summit is...

  13. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    participates in National Lab Day to increase awareness of science across the nation April 29, 2010 Events planned May 4-5 at Bradbury Science Museum LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, April...

  14. 2012 National Electricity Forum

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the 2012 National Electricity Forum, held February 8-9, 2012 and jointly organized by DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability (OE) and the National Association of...

  15. nevada national security site

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7%2A en Nevada National Security Site operator recognized for green fleet http:www.nnsa.energy.govblognevada-national-security-site-operator-recognized-green-fleet

    The...

  16. National Environmental Research Parks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The National Environmental Research Parks are outdoor laboratories that provide opportunities for environmental studies on protected lands that act as buffers around Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The research parks are used to evaluate the environmental consequences of energy use and development as well as the strategies to mitigate these effects. They are also used to demonstrate possible environmental and land-use options. The seven parks are: Fermilab National Environmental Research Park; Hanford National Environmental Research Park; Idaho National Environmental Research Park; Los Alamos National Environmental Research Park; Nevada National Environmental Research Park; Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park; and Savannah River National Environmental Research Park. This document gives an overview of the events that led to the creation of the research parks. Its main purpose is to summarize key points about each park, including ecological research, geological characteristics, facilities, and available databases.

  17. China: Emissions pattern of the world leader in CO2 emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregg, J; Andres, Robert Joseph; Marland, Gregg

    2008-01-01

    Release of carbon dioxide (CO2) from fossil fuel combustion and cement manufacture is the primary anthropogenic driver of climate change. Our best estimate is that China became the largest national source of CO2 emissions during 2006. Previously, the United States (US) had occupied that position. However, the annual emission rate in the US has remained relatively stable between 2001-2006 while the emission rate in China has more than doubled, apparently eclipsing that of the US in late 2006. Here we present the seasonal and spatial pattern of CO2 emissions in China, as well as the sectoral breakdown of emissions. Though our best point estimate places China in the lead position in terms of CO2 emissions, we qualify this statement in a discussion of the uncertainty in the underlying data (3-5% for the US; 15-20% for China). Finally, we comment briefly on the implications of China's new position with respect to international agreements to mitigate climate change.

  18. Facilities | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities Some of the nation's most powerful and sophisticated facilities for energy research Argonne National Laboratory is home to some of the nation's most powerful and sophisticated research facilities. As a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory, Argonne offers access to the facilities listed below through a variety of arrangements. Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Center for Transportation Research Materials Engineering Research Facility Distributed Energy Research Center

  19. Seneca Nation- 2007 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On the three territories of the Seneca Nation, there exist opportunities for energy development from both renewable and nonrenewable resources.

  20. National User Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National User Facilities Our Vision National User Facilities Research Areas In Focus Global Solutions ⇒ Navigate Section Our Vision National User Facilities Research Areas In Focus Global Solutions Berkeley Lab's User Facilities-Engines of Discovery Berkeley Lab's User Facilities provide state-of-the-art resources for scientists across the nation and around the world. About 10,000 researchers a year use these facilities, representing nearly one third of the total for all Department of Energy

  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tribal Energy Program Review Roger Taylor Manger State, Local & Tribal Integrated Application Group National Renewable Energy Laboratory November 5-8, 2007 Major DOE National Laboratories Brookhaven Brookhaven Pacific Northwest Pacific Northwest Lawrence Berkeley Lawrence Berkeley Lawrence Livermore Lawrence Livermore h h h h h INEL INEL National Renewable National Renewable Energy Laboratory Energy Laboratory Los Alamos Los Alamos Sandia Sandia Argonne Argonne Oak Ridge Oak Ridge Defense

  2. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scientists will codirect $14.5 million National Center for Systems Biology July 28, 2009 Lab contributes computer modeling, antibody engineering capabilities Los Alamos, New Mexico, July 28, 2009- Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists will codirect a new National Center for Systems Biology located at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. The new Spatiotemporal Modeling Center (STMC) is funded by a $14.5 million, five- year grant from the National Institute for General Medical Sciences

  3. National Hydropower Map

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    High-resolution map produced by Oak Ridge National Laboratory showing hydropower resources throughout the United States.

  4. Management | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Sciences & Engineering Focus: Understanding & Control of Interfacial Processes Web Site Michael Thackeray Michael Thackeray (Deputy Director) Argonne National Laboratory...

  5. Downloads | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    --Environmental policy & planning --Geochemistry ... -Decision science --Emergency & disaster management ... the nation to solve society's complex scientific problems. ...

  6. National Geothermal Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Geothermal Energy Association hosts its annual National Geothermal Summit in Reno, Nevada, June 3-4, 2015.

  7. Alamos National Laboratory's 2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    .1 million pledged during Los Alamos National Laboratory's 2013 employee giving campaign December 17, 2012 LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO, December 17, 2012-Los Alamos National Laboratory employees have again demonstrated concern for their communities and those in need by pledging a record $2.13 million to United Way and other eligible nonprofit programs. Los Alamos National Security, LLC, which manages and operates the Laboratory for the National Nuclear Security Administration, plans to prorate its $1

  8. Alamos National Security, LLC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Eleven nonprofit organizations receive community giving grants from Los Alamos National Security, LLC December 15, 2009 Los Alamos, New Mexico, December 15, 2009- Eleven local nonprofit organizations with projects supported by Los Alamos National Laboratory employee volunteers received $75,000 in Community Giving grants from Los Alamos National Security, LLC, the company that manages the Lab for the National Nuclear Security Administration. The organizations are located in Los Alamos, Española,

  9. Photos | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -Arms control & nonproliferation --Research reactor conversion -Biometrics -Biotechnology for national security -Cyber security -Facility security -Decision science ...

  10. Videos | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -Arms control & nonproliferation --Research reactor conversion -Biometrics -Biotechnology for national security -Cyber security -Facility security -Decision science ...

  11. National SCADA Testbed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab Photovoltaic Systems Evaluation Laboratory PV Regional ... Facility Geomechanics and Drilling Labs National ... Health Monitoring Offshore Wind High-Resolution ...

  12. NATIONAL SECURITY TECHNOLOGIES - NEVADA NATIONAL SECURITY SITE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    - NEVADA NATIONAL SECURITY SITE FISCAL YEARS 2009 THRU 2015 SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM RESULTS & FORECAST CATEGORY Total Procurement Total SB Small Disad. Bus Woman-Owned SB Hub-Zone ...

  13. lasers. National Ignition Facility | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    target shot of fiscal year 2015 WASHINGTON - Last week, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) fired its 300th laser target shot in fiscal year (FY) 2015, meeting the year's goal...

  14. National SCADA Test Bed

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) is a one-of-a-kind national resource that draws on the integrated expertise and capabilities of the Argonne, Idaho, Lawrence Berkeley, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, Pacific Northwest, and Sandia National Laboratories to address the cybersecurity challenges of energy delivery systems.

  15. Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Sandia National Laboratories Sandia employee dubbed a master at locking down NNSA's enterprise NNSA's primary missions include keeping dangerous materials out of the wrong hands while protecting and maintaining the nation's nuclear deterrent. It's no surprise, then, that NNSA's labs and sites employ the best experts available in security. At NNSA's Sandia... On Womens Equality Day, we celebrate NNSA's talented Women in STEM Sandia California hosts Military Academic Collaboration students Sandia

  16. Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) Sandia National Laboratories NNSA's Sandia National Laboratories are responsible for the development, testing, and production of specialized nonnuclear components and quality assurance and systems engineering for all of the United States' nuclear weapons. Sandia has locations in Albuquerque, NM; Livermore, CA; Kauai, HI; and Tonopah, NV. The labs are operated by Sandia Corporation. Visit our website Z-Machine Z-Machine Related News Sandia employee dubbed a master at locking down

  17. Physicist, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Physicist, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Kennedy Reed Kennedy Reed July 2009 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science and Engineering Mentoring President Obama has named Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory physicist Kennedy Reed as a recipient of the prestigious Presidential Award for Excellence in Science and Engineering Mentoring. Reed is a theoretical physicist at the laboratory, conducting research on atomic collisions in high temperature

  18. Researcher, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Researcher, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Placeholder for Bruce Macintosh image Bruce Macintosh February 2010 AAAS Newcomb Cleveland Prize A Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researcher's paper published in November 2008 is co-winner of this year's American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Newcomb Cleveland Prize. The Paper is one of two outstanding papers published in Science from June 1, 2008 through May 31, 2009. Bruce

  19. Researcher, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Researcher, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Placeholder for Mike Fitzgerald image Mike Fitzgerald February 2010 AAAS Newcomb Cleveland Prize A Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researcher's paper published in November 2008 is co-winner of this year's American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Newcomb Cleveland Prize. The Paper is one of two outstanding papers published in Science from June 1, 2008 through May 31, 2009. Another

  20. Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) Sandia National Laboratories Allison Davis Allison Davis October 2009 NNSA Defense Programs Award of Excellence Two individuals and nine teams received the NNSA Defense Programs Awards of Excellence at ceremonies this year at Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico and California. The NNSA Defense Programs Awards of Excellence were created in the early 1980s to give special recognition to those at the laboratories and plants directly associated with the stockpile modernization

  1. Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) Sandia National Laboratories Kevin Eklund Kevin Eklund May 2010 NNSA Defense Programs Awards of Excellence Two individuals and nine teams received the NNSA Defense Programs Awards of Excellence at ceremonies this year at Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico and California. The NNSA Defense Programs Awards of Excellence were created in the early 1980s to give special recognition to those at the laboratories and plants directly associated with the stockpile modernization program.

  2. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration Livermore National Laboratories NNSA, Air Force Complete Successful B61-12 Life Extension Program Instrumented Flight Tests WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and United States Air Force completed eight successful B61-12 Life Extension Program (LEP) Vibration Fly Around/ Instrumented Measurement Vehicle (VFA/IMV) tests at Eglin Air Force Base and Edwards Air Force Base during July to

  3. Sandia National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) Sandia National Laboratory NNSA's Sandia National Laboratories are responsible for the development, testing, and production of specialized nonnuclear components and quality assurance and systems engineering for all of the United States' nuclear weapons. Sandia has locations in Albuquerque, New Mexico; Livermore, California; Kauai, Hawaii; and Tonopah, Nevada. Sandia Field Office Contact the Field Office Contract Administration & Business Management Emergency Information Facilities

  4. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory--Capture and Sequestration Support Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - Capture and Sequestration Support Services Background The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is helping to develop technologies to capture, separate, and store carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to reduce green-house gas (GHG) emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS)-the capture of CO 2 from large point sources and subsequent injection into deep

  5. Idaho National Laboratory’s FY14 Greenhouse Gas Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frerichs, Kimberly Irene

    2015-03-01

    A greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory is a systematic approach to account for the production and release of certain gases generated by an institution from various emission sources. The gases of interest are those that climate science has identified as related to anthropogenic global climate change. This document presents an inventory of GHGs generated during Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored entity, located in southeastern Idaho. In recent years, concern has grown about the environmental impact of GHGs. This, together with a desire to decrease harmful environmental impacts, would be enough to encourage the calculation of an inventory of the total GHGs generated at INL. Additionally, INL has a desire to see how its emissions compare with similar institutions, including other DOE national laboratories. Executive Order 13514 requires that federal agencies and institutions document reductions in GHG emissions. INL’s GHG inventory was calculated according to methodologies identified in federal GHG guidance documents using operational control boundaries. It measures emissions generated in three scopes: (1) INL emissions produced directly by stationary or mobile combustion and by fugitive emissions, (2) the share of emissions generated by entities from which INL purchased electrical power, and (3) indirect or shared emissions generated by outsourced activities that benefit INL (occur outside INL’s organizational boundaries, but are a consequence of INL’s activities). This inventory found that INL generated 73,521 metric tons (MT) of CO2 equivalent (CO2e ) emissions during FY14. The following conclusions were made from looking at the results of the individual contributors to INL’s FY14 GHG inventory: • Electricity (including the associated transmission and distribution losses) is the largest contributor to INL’s GHG inventory, with over 50% of the CO2e emissions • Other sources with high emissions were

  6. Technology Opportunities to Reduce U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1997-10-01

    This report serves as the technology basis of a needed national climate change technology strategy, with the confidence that a strong technology R&D program will deliver a portfolio of technologies with the potential to provide very substantial greenhouse gas emission reductions along with continued economic growth. Much more is needed to define such a strategy, including identification of complementary deployment policies and analysis to support the seeping and prioritization of R&D programs. A national strategy must be based upon governmental, industrial, and academic partnerships.

  7. Generalized local emission tomography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katsevich, Alexander J.

    1998-01-01

    Emission tomography enables locations and values of internal isotope density distributions to be determined from radiation emitted from the whole object. In the method for locating the values of discontinuities, the intensities of radiation emitted from either the whole object or a region of the object containing the discontinuities are inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) to define the location S of the isotope density discontinuity. The asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) is determined in a neighborhood of S, and the value for the discontinuity is estimated from the asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) knowing pointwise values of the attenuation coefficient within the object. In the method for determining the location of the discontinuity, the intensities of radiation emitted from an object are inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) to define the location S of the density discontinuity and the location .GAMMA. of the attenuation coefficient discontinuity. Pointwise values of the attenuation coefficient within the object need not be known in this case.

  8. Vehicle Emissions Review - 2011 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Vehicle Emissions Review - 2011 Reviews regulatory requirements and general technology approaches for heavy- and light-duty vehicle emissions control - filter technology, new catalysts, NOx control, diesel oxidation catalysts, gasoline particulate filters deer11_johnson.pdf (2.67 MB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Emissions Review - 2012 Diesel Emission Control Review Review of Emerging Diesel Emissions and Control

  9. Vehicle Emissions Review - 2012 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Vehicle Emissions Review - 2012 Reviews vehicle emission control highlighting representative studies that illustrate the state-of-the-art deer12_johnson.pdf (4.79 MB) More Documents & Publications Diesel Emission Control Review Review of Emerging Diesel Emissions and Control Diesel Emission Control Technology in Review

  10. National Template: Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    pipeline safety) CONTROLLING AUTHORITIES: State and Local Government (zoning, building permits) CONTROLLING AUTHORITIES: DOT/NHTS (crashworthiness) EPA (emissions) Many standards development organizations (SDOs) are working to develop codes and standards needed to prepare for the commercialization of alternative fuel vehicle technologies. This graphic template shows the SDOs responsible for leading the support and development of key codes and standards for hydrogen. National Template: Hydrogen

  11. An approach for verifying biogenic greenhouse gas emissions inventories with atmospheric CO 2 concentration data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogle, Stephen; Davis, Kenneth J.; Lauvaux, Thomas; Schuh, Andrew E.; Cooley, Dan; West, Tristram O.; Heath, L.; Miles, Natasha; Richardson, S. J.; Breidt, F. Jay; Smith, Jim; McCarty, Jessica L.; Gurney, Kevin R.; Tans, P. P.; Denning, Scott

    2015-03-10

    Verifying national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventories is a critical step to ensure that reported emissions data to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) are accurate and representative of a country’s contribution to GHG concentrations in the atmosphere. Verification could include a variety of evidence, but arguably the most convincing verification would be confirmation of a change in GHG concentrations in the atmosphere that is consistent with reported emissions to the UNFCCC. We report here on a case study evaluating this option based on a prototype atmospheric CO2 measurement network deployed in the Mid-Continent Region of the conterminous United States. We found that the atmospheric CO2 measurement data did verify the accuracy of the emissions inventory within the confidence limits of the emissions estimates, suggesting that this technology could be further developed and deployed more widely in the future for verifying reported emissions.

  12. Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for the Hanford Site Calendar Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROKKAN, D.J.

    2000-06-01

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the US. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in 1999 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) member of the public. The report has been prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities'', and with the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247. Radiation Protection-Air Emissions. The federal regulations in Subpart H of 40 CFR 61 require the measurement and reporting of radionuclides emitted from US. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and the resulting offsite dose from those emissions. A standard of 10 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent (EDE) is imposed on them. The EDE to the MEI due to routine emissions in 1999 from Hanford Site point sources was 0.029 mrem (2.9 E-04 mSv), which is less than 0.3 percent of the federal standard. WAC 246-247 requires the reporting of radionuclide emissions from all Hanford Site sources, during routine as well as nonroutine operations. The state has adopted the 40 CFR 61 standard of 10 mrem/yr EDE into their regulations. The state further requires that the EDE to the MEI be calculated not only from point source emissions but also from diffuse and fugitive sources of emissions. The EDE from diffuse and fugitive emissions at the Hanford Site in 1999 was 0.039 mrem (3.9 E-04 mSv) EDE. The total dose from point sources and from diffuse and fugitive sources of radionuclide emissions during all operating conditions in 1999 was 0.068 mrem (6.8 E-04 mSv) EDE, which is less than 0.7 percent of the state standard.

  13. CEQ Issues Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and the Effects of Climate Change in NEPA Reviews

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) issued revised draft guidance on consideration of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and the effects of climate change in National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) reviews on December 18, 2014

  14. Los Alamos National Security, LLC Los Alamos National Laboratory...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Security, LLC Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Assessment Los Alamos National Security, LLC Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Voluntary...

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory participates in National Lab Day...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab Day Los Alamos National Laboratory participates in National Lab Day to increase awareness of science across the nation Connecting teachers and students with scientists,...

  16. Physical Sciences Facility Air Emission Control Equivalency Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, David M.; Belew, Shan T.

    2008-10-17

    This document presents the adequacy evaluation for the application of technology standards during design, fabrication, installation and testing of radioactive air exhaust systems at the Physical Sciences Facility (PSF), located on the Horn Rapids Triangle north of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) complex. The analysis specifically covers the exhaust portion of the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems associated with emission units EP-3410-01-S, EP-3420-01-S and EP 3430-01-S.

  17. Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from Advanced

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Desulfation | Department of Energy 3 DEER Conference Presentation: Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2003_deer_huff.pdf (894.29 KB) More Documents & Publications Exploring Advanced Combustion Regimes for Efficiency and Emissions Combining Low-Temperature Combustion with Lean-NOx Trap Yields Progress Toward Targets of Efficient NOx Control for Diesels Intra-catalyst Reductant Chemistry in Lean NOx Traps: A Study on Sulfur Effects Technologies | Department of Energy

    9 DOE Hydrogen

  18. Can reducing black carbon emissions counteract global warming?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tami C. Bond; Haolin Sun

    2005-08-15

    Field measurements and model results have recently shown that aerosols may have important climatic impacts. One line of inquiry has investigated whether reducing climate-warming soot or black carbon aerosol emissions can form a viable component of mitigating global warming. Black carbon is produced by poor combustion, from our example hard coal cooking fires for and industrial pulverized coal boilers. The authors review and acknowledge scientific arguments against considering aerosols and greenhouse gases in a common framework, including the differences in the physical mechanisms of climate change and relevant time scales. It is argued that such a joint consideration is consistent with the language of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Results from published climate-modeling studies are synthesized to obtain a global warming potential for black carbon relative to that of CO{sub 2} (680 on a 100 year basis). This calculation enables a discussion of cost-effectiveness for mitigating the largest sources of black carbon. It is found that many emission reductions are either expensive or difficult to enact when compared with greenhouse gases, particularly in Annex I countries. Finally, a role for black carbon in climate mitigation strategies is proposed that is consistent with the apparently conflicting arguments raised during the discussion. Addressing these emissions is a promising way to reduce climatic interference primarily for nations that have not yet agreed to address greenhouse gas emissions and provides the potential for a parallel climate agreement. 31 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenbaum, Daniel; Costantini, Maria; Van Erp, Annemoon; Shaikh, Rashid; Bailey, Brent; Tennant, Chris; Khalek, Imad; Mauderly, Joe; McDonald, Jacob; Zielinska, Barbara; Bemis, Jeffrey; Storey, John; Hallberg, Lance; Clark, Nigel

    2013-12-31

    The objective of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) was to determine before widespread commercial deployment whether or not the new, energy-efficient, heavy duty diesel engines (2007 and 2010 EPA Emissions Standards Compliant) may generate anticipated toxic emissions that could adversely affect the environment and human health. ACES was planned to take place in three phases. In Phase 1, extensive emissions characterization of four production-intent prototype engine and control systems designed to meet 2007 standards for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was conducted at an existing emissions characterization facility: Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). One of the tested engines was selected (at random, after careful comparison of results) for health testing in Phase 3. In Phase 2, extensive emission characterization of three production-intent prototype engine and control systems meeting the 2010 standards (including more advanced NOx controls to meet the more stringent 2010 NOx standards) was conducted at the same test facility. In Phase 3, one engine/aftertreatment system selected from Phase 1 was further characterized during health effects studies (at an existing inhalation toxicology laboratory: Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, [LRRI]) to form the basis of the ACES safety assessment. The Department of Energy (DOE) award provided funding for emissions characterization in Phases 1 and 2 as well as exposure characterization in Phase 3. The main health analyses in Phase 3 were funded separately and are not reported here.

  20. Emissions Tool Estimates the Impact of Emissions on Smart Grid...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The free, web-based calculator aims to estimate the impact of NOx, SO2 and CO2 emissions on smart grid infrastructure investments, taking into account specific context and project ...

  1. Evaluating Radionuclide Air Emission Stack Sampling Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.

    2002-12-16

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of research and development (R&D) facilities for the U.S. Department of Energy at the Hanford Site, Washington. These facilities are subject to Clean Air Act regulations that require sampling of radionuclide air emissions from some of these facilities. A revision to an American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard on sampling radioactive air emissions has recently been incorporated into federal and state regulations and a re-evaluation of affected facilities is being performed to determine the impact. The revised standard requires a well-mixed sampling location that must be demonstrated through tests specified in the standard. It also carries a number of maintenance requirements, including inspections and cleaning of the sampling system. Evaluations were performed in 2000 2002 on two PNNL facilities to determine the operational and design impacts of the new requirements. The evaluation included inspection and cleaning maintenance activities plus testing to determine if the current sampling locations meet criteria in the revised standard. Results show a wide range of complexity in inspection and cleaning activities depending on accessibility of the system, ease of removal, and potential impact on building operations (need for outages). As expected, these High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA)-filtered systems did not show deposition significant enough to cause concerns with blocking of the nozzle or other parts of the system. The tests for sampling system location in the revised standard also varied in complexity depending on accessibility of the sample site and use of a scale model can alleviate many issues. Previous criteria to locate sampling systems at eight duct diameters downstream and two duct diameters upstream of the nearest disturbances is no guarantee of meeting criteria in the revised standard. A computational fluid dynamics model was helpful in understanding flow and

  2. Metal tritides helium emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beavis, L.C.

    1980-02-01

    Over the past several years, we have been measuring the release of helium from metal tritides (primarily erbium tritide). We find that qualitatively all tritides of interest to us behave the same. When they are first formed, the helium is released at a low rate that appears to be related to the amount of surface area which has access to the outside of the material (either film or bulk). For example, erbium tritide films initially release about 0.3% of the helium generated. Most tritide films emit helium at about this rate initially. At some later time, which depends upon the amount of helium generated, the parent occluding element and the degree of tritium saturation of the dihydride phase the helium emission changes to a new mode in which it is released at approximately the rate at which it is generated (for example, we measure this value to be approx. = .31 He/Er for ErT/sub 1/./sub 9/ films). If erbium ditritide is saturated beyond 1.9 T/Er, the critical helium/metal ratio decreases. For example, in bulk powders ErT/sub 2/./sub 15/ reaches critical release concentration at approx. = 0.03. Moderate elevation of temperature above room temperature has little impact on the helium release rate. It appears that the process may have approx. = 2 kcal/mol activation energy. The first helium formed is well bound. As the tritide ages, the helium is found in higher energy sites. Similar but less extensive measurements on scandium, titanium, and zirconium tritides are also described. Finally, the thermal desorption of erbium tritides of various ages from 50 days to 3154 days is discussed. Significant helium is desorbed along with the tritium in all but the youngest samples during thermodesorption.

  3. Acoustic emission sensor radiation damage threshold experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beeson, K.M.; Pepper, C.E.

    1994-09-01

    Determination of the threshold for damage to acoustic emission sensors exposed to radiation is important in their application to leak detection in radioactive waste transport and storage. Proper response to system leaks is necessary to ensure the safe operation of these systems. A radiation impaired sensor could provide ``false negative or false positive`` indication of acoustic signals from leaks within the system. Research was carried out in the Radiochemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the beta/gamma radiation damage threshold for acoustic emission sensor systems. The individual system consisted of an acoustic sensor mounted with a two part epoxy onto a stainless steel waveguide. The systems were placed in an irradiation fixture and exposed to a Cobalt-60 source. After each irradiation, the sensors were recalibrated by Physical Acoustics Corporation. The results were compared to the initial calibrations performed prior to irradiation and a control group, not exposed to radiation, was used to validate the results. This experiment determines the radiation damage threshold of each acoustic sensor system and verifies its life expectancy, usefulness and reliability for many applications in radioactive environments.

  4. Schneider National | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Jump to: navigation, search Name: Schneider National Place: Denver, CO Website: www.schneidernational.com References: Schneider National1 Information About Partnership...

  5. cygnus | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    and operated with National Securities Technologies and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), has fired its 3,000th shot. Originally...

  6. Flat panel display development activities at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiBello, E.G.; Worobey, W.; Burchett, S.; Hareland, W.; Felter, T.; Mays, B.

    1994-12-31

    The flat panel display development activities underway at Sandia National Laboratories are described. Research is being conducted in the areas of glass substrates, phosphors, large area processes, and electron emissions. Projects are focused on improving process yield, developing large area processes, and using modeling techniques to predict design performance.

  7. Trading Emissions PLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Trading Emissions PLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Trading Emissions PLC Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: EC2N 4AW Product: Trading Emissions PLC is an investment fund...

  8. Active Diesel Emission Control Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems Active Diesel Emission Control Systems 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conferencen Presentation: RYPOS Active Diesel Emission Control Systems ...

  9. SNL Los Alamos National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration SNL Los Alamos National Laboratory

  10. National Ignition Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) National Ignition Facility Glass amplifiers in Laser Bay 2 at the National Ignition Facility. The construction of the 192-beam 1.8 MJ UV NIF, the world's most energetic laser, was completed in March 2009. Current experiments are focusing on using the NIF laser and other ICF high energy density facilities leading to demonstrate fusion ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory. The NIF is also being used to support basic science and SSP experiments. By the end of FY 2012, the

  11. Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) Sandia National Laboratories Sandia National Laboratories DE-AC04-94AL85000 Operated by Sandia Corporation a Subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation Contract Conformed 09/30/2015 to Modification 0588. View previous Sandia Contract and Mods (M081-A201). BASIC Contract (Official) Modifications (Official) Funding Mods Available Upon Request Conformed Contract (Updated 09/30/2015 to Mod 0588) (Unofficial) SNL M202 Section A (Supersedes Basic and all Mods) (pdf, 397KB) SNL M216 (9/15/04)

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Ethanol Vehicle Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle

  13. Reduction of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions for lean Burn Engine Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGill, R.N.

    1998-08-04

    Lean-burn engines offer the potential for significant fuel economy improvements in cars and trucks, perhaps the next great breakthrough in automotive technology that will enable greater savings in imported petroleum. The development of lean-burn engines, however, has been an elusive goal among automakers because of the emissions challenges associated with lead-burn engine technology. Presently, cars operate with sophisticated emissions control systems that require the engine's air-fuel ratio to be carefully controlled around the stoichiometric point (chemically correct mixture). Catalysts in these systems are called "three-way" catalysts because they can reduce hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxide emissions simultaneously, but only because of the tight control of the air-fuel ratio. The purpose of this cooperative effort is to develop advanced catalyst systems, materials, and necessary engine control algorithms for reducing NOX emissions in oxygen-rich automotive exhaust (as with lean-burn engine technology) to meet current and near-future mandated Clean Air Act standards. These developments will represent a breakthrough in both emission control technology and automobile efficiency. The total project is a joint effort among five national laboratories, together with US CAR. The role of Lockheed-Martin Energy Systems in the total project is two fold: characterization of catalyst performance through laboratory evaluations from bench-scale flow reactor tests to engine laboratory tests of full-scale prototype catalysts, and microstructural characterization of catalyst material before and after test stand and/or engine testing.

  14. Limiting net greenhouse gas emissions in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, R A; Watts, E C; Williams, E R

    1991-09-01

    In 1988, Congress requested that DOE produce a study on carbon dioxide inventory and policy to provide an inventory of emissions sources and to analyze policies to achieve a 20% reduction in carbon dioxide emissions in 5 to 10 years and a 50% reduction in 15 to 20 years. Energy and environmental technology data were analyzed using computational analysis models. This information was then evaluated, drawing on current scientific understanding of global climate change, the possible consequences of anthropogenic climate change (change caused by human activity) and the relationship between energy production and use and the emission of radiatively important gases. Topics discussed include: state of the science in estimating atmosphere/climate change relationships, the potential consequences of atmosphere/climate change, us greenhouse emissions past and present, an approach to analyzing the technical potential and cost of reducing US energy-related greenhouse gas emissions, current policy base and National Energy Strategy actions, fiscal instruments, regulatory instruments, combined strategies and instruments, macroeconomic impacts, carbon taxation and international trade, a comparison to other studies.

  15. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, G.L.; Paquette, D.E.; Naidu, J.R.; Lee, R.J.; Briggs, S.L.K.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and summarizes information about environmental compliance for 1996. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and of a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in the ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna, and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at adjacent sites. The report also evaluates the Laboratory`s compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and non-radiological emissions and effluents to the environment.

  16. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-10-25

    This device relates to the concept of and means for performing Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography, which combines the advantages of linear holographic imaging and Acoustic Emission into a single non-destructive inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological, linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. The innovation is the concept of utilizing the crack-generated acoustic emission energy to generate a chronological series of images of a growing crack by applying linear, pulse holographic processing to the acoustic emission data. The process is implemented by placing on a structure an array of piezoelectric sensors (typically 16 or 32 of them) near the defect location. A reference sensor is placed between the defect and the array.

  17. emissions | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    cities CO2 emissions OpenEI suburbs US New research from the University of California-Berkeley shows that those who live in cities in the United States have significantly smaller...

  18. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ACES is a cooperative multi-party effort to characterize emissions and possible health effects of new, advanced heavy duty engine and control systems and fuels in the market 2007 - 2010.

  19. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.P.Evans; K.E. Redinger; M.J. Holmes

    1998-04-01

    The objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. Ideally, the project aim is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPS), fabric filters (baghouse), and wet flue gas desulfurization. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate and hydrogen chloride. Following the construction and evaluation of a representative air toxics test facility in Phase I, Phase II focused on the evaluation of mercury and several other air toxics emissions. The AECDP is jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development (oCDO), and Babcock& Wilcox-a McDermott company (B&W).

  20. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    grasslands 34 Net carbon dioxide sequestration in U.S. urban trees, yard trimmings, and food scraps 35 Emissions of carbon dioxide from biofuelbioenergy use by sector and fuel

  1. Diesel Emission Control in Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  2. Dielectric Resonator Metamasurfaces: Optical Magnetism Emission...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Optical Magnetism Emission and Optical Devices. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dielectric Resonator Metamasurfaces: Optical Magnetism Emission and Optical Devices. ...

  3. IPCC Emission Factor Database | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Emission Factor Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IPCC Emission Factor Database AgencyCompany Organization: World Meteorological Organization,...

  4. Steinbeis Technology Transfer Centre for Emissions Trading |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Steinbeis Technology Transfer Centre for Emissions Trading Jump to: navigation, search Name: Steinbeis Technology Transfer Centre for Emissions Trading Place: Augsburg, Bavaria,...

  5. IGES GHG Emissions Data | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.iges.or.jpencdmreportkyoto.html References: IGES GHG Emissions Data1 Summary "IGES GHG Emissions Data is aimed at...

  6. Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    Energy-related carbon emissions in manufacturing analysis and issues related to the energy use, energy efficiency, and carbon emission indicators.

  7. Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program - Bangladesh ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program - Bangladesh Redirect page Jump to: navigation, search REDIRECT Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Retrieved from...

  8. Zero Emissions Leasing LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zero Emissions Leasing LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Zero Emissions Leasing LLC Place: Honolulu, Hawaii Zip: 96822 Sector: Solar Product: Honolulu-based developer of solar...

  9. How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    dioxide emissions are the main component of greenhouse gas emissions caused by human activity. Carbon dioxide is emitted mostly as a byproduct of the combustion of fossil fuels...

  10. Emission Factors (EMFAC) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The EMission FACtors (EMFAC) model is used to calculate emission rates from all motor vehicles, such as passenger cars to heavy-duty trucks, operating on highways, freeways...

  11. Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from Advanced Technologies Measurement and Characterization ...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News 2016 PPM work featured in book chapter PPM Team Member Highlighted in 2016 Sandia Recruiting Video 2015 PPM Member receives national recognition PPM Member serves on national roadmapping study for modeling across length scales Members of PPM speak at the National Academies Workshop on Additive Manufacturing 2014 Studying materials at the breaking point. May 2014 Computer model used in softening steel. April 2014 2013 Density Functional Theory (DFT) provides ab-initio, electronica structure

  13. National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP NATIONAL HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP . . Toward a More Secure and Cleaner Energy Future for America Based on the results of the National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap Workshop Washington, DC April 2-3, 2002 United States Department of Energy November 2002 PRODUCTION * DELIVERY * STORAGE * CONVERSION * APPLICATIONS * PUBLIC EDUCATION AND OUTREACH PRODUCTION * DELIVERY * STORAGE * CONVERSION * APPLICATIONS * PUBLIC EDUCATION AND OUTREACH vii As we act on President Bush's National

  14. National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Keith Wipke, Sam Sprik, Jennifer Kurtz, Todd Ramsden, Chris Ainscough, Genevieve Saur February 6, 2012 DOE's Informational Webinar Series National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC v8 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 2

  15. National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8 Annual Review Roger Taylor November 17, 2008 National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Major DOE National Laboratories Brookhaven Pacific Northwest Lawrence Berkeley Lawrence Livermore          INEL National Renewable Energy Laboratory Los Alamos Sandia Argonne Oak Ridge   Defense Program Labs  Office of Science Labs  Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Lab  Environmental Management Lab  Fossil Energy Lab NETL 

  16. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration Pacific Northwest National Laboratory NNSA deputy visits PNNL to see radiochemistry and threat detection capabilities NNSA Principal Deputy Administrator Madelyn Creedon visited the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Washington this month to see the work it does for the agency, focusing on radiochemistry and threat detection. NNSA hosts international CTBT on-site inspection experts at Nevada National Security Site This month, NNSA hosted a Comprehensive

  17. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory i Table of Contents Letter from the Division Director 1 Innovation Prize Nominations 2 Innovation Prize Winner 5 About the Feynman Center for Innovation 6 Innovation Assets 7 Strategic Sponsored Work 8 National High Magnetic Field Laboratory 9 Licensing 10 SOLVE 11 Economic Development 12 STAR Cryoelectronics 13 Partnership 14 Verdesian Life Sciences 15 R&D 100 Awards 16 Federal Laboratory Consortium Awards 17 Los Alamos National Laboratory 1 As scientists and

  18. Idaho_National_Laboratory

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Stacey Francis Small Business Program Manager Idaho National Laboratory 2 Idaho National Laboratory Prime Contractors * Idaho National Laboratory - Managed and Operated by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC - Office of Nuclear Energy * Idaho Cleanup Project - Managed by Fluor Idaho, LLC - Office of Environmental Management * Naval Reactor Facility - Managed by Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corporation - Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Department of Energy - Idaho 3 We Maintain: * 890 square miles * 111

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Pathfinder Airborne ISR Systems Publications Sandia National Laboratories: Synthetic Aperature Radar (SAR): Publications Reports authored by Sandia National Laboratories 63 results OSTI ID Report No. Type Title Authors Pub. Date Researcher Sponsor 1121978 Full Text Available SAND2013-10619 Technical Report Window taper functions for subaperture processing. Doerry, Armin Walter Dec. 2013 Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

  20. Savannah River National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Savannah River National Laboratory srnl.doe.gov SRNL is a DOE National Laboratory operated by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions. At a glance 'Tin whiskers' suppression method Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have identified a treatment method that slows or prevents the formation of whiskers in lead-free solder. Tin whiskers spontaneously grow from thin films of tin, often found in microelectronic devices in the form of solders and platings. Background This problem was

  1. Mentoring | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mentoring Why mentoring? As one of the largest laboratories in the nation for science and engineering research, Argonne National Laboratory is home to some of the most prolific and well-renowned scientists and engineers. To maintain an environment that fosters innovative research, we are committed to ensuring the success of our major players on the frontlines of our research-our Postdoctoral Scientists. The Argonne National Laboratory has a long-standing reputation as a place that offers

  2. Alamos National Laboratory's 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    $2 million pledged during Los Alamos National Laboratory's 2014 employee giving campaign December 17, 2013 "I Give Because..." theme focuses on unique role Lab plays in local communities LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Dec. 17, 2013-Nearly $2 million has been pledged by Los Alamos National Laboratory employees to United Way and other eligible nonprofit programs during the Laboratory's 2014 Employee Giving Campaign. Los Alamos National Security, LLC, which manages and operates the Laboratory for the

  3. Alamos National Security, LLC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    200 nonprofit organizations to receive monetary donations from Los Alamos National Security, LLC June 7, 2010 Employee volunteer efforts to be recognized LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, June 7, 2010-Nonprofit organizations are receiving more than $117,000 from Los Alamos National Security, LLC during a recognition event beginning at 9 a.m. Wednesday at Fuller Lodge in downtown Los Alamos. The monetary donations are being made to the nonprofits as a result of the volunteer efforts of Los Alamos National

  4. Nevada National Security Site Performance Evaluations | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Nevada National Security Site Performance Evaluations FY 2016 FY 2016 Performance Evaluation Plan, National Security Technologies, LLC FY 2015 FY 2015 Performance Evaluation Report, National Security Technologies, LLC FY 2015 Performance Evaluation Report, Fee Determination Letter, National Security Technologies, LLC FY 2015 Performance Evaluation Plan, National Security Technologies, LLC FY 2014 FY 2014 Performance Evaluation Report, National Security

  5. National Day of Remembrance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-01

    Ames Laboratory observed the National Day of Remembrance for weapons workers from the Cold War era with a ceremony held Oct. 27, 2009 at the Ames Public Library.

  6. National Geothermal Student Competition

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Energy Department's National Geothermal Student Competition (GSC) seeks students interested in building and showcasing scientific research, communication and leadership skills to convey the...

  7. National RES Las Vegas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RES Las Vegas is another multifaceted event from The National Center which will feature unparalleled access to respected tribal leaders, members of congress, federal agency representatives, state...

  8. SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Impacts on Sandia and the Nation 2 SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES 3 LDRD Impacts on Sandia and the Nation For further information, contact: Wendy R. Cieslak Senior Manager, Science, Technology, and Engineering Strategic Initiatives wrciesl@sandia.gov (505) 844-8633 or Henry R. Westrich LDRD Program Manager hrwestr@sandia.gov 505-844-9092 LDRD Impacts on Sandia and the Nation ABOUT THE COVER: Images from some of the case studies in this brochure: a near-UV light- emitting diode (LED), a cell

  9. National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    the University of California for violations of nuclear safety rules at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in New Mexico. The University of California operates LANL for ...

  10. " Level: National Data;" " ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Reasons that Made Residual Fuel Oil Unswitchable, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: ... barrels." ,,,,"Reasons that Made Residual Fuel Oil Unswitchable" " "," ",,,..." " ...

  11. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    70th anniversary app for iPhone, iPads June 5, 2013 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., June 4, 2013-Los Alamos National Laboratory has launched its first app for iPhones and iPads as part of the Laboratory's yearlong celebration of 70 years serving the nation. The free application is available from the Apple Store (search for Los Alamos National Lab). The app enables users to learn more about the Laboratory's national security mission, cutting edge research, unique history, top-flight scientists and the many

  12. Careers | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    identity, genetic information, marital status, national origin, pregnancy, race, religion, sexual orientation, veteran status or any other characteristic protected by law. EEO...

  13. National Security Education Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurd, Alan J.

    2015-04-22

    Information about the National Security Education Center is given. Information about the Center’s history and current practices, including its facilities and its practicality are outlined.

  14. 2015 SACNAS National Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Location: The Gaylord Conventiona Center at The National Harbor, Prince George's County, MD POC: Recruitment@doe.gov Website: 2015 SACNAS Conference

  15. National Laboratory's Weapons Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Security, LLC, began managing the Laboratory. Prior to joining the Laboratory, McMillan served in a variety of research and management positions at Lawrence Livermore...

  16. 2015 APPA National Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The American Public Power Association (APPA) is hosting their national conference that covers the political, economic, and technological trends shaping the electric utility industry.

  17. Sandia National Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of, or supplemental to, this entry is a fair and accurate representation of this ... Sandia National Laboratories' (Sandia) Xyce Parallel Circuit Simulator is the world's ...

  18. National Energy Awareness Month

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    October is National Energy Awareness Month. It's also a chance to talk about our country’s energy security and its clean energy future.

  19. Seneca Nation- 2014 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Seneca Nation of Indians (SNI) will install one 1.8-megawatt (MW) wind turbine on tribal common lands near Lake Erie in New York.

  20. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3, 2015 Projects save taxpayer dollars, promote environmental stewardship, sustainability LOS ALAMOS, N.M., April 22, 2015-Nearly 400 Los Alamos National Laboratory employees on 32...

  1. National Laboratory Photovoltaics Research

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE supports photovoltaic (PV) research and development and facilities at its national laboratories to accelerate progress toward achieving the SunShot Initiative's technological and economic...

  2. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    million National Center for Systems Biology July 28, 2009 Lab contributes computer ... Center for Systems Biology located at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. ...

  3. Los alamos national laboratory

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    hosted representatives from 11StatesParties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and one representative from the United Nations Office for...

  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sustainability award October 14, 2010 LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, October 14, 2010-Los Alamos National Laboratory recently received an Environmental Sustainability (EStar) ...

  5. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6th Hazmat Challenge July 31, 2012 Competition tests skills of hazardous materials response teams LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, July 31, 2012 What: Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)...

  6. National Women's History Month

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NATIONAL WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH is an annual declared month that highlights the contributions of women to events in history and contemporary society.

  7. Mentoring | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne National Laboratory About Safety News Careers Education Community Diversity Directory Energy Environment Security User Facilities Science Work with Argonne Careers Apply ...

  8. Nevada National Security Site

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... and Beyond - National Security - Non-Proliferation - Environmental Management Defense ... explosive devices and to detect the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. * ...

  9. BROADER National Security Missions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    We use our nuclear materials and forensics expertise to help solve national security ... materials, security and consequence management, and manufacturing and technical ...

  10. National Day of Remembrance

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-03-01

    Ames Laboratory observed the National Day of Remembrance for weapons workers from the Cold War era with a ceremony held Oct. 27, 2009 at the Ames Public Library.

  11. National Drive Electric Week

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Celebrate National Drive Electric Week with ways to make your all-electric or plug-in hybrid cars even greener!

  12. National Laboratory Geothermal Publications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    You can find publications, including technical papers and reports, about geothermal technologies, research, and development at the following U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories.

  13. Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    short-pulse laser, scientists from Los Alamos, the Technical University of Darmstadt, Germany, and Sandia National Laboratories focus high-intensity light on an ultra-thin...

  14. National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    The Department of Energy (DOE), the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the University of California (UC) have agreed on new management and operations contracts for ...

  15. Awards | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Performance Award, 2013 (with two other researchers) U.S. Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies Office R&D Award, 2013 Argonne National Laboratory Distinguished...

  16. National Transportation Stakeholders Forum

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    National Transportation Stakeholders Forum OSRP * NNSA Contractors transporting in commerce, are required law to comply with applicable regulations required law to comply with ...

  17. Resources | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Career Postdoctoral Factsheet: Before You Arrive Newsletters Professional Development Mentoring Resources Postdoctoral Society of Argonne LinkedIn Group National Postdoctoral...

  18. Effect of Environmental Factors on Sulfur Gas Emissions from Drywall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddalena, Randy

    2011-08-20

    Problem drywall installed in U.S. homes is suspected of being a source of odorous and potentially corrosive indoor pollutants. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission's (CPSC) investigation of problem drywall incorporates three parallel tracks: (1) evaluating the relationship between the drywall and reported health symptoms; (2) evaluating the relationship between the drywall and electrical and fire safety issues in affected homes; and (3) tracing the origin and the distribution of the drywall. To assess the potential impact on human health and to support testing for electrical and fire safety, the CPSC has initiated a series of laboratory tests that provide elemental characterization of drywall, characterization of chemical emissions, and in-home air sampling. The chemical emission testing was conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The LBNL study consisted of two phases. In Phase 1 of this study, LBNL tested thirty drywall samples provided by CPSC and reported standard emission factors for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), aldehydes, reactive sulfur gases (RSGs) and volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs). The standard emission factors were determined using small (10.75 liter) dynamic test chambers housed in a constant temperature environmental chamber. The tests were all run at 25 C, 50% relative humidity (RH) and with an area-specific ventilation rate of {approx}1.5 cubic meters per square meter of emitting surface per hour [m{sup 3}/m{sup 2}/h]. The thirty samples that were tested in Phase 1 included seventeen that were manufactured in China in 2005, 2006 and 2009, and thirteen that were manufactured in North America in 2009. The measured emission factors for VOCs and aldehydes were generally low and did not differ significantly between the Chinese and North American drywall. Eight of the samples tested had elevated emissions of volatile sulfur-containing compounds with total RSG emission factors between 32 and 258 micrograms per square meter

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia National Laboratories: Missions:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Defense Systems & Assessments: Accomplishments Top Archives About Defense Systems & Assessments Program Areas Accomplishments Archives Cybersecurity Programs Archives Sandia's scientists and engineers have a significant impact on national security and continually deliver results. View our previous accomplishments: 2011 Archives: View our 2011 Accomplishments 2010 Archives: View our 2010 Accomplishments

  20. [GUIRR workshops on national competitiveness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayo, M. J.

    2003-12-30

    GUIRR conducted several projects in the area of national competitiveness, including a workshop on DOE National Laboratories and Universities Collaboration.

  1. ssp | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    for Computation at NNSA's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), announced ... Administration's (NNSA's) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory today announced the ...

  2. Infrared Land Surface Emissivity in the Vicinity of the ARM SGP Central Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Land Surface Emissivity in the Vicinity of the ARM SGP Central Facility R. O. Knuteson, R. G. Dedecker, W. F. Feltz, B. J. Osbourne, H. E. Revercomb, and D. C. Tobin Space Science and Engineering Center University of Wisconsin-Madison Madison, Wisconsin Introduction The University of Wisconsin Space Science and Engineering Center (UW-SSEC) has developed, under National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) funding, a model for the infrared land surface emissivity (LSE) in the

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Bioscience Investigating cellular and biomolecular processes for bioenergy and biodefense. Computing and information science Developing essential tools for solving the world's most difficult problems. Engineering science Applying predictive simulation to engineering design and decision-making. Materials science Leading the nation in the knowledge of materials engineering, processing, and aging. Nanodevices and microsystems Developing and delivering custom microsystems and national

  4. National Nanotechnology Initiative

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Materials Sciences & Engineering (MSE) Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences (CSGB) Accelerator and Detector Research Research Conduct Policies DOE Energy Innovation Hubs Energy Frontier Research Centers National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) Nanomaterials ES&H Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC)

  5. Kaw Nation- 2002 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The study will assess the feasibility of a commercial wind facility on lands selected and owned by the Kaw Nation adjacent to the vacant Chilocco Indian School campus. The Kaw Nation will examine the potential for integration of the wind facility into a redevelopment plan for the property.

  6. Idaho National Laboratory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Snake River Geothermal Consortium (SRGC) is a research partnership focused on advancing geothermal energy. Hosted by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), SRGC proposes establishing FORGE as a resource for technology development, deployment, and validation. Their team includes members from national laboratories, universities, industry, and state and federal agencies. The technical team consists of members from Baker Hughes, the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) – Idaho National Laboratory, University of Idaho, Idaho State University, Boise State University, University of Wyoming - Campbell Scientific, Chena Power, Geothermal Resources Group, Idaho Department of Water Resources, Idaho Geologic Survey, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Mink GeoHydro, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, University of Oklahoma, University of Utah, U.S. Geothermal, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

  7. Return to 1990: The cost of mitigating United States carbon emissions in the post-2000 period

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmonds, J.A.; Kim, S.H.; MacCracken, C.N.; Sands, R.D.; Wise, M.A.

    1997-10-01

    The Second Generation Model (SGM) is employed to examine four hypothetical agreements to reduce emissions in Annex 1 nations (OECD nations plus most of the nations of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union) to levels in the neighborhood of those which existed in 1990, with obligations taking effect in the year 2010. The authors estimate the cost to the US of complying with such agreements under three distinct conditions: no trading of emissions rights, trading of emissions rights only among Annex 1 nations, and a fully global trading regime. The authors find that the marginal cost of returning to 1990 emissions levels in the US in the absence of trading opportunities is approximately $108 per metric ton carbon in 2010. The total cost in that year is approximately 0.2% of GDP. International trade in emissions permits lowers the cost of achieving any mitigation objective by equalizing the marginal cost of carbon mitigation among countries. For the four mitigation scenarios in this study, economic costs to the US remain below 1% of GDP through at least the year 2020.

  8. Consent Order, Lawrence Livermore National National Security, LLC -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    WCO-2010-01 | Department of Energy Lawrence Livermore National National Security, LLC - WCO-2010-01 Consent Order, Lawrence Livermore National National Security, LLC - WCO-2010-01 October 29, 2010 Issued to Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC for deficiencies associated with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program On October 29, 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) issued a

  9. Development of the Emission Measurement and Information Tracking System (EMITS) for regulatory analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormack, C.E.; Dorenkamp, L.D.

    1994-10-01

    With the constant implementation of complex and restrictive state and federal clean air laws, a facility must have a comprehensive understanding of the types and amount of emissions associated with the facility`s operations. Knowledge of the facility`s emissions is essential to assess the operational impacts of current and upcoming legislation. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), located in California, is regulated by federal, state, and local air quality agencies. Of most concern to the facility is California`s Assembly Bill 2588 (also known as the {open_quotes}Air Toxics Hot Spots{close_quotes} program) and the federal Title III, Title V, and Title VI provisions of the Clean Air Act as amended in 1990. Because of the complex regulatory requirements, LLNL needed a system to calculate and classify air emissions by each applicable regulatory program. This paper outlines the development of LLNL`s comprehensive emissions inventory known as the Emissions Measurement and Information Tracking System (EMITS).

  10. U.S. Government Supports Low Emission Economic Growth (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, A.; Sandor, D.; Butheau, M.

    2013-11-01

    Countries around the world face the challenge of maintaining long-term sustainable economic growth and development under the threat of climate change. By identifying and pursuing a sustainable development pathway now, they are better positioned to reach their economic growth goals while addressing climate change impacts and lowering greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Low emission development strategies - development plans that promote sustainable social and economic development while reducing long-term GHG emissions - provide a pathway to preparing for a global low emission future. Partner country governments are working with the U.S. government through the Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies (EC-LEDS) program to further their national development objectives.

  11. National Ignition Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Ignition Facility Former Army Ranger wins Sandia-sponsored student of the year award Former Army Ranger Damon Alcorn recently received the Sandia National Laboratories-Livermore Chamber of Commerce Student of the Year Award. Presented at the Chamber's State of the City Luncheon last month, the annual award highlights a Las Positas College student with exemplary academic... NNSA makers and hackers engage innovation and partnerships NNSA's labs change the world everyday through cutting-edge

  12. Physicist, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Physicist, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Omar Hurricane Omar Hurricane Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Omar Hurricane has been named as a recipient of the Department of Energy's prestigious Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award. He is honored for his scientific leadership to advance understanding in a long-standing nuclear weapons physics anomaly and his contribution to nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship. He will be honored at a ceremony in Washington, D.C.

  13. Researcher, Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Researcher, Sandia National Laboratories David Haaland David Haaland December 2009 Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science Sandia researchers David Haaland and David Myers have been elected Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Election as a Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. Haaland was cited for "distinguished contributions in the area of chemometrics and spectral imaging,

  14. Researcher, Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Researcher, Sandia National Laboratories David Myers David Myers December 2009 Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science Sandia researchers David Haaland and David Myers have been elected Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Election as a Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. Myers was cited for "contributions to the science, management, and early application of ion implantation,

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: National Security Missions: International

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Homeland and Nuclear Security: Homeland Defense and Force Protection Programs Homeland Defense & Force Protection HDPF We design and implement advanced systems for intrusion detection and denial. We anticipate new threats and develop responses and countermeasures. We field technologies for protecting security forces and military personnel. We are committed to providing a Center of Excellence for Physical Security to support the DOE and DOD in ensuring the security of the nation's

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: National Security Missions: International

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Homeland and Nuclear Security: Remote Sensing and Verification Programs Remote Sensing and Verification Remote Sensing and Verification Image We extend Sandia's 60-year heritage in nuclear detonation detection to develop, deliver, and provide mission expertise for advanced remote sensing systems to monitor worldwide activities of consequence to national security. We design and build satellite sensor payloads and ground-based systems for the detection of nuclear detonations. We develop and

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia National Laboratories: Missions:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Defense Systems & Assessments: About Us Defense Systems About Defense Systems & Assessments Program Areas Accomplishments Cybersecurity Programs About Defense Systems & Assessments soldier silhouetted by a sunset Defense Systems & Assessments supports guardians of peace and freedom on the battlefield and in the laboratory by applying engineering, science, and technology solutions to deter, detect, defeat, and defend threats to our national security. We analyze and exploit the

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia National Laboratories: Missions:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Weapons: About About Nuclear Weapons at Sandia Weapons Researcher World-class scientists and engineers come to Sandia to conduct breakthrough research in nuclear weapons. Sandia designs more than 6,300 parts of a modern nuclear weapon's 6,500 components. Our state-of-the-art laboratories facilitate large-scale testing and computer simulation. Sandia's work is of the highest consequence and those doing the work face awesome responsibilities. Unlike other national labs, which focus on

  19. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Thin-film Photovoltaic Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    As clean energy increasingly becomes part of the national dialogue, lenders, utilities, and lawmakers need the most comprehensive and accurate information on GHG emissions from various sources of energy to inform policy, planning, and investment decisions. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that gives decision makers and investors more precise estimates of life cycle GHG emissions for renewable and conventional generation, clarifying inconsistent and conflicting estimates in the published literature, and reducing uncertainty.

  20. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    As clean energy increasingly becomes part of the national dialogue, lenders, utilities, and lawmakers need the most comprehensive and accurate information on GHG emissions from various sources of energy to inform policy, planning, and investment decisions. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that gives decision makers and investors more precise estimates of life cycle GHG emissions for renewable and conventional generation, clarifying inconsistent and conflicting estimates in the published literature, and reducing uncertainty.

  1. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Utility-Scale Wind Power: Systematic Review and Harmonization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As clean energy increasingly becomes part of the national dialogue, lenders, utilities, and lawmakers need the most comprehensive and accurate information on GHG emissions from various sources of energy to inform policy, planning, and investment decisions. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that gives decision makers and investors more precise estimates of life cycle GHG emissions for renewable and conventional generation, clarifying inconsistent and conflicting estimates in the published literature, and reducing uncertainty.

  2. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Nuclear Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As clean energy increasingly becomes part of the national dialogue, lenders, utilities, and lawmakers need the most comprehensive and accurate information on GHG emissions from various sources of energy to inform policy, planning, and investment decisions. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that gives decision makers and investors more precise estimates of life cycle GHG emissions for renewable and conventional generation, clarifying inconsistent and conflicting estimates in the published literature, and reducing uncertainty.

  3. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Coal-Fired Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As clean energy increasingly becomes part of the national dialogue, lenders, utilities, and lawmakers need the most comprehensive and accurate information on GHG emissions from various sources of energy to inform policy, planning, and investment decisions. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that gives decision makers and investors more precise estimates of life cycle GHG emissions for renewable and conventional generation, clarifying inconsistent and conflicting estimates in the published literature, and reducing uncertainty.

  4. Advanced Emission Control Development Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, A.P.

    1997-12-31

    Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  5. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. P. Evans

    1998-12-03

    McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species, hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  6. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, A P

    1998-12-03

    Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W's new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  7. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Holmes

    1998-12-03

    McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  8. Radionuclide air emissions report for the Hanford Site -- calendar year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleckler, B.P.; Rhoads, K.

    1998-06-17

    This report documents radionuclide air emission from the Hanford Site in 1997, and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed member of the public, referred to as the MEI. The report has been prepared in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities. This report has also been prepared in accordance with the reporting requirements of the Washington Administrative Code Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection-Air Emissions. The effective dose equivalent to the MEI from the Hanford Site`s 1997 point source emissions was 1.2 E-03 mrem (1.2 E-05 mSv), which is well below the 40 CFR 61 Subpart H regulatory limit of 10 mrem/yr. Radon and thoron emissions, exempted from 40 CFR 61 Subpart H, resulted in an effective dose equivalent to the MEI of 2.5 E-03 mrem (2.5 E-05 mSv). The effective dose equivalent to the MEI attributable to diffuse and fugitive emissions was 2.2 E-02 mrem (2.2 E-04 mSv). The total effective dose equivalent from all of the Hanford Site`s air emissions was 2.6 E-02 mrem (2.6 E-04 mSv). The effective dose equivalent from all of the Hanford Site`s air emissions is well below the Washington Administrative Code, Chapter 246-247, regulatory limit of 10 mrem/yr.

  9. Reduced carbon emission estimates from fossil fuel combustion and cement production in China

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Z.; Guan, D.; Wei, W.; Davis, S.; Ciais, P.; Bai, J; Peng, S.; Zhang, Q.; Hubacek, K.; Marland, Gregg; et al

    2015-08-19

    Nearly three-quarters of the growth in global carbon emissions from the burning of fossil fuels and cement production between 2010 and 2012 occurred in China. Yet estimates of Chinese emissions remain subject to large uncertainty; inventories of China’s total fossil fuel carbon emissions in 2008 differ by 0.3 gigatonnes of carbon, or 15 per cent. The primary sources of this uncertainty are conflicting estimates of energy consumption and emission factors, the latter being uncertain because of very few actual measurements representative of the mix of Chinese fuels. Here we re-evaluate China’s carbon emissions using updated and harmonized energy consumption andmore » clinker production data and two new and comprehensive sets of measured emission factors for Chinese coal. We find that total energy consumption in China was 10 per cent higher in 2000–2012 than the value reported by China’s national statistics, that emission factors for Chinese coal are on average 40 per cent lower than the default values recommended by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and that emissions from China’s cement production are 45 per cent less than recent estimates. Altogether, our revised estimate of China’s CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and cement production is 2.49 gigatonnes of carbon (2 standard deviations = ±7.3 per cent) in 2013, which is 14 per cent lower than the emissions reported by other prominent inventories. Over the full period 2000 to 2013, our revised estimates are 2.9 gigatonnes of carbon less than previous estimates of China’s cumulative carbon emissions. Our findings suggest that overestimation of China’s emissions in 2000–2013 may be larger than China’s estimated total forest sink in 1990–2007 (2.66 gigatonnes of carbon) or China’s land carbon sink in 2000–2009 (2.6 gigatonnes of carbon).« less

  10. Reduced carbon emission estimates from fossil fuel combustion and cement production in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Z.; Guan, D.; Wei, W.; Davis, S.; Ciais, P.; Bai, J; Peng, S.; Zhang, Q.; Hubacek, K.; Marland, Gregg; Andres, Robert Joseph; Crawford-Brown, D.; Lin, J.; Zhao, H.; Hong, C.; Boden, Thomas A.; Feng, K.; Peters, Glen P.; Xi, F.; Liu, J.; Li, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Zeng, Ning; He, K.

    2015-08-19

    Nearly three-quarters of the growth in global carbon emissions from the burning of fossil fuels and cement production between 2010 and 2012 occurred in China. Yet estimates of Chinese emissions remain subject to large uncertainty; inventories of China’s total fossil fuel carbon emissions in 2008 differ by 0.3 gigatonnes of carbon, or 15 per cent. The primary sources of this uncertainty are conflicting estimates of energy consumption and emission factors, the latter being uncertain because of very few actual measurements representative of the mix of Chinese fuels. Here we re-evaluate China’s carbon emissions using updated and harmonized energy consumption and clinker production data and two new and comprehensive sets of measured emission factors for Chinese coal. We find that total energy consumption in China was 10 per cent higher in 2000–2012 than the value reported by China’s national statistics, that emission factors for Chinese coal are on average 40 per cent lower than the default values recommended by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and that emissions from China’s cement production are 45 per cent less than recent estimates. Altogether, our revised estimate of China’s CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and cement production is 2.49 gigatonnes of carbon (2 standard deviations = ±7.3 per cent) in 2013, which is 14 per cent lower than the emissions reported by other prominent inventories. Over the full period 2000 to 2013, our revised estimates are 2.9 gigatonnes of carbon less than previous estimates of China’s cumulative carbon emissions. Our findings suggest that overestimation of China’s emissions in 2000–2013 may be larger than China’s estimated total forest sink in 1990–2007 (2.66 gigatonnes of carbon) or China’s land carbon sink in 2000–2009 (2.6 gigatonnes of carbon).

  11. Emission Market Opportunities for Federal Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vimmerstedt, L.; Shah, C.

    2005-06-01

    This document assists federal agencies in incorporating emissions market opportunities in their energy projects, including emission reduction credit markets and cap and trade. It looks at how potential emissions costs/revenues can be incorporated into project proposals, how groups can apply for emissions allowances, and how agencies can sell emissions allowances and receive the financial benefit. The fact sheet also outlines how FEMP can provide assistance throughout the process.

  12. Software solutions for emission monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeFriez, H.; Schillinger, S.; Seraji, H.

    1996-12-31

    Industry and state and federal environmental regulatory agencies are becoming ever more conciliatory due to the high cost of implementing the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) for the operation of Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems (CEMS). In many cases the modifications do nothing to reduce emissions or even to measure the pollution, but simply let the source owner or operator and the permitting authority agree on a monitoring method and/or program. The EPA methods and standards developed under the Code of Federal Regulations (CFRs) have proven to be extremely costly and burdensome. Now, the USEPA and state agencies are making efforts to assure that emissions data has a strong technical basis to demonstrate compliance with regulations such as Title V.

  13. Nevada National Security Site

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nevada National Security Site Proud Past, Exciting Future Nevada National Security Site Pre-Proposal Meeting November 19, 2015 Agenda * 8:30 am Welcome * 9:00 am Overview of NNSS and NFO * 10:00 am Break * 10:30 am NNSS Video * 11:00 am Questions * 11:30 am Lunch * 1:00 pm Solicitation Overview * 2:15 pm Break * 2:45 pm Questions * 4:00 pm Conclusion The Nevada National Security Site * Large geographically diverse outdoor laboratory - 1,360 square miles of federally owned and controlled land -

  14. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    remembers former director Harold Agnew September 30, 2013 Manhattan Project pioneer was LANL director from 1970-1979 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Sept. 30, 2013-Los Alamos National Laboratory Director Charlie McMillan today remembered Harold Agnew as a national treasure who transformed the Laboratory into what it is in the 21st century. "His contributions to the Laboratory made us the institution we are today," McMillan said. "It was his vision - decades ago - that recognized that national

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory's

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (NNSA) Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory DE-AC52-06NA25396 Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC Conformed to Modification 0341 dated 02/29/2016 BASIC Contract (Official) Modifications (Official) Funding Mods Available Upon Request Conformed Contract (Unofficial) LANL Basic Contract dated 12/21/05 (pdf, 5,501KB) LANL A004 (8/11/06) (pdf, 501KB) LANL Conformed Contract (Conformed to to Modification 0341 dated 02/29/2016) LANL A008 (9/29/06) (pdf, 485KB)

  16. AMERICA'S NATIONAL LABS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AMERICA'S NATIONAL LABS by 50 50 M A D E IN U S A B r e a k t h r o u g h s America's National Laboratory system has been changing and improving the lives of millions for more than 80 years. Born at a time of great societal need, this network of Department of Energy Laboratories has now grown into 17 facilities, working together as engines of prosperity and invention. As this list of 50 Break- throughs attests, National Laboratory discoveries have spawned industries, saved lives, generated new

  17. Foreign National New Hires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign Nationals Foreign National New Hires All foreign nationals including students and postdocs must complete this process. Contact (505) 667-4451, Option 6 Email The new-hire process, including the official pre-arrival period, does not begin until you receive and accept your written offer letter. Pre-Arrival New Hire Process Benefit Options New Employee App For your convenience, download the New Employee App from iTunes (IOS devices) or Google Play (Android devices). You can access new hire

  18. Sandia National Laboratories

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Laboratories Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Sand 2011-4582 P. ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Albuquerque N e w M e x i c o Sandia Mountains Q Q ApproximatelyQ8,800QacresQQ ofQDOE-ownedQandQQ permittedQland Q Q LocatedQwithinQtheQQ KirtlandQAirQForceQQ

  19. Lawrence Livermore National Lab Perforemance Evaluations | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Lawrence Livermore National Lab Perforemance Evaluations FY 2016 FY 2016 Performance Evaluation Plan, Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC FY 2015 FY 2015 Performance Evaluation Report, Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC FY 2015 Performance Evaluation Report, Fee Determination Letter, Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC FY 2015 Performance Evaluation Plan, Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC FY 2014 FY 2014 Performance Evaluation

  20. Transportable Emissions Testing Laboratory for Alternative Vehicles Emissions Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Nigel

    2012-01-31

    The overall objective of this project was to perform research to quantify and improve the energy efficiency and the exhaust emissions reduction from advanced technology vehicles using clean, renewable and alternative fuels. Advanced vehicle and alternative fuel fleets were to be identified, and selected vehicles characterized for emissions and efficiency. Target vehicles were to include transit buses, school buses, vocational trucks, delivery trucks, and tractor-trailers. Gaseous species measured were to include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons, and particulate matter. An objective was to characterize particulate matter more deeply than by mass. Accurate characterization of efficiency and emissions was to be accomplished using a state-of-the-art portable emissions measurement system and an accompanying chassis dynamometer available at West Virginia University. These two units, combined, are termed the Transportable Laboratory. An objective was to load the vehicles in a real-world fashion, using coast down data to establish rolling resistance and wind drag, and to apply the coast down data to the dynamometer control. Test schedules created from actual vehicle operation were to be employed, and a specific objective of the research was to assess the effect of choosing a test schedule which the subject vehicle either cannot follow or can substantially outperform. In addition the vehicle loading objective was to be met better with an improved flywheel system.