National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for nepa process costs

  1. Streamlining the process: A strategy for making NEPA work better and cost less

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, R.P.; Hansen, J.D.; Wolff, T.A.

    1998-05-01

    When the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) was enacted in 1969, neither Congress nor the Federal Agencies affected anticipated that implementation of the NEPA process would result in the intolerable delays, inefficiencies, duplication of effort, commitments of excessive financial and personnel resources, and bureaucratic gridlock that have become institutionalized. The 1975 Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations, which were intended to make the NEPA process more efficient and more useful to decision makers and the public, have either been largely ignored or unintentionally subverted. Agency policy mandates, like those of former Secretary of Energy Hazel R. O`Leary, to ``make NEPA work better and cost less`` have, so far, been disappointingly ineffectual. Federal Agencies have reached the point where almost every constituent of the NEPA process must be subjected to crisis management. This paper focuses on a ten-point strategy for streamlining the NEPA process in order to achieve the Act`s objectives while easing the considerable burden on agencies, the public, and the judicial system. How the ten points are timed and implemented is critical to any successful streamlining.

  2. The DOE NEPA process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Ooteghem, S.A.

    1993-09-01

    A brief overview indicating the types Of NEPA documents that are produced by the Department of Energy (DOE) in compliance with NEPA is shown in the figure. This figure indicates that the level of NEPA documentation required for any given project is graded and dependent on that project`s size, complexity, and potential consequences to health and the human environment. More complex projects with potentially greater environmental impacts require a much more in-depth analysis to ensure that these potential consequences can be managed and/or mitigated, so that the proposed project can proceed in compliance with NEPA. It is important to keep in mind the following points when conducting any project that involves Federal land, Federal monies, or Federal permits: Under these conditions (involvement of Federal lands, use of Federal monies, or requirement for Federal permits), some level of NEPA analysis and documentation is required. The NEPA process must be completed and a decision favorable to the proposed project must be supported by the NEPA analysis before that proposed project can fully expend Federal funds. Activities that cannot proceed until the NEPA analysis and decision-making process is completed are those that: Result in an adverse environmental impact and/or limit the choice of reasonable alternatives.

  3. The cost effectiveness of NEPA: Are the benefits worth the costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mangi, J.I. )

    1993-01-01

    NEPA is much loved, and much hated; too often ignored, and even more often ill-used. NEPA's framers intended the Act to have some substantive effects on Government actions, but they did not foresee the regulatory process and organizational structures that have accreted around the Act. Compliance with NEPA and its regulations may cost the US taxpayer, directly and indirectly, on the order of $1 billion a year. The benefits of NEPA compliance are obvious in some cases, not so in others. NEPA has success stories, but also boondoggles in its current and recent practice. Yet the taxpayer is entitled to know whether NEPA's non-trivial costs yield sufficient benefit to make compliance efforts a worthwhile investment. This paper will analyze the issue of the costs of NEPA compliance, and the issue of its benefits, and will suggest an answer as to the question of NEPA's cost effectiveness.

  4. The DOE NEPA process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Ooteghem, S.A.

    1993-06-01

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) declares that Federal agencies shall have a general commitment to {open_quotes}use all practicable means{close_quotes} to conduct their activities in a way that will promote {open_quotes}the general welfare where man and nature can exist in productive harmony.{close_quotes} Within these general guidelines, the manner in which NEPA requirements are implemented may be somewhat different and unique from one Federal agency to the next. A brief overview indicating the types of NEPA documents that are produced by the Department of Energy (DOE) in compliance with NEPA is shown in the figure. This figure indicates that the level of NEPA documentation required for any given project is graded and dependent on that project`s size, complexity, and potential consequences to health and the human environment. More complex projects with potentially greater environmental impacts require a much more in-depth analysis to ensure that these potential consequences can be managed and/or mitigated, so that the proposed project can proceed in compliance with NEPA.

  5. Guidance Regarding Actions That May Proceed During the NEPA Process...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Actions That May Proceed During the NEPA Process: Interim Actions Guidance Regarding Actions That May Proceed During the NEPA Process: Interim Actions DOE guidance to provide...

  6. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Process

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Process ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Steps to SWEIS Development Notice of Intent to Prepare SWEIS Public Scoping Period Opportunities for Public Input Preparation of Draft SWEIS Notice of Availability for Draft SWEIS Public Comment Period Preparation of Final SWEIS Notice of Availability of Final SWEIS Published in the Federal Register 30-Day Waiting Period Record of Decision Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by

  7. NEPA Process Transparency and Openness (DOE, 2009) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Process Transparency and Openness (DOE, 2009) NEPA Process Transparency and Openness (DOE, 2009) This memorandum describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) policy for posting online the categorical exclusion determinations made by DOE NEPA Compliance Officers. Download Document NEPA Process Transparency and Openness (59.69 KB) More Documents & Publications Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Second Edition (DOE, 2004) 10

  8. Guidelines and techniques for improving the NEPA process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salk, M.S.; Tolbert, V.R.; Dickerman, J.A.

    1999-05-01

    The Council on Environmental Quality`s (CEQ`s) principal aims in implementing the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) are (1) to reduce paperwork, (2) to avoid delay, and most importantly (3) to produce better decisions that protect, restore, and enhance the environment. This paper presents four strategies for improving the NEPA process along with tools that can be used to implement each strategy. The tools include guidelines for project management and problem definition, tips for acquiring existing information and identifying issues of public concern, worksheets on how to identify and analyze potential impacts on resources, ideas for enhancing NEPA documents, and a NEPA process checklist. The tools can be used at various stages of the NEPA process and provide a toolbox of guidelines and techniques to improve implementation of the NEPA process by focusing the pertinent information for decisionmakers and stakeholders.

  9. Using the NEPA Process to Further the Department's Mission and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DOE's Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health regarding ways to use the NEPA process to help accomplish the Department's mission, consistent with environmental...

  10. DOE Advances Innovative CCS Polygeneration Plant Through NEPA Process |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Advances Innovative CCS Polygeneration Plant Through NEPA Process DOE Advances Innovative CCS Polygeneration Plant Through NEPA Process July 9, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the California Energy Commission (CEC) are working together to advance an innovative carbon capture and storage (CCS) plant simultaneously through the federal National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review and a complementary California Energy

  11. Applying value engineering and modern assessment tools in managing NEPA: Improving effectiveness of the NEPA scoping and planning process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ECCLESTON, C.H.

    1998-09-03

    While the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) implementing regulations focus on describing ''What'' must be done, they provide surprisingly little direction on ''how'' such requirements are to be implemented. Specific implementation of these requirements has largely been left to the discretion of individual agencies. More than a quarter of a century after NEPA's enactment, few rigorous tools, techniques, or methodologies have been developed or widely adopted for implementing the regulatory requirements. In preparing an Environmental Impact Statement, agencies are required to conduct a public scoping process to determine the range of actions, alternatives, and impacts that will be investigated. Determining the proper scope of analysis is an element essential in the successful planning and implementation of future agency actions. Lack of rigorous tools and methodologies can lead to project delays, cost escalation, and increased risk that the scoping process may not adequately capture the scope of decisions that eventually might need to be considered. Recently, selected Value Engineering (VE) techniques were successfully used in managing a prescoping effort. A new strategy is advanced for conducting a pre-scoping/scoping effort that combines NEPA with VE. Consisting of five distinct phases, this approach has potentially wide-spread implications in the way NEPA, and scoping in particular, is practiced.

  12. NEPA Contracting Reform Guidance (DOE, 1996) | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    NEPA process costs, NEPA contractor evaluation procedures, and details on the DOE NEPA Web site. The statement of work here is superseded by that of the DOE-wide Contracts. ...

  13. NEPA Contracting Reform Guidance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    defining early what contractors should accomplish < establishing contracts ahead of time < minimizing cost while maintaining quality by * maximizing competition and use of incentives * using past performance information in awarding work * managing the NEPA process as a project This guidance provides: < model statements of work < information on contract types and incentives < direction on effective NEPA contract management by the NEPA Document Manager < a system for measuring

  14. File:09-FD-e - DOE NEPA Process.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    9-FD-e - DOE NEPA Process.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:09-FD-e - DOE NEPA Process.pdf Size of this preview: 463 599 pixels. Other...

  15. File:09-FD-g - USFS NEPA Process.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    g - USFS NEPA Process.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:09-FD-g - USFS NEPA Process.pdf Size of this preview: 463 599 pixels. Other...

  16. DOE Policy on NEPA Process Transparency and Openness | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policy on NEPA Process Transparency and Openness DOE Policy on NEPA Process Transparency and Openness Under the new policy, each Program and Field Office (including the National Nuclear Security Administration and the Power Marketing Administrations) will document and post online all categorical exclusion determinations involving classes of actions listed in Appendix B of the Department's NEPA implementing procedures, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021. DOE Policy on NEPA Process Transparency and Openness

  17. Hanford Advisory Board Handout U.S. Department of Energy NEPA vs. CERCLA Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Handout U.S. Department of Energy NEPA vs. CERCLA Process 2/7/2013 NEPA Notice of Intent to prepare an EIS Scoping -Public Comment Period Draft EIS Public Comment Period Final EIS Issued NEPA ROD(s) Issued NEPA Mitigation Action Plan (USDOE) RCRA Permitting Process with Opportunity for Public Comment CERCLA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Proposed Plan Issued - Notice Issued Public Comment Period CERCLA ROD Issued CERCLA Work Plan CERCLA 5-Year Review

  18. CEQ Issues Guidance on Improving NEPA Process Efficiency | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by reference; expediting responses to comments; and clear timelines for NEPA reviews. ... Efficiency CEQ Issues Revised Draft NEPA Guidance on GHG Emissions and Climate Change

  19. DOE Policy on NEPA Process Transparency and Openness

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2, 2009 MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF D E P A R T M m ELEMENTS FROM: DANIEL B. PONE SUBJECT: NEPA Process Transparency and Openness President Obama's memorandum on "Transparency and Open Government," issued in the very first hours of his presidency on January 2 1,2009, announced his commitment to creating an unprecedented level of openness in Government. The President specifically called on executive agency heads to make information about agency operations and decisions available to the

  20. DRAFT Hanford Advisory Board Handout for PIC MTG 2/6/13 DOE NEPA vs. CERCLA Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Advisory Board Handout for PIC MTG 2/6/13 DOE NEPA vs. CERCLA Process NEPA Notice of Intent (NOI) to prepare an EIS Published in Federal Register Scoping and Public Involvement Draft EIS Public Comment Period Final EIS Issued (with responses to public comments) NEPA ROD(s) Issued NEPA Mitigation Action Plan (USDOE) NEPA allows for judicial review before agency action under the Administrative Procedure Act (APA). RCRA Permitting Process with Opportunity for Public Comment for those units

  1. NEPA Contracting Reform Guidance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guidance also provides: model statements of work, direction on NEPA contract management by NEPA Document Manager; a system for measuring NEPA costs and for evaluating contractor ...

  2. OFFICE: NEPA REVIEWS:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 Annual NEPA Planning Summary NEPA COMPLIANCE OFFICER: Secretarial Officers and Heads of Field Organizations submit annual NEPA planning summaries that briefly describe the status of ongoing NEPA compliance activities including Environmental Assessments expected to be prepared in the next 12 months, Environmental Impact Statements expected to be prepared in the next 24 months, the planned cost and schedule for each NEPA review, and every 3 years each Field Organization must include an

  3. Socio-economic impact analysis in the NEPA process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karnovitz, A.; McQueen, S.

    1997-08-01

    National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) regulations require environmental impact statements to assess direct and indirect effects on a number of different environmental resource categories, including economic and social effects. However, NEPA regulations do not dictate the scope of the socio-economic analyses or specify which analytical procedures must be employed. As a result, socio-economic impact analyses vary considerably across NEPA documents in both the methodology of analysis and in the models used to quantify impacts. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of socio-economic analyses in NEPA documents and present strategies for ensuring that the socio-economic analyses are focused on the most relevant socio-economic indicators, while still conforming to the full intent of NEPA. This paper will provide guidance on what factors should be considered when identifying the economic indicators to be assessed. The paper will also describe and discuss various types of models currently used to quantify economic impacts in NEPA documents, and the comparative advantages and disadvantages of these models. In addition, the definition of the appropriate Return On Investment in relation to the model used and the analysis performed will be discussed. The offices of the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, and the Food and Drug Administration present real world examples of innovative approaches to socio-economic impact analysis.

  4. File:09-FD-f - DOD NEPA Process (2).pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (2).pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:09-FD-f - DOD NEPA Process (2).pdf Size of this preview: 463 599 pixels. Other resolution:...

  5. 516 DM Chapter 8 Managing the NEPA Process U.S. Fish and Wildlife...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    8 Managing the NEPA Process U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: 516 DM Chapter 8 Managing...

  6. 516 DM Chapter 12 Managing the NEPA Process National Park Service...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    12 Managing the NEPA Process National Park Service Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: 516 DM Chapter 12 Managing the...

  7. Title 40 CFR 1506.1 Limitations On Actions During NEPA Process...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    .1 Limitations On Actions During NEPA Process Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation: Title 40 CFR...

  8. Re-engineering the Federal planning process: A total Federal planning strategy, integrating NEPA with modern management tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eccleston, C.H.

    1997-09-05

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 was established by Congress more than a quarter of a century ago, yet there is a surprising lack of specific tools, techniques, and methodologies for effectively implementing these regulatory requirements. Lack of professionally accepted techniques is a principal factor responsible for many inefficiencies. Often, decision makers do not fully appreciate or capitalize on the true potential which NEPA provides as a platform for planning future actions. New approaches and modem management tools must be adopted to fully achieve NEPA`s mandate. A new strategy, referred to as Total Federal Planning, is proposed for unifying large-scale federal planning efforts under a single, systematic, structured, and holistic process. Under this approach, the NEPA planning process provides a unifying framework for integrating all early environmental and nonenvironmental decision-making factors into a single comprehensive planning process. To promote effectiveness and efficiency, modem tools and principles from the disciplines of Value Engineering, Systems Engineering, and Total Quality Management are incorporated. Properly integrated and implemented, these planning tools provide the rigorous, structured, and disciplined framework essential in achieving effective planning. Ultimately, the goal of a Total Federal Planning strategy is to construct a unified and interdisciplinary framework that substantially improves decision-making, while reducing the time, cost, redundancy, and effort necessary to comply with environmental and other planning requirements. At a time when Congress is striving to re-engineer the governmental framework, apparatus, and process, a Total Federal Planning philosophy offers a systematic approach for uniting the disjointed and often convoluted planning process currently used by most federal agencies. Potentially this approach has widespread implications in the way federal planning is approached.

  9. NEPA Policy Statement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The NEPA process is a valuable planning tool and provides an opportunity to improve the Department of Energy decisions and build public trust. Reviews of the Department's NEPA program have shown...

  10. Visions of success and achievement in recreation-related USDA Forest Service NEPA processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, Marc J.; Blahna, Dale J.; Cerveny, Lee K.; Mortimer, Michael J.

    2009-07-15

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is incorporated into the planning and decision-making culture of all natural resource agencies in the U.S. Yet, we know little about how the attitudes and internal interactions of interdisciplinary (ID) teams engaged in NEPA processes influence process outcomes. We conducted a web-based survey of 106 ID team leaders involved with environmental analyses (EA) or environmental impact statements (EIS) for projects dealing with recreation and travel management on national forests. We explore how they define success in these processes and identify factors most powerfully associated with perceptions of positive outcomes. The survey revealed a tremendous diversity in definitions of success. Strong correlations between the perceived importance of particular indicators of success and their achievement suggest that pre-conceived notions may often help to shape process outcomes. Regression analyses revealed the following factors as the best predictors of ID team leaders' perception of an 'excellent outcome': achievement of the agency mission, whether compromise had taken place between the interested parties, team satisfaction and harmony, timely process completion, and project implementation. Yet, respondents consistently ranked compromise with interested parties and team member satisfaction among the least important measures of successful NEPA processes. Results suggest that clarifying appropriate measures of success in NEPA processes across the agency could make ID team performance more consistent. The research also suggests that greater attention to ID team interactions, both internally and between teams and interested publics, could result in better outcomes.

  11. Effective early planning and integration of NEPA into the decision-making process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hannon, W.C.; Gensler, J.D. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper covers several key challenges and lessons learned in a federal agency assignment to educate the decision makers in NEPA and then to effectuate decisions early in the decision-making process based on the information derived from the NEPA process participants and documentation. Many of the key challenges faced by these federal decision makers stem, in part, from unfamiliarity with NEPA requirements and the benefits that can be derived by utilizing the process to support making an informed decision. Secondly, federal managers, at times believe that the process is a hindrance to accomplishing their mission. Lastly, there was a genuine belief that the public and other organizations within the agency should have no part in evaluating or commenting on the proposed action. Using the knowledge gained from drafting and reviewing EISs and EAs, Booz, Allen devised a systematic process that effectively: educated management on NEPA requirements; developed a management tool to guide and integrate the process; and encouraged the early and effective use of environmental and social information into all decision-making processes.

  12. NEPA Success Stories and Benefits | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NEPA Success Stories and Benefits NEPA Success Stories and Benefits September 16, 2013 Examples of Benefits from the NEPA process for ARRA funded activities Efforts to implement ...

  13. Tribal Energy NEPA Fundamentals Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tribal Energy NEPA Fundamentals Workshop is a three-day workshop for tribes to understand how to manage the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process and implement the Council on...

  14. Tribal Energy NEPA Fundamentals Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), this two-day workshop is for tribes involved in energy and natural resource development to understand how to manage the NEPA process,...

  15. Examples of Benefits from the NEPA process for ARRA funded activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Efforts to implement the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) include ensuring, and reporting on, timely NEPA reviews prepared in support of projects and activities funded under major provisions of ARRA. In addition to reporting on the status of the NEPA environmental reviews, agencies also report on the benefits of NEPA.

  16. Compilation and Presentation of Existing Data on Oil and Gas Leasing Development in a Manner Useful to the NEPA Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amy Childers; Dave Cornue

    2008-11-30

    In recognition of our nation's increasing energy needs, the George W. Bush Administration's National Energy Policy Development Group report (May 2001) suggested that one way to increase domestic on-shore production of oil and gas is to increase access to undiscovered resources on federal lands. Also recognized is the need to protect and conserve natural resources, which often are located on and around federal lands. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) was designed to create and maintain conditions under which man and nature can exist in productive harmony. NEPA requires that federal agencies prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) prior to the approval of any development activities. The NEPA scope is broad, with the process applicable to many situations from the building of highways, barge facilities and water outtake facilities, bridges, and watersheds to other less significant projects. The process often involves cooperation among multiple federal agencies, industry, scientists and consultants, and the surrounding community. The objective of the project, titled Compilation and Presentation of Existing Data on Oil and Gas Leasing and Development in a Manner Useful to the NEPA Process, is to facilitate faster and more comprehensive access to current oil and gas data by land management agencies and operators. This will enable key stakeholders in the NEPA process to make decisions that support access to federal resources while at the same time achieving a legitimate balance between environmental protection and appropriate levels of development.

  17. Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this guidance memorandum is to describe potential benefits of conducting a site-wide NEPA review (environmental impact statement orenvironmental assessment). Site-wide reviews can aid the Department of Energy (DOE) in meeting its goals to streamline the NEPA process, to make that process more useful to decision makers and thepublic, and to reduce the time and cost required to prepare NEPA documents.

  18. NEPA Lessons Learned Questionnaire

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A questionnaire to help aid the Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance in meeting its responsibility to foster continuing improvement of the Department of Energy's National Environmental Policy Act process.

  19. NREL Programmatic NEPA Determinations | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Programmatic NEPA Determinations NREL Programmatic NEPA Determinations The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy has developed five Programmatic NEPA Determinations (PND) to address routine activities and ongoing research conducted at National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) facilities. These determinations were conducted as part of a joint DOE and NREL NEPA Enhancement Project that was developed to help streamline the NEPA process for activities

  20. DOE NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index - List of Contents...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the NEPA Process - Interim Actions DOE2003 Administrative Record Guidance DOJ1991 Aligning the NEPA Process with EMS CEQ2007 Alternative Actions For Analysis in ...

  1. Making NEPA more effective and economical for the new millennium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HANSEN,ROGER P.; WOLFF,THEODORE A.

    2000-03-08

    This paper focuses on a ten-element strategy for streamlining the NEPA process in order to achieve the Act's objectives while easing the considerable burden on agencies, the public, and the judicial system. In other words, this paper proposes a strategy for making NEPA work better and cost less. How these ten elements are timed and implemented is critical to any successful streamlining. The strategy elements discussed in this paper, in no particular order of priority, are as follows: (1) integrate the NEPA process with other environmental compliance and review procedures; (2) accelerate the decision time for determining the appropriate level of NEPA documentation; (3) conduct early and thorough internal EIS (or EA) scoping before public scoping or other public participation begins; (4) organize and implement public scoping processes that are more participatory than confrontational; (5) maintain an up-to-date compendium of environmental baseline information; (6) prepare more comprehensive, broad-scope umbrella EISs that can be used effectively for tiering; (7) encourage preparation of annotated outlines with detailed guidance that serve as a road map for preparation of each EIS or EA; (8) decrease the length and complexity of highly technical portions of NEPA documents; (9) increase and systematize NEPA compliance outreach, training, and organizational support; and (10) work diligently to influence the preparation of better organized, shorter, and more readable NEPA documents.

  2. 550 FW 3 NEPA Decision Documents | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Handbook Abstract Outlines required NEPA documents for FWS NEPA process. Author Fish and Wildlife Service Published Fish and Wildlife Service, 1996 DOI Not Provided Check...

  3. NEPA Database | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NEPA Database Home > Blogs > Kyoung's blog Kyoung's picture Submitted by Kyoung(150) Contributor 25 February, 2013 - 10:19 data NEPA quarterly meeting We are in the process of...

  4. DOE NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index - Table of Contents |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Table of Contents DOE NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index - Table of Contents Return to Download Page The DOE NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index includes: NEPA Guidance and Requirements Documents Issued by Published A Brief Guide - DOE-wide Contracts For NEPA Documentation DOE 2003 A Citizen's Guide to the NEPA - Having Your Voice Heard CEQ 2007 A Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment DOE 2002 Actions During the NEPA Process -

  5. NEPA Terminology | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NEPA Terminology A brief overview of some commonly used terms associated with the NEPA process A brief overview of some commonly used terms associated with the NEPA process Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) - The detailed written statement that is required by section 102(2)(C) of NEPA for a proposed major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. ROD means a Record of Decision as described at 40 CFR 1505.2. Environmental Assessment (EA) - A concise public

  6. NEPA Documentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Note for: Cynthia Quarterman Keith Harper From: Carol Borgstrom Subject: NEPA Documentation Date: December 3, 2008 Attached, per your request, are two lists: (1) DOE environmental assessments (EAs) issued since 12/1/2006 and (2) DOE environmental impact statements (EISs) issued since 12/1/2006. Also, per your request, is a copy of a general NEPA briefing provided to the Acting Deputy Secretary in May 2008. Please let me know if you have any further questions (carol.borgstrom @hq.doe.gov;

  7. The NEPA mandate and federal regulation of the natural gas industry. [NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoecker, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    Utility regulators increasingly take responsibility for the [open quotes]extemalities[close quotes] associated with their decisions, meaning the economic and social costs related to rate decisions or other kinds of authorizations. Yet, when Congress adopted the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), it intervened to ensure protection of the natural environment, not from abuses by the citizenry but from the activities of the federal government itself. Comprised of action forcing procedures, NEPA was designed to infuse the decisional processes of federal agencies with a broad awareness of the environmental consequences of their actions. NEPA encourages decisionmakers to counterbalance the organic statutory and political missions of their departments or agencies with a sensitivity to the ecological consequences of their directives and authorizations. This paper examines how the requirements of NEPA have fared in the environment of classical public utility regulation at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. Commission proceedings did not evidence any widely held opinion that economic regulation of the gas industry is hostile to the NEPA process.

  8. Questions and Answers about National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    about NEPA Compliance 1. Can State environmental regulations (e.g., New York's State Environmental Quality Review Act) be used in place of NEPA? Or, can DOE delegate NEPA authority to States with their own governmental bodies designed to conduct their own environmental impact assessments? Answer: NEPA is a federal statute and a federal obligation. State processes cannot substitute for the Federal NEPA process, and the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 does not authorize DOE to delegate

  9. NEPA Contracting Reform Guidance (December 1996)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... process cannot be accurately forecast for many proposed actions. In fact, the more that information gained from the NEPA process influences project planning, the more difficult ...

  10. 2008 Network Open Season (NOS) NEPA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process and the preliminary engineering and design work (stage gate 1 of a 2-stage gated project approval process) for the following transmission...

  11. A NEPA compliance strategy plan for providing programmatic coverage to agency problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eccleston, C.H.

    1994-04-01

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, requires that all federal actions be reviewed before making a final decision to pursue a proposed action or one of its reasonable alternatives. The NEPA process is expected to begin early in the planning process. This paper discusses an approach for providing efficient and comprehensive NEPA coverage to large-scale programs. Particular emphasis has been given to determining bottlenecks and developing workarounds to such problems. Specifically, the strategy is designed to meet four specific goals: (1) provide comprehensive coverage, (2) reduce compliance cost/time, (3) prevent project delays, and (4) reduce document obsolescence.

  12. OFFICE: NEPA REVIEWS:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    OFFICE: NEPA REVIEWS: No NEPA reviews are ongoing or planned. SITE-WIDE: Preparation of a site-wide EIS was not considered at this time. The ongoing and planned NEPA reviews are listed in Part 2 below. A site-wide EIS WOULD facilitate future NEPA compliance efforts. A site-wide EIS WOULD NOT facilitate future NEPA compliance efforts. Part 3 DATE: PAGE: of 2016 Annual NEPA Planning Summary NEPA COMPLIANCE OFFICER: Secretarial Officers and Heads of Field Organizations submit annual NEPA planning

  13. OFFICE: NEPA REVIEWS:

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    must submit annual NEPA planning summaries that briefly describe the status of ongoing NEPA compliance activities including Environmental Assessments expected to be prepared in...

  14. DOE NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index - List of Contents |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy List of Contents DOE NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index - List of Contents Return to Download Page The NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index includes: A Brief Guide - DOE-wide Contracts For NEPA Documentation [DOE][2003] A Citizen's Guide to the NEPA - Having Your Voice Heard [CEQ][2007] A Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment [DOE][2002] Actions During the NEPA Process - Interim Actions [DOE][2003] Administrative Record Guidance

  15. NEPA Success Stories from Lessons Learned Quarterly Reports | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Success Stories from Lessons Learned Quarterly Reports NEPA Success Stories from Lessons Learned Quarterly Reports NEPA Success Stories from Lessons Learned Quarterly Reports This document contains a compilation of NEPA "success stories" that were featured in DOE Lessons Learned Quarterly Reports (LLQRs). Feature articles in LLQR have described how the NEPA process provided an organized structure for making some of the Department's most complex decisions. NEPA reviews have

  16. FWS NEPA Handbook | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GuidanceGuideHandbook Abstract Provides overview of FWS's NEPA process. Author Fish and Wildlife Service Published Fish and Wildlife Service, 2015 DOI Not Provided Check...

  17. NEPA effectiveness -- a survey of academics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canter, L.; Clark, R.

    1997-09-01

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) went into effect in the United States on January 1, 1970, just over 25 years ago. In light of this milestone, a survey of academics on the effectiveness of NEPA has been conducted regarding the preparation of environmental assessments (EAs) or environmental impact statements (EISs). This paper summarizes the results of a survey of 31 academics in 12 disciplines from 21 states. Several strengths of NEPA were identified, most importantly that NEPA encourages agencies and decision makers: (1) to acknowledge potential environmental consequences to the public, thus opening up the decision process; and (2) to think about environmental consequences before resources are committed. Surveyed participants also prioritized needs for improvement. While this survey was focused on the NEPA process in the United States, the identified issues have implications for the worldwide practice of environmental impact assessment. Finally, recommendations are described that are primarily associated with guidance, possible modifications in the NEPA process and follow-on training.

  18. DOE NEPA Implementing Procedures: Final Rule (61 Fed Reg 64603)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE amended its regulations governing compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). These amendments incorporate changes primarily related to DOE’s power marketing activities, based on DOE’s experience in applying the current NEPA regulations. The revised regulations are intended to improve DOE’s efficiency in implementing NEPA requirements by reducing costs and preparation time, while maintaining quality, consistent with the DOE Secretarial Policy Statement on NEPA issued in June 1994.

  19. Pollution Prevention- Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for NEPA/309 Reviewers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The environmental review process under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) provides a valuable opportunity for Federal agency NEPA/309 reviewers to incorporate pollution prevention and environmental impact reduction into actions (or projects). This Environmental Protection Agency guidance was prepared to assist NEPA/309 reviewers in incorporating pollution prevention into each step of the environmental review process, including scoping, mitigation, monitoring, and enforcement.

  20. NEPA Litigation Surveys

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CEQ publishes surveys on NEPA litigation on an annual basis. These surveys identify the number of cases involving a NEPA based cause of action, Federal agencies that were identified as a lead...

  1. Federal Agency NEPA Procedures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Each Federal agency is required to develop NEPA procedures that supplement the CEQ Regulations. Developed in consultation with CEQ, Federal agency NEPA procedures must meet the standards in the CEQ...

  2. Category:NEPA Properties | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Decision Property:NEPA Decision Url Property:NEPA DecisionDocumentDate Property:NEPA DNA Worksheet Property:NEPA Document Property:NEPA EA EIS Report Property:NEPA EA EIS...

  3. NEPA Litigation Surveys | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NEPA Litigation Surveys NEPA Litigation Surveys CEQ publishes surveys on NEPA litigation on an annual basis. These surveys identify the number of cases involving a NEPA based cause...

  4. Category:NEPA Doc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NEPA Doc Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Category: NEPA Documents Collections Add.png Add a new NEPA Document Collection Pages in category "NEPA Doc"...

  5. The NEPA reference guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swartz, L.L.; Reinke, D.C.

    1999-10-01

    The NEPA Reference Guide conveniently organizes and indexes National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations and guidance, along with relevant federal case law, all in one place. It allows the user to quickly learn the statutory, regulatory, and case law authority for a large number of NEPA subjects. A unique feature of The NEPA Reference Guide is its detailed index that includes a large number of diverse NEPA subjects. The index enables users to find and compile any statutory, regulatory (including CEQ guidance), and case law original source material and references on virtually any NEPA subject. This will be an especially useful tool for new NEPA practitioners who need to become immersed in a particular subject quickly.

  6. NEPA Updates | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NEPA Updates NEPA Updates Subscribe to DOE NEPA - Latest Documents and Notices Subscribe to DOE NEPA News The Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance maintains two notification services which provide you with updates for both: DOE NEPA News - which includes general announcements, and DOE NEPA - Latest Documents and Notices - which includes new project documents and notices posted on this website. You can subscribe to either or both of these services by clicking on panels or links above.

  7. Collaboration in NEPA: A Handbook for NEPA Practitioners (CEQ, 2007)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this handbook by the Council on Environmental Quality is to assist federal agencies to expand the effective use of collaboration as part of the NEPA process. It introduces the concept of collaboration, outlines general principles, presents useful steps, and provides information on methods of collaboration.

  8. Collaboration in NEPA: A Handbook for NEPA Practitioners (2007)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this handbook by the Council on Environmental Quality is to assist federal agencies to expand the effective use of collaboration as part of the NEPA process. It introduces the concept of collaboration, outlines general principles, presents useful steps, and provides information on methods of collaboration.

  9. About the NEPA Office | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    About the NEPA Office About the NEPA Office Welcome to the U.S. Department of Energy's NEPA Website. The DOE NEPA Website serves as a focal point for DOE NEPA implementation, and contains information about current DOE NEPA events, an electronic archive of DOE NEPA documents, and other resources for NEPA practitioners and members of the public. To contact Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance staff, see the Office Staff Directory. To contact the NEPA Compliance Officers, see the NEPA Compliance

  10. NEPA Lessons Learned Questionnaire

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE NEPA Document Number: DOEEA- DOEEIS- Would you like to keep the source of this information confidential? * Yes No Schedule 1. Was a schedule initially established for the ...

  11. OpenEI Community - NEPA

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal NEPA Workshop at GRC http:en.openei.orgcommunitybloggeothermal-nepa-workshop-grc

    On Tuesday, October 2, the Geothermal Technology Office and the National...

  12. Guidance Regarding Actions That May Proceed During the NEPA Process: Interim Actions (DOE, 2003)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE guidance to provide assistance in determining whether an action within the scope of an EIS may be taken before a record of decision is issued. The guidance reviews applicable requirements, gives examples of the types of actions that may proceed as interim actions, describes case studies, and outlines the steps in the EIS process for interim actions.

  13. Guidance Regarding Actions That May Proceed During the NEPA Process: Interim Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE guidance to provide assistance in determining whether an action within the scope of an EIS may be taken before a record of decision is issued. The guidance reviews applicable requirements, gives examples of the types of actions that may proceed as interim actions, describes case studies, and outlines the steps in the EIS process for interim actions.

  14. Erosion control for the Fundamental values in NEPA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMillen, M.C.; Hinds, W.T.

    1997-08-01

    A commitment to exploring alternatives to major Federal actions, pursuing and facilitating public involvement, and identifying measures to mitigate the adverse effects of actions selected for implementation are important values of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process. While other major environmental legislation may commit an agency to different aspects of environmental review and protection, no other Federal statute combines the unique values that NEPA does. Since its enactment over 26 years ago, NEPA has faced numerous challenges to its fundamental intent and values. Recently, processes deemed to be, or assumed to be, functionally equivalent have attempted to subsume important NEPA values while allowing major Federal actions to proceed without NEPA`s environmental review. This paper examines the concept and origin of the term NEPA values, and the effects of judicial review and actions such as DOE`s NEPA/CERCLA integration agreement, have had on maintaining fundamental NEPA values in the Federal decision making process. In addition, based on concerns that are building momentum in the US Congress, a brief discussion will be included exploring what may occur in the future to prevent further erosion of fundamental NEPA values.

  15. Federal Agency NEPA Procedures | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Agency NEPA Procedures Federal Agency NEPA Procedures Each Federal agency is required to develop NEPA procedures that supplement the CEQ Regulations. Developed in...

  16. GC NEPA Listserv | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NEPA Updates The Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance maintains two Listserv lists to provide a central notification system for (1) DOE NEPA news, including announcements, notices,...

  17. Techniques and guidelines for streamlining NEPA: Four ideas, nine tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickerman, J.A.; Tolbert, V.R.; Salk, M.S.; Richmond, A.A.

    1993-12-31

    The Council on Environmental Quality`s (CEQ`S) principal aims in implementing the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) are (1) to reduce paperwork, (2) to reduce delay, and (3) to produce better decisions. However, almost since the passage of NEPA, the quality and quantity of information typically found in NEPA documents have been criticized. The quality of NEPA documents could be greatly enhanced through improved planning and acquisition, organization, and presentation of information. The authors offer ideas for streamlining the NEPA process and documents for preparers of NEPA documents. These ideas address the issues of improved planning and information handling. Although most of these ideas are not new, stricter adherence to them would address many of the criticisms of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements.

  18. Pollution Prevention- Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for NEPA/309 Reviewers (EPA, 1995)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The environmental review process under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) provides a valuable opportunity for Federal agency NEPA/309 reviewers to incorporate pollution prevention and environmental impact reduction into actions (or projects). This Environmental Protection Agency guidance was prepared to assist NEPA/309 reviewers in incorporating pollution prevention into each step of the environmental review process, including scoping, mitigation, monitoring, and enforcement.

  19. NEPA Documents | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Services » NEPA Documents NEPA Documents To see a list of available NEPA documents by type and sorted by publication date, click on the links below. Documents listed in this section are available to members of the public. To see documents not electronically available to the public see the Secure NEPA Documents page for more information. Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations Categorical exclusions are categories of actions that DOE has determined, by regulation, do not individually or

  20. The people problems of NEPA: Social impact assessment and the role of public involvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carnes, S.A.

    1989-12-31

    This Chapter of the book `` The Scientific Challenges of NEPA`` discusses the people problems of NEPA and social impact assessment and the role of public involvement in NEPA. When Congress passed the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) in 1969, there was little guidance on the preparation of environmental impact statements (EIS) and the role of the public in the NEPA process. Excepting the statutory language of NEPA, which referred to impacts on the human environment, nowhere was this more evident than with respect to people. Questions such as what impacts on people should be assessed, how impacts on people should be assessed, and how people, including but not limited to those persons potentially impacted, should be involved in the assessment itself as well as NEPA`s associated administrative processes, were simply not addressed.

  1. Reasons and strategies for more effective NEPA implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ensminger, J.T. ); McLean, R.B. )

    1993-01-01

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) calls for an integrated approach to planning by federal agencies, with environmental issues being emphasized along with other types of planning concerns (i.e., financial, technical, and political). Because of NEPA, federal agencies have become more aware that environmental concerns must be addressed in their planning processes. However, a recent survey of NEPA practitioners indicated that many members of this group believe that deficiencies exist in the NEPA implementation processes of some federal agencies. According to the survey responses, the principal deficiencies are: (1) the tendency to use environmental impact statements as decision-implementation rather than decision-making documents; (2) the lack of effective planning and follow-up concerning mitigation measures identified by the NEPA process; and (3) NEPA overkill, particularly in the preparation of extensively detailed environmental assessments. As a result, NEPA may be addressed only cursorily as an afterthought, or the procedural aspects of NEPA document preparation may be overemphasized. Neither approach is conducive to serious planning and follow-up for impact mitigation measures. The results of the survey are discussed, as are the causes and possible solutions of these problems.

  2. Sandia Field Office NEPA Documents and Categorical Exclusion...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Office of General Counsel National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) NEPA Reading Room Sandia Field Office NEPA Documents and Categorical ... Sandia Field Office NEPA...

  3. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Management System National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Regulations and Links DOE NEPA Website NEPA Compliance Program ...

  4. Council on Environmental Quality Collaboration in NEPA A Handbook...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Council on Environmental Quality Collaboration in NEPA A Handbook for NEPA Practitioners Council on Environmental Quality Collaboration in NEPA A Handbook for NEPA Practitioners ...

  5. Techniques and guidelines for streamlining NEPA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickerman, J.A.; Tolbert, V.R.; Richmond, A.A.; Salk, M.S. )

    1993-01-01

    Five ideas for streamlining both the NEPA process and documents are explored for preparers of NEPA documents. Techniques and guidelines that implement these ideas will be provided as effective worksheets, pithy guidelines, flowcharts, and examples. The five streamlining ideas and the techniques or guidelines to achieve them are: (1) emphasize early planning through concise definition of project scope, purpose, need, and proposed action; determine need for compliance with applicable environmental requirements. (2) develop effective worksheets that include purpose, need, and proposed action; issue analysis; alternatives; environmental consequences; and NEPA checklist. (3) use information services/databases to integrate information services and identify existing databases. (4) maximize use of tables and graphs for analysis of alternatives; assumptions used (bounding analyses); environmental consequences. (5) create inviting documents with clear, concise writing; summarize in text; supporting data in appendices; and inviting visual layouts.

  6. The Application of NEPA to CERCLA Cleanups

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On March 31, 1994, officials from the Departrnent of Energy (DOE), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) met with then Acting Assistant Attorney General Lois Schiffer and other representatives of the Department of Justice (DOJ) to discuss the issue of the relationship of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to the cleanup of federal facilities under the CERCLA Superfund program. The meeting focused on proposals for addressing problems that have arisen from DOE's attempts to integrate the procedural and analytical approaches of NEPA into the CERCLA cleanup process. This document describes what was discussed at the meeting and the consensus reached there.

  7. NEPA and CEQA: Integrating State and Federal Environmental Reviews (Final)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    CEQ and the California Governor’s Office of Planning and Research (OPR) have jointly prepared the handbook “NEPA and CEQA: Integrating Federal and State Environmental Reviews.” The handbook provides practitioners with an overview of NEPA and CEQA as well as suggestions for developing a single environmental review process that can meet the requirements of both statutes. The handbook also provides a framework for a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between two or more agencies entering into a joint NEPA/ CEQA review process, and addresses the California Energy Commission licensing process, which takes the place of the CEQA process for certain power plants

  8. DOE NEPA Implementing Procedures: Final Rule (61 Fed Reg 36222)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE amended its existing regulations governing compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The amendments incorporate changes that improve DOE’s efficiency in implementing NEPA requirements by reducing costs and preparation time while maintaining quality, consistent with the DOE Secretarial Policy Statement on NEPA issued in June 1994. These amendments also incorporate changes necessary to conform to recent changes in DOE’s missions, programs, and policies that have evolved in response to changing national priorities since the current regulations were issued in 1992.

  9. NEPA/CERCLA/RCRA integration: Policy vs. practice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, R.P. ); Wolff, T.A. )

    1993-01-01

    Overwhelmed with environmental protection documentation requirements, a number of Federal agencies are grappling with the complexities of attempting to integrate'' the documentation requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). While there is some overlap between the general environmental policy objectives of NEPA, and the much more specific waste cleanup objectives of CERCLA and RCRA, there are also major differences and outright conflicts. This paper identifies both problems and opportunities associated with implementing emerging and evolving Federal agency policy regarding integration of the procedural and documentation requirements of NEPA, CERCLA, and RCRA. The emphasis is on NEPA/CERCLA/RCRA integration policy and practice at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The paper provides a comparative analysis of NEPA, CERCLA, and RCRA processes and discusses special integration issues including scoping, development and analysis of alternatives, risk assessment, tiering, scheduling, and the controversy surrounding applicability of NEPA to CERCLA or RCRA cleanup activities. Several NEPA/CERCLA/RCRA integration strategy options are evaluated and an annotated outline of an integrated NEPA/CERCLA document is included.

  10. Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Site-wide reviews can aid the Department of Energy (DOE) in meeting its goals to streamline the NEPA process, to make that process more useful to decision makers and thepublic,...

  11. Golden Reading Room: NEPA Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NEPA Categorical Exclusions Golden Reading Room: NEPA Categorical Exclusions Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Golden Field Office of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 28, 2016 CX-100668 Categorical Exclusion Determination A New Remote Communications Link to Reduce Residential PV Solar Costs Award Number: DE-EE0007592 CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.15 Solar Energy Technology Office Date: 7/26/2016 Location(s): CA Office(s):

  12. NEPA Lessons Learned Cumulative Index December 2012 1 DOE NEPA...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Agencies; Tribes Integration see: NEPA, Integration with Other Review Interim Actions Mar 026; Sep 0214 International Association for Impact Assessment Jun 9710; Sep ...

  13. NEPA Determination Form

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    LA NEPA COMPLIANCE DETERMINATION FORM PRID - 09P-0059 V2 Page 1 of 8 Project/Activity Title: TA-3 Substation Replacement Project PRID: 09P-0059 V2 Date: February 16, 2016 Purpose: The proposed demolition and replacement of the Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) Technical Area (TA)-3 electrical power substation is needed to provide reliable and efficient electrical distribution systems with sufficient electrical capacity to support the national security missions. The electrical distribution

  14. Looking in from the outside: The citizen and the NEPA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, S.; Norte, M.

    1995-12-01

    The original intent of the NEPA was to open the decisionmaking process and the information on which it is based and to enable greater, more effective examination, assessment, scrutiny, and input by both public officials and citizens. NEPA procedures must insure environmental information is available to public officials and citizens before decisions are made and before actions are taken. The information must be of high quality. Accurate scientific analysis, expert agency comments, and public scrutiny are essential to implementing NEPA. The NEPA is clearly one of the broadest and subtly comprehensive pieces of legislation in history and its very breadth has also made it one of the most extensively studied, argued, and litigated laws in history. Yet, much of the decisionmaking process and the NEPA itself remain relatively foreign, closed inaccessible, and enigmatic to the majority of the public at large and to many public officials, even including many who have environmental or public lands management responsibilities. The majority of both public officials and citizens alike remain spectators, rather than participants, and the NEPA remains an arcane battleground, increasingly populated by lawyers, special interests, environmental activists, and haggard agency specialists. Prepared by laypersons with virtually no vested interest in the NEPA itself, this paper examines several recent implementations of the NEPA Process with the goal of looking past the specific environmental issues involved and focusing on our experience with the actual procedural implementation of the NEPA. Attempting to adhere to an objective examination of the process in the spirit of Total Quality Management, the paper seeks to assess process level problems and, through root cause analysis, begin to identify possible process level solutions.

  15. Environmental Justice: Guidance Under NEPA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Guidance from the Council on Environmental Quality to assist Federal agencies with their NEPA procedures so that environmental justice concerns are effectively identified and addressed.

  16. NEPA Policy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guidance to assist DOE programs in meeting the Annual NEPA Planning Summary reporting requirements, to promote continuous improvement of the summaries as a tool to facilitate field ...

  17. NEPA History | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    These amendments incorporate changes primarily related to DOE's power marketing activities, based on DOE's experience in applying the current NEPA regulations. The revised ...

  18. Form:NEPA Doc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NEPA Doc Jump to: navigation, search Input the name of a NEPA Document below. If the document already exists, you will be able to edit its information. AddEdit a NEPA Document...

  19. Property:NEPA FONSI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FONSI Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA FONSI Property Type Page Description FONSI files for NEPA Docs This is a property of type Page. Pages using the property "NEPA...

  20. Memorandum for General Counsels, NEPA Liaisons and Participants in Scoping

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of its continuing oversight of the implementation of the NEPA regulations, the Council on Environmental Quality has been investigating agency experience with scoping. This is the process by...

  1. NEPA Contracting Reform Guidance (December 1996)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This guidance provides: model statements of work, information on contract types and incentives, direction on effective NEPA contract management by the NEPA Document Manager, a system for measuring...

  2. Property:NEPA Url | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Url Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA Url Property Type URL Description URLs to any other relevant information associated with NEPA Docs that are not appropriate to...

  3. Property:NEPA Document | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Document Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA Document Property Type Page Description Any other relevant files associated with NEPA Docs that are not appropriate to...

  4. Property:NEPA Decision | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Decision Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA Decision Property Type Page Description Files documenting decisions on NEPA Docs This is a property of type Page. Pages...

  5. Property:NEPA Application | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Application Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA Application Property Type Page Description NEPA application files. All NOIs. Drilling permits are also appropriate. This...

  6. Federal NEPA Contacts | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Federal NEPA Contacts CEQ and most Federal agencies identify primary points of contact for NEPA compliance. Normally a senior environmental professional, environmental law...

  7. Improving (NEPA) the National Environmental Policy Act through ISO 14001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkinson, C H

    1999-02-25

    Federal application of ISO 14001 and / or the EPA Code of Environmental Management Principles (CEMP) could substantially improve the mitigation and monitoring aspects of the NEPA process. In addition, application of those management systems could also enhance fulfillment of Section 101 goals of NEPA. An ISO 14001 Environmental Management System would provide for a plan to continually address and improve environmental aspects and impacts. The strong feedback and improvement loops in both CEMP and ISO 14001 would help strengthen this weakness of NEPA by providing a mechanism to foster excellent environmental action, not just more dusty paperwork.

  8. Process Equipment Cost Estimation, Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H.P. Loh; Jennifer Lyons; Charles W. White, III

    2002-01-01

    This report presents generic cost curves for several equipment types generated using ICARUS Process Evaluator. The curves give Purchased Equipment Cost as a function of a capacity variable. This work was performed to assist NETL engineers and scientists in performing rapid, order of magnitude level cost estimates or as an aid in evaluating the reasonableness of cost estimates submitted with proposed systems studies or proposals for new processes. The specific equipment types contained in this report were selected to represent a relatively comprehensive set of conventional chemical process equipment types.

  9. NEPA and the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMillen, M.C. )

    1993-01-01

    In an effort to streamline the US military and make the structure of forces consistent with base structure, the Defense Secretary's Commission on Base Realignment and Closure was created in 1988, and was charged with the task of conducting an independent study of the domestic military base structure and to recommend installations for realignment and closure. The resulting round of base closure and realignment recommendations was termed BRAC 91. To facilitate the BRAC 91 process, Congress passed Public Law 101-510 which includes the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Act of 1990 (Title XXIX). The closing and realigning of a military installation is considered a major Federal action'' subject to the environmental review process established under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The NEPA process proved to be more than the BRAC process was capable of handling in a reasonable and practicable manner. This paper examines the exact nature of the changes made to the NEPA process under BRAC 91, and what effect these changes have on the process itself. To illustrate the effects of the BRAC 91 changes on the NEPA process and subsequent documents prepared under BRAC, case examples will be used. The paper will identify for the NEPA practitioner what works, and what needs to be avoided when preparing NEPA documents under such circumstances.

  10. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) projects are reviewed under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 – 42 U.S.C. Section 4321 et seq. The Department of Energy regulations that implement NEPA require OE to determine whether a proposal requires preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), an Environmental Assessment (EA), or a Categorical Exclusion (CX).

  11. Annotated bibliography National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents for Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, J.M.

    1995-04-01

    The following annotated bibliography lists documents prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE), and predecessor agencies, to meet the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) for activities and facilities at Sandia National Laboratories sites. For each NEPA document summary information and a brief discussion of content is provided. This information may be used to reduce the amount of time or cost associated with NEPA compliance for future Sandia National Laboratories projects. This summary may be used to identify model documents, documents to use as sources of information, or documents from which to tier additional NEPA documents.

  12. NEPA Determination FY16 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NEPA Determination FY16 NEPA Determination FY16 The document below is the State Energy Program''s NEPA Determination for Fiscal Year 2016. NEPA Determination FY16 (233.8 KB) More Documents & Publications EECBG Guidance SEP Guidance EA-1972: Final Environmental Assessment

  13. Substantive scientific and technical guidance for NEPA analysis: Pitfalls in the real world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickerson, W. . Office of Federal Activities); Montgomery, J. . Environmental Programs Branch)

    1993-01-01

    The issue of how to improve the science in environmental impact statements (EISs) and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process has been receiving increased attention during the last decade. Based on review of several studies on prediction in NEPA reviews and their own professional experience, the authors conclude that the NEPA process is reasonably effective in producing useful predictions of impact. However, the federal government could take steps to upgrade the quality of scientific analysis in the NEPA process, particularly in addressing issues where the state of scientific knowledge is uncertain. These steps include increased peer review of NEPA documents, more oversight of NEPA implementation, and refinement and development of various methodologies and technical guidance.

  14. Memorandum for Federal NEPA Contacts: Emergency Actions and NEPA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Council on Environmental Quality memorandum provides general information on (1) the response to hurricane Katrina; (2) reporting oil and chemical spills; (3) projected long term recovery efforts; and (4) how agencies can respond to emergencies and comply with NEPA.

  15. MEMORANDUM FOR NEPA FILE FROM: MARK LUSK NEPA DOCUMENT MANAGER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 11, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR NEPA FILE FROM: MARK LUSK NEPA DOCUMENT MANAGER SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Saft America, Inc. Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Application, Jacksonville, Florida (DOE/EA-1711) UNew InformationU : Proposed Minor Change to Saft America, Inc. Proposed Project U LocationU : Saft America, Inc. Plant at the Cecil Commerce Center, near Jacksonville, Florida, in Duval County UProposed ByU : Saft America, Inc. 1. U

  16. The relationship of ecosystem management to NEPA and its goals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, C.G.; Randolph, J.

    2000-07-01

    The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) was intended to promote a systematic, comprehensive, interdisciplinary approach to planning and decision making, including the integration of the natural and social sciences and the design arts. NEPA critics have cited three key shortcomings in its implementation: (1) a lack of engagement with the NEPA process early in the planning process through interdisciplinary collaboration; (2) a lack of rigorous science and the incorporation of ecological principles and techniques; and (3) a lack of emphasis on the Act's substantive goals and objectives. In recent years and independent of NEPA, a policy of ecosystem management has been developed, which represents a fundamental change from a fragmented, incremental planning and management approach to a holistic, comprehensive, interdisciplinary land and resource management effort. The authors postulate that by incorporating ecosystem management principles in their planning and decisionmaking, federal agencies can address the shortcomings in NEPA implementation and move closes to NEPA's intent. A case analysis of EISs prepared by the USDA Forest Service before and after adopting an ecosystem management approach supports their hypothesis.

  17. NEPA and NHPA: A Handbook for Integrating NEPA and Section 106...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NHPA: A Handbook for Integrating NEPA and Section 106 (CEQ and ACHP, 2013) NEPA and NHPA: A Handbook for Integrating NEPA and Section 106 (CEQ and ACHP, 2013) In this document, the ...

  18. Need to Consider Intentional Destructive Acts in NEPA Documents...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Need to Consider Intentional Destructive Acts in NEPA Documents Need to Consider Intentional Destructive Acts in NEPA Documents DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) ...

  19. Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) NEPA Guidance and Requirements...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) NEPA Guidance and Requirements Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) NEPA Guidance and Requirements Also see CEQ's NEPA guidance page: ...

  20. Federal Register Notices for DOE NEPA Guidelines and Regulations...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Notices for DOE NEPA Guidelines and Regulations Federal Register Notices for DOE NEPA Guidelines and Regulations Historical compilation of Federal Register notices for DOE NEPA...

  1. DOE-NEPA-Document-CertificationandTransmittalFormAugust2012.pdf

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NEPA Policy and Compliance August 2012 DOE NEPA Document Certification and Transmittal Form 1. NEPA Document :(e.g., DOEEIS-XXX, DOEEA-XXXX)...

  2. LM Annual NEPA Planning Summary 2015 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    LM Annual NEPA Planning Summary 2015 More Documents & Publications 2015 Annual NEPA Planning Summaries Annual NEPA Planning Summary Report Template 2013 Annual Planning Summary for...

  3. Annual NEPA Planning Summary Report Template | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NEPA Planning Summary Report Template Annual NEPA Planning Summary Report Template Adobe Acrobat templates and User's Guide for preparing and submitting an Annual NEPA...

  4. NEPA Documentation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of a general NEPA briefing provided to the Acting Deputy Secretary in May 2008. Please let me know if you have any further questions (carol.borgstrom @hq.doe.gov; 202-586-4600). ...

  5. NEPA-Related Public Involvement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Loan Programs Office’s NEPA-related hearings, public meetings, and public notices (e.g. public scoping meeting, public hearing, notice of proposed floodplain or wetland action) are presented...

  6. NEPA, monitoring, and adaptive management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    Getting concerns about the environment on the decision making table before Federal actions are taken is the recognized business of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), but keeping them there is just as important. Human interventions into natural systems seldom proceed as originally planned. Scientific uncertainties prevent environmental impacts from being reliably or precisely predicted. Thus, the style of management must provide for monitoring to guide mid-course corrections adapting to inevitable surprises. the one time, pre-approval EA/EIS procedure remains essential but is not sufficient to assure the goal of NEPA {open_quotes}to...maintain conditions under which man and nature can exist in productive harmony...{close_quotes} (NEPA, 1969). This paper explores the extent to which NEPA encourages continuous assessment for timely feedback to managers, and the practical difficulties involved in doing so.

  7. Biodiversity conservation and NEPA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southerland, M.T. )

    1993-01-01

    The Council of Environmental Quality (CEQ) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have recently developed new guidelines to facilitate the consideration of biodiversity in the preparation and review of environmental impact assessments. The purpose of these efforts is to facilitate the incorporation of biodiversity considerations into the ecological analyses of all federal agencies. Because federal decisions requiring environmental impact assessments under NEPA affect hundreds of millions of federal and non-federal lands and waters, improved consideration of the impacts of federal activities is essential to stemming the loss of biological diversity in the United States. The designation of ecosystems or habitats'' of concern is a useful first step identifying risks to biodiversity. After reviewing the status and trends of habitats within eight major regions of the US, the EPA guidelines identify habitats contributing to regional and global biodiversity such as remnant prairies, riparian habitats, and old-growth forests. This document also discusses how the impacts on habitats vary with the different activities of land conversion, timber harvesting, grazing, mining, and water management.

  8. LM Annual NEPA Planning Summary 2016 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 LM Annual NEPA Planning Summary 2016 LM Annual NEPA Planning Summary 2016 LM Annual NEPA Planning Summary 2016 (198.55 KB) More Documents & Publications LM Annual NEPA Planning Summary 2015

  9. NEPA Reading Room | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NEPA Reading Room Welcome to the National Nuclear Security Administration's NEPA Reading Room. This site serves as a focal point for NNSA NEPA implementation and contains information about past and current NNSA NEPA actions as well as other resources for NEPA practitioners and members of the public. Welcome to the National Nuclear Security Administration's NEPA Reading Room. This site serves as a focal point for NNSA NEPA implementation and contains information about past and current NNSA NEPA

  10. Application of NEPA requirements to CERCLA remedial actions. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strobbe, C.L.

    1994-06-01

    This study investigated the application of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requirements to Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) actions. Similarities in the documentation and public participation requirements of NEPA and CERCLA include identification and evaluation of alternatives and public participation. Differences include document contents and timing of public participation. This study presented four options for ensuring NEPA compliance at CERCLA sites. Option one included a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) with subsequent combined FS/EIS report for each subunit. Option two eliminated the PEIS, but retained a stand-alone NEPA document for each CERCLA subunit. Option three included a PEIS with a subsequent combined FS/EIS report for each subunit. Option four eliminated the PEIS but retained a combined FS/EIS report for each subunit. The model presented in this study can be used at any installation to determine the optimal approach for the site. The model's goal is to comply with NEPA and CERCLA while maintaining a balance between cost, schedule, and public acceptance.

  11. 2015 Annual NEPA Planning Summaries | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Annual NEPA Planning Summaries 2015 Annual NEPA Planning Summaries The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for various US Department of Energy offices. 2015 Annual NEPA Planning Summaries (11.72 MB) More Documents & Publications LM Annual NEPA Planning Summary 2015 LM Annual NEPA Planning Summary 2016 Annual NEPA Planning Summary Report Template (DOE, 2015

  12. DOE-wide NEPA Contracting Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A DOE team is evaluating the offers received in response to a Request for Quotations to provide NEPA support services. The scope of the solicitation is similar to that of the DOE-wide NEPA support...

  13. Designating and Supporting NEPA Document Managers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The purpose of this memorandum is to emphasize the important role that National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Document Managers play in the success of the DOE's NEPA compliance program and to help maximize their effectiveness.

  14. Processing Cost Analysis for Biomass Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badger, P.C.

    2002-11-20

    The receiving, handling, storing, and processing of woody biomass feedstocks is an overlooked component of biopower systems. The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) to identify and characterize all the receiving, handling, storing, and processing steps required to make woody biomass feedstocks suitable for use in direct combustion and gasification applications, including small modular biopower (SMB) systems, and (2) to estimate the capital and operating costs at each step. Since biopower applications can be varied, a number of conversion systems and feedstocks required evaluation. In addition to limiting this study to woody biomass feedstocks, the boundaries of this study were from the power plant gate to the feedstock entry point into the conversion device. Although some power plants are sited at a source of wood waste fuel, it was assumed for this study that all wood waste would be brought to the power plant site. This study was also confined to the following three feedstocks (1) forest residues, (2) industrial mill residues, and (3) urban wood residues. Additionally, the study was confined to grate, suspension, and fluidized bed direct combustion systems; gasification systems; and SMB conversion systems. Since scale can play an important role in types of equipment, operational requirements, and capital and operational costs, this study examined these factors for the following direct combustion and gasification system size ranges: 50, 20, 5, and 1 MWe. The scope of the study also included: Specific operational issues associated with specific feedstocks (e.g., bark and problems with bridging); Opportunities for reducing handling, storage, and processing costs; How environmental restrictions can affect handling and processing costs (e.g., noise, commingling of treated wood or non-wood materials, emissions, and runoff); and Feedstock quality issues and/or requirements (e.g., moisture, particle size, presence of non-wood materials). The study found that over the

  15. Ensuring cost effectiveness in the TAP process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trego, A.L.

    1992-06-16

    The Training Accredition Program (TAP) at the Waste Isolation Division (WID) is discussed by the general manager. Cost effectiveness in the TAP process is made possible by saving through sharing which refers to the exchange and co-development of information and technology among Westinghouse Government owned-contractor operators and with other organizations. In 1990 a comprehensive management and supervisor training (MAST) program plan was devised and a MAST certification program of 31 self-paced written moduler was developed. This program has proven to be inexpensive to develop and implement when compared to classroom training. In addition, total quality is used as a tool to continuously improve work process. Continuous improvement requires continued evaluation of work process, such as TAP analysis and development in summary to make training at DOE facilities the most cost-effective training anywhere, we need to share, challenge conventional wisdom, and seek to continuously improve.

  16. OFFICE: NEPA REVIEWS:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Schedule and cost are yet to be determined. EA Proposed Mining Operations on a DOE-Uranium ... Schedule and cost are yet to be determined. EA Land Withdrawal for Central Nevada Test ...

  17. Property:NEPA Extraordinary | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Extraordinary Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA Extraordinary Property Type Page Description Files documenting extraordinary circumstances checklist or documentation...

  18. A review of recent NEPA alternatives analysis case law

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Michael D. . E-mail: michael.smith@humboldt.edu

    2007-03-15

    According to the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Regulations for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the analysis and comparison of alternatives is considered the 'heart' of the NEPA process. Although over 20 years have passed since the original mandate appeared to construct and assess a 'reasonable range' of alternatives contained in the CEQ Regulations, there is a perception that there is still a significant amount of confusion about what exactly constitutes a legally-compliant alternatives analysis. One manifestation of this confusion is the increasing amount of litigation over the alternatives analysis in NEPA documents. This study examined decisions on challenges to alternative analyses contained in federal agency NEPA documents in federal Courts of Appeals for the ten-year period 1996-2005. The results show that federal agencies are overwhelmingly successful against such challenges - winning 30 of the 37 cases. The most common challenge was that federal agencies had not included a full reasonable range of alternatives, while the second most frequent was that agencies had improperly constructed their purpose and need for their projects. Brief descriptions of several of the key court decisions are provided that illustrate the main factors that led to agencies being successful, as well as being unsuccessful, in their court challenges. The results provide little support for recent calls to amend the NEPA Statute and the CEQ Regulations to better clarify the requirements for alternatives analysis. The conclusion to the study focuses on practical steps NEPA practitioners can take to prepare their alternatives analyses in a manner that fulfills the requirements of the NEPA Statute and Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Regulations and makes them less vulnerable to an unfavorable court decision if legally challenged.

  19. DOE NEPA Compliance Officers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NEPA Compliance Officers DOE NEPA Compliance Officers NEPA Compliance Officers are listed by program office. Field offices are listed under their primary program office. NCO_Directory_2016-07-29.pdf (94.63 KB) More Documents & Publications DOE Employee Concerns Program Contact List Privacy Act Officers Contact List Field Facilities Contacts for Printing and Mail

  20. Modular Process Equipment for Low Cost Manufacturing of High...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Process Equipment for Low Cost Manufacturing of High Capacity Prismatic Li-Ion Cell Alloy Anodes Modular Process Equipment for Low Cost Manufacturing of High Capacity Prismatic Li-...

  1. Process Equipment Cost Estimation, Final Report (Technical Report...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Process Equipment Cost Estimation, Final Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Process Equipment Cost Estimation, Final Report You are accessing a document from the ...

  2. NEPA scoping averts agency funds from blowing in the wind: A NEPA success story

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade, M.C.; Van Dyke, J.; Crew, J.

    1998-06-01

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process has been successful without the preparation of an Environmental Assessment (EA) or an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) The Agricultural Research Service (ARS) has used early application of the NEPA process to make an informed decision and thus avoid negative ecological and financial results. The NEPA process was initiated to assess the potential impacts of constructing and operating a 6--9 megawatt wind turbine farm. The farm was to consist of up to 18 turbines to be placed along the spine of Plum Island which lies in the Atlantic Ocean off the shore of eastern Long Island. The rationale for the proposal was to provide an alternative energy source and thus avoid the expenditure of more than one million dollars per year on electricity and the dependency on the mainland public utility companies. A sufficient wind resource is readily available on Plum Island. Complicating the issue was a window of opportunity to obtain federal production tax credits if the wind energy system could become operational before July 1, 1999.

  3. Attainment of the spirit of NEPA: A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergstrom, D.J. ); Kott, F.J. )

    1993-01-01

    Great Lakes Gas Transmission Company recently undertook a major expansion of their interstate natural gas pipeline system. The environmental permitting process for this large (460 mile), multi-state construction project exemplified the pervasiveness of the spirit of NEPA in dozens of federal, state, and local jurisdictional agencies, as well as associated organizations which lacked permitting authority but which took an active interest in the permitting process. Additionally, approvals from watershed districts, county zoning offices, and military preserves were obtained. Permit applications and agency consultations were complex and extremely labor-intensive. Overlapping jurisdictional authority turned permit acquisition into a labyrinth for which progress needed to be tracked weekly, and interagency logjams proved to be problematic. One specific example involved an archaeological site at the edge of a wetland under an eagle's nest. While the efficiency of multiple agencies administering NEPA is questionable, there seems little doubt as to the efficacy of the spirit of NEPA in this geographic region.

  4. From rags to riches in the world of NEPA: The Hanford Site experience in applying the Department of Energy`s NEPA program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guzzetta, D.J.

    1995-12-01

    The Department of Energy`s procedures for implementing the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) have undergone significant changes since February 5, 1990 when the then Secretary of Energy, Admiral James Watkins, issued Secretary of Energy Notice 15 (SEN-15). This notice directed all DOE elements to integrate NEPA into their decision making processes and temporarily centralized NEPA decision making for all level of NEPA documents (categorical exclusions, environmental assessments (EA), and environmental impact statements) at DOE Headquarters. Since 1990 most of the responsibilities for NEPA have been returned to DOE field elements. However, in the intervening five years, there have been significant changes at all levels of DOE regarding the role NEPA will play in DOE decision making. DOE`s new NEPA regulations were published on April 24, 1992 and required greater state and Native American involvement in the preparation of EAs. Delegation of EA authority to the DOE field offices followed the current Secretary of Energy`s letter of June 13, 1994. In order for delegation to take place each DOE field element provided a plan that included internal scoping and public participation in the EA process. Since the Manhattan Project the Hanford Site has been a crucial component of the nation`s nuclear weapons program. Since the late 1980s Hanford`s mission has changed from the production of defense nuclear materials to environmental clean-up. This paper will provide an overview of NEPA at the Hanford Site since 1990 and how the application of NEPA has changed in the five years since SEN-15. Of particular interest will be the EA process at Hanford. This EA process strongly parallels the procedural requirements for an EIS. It includes notification of states, Native Americans, and the public, internal scoping, preparation and circulation of a draft EA, and creation of a panel for making recommendations regarding the significance of the proposed action.

  5. Future challenges of NEPA: A panel discussion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, E.D.

    1989-01-01

    One portion of a plenary session during the conference was a forum on The Future Challenges of NEPA.'' The session was a panel discussion. Each of the panelists was to spent 10 to 15 minutes talking about their observations on how NEPA is operating, some of the trends they observed, and how they thought NEPA might change in the future. Topics discussed in this forum included Congressional proposals to amend NEPA; possible changes at the CEQ; post-decision monitoring, mitigation, and follow-up studies; applicability of NEPA to international actions of the US government; assessment of global change impacts; and the relationship between NEPA and state little NEPA'' laws. The individual presentations and the subsequent discussion are described in this paper. 5 refs.

  6. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Management System » National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Regulations and Links DOE NEPA Website NEPA Compliance Program (DOE O 451.1B) Council on Environmental Quality A Citizen's Guide to the NEPA Recent NEPA Actions and Determinations Categorically Excluded Actions Environmental Assessments (EA) None in Progress Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) None in Progress Prior NEPA determinations for EAs and EISs are available on the

  7. State Energy Program NEPA Determination FY15 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 State Energy Program NEPA Determination FY15 The document below is the State Energy Program''s NEPA Determination for Fiscal Year 2015. NEPA Determination FY15 (134.52 KB) More Documents & Publications State Energy Program NEPA Determination FY14 State Energy Program NEPA Determination FY13 CX-009008

  8. DOE NEPA Rulemaking | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE NEPA Rulemaking DOE NEPA Rulemaking Revisions to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regulations regarding implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) became effective on November 14, 2011. DOE has established 20 new categorical exclusions, most of which include criteria (e.g., acreage, location, and height limitations) that limit the covered actions. These categorical exclusions address actions such as stormwater runoff control, alternative fuel vehicle fueling stations and

  9. The National Environmental Policy Act net (NEPAnet) and DOE NEPA Web: What they bring to environmental impact assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jessee, L.

    1998-01-01

    The US National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) requires agencies to use a systematic, interdisciplinary approach to ensure integrated use of natural and social sciences and the environmental design arts in planning and decision-making. Numerous environmental analyses have been prepared that contain valuable information about regions and ecosystems, but these data were not stored in a retrievable manner. In 1993 and 1994, agency-specific NEPA and related datasets were consolidated into the US Department of Energy NEPA Web and NEPAnet. These improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the environmental impact assessment/NEPA process in the US.

  10. Council on Environmental Quality Collaboration in NEPA A Handbook for NEPA Practitioners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Collaboration in NEPA - a Handbook for NEPA Practitioners is a collaboration of research and consultations by CEQ concerning analyses prepared under NEPA. Updated in the Fall of 2007, this 100-page guide introduces interested parties to collaborative principles, and includes suggestions for successful collaborative efforts.

  11. Recommendations for Analyzing Accidents Under NEPA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This DOE guidance clarifies and supplements "Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements." It focuses on principles of accident analyses under NEPA.

  12. Template:NEPA Doc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    General NEPA Document Information EnergyTechnology - Energy Sector (e.g. Geothermal, Solar, Wind) (page: Category:ElectricityGeneratingTechnologies) EnvironmentalAnalysisTyp...

  13. Template:Nepa Transmission | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    General NEPA Document Information TransmissionType - Energy Sector (e.g. Geothermal, Solar, Wind) (page: Category:ElectricityGeneratingTechnologies) EnvironmentalAnalysisTyp...

  14. BOR NEPA Handbook | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: BOR NEPA HandbookPermittingRegulatory GuidanceGuideHandbook Abstract...

  15. Category:NEPA Transmission | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pages in category "NEPA Transmission" This category contains only the following page. T TransWest Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCategory:NEPATransmiss...

  16. RAPID/NEPA/About | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and potential application of future tiered NEPA analyses such as DNAs. Resource (e.g. Air Quality) Users can look at mitigation measures proposed and imposed on previous...

  17. All NEPA Guidance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Final Guidance for Consideration of Environmental Justice in Clean Air Act 309 Reviews (1999) Pollution Prevention & Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for NEPA309 ...

  18. NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Questionnaire | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from the Department of Energy (DOE) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Community. ... of losing unsaved work (e.g., if internet connectivity is lost while completing the form). ...

  19. Environmental Justice: Guidance Under NEPA (CEQ, 1997)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Guidance from the Council on Environmental Quality to assist Federal agencies with their NEPA procedures so that environmental justice concerns are effectively identified and addressed.

  20. Federal NEPA Contacts | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CEQ and most Federal agencies identify primary points of contact for NEPA compliance. Normally a senior environmental professional, environmental law attorney, or member of agency ...

  1. Annual NEPA Planning Summary Report Template (DOE, 2015) | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Annual NEPA Planning Summary Report Template (DOE, 2015) Annual NEPA Planning Summary Report Template (DOE, 2015) Adobe Acrobat templates and User's Guide for preparing and submitting an Annual NEPA Planning Summary. 2016 Annual Planning Summary Template (93.08 KB) 2016 Annual Planning Summary Template Continuation Sheet (108.41 KB) APS User's Guide (33.55 KB) More Documents & Publications LM Annual NEPA Planning Summary 2015 2015 Annual NEPA Planning Summaries LM Annual NEPA

  2. DOE-Wide NEPA Contracting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE-Wide NEPA Contracting DOE-Wide NEPA Contracting The DOE-wide NEPA contracts expired in 2014. These contracts were for NEPA support services in preparing EISs and EAs and other environmental documents. This page will be updated when new information is available. Inquiries may be addressed to askNEPA@hq.doe.gov. Document(s) Available For Download December 1, 1996 NEPA Contracting Reform Guidance (DOE, 1996) This guidance provides: model statements of work, information on contract types and

  3. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents NBL Program Office NBL PO Home About Programs Certified Reference Materials (CRMs) NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion ...

  4. Council on Environmental Quality - Emergency Actions and NEPA...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NEPA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Memorandum: Council on Environmental Quality - Emergency Actions and NEPA Abstract This memorandum...

  5. DRAFT NEPA Guidance on Consideration of the Effects of Climate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DRAFT NEPA Guidance on Consideration of the Effects of Climate Change and Greenhouse Gas Emissions DRAFT NEPA Guidance on Consideration of the Effects of Climate Change and ...

  6. NEPA and CEQA: Integrating State and Federal Environmental Reviews...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NEPA and CEQA: Integrating State and Federal Environmental Reviews (Draft) The Council on ... & Publications NEPA and CEQA: Integrating State and Federal Environmental Reviews (Final

  7. NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These appendices are intended to improve public participation and facilitate agency compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Council on Environmental Quality's NEPA...

  8. Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA PDF icon CEQ Regulations for Implementing the...

  9. Property:NEPA CU Document | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CU Document Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA CU Document Property Type Page Description CU files for NEPA Docs. Typically Casual Use Documentation consists of a...

  10. Property:NEPA Application Url | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Application Url Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA Application Url Property Type URL Description URLs to NEPA application files. All NOIs. Drilling permits are also...

  11. "Frequently Asked Questions" on the Department of Energy's NEPA...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    regarding DOE's NEPA implementation regulations. Revised "Frequently Asked Questions on the Department of Energy's NEPA Regulations More Documents & Publications Questions and...

  12. States with NEPA-like Environmental Planning Requirements | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    States with NEPA-like Environmental Planning Requirements States with NEPA-like Environmental Planning Requirements Several states have environmental planning requirements that are...

  13. 2012 General Counsel's Reminder Letter Regarding NEPA Planning...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    General Counsel's Reminder Letter Regarding NEPA Planning Summaries 2012 General Counsel's Reminder Letter Regarding NEPA Planning Summaries PDF icon 2012 APS Reminder Letter...

  14. Property:NEPA ApplicationAttachments | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ApplicationAttachments Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA ApplicationAttachments Property Type Page Description FONSI files for NEPA Docs. For example: Cover letters,...

  15. Property:NEPA SerialRegisterPage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SerialRegisterPage Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA SerialRegisterPage Property Type Page Description Serial Register Page files for NEPA Docs. Related Serial...

  16. Effective Use of Programmatic NEPA Reviews (CEQ, 2014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Council on Environmental Quality issued this guidance to explain the requirements of NEPA and CEQ Regulations when agencies prepare programmatic NEPA reviews.

  17. Milestone Reached: New Process Reduces Cost and Risk of Biofuel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a bio-oil intermediate into biofuel, making the conversion process expensive. Battelle's new process substantially reduces the cost and risk of biofuel production and helps make ...

  18. Guidance on NEPA Review for Corrective Actions under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (DOE, 1997)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This guidance results from the work of a Task Team formed by DOE's Environmental Management's NEPA Compliance Officer to study streamlining the NEPA process for RCRA corrective actions, in response to a recommendation in the National Academy of Sciences Report on "Improving the Environment: An Evaluation of DOE'S Environmental Management Program."

  19. The role of NEPA in the Clean Coal Technology Program of the US Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pell, J.

    1994-12-31

    The Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program of the US Dept. of Energy (DOE) supports the demonstration of emerging advanced systems capable of reducing emissions of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and, through increased efficiency, CO{sub 2}. Along with four previous solicitations, a fifth, {open_quotes}Program Opportunity Notice{close_quotes} (PON), was released on 6 July 1992, and awarded on 4 May 1993. Together, these solicitations fulfill the commitment that was made to implement a five-year, $5 billion (cost shared), program for the demonstration of clean coal technologies. The fourth (1991) and fifth PONs incorporated several new environmental features. These latter $570 million and $568 million competitions were tailored to attract advanced coal technologies, expected to be used into the 21st century. Projects considered for funding support are subject to review in accordance with the NEPA requirements. DOE`s three step process to ensure Program compliance includes preparation of a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (November 1989), pre-selection project-specific environmental review, and post-selection site-specific documentation. Most CCT Environmental Assessments culminate in {open_quotes}Findings of No Significant Impacts.{close_quotes} During the course of the EIS process, NEPA prohibits the taking of any action that could {open_quotes}have an adverse environmental effect or limit the choice of reasonable alternatives{close_quotes} to the project.

  20. Understanding Cost Growth and Performance Shortfalls in Pioneer Process

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Plants | Department of Energy Cost Growth and Performance Shortfalls in Pioneer Process Plants Understanding Cost Growth and Performance Shortfalls in Pioneer Process Plants This report presents an empirical and quantitative analysis of the misestimation of the capital costs and performance of innovative energy process plants and other chemical process facilities that create fundamental problems for government and industry in planning the development and commercialization of such plants.

  1. LM Annual NEPA Planning Summary 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 LM Annual NEPA Planning Summary 2014 LM Annual NEPA Planning Summary 2014 LM Annual NEPA Planning Summary 2014 (15.38 KB) More Documents & Publications 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Office of Fossil Energy 2011 ANNUAL PLANNING SUMMARY FOR ADVANCED RESEARCH AND PROJECTS AGENCY WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION LM Annual NEPA Planning Summary 2015

  2. State Energy Program NEPA Determination FY13 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 State Energy Program NEPA Determination FY13 The document below is the State Energy Program''s NEPA Determination for Fiscal Year 2013. NEPA Determination FY13 (143.76 KB) More Documents & Publications State Energy Program NEPA Determination FY15 CX-009008: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009155

  3. State Energy Program NEPA Determination FY14 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 State Energy Program NEPA Determination FY14 The document below is the State Energy Program''s NEPA Determination for Fiscal Year 2014. NEPA Determination FY14 (142.76 KB) More Documents & Publications State Energy Program NEPA Determination FY15 CX-009008: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009566

  4. Advanced Burner Reactor Preliminary NEPA Data Study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briggs, L. L.; Cahalan, J. E.; Deitrich, L. W.; Fanning, T. H.; Grandy, C.; Kellogg, R.; Kim, T. K.; Yang, W. S.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-10-15

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is a new nuclear fuel cycle paradigm with the goals of expanding the use of nuclear power both domestically and internationally, addressing nuclear waste management concerns, and promoting nonproliferation. A key aspect of this program is fast reactor transmutation, in which transuranics recovered from light water reactor spent fuel are to be recycled to create fast reactor transmutation fuels. The benefits of these fuels are to be demonstrated in an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), which will provide a representative environment for recycle fuel testing, safety testing, and modern fast reactor design and safeguard features. Because the GNEP programs will require facilities which may have an impact upon the environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), preparation of a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for GNEP is being undertaken by Tetra Tech, Inc. The PEIS will include a section on the ABR. In support of the PEIS, the Nuclear Engineering Division of Argonne National Laboratory has been asked to provide a description of the ABR alternative, including graphics, plus estimates of construction and operations data for an ABR plant. The compilation of this information is presented in the remainder of this report. Currently, DOE has started the process of engaging industry on the design of an Advanced Burner Reactor. Therefore, there is no specific, current, vendor-produced ABR design that could be used for this PEIS datacall package. In addition, candidate sites for the ABR vary widely as to available water, geography, etc. Therefore, ANL has based its estimates for construction and operations data largely on generalization of available information from existing plants and from the environmental report assembled for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) design [CRBRP, 1977]. The CRBRP environmental report was chosen as a resource because it thoroughly

  5. Overcoming Processing Cost Barriers of High-Performance Lithium...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Overcoming Processing Cost Barriers of High-Performance Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes ...

  6. Solid State Processing of New Low Cost Titanium Powders Enabling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Powders Enabling Affordable Automotive Components Solid State Processing of New Low Cost Titanium Powders Enabling Affordable Automotive Components Presentation given at ...

  7. Designating and Supporting NEPA Document Managers (DOE, 1998) | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Designating and Supporting NEPA Document Managers (DOE, 1998) Designating and Supporting NEPA Document Managers (DOE, 1998) The purpose of this memorandum is to emphasize the important role that National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Document Managers play in the success of the DOE's NEPA compliance program and to help maximize their effectiveness. Designating and Supporting NEPA Document Managers (462.08 KB) More Documents & Publications Lessons Learned Quarterly Report,

  8. Promoting NEPA Transparency and Public Engagement | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Promoting NEPA Transparency and Public Engagement Promoting NEPA Transparency and Public Engagement June 3, 2011 - 1:14pm Addthis "NEPA is, at its core, a transparency statute," said Katie Scharf, Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Deputy General Counsel, in opening a panel discussion on using information technology to support open government initiatives, engage the public, and add value to NEPA analysis. At the March 9, 2011, event - hosted by CEQ for Federal NEPA and legal staff

  9. States with NEPA-like Environmental Planning Requirements | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy States with NEPA-like Environmental Planning Requirements States with NEPA-like Environmental Planning Requirements Several states have environmental planning requirements that are similar to NEPA. These requirements are either State laws, regulations, or executive orders. Please click below for additional information on those requirements. States with NEPA-like Environmental Planning Requirements (60.65 KB) More Documents & Publications Federal NEPA Contacts Directory of

  10. USCG NEPA Handbook | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: USCG NEPA HandbookPermittingRegulatory GuidanceGuideHandbook Abstract This...

  11. BLM NEPA Handbook | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: BLM NEPA HandbookPermittingRegulatory GuidanceGuideHandbook Author BLM...

  12. NEPA Guidance and Requirements- Search Index

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The NEPA Guidance and Requirements - Search Index is a one-stop solution providing you with DOE's Guidance and Requirements documents combined into one file for easy download and use.

  13. Template for Expedited NEPA Review of Certain

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Expedited NEPA Review of Certain Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Sub-grants Purpose: This document provides an optional approach that a State may use to help the Department of Energy (DOE) expedite National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review of certain Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants (EECBG) sub-grants that States plan to award to eligible units of local governments (Sub-recipients) under Sections 544 and 545(c) of the Energy Information and

  14. NEPA - Environmental Impact Statements - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Statements Documents Documents Hanford Site Cleanup Completion Framework Tri-Party Agreement Freedom of Information and Privacy Act Hanford Site Budget Hanford Site Safety Standards DOE - ORP Contracts/Procurements DOE - RL Contracts/Procurements Integrated Waste Feed Delivery Plan Single-Shell Tank Evaluations Deep Vadose Zone 100-F RI/FS 100-D/H Operable Units RI/FS Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis Environmental CERCLA Five-Year Review NEPA - Categorical Exclusions NEPA -

  15. Prospects for reducing the processing cost of lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood III, David L.; Li, Jianlin; Daniel, Claus

    2014-11-06

    A detailed processing cost breakdown is given for lithium-ion battery (LIB) electrodes, which focuses on: elimination of toxic, costly N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) dispersion chemistry; doubling the thicknesses of the anode and cathode to raise energy density; and, reduction of the anode electrolyte wetting and SEI-layer formation time. These processing cost reduction technologies generically adaptable to any anode or cathode cell chemistry and are being implemented at ORNL. This paper shows step by step how these cost savings can be realized in existing or new LIB manufacturing plants using a baseline case of thin (power) electrodes produced with NMP processing and a standard 10-14-day wetting and formation process. In particular, it is shown that aqueous electrode processing can cut the electrode processing cost and energy consumption by an order of magnitude. Doubling the thickness of the electrodes allows for using half of the inactive current collectors and separators, contributing even further to the processing cost savings. Finally wetting and SEI-layer formation cost savings are discussed in the context of a protocol with significantly reduced time. These three benefits collectively offer the possibility of reducing LIB pack cost from $502.8 kWh-1-usable to $370.3 kWh-1-usable, a savings of $132.5/kWh (or 26.4%).

  16. Prospects for Reducing the Processing Cost of Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood III, David L; Li, Jianlin; Daniel, Claus

    2014-01-01

    A detailed processing cost breakdown is given for lithium-ion battery (LIB) electrodes, which focuses on: 1) elimination of toxic, costly N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) dispersion chemistry; 2) doubling the thicknesses of the anode and cathode to raise energy density; and 3) reduction of the anode electrolyte wetting and SEI-layer formation time. These processing cost reduction technologies generically adaptable to any anode or cathode cell chemistry and are being implemented at ORNL. This paper shows step by step how these cost savings can be realized in existing or new LIB manufacturing plants using a baseline case of thin (power) electrodes produced with NMP processing and a standard 10-14-day wetting and formation process. In particular, it is shown that aqueous electrode processing can cut the electrode processing cost and energy consumption by an order of magnitude. Doubling the thickness of the electrodes allows for using half of the inactive current collectors and separators, contributing even further to the processing cost savings. Finally wetting and SEI-layer formation cost savings are discussed in the context of a protocol with significantly reduced time. These three benefits collectively offer the possibility of reducing LIB pack cost from $502.8 kWh-1-usable to $370.3 kWh-1-usable, a savings of $132.5/kWh (or 26.4%).

  17. Prospects for reducing the processing cost of lithium ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wood III, David L.; Li, Jianlin; Daniel, Claus

    2014-11-06

    A detailed processing cost breakdown is given for lithium-ion battery (LIB) electrodes, which focuses on: elimination of toxic, costly N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) dispersion chemistry; doubling the thicknesses of the anode and cathode to raise energy density; and, reduction of the anode electrolyte wetting and SEI-layer formation time. These processing cost reduction technologies generically adaptable to any anode or cathode cell chemistry and are being implemented at ORNL. This paper shows step by step how these cost savings can be realized in existing or new LIB manufacturing plants using a baseline case of thin (power) electrodes produced with NMP processing and amore » standard 10-14-day wetting and formation process. In particular, it is shown that aqueous electrode processing can cut the electrode processing cost and energy consumption by an order of magnitude. Doubling the thickness of the electrodes allows for using half of the inactive current collectors and separators, contributing even further to the processing cost savings. Finally wetting and SEI-layer formation cost savings are discussed in the context of a protocol with significantly reduced time. These three benefits collectively offer the possibility of reducing LIB pack cost from $502.8 kWh-1-usable to $370.3 kWh-1-usable, a savings of $132.5/kWh (or 26.4%).« less

  18. Use of comprehensive NEPA documents to reduce program risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, T.A.; Hansen, R.P.

    1994-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories operates DOE`s Kauai Test Facility (KTF) on the western coast of the Hawaiian island of Kauai. In July 1992, DOE approved a comprehensive Environmental Assessment (EA) covering ongoing and future rocket launches of experimental payloads. The KTF EA fulfilled two basic objectives: Consideration of environmental values early in the planning and decision making process; and public disclosure. These objectives can also be considered to be benefits of preparing comprehensive NEPA documents. However, proponents of an action are not as dedicated to these twin NEPA objectives as they are motivated by NEPA`s ability to reduce program risks. Once the KTF environmental assessment was underway, it was apparent that reducing risks to the program, budget, and schedule was the main incentive for successful completion of the EA. The comprehensive or ``omnibus`` environmental assessment prepared for the KTF is a de facto ``detailed statement,`` and it is also a good example of a ``mitigated FONSI,`` i.e., mitigation measures are essential to render some potential impacts not significant. Because the KTF EA is a broad scope, umbrella-like, site-wide assessment, it ``bounds`` the impacts of continuing and proposed future actions. The successful completion of this document eliminated the need to review, document, and gain approval individually for numerous related actions. Also, because it supported a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) after identifying appropriate mitigation, it also eliminated the need for an environmental impact statement (EIS). This paper discusses seven specific ways in which the KTF EA reduced program risks and supported budget and schedule objectives.

  19. u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    RECIPI ENT:Strategic Analysis. Inc. PROJECf TITLE: Hydrogen Storage System Cost Assessment Page 1 of2 STATE: VA funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-(){)()()420 DE-EEOOOS2S3 GF0-0005253-OO1 EE5253 Based on my review orehe inrormation concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4S1.IA), 1 have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX ANO NUMBER: Description: A9

  20. Determining if a change to a proposal requires additional NEPA documentation: the Smithsonian Solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ECCLESTON, C.H.

    1999-02-23

    Proposed actions tend to evolve over time. Once National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation is completed, agencies are at risk that subsequent changes may not be adequately covered or that existing NEPA documentation maybe completely invalidated. Neither NEPA nor its subsequent regulations provide sufficient direction for determining the degree to which a proposed action may change before preparation of new or supplemental documentation is necessary. Yet, decisionmakers are routinely involved in determining if a change to a proposed action departs, to such an extent, from the description presented in the NEPA document that additional documentation is necessary. Experience demonstrates that no two decisionmakers will completely agree, one decisionmaker might believe that a particular change would not require additional documentation, while the other concludes the exact opposite. Lacking definitive direction, decisionmakers and critics alike may point to a universe of potential considerations as the basis for defending their claim that a change in an action does or does not require new or additional NEPA documentation. Assertions are often based on equivocal opinions that can be neither proved nor disproved. Moreover, decisionmakers are frequently placed in an arduous dilemma of justifying a decision, for which there is no generally accepted methodology on which to base the decision. Lack of definitive direction can prolong the decisionmaking process, resulting in project delays. This can also lead to inappropriate levels of NEPA documentation, inconsistencies in decisionmaking, and increased risk of a legal challenge because of insufficient documentation. Clearly, a more systematic and less subjective approach is needed, A tool for streamlining the NEPA process, by reducing this degree of subjectivity, is presented in this paper.

  1. Milestone Reached: New Process Reduces Cost and Risk of Biofuel...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Risk of Biofuel Production from Bio-Oil Upgrading Milestone Reached: New Process Reduces Cost and Risk of Biofuel Production from Bio-Oil Upgrading May 6, 2015 - 11:29am Addthis ...

  2. Low-cost exterior insulation process and structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vohra, A.

    1999-03-02

    A low-cost exterior insulation process of stacking bags of insulating material against a wall and covering them with wire mesh and stucco provides a durable structure with good insulating value. 2 figs.

  3. Low-cost exterior insulation process and structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vohra, Arun

    1999-01-01

    A low-cost exterior insulation process of stacking bags of insulating material against a wall and covering them with wire mesh and stucco provides a durable structure with good insulating value.

  4. EERE Success Story-Milestone Reached: New Process Reduces Cost...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Biofuel Production from Bio-Oil Upgrading EERE Success Story-Milestone Reached: New Process Reduces Cost and Risk of Biofuel Production from Bio-Oil Upgrading May 12, 2015 - ...

  5. Department of Energy - Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Department of Energy - Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance...

  6. Bureau of Land Management - NEPA Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Bureau of Land Management - NEPA Website Abstract This page links to the BLM NEPA website....

  7. Bureau of Land Management - NEPA Web Guide | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Web Guide Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Bureau of Land Management - NEPA Web Guide Abstract The NEPA Web Guide includes links to...

  8. Public Comment Received on Proposed Revisions to DOE's NEPA Rule...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Public Comment Received on Proposed Revisions to DOE's NEPA Rule: 10 CFR Part 1021 Public Comment Received on Proposed Revisions to DOE's NEPA Rule: 10 CFR Part 1021 Public Comment...

  9. Title 40 CFR 1505 NEPA and Agency Decisionmaking | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NEPA and Agency Decisionmaking Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation: Title 40 CFR 1505 NEPA and...

  10. Property:NEPA Decision Url | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Decision Url Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA Decision Url Property Type URL Description URLs to decisions on NEPA Docs This is a property of type URL. Retrieved from...

  11. Property:NEPA FONSI Url | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FONSI Url Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA FONSI Url Property Type URL Description URLs to FONSI reports for NEPA Docs This is a property of type URL. Retrieved from...

  12. Property:NEPA RevisedApplicationDate | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RevisedApplicationDate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA RevisedApplicationDate Property Type Date This is a property of type Date. Pages using the property "NEPA...

  13. Property:NEPA DNA Worksheet | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DNA Worksheet Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA DNA Worksheet Property Type Page Description DNA Worksheet files for NEPA Docs. This is a property of type Page. It...

  14. Property:NEPA Application Type | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Type Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA Application Type Property Type String Allows Values NOI;GPD;POO;POU;POD;ROW;Sundry Notice Pages using the property "NEPA...

  15. Property:NEPA ScopingInitiatedDate | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ScopingInitiatedDate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA ScopingInitiatedDate Property Type Date This is a property of type Date. Pages using the property "NEPA...

  16. Property:NEPA PreliminaryEA-EISDate | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PreliminaryEA-EISDate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA PreliminaryEA-EISDate Property Type Date This is a property of type Date. Pages using the property "NEPA...

  17. Property:NEPA FinalEA-EISDate | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FinalEA-EISDate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA FinalEA-EISDate Property Type Date This is a property of type Date. Pages using the property "NEPA FinalEA-EISDate"...

  18. Property:NEPA TieredDoc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TieredDoc Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA TieredDoc Property Type Page This is a property of type Page. Pages using the property "NEPA TieredDoc" Showing 25 pages...

  19. Property:NEPA SerialNumber | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SerialNumber Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA SerialNumber Property Type String This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "NEPA SerialNumber"...

  20. Property:NEPA ApplicationDate | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ApplicationDate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA ApplicationDate Property Type Date This is a property of type Date. Pages using the property "NEPA ApplicationDate"...

  1. Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (DOE, 1994) Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (DOE, 1994) The purpose of this ...

  2. DOE NEPA Guidance on EIS Distribution (06/15/06)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... NEPA guidance, available on the DOE NEPA Web site at www.eh.doe.govnepa under Selected ... copy, compact disk (CD), access from a DOE Web site). - Other information that may be ...

  3. Template for Expedited National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Certain State Energy Program Projects | Department of Energy National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review of Certain State Energy Program Projects Template for Expedited National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review of Certain State Energy Program Projects National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), expedited review for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) State Energy Program (SEP) in the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. template_nepa_review.pdf (150.45 KB) More

  4. NEPA Supplemental Analysis of Tritium Target.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Overview for Weatherization Assistance Program Grantees NEPA Overview for Weatherization Assistance Program Grantees The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) hosted a webinar Aug. 3, 2016, on understanding the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) for WAP grantees. Speakers covered how all projects receiving financial assistance from DOE must be reviewed under NEPA. Understanding NEPA early in a new program year ensures smooth implementation

  5. GO 2009 Annual NEPA Planning Summary | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GO 2009 Annual NEPA Planning Summary GO 2009 Annual NEPA Planning Summary 2009 Annual National Environmental Policy Act Planning Summary for the U.S. Department of Energy's Golden Field Office (GO). GO 2009 Annual NEPA Planning Summary (2.71 MB) More Documents & Publications 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Berkeley Site Office LM Annual NEPA Planning Summary 2014 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA)

  6. Managing NEPA at the Department of Energy (DOE, 1998)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    A report, by the National Academy of Public Administration, on the management of NEPA within the Department of Energy.

  7. {In Archive} Fw: NEPA for German Fuel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fw: NEPA for German Fuel Maxcine Maxted to: lsaraka 11/14/2014 08:14 AM Cc: Drew Grainger Archive: This message is being viewed in an archive. I got this late yesterday. Thanks, Maxcine Maxted (803) 208-0506 pager 20767 ----- Forwarded by Maxcine Maxted/DOE/Srs on 11/14/2014 08:14 AM ----- From: Herbert Crapse/DOE/Srs To: Jean Ridley/DOE/Srs@Srs, Maxcine Maxted/DOE/Srs@SRS, Date: 11/13/2014 02:25 PM Subject: Fw: NEPA for German Fuel As requested. I have reviewed their input for accuracy and find

  8. Memorandum for Federal NEPA Contacts: Emergency Actions and NEPA (CEQ, 2005)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This Council on Environmental Quality memorandum provides general information on (1) the response to hurricane Katrina; (2) reporting oil and chemical spills; (3) projected long term recovery efforts; and (4) how agencies can respond to emergencies and comply with NEPA.

  9. Nuclear processing - a simple cost equation or a complex problem?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banfield, Z.; Banford, A.W.; Hanson, B.C.; Scully, P.J.

    2007-07-01

    BNFL has extensive experience of nuclear processing plant from concept through to decommissioning, at all stages of the fuel cycle. Nexia Solutions (formerly BNFL's R and D Division) has always supported BNFL in development of concept plant, including the development of costed plant designs for the purpose of economic evaluation and technology selection. Having undertaken such studies over a number of years, this has enabled Nexia Solutions to develop a portfolio of costed plant designs for a broad range of nuclear processes, throughputs and technologies. This work has led to an extensive understanding of the relationship of the cost of nuclear processing plant, and how this can be impacted by scale of process, and the selection of design philosophy. The relationship has been seen to be non linear and so simplistic equations do not apply, the relationship is complex due to the variety of contributory factors. This is particularly evident when considering the scale of a process, for example how step changes in design occurs with increasing scale, how the applicability of technology options can vary with scale etc... This paper will explore the contributory factor of scale to nuclear processing plant costs. (authors)

  10. TOWARD LOW-COST FABRICATION OF MICROCHANNEL PROCESS TECHNOLOGIES - COST MODELING FOR MANUFACTURING DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leith, Steven D.; King, Dale A.; Paul, Brian

    2010-11-07

    Chemical and energy conversion systems based on microchannel process technology (MPT) demonstrate high performance in applications in which rates are controlled by diffusive heat and mass transfer flux. The performance of MPT-based heat exchangers, absorbers/desorbers and chemical reactors all benefit from process intensification and have been used in a variety of mobile energy conversion systems including fuel reformers/converters, heat pumps and waste heat scavenging technologies. The service environments typical of MPTs often require the devices to be fabricated from metals such as aluminum, titanium, stainless steel or high temperature super alloys. Flow channels and associated critical dimensions in these devices can be as small as 50 um, but generally range from 100 to 1000 um in width and height with characteristic flow channel lengths normally in the mm to cm range. High surface area architectures (e.g. wicks or textured surfaces) are often included in the flow channels as well for enhanced mass transfer and/or catalytic functionality. Fabrication of MPT devices has historically been performed using a stacked-shim approach in which individual metal sheets are first patterned with micro- and meso-scale flow channels and subsequently bonded in a stack to create an array of miniaturized, parallel flow paths. Typical proof-of-concept fabrication efforts have utilized photo chemical machining (PCM) for shim patterning and diffusion bonding or diffusion brazing for joining of shim stacks. While flexible and capable of supporting technology demonstration, however, these techniques can be expensive at prototyping volumes. The high fabrication cost associated with these prototyping processes has contributed to a perception that MPT technology is expensive and will be relegated to a small application space. Recent work at the Microproducts Breakthrough Institute (MBI) has focused on exploring the cost structure of high volume manufacturing of MPT devices in effort to

  11. The Application of NEPA to CERCLA Cleanups (Department of Justice, 1995)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On March 31, 1994, officials from the Departrnent of Energy (DOE), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) met with then Acting Assistant Attorney General Lois Schiffer and other representatives of the Department of Justice (DOJ) to discuss the issue of the relationship of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to the cleanup of federal facilities under the CERCLA Superfund program. The meeting focused on proposals for addressing problems that have arisen from DOE's attempts to integrate the procedural and analytical approaches of NEPA into the CERCLA cleanup process. This document describes what was discussed at the meeting and the consensus reached there.

  12. Wind Program Manufacturing Research Advances Processes and Reduces Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Knowing that reducing the overall cost of wind energy begins on the factory floor, the Wind Program supports R&D efforts and funding opportunities that integrate new designs, materials, and advanced techniques into the manufacturing process, making wind a more affordable source of renewable energy for communities nationwide.

  13. The administrative record: What constitutes a relevant NEPA document?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennan, C.; Every, D.V.

    1997-08-01

    Neither the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) nor the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Regulations for implementing NEPA address the contents of an administrative record (AR). The AR typically contains the documents and information used in the development of NEPA documents and supports the decisions defined in them. The AR also should include all records pertaining to public comments and all records demonstrating the project`s efforts to involve the public. This paper will attempt to establish comprehensive guidelines to be used in assembling an AR in support of a NEPA document. While the AR is created to support an agency`s decisions, its main purpose is to demonstrate that an agency has adhered to NEPA`s procedural requirements. The CEQ requires that relevant environmental documents, comments and responses be part of the record in formal rulemaking or adjudicatory proceedings. Other Federal agency NEPA implementing procedures generally do not provide additional guidance on the contents of an AR. The CEQ and DOE guidelines make reference to the inclusion of relevant NEPA documents. The guidelines established in this paper will aid the NEPA practitioner in determining what constitutes a relevant NEPA document.

  14. WIPP Documents - National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Adoption of Environmental Assessment DOI-BLM-NM-P020-11-1414 Double Eagle Water System DOE/EA-1905 October 2011 This document examines the potential environmental impacts associated with providing DOE funding for the proposed improvements to the City of Carlsbad Double Eagle Water System Amendment to the Record of Decision for the Department of Energy's Waste Management Program: Treatment and Storage of Transuranic Waste This Federal Register Notice

  15. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide, Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, R.P.

    1995-08-01

    This report contains a comprehensive National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide for the Sandia National Laboratories. It is based on the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) NEPA regulations in 40 CFR Parts 1500 through 1508; the US Department of Energy (DOE) N-EPA implementing procedures in 10 CFR Part 102 1; DOE Order 5440.1E; the DOE ``Secretarial Policy Statement on the National Environmental Policy Act`` of June 1994- Sandia NEPA compliance procedures-, and other CEQ and DOE guidance. The Guide includes step-by-step procedures for preparation of Environmental Checklists/Action Descriptions Memoranda (ECL/ADMs), Environmental Assessments (EAs), and Environmental Impact Statements (EISs). It also includes sections on ``Dealing With NEPA Documentation Problems`` and ``Special N-EPA Compliance Issues.``

  16. NEPA strategy for the Bonneville Power Administration energy resource acquisition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, K.S.; Alton, C.C.; Linehan, A.O.

    1995-12-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has a statutory obligation to supply cost-effective electric power to its customers. BPA must also be consistent with the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act, which requires consideration of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s Conservation and Electric Power Plan and Fish and Wildlife Program. The challenge is to operate effectively within an increasingly competitive and dynamic electric utility market while continuing its commitment to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). BPA developed a tiered approach to its environmental analyses associated with energy resource planning and acquisition. The Resource Programs Environmental Impact Statement (RPEIS) is a programmatic document designed to support energy resource decisions for several years. The RPEIS includes a description of the environmental impacts and potential mitigation measures for various energy resources-including conservation, efficiency improvements, renewable resources, cogeneration, combustion turbines, nuclear, and coal. Information was also provided on fuel switching, load management, and emerging technologies. After analyzing the environmental trade-offs among resources, the RPEIS focuses on the cumulative effects of adding these resources to the existing power system. The Record of Decision documents that BPA`s resource acquisitions will include all cost-effective conservation and efficiency improvements, supplemented by a mix of renewables and thermal resources. Subsequent site-specific documents have been prepared on individual resource acquisitions. By focusing environmental reviews on the actual issues ripe for decision and by providing timely environmental information to the public and to the decisionmakers, this tiered approach led to better decisionmaking. BPA was able to operate in a more business-like manner while assuring NEPA compliance.

  17. Alloy Design and Method for Processing Low-Cost Refractory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dispersoid-Reinforced Alloys for Harsh Environments - Energy Innovation Portal Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Alloy Design and Method for Processing Low-Cost Refractory Dispersoid-Reinforced Alloys for Harsh Environments Ames Laboratory Contact AMES About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Alloys used in applications such as exhaust valves are increasingly subject to demanding operating environments, such as high temperatures and exposure

  18. Award-Winning Etching Process Cuts Solar Cell Costs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Award-Winning Etching Process Cuts Solar Cell Costs Optimizing solar-cell technology can be a complex job, requiring expertise in material science, physics, and optics to convert as much sunlight as possible into electricity. But despite this complexity, a simple fact is key to making a high-performance solar cell: any sunlight reflected off the cell can't possibly be converted into electricity. Manufacturers have tried to minimize the reflection of sunlight off of solar cells by first

  19. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorically Excluded Actions |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy NEPA » National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorically Excluded Actions National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorically Excluded Actions Categorical Exclusions (CX) - Categorical exclusions are categories of actions that DOE has determined, by regulation, do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment and for which neither an environmental assessment nor an environmental impact statement is typically required. Title

  20. Template for Expedited NEPA Review of Certain | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NEPA Review of Certain Template for Expedited NEPA Review of Certain This document provides an optional approach that a State may use to help the Department of Energy (DOE) expedite National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review of certain Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants (EECBG) sub-grants. eecbg_neps_template_061510.pdf (40.21 KB) More Documents & Publications Guidance for Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Recipients on Formula Grants CX-001111:

  1. Los Alamos Field Office NEPA Documents | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Los Alamos Field Office NEPA Documents NEPA Documents Below are links that provide NEPA documents which govern the Los Alamos National Laboratory operational envelope. This website is organized into three categories: Environmental Impact Statements (EIS), which includes Supplemental Analysis (SA); Environmental Assessments (EA) and Categorical Exclusions (CX). Under each of these sections, you will find a list of documents organized by document number, which is linked

  2. Notice of Change in National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Compliance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Approach | Department of Energy Change in National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Compliance Approach Notice of Change in National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Compliance Approach Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Facilities Project Notice of Change in National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Compliance Approach for the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Facilities Project (4/28/03). The purpose of this Notice is to inform the public of the change in the approach for the

  3. DOE Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions DOE Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions September 30, 2011 - 2:30pm Addthis On September 27, 2011, the Department of Energy (DOE) approved revisions to its National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) regulations, and on September 28th, submitted the revisions to the Federal Register. The final regulations, which become effective 30 days after publication in the Federal Register, are

  4. Deputy General Counsel Highlights Role of Environmental Justice in NEPA |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Deputy General Counsel Highlights Role of Environmental Justice in NEPA Deputy General Counsel Highlights Role of Environmental Justice in NEPA December 1, 2015 - 12:33pm Addthis Kedric L. Payne, DOE Deputy General Counsel for Environment and Compliance, described the evolution of environmental justice (EJ) in NEPA practice at the inaugural National Civil Rights Conference in Washington, DC, on November 4-5. The mission of the National Civil Rights Conference, co-hosted

  5. Title 40 CFR 1505 - NEPA and Agency Decisionmaking | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Agency DecisionmakingLegal Abstract This section mandates that agencies shall set forth procedures to ensure that decisions are made in accordance with NEPA, that agencies...

  6. Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) NEPA Regulations: 40 CFR...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Secondary Legal SourceSecondary Legal Source: Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) NEPA Regulations: 40 CFR 1500 - 1518Legal Author CEQ...

  7. NEPA and CEQA: Integrating Federal and State Environmental Reviews...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). Author White House Council on Environmental Quality; California Governor's Office of Planning and Research...

  8. Promising Practices for EJ Methodologies in NEPA Reviews (EJ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Practices report is a compilation of approaches that the NEPA Committee gleaned from an ... Guidance Under the National Environmental Policy Act EO 12898: Environmental Justice in ...

  9. Designating and Supporting NEPA Document Managers (November 24, 1998)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    UUI= f- 1;;2b.~ (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE:November 24, 1998 RA~~Y 6~ Office ofNEPA Policy and Assistance:Daniel:6-9760 SUBJECT: Designating and Supporting NEPA Document Managers TO: Secretarial Officersand Heads ofField Organizations The purpose of this memorandumis to emphasizeto you the important role your National EnvironmentalPolicy Act (NEPA) Document Managers play in the success of the Department's NEPA compliance program and to help you

  10. Bureau of Land Management - NEPA Handbook | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Bureau of Land Management - NEPA HandbookPermittingRegulatory GuidanceGuideHandbook Abstract The purpose of...

  11. Recommendations for Analyzing Accidents Under NEPA (DOE, 2002)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This DOE guidance clarifies and supplements "Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements." It focuses on principles of accident analyses under NEPA.

  12. RAPID/Best Practices/NEPA Timelines | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Best Practice: NEPA Timelines This best practice...

  13. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and NEPA: CEQ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    reviews for Recovery Act funded projects and activities. The President assigned this reporting responsibility to CEQ. Reports to Congress on the status and progress of NEPA reviews ...

  14. Scoping Guidance: Memorandum for General Counsels, NEPA Liaisons...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Participants in Scoping (CEQ, 1981) Scoping Guidance: Memorandum for General Counsels, NEPA Liaisons, and Participants in Scoping (CEQ, 1981) This Council on Environmental ...

  15. Transmission/Resource Library/NEPA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Library Jump to: navigation, search ResourceLibraryHeader.png Planning Public Involvement GIS Tools and Maps Environmental Resources and Mitigation NEPA MOUs General...

  16. Microsoft Word - NEPA Fact Sheet Oct 17 2011

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NEPA requires the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) for major federal actions ... agencies, including procedures for preparing EISs (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508). ...

  17. Revised DRAFT NEPA Guidance on Consideration of the Effects of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Climate Change and Greenhouse Gas Emissions (DOE, 2014) Revised DRAFT NEPA Guidance on Consideration of the Effects of Climate Change and Greenhouse Gas Emissions (DOE, ...

  18. Statement of Work-National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Support...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Statement of Work-National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Support Services Acquisition: Preparation and Review of Environmental Impact Statements, Environmental Assessments, ...

  19. NEPA litigation 1988-1995: A detailed statistical analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reinke, D.C.; Robitaille, P.

    1997-08-01

    The intent of this study was to identify trends and lessons learned from litigated NEPA documents and to compare and contrast these trends among Federal agencies. More than 350 NEPA cases were collected, reviewed, and analyzed. Of the NEPA cases reviewed, more than 170 were appeals or Supreme Court cases, mostly from the late 1980s through 1995. For this time period, the sampled documents represent the majority of the appeals court cases and all the Supreme Court cases. Additionally, over 170 district court cases were also examined as a representative sample of district court decisions on NEPA. Cases on agency actions found to need NEPA documentation (but that had no documentation) and cases on NEPA documents that were found to be inadequate were pooled and examined to determine the factors that were responsible for these findings. The inadequate documents were specifically examined to determine if there were any general trends. The results are shown in detailed statistical terms. Generally, when a Federal agency has some type of NEPA documentation (e.g., CX, EA, or EIS) and at least covers the basic NEPA procedural requirements, the agency typically wins the litigation. NEPA documents that lose generally have serious errors of omission. An awareness and understanding of the errors of omission can help Federal agencies to ensure that they produce winner a greater percentage of the time.

  20. Title 36 CFR 220 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    0 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation: Title...

  1. Property:NEPA Extraordinary Url | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Extraordinary Url Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA Extraordinary Url Property Type URL Description URLs that document extraordinary circumstances checklist or...

  2. Property:NEPA CategoricalExclusion | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CategoricalExclusion Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA CategoricalExclusion Property Type Page Description Files documenting Categorical Exclusion Environmental Review...

  3. NEPA Reports and Records of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NEPA Reports and Records of Decision Report of the Review of the Hanford Solid Waste Environmental Impact Statement regarding Data Quality Control and Management Issues - As part ...

  4. Notice of Change in National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Compliance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Facilities Project Notice of Change in National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Compliance Approach for the Depleted Uranium ...

  5. Property:NEPA OtherDocuments | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NEPA OtherDocuments Property Type Page Description Additional supporting documents (e.g. biological assessment, cultural, completion reports, etc.) that don't fit any other...

  6. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NEPA-related areas Reviewing Supplement Analyses, Environmental Assessments, and associated documents, including Management and Review Team membership Facilitating adoption of ...

  7. NEPA Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Implementation Procedures: Appendices I, II, and III NEPA Implementation Procedures: ... agency compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act and the CEQ's regulations. ...

  8. NEPA at 19: A Primer on an "Old" Law with Solutions to New Problems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    She describes current issues in NEPA practice and policy, and observes that NEPA has continuing vitality in the context of a new generation of environmental concerns. PDF icon NEPA ...

  9. Energy conservation and cost benefits in the dairy processing industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-01-01

    Guidance is given on measuring energy consumption in the plant and pinpointing areas where energy-conservation activities can return the most favorable economics. General energy-conservation techniques applicable to most or all segments of the dairy processing industry, including the fluid milk segment, are emphasized. These general techniques include waste heat recovery, improvements in electric motor efficiency, added insulation, refrigeration improvements, upgrading of evaporators, and increases in boiler efficiency. Specific examples are given in which these techniques are applied to dairy processing plants. The potential for energy savings by cogeneration of process steam and electricity in the dairy industry is also discussed. Process changes primarily applicable to specific milk products which have resulted in significant energy cost savings at some facilities or which promise significant contributions in the future are examined. A summary checklist of plant housekeeping measures for energy conservation and guidelines for economic evaluation of conservation alternatives are provided. (MHR)

  10. DOE Order 451.1B: NEPA Compliance Program (DOE, 2012) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Council on Environmental Quality Regulations Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508), and the DOE NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR Part 1021). ...

  11. HYBRID SULFUR PROCESS REFERENCE DESIGN AND COST ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorensek, M.; Summers, W.; Boltrunis, C.; Lahoda, E.; Allen, D.; Greyvenstein, R.

    2009-05-12

    This report documents a detailed study to determine the expected efficiency and product costs for producing hydrogen via water-splitting using energy from an advanced nuclear reactor. It was determined that the overall efficiency from nuclear heat to hydrogen is high, and the cost of hydrogen is competitive under a high energy cost scenario. It would require over 40% more nuclear energy to generate an equivalent amount of hydrogen using conventional water-cooled nuclear reactors combined with water electrolysis compared to the proposed plant design described herein. There is a great deal of interest worldwide in reducing dependence on fossil fuels, while also minimizing the impact of the energy sector on global climate change. One potential opportunity to contribute to this effort is to replace the use of fossil fuels for hydrogen production by the use of water-splitting powered by nuclear energy. Hydrogen production is required for fertilizer (e.g. ammonia) production, oil refining, synfuels production, and other important industrial applications. It is typically produced by reacting natural gas, naphtha or coal with steam, which consumes significant amounts of energy and produces carbon dioxide as a byproduct. In the future, hydrogen could also be used as a transportation fuel, replacing petroleum. New processes are being developed that would permit hydrogen to be produced from water using only heat or a combination of heat and electricity produced by advanced, high temperature nuclear reactors. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is developing these processes under a program known as the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI). The Republic of South Africa (RSA) also is interested in developing advanced high temperature nuclear reactors and related chemical processes that could produce hydrogen fuel via water-splitting. This report focuses on the analysis of a nuclear hydrogen production system that combines the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR), under development by

  12. The NEPA Task Force Report to the Council on Environmental Quality: Modernizing NEPA Implementation (CEQ, 2003)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report presents the results of research and consultations by the National Environmental Policy Task Force concerning the implementation of the environmental impact analysis requirement of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The task force interviewed federal agencies; reviewed public comments, literature, reports, and case studies; and spoke with individuals and representatives from federal, state, and local governments, tribes, and interest groups.

  13. Microsoft Word - NEPA18_Final.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6415 Rev. 18 Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization J. P. Duncan, Editor K. W. Burk M. A. Chamness R. A. Fowler B. G. Fritz P. L. Hendrickson E. P. Kennedy G. V. Last T. M. Poston M. R. Sackschewsky M. J. Scott S. F. Snyder M. D. Sweeney P. D. Thorne September 2007 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the

  14. Teaching a new dog old tricks: the synergy of ISO 14000, NEPA, and integrated ES{ampersand}H management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkinson, C.H.

    1997-03-01

    For more than twenty-five years, federal agencies have wrestled with (and even learned from) the planning and decision making processes of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Accordingly, agencies have developed established processes for environmental planning, impact assessment,and environmental-based decision making. Agencies are now faced with an opportunity to align existing environmental planning systems developed under NEPA with those of ISO 14001, the new international standard for environmental management systems. Through experience gained with NEPA, agencies may have an opportunity to assist the private sector through sharing of lessons learned in identification and mitigation of environmental aspects and impacts. However, agencies should also learn from the private sector how integrated environmental management includes integrating environment, safety, and health (ES&H) considerations in such away as to add direct value to the business. In times of continued and increasing federal agency downsizing, the government can streamline ES&H management planning by integrating ES&H values with business goals. The first synergy of NEPA and ISO 14001 is the identification and assessment of environmental impacts. Under IS0 14001,an organization must identify the `environmental aspects of its activities, products or services`. This is similar to the approach taken in NEPA where agencies must evaluate significant environmental impacts of its actions. The second synergy is the reduction and mitigation of the impacts. IS0 14001 requires a commitment to prevention of pollution and the NEPA process integrates pollution prevention with environmental planning. IS0 14001 requires checking and corrective action to monitor and measure progress toward environmental goals. NEPA applies mitigation measures to avoid or mitigate potential impacts. Because agencies have been conducting NEPA impact assessment for more than twenty-five years, this body of impact assessment

  15. Oak Ridge National Laboratory's philosophy and approach to NEPA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Hook, R.I.; Braunstein, H.M.; Sigal, L.L.; Trettin, C.C.

    1991-01-01

    At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the overall responsibility for compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) resides with Environmental Review and Documentations Section that is within the Office of Environmental Compliance and Documentation (OECD). Organizationally, OECD is a line-management division reporting to the Director for Environmental, Safety and Health Compliance. The cornerstone for NEPA compliance at ORNL is the Internal Environmental Assessment (IEA), which is designed to provide a basis for NEPA review and documentation. The Standard Operating Procedures provide for evaluation and documentation records management and training, and auditing. The IEA provides a project description and a review of environmental, health and safety issues. The completed IEA is used to make recommendations to DOE regarding the appropriate level of NEPA documentation required for the action. NEPA documents which may be prepared include the Categorical Exclusion, Abbreviated Environmental Assessment, and Environmental Assessment; actions requiring Environmental Impact Statements are prepared by US Department of Energy (US DOE). The relatively recent DOE initiative for agency-wide compliance with NEPA has created areas in which ORNL has found itself lacking adequate resources and expertise. These are discussed in this paper. Throughout ORNL, there is strong management support for compliance with NEPA which has resulted in enhanced awareness and implementation of the NEPA requirements. Guidance is being provided and Laboratory divisions are factoring early integration of NEPA into their project planning with the goal of ensuring that their activities are carried out in full compliance with the letter and the spirit of NEPA and the other environmental statutes and regulations.

  16. NEPA Success Stories: Celebrating 40 Years of Transparency and Open Government

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    NEPA Success Stories: Celebrating 40 Years of Transparency and Open Government, Environmental Law Institute, 2010.

  17. NEPA mitigation and monitoring activities on Army installations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reinke, D.C.; Robitaille, P.

    1995-12-01

    The Army National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) implementation regulation AR 200-2 (Army Regulation) requires only mitigation measures that can reasonably be accompanied as part of a proposed alternative be identified in the NEPA document. Failure of the identified mitigation actions to be executed or to perform as expected leads to a required reevaluation of the project and the significance of its impacts. The USAEC has undertaken a study of mitigation and monitoring actions listed in Army NEPA documents. As part of the USAEC NEPA program the study has outlined three major tasks (1) collection of a significant sample of Army NEPA documents, (2) review environmental documentation management and retention, and (3) review in detail a subsample of documents and follow-up with site visits. Some 242 Army NEPA documents, Environmental Assessments (EA) and Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) were collected and evaluated for mitigation requirements. Ninety seven of the 242 NEPA documents committed to one or more mitigation actions. While a wide array of mitigating activities have been identified in these documents, the four most common are (1) management plans and practices, (2) training actions, (3) revegetation actions, and (4) construction practices. Site visits to selected Army installations showed that mitigation practices were for the most part being done, but were poorly documented. No installation visited had a mitigation monitoring plan in place as required by AR 200-2.

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - 1_FG2 scoping_DOE NEPA [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of Fossil Energy AGENDA Welcome - Cliff Whyte (DOE-NETL) Background and DOE's Role - Jeff Hoffmann (DOE-NETL) Ameren Project Overview - Mike Long (Ameren) FG Alliance Project Overview - Gordon Beeman (June 7, 8) (FG Alliance) - Ken Humphreys (June 9) (FG Alliance) NEPA Process - Cliff Whyte (DOE-NETL) Public Comments Office of Fossil Energy FutureGen 2.0 Program and the National Environmental Policy Act Public Scoping Meetings - June 7-9, 2011 3 Office of Fossil Energy National

  19. DOE NEPA: Getting Better and Better 2000-2004 (07/04)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 SRS Salt Processing EIS Y-12 National Security Complex SWEIS Condon Wind Project EIS Sundance Energy Project EIS National Ignition Facility Supplemental EIS NCO Meeting Washington, DC NEPA Website Responds to Post-9/ 11 Security Concerns Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain EIS Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition EIS SRS High-Level Waste Tank Closure EIS Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Project EIS Relocation of TA-18 at LANL EIS Umatilla

  20. Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurston, Anthony

    2012-10-31

    The objective of the research was to determine the best low cost method for the large scale production of the Nickel-Cobalt-Manganese (NCM) layered cathode materials. The research and development focused on scaling up the licensed technology from Argonne National Laboratory in BASFs battery material pilot plant in Beachwood Ohio. Since BASF did not have experience with the large scale production of the NCM cathode materials there was a significant amount of development that was needed to support BASFs already existing research program. During the three year period BASF was able to develop and validate production processes for the NCM 111, 523 and 424 materials as well as begin development of the High Energy NCM. BASF also used this time period to provide free cathode material samples to numerous manufactures, OEMs and research companies in order to validate the ma-terials. The success of the project can be demonstrated by the construction of the production plant in Elyria Ohio and the successful operation of that facility. The benefit of the project to the public will begin to be apparent as soon as material from the production plant is being used in electric vehicles.

  1. Low-cost exterior insulation process and structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vohra, Arun

    1997-12-01

    The invention relates to a low-cost process for insulating walls comprising: (a) stacking bags filled with insulating material next to the exterior surface of a wall until the wall is covered, the stack of bags thus formed having fasteners to attach to a wire mesh (e.g., straps looped between the bags and fastened to the wall); (b) stretching a wire mesh (e.g., chicken wire or stucco netting) over the stack of bags, covering the side of the bags which is not adjacent to the wall; (c) fastening the wire mesh to stationary objects; (d) attaching the wire mesh to said fasteners on said stack of bags; and (e) applying a cemetitious material (e.g., stucco) to the wire mesh and allowing it to harden. Stacking the bags against the wall is preferably preceded by laying a base on the ground at the foot of the wall using a material such as cement or crushed stone wrapped in a non-woven fabric (e.g., geosynthetic felt). It is also preferred to erect stationary corner posts at the ends of the wall to be insulated, the top ends of the posts being tied to each other and/or tied or otherwise anchored to the wall. The invention also includes the structure made by this process. The structure comprises a stack of bags of insulating material next to the exterior wall of a building, said stack of bags of insulating material being attached to said wall and having a covering of cementitious material on the side not adjacent to said wall.

  2. EPA's Section 309 Review: The Clean Air Act and NEPA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document discusses Section 309 of the Clean Air Act, which authorizes the Environmental Protection Agency to review certain proposed actions of other federal agencies in accordance with NEPA and make those reviews public.

  3. DOE NEPA Implementing Procedures: Final Rule (57 Fed Reg 15122)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE revised the existing rule at 10 CFR part 1021, titled "Compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act," to incorporate revised provision of DOE's Guidelines for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

  4. NEPA Determination: LM-05-12 Amendment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5-12 Amendment NEPA Determination: LM-05-12 Amendment Obtain Access Agreement to Sample Homestake Mining Company Groundwater Monitoring Well HMC-951 Amendment CX(s) Applied: B3.1...

  5. Questions and Answers about National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Questions and answers about National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance for state and local projects funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) State Energy Program (SEP) in the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  6. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, D.A.; Fosmire, C.J.; Fowler, R.A.

    1998-09-01

    This document describes the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site environment and is numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is presented in Hanford Site NEPA related documents. The document is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many NEPA documents that are being prepared by contractors. The two chapters in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered this way to correspond to the chapters where such information is presented in environmental impact statements (EISs) and other Site-related NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes the Hanford Site environment, and includes information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological and historical resources, socioeconomics, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes applicable federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site.

  7. NEPA and CEQA: Integrating State and Federal Environmental Reviews (Draft)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ), in collaboration with the California Governor’s Office of Planning and Research, issued on March 5, 2013, a draft handbook on integrating NEPA and...

  8. Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance, Staff Directory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance, Staff Directory including phone number and areas of responsibility for the  Energy and Waste Management Unit, Western Energy and Waste Management Unit, and the...

  9. Council on Environmental Quality - A Citizen's Guide to the NEPA...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A Citizen's Guide to the NEPA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Council on Environmental Quality -...

  10. Glossary of Terms Used in DOE NEPA Documents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Glossary is provided as a resource for preparing technical glossaries and related explanatory material (such as text-box explanations of technical concepts) for DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents.

  11. Template for Expedited National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), expedited review for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) State Energy Program (SEP) in the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable ...

  12. Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE Offices are encouraged to be inclusive in providing potentially interested parties with opportunities to review NEPA documents.  This Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under...

  13. Glossary of Terms Used in DOE NEPA Documents (DOE, 1998)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This Glossary is provided as a resource for preparing technical glossaries and related explanatory material (such as text-box explanations of technical concepts) for DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents.

  14. United States Forest Service - Forest Service NEPA Procedures...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Guidance Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: United States Forest Service - Forest Service NEPA Procedures and Guidance Abstract This...

  15. Property:NEPA DecisionDocumentDate | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DecisionDocumentDate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA DecisionDocumentDate Property Type Date This is a property of type Date. Subproperties This property has the...

  16. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 & NEPA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Section 1609(c) requires a report to Congress on the status and progress of NEPA reviews for Recovery Act funded projects and activities. The President has assigned reporting responsibility to CEQ

  17. Golden Reading Room: NREL Environmental and NEPA Documents | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy NREL Environmental and NEPA Documents Golden Reading Room: NREL Environmental and NEPA Documents Below are electronic versions of Golden Field Office Reading Room documents that were created after November 1, 1996, per the requirements of the Electronic Freedom of Information Act Amendment of 1996. Most documents are available in Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format (PDF). NREL Annual Environmental Performance Reports (Annual Site Environmental Reports) Every year the National

  18. Golden Reading Room: Other NEPA Documents | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Other NEPA Documents Golden Reading Room: Other NEPA Documents Below are electronic versions of Golden Field Office Reading Room documents that were created after November 1, 1996, per the requirements of the Electronic Freedom of Information Act Amendment of 1996. Most documents are available in Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format (PDF). Floodplain Assessment for Installation of a Renewable Energy Anaerobic Digester Facility at the University of California, Davis in Yolo County, California

  19. Attempts to avoid NEPA: Is it bad faith?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuckfield, D.J.

    1995-12-01

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) imposes procedural requirements on federal agencies that undertake {open_quotes}major Federal actions significantly affecting the quality of the human environment.{close_quotes} Determining whether a project is a major federal action, subject to NEPA, is not always an easy task. When a determination is made that a project is not subject to NEPA, opponents of the project and environmental organizations occasionally cry foul. Often there are allegations that the federal agency of the project proponent (or both) acted in bad faith to avoid NEPA. The question of whether bad faith is relevant in NEPA inquiries has been the subject litigation for many of years. In that time, courts have addressed a number of bad faith questions. A common question is whether it is appropriate for a non-federal project proponent to structure a project to maintain eligibility for federal funding, but at the last minute withdraw the project from eligibility for the sole purpose of avoiding NEPA. More difficult questions arise when the federal government allocates some federal money to the project for preliminary design work before the project is withdrawn from eligibility for additional federal construction funds. Still other questions arise with respect to whether project proponents must reimburse the federal government for funds allocated to a project before the determination is made that it will not be a federal project. This paper will trace the evolution of the courts` struggle with bad faith NEPA claims. It will then show how courts have recently begun to develop a workable and appropriate test for determining when bad faith is an issue in NEPA litigation. This issue is important for project proponents and federal agency officials so they will not unwittingly take steps others might construe as bad faith. It is important for members of environmental organizations so they may recognize and properly assert bad faith claims when appropriate.

  20. Sandia Field Office NEPA Documents and Categorical Exclusion Determinations

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Sandia Field Office NEPA Documents and Categorical Exclusion Determinations NEPA Documents Date Title Document # June 2010 Draft Environmental Assessment for Removal Actions at the Technical Area III Classified Waste Landfill at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico DOE/EA-1729 January 2003 Final Site-Wide Environmental Assessment of the Sandia National Laboratories/California DOE/EA-1422 Categorical Exclusion Determinations Date Document

  1. Geothermal NEPA Database on OpenEI (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, K. R.; Levine, A.

    2014-09-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed the Geothermal National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Database as a platform for government agencies and industry to access and maintain information related to geothermal NEPA documents. The data were collected to inform analyses of NEPA timelines, and the collected data were made publically available via this tool in case others might find the data useful. NREL staff and contractors collected documents from agency websites, during visits to the two busiest Bureau of Land Management (BLM) field offices for geothermal development, and through email and phone call requests from other BLM field offices. They then entered the information into the database, hosted by Open Energy Information (http://en.openei.org/wiki/RAPID/NEPA). The long-term success of the project will depend on the willingness of federal agencies, industry, and others to populate the database with NEPA and related documents, and to use the data for their own analyses. As the information and capabilities of the database expand, developers and agencies can save time on new NEPA reports by accessing a single location to research related activities, their potential impacts, and previously proposed and imposed mitigation measures. NREL used a wiki platform to allow industry and agencies to maintain the content in the future so that it continues to provide relevant and accurate information to users.

  2. A systematic interdisciplinary approach to NEPA compliance programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    March, F. )

    1993-01-01

    NEPA calls for a systematic interdisciplinary approach'', but no substantive guidance is provided by the law or the regulations on how to implement such an approach. A review of the literature on the impact assessment methods (most of which were written in the 1970s) reveals a variety of valid approaches, but is largely useful within a specific program context. This paper presents and illustrates a more general theory for a systematic interdisciplinary approach. The logic for this approach is rigorously grounded on statements in NEPA itself and in CEQ's regulations. The results have provided a part of the theoretical framework for a NEPA expert system and have proven useful in training project managers in implementing NEPA. The paper first summarizes NEPA and CEQ's specific statements relating to a systematic interdisciplinary approach. It distinguishes between the procedural vs substantive aspects of an approach. The procedural approach is first presented in the form of a logic diagram cross-referenced in detail to requirements or guidance in the CEQ regulations. This provides the framework for an expert system approach to procedural compliance, and for a NEPA program management plan.

  3. Managing the analysis of air quality impacts under NEPA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Y.B.; Leslie, A.C.D.

    1995-12-31

    The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) mandates the analysis and evaluation of potential impacts of major Federal actions having the potential to affect the environment. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify an array of new air quality issues appropriate for analysis in compliance with NEPA. An example is emissions of the 189 hazardous air pollutants identified in Title III. The utility industry estimates that more than 2.4 billion pounds of toxic pollutants were emitted to the atmosphere in 1988, with the potential for resultant adverse health impacts such as cancer, reproductive effects, birth defects, and respiratory illness. The US Department of Energy (DOE) provides Federal funds for projects that utilize coal as the primary fuel, including the approximately 45 projects funded over the past ten years under the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. Provision of Federal funds brings these projects under NEPA review. While electric steam generating units greater than 25 MW are currently excluded from regulatory review for the 189 air toxics listed in Title III, they are not, due to their potential impacts, excluded from NEPA review when Federally funded, in whole or in part. The authors will discuss their experiences drawn from NEPA evaluations of coal-fired power projects, the differences between regulatory requirements and NEPA requirements, source categories, major and area sources, conformity, maximum achievable control technology, mandatory licensing, radionuclides, visibility, toxics found to be emitted from coal combustion, public involvement, citizen suits, the bounty system, and how NEPA review can result in beneficial changes to proposed projects through mitigation measures to avoid or minimize potentially adverse environmental impacts.

  4. Benefit/cost analysis of RDF process in Taiwan (Conference) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    unit prior to the incineration process. However, many engineering and economic disciplines are involved in the integration of refuse-derived fuel and waste-to-energy processes. ...

  5. The NEPA threshold question revisited: Proposed'' actions and continuing'' activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, T.A. ); Hansen, R.P. )

    1993-01-01

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires Federal agencies to include a detailed statement'' in every recommendation or report on proposals'' for major Federal actions significantly affecting the quality of the human environment.'' Unless the three elements of a proposal are present (major, federal, and action), preparation of a detailed statement is not required. This paper addresses the practical decision-making dilemma that attends determinations of what types of Federal activities meet the NEPA threshold test under what kinds of varying circumstances. The authors' experience with the US Dept. of Energy (DOE) NEPA documentation is used to discuss how decisions may be made to determine whether a proposed action qualifies for a categorical exclusion'' or whether it requires preparation of an environmental assessment (EA) or an environmental impact statement (EIS). The concept of new'' actions versus continuing'' actions which may be bounded'' by previous NEPA documentation is also discussed. A dichotomous key for separating or combining Federal action'' candidates for different levels of NEPA documentation is provided. Leading court opinions on the threshold question and related issues are discussed in lay terms.

  6. GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide Twelve Steps of a High-Quality Cost Estimating Process

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - REVISED References: Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Parts and Subparts  2.1 - Definitions  8.4 - Federal supply schedules  9.4 - Debarment, suspension, and ineligibility  9.6 - Contractor teaming arrangements  15.4 - Contract pricing  17.5 - Interagency acquisitions  31 - Contract cost principles and procedures  32 - Contract financing  34.2 - Earned value management system  42 - Contract administration and audit services  42.15 - Contractor performance

  7. A Citizen's Guide to the NEPA: Having Your Voice Heard | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the need for a Citizen's Guide to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Participants in NEPA Regional Roundtables held in 2003-2004 clearly voiced the need for an ...

  8. Title 40 CFR 1501 NEPA and Agency Planning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1 NEPA and Agency Planning Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation: Title 40 CFR 1501 NEPA and...

  9. Property:NEPA LeadAgencyDocNumber | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LeadAgencyDocNumber Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA LeadAgencyDocNumber Property Type String This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "NEPA...

  10. DOE Proposes First Revision to its NEPA Rules in More than a...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Proposes First Revision to its NEPA Rules in More than a Decade DOE Proposes First Revision to its NEPA Rules in More than a Decade December 20, 2010 - 5:22pm Addthis Today, the ...

  11. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushing, C.E.

    1992-12-01

    This fifth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Information is presented on climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels, prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. Models are described that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. Federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable for the NEPA documents at the Hanford Site, are provided.

  12. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization. Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushing, C.E.

    1992-12-01

    This fifth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Information is presented on climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels, prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. Models are described that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. Federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable for the NEPA documents at the Hanford Site, are provided.

  13. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, D.A.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Fosmire, C.J.

    1997-08-01

    This ninth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Chapters 4 and 6 in Hanford Site-related NEPA documents. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) includes information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological and historical resources, socioeconomics, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE directives and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site. Not all of the sections have been updated for this revision. The following lists the updated sections: climate and meteorology; ecology (threatened and endangered species section only); culture, archaeological, and historical resources; socioeconomics; all of Chapter 6.

  14. Questions and Answers on the Secretarial Policy Statement on NEPA (DOE,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1994) | Department of Energy Questions and Answers on the Secretarial Policy Statement on NEPA (DOE, 1994) Questions and Answers on the Secretarial Policy Statement on NEPA (DOE, 1994) Questions and Answers on the DOE Secretarial Policy Statement on NEPA. QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS on the SECRETARIAL POLICY STATEMENT on the NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (58.68 KB) More Documents & Publications "Frequently Asked Questions" on the Department of Energy's NEPA Regulations (DOE,

  15. "Frequently Asked Questions" on the Department of Energy's NEPA Regulations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (DOE, 1998) | Department of Energy "Frequently Asked Questions" on the Department of Energy's NEPA Regulations (DOE, 1998) "Frequently Asked Questions" on the Department of Energy's NEPA Regulations (DOE, 1998) Answers to frequently asked questions regarding DOE's NEPA implementation regulations. Revised "Frequently Asked Questions on the Department of Energy's NEPA Regulations (94.47 KB) More Documents & Publications Questions and Answers on the Secretarial

  16. CEQ Issues Final Guidance for Effective Use of Programmatic NEPA Reviews |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Issues Final Guidance for Effective Use of Programmatic NEPA Reviews CEQ Issues Final Guidance for Effective Use of Programmatic NEPA Reviews December 22, 2014 - 1:15pm Addthis The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) issued final guidance for effective use of programmatic National Environmental Policy Act reviews on December 18, 2014. The guidance provides clarification on when and how Federal agencies can use programmatic NEPA reviews in accordance with NEPA and the

  17. Benefit/cost analysis of RDF process in Taiwan (Conference) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Solid Waste Processing Div.; Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Air Pollution Technology Branch Country of Publication: United States ...

  18. Understanding Process Plant Schedule Slippage and Startup Costs...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    This study explores major factors causing schedule delays and problems often experienced in constructing and starting up new process plants. The results of this research provide ...

  19. Processes for producing low cost, high efficiency silicon solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rohatgi, A.; Doshi, P.; Tate, J.K.; Mejia, J.; Chen, Z.

    1998-06-16

    Processes which utilize rapid thermal processing (RTP) are provided for inexpensively producing high efficiency silicon solar cells. The RTP processes preserve minority carrier bulk lifetime {tau} and permit selective adjustment of the depth of the diffused regions, including emitter and back surface field (bsf), within the silicon substrate. In a first RTP process, an RTP step is utilized to simultaneously diffuse phosphorus and aluminum into the front and back surfaces, respectively, of a silicon substrate. Moreover, an in situ controlled cooling procedure preserves the carrier bulk lifetime {tau} and permits selective adjustment of the depth of the diffused regions. In a second RTP process, both simultaneous diffusion of the phosphorus and aluminum as well as annealing of the front and back contacts are accomplished during the RTP step. In a third RTP process, the RTP step accomplishes simultaneous diffusion of the phosphorus and aluminum, annealing of the contacts, and annealing of a double-layer antireflection/passivation coating SiN/SiO{sub x}. In a fourth RTP process, the process of applying front and back contacts is broken up into two separate respective steps, which enhances the efficiency of the cells, at a slight time expense. In a fifth RTP process, a second RTP step is utilized to fire and adhere the screen printed or evaporated contacts to the structure. 28 figs.

  20. Processes for producing low cost, high efficiency silicon solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rohatgi, Ajeet; Doshi, Parag; Tate, John Keith; Mejia, Jose; Chen, Zhizhang

    1998-06-16

    Processes which utilize rapid thermal processing (RTP) are provided for inexpensively producing high efficiency silicon solar cells. The RTP processes preserve minority carrier bulk lifetime .tau. and permit selective adjustment of the depth of the diffused regions, including emitter and back surface field (bsf), within the silicon substrate. In a first RTP process, an RTP step is utilized to simultaneously diffuse phosphorus and aluminum into the front and back surfaces, respectively, of a silicon substrate. Moreover, an in situ controlled cooling procedure preserves the carrier bulk lifetime .tau. and permits selective adjustment of the depth of the diffused regions. In a second RTP process, both simultaneous diffusion of the phosphorus and aluminum as well as annealing of the front and back contacts are accomplished during the RTP step. In a third RTP process, the RTP step accomplishes simultaneous diffusion of the phosphorus and aluminum, annealing of the contacts, and annealing of a double-layer antireflection/passivation coating SiN/SiO.sub.x. In a fourth RTP process, the process of applying front and back contacts is broken up into two separate respective steps, which enhances the efficiency of the cells, at a slight time expense. In a fifth RTP process, a second RTP step is utilized to fire and adhere the screen printed or evaporated contacts to the structure.

  1. NEPA at 19: A Primer on an "Old" Law with Solutions to New Problems (CEQ, 1989)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In this article, the former General Counsel of the Council on Environmental Quality, outlines NEPA's purposes, scope, and implementation procedures. She describes current issues in NEPA practice and policy, and observes that NEPA has continuing vitality in the context of a new generation of environmental concerns.

  2. OFFICE OF NEPA POLICY AND COMPLIANCE - STAFF DIRECTORY | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy OFFICE OF NEPA POLICY AND COMPLIANCE - STAFF DIRECTORY OFFICE OF NEPA POLICY AND COMPLIANCE - STAFF DIRECTORY Carol Borgstrom, Director 202-586-4600 Carol.Borgstrom@hq.doe.gov Lettie Wormley, Secretary 202-586-4610 Lettie.Wormley@hq.doe.gov ENERGY AND WASTE MANAGEMENT UNIT Brian Costner, Unit Leader 202-586-9924 Brian.Costner@hq.doe.gov Carrie Moeller Abravanel 202-586-8397 Carrie.Abravanel@hq.doe.gov - Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability: Transmission Line Projects -

  3. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorical Exclusions (CX)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Determinations You are here: DOE-ID Home >NEPA National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations CX Posting No. Project Title Posted DOE-ID-INL-16-100 Lighting Replacements in Test Reactor Area (TRA)-653 (Weld Shop) and TRA-662 (Warehouse) SECTION B. -76 Kb 08/29/2016 DOE-ID-INL-16-099 Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC)-1734 Deactivation and Demolition -68 Kb 08/29/2016 DOE-ID-INL-16-098 Installation of Staircase to Access Idaho Falls (IF)-603 Water Storage

  4. Consideration Of Cumulative Impacts In EPA Review of NEPA Documents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this guidance is to assist EPA reviewers of NEPA documents in providing accurate, realistic, and consistent comments on the assessment of cumulative impacts. The guidance focuses on specific issues that are critical in EPA's review of NEPA documents under Section 309 of the Clean Air Act. The guidance offers information on what issues to look for in the analysis, what practical considerations should be kept in mind when reviewing the analysis, and what should be said in EPA comments concerning the adequacy of the analysis.

  5. Processes for producing low cost, high efficiency silicon solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rohatgi, Ajeet; Chen, Zhizhang; Doshi, Parag

    1996-01-01

    Processes which utilize rapid thermal processing (RTP) are provided for inexpensively producing high efficiency silicon solar cells. The RTP processes preserve minority carrier bulk lifetime .tau. and permit selective adjustment of the depth of the diffused regions, including emitter and back surface field (bsf), within the silicon substrate. Silicon solar cell efficiencies of 16.9% have been achieved. In a first RTP process, an RTP step is utilized to simultaneously diffuse phosphorus and aluminum into the front and back surfaces, respectively, of a silicon substrate. Moreover, an in situ controlled cooling procedure preserves the carrier bulk lifetime .tau. and permits selective adjustment of the depth of the diffused regions. In a second RTP process, both simultaneous diffusion of the phosphorus and aluminum as well as annealing of the front and back contacts are accomplished during the RTP step. In a third RTP process, the RTP step accomplishes simultaneous diffusion of the phosphorus and aluminum, annealing of the contacts, and annealing of a double-layer antireflection/passivation coating SiN/SiO.sub.x.

  6. Aligning National Environmental Policy Act Process with Environmental Management Systems (CEQ, 2007)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Aligning National Environmental Policy Act Process with Environmental Management Systems (EMS) is a guidebook for NEPA and EMS practitioners that identifies elements of an EMS that can improve NEPA implementation. Alignment of NEPA and EMS further enhances both NEPA's goals and the sustainability goals laid out in the Executive Order 13423: " to create and maintain conditions, under which humans and nature can exist in productive harmony, that permit fulfilling the social, economic, and other requirements of the present and future generations of Americans."

  7. Low cost materials of construction for biological processes: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-13

    The workshop was held, May 1993 in conjunction with the 15th Symposium on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals. The purpose of this workshop was to present information on the biomass to ethanol process in the context of materials selection and through presentation and discussion, identify promising avenues for future research. Six technical presentations were grouped into two sessions: process assessment and technology assessment. In the process assessment session, the group felt that the pretreatment area would require the most extensive materials research due the complex chemical, physical and thermal environment. Discussion centered around the possibility of metals being leached into the process stream and their effect on the fermentation mechanics. Linings were a strong option for pretreatment assuming the economics were favorable. Fermentation was considered an important area for research also, due to the unique complex of compounds and dual phases present. Erosion in feedstock handling equipment was identified as a minor concern. In the technology assessment session, methodologies in corrosion analysis were presented in addition to an overview of current coatings/linings technology. Widely practiced testing strategies, including ASTM methods, as well as novel procedures for micro-analysis of corrosion were discussed. Various coatings and linings, including polymers and ceramics, were introduced. The prevailing recommendations for testing included keeping the testing simple until the problem warranted a more detailed approach and developing standardized testing procedures to ensure the data was reproducible and applicable. The need to evaluate currently available materials such as coatings/linings, carbon/stainless steels, or fiberglass reinforced plastic was emphasized. It was agreed that economic evaluation of each material candidate must be an integral part of any research plan.

  8. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Eschbach, Tara O.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Goodwin, Shannon M.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Hoitink, Dana J.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.; Rohay, Alan C.; Scott, Michael J.; Thorne, Paul D.

    2002-09-01

    This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No statements of significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year's report is the thirteenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the fourteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (Weiss) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological, and historical resources, socioeconomics, occupational safety, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities.

  9. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Antonio, Ernest J.; Eschbach, Tara O.; Fowler, Richard A.; Goodwin, Shannon M.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Hoitink, Dana J.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast, Ellen L.; Rohay, Alan C.; Thorne, Paul D.

    2001-09-01

    This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No statements of significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year's report is the thirteenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the fourteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (Weiss) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological, and historical resources, socioeconomics, occupational safety, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities.

  10. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization, Revision 15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Burk, Kenneth W.; Cannon, Sandra D.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.; Reidel, Steve P.; Scott, Michael J.; Thorne, Paul D.; Woody, Dave M.

    2003-09-01

    This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No statements of significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year's report is the thirteenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the fourteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (Weiss) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological, and historical resources, socioeconomics, occupational safety, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities.

  11. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Cannon, Sandra D.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Hoitink, Dana J.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.; Reidel, Steve P.; Rohay, Alan C.; Scott, Michael J.; Thorne, Paul D.

    2004-09-22

    This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No statements of significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year's report is the sixteenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the seventeenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (Weiss) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological, and historical resources, socioeconomics, occupational safety and health, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities.

  12. National Environmental Policy Act Process WATER Los Alamos National...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Environmental Policy Act Process WATER Los Alamos National Laboratory WATER The campaigns LA-UR-15-27484 * The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process begins with a ...

  13. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushing, C.E.

    1988-09-01

    This document describes the Hanford Site environment (Chapter 4) and contains data in Chapter 5 and 6 which will guide users in the preparation of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)-related documents. Many NEPA compliance documents have been prepared and are being prepared by site contractors for the US Department of Energy, and examination of these documents reveals inconsistencies in the amount of detail presented and the method of presentation. Thus, it seemed necessary to prepare a consistent description of the Hanford environment to be used in preparing Chapter 4 of environmental impact statements and other site-related NEPA documentation. The material in Chapter 5 is a guide to the models used, including critical assumptions incorporated in these models, in previous Hanford NEPA documents. The users will have to select those models appropriate for the proposed action. Chapter 6 is essentially a definitive NEPA Chapter 6, which describes the applicable laws, regulations, and DOE and state orders. In this document, a complete description of the environment is presented in Chapter 4 without excessive tabular data. For these data, sources are provided. Most subjects are divided into a general description of the characteristics of the Hanford Site, followed by site-specific information where it is available on the 100, 200, 300, and other Areas. This division will allow a person requiring information to go immediately to those sections of particular interest. However, site-specific information on each of these separate areas is not always complete or available. In this case, the general Hanford Site description should be used. 131 refs., 19 figs., 32 tabs.

  14. LM Annual NEPA Summary 2014.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Title, Location, Document Number Estimated Cost Description EA Determination Date: 1/23/2013 Transmittal to State: TBD EA Approval: TBD FONSI: TBD EA Determination Date: TBD Transmittal to State: EA Approval: FONSI: EA Determination Date: TBD Transmittal to State: EA Approval: FONSI: EA Determination Date: TBD Transmittal to State: EA Approval: FONSI: EA Determination Date: TBD Transmittal to State: EA Approval: FONSI: Total Estimated Cost $35,000 UMTRCA Title II Split Rock, WY Disposal Site

  15. Webinar: Low Cost Carbon Fiber Process Soliciation, April 7th, 2016

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be hosting a webinar for the AMO supported Low Cost Carbon Fiber Process Solicitation. ORNL is seeking commercialization partners to license a new method...

  16. Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO2 Capture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO2 Capture Project No.: FE0007502 GE Global Research and their project partners are conducting research on the use of a novel silicone...

  17. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohay, A.C.; Fosmire, C.J.; Neitzel, D.A.; Hoitink, D.J.; Harvey, D.W.; Antonio, E.J.; Wright, M.K.; Thorne, P.D.; Hendrickson, P.L.; Fowler, R.A.; Goodwin, S.M.; Poston, T.M.

    1999-09-28

    This document describes the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many NEPA documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No conclusions or recommendations are provided. This year's report is the eleventh revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the 12th revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA; SEPA and CERCLA documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is presented in environmental impact statements (EISs) and other Site-related NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological and historical resources, socioeconomic; occupational safety, and noise. Sources for extensive tabular data related to these topics are provided in the chapter. Most subjects are divided into a general description of the characteristics of the Hanford Site, followed by site-specific information, where available, of the 100,200,300, and other Areas. This division allows the reader to go directly to those sections of particular interest. When specific information on each of these separate areas is not complete or available, the general Hanford Site description should be used. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) is essentially a definitive NEPA Chapter 6.0, which describes applicable federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site. People preparing environmental assessments and EISs should also be cognizant of the document entitled ''Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements'' published by

  18. NEPA and the Clean Air Act: Complementary approaches to maintaining air quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.L.; McCold, L.N.

    1991-01-01

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 was established to prevent or eliminate damage to the environmental and biosphere from federal actions and stimulate the public health and welfare. An intertwined focus of NEPA has been to create and maintain conditions under which people and nature can exist in productive harmony. Meanwhile, the Clean Air Act (CAA) and amendments are the basis for regulating emission of air pollutants and otherwise maintaining or enhancing air quality to protect public health and welfare throughout the United States. Because the CAA is to comprehensive, a frequently asked question concerns the usefulness of NEPA from an air quality perspective: What can NEPA accomplish for federal actions that is not already accomplished by the CAA This paper contends that NEPA plays an important role in identifying and informing federal decision-makers of potential air quality impacts of federal actions. NEPA encompasses a broader scope and provides an independent analysis of CAA requirements for federal actions. NEPA ensures that spectrum of potential environmental effects is examined, rather than air quality alone. In some cases, NEPA analyses involve evaluating trade-offs of beneficial and adverse effects among different environmental media, such as air emissions vs solid waste. NEPA air quality analyses sometimes encompass potential concerns that are beyond those required for compliance with the CAA. Also, the environmental consequences of alternative actions are assessed to assist federal decision-makers in selecting a preferred alternative. Finally, proposed federal programs are evaluated under NEPA for their potential effects. 8 refs.

  19. An approach to defining significance under NEPA: A practitioner's perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMillen, M.C. )

    1993-01-01

    The term significant impact'' has a specific meaning and intent when used in documents prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Often the word significant is avoided because of the implications related to its use. Significant adverse impacts discovered in the analysis performed for an EA can trigger the next level of NEPA scrutiny, the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). This paper looks at using methodologies with a prescribed set of criteria that measure factors including the magnitude, extent, duration and frequency, and likelihood of impacts related to a proposed action. Examples of this approach, and a rationale for placing an emphasis on developing the criteria for certain factors will be presented. The paper will also demonstrate the pragmatism of using a structured methodology versus professional opinion'' in the determination of significance.

  20. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushing, C.E. ed.; Baker, D.A.; Chamness, M.A. and others

    1995-09-01

    This seventh revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes up-to-date information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, environmental monitoring, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors. Chapter 5.0 was not updated from the sixth revision (1994). It describes models, including their principal underlying assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. The updated Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE Orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site, following the structure of Chapter 4.0. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be used directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

  1. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushing, C.E.; Baker, D.A.; Chamness, M.A.

    1994-08-01

    This sixth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes up-to-date information on climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors; Chapter 5.0 has been significantly updated from the fifth revision. It describes models, including their principal underlying assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions; The updated Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site, following the structure of Chapter 4.0. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be utilized directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

  2. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, D.A.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Fosmire, C.J.; Fowler, R.A.

    1996-08-01

    This eighth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Chapters 4 and 6 in Hanford Site-related NEPA documents. Chapter 4 (Affected Environment) includes information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, historical, archaeological and cultural resources, socioeconomics, and noise. Chapter 6 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE directives and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site. The following sections were updated in this revision: climate and meteorology; ecology (threatened and endangered species section only); historical; archaeological and cultural resources; and all of chapter 6. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be used directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

  3. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Source Guide for the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JANSKY, M.T.

    2000-09-01

    This Source Guide will assist those working with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 to become more familiar with the environmental assessments (EA) and environmental impact statements (EIS) that apply to specific activities and facilities on the Hanford Site. This document should help answer questions concerning NEPA coverage, history, processes, and the status of many of the buildings and units on and related to the Hanford Site. This document summarizes relevant EAs and EISs by briefly outlining the proposed action of each document and the decision made by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) or its predecessor agencies, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). The summary includes the proposed action alternatives and current status of the proposed action. If a decision officially was stated by the DOE, as in a finding of no significant impact (FONSI) or a record of decision (ROD), and the decision was located, a summary is provided. Not all federal decisions, such as FONSIs and RODs, can be found in the Federal Register (FR). For example, although significant large-action FONSIs can be found in the FR, some low-interest FONSIs might have been published elsewhere (i.e., local newspapers).

  4. Comparative assessment of TRU waste forms and processes. Volume II. Waste form data, process descriptions, and costs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, W.A.; Lokken, R.O.; May, R.P.; Roberts, F.P.; Thornhill, R.E.; Timmerman, C.L.; Treat, R.L.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.

    1982-09-01

    This volume contains supporting information for the comparative assessment of the transuranic waste forms and processes summarized in Volume I. Detailed data on the characterization of the waste forms selected for the assessment, process descriptions, and cost information are provided. The purpose of this volume is to provide additional information that may be useful when using the data in Volume I and to provide greater detail on particular waste forms and processes. Volume II is divided into two sections and two appendixes. The first section provides information on the preparation of the waste form specimens used in this study and additional characterization data in support of that in Volume I. The second section includes detailed process descriptions for the eight processes evaluated. Appendix A lists the results of MCC-1 leach test and Appendix B lists additional cost data. 56 figures, 12 tables.

  5. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Ames Site Office (AMSO) AMSO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Resources Contact Information Ames Site Office U.S. Department of Energy 9800 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 P: (630) 252-6167 F: (630) 252-2855 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Related

  6. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Argonne Site Office (ASO) ASO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Resources Contact Information Argonne Site Office U.S. Department of Energy 9800 South Cass Avenue Building 201 Argonne, IL 60439 P: (630) 252-8637 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Related

  7. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Brookhaven Site Office (BHSO) BHSO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Resources Contact Information Brookhaven Site Office U.S. Department of Energy PO Box 5000 Upton, NY 11973 P: (631) 344-3425 E: Email Us National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Related Links

  8. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Berkeley Site Office (BSO) BSO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Resources Contact Information Berkeley Site Office U.S. Department of Energy One Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA 94720 P: (510) 486-5784 E: Email Us National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Related

  9. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Fermi Site Office (FSO) FSO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Resources Contact Information Fermi Site Office U.S. Department of Energy MS 118 P.O. Box 2000 Kirk Road and Pine Street Batavia, IL 60510 P: (630) 840-3281 F: (630) 840-3285 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Print Text Size: A A A

  10. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Oak Ridge National Laboratory Site Office (OSO) OSO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Contact Information Oak Ridge National Laboratory Site Office U.S. Department of Energy Post Office Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6269 P: (865) 576-0710 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Print Text Size: A A A

  11. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) PNSO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Resources Contact Information Pacific Northwest Site Office U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 350, MS K9-42 Richland, WA 99352 P: (509) 372-4005 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare

  12. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Princeton Site Office (PSO) PSO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Contact Information Princeton Site Office U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 102 Princeton, NJ 08543 P: (609) 243-3700 F: (609) 243-2032 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Related Links

  13. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents SLAC Site Office (SSO) SSO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Contact Information SLAC Site Office U.S. Department of Energy Bldg 41, M/S 08A 2575 Sand Hill Road Menlo Park, CA 94025 P: (650) 926-2505 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Related Links

  14. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Thomas Jefferson Site Office (TJSO) TJSO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Resources Contact Information Thomas Jefferson Site Office U.S. Department of Energy 12000 Jefferson Avenue Newport News, VA 23606 P: (757) 269-7140 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare

  15. GAO-14-369, NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT: Little Information Exists on NEPA Analyses

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Little Information Exists on NEPA Analyses Report to Congressional Requesters April 2014 GAO-14-369 United States Government Accountability Office United States Government Accountability Office Highlights of GAO-14-369, a report to congressional requesters April 2014 NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Little Information Exists On NEPA Analyses Why GAO Did This Study NEPA requires all federal agencies to evaluate the potential environmental effects of proposed

  16. NEPA?a grand new idea

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    potential for radiation exposure even made some aircraft designers recommend that only elderly men be considered as aircraft crew members. Sound ridiculous? The thought process was...

  17. Mixed Waste Treatment Cost Analysis for a Range of GeoMelt Vitrification Process Configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, L. E.

    2002-02-27

    GeoMelt is a batch vitrification process used for contaminated site remediation and waste treatment. GeoMelt can be applied in several different configurations ranging from deep subsurface in situ treatment to aboveground batch plants. The process has been successfully used to treat a wide range of contaminated wastes and debris including: mixed low-level radioactive wastes; mixed transuranic wastes; polychlorinated biphenyls; pesticides; dioxins; and a range of heavy metals. Hypothetical cost estimates for the treatment of mixed low-level radioactive waste were prepared for the GeoMelt subsurface planar and in-container vitrification methods. The subsurface planar method involves in situ treatment and the in-container vitrification method involves treatment in an aboveground batch plant. The projected costs for the subsurface planar method range from $355-$461 per ton. These costs equate to 18-20 cents per pound. The projected cost for the in-container method is $1585 per ton. This cost equates to 80 cents per pound. These treatment costs are ten or more times lower than the treatment costs for alternative mixed waste treatment technologies according to a 1996 study by the US Department of Energy.

  18. NEPA Process for Geothermal Power Plants in the Deschutes National...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oregon Project Phase GeothermalExploration, GeothermalWell Field, GeothermalPower Plant Techniques Exploration Drilling, Exploratory Boreholes, Production Wells, Thermal...

  19. Need to Consider Intentional Destructive Acts in NEPA Documents (CEQ, 2006)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents, including environmental impact statements (EISs) and environmental assessments (EAs), should explicitly address potential environmental...

  20. u.s. DEPARTl\\IENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DEPARTlIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERllJNAIION RECIPIENT:City of Philip and Philip Health Services PROJECf TITLE: Philip Health Services Geothermal ...

  1. DOE Order 451.1B: NEPA Compliance Program (DOE, 2012)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this Order is to establish DOE internal requirements and responsibilities for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), the Council on Environmental Quality...

  2. RL-721 REV? I. Project Title: NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM Document...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Subpart D, Appendix B) for categorically excluding actions under the provisions of the NEPA regulations. There shall be no extraordinary circumstances where normally excluded...

  3. Formal guidance for the use of science in EIA: Analysis of agency procedures for implementing NEPA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malik, M.; Bartlett, R.V. . Dept. of Political Science)

    1993-01-01

    The authors undertake here an analysis and evaluation of official department and agency procedures for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). They assess the extent to which these procedures provide implementing guidance, beyond that provided by the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations themselves, for those provisions of NEPA and the regulations pertaining to scientific integrity, content, and methodology. They analyze and evaluate content using criteria explicit or implicit in NEPA and the regulations, finding that many federal agencies still require little attention to scientific precepts and methodology in the implementation of NEPA. The substantive guidance provided by agencies on conceptual and methodological questions is general and, with few exceptions, minimal.

  4. RL-721 REV7 I. Project Title: NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM Document...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Subpart D, Appendix B) for categorically excluding actions under the provisions of the NEPA regulations. There shall be no extraordinary circumstances where normally excluded...

  5. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:Midwest Renewable Energy ... instructors together to develop classroom resources and an instructor discussion group. ...

  6. CEQ Guidance on the Application of NEPA to Proposed Federal Actions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    States with Transboundary Effects CEQ Guidance on the Application of NEPA to Proposed Federal Actions in the United States with Transboundary Effects CEQ Guidance on the ...

  7. CEQ Issues Revised Draft NEPA Guidance on GHG Emissions and Climate Change

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy NEPA Guidance on GHG Emissions and Climate Change CEQ Issues Revised Draft NEPA Guidance on GHG Emissions and Climate Change March 3, 2015 - 10:37am Addthis CEQ Issues Revised Draft NEPA Guidance on GHG Emissions and Climate Change What are the key facts? CEQ issued revised draft guidance in December to "provide Federal agencies direction on when and how to consider the effects of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and climate change" in NEPA reviews. The revised

  8. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.; Burk, Kenneth W.; Chamness, Mickie A.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Kennedy, Ellen P.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Scott, Michael J.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Thorne, Paul D.

    2007-09-27

    This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site for the many environmental documents being prepared by DOE contractors concerning the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). No statements regarding significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year’s report is the eighteen revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the nineteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. Two chapters are included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6), numbered to correspond to chapters typically presented in environmental impact statements (EISs) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology; air quality; geology; hydrology; ecology; cultural, archaeological, and historical resources; socioeconomics; noise; and occupational health and safety. Sources for extensive tabular data related to these topics are provided in the chapter. When possible, subjects are divided into a general description of the characteristics of the Hanford Site, followed by site-specific information, where available, for the 100, 200, 300 and other areas. This division allows the reader to go directly to those sections of particular interest. When specific information on each of these separate areas is not complete or available, the general Hanford Site description should be used. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities. Information in Chapter 6 can be adapted and supplemented with

  9. Milestone Reached: New Process Reduces Cost and Risk of Biofuel Production from Bio-Oil Upgrading

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Battelle—a nonprofit research and development organization that operates many of the national laboratories—reached an Energy Department project milestone to demonstrate at least 1,000 hours of bio-oil hydrotreatment on a single catalyst charge. Typically, it takes many catalysts to convert a bio-oil intermediate into biofuel, making the conversion process expensive. Battelle’s new process substantially reduces the cost and risk of biofuel production and helps make the process more commercially viable.

  10. Award-Winning Etching Process Cuts Solar Cell Costs (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-08-01

    NREL scientists have invented the 'black silicon' nanocatalytic wet-chemical etch, an inexpensive, one-step process that literally turns the solar cells black, allowing them to absorb more than 98% of incident sunlight. The process costs just a few cents per watt of solar-cell power-producing capacity. Increases in manufactured cell efficiencies of up to 0.8% are possible because of the reduced reflectance of black silicon. This would reduce silicon solar module costs by $5-$10 per module.

  11. EERE Success Story-Milestone Reached: New Process Reduces Cost and Risk

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Biofuel Production from Bio-Oil Upgrading | Department of Energy Reached: New Process Reduces Cost and Risk of Biofuel Production from Bio-Oil Upgrading EERE Success Story-Milestone Reached: New Process Reduces Cost and Risk of Biofuel Production from Bio-Oil Upgrading May 12, 2015 - 4:53pm Addthis Battelle-a nonprofit research and development organization that operates many of the national laboratories-reached an Energy Department project milestone to demonstrate at least 1,000 hours of

  12. The cost of ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass -- A comparison of selected alternative processes. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grethlein, H.E.; Dill, T.

    1993-04-30

    The purpose of this report is to compare the cost of selected alternative processes for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. In turn, this information will be used by the ARS/USDA to guide the management of research and development programs in biomass conversion. The report will identify where the cost leverages are for the selected alternatives and what performance parameters need to be achieved to improve the economics. The process alternatives considered here are not exhaustive, but are selected on the basis of having a reasonable potential in improving the economics of producing ethanol from biomass. When other alternatives come under consideration, they should be evaluated by the same methodology used in this report to give fair comparisons of opportunities. A generic plant design is developed for an annual production of 25 million gallons of anhydrous ethanol using corn stover as the model substrate at $30/dry ton. Standard chemical engineering techniques are used to give first order estimates of the capital and operating costs. Following the format of the corn to ethanol plant, there are nine sections to the plant; feed preparation, pretreatment, hydrolysis, fermentation, distillation and dehydration, stillage evaporation, storage and denaturation, utilities, and enzyme production. There are three pretreatment alternatives considered: the AFEX process, the modified AFEX process (which is abbreviated as MAFEX), and the STAKETECH process. These all use enzymatic hydrolysis and so an enzyme production section is included in the plant. The STAKETECH is the only commercially available process among the alternative processes.

  13. A low-cost solid–liquid separation process for enzymatically hydrolyzed corn stover slurries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sievers, David A.; Lischeske, James J.; Biddy, Mary J.; Stickel, Jonathan J.

    2015-07-01

    Solid-liquid separation of intermediate process slurries is required in some process configurations for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to transportation fuels. Thermochemically pretreated and enzymatically hydrolyzed corn stover slurries have proven difficult to filter due to formation of very low permeability cakes that are rich in lignin. Treatment of two different slurries with polyelectrolyte flocculant was demonstrated to increase mean particle size and filterability. Filtration flux was greatly improved, and thus scaled filter unit capacity was increased approximately 40-fold compared with unflocculated slurry. Although additional costs were accrued using polyelectrolyte, techno-economic analysis revealed that the increase in filter capacity significantly reduced overall production costs. Fuel production cost at 95% sugar recovery was reduced by $1.35 US per gallon gasoline equivalent for dilute-acid pretreated and enzymatically hydrolyzed slurries and $3.40 for slurries produced using an additional alkaline de-acetylation preprocessing step that is even more difficult to natively filter.

  14. Low Cost Chemical Feedstocks Using an Improved and Energy Efficient Natural Gas Liquid Removal Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-07-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to develop a new low-cost and energy efficient NGL recovery process - through a combination of theoretical, bench-scale, and pilot-scale testing - so that it can be offered to the natural gas industry for commercialization.

  15. Ms. Paula Call NEPA Document Manager US Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Via electronic mail landconveyanceEA@rl.doe.gov October 19, 2012 Ms. Paula Call NEPA Document Manager US Department of Energy Richland Operations Office P0 Box 550, MSIN A2-15 Richland, WA 99352 Re: Scoping Comments on the Department of Energy's Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment (EA) for the Proposed Conveyance of Land at the Hanford Site, Richland, WA and Notice of Potential Floodplain and Wetland Involvement. Dear Ms. Call, I am writing on behalf of Hanford Challenge to

  16. DOE Annual NEPA Planning Summary report templates 2011

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    APS Excel Spreadsheet Directions" "* Please download the spreadsheet file and save it to your computer." "* Use the tabs at the bottom of the page to move between this instruction page and the spreadsheet pages for EAs, EISs, and MAPs" "* Only type the necessary data into the empty cells." "* If more documents need to be listed, insert more blocks of rows. " "* If a DOE NEPA document number has been assigned, include that number in the first

  17. Expedited Site Characterization: A rapid, cost-effective process for preremedial site characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, J.C.; Walker, J.L.; Jennings, T.V.; Aggarwal, P.K.; Hastings, B.; Meyer, W.T.; Rose, C.M.; Rosignolo, C.L.

    1993-11-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a unique, cost- and time-effective, technically innovative process for preremedial site characterization, referred to as Expedited Site Characterization (ESC). The cost of the ESC field sampling process ranges from 1/10 to 1/5 of the cost of traditional site characterization. The time required for this ESC field activity is approximately 1/30 of that for current methods. Argonne`s preremedial site investigations based on this approach have been accepted by the appropriate regulatory agencies. The ESC process is flexible and neither site nor contaminant dependent. The process has been successfully tested and applied in site investigations of multiple contaminated landfills in New Mexico (for the US Department of the Interior`s Bureau of Land Management [BLM]) and at former grain storage facilities in Nebraska and Kansas, contaminated with carbon tetrachloride (for the Department of Agriculture`s Commodity Credit Corporation [CCC/USDA]). A working demonstration of this process was sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development as a model of the methodology needed to accelerate site characterizations at DOE facilities. This report describes the application of the process in New Mexico, Nebraska and Kansas.

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - FNC NEPA GHG Climate Slides -- 16Jan2015 updated 23Jan2015.pptx [Read-Only]

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    OVERVIEW OF THE COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY'S REVISED DRAFT GUIDANCE ON CONSIDERATION OF GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS AND THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT REVIEWS HORST G GRECZMIEL ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR FOR NEPA OVERSIGHT FEDERAL NEPA CONTACTS MEETING 16 JANUARY 2015 UPDATED 23 JANUARY 2015 2 WHERE Revised Draft Guidance for Federal Departments and Agencies on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and the Effects of Climate Change in NEPA Reviews  NEPA.GOV

  19. Incorporating Biodiversity Considerations Into Environmental Impact Analysis Under NEPA (CEQ, 1993)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) report is intended to provide background on the emerging, complex subject of biodiversity, outline some general concepts that underlie biological diversity analysis and management, describe how the issue is currently addressed in NEPA analyses, and provide options for agencies undertaking NEPA analyses that consider biodiversity.

  20. Procedural vs. substantive in the NEPA law: Cutting the Gordian knot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boggs, J.P. . Dept. of Anthropology)

    1993-01-01

    The debate whether the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is procedural or substantive has become central both to agency implementation of the act and to court review of agency compliance. While NEPA mandates both procedural and substantive reform as a means to improve environmental quality, NEPA also focuses on cognitive reform--the improved utilization of knowledge in public affairs. Choices about what knowledge to base public decisions on, and how that knowledge will be used, build the social realities that shape lives. Thus, NEPA's mandates for the creation and use of public knowledge activate fundamentally conflicting values and visions of social order. However, debate about the procedural and substantive provisions of NEPA cannot resolve the conflict about values that actually motivates the debate, and this constrictive debate impoverishes public discussion about NEPA implementation and judicial review. This paper links the present debate with the values issues that underlie it, suggesting a more direct language for characterizing NEPA and a broader framework of legal theory for debating the issues it raises. This paper also finds that environmental and social science practitioners are strategically positioned to contribute materially to the issues raised by a NEPA properly understood as law that mandates knowledge utilization.

  1. Developing guidelines for improved assessment of risk to environmental receptors in NEPA documents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, M.; Abbott, L.; Berger, J.

    1995-12-01

    NAEP`s NEPA Practice Committee has formed several subcommittees to develop guidelines, and ultimately standards, for conducting various analyses to meet the letter and spirit of NEPA. The authors comprise the Ecological Risk Assessment Subcommittee, and our purpose is to identify those aspects of ecological risk assessment of potentially greatest use in analyses for NEPA documents and to make this information available to NAEP members and other NEPA practioners. Our task is to identify procedures and techniques commonly used in ecological risk assessment for CERCLA and RCRA compliance that are useful directly, or in modified form, to improve the estimation of risk to environmental receptors in NEPA analyses. Environmental receptors include biota and media such as air and water. Our approach is to focus first on the practical aspects of environmental assessment for NEPA that we identify as needing improvement. These include: (1) knowing when a quantitative risk assessment is warranted; (2) assigning significance of potential harm; (3) how to assess cumulative risk; (4) how to cope with missing information and knowing when surrogate information is available and appropriate to use; (5) efficiency in analysis - lack of explicit screening steps; and (6) biodiversity-related effects assessment. Specific steps to help environmental professionals prepare NEPA documents to address these issues will be presented, including references to NEPA documents that employ explicit risk estimation.

  2. Integrating a life-cycle assessment with NEPA: Does it make sense?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ECCLESTON, C.H.

    1998-09-03

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 provides the basic national charter for protection of the environment in the US. Today NEPA has provided an environmental policy model which has been emulated by nations around the world. Recently, questions have been raised regarding the appropriateness and under what conditions it makes sense to combine the preparation of a NEPA analysis with the International Organization for Stnadardization (ISO) - 14000 Standards for Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA). This paper advantages a decision making tool consisting of six discrete criteria which can be employed by a user in reaching a decision regarding the integration of NEPA analysis and LCA. Properly applied, this tool should reduce the risk that a LCA may be inappropriately prepared and integrated with a NEPA analysis.

  3. Chemical coal cleaning process and costs refinement for coal-water slurry manufacture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhasin, A.K.; Berggren, M.H.; Ronzio, N.J.; Smit, F.J.

    1985-12-31

    This report describes the results of process and cost refinement studies for the manufacture of ultra-clean coal-slurry fuel for direct-fired gas turbines. The work was performed as an extension to an earlier contract in which AMAX R and D supplied METC with two lots of highly beneficiated coal slurry fuel for use in the Heat Engines program. A conceptual design study and cost estimate supplied to METC at that time indicated that a combined physical and chemical cleaning process could produce ultra-clean fuel at a competitive price. Laboratory and pilot plant studies performed for the contract extension further defined the process conditions and operating and capital costs to prepare coals containing from 0.2 to 1.0% ash as slurry fuels. A base-case fuel containing coal cleaned to 0.5% ash in a 1000 cp slurry containing 55% coal was $4.16 per million Btu when produced in quantities required to fuel a 500 MW gas-turbine generating station. Coal slurry fuel production costs as low as $3.66 per million Btu were projected for coals cleaned to 1.0% ash. 12 refs., 23 figs., 63 tabs.

  4. Initial cost analysis of a desalination process utilizing hydrotalcite and permutite for ion sequestration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, James Edward; Evans, Lindsey R.

    2004-12-01

    An initial cost analysis of a proposed desalination process was performed. The proposed process utilizes tailored inorganic ion exchangers, hydrotalcite and permutite, to sequester anions and cations from a brackish water solution. Three different process scenarios were considered: (1) disposal of the spent exchangers as dry waste (2) conventional chemical regeneration, and (3) acid regeneration of permutite coupled with thermal (550 C) regeneration of hydrotalcite. Disposal of the resin and conventional regeneration are not viable options from an economic standpoint. Applying limited data and optimistic assumptions to the third scenario yielded an estimate of $2.34/kgal of product water. Published values for applying conventional reverse osmosis to similar water streams range from $0.70 to $2.65/kgal. Consistent with these baseline values, the Water Treatment Estimation Routine, WaTER, developed by the United States Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation produced a cost estimate of $1.16/kgal for brackish water reverse osmosis.

  5. Los Alamos Waste Management Cost Estimation Model; Final report: Documentation of waste management process, development of Cost Estimation Model, and model reference manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matysiak, L.M.; Burns, M.L.

    1994-03-01

    This final report completes the Los Alamos Waste Management Cost Estimation Project, and includes the documentation of the waste management processes at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for hazardous, mixed, low-level radioactive solid and transuranic waste, development of the cost estimation model and a user reference manual. The ultimate goal of this effort was to develop an estimate of the life cycle costs for the aforementioned waste types. The Cost Estimation Model is a tool that can be used to calculate the costs of waste management at LANL for the aforementioned waste types, under several different scenarios. Each waste category at LANL is managed in a separate fashion, according to Department of Energy requirements and state and federal regulations. The cost of the waste management process for each waste category has not previously been well documented. In particular, the costs associated with the handling, treatment and storage of the waste have not been well understood. It is anticipated that greater knowledge of these costs will encourage waste generators at the Laboratory to apply waste minimization techniques to current operations. Expected benefits of waste minimization are a reduction in waste volume, decrease in liability and lower waste management costs.

  6. Defining the no action alternative for NEPA document of continuing actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCold, L.N.; Saulsbury, J.W.

    1995-12-01

    Environmental professionals today must address many issues that might not have been foreseen by developers of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) or the President`s Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations for implementing NEPA. One issue is the definition of the no action alternative for NEPA documentation of continuing actions. The CEQ regulations do not define the no action alternative, but merely state that NEPA analyses shall {open_quotes}include the alternative of no action{close_quotes}. For NEPA analyses of newly proposed actions, the practical definition of the no action alternative is clear (i.e., the agency will not implement the proposed action or alternative actions). However, the practical definition for NEPA analyses of continuing actions is not so clear. To clarify the definition of the no action alternative for continuing actions, particularly those that involve agency decisions about relicensing existing projects or continuing to operate existing programs or facilities. In trying to clarify the definition of the no action alternative for continuing actions, this paper examines the function of the no action alternative for NEPA analyses in general. Pertinent issues include how the definition of the no action alternative affects the selection of the baseline for environmental analysis and whether inclusion of the no action alternative really forces agencies to consider no action as a realistic alternative. To address these issues, this paper begins with a discussion of relevant legal decisions involving the no action alternative in NEPA analyses. The paper then examines some agency NEPA regulations and recent NEPA documents to provide examples of how some agencies address the no action alternative for continuing actions. Finally, the paper suggests definitions of the no action alternative for continuing actions and methods for addressing no action as a realistic alternative.

  7. Hanford Site National Evnironmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushing, C.E.

    1991-12-01

    This fourth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. In Chapter 4.0 are presented summations of up-to-date information about climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels. Chapter 5.0 describes models, including their principal assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclides transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable for environmental impact statements for the Hanford Site, following the structure Chapter 4.0. NO conclusions or recommendations are given in this report.

  8. Hanford Site National Evnironmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushing, C.E.

    1991-12-01

    This fourth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. In Chapter 4.0 are presented summations of up-to-date information about climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels. Chapter 5.0 describes models, including their principal assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclides transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable for environmental impact statements for the Hanford Site, following the structure Chapter 4.0. NO conclusions or recommendations are given in this report.

  9. Cost savings deliverables and criteria for the OST technology decision process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCown, A.

    1997-04-01

    This document has been prepared to assist focus area (FA) technical and management teams in understanding the cost savings deliverables associated with a technology system during its research and development (R and D) phases. It discusses the usefulness of cost analysis in the decision-making process, and asserts that the level of confidence and data quality of a cost analysis is proportional to the maturity of the technology system`s development life cycle. Suggestions of specific investment criteria or cost savings metrics that a FA might levy on individual research projects are made but the final form of these elements should be stipulated by the FA management based on their rationale for a successful technology development project. Also, cost savings deliverables for a single FA will be more detailed than those for management of the Office of Science and Technology (OST). For example, OST management may want an analysis of the overall return on investment for each FA, while the FA program manager may want this analysis and the return on investment metrics for each technology research activity the FA supports.

  10. Continuous Process for Low-Cost, High-Quality YSZ Powder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott L. Swartz; Michael Beachy; Matthew M. Seabaugh

    2006-03-31

    This report describes results obtained by NexTech Materials, Ltd. in a project funded by DOE under the auspices of the Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA). The project focused on development of YSZ electrolyte powder synthesis technology that could be ''tailored'' to the process-specific needs of different solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) designs being developed by SECA's industry teams. The work in the project involved bench-scale processing work aimed at establishing a homogeneous precipitation process for producing YSZ electrolyte powder, scaleup of the process to 20-kilogram batch sizes, and evaluation of the YSZ powder products produced by the process. The developed process involved the steps of: (a) preparation of an aqueous hydrous oxide slurry via coprecipitation; (b) washing of residual salts from the precipitated hydroxide slurry followed by drying; (c) calcination of the dried powder to crystallize the YSZ powder and achieve desired surface area; and (d) milling of the calcined powder to targeted particle size. YSZ powders thus prepared were subjected to a comprehensive set of characterization and performance tests, including particle size distribution and surface area analyses, sintering performance studies, and ionic conductivity measurements. A number of different YSZ powder formulations were established, all of which had desirable performance attributes relative to commercially available YSZ powders. Powder characterization and performance metrics that were established at the onset of the project were met or exceeded. A manufacturing cost analysis was performed, and a manufactured cost of $27/kg was estimated based on this analysis. The analysis also allowed an identification of process refinements that would lead to even lower cost.

  11. Advanced Oxyfuel Boilers and Process Heaters for Cost Effective CO2 Capture and Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Max Christie; Rick Victor; Bart van Hassel; Nagendra Nagabushana; Juan Li; Joseph Corpus; Jamie Wilson

    2007-03-31

    The purpose of the advanced boilers and process heaters program is to assess the feasibility of integrating Oxygen Transport Membranes (OTM) into combustion processes for cost effective CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. Introducing CO{sub 2} capture into traditional combustion processes can be expensive, and the pursuit of alternative methods, like the advanced boiler/process heater system, may yield a simple and cost effective solution. In order to assess the integration of an advanced boiler/process heater process, this program addressed the following tasks: Task 1--Conceptual Design; Task 2--Laboratory Scale Evaluation; Task 3--OTM Development; Task 4--Economic Evaluation and Commercialization Planning; and Task 5--Program Management. This Final report documents and summarizes all of the work performed for the DOE award DE-FC26-01NT41147 during the period from January 2002-March 2007. This report outlines accomplishments for the following tasks: conceptual design and economic analysis, oxygen transport membrane (OTM) development, laboratory scale evaluations, and program management.

  12. Award-Winning Etching Process Cuts Solar Cell Costs - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Award-Winning Etching Process Cuts Solar Cell Costs National Renewable Energy Laboratory Success Story Details Partner Location Agreement Type Publication Date Natcore Technology Inc. New Jersey Other August 1, 2013 Summary Optimizing solar-cell technology can be a complex job, requiring expertise in material science, physics, and optics to convert as much sunlight as possible into electricity. But despite this complexity, a simple fact is key to making a high-performance solar cell:

  13. Decision making, procedural compliance, and outcomes definition in U.S. forest service planning processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, Marc J.; Predmore, S. Andrew

    2011-04-15

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) dictates a process of analyzing and disclosing the likely impacts of proposed agency actions on the human environment. This study addresses two key questions related to NEPA implementation in the U.S. Forest Service: 1) how do Interdisciplinary (ID) team leaders and decision makers conceptualize the outcomes of NEPA processes? And 2), how does NEPA relate to agency decision making? We address these questions through two separate online surveys that posed questions about recently completed NEPA processes - the first with the ID team leaders tasked with carrying out the processes, and the second with the line officers responsible for making the processes' final decisions. Outcomes of NEPA processes include impacts on public relations, on employee morale and team functioning, on the achievement of agency goals, and on the achievement of NEPA's procedural requirements (disclosure) and substantive intent (minimizing negative environmental impacts). Although both tended to view public relations outcomes as important, decision makers' perceptions of favorable outcomes were more closely linked to the achievement of agency goals and process efficiency than was the case for ID team leaders. While ID team leaders' responses suggest that they see decision making closely integrated with the NEPA process, decision makers more commonly decoupled decision making from the NEPA process. These findings suggest a philosophical difference between ID team leaders and decision makers that may pose challenges for both the implementation and the evaluation of agency NEPA. We discuss the pros and cons of integrating NEPA with decision making or separating the two. We conclude that detaching NEPA from decision making poses greater risks than integrating them.

  14. A Citizen's Guide to the NEPA: Having Your Voice Heard (CEQ, 2007)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This guide is based on research and consultations undertaken by the Council on Environmental Quality concerning the need for a Citizen’s Guide to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Participants in NEPA Regional Roundtables held in 2003-2004 clearly voiced the need for an guide that provides an explanation of NEPA, how it is implemented, and how people outside the Federal government — individual citizens, private sector applicants, members of organized groups, or representatives of Tribal, State, or local government agencies — can better participate in the assessment of environmental impacts conducted by Federal agencies.

  15. DFPARThIl!NT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlIfiNATION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    s DFPARThIl!NT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlIfiNATION Page 1 of3 RECIPIENT :State of Hawaii DBEOT STATE : HI PROJECf TITLE: Loan Loss Reserve Funding Opportunity Announc~ment Number DE-FOA-0000052 Procurement Inslrument Number DE-EEOOOO216 NEPA Control Number em Number GF0-0000216-001 GO Based on my review ofthe informalion concerning the proposed aClion, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS

  16. US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DEI'ER1IllNATION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DEI'ER1IllNATION Page I of3 RECIPIENT:Verdant Power, Inc. STATE: NY PROJECT TITLE : Advancement of the Kinetic Hydropower System (KHPS) to DOE TRL 7/8 Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-OOOO293 Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-EEOOO5929 GF0-0005929-OO1 EE5929 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following

  17. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, T.A.; Hansen, R.P.

    1998-08-01

    This report on National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) chronicles past and current compliance activities and includes a recommended strategy that can be implemented for continued improvement. This report provides a list of important references. Attachment 1 contains the table of contents for SAND95-1648, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide Sandia National Laboratories (Hansen, 1995). Attachment 2 contains a list of published environmental assessments (EAs) and environmental impact statements (EISs) prepared by SNL/NM. Attachment 3 contains abstracts of NEPA compliance papers authored by SNL/NM and its contractors.

  18. A low-cost solid–liquid separation process for enzymatically hydrolyzed corn stover slurries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sievers, David A.; Lischeske, James J.; Biddy, Mary J.; Stickel, Jonathan J.

    2015-07-01

    Solid-liquid separation of intermediate process slurries is required in some process configurations for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to transportation fuels. Thermochemically pretreated and enzymatically hydrolyzed corn stover slurries have proven difficult to filter due to formation of very low permeability cakes that are rich in lignin. Treatment of two different slurries with polyelectrolyte flocculant was demonstrated to increase mean particle size and filterability. Filtration flux was greatly improved, and thus scaled filter unit capacity was increased approximately 40-fold compared with unflocculated slurry. Although additional costs were accrued using polyelectrolyte, techno-economic analysis revealed that the increase in filter capacity significantlymore » reduced overall production costs. Fuel production cost at 95% sugar recovery was reduced by $1.35 US per gallon gasoline equivalent for dilute-acid pretreated and enzymatically hydrolyzed slurries and $3.40 for slurries produced using an additional alkaline de-acetylation preprocessing step that is even more difficult to natively filter.« less

  19. Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vipperla, Ravikumar; Yee, Michael; Steele, Ray

    2012-11-01

    This report presents system and economic analysis for a carbon capture unit which uses an amino-silicone solvent for CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration (CCS) in a pulverized coal (PC) boiler. The amino-silicone solvent is based on GAP-1 with Tri-Ethylene Glycol (TEG) as a co-solvent. The report also shows results for a CCS unit based on a conventional approach using mono-ethanol amine (MEA). Models were developed for both processes and used to calculate mass and energy balances. Capital costs and energy penalty were calculated for both systems, as well as the increase in cost of electricity. The amino-silicone solvent based system demonstrates significant advantages compared to the MEA system.

  20. Metal and Glass Manufacturers Reduce Costs by Increasing Energy Efficiency in Process Heating Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Process heating plays a key role in producing steel, aluminum, and glass and in manufacturing products made from these materials. Faced with regulatory and competitive pressures to control emissions and reduce operating costs, metal and glass manufacturers are considering a variety of options for reducing overall energy consumption. As 38% of the energy used in U.S. industrial plants is consumed for process heating applications, metal and glass manufacturers are discovering that process heating technologies provide significant opportunities for improving industrial productivity, energy efficiency, and global competitiveness. This fact sheet is the first in a series to describe such opportunities that can be realized in industrial systems by conducting plant-wide assessments (PWA).

  1. A NOVEL APPROACH TO MINERAL CARBONATION: ENHANCING CARBONATION WHILE AVOIDING MINERAL PRETREATMENT PROCESS COST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael J. McKelvy; Andrew V.G. Chizmeshya; Kyle Squires; Ray W. Carpenter; Hamadallah Bearat

    2005-10-01

    Known fossil fuel reserves, especially coal, can support global energy demands for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Unlike other CO{sub 2} sequestration candidate technologies that propose long-term storage, mineral sequestration provides permanent disposal by forming geologically stable mineral carbonates. Carbonation of the widely occurring mineral olivine (e.g., forsterite, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) is a large-scale sequestration process candidate for regional implementation, which converts CO{sub 2} into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The primary goal is cost-competitive process development. As the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is key to economic viability. Recent studies at the U.S. DOE Albany Research Center have established that aqueous-solution carbonation using supercritical CO{sub 2} is a promising process; even without olivine activation, 30-50% carbonation has been achieved in an hour. Mechanical activation (e.g., attrition) has accelerated the carbonation process to an industrial timescale (i.e., near completion in less than an hour), at reduced pressure and temperature. However, the activation cost is too high to be economical and lower cost pretreatment options are needed. Herein, we report our first year progress in exploring a novel approach that offers the potential to substantially enhance carbonation reactivity while bypassing pretreatment activation. We have discovered that robust silica-rich passivating layers form on the olivine surface during carbonation. As carbonation proceeds, these passivating layers thicken, fracture and eventually exfoliate, exposing fresh olivine surfaces during rapidly-stirred/circulating carbonation. We are exploring the mechanisms that govern carbonation reactivity and the impact that (1) modeling/controlling the slurry fluid-flow conditions, (2) varying the

  2. New membranes could speed the biofuels conversion process and reduce cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Michael

    2014-07-23

    ORNL researchers have developed a new class of membranes that could enable faster, more cost efficient biofuels production. These membranes are tunable at the nanopore level and have potential uses in separating water from fuel and acid from bio-oils. The membrane materials technology just won an R&D 100 award. ORNL and NREL are partnering, with support from the DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office, to determine the best uses of these membranes to speed the biofuels conversion process. Development of the membranes was funded by DOE BETO and ORNL's Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program.

  3. New membranes could speed the biofuels conversion process and reduce cost

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hu, Michael

    2014-08-06

    ORNL researchers have developed a new class of membranes that could enable faster, more cost efficient biofuels production. These membranes are tunable at the nanopore level and have potential uses in separating water from fuel and acid from bio-oils. The membrane materials technology just won an R&D 100 award. ORNL and NREL are partnering, with support from the DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office, to determine the best uses of these membranes to speed the biofuels conversion process. Development of the membranes was funded by DOE BETO and ORNL's Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program.

  4. Consideration of Cumulative Impacts in EPA Review of NEPA Documents, EPA Office of Federal Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this guidance is to assist EPA reviewers of NEPA documents in providing accurate, realistic, and consistent comments on the assessment of cumulative impacts. The guidance focuses on...

  5. USACE ER 200-2-2 Procedures for Implementing NEPA | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ER 200-2-2 Procedures for Implementing NEPA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: USACE ER 200-2-2...

  6. Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA (DOE, 2016)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE Offices are encouraged to be inclusive in providing potentially interested parties with opportunities to review NEPA documents.  This Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under...

  7. Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA (DOE, 2015)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Offices are encouraged to be inclusive in providing potentially interested parties with opportunities to review NEPA documents.  This Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under...

  8. Handbook Issued on NEPA and CEQA: Integrating Federal and State Environmental Reviews

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) and the California Governor's Office of Planning and Research (OPR) jointly issued a new handbook, NEPA and CEQA: Integrating Federal and State...

  9. Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This letter, from the Director of the Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Federal Activities, outlines EPA's position as to how the revised National Air Quality Standard should be reflected in NEPA evaluations of proposed actions.

  10. Department of Energy - DOE, NEPA and You - A Guide to Public...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DOE, NEPA and You - A Guide to Public Participation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Department...

  11. DEPARTlIiIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AG EMENT CENTER NEPA...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    lAUIl) u.s. DEPARTlIiIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AG EMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:Ocean Engineering and Energy Systems Intemational, Inc. (OCEES) Page lof3 STATE: ...

  12. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and NEPA: CEQ Reports to Congress

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Section 1609(c) of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) requires a report to Congress on the status and progress of NEPA reviews for Recovery Act funded projects and activities...

  13. EPA's Section 309 Review: The Clean Air Act and NEPA (EPA, 1999)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This document discusses Section 309 of the Clean Air Act, which authorizes the Environmental Protection Agency to review certain proposed actions of other federal agencies in accordance with NEPA and make those reviews public.

  14. Title 40 CFR 1506 Other Requirements of NEPA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Other Requirements of NEPA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation: Title 40 CFR 1506 Other...

  15. NEPA audits at the Bonneville Power Administration's office of energy sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, M. )

    1993-01-01

    Since 1984, the Bonneville Power Administration has evaluated the environmental performance of its energy resource acquisition programs. To date, these programs have mostly comprised conservation activities in residential and commercial buildings. In its NEPA documentation for these programs, the agency has established a set of mitigation measures that ensure against adverse environmental impacts. The agency uses the environmental audits to evaluate the programs' performance in meeting the NEPA promises, as well as addressing how well NEPA documents meet the programs' needs and how effectively environmental and program staff interact. The audits are inexpensive and unobtrusive, thus they can be repeated as needed and can be used as a tool to facilitate communication rather than simply to meet administrative rules. As Bonneville moves to an aggressive energy resource acquisition mode, these audits will serve as a model for the ongoing evaluation of environmental performance and may be adopted agency-wide to address regulations beyond NEPA.

  16. BLM and NEPA: Lets`s get back to the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meridith, D.P.

    1995-12-01

    This talk is a personalized account of the relationship between The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the challenges the BLM faces in the future.

  17. Department of Energy Extends Comment Period on Proposed Revisions to its NEPA Rules

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy today announced that,  in response to requests from a number of parties, it has re-opened the public comment period on its proposed revisions to the Department’s NEPA rules...

  18. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Integrated Support Center (ISC) ISC Home About Services Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Privacy Act NEPA Documents ISC-Chicago Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations ISC-Oak Ridge Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations ISC-Chicago Office Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements ISC-Oak Ridge Office Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Contact Information Integrated

  19. Secretarial Memorandum on Integrating Project Management with NEPA Compliance to Improve Decision Making

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Declaring that “Compliance with [NEPA] is a pre-requisite to successful implementation of DOE programs and projects,” the Secretary has signed a memorandum on "Improved Decision Making through the Integration of Program and Project Management with National Environmental Policy Act Compliance." The memo urges better use of existing tools and guidance, and highlights principles for strengthening NEPA compliance – for example, through Field and Headquarters teamwork, realistic schedules, and performance accountability.

  20. Template for Expedited National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review of Certain State Energy Program Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enclosure 2 Template for Expedited NEPA Review of Certain State Energy Program Projects Purpose: This document provides an optional approach/Template that a State may use to help the Department of Energy (DOE) expedite National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review of certain activities (Projects) contained in the State's energy and conservation plan for which the State requests State Energy Program (SEP) funding. This optional approach/Template builds on the August 21, 2009, draft guidance

  1. Energy and costs scoping study for plasma pyrolysis thermal processing system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherick, K.E.; Findley, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide information in support of an investigation of thermal technologies as possible treatment process for buried wastes at the INEL. Material and energy balances and a cost estimate were generated for a representative plasma torch-based thermal waste treatment system operating in a pyrolysis mode. Two waste streams were selected which are representative of INEL buried wastes, large in volume, and difficult to treat by other technologies. These streams were a solidified nitrate sludge waste stream and a waste/soil mix of other buried waste components. The treatment scheme selected includes a main plasma chamber operating under pyrolyzing conditions; a plasma afterburner to provide additional residence time at high temperature to ensure complete destruction of hazardous organics; an off-gas treatment system; and a incinerator and stack to oxidize carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and vent the clean, oxidized gases to atmosphere. The material balances generated provide materials flow and equipment duty information of sufficient accuracy to generate initial rough-order-of-magnitude (ROM) system capital and operating cost estimates for a representative plasma thermal processing system.

  2. A Novel Approach To Mineral Carbonation: Enhancing Carbonation While Avoiding Mineral Pretreatment Process Cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael J. McKelvy; Andrew V. G. Chizmeshya; Kyle Squires; Ray W. Carpenter; Hamdallah Bearat

    2006-06-21

    Known fossil fuel reserves, especially coal, can support global energy demands for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Unlike other CO{sub 2} sequestration candidate technologies that propose long-term storage, mineral sequestration provides permanent disposal by forming geologically stable mineral carbonates. Carbonation of the widely occurring mineral olivine (e.g., forsterite, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) is a large-scale sequestration process candidate for regional implementation, which converts CO{sub 2} into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The primary goal is cost-competitive process development. As the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is key to economic viability. Recent studies at the U.S. DOE Albany Research Center have established that aqueous-solution carbonation using supercritical CO{sub 2} is a promising process; even without olivine activation, 30-50% carbonation has been achieved in an hour. Mechanical activation (e.g., attrition) has accelerated the carbonation process to an industrial timescale (i.e., near completion in less than an hour), at reduced pressure and temperature. However, the activation cost is too high to be economical and lower cost pretreatment options are needed. Herein, we report our second year progress in exploring a novel approach that offers the potential to substantially enhance carbonation reactivity while bypassing pretreatment activation. As our second year progress is intimately related to our earlier work, the report is presented in that context to provide better overall understanding of the progress made. We have discovered that robust silica-rich passivating layers form on the olivine surface during carbonation. As carbonation proceeds, these passivating layers thicken, fracture and eventually exfoliate, exposing fresh olivine surfaces during rapidly

  3. Design of Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Benjamin

    2012-06-30

    The major goal of the project is to design and optimize a bench-scale process for novel silicone CO{sub 2}-capture solvents and establish scalability and potential for commercialization of post-combustion capture of CO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plants. This system should be capable of 90% capture efficiency and demonstrate that less than 35% increase in the cost of energy services can be achieved upon scale-up. Experiments were conducted to obtain data required for design of the major unit operations. The bench-scale system design has been completed, including sizing of major unit operations and the development of a detailed Process and Instrument Diagram (P&ID). The system has been designed to be able to operate over a wide range of process conditions so that the effect of various process variables on performance can be determined. To facilitate flexibility in operation, the absorption column has been designed in a modular manner, so that the height of the column can be varied. The desorber has also been designed to allow for a range of residence times, temperatures, and pressures. The system will be fabricated at Techniserv Inc.

  4. Pilot-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Surinder; Spiry, Irina; Wood, Benjamin; Hancu, Dan; Chen, Wei

    2014-07-01

    This report presents system and economicanalysis for a carbon-capture unit which uses an aminosilicone-based solvent for CO₂ capture in a pulverized coal (PC) boiler. The aminosilicone solvent is a 60/40 wt/wt mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) with tri-ethylene glycol (TEG) as a co-solvent. Forcomparison purposes, the report also shows results for a carbon-capture unit based on a conventional approach using mono-ethanol amine (MEA). The first year removal cost of CO₂ for the aminosilicone-based carbon-capture process is $46.04/ton of CO₂ as compared to $60.25/ton of CO₂ when MEA is used. The aminosilicone- based process has <77% of the CAPEX of a system using MEA solvent. The lower CAPEX is due to several factors, including the higher working capacity of the aminosilicone solvent compared the MEA, which reduces the solvent flow rate required, reducing equipment sizes. If it is determined that carbon steel can be used in the rich-lean heat exchanger in the carbon capture unit, the first year removal cost of CO₂ decreases to $44.12/ton. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a higherthermal stability than MEA, allowing desorption to be conducted at higher temperatures and pressures, decreasing the number of compressor stages needed. The aminosilicone-based solvent also has a lowervapor pressure, allowing the desorption to be conducted in a continuous-stirred tank reactor versus a more expensive packed column. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a lowerheat capacity, which decreases the heat load on the desorber. In summary, the amino-silicone solvent has significant advantages overconventional systems using MEA.

  5. New Design Methods And Algorithms For High Energy-Efficient And Low-cost Distillation Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, Rakesh

    2013-11-21

    This project sought and successfully answered two big challenges facing the creation of low-energy, cost-effective, zeotropic multi-component distillation processes: first, identification of an efficient search space that includes all the useful distillation configurations and no undesired configurations; second, development of an algorithm to search the space efficiently and generate an array of low-energy options for industrial multi-component mixtures. Such mixtures are found in large-scale chemical and petroleum plants. Commercialization of our results was addressed by building a user interface allowing practical application of our methods for industrial problems by anyone with basic knowledge of distillation for a given problem. We also provided our algorithm to a major U.S. Chemical Company for use by the practitioners. The successful execution of this program has provided methods and algorithms at the disposal of process engineers to readily generate low-energy solutions for a large class of multicomponent distillation problems in a typical chemical and petrochemical plant. In a petrochemical complex, the distillation trains within crude oil processing, hydrotreating units containing alkylation, isomerization, reformer, LPG (liquefied petroleum gas) and NGL (natural gas liquids) processing units can benefit from our results. Effluents from naphtha crackers and ethane-propane crackers typically contain mixtures of methane, ethylene, ethane, propylene, propane, butane and heavier hydrocarbons. We have shown that our systematic search method with a more complete search space, along with the optimization algorithm, has a potential to yield low-energy distillation configurations for all such applications with energy savings up to 50%.

  6. A Novel Approach to Mineral Carbonation: Enhancing Carbonation While Avoiding Mineral Pretreatment Process Cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew V. G. Chizmeshya; Michael J. McKelvy; Kyle Squires; Ray W. Carpenter; Hamdallah Bearat

    2007-06-21

    Known fossil fuel reserves, especially coal, can support global energy demands for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Unlike other CO{sub 2} sequestration candidate technologies that propose long-term storage, mineral sequestration provides permanent disposal by forming geologically stable mineral carbonates. Carbonation of the widely occurring mineral olivine (e.g., forsterite, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) is a large-scale sequestration process candidate for regional implementation, which converts CO{sub 2} into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The primary goal is cost-competitive process development. As the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is key to economic viability. Recent studies at the U.S. DOE Albany Research Center have established that aqueous-solution carbonation using supercritical CO{sub 2} is a promising process; even without olivine activation, 30-50% carbonation has been achieved in an hour. Mechanical activation (e.g., attrition) has accelerated the carbonation process to an industrial timescale (i.e., near completion in less than an hour), at reduced pressure and temperature. However, the activation cost is too high to be economical and lower cost pretreatment options are needed. We have discovered that robust silica-rich passivating layers form on the olivine surface during carbonation. As carbonation proceeds, these passivating layers thicken, fracture and eventually exfoliate, exposing fresh olivine surfaces during rapidly-stirred/circulating carbonation. We are exploring the mechanisms that govern carbonation reactivity and the impact that (1) modeling/controlling the slurry fluid-flow conditions, (2) varying the aqueous ion species/size and concentration (e.g., Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cl-, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}), and (3) incorporating select sonication offer to enhance exfoliation and carbonation. Thus

  7. Defect Engineering, Cell Processing, and Modeling for High-Performance, Low-Cost Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buonassisi, Tonio

    2013-02-26

    The objective of this project is to close the efficiency gap between industrial multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) and monocrystalline silicon solar cells, while preserving the economic advantage of low-cost, high-volume substrates inherent to mc-Si. Over the course of this project, we made significant progress toward this goal, as evidenced by the evolution in solar-cell efficiencies. While most of the benefits of university projects are diffuse in nature, several unique contributions can be traced to this project, including the development of novel characterization methods, defect-simulation tools, and novel solar-cell processing approaches mitigate the effects of iron impurities ("Impurities to Efficiency" simulator) and dislocations. In collaboration with our industrial partners, this project contributed to the development of cell processing recipes, specialty materials, and equipment that increased cell efficiencies overall (not just multicrystalline silicon). Additionally, several students and postdocs who were either partially or fully engaged in this project (as evidenced by the publication record) are currently in the PV industry, with others to follow.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF LOW-COST MANUFACTURING PROCESSES FOR PLANAR, MULTILAYER SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Swartz; Matthew Seabaugh; William Dawson; Harlan Anderson; Tim Armstrong; Michael Cobb; Kirby Meacham; James Stephan; Russell Bennett; Bob Remick; Chuck Sishtla; Scott Barnett; John Lannutti

    2004-06-12

    This report summarizes the results of a four-year project, entitled, ''Low-Cost Manufacturing Of Multilayer Ceramic Fuel Cells'', jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, the State of Ohio, and by project participants. The project was led by NexTech Materials, Ltd., with subcontracting support provided by University of Missouri-Rolla, Michael A. Cobb & Co., Advanced Materials Technologies, Inc., Edison Materials Technology Center, Gas Technology Institute, Northwestern University, and The Ohio State University. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, though not formally a subcontractor on the program, supported the effort with separate DOE funding. The objective of the program was to develop advanced manufacturing technologies for making solid oxide fuel cell components that are more economical and reliable for a variety of applications. The program was carried out in three phases. In the Phase I effort, several manufacturing approaches were considered and subjected to detailed assessments of manufacturability and development risk. Estimated manufacturing costs for 5-kW stacks were in the range of $139/kW to $179/kW. The risk assessment identified a number of technical issues that would need to be considered during development. Phase II development work focused on development of planar solid oxide fuel cell elements, using a number of ceramic manufacturing methods, including tape casting, colloidal-spray deposition, screen printing, spin-coating, and sintering. Several processes were successfully established for fabrication of anode-supported, thin-film electrolyte cells, with performance levels at or near the state-of-the-art. The work in Phase III involved scale-up of cell manufacturing methods, development of non-destructive evaluation methods, and comprehensive electrical and electrochemical testing of solid oxide fuel cell materials and components.

  9. Chemical coal cleaning process and costs refinement for coal-water slurry manufacture. Semi-annual progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhasin, A.K.; Berggren, M.H.; Smit, F.J.; Ames, L.B.; Ronzio, N.J.

    1985-03-01

    The Department of Energy, through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), has initiated a program to determine the feasibility and potential applications for direct firing of coal and coal-derived fuels in heat engines, specifically gas turbines and diesel engines. AMAX Extractive Research and Development, Inc. supplied METC with two lots of highly beneficiated coal slurry fuel for use in the Heat Engines programs. One of the lots was of ultra-clean coal-water slurry fuel (UCCSF) for which a two-stage caustic and acid leaching procedure was developed to chemically clean the coal. As a part of the contract, AMAX R and D developed a conceptual design and preliminary cost estimate for a commercial-scale process for UCCSF manufacture. The contract was extended to include the following objectives: define chemical cleaning and slurry preparation process conditions and costs more precisely; investigate methods to reduce the product cost; and determine the relationship, in dollars per million Btu, between product cost and fuel quality. Laboratory investigations have been carried out to define the chemical cleaning process conditions required to generate fuels containing from 0.17 to 1.0% ash. Capital and operating cost refinements are to be performed on the basis of the preferred process operating conditions identified during the laboratory investigations. Several such areas for cost reductions have been identified. Caustic strengths from 2 to 7% NaOH are currently anticipated while 25% NaOH was used as the basis for the preliminary cost estimate. In addition, leaching times for each of the process steps have been reduced to half or less of the times used for the preliminary cost estimate. Improvement of fuel quality has been achieved by use of a proprietary hot-water leaching step to reduce the residual alkali content to less than 250 ppM (Na/sub 2/O plus K/sub 2/O) on a dry coal basis. 2 refs., 3 figs., 24 tabs.

  10. BPA's Costs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    links Financial Information Financial Public Processes Asset Management Cost Verification Process Rate Cases BP-18 Rate Case Related Publications Meetings and Workshops Customer...

  11. National Environmental Policy Act guidance: A model process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angle, B.M.; Lockhart, V.A.T.; Sema, B.; Tuott, L.C.; Irving, J.S.

    1995-04-01

    The ``Model National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Process`` includes: References to regulations, guidance documents, and plans; training programs; procedures; and computer databases. Legislative Acts and reference documents from Congress, US Department of Energy, and Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company provide the bases for conducting NEPA at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) NEPA / Permitting Department, the Contractor Environmental Organization (CEO) is responsible for developing and maintaining LITCO NEPA and permitting policies, guidance, and procedures. The CEO develops procedures to conduct environmental evaluations based on NEPA, Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations, and DOE guidance. This procedure includes preparation or support of environmental checklists, categorical exclusion determinations, environmental assessment determinations, environmental assessments, and environmental impact statements. In addition, the CEO uses this information to train personnel conducting environmental evaluations at the INEL. Streamlining these procedures fosters efficient use of resources, quality documents, and better decisions on proposed actions.

  12. Decreasing Soft Costs for Solar Photovoltaics by Improving the Interconnection Process: A Case Study of Pacific Gas and Electric

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Decreasing Soft Costs for Solar Photovoltaics by Improving the Interconnection Process: A Case Study of Pacific Gas and Electric Kristen Ardani and Robert Margolis National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-7A40-65066 September 2015 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  13. Final Guidance on Improving the Process for Preparing Efficient and Timely Environmental Reviews Under the National Environmental Policy Act (CEQ, 2012)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Council on Environmental Quality is issuing its final guidance on Improving the Process for Preparing Efficient and Timely Environmental Reviews under the National Environmental Policy Act. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and CEQ Regulations implementing NEPA provide numerous techniques for preparing efficient and timely environmental reviews. CEQ is issuing this guidance for Federal departments and agencies to emphasize and clarify that these techniques are available for all NEPA Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements.

  14. CEQ 's Response to a Petition for Rulemaking and Issuance of Guidance to Require Inclusion of Climate Change Analyses in NEPA Documents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) denied a petition requesting that CEQ (1) amend its NEPA regulations to require Federal agencies to address greenhouse gases (GHGs) and climate change effects in their NEPA documents, and (2) issue guidance on agencies should address GHGs and climate change under NEPA.

  15. Consideration Of Cumulative Impacts In EPA Review of NEPA Documents (EPA, 1999)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this guidance is to assist EPA reviewers of NEPA documents in providing accurate, realistic, and consistent comments on the assessment of cumulative impacts. The guidance focuses on specific issues that are critical in EPA's review of NEPA documents under Section 309 of the Clean Air Act. The guidance offers information on what issues to look for in the analysis, what practical considerations should be kept in mind when reviewing the analysis, and what should be said in EPA comments concerning the adequacy of the analysis.

  16. NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, Issue No. 40, Third Quarter FY 2004 (09/01/04)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lessons Lear ned September 2004 1 National Environmental Policy Act N E P A U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT Third Quarter FY 2004 September 1, 2004; Issue No. 40 LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS "What can we do better?" Participants addressed this question at DOE's annual NEPA Community Meeting, "Getting Better and Better," on July 20 and 21, 2004. "For those of us in the NEPA business, getting better and better is not an option, it is a necessity,"

  17. Development of Production PVD-AIN Buffer Layer System and Processes to Reduce Epitaxy Costs and Increase LED Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerio, Frank

    2013-09-14

    The DOE has set aggressive goals for solid state lighting (SSL) adoption, which require manufacturing and quality improvements for virtually all process steps leading to an LED luminaire product. The goals pertinent to this proposed project are to reduce the cost and improve the quality of the epitaxial growth processes used to build LED structures. The objectives outlined in this proposal focus on achieving cost reduction and performance improvements over state-of-the-art, using technologies that are low in cost and amenable to high efficiency manufacturing. The objectives of the outlined proposal focus on cost reductions in epitaxial growth by reducing epitaxy layer thickness and hetero-epitaxial strain, and by enabling the use of larger, less expensive silicon substrates and would be accomplished through the introduction of a high productivity reactive sputtering system and an effective sputtered aluminum-nitride (AlN) buffer/nucleation layer process. Success of the proposed project could enable efficient adoption of GaN on-silicon (GaN/Si) epitaxial technology on 150mm silicon substrates. The reduction in epitaxy cost per cm{sup 2} using 150mm GaN-on-Si technology derives from (1) a reduction in cost of ownership and increase in throughput for the buffer deposition process via the elimination of MOCVD buffer layers and other throughput and CoO enhancements, (2) improvement in brightness through reductions in defect density, (3) reduction in substrate cost through the replacement of sapphire with silicon, and (4) reduction in non-ESD yield loss through reductions in wafer bow and temperature variation. The adoption of 150mm GaN/Si processing will also facilitate significant cost reductions in subsequent wafer fabrication manufacturing costs. There were three phases to this project. These three phases overlap in order to aggressively facilitate a commercially available production GaN/Si capability. In Phase I of the project, the repeatability of the performance

  18. Low-cost copper complexes as p-dopants in solution processable hole transport layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kellermann, Renate; Taroata, Dan; Maltenberger, Anna; Hartmann, David; Schmid, Guenter; Brabec, Christoph J.

    2015-09-07

    We demonstrate the usage of the Lewis-acidic copper(II)hexafluoroacetylacetonate (Cu(hfac){sub 2}) and copper(II)trifluoroacetylacetonate (Cu(tfac){sub 2}) as low-cost p-dopants for conductivity enhancement of solution processable hole transport layers based on small molecules in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). The materials were clearly soluble in mixtures of environmentally friendly anisole and xylene and spin-coated under ambient atmosphere. Enhancements of two and four orders of magnitude, reaching 4.0 × 10{sup −11} S/cm with a dopant concentration of only 2 mol% Cu(hfac){sub 2} and 1.5 × 10{sup −9} S/cm with 5 mol% Cu(tfac){sub 2} in 2,2′,7,7′-tetra(N,N-ditolyl)amino-9,9-spiro-bifluorene (spiro-TTB), respectively, were achieved. Red light emitting diodes were fabricated with reduced driving voltages and enhanced current and power efficiencies (8.6 lm/W with Cu(hfac){sub 2} and 5.6 lm/W with Cu(tfac){sub 2}) compared to the OLED with undoped spiro-TTB (3.9 lm/W). The OLED with Cu(hfac){sub 2} doped spiro-TTB showed an over 8 times improved LT{sub 50} lifetime of 70 h at a starting luminance of 5000 cd/m{sup 2}. The LT{sub 50} lifetime of the reference OLED with PEDOT:PSS was only 8 h. Both non-optimized OLEDs were operated at similar driving voltage and power efficiency.

  19. NEPA analysis of US-Canadian power transactions under the Columbia River Treaty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, K.S.; Weintraub, N.H.; Linehan, A.O.

    1995-12-01

    The Columbia River Treaty of 1961 led to the development of three hydroelectric projects on the Columbia River in Canada and one in the United States. Canada sold its share of the downstream power generation benefits of these facilities to US utilities for 30 years. The administrator of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) of the US Department of Energy is the {open_quotes}United States Entity{close_quotes} under the Columbia River Treaty with Canada. BPA prepared the {open_quotes}Delivery of the Canadian Entitlement{close_quotes} Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to evaluate alternative means for the US to return to Canada the Canadian share of the downstream benefits when these 30-year agreements expire. Alternatives on both sides of the US-Canada border included new high-voltage transmission lines; new generating and conservation resources; and power sales, exchanges, and other transactions. BPA developed an EIS methodology and graphical representation technique for comparing the diverse options associated with the Delivery of the Canadian Entitlement that were instrumental in helping managers understand the impacts of alternatives in a timely manner. A graphical, modular approach helped convey complex relationships in ways that were easy to read and understand. In addition, analysis of potential environmental impacts in Canada was developed in order to provide relevant information to US decision-makers, without compromising the Canadian environmental review process. As a result, environmental analysis was fully integrated into the decision process. The EIS approach used in this project has become a prototype for other Department of Energy NEPA documents, both site-specific and programmatic.

  20. Memorandum for Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies: Emergencies and NEPA (CEQ, 2010)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With this Memorandum, the Council on Environmental Quality reiterates its previous guidance on the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) environmental review of proposed emergency response actions.This memorandum clarifies that the previous guidance remains applicable to current situations and provides guidance on required agency environmental review.

  1. Memorandum for Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies: Emergencies and NEPA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With this Memorandum, the Council on Environmental Quality reiterates its previous guidance on the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) environmental review of proposed emergency response actions.This memorandum clarifies that the previous guidance remains applicable to current situations and provides guidance on required agency environmental review.

  2. NEPA and the Endangered Species Act: Complementary approaches or regulatory excess

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salk, M.S.; McCold, L.N.

    1991-01-01

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, provides a broad mandate requiring protection of human health and the natural environmental, while the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973, as amended, has a much narrower mandate. NEPA's purpose is to prevent or eliminate damage to the environment and biosphere{hor ellipsis},'' while the ESA's is to provide a means whereby the ecosystems upon which endangered species and threatened species depend may be conserved'' and a a program for the conservation of such endangered species and threatened species{hor ellipsis}'' NEPA's current role in improving the quality of decision making by federal agencies with respect to environmental matters is a matter of some debate. This paper discusses several ways in which NEPA provides protection for rare species beyond that provided by the ESA including public involvement, consideration of rare plant species, consideration of species which are not federally listed, consideration of incremental actions of federal agencies, and discussion of alternative means to accomplish the goal of a projected action. 3 refs.

  3. NEPA audits at the Bonneville Power Administration`s office of energy resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beachler, M.C.; Patton, J.E.; Alton, C.C.

    1993-05-01

    Since 1984, the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) has evaluated the environmental performance of its energy resource acquisition programs. To date, these programs have mostly comprised conservation activities in residential and commercial buildings. In the environmental documentation for these programs under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), the agency has established a set of mitigation measures that ensure against adverse environmental impacts. The agency uses environmental audits to evaluate the programs` performance in meeting the NEPA promises, and how well NEPA documents meet the programs needs and how effectively environmental and program staff interact. Since 1984 the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has conducted 22 of the audits for Bonneville. The audits are inexpensive and unobstrusive; thus they can be repeated as needed and can be used as a tool to facilitate communication rather than simply to meet administrative rules. As Bonneville moves into an aggressive energy resource acquisition mode, these audits will serve as a model for the ongoing evaluation of environmental performance and may be adopted agency-wide to address regulations beyond NEPA.

  4. Environmental planning and categorical exclusions: Making the categorical exclusion an integral part of your NEPA tool kit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holthoff, M.G.; Hanrahan, T.P.

    1994-06-01

    As contained in the Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act, 40 CFR 1500--1508, the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) directs federal agencies to adopt their own procedures for implementing the Act. The US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Department of Agriculture Forest Service (USFS) are two examples of federal agencies with dissimilar but functionally equivalent CX processes. The DOE and USFS were selected as subjects for this study because of their distinctly different missions and as a results of the author`s familiarity with the policies of both agencies. The objectives of this study are to: (1) describe the CX policies and processes of the two agencies, (2) identify the similarities and differences between the two processes, and (3) suggest ways for improving these processes. In performing this evaluation, the authors will identify the components of each agency`s CX process that clearly contributes qualitative information for the purpose of making environmental planning decisions. Drawing from the best elements of each process, the authors will provide some general recommendations that should enable the agencies to fulfill their various obligations to the CX process while concurrently performing early, thorough, and expeditious environmental reviews under NEPA.

  5. Chemical coal cleaning process and costs refinement for coal-water slurry manufacture. Monthly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, M.

    1985-05-15

    Activity in April centered on performing hot-water leaching investigations. Analyses of caustic filtrates to be used for regeneration tests were completed. Modifications to the Inconel caustic-leach reactor were made to permit injection of caustic after preheating the coal-water feed slurry. Criteria for cost estimates and sensitivity analysis were established.

  6. Two Peer Review Processes Help EM Achieve Cost, Schedule Targets in Environmental Cleanup Mission

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – EM revamped and expanded peer reviews for its contracts and projects in the past year with a goal of improving performance and delivering results in the world’s largest nuclear cleanup on time and within cost.

  7. NEPA and CEQA: Integrating State and Federal Environmental Reviews...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Reviews (Final) CEQ and the California Governor's Office of Planning and ... CEQA review process, and addresses the California Energy Commission licensing process, ...

  8. CEQ Issues Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and the Effects of Climate Change in NEPA Reviews

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) issued revised draft guidance on consideration of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and the effects of climate change in National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) reviews on December 18, 2014

  9. Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations (EPA, 2007)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This letter, from the Director of the Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Federal Activities, outlines EPA's position as to how the revised National Air Quality Standard should be reflected in NEPA evaluations of proposed actions.

  10. Driving Down HB-LED Costs. Implementation of Process Simulation Tools and Temperature Control Methods of High Yield MOCVD Growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, William

    2012-04-30

    The overall objective of this multi-faceted program is to develop epitaxial growth systems that meet a goal of 75% (4X) cost reduction in the epitaxy phase of HB-LED manufacture. A 75% reduction in yielded epitaxy cost is necessary in order to achieve the cost goals for widespread penetration of HB-LED's into back-lighting units (BLU) for LCD panels and ultimately for solid-state lighting (SSL). To do this, the program will address significant improvements in overall equipment Cost of Ownership, or CoO. CoO is a model that includes all costs associated with the epitaxy portion of production. These aspects include cost of yield, capital cost, operational costs, and maintenance costs. We divide the program into three phases where later phases will incorporate the gains of prior phases. Phase one activities are enabling technologies. In collaboration with Sandia National Laboratories we develop a Fluent-compatible chemistry predictive model and a set of mid-infrared and near-ultraviolet pyrometer monitoring tools. Where previously the modeling of the reactor dynamics were studied within FLUENT alone, here, FLUENT and Chemkin are integrated into a comprehensive model of fluid dynamics and the most advanced transport equations developed for Chemkin. Specifically, the Chemkin model offered the key reaction terms for gas-phase nucleation, a key consideration in the optimization of the MOCVD process. This new predictive model is used to design new MOCVD reactors with optimized growth conditions and the newly developed pyrometers are used monitor and control the MOCVD process temperature to within 0.5°C run-to-run and within each wafer. This portion of the grant is in collaboration with partners at Sandia National Laboratories. Phase two activities are continuous improvement projects which extend the current reactor platform along the lines of improved operational efficiency, improved systems control for throughput, and carrier modifications for increased yield

  11. A Low-Cost High-Yield Process for the Direct Production of High...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... ProgressResults Task E: Energy Systems Analysis (M.4.19.7) Augmented processes ... Global optimization of Mixed-Integer Nonlinear Programming, 2002 An example ...

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Advanced Drying Process for Lower Manufacturing Cost of Electrodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Lambda Technologies at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced drying process...

  13. Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vipperla, Ravikumar; Yee, Michael; Steele, Ray; Singh, Surinder; Spiry, Irina; Wood, Benjamin

    2013-12-30

    This report presents system and economic analysis for a carbon capture unit which uses an amino-silicone solvent for CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration (CCS) in a pulverized coal (PC) boiler. The amino-silicone solvent is based on GAP-1 with tri-ethylene glycol (TEG) as a co-solvent. For comparison purposes, the report also shows results for a CCS unit based on a conventional approach using mono-ethanol amine (MEA). At a steam temperature of 395 °C (743 °F), the CCS energy penalty for amino-silicone solvent is only 30.4% which compares to a 35.9% energy penalty for MEA. The increase in COE for the amino-silicone solvent relative to the non-capture case is between 98% and 103% (depending on the solvent cost) which compares to an ~109% COE cost increase for MEA. In summary, the amino-silicone solvent has significant advantages over conventional systems using MEA.

  14. Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Benjamin; Genovese, Sarah; Perry, Robert; Spiry, Irina; Farnum, Rachael; Sing, Surinder; Wilson, Paul; Buckley, Paul; Acharya, Harish; Chen, Wei; McDermott, John; Vipperia, Ravikumar; Yee, Michael; Steele, Ray; Fresia, Megan; Vogt, Kirk

    2013-12-31

    A bench-scale system was designed and built to test an aminosilicone-based solvent. A model was built of the bench-scale system and this model was scaled up to model the performance of a carbon capture unit, using aminosilicones, for CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration (CCS) for a pulverized coal (PC) boiler at 550 MW. System and economic analysis for the carbon capture unit demonstrates that the aminosilicone solvent has significant advantages relative to a monoethanol amine (MEA)-based system. The CCS energy penalty for MEA is 35.9% and the energy penalty for aminosilicone solvent is 30.4% using a steam temperature of 395 °C (743 °F). If the steam temperature is lowered to 204 °C (400 °F), the energy penalty for the aminosilicone solvent is reduced to 29%. The increase in cost of electricity (COE) over the non-capture case for MEA is ~109% and increase in COE for aminosilicone solvent is ~98 to 103% depending on the solvent cost at a steam temperature of 395 °C (743 °F). If the steam temperature is lowered to 204 °C (400 °F), the increase in COE for the aminosilicone solvent is reduced to ~95-100%.

  15. Low Cost Chemical Feedstocks Using an Improved and Energy Efficient Natural Gas Liquid (NGL) Removal Process, Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Howard, S.; Lu, Yingzhong

    2012-08-10

    The overall objective of this project is to develop a new low-cost and energy efficient Natural Gas Liquid (NGL) recovery process - through a combination of theoretical, bench-scale and pilot-scale testing - so that it could be offered to the natural gas industry for commercialization. The new process, known as the IROA process, is based on U.S. patent No. 6,553,784, which if commercialized, has the potential of achieving substantial energy savings compared to currently used cryogenic technology. When successfully developed, this technology will benefit the petrochemical industry, which uses NGL as feedstocks, and will also benefit other chemical industries that utilize gas-liquid separation and distillation under similar operating conditions. Specific goals and objectives of the overall program include: (i) collecting relevant physical property and Vapor Liquid Equilibrium (VLE) data for the design and evaluation of the new technology, (ii) solving critical R&D issues including the identification of suitable dehydration and NGL absorbing solvents, inhibiting corrosion, and specifying proper packing structure and materials, (iii) designing, construction and operation of bench and pilot-scale units to verify design performance, (iv) computer simulation of the process using commercial software simulation platforms such as Aspen-Plus and HYSYS, and (v) preparation of a commercialization plan and identification of industrial partners that are interested in utilizing the new technology. NGL is a collective term for C2+ hydrocarbons present in the natural gas. Historically, the commercial value of the separated NGL components has been greater than the thermal value of these liquids in the gas. The revenue derived from extracting NGLs is crucial to ensuring the overall profitability of the domestic natural gas production industry and therefore of ensuring a secure and reliable supply in the 48 contiguous states. However, rising natural gas prices have dramatically reduced

  16. Lignin Process Design Confirmation and Capitol Cost Evaluation: Report 42002/02 -- Review of Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montague, L.

    2003-10-01

    Harris Group prepared this report on NREL's conceptual design for a process that converts lignin into a hydrocarbon that can be used as a high-octane automobile fuel additive.

  17. Proposed Columbia Wind Farm No. 1 : Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Joint NEPA/SEPA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Klickitat County

    1995-03-01

    This Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) addresses the Columbia Wind Farm {number_sign}1 (Project) proposal for construction and operation of a 25 megawatt (MW) wind power project in the Columbia Hills area southeast of Goldendale in Klickitat County, Washington. The Project would be constructed on private land by Conservation and Renewable Energy System (CARES) (the Applicant). An Environmental Impact Statement is required under both NEPA and SEPA guidelines and is issued under Section 102 (2) (C) of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) at 42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq and under the Washington State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) as provided by RCW 43.21C.030 (2) (c). Bonneville Power Administration is the NEPA lead agency; Klickitat County is the nominal SEPA lead agency and CARES is the SEPA co-lead agency for this DEIS. The Project site is approximately 395 hectares (975 acres) in size. The Proposed Action would include approximately 91 model AWT-26 wind turbines. Under the No Action Alternative, the Project would not be constructed and existing grazing and agricultural activities on the site would continue.

  18. Bench-Scale Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Using a Phase-Changing Absorbent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westendorf, Tiffany; Caraher, Joel; Chen, Wei; Farnum, Rachael; Perry, Robert; Spiry, Irina; Wilson, Paul; Wood, Benjamin

    2015-03-31

    The objective of this project is to design and build a bench-scale process for a novel phase-changing aminosilicone-based CO2-capture solvent. The project will establish scalability and technical and economic feasibility of using a phase-changing CO2-capture absorbent for post-combustion capture of CO2 from coal-fired power plants with 90% capture efficiency and 95% CO2 purity at a cost of $40/tonne of CO2 captured by 2025 and a cost of <$10/tonne of CO2 captured by 2035. In the first budget period of this project, the bench-scale phase-changing CO2 capture process was designed using data and operating experience generated under a previous project (ARPA-e project DE-AR0000084). Sizing and specification of all major unit operations was completed, including detailed process and instrumentation diagrams. The system was designed to operate over a wide range of operating conditions to allow for exploration of the effect of process variables on CO2 capture performance.

  19. FGD system capital and operating cost reductions based on improved thiosorbic scrubber system design and latest process innovations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.; Tseng, S.; Babu, M.

    1994-12-31

    Dravo Lime Company has operated the Miami Fort wet scrubber FGD pilot test unit since late 1989 and has continued in-house R&D to improve the economics of the magnesium-enhanced scrubbing process. Areas investigated include the scrubber configuration, flue gas velocity, spray nozzle type, droplet size, mist eliminator design, additives to inhibit oxidation, improved solids dewatering, etc. Also tested was the forced oxidation Thioclear process. The data gathered from the pilot plant and in-house programs were used to evaluate the capital and operating costs for the improved systems. These evaluations were made with eye towards the choices electric utilities will need to make in the near future to meet the Phase II emission limits mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act. Some of the process modifications investigated, for example, the dewatering improvements apply to potential beneficial retrofit of existing FGD systems today.

  20. Other NEPA Guidance and Reports | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    implementing guidelines explain the use of natural systems, ecosystem processes, and nature-based approaches for identifying alternatives, and provide other technical guidance ...

  1. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization Report, Revision 17

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Cannon, Sandra D.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Hoitink, Dana J.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.; Reidel, Steve P.; Rohay, Alan C.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Scott, Michael J.; Thorne, Paul D.

    2005-09-30

    This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many environmental documents being prepared by DOE contractors concerning the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). No statements about significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year’s report is the seventeenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the eighteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (EISs) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology; air quality; geology; hydrology; ecology; cultural, archaeological, and historical resources; socioeconomics; noise; and occupational health and safety. Sources for extensive tabular data related to these topics are provided in the chapter. Most subjects are divided into a general description of the characteristics of the Hanford Site, followed by site-specific information, where available, of the 100, 200, 300, and other areas. This division allows the reader to go directly to those sections of particular interest. When specific information on each of these separate areas is not complete or available, the general Hanford Site description should be used. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities

  2. Pilot-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farnum, Rachel; Perry, Robert; Wood, Benjamin

    2014-12-31

    GE Global Research is developing technology to remove carbon dioxide (CO 2) from the flue gas of coal-fired powerplants. A mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) and triethylene glycol (TEG) is the preferred CO2-capture solvent. GE Global Research was contracted by the Department of Energy to test a pilot-scale continuous CO2 absorption/desorption system using a GAP-1m/TEG mixture as the solvent. As part of that effort, an Environmental, Health, and Safety (EH&S) assessment for a CO2-capture system for a 550 MW coal-fired powerplant was conducted. Five components of the solvent, CAS#2469-55-8 (GAP-0), CAS#106214-84-0 (GAP-1-4), TEG, and methanol and xylene (minor contaminants from the aminosilicone) are included in this assessment. One by-product, GAP- 1m/SOX salt, and dodecylbenzenesulfonicacid (DDBSA) were also identified foranalysis. An EH&S assessment was also completed for the manufacturing process for the GAP-1m solvent. The chemicals associated with the manufacturing process include methanol, xylene, allyl chloride, potassium cyanate, sodium hydroxide (NaOH), tetramethyldisiloxane (TMDSO), tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide, Karstedt catalyst, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), Aliquat 336, methyl carbamate, potassium chloride, trimethylamine, and (3-aminopropyl) dimethyl silanol. The toxicological effects of each component of both the CO2 capture system and the manufacturing process were defined, and control mechanisms necessary to comply with U.S. EH&S regulations are summarized. Engineering and control systems, including environmental abatement, are described for minimizing exposure and release of the chemical components. Proper handling and storage recommendations are made for each chemical to minimize risk to workers and the surrounding community.

  3. ADVANCED OXYFUEL BOILERS AND PROCESS HEATERS FOR COST EFFECTIVE CO2 CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bart van Hassel; John Sirman

    2005-07-01

    This annual technical progress report summarizes the work accomplished during the third year of the program, January-December 2004, in the following task areas: Task 1--Conceptual Design, Task 2--Laboratory Scale Evaluations, Task 3--OTM Development, Task 4--Economic Evaluation and Commercialization Planning and Task 5--Program Management. The groundwork was laid for both the membrane materials development and the construction of the required facilities for testing the membrane reliability and performance. It has resulted in the construction of a single tube and multi-tube combustion test facility. Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) principles were applied to the membrane material selection process. The required ceramic powders were ordered and will be evaluated in 2005. Design of experiment techniques (fuel gas mixture design) were applied to the membrane performance evaluation process. The first results indicate that the oxygen flux of the membrane is significantly higher when the porous support is exposed to the fuel gas mixture instead of air. Failures of the oxygen transport membrane tube did not occur during the reporting period which is supporting evidence that our emphasis on design for robustness is yielding the desired result. All work on the project was performed in a safe manner as proven by zero recordable injuries or lost work days.

  4. ADVANCED OXYFUEL BOILERS AND PROCESS HEATERS FOR COST EFFECTIVE CO2 CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Sirman; Leonard Switzer; Bart van Hassel

    2004-06-01

    This annual technical progress report summarizes the work accomplished during the second year of the program, January-December 2003, in the following task areas: Task 1--Conceptual Design, Task 2--Laboratory Scale Evaluations, Task 3--OTM Development, Task 4--Economic Evaluation and Commercialization Planning and Task 5--Program Management. The program has experienced significant delays due to several factors. The budget has also been significantly under spent. Based on recent technical successes and confirmation of process economics, significant future progress is expected. Concepts for integrating Oxygen Transport Membranes (OTMs) into boilers and process heaters to facilitate oxy-fuel combustion have been investigated. OTM reactor combustion testing was delayed to insufficient reliability of the earlier OTM materials. Substantial improvements to reliability have been identified and testing will recommence early in 2004. Promising OTM material compositions and OTM architectures have been identified that improve the reliability of the ceramic elements. Economic evaluation continued. Information was acquired that quantified the attractiveness of the advanced oxygen-fired boiler. CO{sub 2} capture and compression are still estimated to be much less than $10/ton CO{sub 2}.

  5. A Low-cost, High-yield Process for the Direct Productin of High Energy Density Liquid Fuel from Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, Rakesh

    2014-02-21

    The primary objective and outcome of this project was the development and validation of a novel, low-cost, high-pressure fast-hydropyrolysis/hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) process (H{sub 2}Bioil) using supplementary hydrogen (H{sub 2}) to produce liquid hydrocarbons from biomass. The research efforts under the various tasks of the project have culminated in the first experimental demonstration of the H2Bioil process, producing 100% deoxygenated >C4+ hydrocarbons containing 36-40% of the carbon in the feed of pyrolysis products from biomass. The demonstrated H{sub 2}Bioil process technology (i.e. reactor, catalyst, and downstream product recovery) is scalable to a commercial level and is estimated to be economically competitive for the cases when supplementary H{sub 2} is sourced from coal, natural gas, or nuclear. Additionally, energy systems modeling has revealed several process integration options based on the H{sub 2}Bioil process for energy and carbon efficient liquid fuel production. All project tasks and milestones were completed or exceeded. Novel, commercially-scalable, high-pressure reactors for both fast-hydropyrolysis and hydrodeoxygenation were constructed, completing Task A. These reactors were capable of operation under a wide-range of conditions; enabling process studies that lead to identification of optimum process conditions. Model compounds representing biomass pyrolysis products were studied, completing Task B. These studies were critical in identifying and developing HDO catalysts to target specific oxygen functional groups. These process and model compound catalyst studies enabled identification of catalysts that achieved 100% deoxygenation of the real biomass feedstock, sorghum, to form hydrocarbons in high yields as part of Task C. The work completed during this grant has identified and validated the novel and commercially scalable H2Bioil process for production of hydrocarbon fuels from biomass. Studies on model compounds as well as real biomass

  6. ADVANCED OXYFUEL BOILERS AND PROCESS HEATERS FOR COST EFFECTIVE CO{sub 2} CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David R. Thompson; Lawrence E. Bool; G. Maxwell Christie

    2003-07-01

    This annual technical progress report summarizes the work accomplished during the first year of the program, January-December 2002, in the following task areas: Task 1--Conceptual Design, Task 2--Laboratory Scale Evaluations, Task 3--OTM Development, Task 4--Economic Evaluation and Commercialization Planning and Task 5--Program Management. The program has experienced significant delays due to several factors. The budget has also been significantly under spent. Based on recent technical successes significant future progress is expected. A number of concepts for integrating Oxygen Transport Membranes (OTMs) into boilers and process heaters to facilitate oxy-fuel combustion have been proposed. A detailed modeling plan has been proposed and early modeling work has focused on developing spreadsheet based models for quick engineering calculations. Combustion reactor laboratory scale evaluations efforts have been delayed due to the closing of Praxair's Tarrytown facility in December 2001. Experimental facilities and personnel have been relocated to Praxair's facility in Tonawanda. The facilities have recently been re-commissioned. Work with the OTM development task has also been delayed as early material selections were discarded. More recently, more promising OTM material compositions have been identified. Economic evaluation commenced. Information was acquired that quantified the attractiveness of the advanced oxygen-fired boiler. CO{sub 2} capture and compression are still estimated to be much less than $10/ton carbon.

  7. Reevaluation Of Vitrified High-Level Waste Form Criteria For Potential Cost Savings At The Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, J. W.; Marra, S. L.; Herman, C. C.

    2013-01-09

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS) the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been immobilizing SRS's radioactive high level waste (HLW) sludge into a durable borosilicate glass since 1996. Currently the DWPF has poured over 3,500 canisters, all of which are compliant with the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Acceptance Product Specifications for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms (WAPS) and therefore ready to be shipped to a federal geologic repository for permanent disposal. Due to DOE petitioning to withdraw the Yucca Mountain License Application (LA) from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2010 and thus no clear disposal path for SRS canistered waste forms, there are opportunities for cost savings with future canister production at DWPF and other DOE producer sites by reevaluating high-level waste form requirements and compliance strategies and reducing/eliminating those that will not negatively impact the quality of the canistered waste form.

  8. Reevaluation of Vitrified High-Level Waste Form Criteria for Potential Cost Savings at the Defense Waste Processing Facility - 13598

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, J.W.; Marra, S.L.; Herman, C.C.

    2013-07-01

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS) the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been immobilizing SRS's radioactive high level waste (HLW) sludge into a durable borosilicate glass since 1996. Currently the DWPF has poured over 3,500 canisters, all of which are compliant with the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Acceptance Product Specifications for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms (WAPS) and therefore ready to be shipped to a federal geologic repository for permanent disposal. Due to DOE petitioning to withdraw the Yucca Mountain License Application (LA) from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2010 and thus no clear disposal path for SRS canistered waste forms, there are opportunities for cost savings with future canister production at DWPF and other DOE producer sites by reevaluating high-level waste form requirements and compliance strategies and reducing/eliminating those that will not negatively impact the quality of the canistered waste form. (authors)

  9. Pilot-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture Preliminary Techno-Economic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Surinder; Spiry, Irina; Wood, Benjamin; Hance, Dan; Chen, Wei; Kehmna, Mark; McDuffie, Dwayne

    2014-03-31

    This report presents system and economic analysis for a carbon-capture unit which uses an aminosilicone-based solvent for CO{sub 2} capture in a pulverized coal (PC) boiler. The aminosilicone solvent is a 60/40 wt/wt mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) with tri-ethylene glycol (TEG) as a co-solvent. For comparison purposes, the report also shows results for a carbon-capture unit based on a conventional approach using mono-ethanol amine (MEA). The first year removal cost of CO{sub 2} for the aminosilicone-based carbon-capture process is $46.04/ton of CO2 as compared to $60.25/ton of CO{sub 2} when MEA is used. The aminosilicone-based process has <77% of the CAPEX of a system using MEA solvent. The lower CAPEX is due to several factors, including the higher working capacity of the aminosilicone solvent compared the MEA, which reduces the solvent flow rate required, reducing equipment sizes. If it is determined that carbon steel can be used in the rich-lean heat exchanger in the carbon capture unit, the first year removal cost of CO{sub 2} decreases to $44.12/ton. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a higher thermal stability than MEA, allowing desorption to be conducted at higher temperatures and pressures, decreasing the number of compressor stages needed. The aminosilicone-based solvent also has a lower vapor pressure, allowing the desorption to be conducted in a continuous-stirred tank reactor versus a more expensive packed column. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a lower heat capacity, which decreases the heat load on the desorber. In summary, the amino-silicone solvent has significant advantages over conventional systems using MEA.

  10. MATERIALS DEGRADATION ANALYSIS AND DEVELOPMENT TO ENABLE ULTRA LOW COST, WEB-PROCESSED WHITE P-OLED FOR SSL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DR. DEVIN MACKENZIE

    2011-12-13

    Progress over Phase II of DE-FG02-07ER86293 'Materials Degradation Analysis and Development to Enable Ultra Low Cost, Web-Processed White P-OLED for SSL' was initially rapid in terms of device performance improvements. We exceeded our device luminance lifetime goals for printed flexible white OLEDs as laid out in our project proposal. Our Phase II performance target was to demonstrate >1500 hours luminance lifetime at 100 Cd/m2 from a printed flexible device. We now have R&D devices well in excess of 8000 hrs lifetime at 100 Cd/m2, tested in air. We also were able to produce devices which met the voltage target of >1500 hours below 15V operation. After completing the initial performance milestones, we went on to focus on color-related degradation issues which were cited as important to commercialization of the technology by our manufacturing partners. We also put additional focus on cathode work as the active material development that occurred over the STTR time period required an adaptation of the cathode from the original cathode formulations which were developed based on previous generation active layer materials. We were able to improve compatibility of the cathode with some of the newer generation active layer materials and improve device yield and voltage behavior. An additional objective of the initial Phase II was to further develop the underlying manufacturing technology and real-life product specifications. This is a key requirement that must be met to ensure eventual commercialization of this DOE-funded technology. The link between commercial investment for full commercialization and R&D efforts in OLED solid State Lighting is often a large one. Add-Vision's lower cost, printed OLED manufacturing approach is an attraction, but close engagement with manufacturing partners and addressing customer specifications is a very important link. Manufacturing technology encompasses development of moisture reduction encapsulation technology, improved cost

  11. Guidance on the Application of NEPA to Proposed Federal Actions in the United States with Transboundary Effects (CEQ, 1997)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this guidance is to clarify the applicability of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to proposed federal actions in the United States, including its territories and possessions, that may have transboundary effects extending across the border and affecting another country's environment. While the guidance arises in the context of negotiations undertaken with the governments of Mexico and Canada to develop an agreement on transboundary environmental impact assessment in North America, the guidance pertains to all federal agency actions that are normally subject to NEPA, whether covered by an international agreement or not.

  12. CEQ Guidance on the Application of NEPA to Proposed Federal Actions in the United States with Transboundary Effects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this guidance is to clarify the applicability of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to proposed federal actions in the United States, including its territories and possessions, that may have transboundary effects extending across the border and affecting another country's environment. While the guidance arises in the context of negotiations undertaken with the governments of Mexico and Canada to develop an agreement on transboundary environmental impact assessment in North America, the guidance pertains to all federal agency actions that are normally subject to NEPA, whether covered by an international agreement or not.

  13. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masanet, Eric; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Graus, Wina; Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry--defined in this Energy Guide as facilities engaged in the canning, freezing, and drying or dehydrating of fruits and vegetables--consumes over $800 million worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement isan important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures applicable to fruit and vegetable processing plants are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in fruit and vegetable processing facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. Given the importance of water in fruit and vegetable processing, a summary of basic, proven measures for improving plant-level water efficiency are also provided. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry reduce energy and water consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--as well as on their applicability to different production

  14. Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pathway Cost Distributions Jim Uihlein Fuel Pathways Integration Tech Team January 25, 2006 2 Outline * Pathway-Independent Cost Goal * Cost Distribution Objective * Overview * H2A Influence * Approach * Implementation * Results * Discussion Process * Summary 3 Hydrogen R&D Cost Goal * Goal is pathway independent * Developed through a well defined, transparent process * Consumer fueling costs are equivalent or less on a cents per mile basis * Evolved gasoline ICE and gasoline-electric

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Thick Low-Cost, High-Power Lithium-Ion Electrodes via Aqueous Processing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about thick low-cost,...

  16. Startup Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter discusses startup costs for construction and environmental projects, and estimating guidance for startup costs.

  17. QGESS: Capital Cost Scaling Methodology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the tonnes of CO2 utilized. The costs of the process are to include infrastructure, raw materials, processing, byproduct disposal, and utilities costs, as well as any other costs....

  18. Establishment of a Cost-Effective and Robust Planning Basis for the Processing of M-91 Waste at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Wayne L.; Parker, Brian M.

    2004-07-30

    This report identifies and evaluates viable alternatives for the accelerated processing of Hanford Site transuranic (TRU) and mixed low-level wastes (MLLW) that cannot be processed using existing site capabilities. Accelerated processing of these waste streams will lead to earlier reduction of risk and considerable life-cycle cost savings. The processing need is to handle both oversized MLLW and TRU containers as well as containers with surface contact dose rates greater than 200 mrem/hr. This capability is known as the ''M-91'' processing capability required by the Tri-Party Agreement milestone M-91--01. The new, phased approach proposed in this evaluation would use a combination of existing and planned processing capabilities to treat and more easily manage contact-handled waste streams first and would provide for earlier processing of these wastes.

  19. High-Efficiency, Cost-effective Thermoelectric Materials/Devices for Industrial Process Refrigeration and Waste Heat Recovery, STTR Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Timothy

    2011-01-07

    This is the final report of DoE STTR Phase II project, “High-efficiency, Cost-effective Thermoelectric Materials/Devices for Industrial Process Refrigeration and Waste Heat Recovery”. The objective of this STTR project is to develop a cost-effective processing approach to produce bulk high-performance thermoelectric (TE) nanocomposites, which will enable the development of high-power, high-power-density TE modulus for waste heat recovery and industrial refrigeration. The use of this nanocomposite into TE modules are expected to bring about significant technical benefits in TE systems (e.g. enhanced energy efficiency, smaller sizes and light weight). The successful development and applications of such nanocomposite and the resultant TE modules can lead to reducing energy consumption and environmental impacts, and creating new economic development opportunities.

  20. New Catalyst Reduces Wasted Carbon in Biofuel Process, Lowers Cost (Fact Sheet), Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL researchers have shown that incorporating copper-modified catalysts into the dimethyl ether-to- fuels pathway increases carbon efficiency and decreases overall production costs. The biomass-to-liquid-fuel approach remains one of the most promising renewable fuel processes in terms of its immediate impact and compatibility with existing infrastructure. Methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) can be produced from biomass, and recent inves- tigations have shown that certain catalysts can convert

  1. RAPID/Best Practices/Online Permitting Systems | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    agencies using the software to process NEPA transactions, costs vary by the numbers of different project types tracked and by the volume of requests processed through the...

  2. Bench-Scale Development of a Hybrid Membrane-Absorption CO{sub 2} Capture Process: Preliminary Cost Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, Brice; Kniep, Jay; Pingjiao, Hao; Baker, Richard; Rochelle, Gary; Chen, Eric; Frailie, Peter; Ding, Junyuan; Zhang, Yue

    2014-03-31

    This report describes a study of capture costs for a hybrid membrane-absorption capture system based on Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR)’s low-pressure membrane contactors and the University of Texas at Austin’s 5 m piperazine (PZ) Advanced Flash Stripper (AFS; 5 m PZ AFS) based CO2 capture system. The report is submitted for NETL review, and may be superseded by a final topical report on this topic that will be submitted to satisfy the Task 2 report requirement of the current project (DE-FE0013118).

  3. SIMULTANEOUS MECHANICAL AND HEAT ACTIVATION: A NEW ROUTE TO ENHANCE SERPENTINE CARBONATION REACTIVITY AND LOWER CO2 MINERAL SEQUESTRATION PROCESS COST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.J. McKelvy; J. Diefenbacher; R. Nunez; R.W. Carpenter; A.V.G. Chizmeshya

    2005-01-01

    Coal can support a large fraction of global energy demands for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Unlike other candidate technologies, which propose long-term storage (e.g., ocean and geological sequestration), mineral sequestration permanently disposes of CO{sub 2} as geologically stable mineral carbonates. Only benign, naturally occurring materials are formed, eliminating long-term storage and liability issues. Serpentine carbonation is a leading mineral sequestration process candidate, which offers large scale, permanent sequestration. Deposits exceed those needed to carbonate all the CO{sub 2} that could be generated from global coal reserves, and mining and milling costs are reasonable ({approx}$4 to $5/ton). Carbonation is exothermic, providing exciting low-cost process potential. The remaining goal is to develop an economically viable process. An essential step in this development is increasing the carbonation reaction rate and degree of completion, without substantially impacting other process costs. Recently, the Albany Research Center (ARC) has accelerated serpentine carbonation, which occurs naturally over geological time, to near completion in less than an hour. While reaction rates for natural serpentine have been found to be too slow for practical application, both heat and mechanical (attrition grinding) pretreatment were found to substantially enhance carbonation reactivity. Unfortunately, these processes are too energy intensive to be cost-effective in their present form. In this project we explored the potential that utilizing power plant waste heat (e.g., available up to {approx}200-250 C) during mechanical activation (i.e., thermomechanical activation) offers to enhance serpentine mineral carbonation, while reducing pretreatment energy consumption and process cost. This project was carried out in collaboration with the Albany Research Center (ARC) to maximize the insight into the

  4. ASPEN costing manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwint, K.J.

    1986-07-25

    The ASPEN program contains within it a Cost Estimation System (CES) which estimates the purchase cost and utility consumption rates for major pieces of equipment in a process flowsheet as well as installed equipment costs. These estimates are ''preliminary-study grade'' with an accuracy of plus or minus 30%. The ASPEN program also contains within it an Economic Evaluation System (EES) which estimates overall capital investment costs, annual operating expenses and profitability indices for a chemical plant. This ASPEN costing manual has been written as a guide for those inexperienced in the use of ASPEN and unfamiliar with standard cost estimating techniques who want to use the ASPEN CES and EES. The ASPEN Costing Manual is comprised of the following sections: (1) Introduction, (2) ASPEN Input Language, (3) ASPEN Cost Estimation System (CES), (4) ASPEN Cost Blocks; and (5) ASPEN Economic Evaluation System (EES).

  5. GAO Report -- National Environmental Policy Act: Little Information Exists

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on NEPA Analyses | Department of Energy GAO Report -- National Environmental Policy Act: Little Information Exists on NEPA Analyses GAO Report -- National Environmental Policy Act: Little Information Exists on NEPA Analyses A report by the United States Government Accountability Office (GAO) on the costs, time frames, and benefits of the NEPA process. The report posted here has been modified through the addition of yellow highlighting to denote text referring to DOE or DOE data. The original

  6. GRC ANNUAL MEETING & GEA GEOEXPO+ | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    on NEPA Analyses | Department of Energy GAO Report -- National Environmental Policy Act: Little Information Exists on NEPA Analyses GAO Report -- National Environmental Policy Act: Little Information Exists on NEPA Analyses A report by the United States Government Accountability Office (GAO) on the costs, time frames, and benefits of the NEPA process. The report posted here has been modified through the addition of yellow highlighting to denote text referring to DOE or DOE data. The original

  7. Decreasing Soft Costs for Solar Photovoltaics by Improving the Interconnection Process. A Case Study of Pacific Gas and Electric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ardani, Kristen; Margolis, Robert

    2015-09-01

    As of the end of 2014, Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) had connected over 130,000 DG PV systems in its service territory, more than any other utility in the U.S. In this case study, we examine how PG&E achieved a faster, more efficient interconnection approval process despite rising application volumes.

  8. Decreasing Soft Costs for Solar Photovoltaics by Improving the Interconnection Process. A Case Study of Pacific Gas and Electric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ardani, Kristen; Margolis, Robert

    2015-09-01

    In this case study, we examine how PG&E achieved a faster, more efficient interconnection approval process despite rising application volumes. Our goal is to draw insights from PG&E's experience that can help to inform decision making at other utilities across the U.S. that may face similar trajectories for DG PV market growth.

  9. Clean Air Act General Conformity Requirements and the National Environmental Policy Act Process (DOE, 2000)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This DOE guidance has three parts. The first part discusses how to coordinate the conformity and NEPA processes. The second part provides greater detail on the Clean Air Act conformity requirements, the conformity review process, and the conformity determination process. The third part provides related references.

  10. A cost-effective process to prepare VO{sub 2} (M) powder and films with superior thermochromic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Xiudi; Zhang, Hua; Chai, Guanqi; Sun, Yaoming; Yang, Tao; Cheng, Haoliang; Chen, Lihua; Miao, Lei; Xu, Gang

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: Combining codeposition and short time post annealing, VO{sub 2} (M) with high quality and excellent phase transition performance is obtained. After mixing the VO{sub 2} powder with acrylic resin, the composite films deposited on glass show superior visible transmission and solar modulation, which can be used as an excellent candidate of low cost smart window in energy saving field. - Highlights: The VO{sub 2} powder obtained by short time thermolysis method is high purity and crystallinity with superior phase transition performance. The maximum decreasing efficiency of phase transition temperature is about ?30 K/at% with w = 0.4 at%. After mixing VO{sub 2} powder with acrylic resin, the maximal visible transmission of the composite films is 48% and the transmission modulation at 2000 nm is 37.3% with phase transition temperature of 66.2 C. Though the phase transition performance is weakened by tungsten doping, the film prepared by 1.3 at% tungsten doped VO{sub 2} still show superior transmission modulation about 26.4%, which means that it is a potential candidate as smart windows. - Abstract: VO{sub 2} powder with superior phase transition performance was prepared by convenient thermolysis method. The results illustrated that VO{sub 2} powder show high purity and crystallinity. VO{sub 2} particles are transformed from cluster to quasi-sphere with the increase of annealing temperature. The DSC analysis proves that VO{sub 2} show superior phase transition performance around 68 C. The phase transition temperature can be reduced to 33.5 C by 1.8 at% tungsten doping. The maximum decreasing efficiency of phase transition temperature is about ?30 K/at% with w = 0.4 at%. After mixing VO{sub 2} powder with acrylic resin, the maximal visible transmission of the composite thin films on glass is 48% and the transmission modulation at 2000 nm is 37.3% with phase transition temperature of 66.2 C. Though the phase transition performance is weakened

  11. DOE Secretarial Policy Statement on the National Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In this policy statement, the Secretary of Energy directed a number of actions to streamline the NEPA process, minimize the cost and time for document preparation and review,...

  12. CEQ Extends Comment Period on Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and the Effects of Climate Change in NEPA Reviews

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) has extended by 30 days the comment period on its revised draft guidance on consideration of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and the effects of climate change in NEPA reviews. The comment period now ends on March 25, 2015.

  13. FERC`s view of itself: FERC`s authority over the licensing process or why third party contracting rules have been difficult to implement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molm, J.

    1995-12-31

    Following the Supreme Court`s decisions in Escondido and Tacoma, it is sometimes difficult to remember FERC`s view of its role in the licensing process and how that view has shaped FERC`s adoption of the NEPA review process. To this day, FERC struggles with reconciling its rules with the NEPA review process. A short historical review of FERC`s efforts in implementing NEPA helps in understanding why FERC does what it does in the environmental context. The first time FERC (then the Federal Power Commission ({open_quotes}FPC{close_quotes})) announced its role in implementing NEPA was in the Commission`s Notice of Proposed Rulemaking issued in response to the Council on Environmental Quality ({open_quotes}CEQ{close_quotes}) regulations in 1979. In the preamble, the commission noted that executive departments were bound by CEQ regulations, but the Commission, as an independent regulatory agency, was not. In its Notice, the Commission stated its concern that under the CEQ referral process, the FPC`s environmental review may be subject to a CEQ review outside of the Commission`s NEPA process.

  14. Early environmental planning: A process for power line corridor selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haagenstad, T.; Bare, C.M.

    1998-12-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted an environmental planning study in the fall of 1997 to help determine the best alternative for upgrading the Laboratory`s electrical power system. Alternatives considered included an on-site power generation facility and two corridors for a 10-mile-long 115-kV power line. This planning process was conducted prior to the formal National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review. The goals were to help select the best proposed action, to recommend modifications and mitigation measures for each alternative for a more environmentally sound project, and to avoid potential delays once the formal Department of Energy review process began. Significant constraints existed from a planning perspective, including operational issues such as existing outdoor high explosives testing areas, as well as environmental issues including threatened and endangered species habitats, multiple archeological sites, contaminated areas, and aesthetics. The study had to be completed within 45 days to meet project schedule needs. The process resulted in a number of important recommendations. While the construction and operation of the on-site power generation facility could have minimal environmental impacts, the need for a new air quality permit would create severe cost and schedule constraints for the project. From an environmental perspective, construction and operation of a power line within either corridor was concluded to be a viable alternative. However, impacts with either corridor would have to be reduced through specific recommended alignment modifications and mitigation measures.

  15. Operating Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter is focused on capital costs for conventional construction and environmental restoration and waste management projects and examines operating cost estimates to verify that all elements of the project have been considered and properly estimated.

  16. Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO{sub 2} Capture. Manufacturing Plan for Aminosilicone-based CO{sub 2} Absorption Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogt, Kirkland

    2013-02-01

    A commercially cost effective manufacturing plan was developed for GAP-1m, the aminosilicone-based part of the CO{sub 2} capture solvent described in DE-FE0007502, and the small-scale synthesis of GAP-1m was confirmed. The plan utilizes a current intermediate at SiVance LLC to supply the 2013-2015 needs for GE Global Research. Material from this process was supplied to GE Global Research for evaluation and creation of specifications. GE Global Research has since ordered larger quantities (60 liters) for the larger scale evaluations that start in first quarter, 2013. For GE’s much larger future commercial needs, an improved, more economical pathway to make the product was developed after significant laboratory and literature research. Suppliers were identified for all raw materials.

  17. Pilot-Scale Demonstration of a Novel, Low-Cost Oxygen Supply Process and its Integration with Oxy-Fuel Coal-Fired Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krish Krishnamurthy; Divy Acharya; Frank Fitch

    2008-09-30

    In order to achieve DOE targets for carbon dioxide capture, it is crucial not only to develop process options that will generate and provide oxygen to the power cycle in a cost-effective manner compared to the conventional oxygen supply methods based on cryogenic air separation technology, but also to identify effective integration options for these new technologies into the power cycle with carbon dioxide capture. The Linde/BOC developed Ceramic Autothermal Recovery (CAR) process remains an interesting candidate to address both of these issues by the transfer of oxygen from the air to a recycled CO{sub 2} rich flue-gas stream in a cyclic process utilizing the high temperature sorption properties of perovskites. Good progress was made on this technology in this project, but significant challenges remain to be addressed before CAR oxygen production technology is ready for commercial exploitation. Phase 1 of the project was completed by the end of September 2008. The two-bed 0.7 tons/day O2 CAR process development unit (PDU) was installed adjacent to WRI's pilot scale coal combustion test facility (CTF). Start-up and operating sequences for the PDU were developed and cyclic operation of the CAR process demonstrated. Controlled low concentration methane addition allowed the beds to be heated up to operational temperature (800-900 C) and then held there during cyclic operation of the 2-bed CAR process, in this way overcoming unavoidable heat losses from the beds during steady state operation. The performance of the PDU was optimized as much as possible, but equipment limitations prevented the system from fully achieving its target performance. Design of the flue gas recirculation system to integrate CAR PDU with the CTF and the system was completed and integrated tests successfully performed at the end of the period. A detailed techno-economic analysis was made of the CAR process for supplying the oxygen in oxy-fuel combustion retrofit option using AEP's 450 MW

  18. An Alternative Low-Cost Process for Deposition of MCrAlY Bond Coats for Advanced Syngas/Hydrogen Turbine Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ying

    2015-09-11

    The objective of this project was to develop and optimize MCrAlY bond coats for syngas/hydrogen turbine applications using a low-cost electrolytic codeposition process. Prealloyed CrAlY-based powders were codeposited into a metal matrix of Ni, Co or Ni-Co during the electroplating process, and a subsequent post-deposition heat treatment converted it to the MCrAlY coating. Our research efforts focused on: (1) investigation of the effects of electro-codeposition configuration and parameters on the CrAlY particle incorporation in the NiCo-CrAlY composite coatings; (2) development of the post-deposition heat treating procedure; (3) characterization of coating properties and evaluation of coating oxidation performance; (4) exploration of a sulfurfree electroplating solution; (5) cost analysis of the present electrolytic codeposition process. Different electro-codeposition configurations were investigated, and the rotating barrel system demonstrated the capability of depositing NiCo-CrAlY composite coatings uniformly on the entire specimen surface, with the CrAlY particle incorporation in the range 37-42 vol.%. Post-deposition heat treatment at 1000-1200 °C promoted interdiffusion between the CrAlY particles and the Ni-Co metal matrix, resulting in β/γ’/γ or β/γ’ phases in the heat-treated coatings. The results also indicate that the post-deposition heat treatment should be conducted at temperatures ≤1100 °C to minimize Cr evaporation and outward diffusion of Ti. The electro-codeposited NiCrAlY coatings in general showed lower hardness and surface roughness than thermal spray MCrAlY coatings. Coating oxidation performance was evaluated at 1000-1100 °C in dry and wet air environments. The initial electro-codeposited NiCoCrAlY coatings containing relatively high sulfur did not show good oxidation resistance. After modifications of the coating process, the cleaner NiCoCrAlY coating exhibited good oxidation performance at 1000 °C during the 2,000 1-h cyclic

  19. Novel, Low-Cost Nanoparticle Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-05-31

    Fact sheet describing a modular hybrid plasma reactor and process to manufacture low-cost nanoparticles

  20. Decommissioning Unit Cost Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanford, P. C.; Stevens, J. L.; Brandt, R.

    2002-02-26

    The Rocky Flats Closure Site (Site) is in the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, and remediating environmental media. A number of contaminated facilities have been decommissioned, including one building, Building 779, that contained gloveboxes used for plutonium process development but did little actual plutonium processing. The actual costs incurred to decommission this facility formed much of the basis or standards used to estimate the decommissioning of the remaining plutonium-processing buildings. Recent decommissioning activities in the first actual production facility, Building 771, implemented a number of process and procedural improvements. These include methods for handling plutonium contaminated equipment, including size reduction, decontamination, and waste packaging, as well as management improvements to streamline planning and work control. These improvements resulted in a safer working environment and reduced project cost, as demonstrated in the overall project efficiency. The topic of this paper is the analysis of how this improved efficiency is reflected in recent unit costs for activities specific to the decommissioning of plutonium facilities. This analysis will allow the Site to quantify the impacts on future Rocky Flats decommissioning activities, and to develop data for planning and cost estimating the decommissioning of future facilities. The paper discusses the methods used to collect and arrange the project data from the individual work areas within Building 771. Regression and data correlation techniques were used to quantify values for different types of decommissioning activities. The discussion includes the approach to identify and allocate overall project support, waste management, and Site support costs based on the overall Site and project costs to provide a ''burdened'' unit cost. The paper ultimately provides a unit cost basis that can be used to support cost estimates for