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1

How to obtain the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) NEMS is used by the modelers at the U. S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) who understand its structure and programming. NEMS has only been used by a few organizations outside of the EIA, because most people that requested NEMS found out that it was too difficult or rigid to use. NEMS is not typically used for state-level analysis and is poorly suited for application to other countries. However, many do obtain the model simply to use the data in its input files or to examine the source code.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

NEMS industrial module documentation report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NEMS Industrial Demand Model is a dynamic accounting model, bringing together the disparate industries and uses of energy in those industries, and putting them together in an understandable and cohesive framework. The Industrial Model generates mid-term (up to the year 2010) forecasts of industrial sector energy demand as a component of the NEMS integrated forecasting system. From the NEMS system, the Industrial Model receives fuel prices, employment data, and the value of output of industrial activity. Based on the values of these variables, the Industrial Model passes back to the NEMS system estimates of consumption by fuel types.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer-based, energy-economy modeling system of U.S. through 2030. NEMS projects the production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy, subject to assumptions on macroeconomic and financial factors, world energy markets, resource availability and costs, behavioral and technological choice criteria, cost and performance characteristics of energy technologies, and demographics. NEMS was designed and implemented by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). NEMS can be used to analyze the effects of existing and proposed government laws and regulations related to energy production and use; the potential impact of new and advanced energy production, conversion, and consumption technologies; the impact and cost of greenhouse gas control; the impact of increased use of renewable energy sources; and the potential savings from increased efficiency of energy use; and the impact of regulations on the use of alternative or reformulated fuels. NEMS has also been used for a number of special analyses at the request of the Administration, U.S. Congress, other offices of DOE and other government agencies, who specify the scenarios and assumptions for the analysis. Modules allow analyses to be conducted in energy topic areas such as residential demand, industrial demand, electricity market, oil and gas supply, renewable fuels, etc.

4

Iwasawa modules with extra structures and p-modular representations of GL2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Iwasawa modules with extra structures and p-modular representations of GL2 Stefano Morra Abstract Let F be a finite extension of Qp. We associate, to certain smooth p-modular represen- tations of GL2(F), a module S() on the mod p Iwasawa of the standard Iwahori subgroup I of GL2(F). When F

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

5

Active vibration suppression of a exible structure using smart material and a modular control patch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Active vibration suppression of a ¯exible structure using smart material and a modular control of vibration suppression of a ¯exible structure using smart materials and a miniaturized digital controller demonstrated the capacity of smart material being used as sensors and actuators for vibration suppression

6

On the modular structure of the genus-one Type II superstring low energy expansion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The analytic contribution to the low energy expansion of Type II string amplitudes at genus-one is a power series in space-time derivatives with coefficients that are determined by integrals of modular functions over the complex structure modulus of the world-sheet torus. These modular functions are associated with world-sheet vacuum Feynman diagrams and given by multiple sums over the discrete momenta on the torus. In this paper we exhibit exact differential and algebraic relations for a certain infinite class of such modular functions by showing that they satisfy Laplace eigenvalue equations with inhomogeneous terms that are polynomial in non-holomorphic Eisenstein series. Furthermore, we argue that the set of modular functions that contribute to the coefficients of interactions up to order D**10 R*4 are linear sums of functions in this class and quadratic polynomials in Eisenstein series and odd Riemann zeta values. Integration over the complex structure results in coefficients of the low energy expansion that are rational numbers multiplying monomials in odd Riemann zeta values.

Eric D'Hoker; Michael B. Green; Pierre Vanhove

2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

7

Integrated NEMS and optoelectronics for sensor applications.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work utilized advanced engineering in several fields to find solutions to the challenges presented by the integration of MEMS/NEMS with optoelectronics to realize a compact sensor system, comprised of a microfabricated sensor, VCSEL, and photodiode. By utilizing microfabrication techniques in the realization of the MEMS/NEMS component, the VCSEL and the photodiode, the system would be small in size and require less power than a macro-sized component. The work focused on two technologies, accelerometers and microphones, leveraged from other LDRD programs. The first technology was the nano-g accelerometer using a nanophotonic motion detection system (67023). This accelerometer had measured sensitivity of approximately 10 nano-g. The Integrated NEMS and optoelectronics LDRD supported the nano-g accelerometer LDRD by providing advanced designs for the accelerometers, packaging, and a detection scheme to encapsulate the accelerometer, furthering the testing capabilities beyond bench-top tests. A fully packaged and tested die was never realized, but significant packaging issues were addressed and many resolved. The second technology supported by this work was the ultrasensitive directional microphone arrays for military operations in urban terrain and future combat systems (93518). This application utilized a diffraction-based sensing technique with different optical component placement and a different detection scheme from the nano-g accelerometer. The Integrated NEMS LDRD supported the microphone array LDRD by providing custom designs, VCSELs, and measurement techniques to accelerometers that were fabricated from the same operational principles as the microphones, but contain proof masses for acceleration transduction. These devices were packaged at the end of the work.

Czaplewski, David A.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Olsson, Roy H., III; Bogart, Gregory R. (Symphony Acoustics, Rio Rancho, NM); Krishnamoorthy, Uma; Warren, Mial E.; Carr, Dustin Wade (Symphony Acoustics, Rio Rancho, NM); Okandan, Murat; Peterson, Kenneth Allen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

NEMS Buildings Sector Working Group Meeting  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs Year2per ThousandWellhead+WellheadMr.NEMS Buildings

9

U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a multi-sector, integrated model of the U.S. energy system put out by the Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration. NEMS is used to produce the annual 20-year forecast of U.S. energy use aggregated to the nine-region census division level. The research objective was to disaggregate this regional energy forecast to the county level for select forecast years, for use in a more detailed and accurate regional analysis of energy usage across the U.S. The process of disaggregation using a geographic information system (GIS) was researched and a model was created utilizing available population forecasts and climate zone data. The model's primary purpose was to generate an energy demand forecast with greater spatial resolution than what is currently produced by NEMS, and to produce a flexible model that can be used repeatedly as an add-on to NEMS in which detailed analysis can be executed exogenously with results fed back into the NEMS data flow. The methods developed were then applied to the study data to obtain residential and commercial electricity demand forecasts. The model was subjected to comparative and statistical testing to assess predictive accuracy. Forecasts using this model were robust and accurate in slow-growing, temperate regions such as the Midwest and Mountain regions. Interestingly, however, the model performed with less accuracy in the Pacific and Northwest regions of the country where population growth was more active. In the future more refined methods will be necessary to improve the accuracy of these forecasts. The disaggregation method was written into a flexible tool within the ArcGIS environment which enables the user to output the results in five year intervals over the period 2000-2025. In addition, the outputs of this tool were used to develop a time-series simulation showing the temporal changes in electricity forecasts in terms of absolute, per capita, and density of demand.

Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Modular robot  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A modular robot may comprise a main body having a structure defined by a plurality of stackable modules. The stackable modules may comprise a manifold, a valve module, and a control module. The manifold may comprise a top surface and a bottom surface having a plurality of fluid passages contained therein, at least one of the plurality of fluid passages terminating in a valve port located on the bottom surface of the manifold. The valve module is removably connected to the manifold and selectively fluidically connects the plurality of fluid passages contained in the manifold to a supply of pressurized fluid and to a vent. The control module is removably connected to the valve module and actuates the valve module to selectively control a flow of pressurized fluid through different ones of the plurality of fluid passages in the manifold. The manifold, valve module, and control module are mounted together in a sandwich-like manner and comprise a main body. A plurality of leg assemblies are removably connected to the main body and are removably fluidically connected to the fluid passages in the manifold so that each of the leg assemblies can be selectively actuated by the flow of pressurized fluid in different ones of the plurality of fluid passages in the manifold. 12 figs.

Ferrante, T.A.

1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

11

Assessment and Suggestions to Improve the Commercial Building Module of EIA-NEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a comprehensive, computer-based, energy-economy modeling system developed and maintained by the Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA). NEMS forecasts the national production...

O'Neal, D. L.; Reddy, T. A.; Sucher, B.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

A MODULAR SHM-SCHEME FOR ENGINEERING STRUCTURES UNDER CHANGING CONDITIONS: APPLICATION TO AN OFFSHORE WIND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TO AN OFFSHORE WIND TURBINE Moritz W. H¨ackell1, Raimund Rolfes1 1 Institute of Structural Analysis, Leibniz in common. A shift from fossil to renewable energy source is the logical con- sequence. (Offshore) wind of remote offshore plants and an ageing fleet of onshore structures raise the demand of structural health

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

13

Price Responsiveness in the AEO2003 NEMS Residential and Commercial Buildings Sector Models  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper describes the demand responses to changes in energy prices in the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 versions of the Residential and Commercial Demand Modules of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). It updates a similar paper completed for the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 version of the NEMS.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

SRS Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The small modular reactor program at the Savannah River Site and the Savannah River National Laboratory.

None

2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

15

SRS Small Modular Reactors  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The small modular reactor program at the Savannah River Site and the Savannah River National Laboratory.

None

2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

16

Nano-Electro-Mechanical (NEM) Relay Devices and Technology for Ultra-Low Energy Digital Integrated Circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology 3.1 Introduction Nano-electro-mechanical (NEM)improvements, a scaled nano-relay technology with optimizedNano-Electro-Mechanical (NEM) Relay Devices and Technology

Nathanael, Rhesa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

A sensitivity analysis of the treatment of wind energy in the AEO99 version of NEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Documentation Report: Wind Energy Submodule (WES). DOE/EIA-The Economic Value of Wind Energy at High Power SystemOF THE TREATMENT OF WIND ENERGY IN THE AEO99 VERSION OF NEMS

Osborn, Julie G.; Wood, Frances; Richey, Cooper; Sanders, Sandy; Short, Walter; Koomey, Jonathan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

NREL Wind Turbine Blade Structural Testing of the Modular Wind Energy MW45 Blade: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-354  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This CRADA was a purely funds-in CRADA with Modular Wind Energy (MWE). MWE had a need to perform full-scale testing of a 45-m wind turbine blade. NREL/NWTC provided the capabilities, facilities, and equipment to test this large-scale MWE wind turbine blade. Full-scale testing is required to demonstrate the ability of the wind turbine blade to withstand static design load cases and demonstrate the fatigue durability. Structural testing is also necessary to meet international blade testing certification requirements. Through this CRADA, MWE would obtain test results necessary for product development and certification, and NREL would benefit by working with an industrial partner to better understand the unique test requirements for wind turbine blades with advanced structural designs.

Hughes, S.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Recycling Guide: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Recycling Information Call 301-496-7990 or visit the NEMS Website at http://www.nems.nih.gov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recycling Guide: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Recycling Information ­ Call 301-496-7990 or visit the NEMS in COMMINGLED bin Rinse food/beverage containers before recycling No Pyrex or Styrofoam Printer and Copier Toner Cartridges in TONER CARTRIDGE bin Recycle packaging material in appropriate bin NIH charities

Baker, Chris I.

20

Modular Integrated Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Honeywell #12;Modular Integrated Energy Systems Task 5 Prototype Development Reference Design DocumentationModular Integrated Energy Systems Prepared for: Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008 Building 3147 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 April 27, 2006 Prepared by: Honeywell Laboratories 3660 Technology Drive

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems modular structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

MODULAR8 01/09 MODULAR8 CRADA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODULAR8 01/09 MODULAR8 CRADA TABLE OF CONTENTS ARTICLE I. DEFINITIONS. OBLIGATIONS AS TO PROTECTED CRADA INFORMATION ................ 6 ARTICLE IX. RIGHTS IN GENERATED INFORMATION XXV. ADMINISTRATION OF THE CRADA........................................................ 13 ARTICLE

Eisen, Michael

22

Comparison of Bottom-Up and Top-Down Forecasts: Vision Industry Energy Forecasts with ITEMS and NEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparisons are made of energy forecasts using results from the Industrial module of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and an industrial economic-engineering model called the Industrial Technology and Energy Modeling System (ITEMS), a model...

Roop, J. M.; Dahowski, R. T

23

Symmetric modular torsatron  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fusion reactor device is provided in which the magnetic fields for plasma confinement in a toroidal configuration is produced by a plurality of symmetrical modular coils arranged to form a symmetric modular torsatron referred to as a symmotron. Each of the identical modular coils is helically deformed and comprise one field period of the torsatron. Helical segments of each coil are connected by means of toroidally directed windbacks which may also provide part of the vertical field required for positioning the plasma. The stray fields of the windback segments may be compensated by toroidal coils. A variety of magnetic confinement flux surface configurations may be produced by proper modulation of the winding pitch of the helical segments of the coils, as in a conventional torsatron, winding the helix on a noncircular cross section and varying the poloidal and radial location of the windbacks and the compensating toroidal ring coils.

Rome, J.A.; Harris, J.H.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Modular optical detector system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A modular optical detector system. The detector system is designed to detect the presence of molecules or molecular species by inducing fluorescence with exciting radiation and detecting the emitted fluorescence. Because the system is capable of accurately detecting and measuring picomolar concentrations it is ideally suited for use with microchemical analysis systems generally and capillary chromatographic systems in particular. By employing a modular design, the detector system provides both the ability to replace various elements of the detector system without requiring extensive realignment or recalibration of the components as well as minimal user interaction with the system. In addition, the modular concept provides for the use and addition of a wide variety of components, including optical elements (lenses and filters), light sources, and detection means, to fit particular needs.

Horn, Brent A. (Livermore, CA); Renzi, Ronald F. (Tracy, CA)

2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

25

NEM modication prevents high-anity ATP binding to the rst nucleotide binding fold of the sulphonylurea receptor, SUR1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEM modi¢cation prevents high-a¤nity ATP binding to the ¢rst nucleotide binding fold, UK Received 7 July 1999; received in revised form 11 August 1999 Abstract Pancreatic LL-cell ATP WWM 8-azido- [KK-32 P]ATP or 8-azido-[QQ-32 P]ATP was inhibited by NEM with Ki of 1.8 WWM and 2.4 WWM

Tucker, Stephen J.

26

Z-score-based modularity for community detection in networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identifying community structure in networks is an issue of particular interest in network science. The modularity introduced by Newman and Girvan [Phys. Rev. E 69, 026113 (2004)] is the most popular quality function for community detection in networks. In this study, we identify a problem in the concept of modularity and suggest a solution to overcome this problem. Specifically, we obtain a new quality function for community detection. We refer to the function as Z-modularity because it measures the Z-score of a given division with respect to the fraction of the number of edges within communities. Our theoretical analysis shows that Z-modularity mitigates the resolution limit of the original modularity in certain cases. Computational experiments using both artificial networks and well-known real-world networks demonstrate the validity and reliability of the proposed quality function.

Miyauchi, Atsushi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP results for the base case and scenarios.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NEMS-MP model generates numerous results for each run of a scenario. (This model is the integrated National Energy Modeling System [NEMS] version used for the Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study [MP].) This appendix examines additional findings beyond the primary results reported in the Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study: Vehicle Characterization and Scenario Analyses (Reference 1). These additional results are provided in order to help further illuminate some of the primary results. Specifically discussed in this appendix are: (1) Energy use results for light vehicles (LVs), including details about the underlying total vehicle miles traveled (VMT), the average vehicle fuel economy, and the volumes of the different fuels used; (2) Resource fuels and their use in the production of ethanol, hydrogen (H{sub 2}), and electricity; (3) Ethanol use in the scenarios (i.e., the ethanol consumption in E85 vs. other blends, the percent of travel by flex fuel vehicles on E85, etc.); (4) Relative availability of E85 and H2 stations; (5) Fuel prices; (6) Vehicle prices; and (7) Consumer savings. These results are discussed as follows: (1) The three scenarios (Mixed, (P)HEV & Ethanol, and H2 Success) when assuming vehicle prices developed through literature review; (2) The three scenarios with vehicle prices that incorporate the achievement of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program vehicle cost goals; (3) The three scenarios with 'literature review' vehicle prices, plus vehicle subsidies; and (4) The three scenarios with 'program goals' vehicle prices, plus vehicle subsidies. The four versions or cases of each scenario are referred to as: Literature Review No Subsidies, Program Goals No Subsidies, Literature Review with Subsidies, and Program Goals with Subsidies. Two additional points must be made here. First, none of the results presented for LVs in this section include Class 2B trucks. Results for this class are included occasionally in Reference 1. They represent a small, though noticeable, segment of the 'LV plus 2B' market (e.g., a little more than 3% of today's energy use in that market). We generally do not include them in this discussion, simply because it requires additional effort to combine the NEMS-MP results for them with the results for the other LVs. (Where there is an exception, we will indicate so.) Second, where reference is made to E85, the ethanol content is actually 74%. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) assumes that, to address cold-starting issues, the percent of ethanol in E85 will vary seasonally. The EIA uses an annual average ethanol content of 74% in its forecasts. That assumption is maintained in the NEMS-MP scenario runs.

Plotkin, S. E.; Singh, M. K.; Energy Systems

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

28

Overview of NEMS-H2, Version 1.0 | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLCDieselEnergy Joining ActivitiesNEMS-H2, Version 1.0

29

Modular RNA architecture revealed by computational analysis of existing pseudoknots and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modular RNA architecture revealed by computational analysis of existing pseudoknots and ribosomal architecture is a hallmark of RNA structures, implying structural, and possibly functional, similar- ity among functional molecules (2­6). Modular architecture also implies similarity of substructural motifs among

Schlick, Tamar

30

Final Report: Design & Evaluation of Energy Efficient Modular Classroom Structures Phase II / Volume I-VII, January 17, 1995 - October 30, 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are developing innovations to enable modular builders to improve the energy performance of their classrooms with no increase in first cost. The Modern Building Systems' (MBS) classroom building conforms to the stringent Oregon energy code, and at $18/ft{sup 2} ($1.67/m{sup 2}) (FOB the factory) it is at the low end of the cost range for modular classrooms. We have investigated daylighting, cross-ventilation, solar preheat of ventilation air, air-to-air heat exchanger, electric lighting controls, and down-sizing HVAC systems as strategies to improve energy performance. We were able to improve energy performance with no increase in first cost in all climates examined. Two papers and a full report on Phase I of this study are available. The work described in this report is from the second phase of the project. In the first phase we redesigned the basic modular classroom to incorporate energy strategies including daylighting, cross-ventilation, solar preheating of ventilation air, and insulation. We also explored thermal mass but determined that it was not a cost-effective strategy in the five climates we examined. Energy savings ranged from 6% to 49% with an average of 23%. Paybacks ranged from 1.3 years to 23.8 years, an average of 12.1 years. In Phase II the number of baseline buildings was expanded by simulating buildings that would be typical of those produced by Modern Building Systems, Inc. (MBS) for each of the seven locations/climates. A number of parametric simulations were performed for each energy strategy. Additionally we refined our previous algorithm for a solar ventilation air wall preheater and developed an algorithm for a roof preheater configuration. These algorithms were coded as functions in DOE 2.1E. We were striving for occupant comfort as well as energy savings. We performed computer analyses to verify adequate illumination on vertical surfaces and acceptable glare levels when using daylighting. We also used computational fluid dynamics software to determine air distribution from cross-ventilation and used the resulting interior wind speeds to calculate occupant comfort and allowable outside air temperatures for cross-ventilation.

NONE

1999-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

31

Ordered bed modular reactor design proposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ordered Bed Modular Reactor (OBMR) is a design as an advanced modular HTGR in which the annular reactor core is filled with an ordered bed of fuel spheres. This arrangement allows fuel elements to be poured into the core cavity which is shaped so that an ordered bed is formed and to be discharged from the core through the opening holes in the reactor top. These operations can be performed in a shutdown shorter time. The OBMR has the most of advantages from both the pebble bed reactor and block type reactor. Its core has great structural flexibility and stability, which allow increasing reactor output power and outlet gas temperature as well as decreasing core pressure drop. This paper introduces ordered packing bed characteristics, unloading and loading technique of the fuel spheres and predicted design features of the OBMR. (authors)

Tian, J. [Inst. of Nuclear Energy Technology, Tsinghua Univ., Beijing 100084 (China)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Modular Interpreted Systems: A Preliminary Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zachmann (Computer Graphics) #12;Modular Interpreted Systems: A Preliminary Report Wojciech Jamroga1

Zachmann, Gabriel

33

Modular error embedding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data containing noise in the low-order bits. The method applies to digital data representing analog signals, for example digital images. The method reduces the error introduced by other methods that replace the low-order bits with auxiliary information. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user through use of a digital key. The modular error embedding method includes a process to permute the order in which the host data values are processed. The method doubles the amount of auxiliary information that can be added to host data values, in comparison with bit-replacement methods for high bit-rate coding. The invention preserves human perception of the meaning and content of the host data, permitting the addition of auxiliary data in the amount of 50% or greater of the original host data.

Sandford, II, Maxwell T. (Los Alamos, NM); Handel, Theodore G. (Los Alamos, NM); Ettinger, J. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Modular container assembled from fiber reinforced thermoplastic sandwich panels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved, load bearing, modular design container structure assembled from thermoformed FRTP sandwich panels in which is utilized the unique core-skin edge configuration of the present invention in consideration of improved load bearing performance, improved useful load volume, reduced manufacturing costs, structural weight savings, impact and damage tolerance and repair and replace issues.

Donnelly, Mathew William (Edgewood, NM); Kasoff, William Andrew (Albuquerque, NM); Mcculloch, Patrick Carl (Irvine, CA); Williams, Frederick Truman (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

35

Modular Isotopic Thermoelectric Generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced RTG concepts utilizing improved thermoelectric materials and converter concepts are under study at Fairchild for DOE. The design described here is based on DOE's newly developed radioisotope heat source, and on an improved silicon-germanium material and a multicouple converter module under development at Syncal. Fairchild's assignment was to combine the above into an attractive power system for use in space, and to assess the specific power and other attributes of that design. The resultant design is highly modular, consisting of standard RTG slices, each producing ~24 watts at the desired output voltage of 28 volt. Thus, the design could be adapted to various space missions over a wide range of power levels, with little or no redesign. Each RTG slice consists of a 250-watt heat source module, eight multicouple thermoelectric modules, and standard sections of insulator, housing, radiator fins, and electrical circuit. The design makes it possible to check each thermoelectric module for electrical performance, thermal contact, leaktightness, and performance stability, after the generator is fully assembled; and to replace any deficient modules without disassembling the generator or perturbing the others. The RTG end sections provide the spring-loaded supports required to hold the free-standing heat source stack together during launch vibration. Details analysis indicates that the design offers a substantial improvement in specific power over the present generator of RTGs, using the same heat source modules. There are three copies in the file.

Schock, Alfred

1981-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

36

Modular power converter having fluid cooled support  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support, in conjunction with other packaging features may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

Beihoff, Bruce C.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Meyer, Andreas A.; Gollhardt, Neil; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

37

Modular power converter having fluid cooled support  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support, in conjunction with other packaging features may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

Beihoff, Bruce C.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Meyer, Andreas A.; Gollhardt, Neil; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

38

Modular Exponentiation Algorithm Analysis for Energy Consumption and Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modular Exponentiation Algorithm Analysis for Energy Consumption and Performance Lin Zhong lzhong of their complexity, parallelism and latency. Insights are found for tradeoff between energy consumption of a tree structure. For example, Figure 1.3 shows to add 5 k-bit integers together in a tree sequence. It

Zhong, Lin

39

Invertible Program Restructurings for Continuing Modular Maintenance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invertible Program Restructurings for Continuing Modular Maintenance Julien Cohen ASCOLA team (EMN in main- tenance with invertible program transformations. We illustrate this on the typical Expression problems with our approach. Keywords-modular maintenance; restructuring; invertible pro- gram

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

40

Abductive Analysis of Modular Logic Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abductive Analysis of Modular Logic Programs Roberto Giacobazzi LIX, Laboratoire d introduce a practical method for abductive analysis of modular logic programs. This is obtained of abductive reasoning in dataflow analysis of logic programs. 1 Introduction Dataflow analysis

Giacobazzi, Roberto

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems modular structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Modularity of Directed Networks: Cycle Decomposition Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The problem of decomposing networks into modules (or clusters) has gained much attention in recent years, as it can account for a coarse-grained description of complex systems, often revealing functional subunits of these systems. A variety of module detection algorithms have been proposed, mostly oriented towards finding hard partitionings of undirected networks. Despite the increasing number of fuzzy clustering methods for directed networks, many of these approaches tend to neglect important directional information. In this paper, we present a novel random walk based approach for finding fuzzy partitions of directed, weighted networks, where edge directions play a crucial role in defining how well nodes in a module are interconnected. We will show that cycle decomposition of a random walk process connects the notion of network modules and information transport in a network, leading to a new, symmetric measure of node communication. walk process, for which we will prove that although being time-reversible it inherits all necessary information about directions and modular structure of the original network. Finally, we will use this measure to introduce a communication graph, for which we will show that although being undirected it inherits all necessary information about modular structures from the original network.

Natasa Djurdjevac Conrad; Ralf Banisch; Christof Schtte

2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

Use of modular web developments to ease the language barrier of Hypertext Processing and Structured Query Language by Jarrell Dwayne Johnson.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Four modules were developed with the extensive use of Personal Home Page (PHP) Hypertext Processing and Structured Query Language (SQL) in order to improve web-integrated capabilities of events planning, user account ...

Johnson, Jarrell Dwayne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Power management as a system-level inhibitor of modularity in the mobile computer industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since the mid-90s, the computer industry has been very modular with respect to both product architecture and industry structure. The growing market size of mobile computers means that the challenges facing this segment are ...

Weinstein, Samuel K. (Samuel Keith), 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Maintenance building structural design description: 4 x 350 MW(t) Modular HTGR [High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor] Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Maintenance Building is a grade-founded, two-story, steel-framed structure, located adjacent to the Turbine Building in the Energy Conversion Area. It has a reinforced concrete foundation and slab on grade, and insulated sheet metal exterior walls and roof decking.

NONE

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Intelligent Control of Modular Robotic Welding Cell  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although robotic machines are routinely used for welding, such machines do not normally incorporate intelligent capabilities. We are studying the general problem of formulating usable levels of intelligence into welding machines. From our perspective, an intelligent machine should: incorporate knowledge of the welding process, know if the process is operating correctly, know if the weld it is making is good or bad, have the ability to learn from its experience to perform welds, and be able to optimize its own performance. To this end, we are researching machine architecture, methods of knowledge representation, decision making and conflict resolution algorithms, methods of learning and optimization, human/machine interfaces, and various sensors. This paper presents work on the machine architecture and the human/machine interface specifically for a robotic, gas metal arc welding cell. Although the machine control problem is normally approached from the perspective of having a central body of control in the machine, we present a design using distributed agents. A prime goal of this work is to develop an architecture for an intelligent machine that will support a modular, plug and play standard. A secondary goal of this work is to formulate a human/machine interface that treats the human as an active agent in the modular structure.

Smartt, Herschel Bernard; Kenney, Kevin Louis; Tolle, Charles Robert

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Metastring Theory and Modular Space-time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

String theory is canonically accompanied with a space-time interpretation which determines S-matrix-like observables, and connects to the standard physics at low energies in the guise of local effective field theory. Recently, we have introduced a reformulation of string theory which does not rely on an {\\it a priori} space-time interpretation or a pre-assumption of locality. This \\hlt{metastring theory} is formulated in such a way that stringy symmetries (such as T-duality) are realized linearly. In this paper, we study metastring theory on a flat background and develop a variety of technical and interpretational ideas. These include a formulation of the moduli space of Lorentzian worldsheets, a careful study of the symplectic structure and consequently consistent closed and open boundary conditions, and the string spectrum and operator algebra. What emerges from these studies is a new quantum notion of space-time that we refer to as a quantum Lagrangian or equivalently a \\hlt{modular space-time}. This concept embodies the standard tenets of quantum theory and implements in a precise way a notion of {relative locality}. The usual string backgrounds (non-compact space-time along with some toroidally compactified spatial directions) are obtained from modular space-time by a limiting procedure that can be thought of as a correspondence limit.

Laurent Freidel; Robert G. Leigh; Djordje Minic

2015-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

47

Modular heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A shell and tube heat exchanger having a plurality of individually removable tube bundle modules. A lattice of structural steel forming rectangular openings therein is placed at each end of a cylindrical shell. Longitudinal structural members are placed in the shell between corners of the rectangular openings situated on opposite ends of the shell. Intermediate support members interconnect the longitudinal supports so as to increase the longitudinal supports rigidity. Rectangular parallelpiped tube bundle moldules occupy the space defined by the longitudinal supports and end supports and each include a rectangular tube sheet situated on each end of a plurality of tubes extending therethrough, a plurality of rectangular tube supports located between the tube sheets, and a tube bundle module stiffening structure disposed about the bundle's periphery and being attached to the tube sheets and tube supports. The corners of each tube bundle module have longitudinal framework members which are mateable with and supported by the longitudinal support members. Intermediate support members constitute several lattice, each of which is situate d in a plane between the end support members. The intermediate support members constituting the several lattice extend horizontally and vertically between longitudinal supports of adjacent tube module voids. An alternative embodiment for intermediate support members constitute a series of structural plates situated at the corners of the module voids and having recesses therein for receiving the respective longitudinal support members adjacent thereto, protrusions separating the recesses, and a plurality of struts situated between protrusions of adjacent structural plates.

Giardina, Angelo R. [Marple Township, Delaware County, PA

1981-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

48

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive modular linear Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

modular linear Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The evolution of modularity in genome architecture John W. Pepper 1 Summary: with non- modular genomes, indicating that modularity...

49

Multidimensional bioseparation with modular microfluidics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multidimensional chemical separation and analysis system is described including a prototyping platform and modular microfluidic components capable of rapid and convenient assembly, alteration and disassembly of numerous candidate separation systems. Partial or total computer control of the separation system is possible. Single or multiple alternative processing trains can be tested, optimized and/or run in parallel. Examples related to the separation and analysis of human bodily fluids are given.

Chirica, Gabriela S.; Renzi, Ronald F.

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

50

Quantum information with modular variables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a novel strategy, based on the use of modular variables, to encode and deterministically process quantum information using states described by continuous variables. Our formalism leads to a general recipe to adapt existing quantum information protocols, originally formulated for finite dimensional quantum systems, to infinite dimensional systems described by continuous variables. This is achieved by using non unitary and non-gaussian operators, obtained from the superposition of gaussian gates, together with adaptative manipulations in qubit systems defined in infinite dimensional Hilbert spaces. We describe in details the realization of single and two qubit gates and briefly discuss their implementation in a quantum optical set-up.

A. Ketterer; S. P. Walborn; A. Keller; T. Coudreau; P. Milman

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

51

Modularity of Termination Using Dependency Pairs ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modularity of Termination Using Dependency Pairs ? Thomas Arts 1 and J¨urgen Giesl 2 1 Computer@informatik.th­darmstadt.de Abstract. The framework of dependency pairs allows automated ter­ mination and innermost termination proofs of this framework in order to prove termination in a modular way. Our mod­ ularity results significantly increase

Ábrahám, Erika

52

Abductive Analysis of Modular Logic Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abductive Analysis of Modular Logic Programs Roberto Giacobazzi LIX, Laboratoire d introduce a practical method for abductive analysis of modular logic programs. This is obtained by reversing and in compile­time optimization. To the best of our knowledge this is the first application of abductive

Giacobazzi, Roberto

53

NGNP Project Regulatory Gap Analysis for Modular HTGRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project Regulatory Gap Analysis (RGA) for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGR) was conducted to evaluate existing regulatory requirements and guidance against the design characteristics specific to a generic modular HTGR. This final report presents results and identifies regulatory gaps concerning current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing requirements that apply to the modular HTGR design concept. This report contains appendices that highlight important HTGR licensing issues that were found during the RGA study. The information contained in this report will be used to further efforts in reconciling HTGR-related gaps in the NRC licensing structure, which has to date largely focused on light water reactor technology.

Wayne Moe

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Modular hybrid plasma reactor and related systems and methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device, method and system for generating a plasma is disclosed wherein an electrical arc is established and the movement of the electrical arc is selectively controlled. In one example, modular units are coupled to one another to collectively define a chamber. Each modular unit may include an electrode and a cathode spaced apart and configured to generate an arc therebetween. A device, such as a magnetic or electromagnetic device, may be used to selectively control the movement of the arc about a longitudinal axis of the chamber. The arcs of individual modules may be individually controlled so as to exhibit similar or dissimilar motions about the longitudinal axis of the chamber. In another embodiment, an inlet structure may be used to selectively define the flow path of matter introduced into the chamber such that it travels in a substantially circular or helical path within the chamber.

Kong, Peter C.; Grandy, Jon D.; Detering, Brent A.

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

55

ADVANCED SEISMIC BASE ISOLATION METHODS FOR MODULAR REACTORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced technologies for structural design and construction have the potential for major impact not only on nuclear power plant construction time and cost, but also on the design process and on the safety, security and reliability of next generation of nuclear power plants. In future Generation IV (Gen IV) reactors, structural and seismic design should be much more closely integrated with the design of nuclear and industrial safety systems, physical security systems, and international safeguards systems. Overall reliability will be increased, through the use of replaceable and modular equipment, and through design to facilitate on-line monitoring, in-service inspection, maintenance, replacement, and decommissioning. Economics will also receive high design priority, through integrated engineering efforts to optimize building arrangements to minimize building heights and footprints. Finally, the licensing approach will be transformed by becoming increasingly performance based and technology neutral, using best-estimate simulation methods with uncertainty and margin quantification. In this context, two structural engineering technologies, seismic base isolation and modular steel-plate/concrete composite structural walls, are investigated. These technologies have major potential to (1) enable standardized reactor designs to be deployed across a wider range of sites, (2) reduce the impact of uncertainties related to site-specific seismic conditions, and (3) alleviate reactor equipment qualification requirements. For Gen IV reactors the potential for deliberate crashes of large aircraft must also be considered in design. This report concludes that base-isolated structures should be decoupled from the reactor external event exclusion system. As an example, a scoping analysis is performed for a rectangular, decoupled external event shell designed as a grillage. This report also reviews modular construction technology, particularly steel-plate/concrete construction using factory prefabricated structural modules, for application to external event shell and base isolated structures.

E. Blanford; E. Keldrauk; M. Laufer; M. Mieler; J. Wei; B. Stojadinovic; P.F. Peterson

2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

56

Small Modular Reactors: Institutional Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

? Objectives include, among others, a description of the basic development status of small modular reactors (SMRs) focused primarily on domestic activity; investigation of the domestic market appeal of modular reactors from the viewpoints of both key energy sector customers and also key stakeholders in the financial community; and consideration of how to proceed further with a pro-active "core group" of stakeholders substantially interested in modular nuclear deployment in order to provide the basis to expedite design/construction activity and regulatory approval. ? Information gathering was via available resources, both published and personal communications with key individual stakeholders; published information is limited to that already in public domain (no confidentiality); viewpoints from interviews are incorporated within. Discussions at both government-hosted and private-hosted SMR meetings are reflected herein. INL itself maintains a neutral view on all issues described. Note: as per prior discussion between INL and CAP, individual and highly knowledgeable senior-level stakeholders provided the bulk of insights herein, and the results of those interviews are the main source of the observations of this report. ? Attachment A is the list of individual stakeholders consulted to date, including some who provided significant earlier assessments of SMR institutional feasibility. ? Attachments B, C, and D are included to provide substantial context on the international status of SMR development; they are not intended to be comprehensive and are individualized due to the separate nature of the source materials. Attachment E is a summary of the DOE requirements for winning teams regarding the current SMR solicitation. Attachment F deserves separate consideration due to the relative maturity of the SMART SMR program underway in Korea. Attachment G provides illustrative SMR design features and is intended for background. Attachment H is included for overview purposes and is a sampling of advanced SMR concepts, which will be considered as part of the current DOE SMR program but whose estimated deployment time is beyond CAPs current investment time horizon. Attachment I is the public DOE statement describing the present approach of their SMR Program.

Joseph Perkowski, Ph.D.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

A MODULAR, SCALABLE, ARCHITECTURE FOR UNMANNED VEHICLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A MODULAR, SCALABLE, ARCHITECTURE FOR UNMANNED VEHICLES David G. Armstrong II, Carl D. Crane III://www.me.ufl.edu/CIMAR Ralph English Wintec, Inc. Ft. Walton Beach, Florida Phillip Adsit Applied Research Associates Tyndall

Florida, University of

58

A design flow based on modular refinement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a practical methodology based on modular refinement to design complex systems. The methodology relies on modules with latency-insensitive interfaces so that the refinements can change the timing contract of a ...

Dave, Nirav H.

59

XAUV : modular high maneuverability autonomous underwater vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The design and construction of a modular test bed autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) is analyzed. Although a relatively common stacked-hull design is used, the state of the art is advanced through an aggressive power ...

Walker, Daniel G. (Daniel George)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Design of a modular motorcycle windshield wiper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motorcycle windshield wipers are essentially non-existent in the United States. Customer and market research reveals a demand for such a product. This paper explores the product viability of a modular motorcycle windshield ...

Boyd, Robert Allen Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems modular structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Metastring Theory and Modular Space-time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

String theory is canonically accompanied with a space-time interpretation which determines S-matrix-like observables, and connects to the standard physics at low energies in the guise of local effective field theory. Recently, we have introduced a reformulation of string theory which does not rely on an {\\it a priori} space-time interpretation or a pre-assumption of locality. This \\hlt{metastring theory} is formulated in such a way that stringy symmetries (such as T-duality) are realized linearly. In this paper, we study metastring theory on a flat background and develop a variety of technical and interpretational ideas. These include a formulation of the moduli space of Lorentzian worldsheets, a careful study of the symplectic structure and consequently consistent closed and open boundary conditions, and the string spectrum and operator algebra. What emerges from these studies is a new quantum notion of space-time that we refer to as a quantum Lagrangian or equivalently a \\hlt{modular space-time}. This conce...

Freidel, Laurent; Minic, Djordje

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Modular ITT Module D Modular ITT Module D Version 1 16/02/2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

manage health and safety at work. Your responses should include: basic statement on safety awarenessModular ITT ­ Module D Modular ITT ­ Module D Version 1 16/02/2012 Module D ­ Health & Safety an overall failing of your bid. This section allows us to assess your competency for health and safety. We

63

Figure 1. Recurrent modular network architecture Recurrent modular network architecture for sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 1. Recurrent modular network architecture Recurrent modular network architecture for sea ice classification in the Marginal Ice Zone using ERS SAR images Andrey V. Bogdanov1a , Marc Toussaint1b , Stein of SAR images of sea ice. Additionally to the local image information the algorithm uses spatial context

Toussaint, Marc

64

Net Energy Metering (NEM)  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced Scorecard Federal2Energy Second QuarterRate principles must Include

65

Advanced Modular Inverter Technology Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electric and hybrid-electric vehicle systems require an inverter to convert the direct current (DC) output of the energy generation/storage system (engine, fuel cells, or batteries) to the alternating current (AC) that vehicle propulsion motors use. Vehicle support systems, such as lights and air conditioning, also use the inverter AC output. Distributed energy systems require an inverter to provide the high quality AC output that energy system customers demand. Today's inverters are expensive due to the cost of the power electronics components, and system designers must also tailor the inverter for individual applications. Thus, the benefits of mass production are not available, resulting in high initial procurement costs as well as high inverter maintenance and repair costs. Electricore, Inc. (www.electricore.org) a public good 501 (c) (3) not-for-profit advanced technology development consortium assembled a highly qualified team consisting of AeroVironment Inc. (www.aerovironment.com) and Delphi Automotive Systems LLC (Delphi), (www.delphi.com), as equal tiered technical leads, to develop an advanced, modular construction, inverter packaging technology that will offer a 30% cost reduction over conventional designs adding to the development of energy conversion technologies for crosscutting applications in the building, industry, transportation, and utility sectors. The proposed inverter allows for a reduction of weight and size of power electronics in the above-mentioned sectors and is scalable over the range of 15 to 500kW. The main objective of this program was to optimize existing AeroVironment inverter technology to improve power density, reliability and producibility as well as develop new topology to reduce line filter size. The newly developed inverter design will be used in automotive and distribution generation applications. In the first part of this program the high-density power stages were redesigned, optimized and fabricated. One of the main tasks was to design and validate new gate drive circuits to provide the capability of high temp operation. The new power stages and controls were later validated through extensive performance, durability and environmental tests. To further validate the design, two power stages and controls were integrated into a grid-tied load bank test fixture, a real application for field-testing. This fixture was designed to test motor drives with PWM output up to 50kW. In the second part of this program the new control topology based on sub-phases control and interphase transformer technology was successfully developed and validated. The main advantage of this technology is to reduce magnetic mass, loss and current ripple. This report summarizes the results of the advanced modular inverter technology development and details: (1) Power stage development and fabrication (2) Power stage validation testing (3) Grid-tied test fixture fabrication and initial testing (4) Interphase transformer technology development

Adam Szczepanek

2006-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

66

Self-assembly, modularity and physical complexity S. E. Ahnert,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-assembly, modularity and physical complexity S. E. Ahnert,1 I. Johnston,2 T. M. A. Fink,3, 4 structure through self-assembly. Our procedure can be adapted to any given geometry, and thus to any given type of physical system. We illustrate our approach using self-assembling polyominoes, and demonstrate

Halligan, Daniel

67

Modular cell biology: retroactivity and insulation Domitilla Del Vecchio1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modular cell biology: retroactivity and insulation Domitilla Del Vecchio1, *, Alexander J Ninfa2 a remarkable insulation property, due to the fast timescales of the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation: computational methods; metabolic and regulatory networks Keywords: feedback; insulation; modularity; singular

Sontag, Eduardo

68

Microsequencer architecture with firmware support for modular microprogramming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A microsequencer architecture and supporting firmware which are suitable for implementing modular microprogramming are proposed. The structure consists of a pla sequencer store, a microcode store (memory) and an address processor. The latter, operating under sequencing commands issued by the pla, generates the effective address for both stores. The supporting firmware primitives or transactions, stored in the pla, are suitable for structured microprogramming constructs, e.g., while-do, if-then-else, etc. This capability is extended to complex sequencing structures which are then implemented by context-free transaction blocks. Such sequencing is required to achieve migration of complicated software functions, such as operating systems, in firmware. It is expected that the proposed method will be compatible with LSI/VLSI array technology. 14 references.

Papachristou, C.A.; Gambhir, S.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Reformulation of a model for hierarchical divisive graph modularity ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agarwal, G., & Kempe, D. (2008). Modularity-maximizing graph communities via mathematical program- ming. The European Physical Journal B - Condensed...

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

70

A Modular Control System for Remote Subsea Eric Stephen Smith  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Modular Control System for Remote Subsea Equipment by Eric Stephen Smith Bachelor of Science the undersigned committee hereby approve the attached thesis A Modular Control System for Remote Subsea Equipment and Environmental Systems #12;iv Abstract Title: A Modular Control System for Remote Subsea Equipment Author: Eric

Wood, Stephen L.

71

Piecing together modular : understanding the benefits and limitations of modular construction methods for multifamily development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The primary purpose of this thesis is to explain the benefits and limitations of modular construction as it pertains to primarily wood-frame, multifamily housing in the United States. This thesis attempts to educate the ...

Cameron, Peter J. (Peter Jay)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Improved Modular Termination Proofs Using Dependency Pairs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improved Modular Termination Proofs Using Dependency Pairs Ren??e Thiemann, J?urgen Giesl, Peter) termination proofs of term rewrite systems (TRSs). For any TRS, it generates inequality constraints that have to be satisfied by well­founded orders. However, proving innermost termination is considerably easier than

Kobbelt, Leif

73

Improved Modular Termination Proofs Using Dependency Pairs #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improved Modular Termination Proofs Using Dependency Pairs # Ren??e Thiemann, J?urgen Giesl, Peter) termination proofs of term rewrite systems (TRSs). For any TRS, it generates inequality constraints that have to be satisfied by well­founded orders. However, proving innermost termination is considerably easier than

Ábrahám, Erika

74

Improved Modular Termination Proofs Using Dependency Pairs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improved Modular Termination Proofs Using Dependency Pairs Ren´e Thiemann, J¨urgen Giesl, Peter) termination proofs of term rewrite systems (TRSs). For any TRS, it generates inequality constraints that have to be satisfied by well-founded orders. However, proving innermost termination is considerably easier than

Middeldorp, Aart

75

Is the Human Mind Massively Modular?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER T H R E E Is the Human Mind Massively Modular? Richard Samuels Introduction: Minds as Mechanisms Among the most pervasive and fundamental assumptions in cognitive science is that the human mind (or mind-brain) is a mechanism of some sort: a physical device com- posed of functionally specifiable

Samuels, Richard

76

Managed Data: Modular Strategies for Data Abstraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

these mechanisms to define specific kinds of data. Managed Data allows program- mers to take control of many management mechanism, not properties of individ- ual data types. It is possible to define such featuresManaged Data: Modular Strategies for Data Abstraction Alex Loh University of Texas at Austin

Cook, William R.

77

The Modular Helium Reactor for Hydrogen Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For electricity and hydrogen production, an advanced reactor technology receiving considerable international interest is a modular, passively-safe version of the high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), known in the U.S. as the Modular Helium Reactor (MHR), which operates at a power level of 600 MW(t). For hydrogen production, the concept is referred to as the H2-MHR. Two concepts that make direct use of the MHR high-temperature process heat are being investigated in order to improve the efficiency and economics of hydrogen production. The first concept involves coupling the MHR to the Sulfur-Iodine (SI) thermochemical water splitting process and is referred to as the SI-Based H2-MHR. The second concept involves coupling the MHR to high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) and is referred to as the HTE-Based H2-MHR.

E. Harvego; M. Richards; A. Shenoy; K. Schultz; L. Brown; M. Fukuie

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Modular test facility for HTS insert coils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The final beam cooling stages of a Muon Collider may require DC solenoid magnets with magnetic fields in the range of 40-50 T. In this paper we will present a modular test facility developed for the purpose of investigating very high field levels with available 2G HTS superconducting materials. Performance of available conductors is presented, together with magnetic calculations and evaluation of Lorentz forces distribution on the HTS coils. Finally a test of a double pancake coil is presented.

Lombardo, V; Bartalesi, A.; Barzi, E.; Lamm, M.; Turrioni, D.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Copper vapor laser modular packaging assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A modularized packaging arrangement for one or more copper vapor lasers and associated equipment is disclosed herein. This arrangement includes a single housing which contains the laser or lasers and all their associated equipment except power, water and neon, and means for bringing power, water, and neon which are necessary to the operation of the lasers into the container for use by the laser or lasers and their associated equipment.

Alger, Terry W. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Dublin, CA); Moses, Edward I. (Castro Valley, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Modular architecture for robotics and teleoperation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems and methods for modularization and discretization of real-time robot, telerobot and teleoperation systems using passive, network based control laws. Modules consist of network one-ports and two-ports. Wave variables and position information are passed between modules. The behavior of each module is decomposed into uncoupled linear-time-invariant, and coupled, nonlinear memoryless elements and then are separately discretized.

Anderson, Robert J. (11908 Ibex Ave., N.E., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems modular structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

1 INTRODUCTION The modular finitedifference groundwater flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 INTRODUCTION The modular finite­difference ground­water flow model (MODFLOW) developed by the U implemented as part of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) MODFLOW/MOC3D ground­water modeling package. The USGS­dimensional ground­water systems (McDonald & Harbaugh, 1988, Harbaugh & McDonald, 1996). MOC3D is a solute

Russell, Thomas F.

82

Small Modular Reactors (468th Brookhaven Lecture)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With good reason, much more media attention has focused on nuclear power plants than solar farms, wind farms, or hydroelectric plants during the past month and a half. But as nations around the world demand more energy to power everything from cell phone batteries to drinking water pumps to foundries, nuclear plants are the only non-greenhouse-gas producing option that can be built to operate almost anywhere, and can continue to generate power during droughts, after the sun sets, and when winds die down. To supply this demand for power, designers around the world are competing to develop more affordable nuclear reactors of the future: small modular reactors. Brookhaven Lab is working with DOE to ensure that these reactors are designed to be safe for workers, members of surrounding communities, and the environment and to ensure that the radioactive materials and technology will only be used for peaceful purposes, not weapons. In his talk, Bari will discuss the advantages and challenges of small modular reactors and what drives both international and domestic interest in them. He will also explain how Brookhaven Lab and DOE are working to address the challenges and provide a framework for small modular reactors to be commercialized.

Bari, Robert

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

83

RAMS (Risk Analysis - Modular System) methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Risk Analysis - Modular System (RAMS) was developed to serve as a broad scope risk analysis tool for the Risk Assessment of the Hanford Mission (RAHM) studies. The RAHM element provides risk analysis support for Hanford Strategic Analysis and Mission Planning activities. The RAHM also provides risk analysis support for the Hanford 10-Year Plan development activities. The RAMS tool draws from a collection of specifically designed databases and modular risk analysis methodologies and models. RAMS is a flexible modular system that can be focused on targeted risk analysis needs. It is specifically designed to address risks associated with overall strategy, technical alternative, and `what if` questions regarding the Hanford cleanup mission. RAMS is set up to address both near-term and long-term risk issues. Consistency is very important for any comparative risk analysis, and RAMS is designed to efficiently and consistently compare risks and produce risk reduction estimates. There is a wide range of output information that can be generated by RAMS. These outputs can be detailed by individual contaminants, waste forms, transport pathways, exposure scenarios, individuals, populations, etc. However, they can also be in rolled-up form to support high-level strategy decisions.

Stenner, R.D.; Strenge, D.L.; Buck, J.W. [and others

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Comments on: Small Modular Reactors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group and UserofProtein structureAnalysis of Parton

85

New Modularization Framework for the FAST Wind Turbine CAE Tool: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL has recently put considerable effort into improving the overall modularity of its FAST wind turbine aero-hydro-servo-elastic tool to (1) improve the ability to read, implement, and maintain source code; (2) increase module sharing and shared code development across the wind community; (3) improve numerical performance and robustness; and (4) greatly enhance flexibility and expandability to enable further developments of functionality without the need to recode established modules. The new FAST modularization framework supports module-independent inputs, outputs, states, and parameters; states in continuous-time, discrete-time, and in constraint form; loose and tight coupling; independent time and spatial discretizations; time marching, operating-point determination, and linearization; data encapsulation; dynamic allocation; and save/retrieve capability. This paper explains the features of the new FAST modularization framework, as well as the concepts and mathematical background needed to understand and apply it correctly. It is envisioned that the new modularization framework will transform FAST into a powerful, robust, and flexible wind turbine modeling tool with a large number of developers and a range of modeling fidelities across the aerodynamic, hydrodynamic, servo-dynamic, and structural-dynamic components.

Jonkman, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Small Modular Reactors Presentation to Secretary of Energy Advisory...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Presentation to Secretary of Energy Advisory Board - Deputy Assistant Secretary John Kelly Small Modular Reactors Presentation to Secretary of Energy Advisory Board - Deputy...

87

A graphical operations interface for modular surface systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents the design and implementation of algorithms for a new graphical operations interface system specifically adapted to operating modular reconfigurable articulated surface systems. Geometric models of ...

Vona, Marsette A.

88

a32 modular polyketide: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

systems and its optimization for applications to quantum repeaters and entanglement distribution and sharing. Gualdi, Giulia; Illuminati, Fabrizio 2010-01-01 6 Modular Entanglement...

89

Shifting responsibly: the importance of striatal modularity to reinforcement learning in uncertain environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose here that the modular organization of the striatum reflects a context-sensitive modular learning architecture in which clustered striosomematrisome domains participate in modular reinforcement learning (RL). ...

Amemori, Ken-ichi

90

Analysis of Modular Arithmetic Markus MullerOlm 1 and Helmut Seidl 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of Modular Arithmetic Markus M?uller­Olm 1 and Helmut Seidl 2 1 Universit?at Dortmund, Fachbereich Informatik, LS 5 Baroper Str. 301, 44221 Dortmund, Germany markus.mueller­olm@cs.uni­dortmund.de 2 . In order to work with mathematical structures #12; 2 Markus M?uller­Olm and Helmut Seidl x := 2x + 1 x

Seidl, Helmut

91

Nucleic acid amplification using modular branched primers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and compositions expand the options for making primers for use in amplifying nucleic acid segments. The invention eliminates the step of custom synthesis of primers for Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR). Instead of being custom-synthesized, a primer is replaced by a combination of several oligonucleotide modules selected from a pre-synthesized library. A modular combination of just a few oligonucleotides essentially mimics the performance of a conventional, custom-made primer by matching the sequence of the priming site in the template. Each oligonucleotide module has a segment that matches one of the stretches within the priming site.

Ulanovsky, Levy (Westmont, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

E-Print Network 3.0 - architecture evolved modular Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: architecture evolved modular Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The evolution of modularity in genome...

93

Modular Quantum Memories Using Passive Linear Optics and Coherent Feedback  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modular Quantum Memories Using Passive Linear Optics and Coherent Feedback Hendra I. Nurdin photon pulsed optical field has a conceptually simple modular realization using only passive linear optics and coherent feedback. We exploit the idea that two decaying optical cavities can be coupled

94

Fast Machine Code for Modular Multiplication Michael Scott  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fast Machine Code for Modular Multiplication Michael Scott School of Computer Applications Dublin, that is the calculation of a = b e mod n where for acceptable levels of security a, b, e, and n are large multiprecision will be not much larger than the number of bits in the binary representation of e. Therefore fast modular

Bernstein, Daniel

95

A Multi-Modular Neutronically Coupled Power Generation System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The High Temperature Integrated Multi-Modular Thermal Reactor is a small modular reactor that uses an enhanced conductivity BeO-UO2 fuel with supercritical CO2 coolant to drive turbo-machinery in a direct Brayton cycle. The core consists of several...

Patel, Vishal

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

96

Toward Infusing Modular and Reflective Design Learning throughout the Curriculum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Toward Infusing Modular and Reflective Design Learning throughout the Curriculum John C. Georgas intervention that cen- ters on the widespread infusion of design learning throughout the curriculum using: An emphasis on broadly infusing design learning through the curriculum using modular design challenges

Georgas, John

97

Non-Linear Analysis of the Modular Coil Windings for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A non linear FEA study has been performed on the modular coils of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX). The modular coils provide the primary magnetic field within NCSX and consist of flexible cable conductor wound on a cast and machined winding form and vacuum impregnated with epoxy. Eighteen coils and associated winding forms are connected at assembly into a toroidal shell structure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the structural response of the windings and shell structure during cooldown and normal operation. Two separate software packages were used for the study, and two independent analyses were undertaken. The first analysis performed with Pro/Mechanica, examined both the response of the modular coils to magnetic pressure and thermal effects during a 2 Tesla pulse. Modeled items included a portion of the shell structure the winding packs, and a set of 48 'pseudo clamps'. The so called 'pseudo clamps' are represented simply by blocks of material that are restrained in their respective normal directions and have properties which mimic the stiffness of the spring washers of the actual preload clamps. The winding pack is free to slide on the shell structure and is restrained only by the clamps. A second model, including the complete shell structure of all three coils, was studied with the FEA program ANSYS. Contact regions defined in both Pro/Mechanica and Ansys allow the winding to slide and detach form the shell structure. The two analyses are compared for parameters such as winding/structure gap, overall displacement, equivalent stress and principle strain values.

Freudenberg, K.D.; Williamson, D.E.; Fan, H.M.; Myatt, L

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Identifying modular flows on multilayer networks reveals highly overlapping organization in social systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unveiling the community structure of networks is a powerful methodology to comprehend interconnected systems across the social and natural sciences. To identify different types of functional modules in interaction data aggregated in a single network layer, researchers have developed many powerful methods. For example, flow-based methods have proven useful for identifying modular dynamics in weighted and directed networks that capture constraints on flow in the systems they represent. However, many networked systems consist of agents or components that exhibit multiple layers of interactions. Inevitably, representing this intricate network of networks as a single aggregated network leads to information loss and may obscure the actual organization. Here we propose a method based on compression of network flows that can identify modular flows in non-aggregated multilayer networks. Our numerical experiments on synthetic networks show that the method can accurately identify modules that cannot be identified in agg...

De Domenico, Manlio; Arenas, Alex; Rosvall, Martin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Horizontal modular dry irradiated fuel storage system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A horizontal, modular, dry, irradiated fuel storage system (10) includes a thin-walled canister (12) for containing irradiated fuel assemblies (20), which canister (12) can be positioned in a transfer cask (14) and transported in a horizontal manner from a fuel storage pool (18), to an intermediate-term storage facility. The storage system (10) includes a plurality of dry storage modules (26) which accept the canister (12) from the transfer cask (14) and provide for appropriate shielding about the canister (12). Each module (26) also provides for air cooling of the canister (12) to remove the decay heat of the irradiated fuel assemblies (20). The modules (26) can be interlocked so that each module (26) gains additional shielding from the next adjacent module (26). Hydraulic rams (30) are provided for inserting and removing the canisters (12) from the modules (26).

Fischer, Larry E. (Los Gatos, CA); McInnes, Ian D. (San Jose, CA); Massey, John V. (San Jose, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Generic small modular reactor plant design.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report gives an overview of expected design characteristics, concepts, and procedures for small modular reactors. The purpose of this report is to provide those who are interested in reducing the cost and improving the safety of advanced nuclear power plants with a generic design that possesses enough detail in a non-sensitive manner to give merit to their conclusions. The report is focused on light water reactor technology, but does add details on what could be different in a more advanced design (see Appendix). Numerous reactor and facility concepts were used for inspiration (documented in the bibliography). The final design described here is conceptual and does not reflect any proposed concept or sub-systems, thus any details given here are only relevant within this report. This report does not include any design or engineering calculations.

Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Jordan, Sabina Erteza; Baum, Gregory A.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems modular structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Dynamics on modular networks with heterogeneous correlations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We develop a new ensemble of modular random graphs in which degree-degree correlations can be different in each module, and the inter-module connections are defined by the joint degree-degree distribution of nodes for each pair of modules. We present an analytical approach that allows one to analyze several types of binary dynamics operating on such networks, and we illustrate our approach using bond percolation, site percolation, and the Watts threshold model. The new network ensemble generalizes existing models (e.g., the well-known configuration model and Lancichinetti-Fortunato-Radicchi networks) by allowing a heterogeneous distribution of degree-degree correlations across modules, which is important for the consideration of nonidentical interacting networks.

Melnik, Sergey [MACSI, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Limerick (Ireland) [MACSI, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Limerick (Ireland); Oxford Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG (United Kingdom); CABDyN Complexity Centre, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 1HP (United Kingdom); Porter, Mason A. [Oxford Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG (United Kingdom) [Oxford Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG (United Kingdom); CABDyN Complexity Centre, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 1HP (United Kingdom); Mucha, Peter J. [Department of Mathematics, Carolina Center for Interdisciplinary Applied Mathematics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3250 (United States) [Department of Mathematics, Carolina Center for Interdisciplinary Applied Mathematics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3250 (United States); Institute for Advanced Materials, Nanoscience and Technology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3216 (United States); Gleeson, James P. [MACSI, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Limerick (Ireland)] [MACSI, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Limerick (Ireland)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Modular, security enclosure and method of assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A transportable, reusable rapidly assembled and disassembled, resizable modular, security enclosure utilizes a stepped panel construction. Each panel has an inner portion and an outer portion which form joints. A plurality of channels can be affixed to selected joints of the panels. Panels can be affixed to a base member and then affixed to one another by the use of elongated pins extending through the channel joints. Alternatively, the base member can be omitted and the panels themselves can be used as the floor of the enclosure. The pins will extend generally parallel to the joint in which they are located. These elongated pins are readily inserted into and removable from the channels in a predetermined sequence to allow assembly and disassembly of the enclosure. A door constructed from panels is used to close the opening to the enclosure.

Linker, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moyer, John W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Modular, multi-level groundwater sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for taking a multiple of samples of groundwater or pressure measurements from a well simultaneously. The apparatus comprises a series of chambers arranged in an axial array, each of which is dimensioned to fit into a perforated well casing and leave a small gap between the well casing and the exterior of the chamber. Seals at each end of the container define the limits to the axial portion of the well to be sampled. A submersible pump in each chamber pumps the groundwater that passes through the well casing perforations into the gap from the gap to the surface for analysis. The power lines and hoses for the chambers farther down the array pass through each chamber above them in the array. The seals are solid, water-proof, non-reactive, resilient disks supported to engage the inside surface of the well casing. Because of the modular design, the apparatus provides flexibility for use in a variety of well configurations.

Nichols, Ralph L. (812 Plantation Point Dr., N. Augusta, SC 29841); Widdowson, Mark A. (4204 Havana Ct., Columbia, SC 29206); Mullinex, Harry (10 Cardross La., Columbia, SC 29209); Orne, William H. (12 Martha Ct., Sumter, SC 29150); Looney, Brian B. (1135 Ridgemont Dr., Aiken, SC 29803)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Human Reliability Analysis for Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because no human reliability analysis (HRA) method was specifically developed for small modular reactors (SMRs), the application of any current HRA method to SMRs represents tradeoffs. A first- generation HRA method like THERP provides clearly defined activity types, but these activity types do not map to the human-system interface or concept of operations confronting SMR operators. A second- generation HRA method like ATHEANA is flexible enough to be used for SMR applications, but there is currently insufficient guidance for the analyst, requiring considerably more first-of-a-kind analyses and extensive SMR expertise in order to complete a quality HRA. Although no current HRA method is optimized to SMRs, it is possible to use existing HRA methods to identify errors, incorporate them as human failure events in the probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), and quantify them. In this paper, we provided preliminary guidance to assist the human reliability analyst and reviewer in understanding how to apply current HRA methods to the domain of SMRs. While it is possible to perform a satisfactory HRA using existing HRA methods, ultimately it is desirable to formally incorporate SMR considerations into the methods. This may require the development of new HRA methods. More practicably, existing methods need to be adapted to incorporate SMRs. Such adaptations may take the form of guidance on the complex mapping between conventional light water reactors and small modular reactors. While many behaviors and activities are shared between current plants and SMRs, the methods must adapt if they are to perform a valid and accurate analysis of plant personnel performance in SMRs.

Ronald L. Boring; David I. Gertman

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Modular industrial solar retrofit project (MISR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The intent of this paper is to describe a major Department of Energy (DOE) thrust to bring line-focus solar thermal technology to commercial readiness. This effort is referred to as the MISR Project. The project is based upon the premise that thermal energy is the basic solar thermal system output and that low-temperature, fossil fuel applications are technically the first that should be retrofitted. Experience has shown that modularity in system design and construction offers potential for reducing engineering design costs, reduces manufacturing costs, reduces installation time and expense, and improves system operational reliability. The modular design effort will be sponsored by Sandia National Laboratories with industry doing the final designs. The operational credibility of the systems will be established by allowing selected industrial thermal energy users to purchase MISR systems from suppliers and operate them for two years. Industries will be solicited by DOE/Albuquerque Operations Office to conduct these experiments on a cost sharing basis. The MISR system allowed in the experiments will have been previously qualified for the application. The project is divided into three development phases which represent three design and experiment cycles. The first cycle will use commercially available trough-type solar collectors and will incorporate 5 to 10 experiments of up to 5000 m/sup 2/ of collectors each. The project effort began in March 1980, and the first cycle is to be completed in 1985. Subsequent cycles will begin at 3-year intervals. The project is success oriented, and if the first cycle reaches commercial readiness, the project will be terminated. If not, a second, and possibly a third, development cycle will be conducted.

Alvis, R.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Modular hydride beds for mobile applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Design, construction, initial testing and simple thermal modeling of modular, metal hydride beds have been completed. Originally designed for supplying hydrogen to a fuel cell on a mobile vehicle, the complete bed design consists of 8 modules and is intended for use on the Palm Desert Vehicle (PDV) under development at the Schatz Energy Center, Humbolt State University. Each module contains approximately 2 kg of a commercially available, low temperature, hydride-forming metal alloy. Waste heat from the fuel cell in the form of heated water is used to desorb hydrogen from the alloy for supplying feed hydrogen to the fuel cell. In order to help determine the performance of such a modular bed system, six modules were constructed and tested. The design and construction of the modules is described in detail. Initial testing of the modules both individually and as a group showed that each module can store {approximately} 30 g of hydrogen (at 165 PSIA fill pressure, 17 C), could be filled with hydrogen in 6 minutes at a nominal, 75 standard liters/min (slm) fueling rate, and could supply hydrogen during desorption at rates of 25 slm, the maximum anticipated hydrogen fuel cell input requirement. Tests made of 5 modules as a group indicated that the behavior of the group run in parallel both in fueling and gas delivery could be directly predicted from the corresponding, single module characteristics by using an appropriate scaling factor. Simple thermal modeling of a module as an array of cylindrical, hydride-filled tubes was performed. The predictions of the model are in good agreement with experimental data.

Malinowski, M.E.; Stewart, K.D.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Focal plane array with modular pixel array components for scalability  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A modular, scalable focal plane array is provided as an array of integrated circuit dice, wherein each die includes a given amount of modular pixel array circuitry. The array of dice effectively multiplies the amount of modular pixel array circuitry to produce a larger pixel array without increasing die size. Desired pixel pitch across the enlarged pixel array is preserved by forming die stacks with each pixel array circuitry die stacked on a separate die that contains the corresponding signal processing circuitry. Techniques for die stack interconnections and die stack placement are implemented to ensure that the desired pixel pitch is preserved across the enlarged pixel array.

Kay, Randolph R; Campbell, David V; Shinde, Subhash L; Rienstra, Jeffrey L; Serkland, Darwin K; Holmes, Michael L

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

108

Analysis of Modular Arithmetic Markus Muller-Olm1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of Modular Arithmetic Markus M¨uller-Olm1 and Helmut Seidl2 1 Universit¨at Dortmund, Fachbereich Informatik, LS 5 Baroper Str. 301, 44221 Dortmund, Germany markus.mueller-olm@cs.uni-dortmund.de 2

Müller-Olm, Markus

109

Cartwright on Causality: Methods, Metaphysics, and Modularity Daniel Steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cartwright on Causality: Methods, Metaphysics, and Modularity Daniel Steel Department of Philosophy 503 S Kedzie Hall Michigan State University East Lansing, MI 48824-1032 USA Email: steel@msu.edu #12

Steel, Daniel

110

The Evolution of a Modular Software Network Miguel A. Fortuna  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Evolution of a Modular Software Network Miguel A. Fortuna , Juan A. Bonachela, and Simon A the website of this journal as a zip folder. To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: fortuna

Fortuna, Miguel A.

111

Modularity in design of the MIT Pebble Bed Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The future of new nuclear power plant construction will depend in large part on the ability of designers to reduce capital, operations, and maintenance costs. One of the methods proposed, is to enhance the modularity of ...

Berte, Marc Vincent, 1977-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Retroactivity, modularity, and insulation in synthetic biology circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A central concept in synthetic biology is the reuse of well-characterized modules. Modularity simplifies circuit design by allowing for the decomposition of systems into separate modules for individual construction. Complex ...

Lin, Allen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Design of long span modular bridges for traffic detours  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The oncoming large amount of bridge replacements in the next 10 to 20 years called for a detailed examination of available replacement schemes which can have variable impact on user costs. Detouring traffic with a modular ...

Potapova, Svetlana (Svetlana S.)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Modular Web-Based Atlas Information Systems Bernhard Jenny  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modular Web-Based Atlas Information Systems Bernhard Jenny Institute of Cartography / ETH Zurich of Cartography / ETH Zurich / Zurich / Switzerland Radu Gogu Department of Geotechnical Engineering and Geo Institute of Cartography / ETH Zurich / Zurich / Switzerland Volker Dietrich Institute for Mineralogy

Jenny, Bernhard

115

MODULAR PEBBLE BED REACTOR PROJECT UNIVERSITY RESEARCH CONSORTIUM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annual Report Page ii MODULAR PEBBLE BED REACTOR ABSTRACT This project is developing a fundamental. Publication of an archival journal article covering this work is being prepared. · Detailed gas reactor Abstract

116

Modularity and Commonality Research: Past Developments and Future Opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research on modularity and commonality has grown substantially over the past 15 years. Searching 36 journals over more than the past 35 years, I identify over 160 references in the engineering and management literature ...

Fixson, Sebastian K.

2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

117

Computational Analysis of Fluid Flow in Pebble Bed Modular Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a Generation IV reactor under consideration by Department of Energy and in the nuclear industry. There are two categories of HTGRs, namely, Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) and Prismatic reactor. Pebble...

Gandhir, Akshay

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

118

Modular, multi-level groundwater sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus is described for taking a multiple of samples of groundwater or pressure measurements from a well simultaneously. The apparatus comprises a series of chambers arranged in an axial array, each of which is dimensioned to fit into a perforated well casing and leave a small gap between the well casing and the exterior of the chamber. Seals at each end of the container define the limits to the axial portion of the well to be sampled. A submersible pump in each chamber pumps the groundwater that passes through the well casing perforations into the gap from the gap to the surface for analysis. The power lines and hoses for the chambers farther down the array pass through each chamber above them in the array. The seals are solid, water-proof, non-reactive, resilient disks supported to engage the inside surface of the well casing. Because of the modular design, the apparatus provides flexibility for use in a variety of well configurations. 3 figures.

Nichols, R.L.; Widdowson, M.A.; Mullinex, H.; Orne, W.H.; Looney, B.B.

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Passive Safety Features for Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rapid growth in the size and complexity of commercial nuclear power plants in the 1970s spawned an interest in smaller, simpler designs that are inherently or intrinsically safe through the use of passive design features. Several designs were developed, but none were ever built, although some of their passive safety features were incorporated into large commercial plant designs that are being planned or built today. In recent years, several reactor vendors are actively redeveloping small modular reactor (SMR) designs with even greater use of passive features. Several designs incorporate the ultimate in passive safety they completely eliminate specific accident initiators from the design. Other design features help to reduce the likelihood of an accident or help to mitigate the accident s consequences, should one occur. While some passive safety features are common to most SMR designs, irrespective of the coolant technology, other features are specific to water, gas, or liquid-metal cooled SMR designs. The extensive use of passive safety features in SMRs promise to make these plants highly robust, protecting both the general public and the owner/investor. Once demonstrated, these plants should allow nuclear power to be used confidently for a broader range of customers and applications than will be possible with large plants alone.

Ingersoll, Daniel T [ORNL] [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Modular HTGR Safety Basis and Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a licensed commercial high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) capable of producing electricity and/or high temperature process heat for industrial markets supporting a range of end-user applications. The NGNP Project has adopted the 10 CFR 52 Combined License (COL) process, as recommended in the NGNP Licensing Strategy - A Report to Congress, dated August 2008, as the foundation for the NGNP licensing strategy [DOE/NRC 2008]. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing of the NGNP plant utilizing this process will demonstrate the efficacy for licensing future HTGRs for commercial industrial applications. This information paper is one in a series of submittals that address key generic issues of the priority licensing topics as part of the process for establishing HTGR regulatory requirements. This information paper provides a summary level introduction to HTGR history, public safety objectives, inherent and passive safety features, radionuclide release barriers, functional safety approach, and risk-informed safety approach. The information in this paper is intended to further the understanding of the modular HTGR safety approach with the NRC staff and public stakeholders. The NGNP project does not expect to receive comments on this information paper because other white papers are addressing key generic issues of the priority licensing topics in greater detail.

Thomas Hicks

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems modular structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Modular Countermine Payload for Small Robots  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Payloads for small robotic platforms have historically been designed and implemented as platform and task specific solutions. A consequence of this approach is that payloads cannot be deployed on different robotic platforms without substantial re-engineering efforts. To address this issue, we developed a modular countermine payload that is designed from the ground-up to be platform agnostic. The payload consists of the multi-mission payload controller unit (PCU) coupled with the configurable mission specific threat detection, navigation and marking payloads. The multi-mission PCU has all the common electronics to control and interface to all the payloads. It also contains the embedded processor that can be used to run the navigational and control software. The PCU has a very flexible robot interface which can be configured to interface to various robot platforms. The threat detection payload consists of a two axis sweeping arm and the detector. The navigation payload consists of several perception sensors that are used for terrain mapping, obstacle detection and navigation. Finally, the marking payload consists of a dual-color paint marking system. Through the multi-mission PCU, all these payloads are packaged in a platform agnostic way to allow deployment on multiple robotic platforms, including Talon and Packbot.

Herman Herman; Doug Few; Roelof Versteeg; Jean-Sebastien Valois; Jeff McMahill; Michael Licitra; Edward Henciak

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Modular framization of the BMW algebra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we introduce the concept of Modular Framization or simply Framization. We construct a framization $F_{d,n}$ of the Birman--Wenzl--Murakami algebra, also known as BMW algebra, and start a systematic study of this framization. We show that $F_{d,n}$ is finite dimensional and the \\lq braid generators\\rq\\ of this algebra satisfy a quartic relation which is of minimal degree not containing the generators $t_i$. They also satisfy a quintic relation, as the smallest closed relation. We conjecture that the algebras $F_{d,n}$ support a Markov trace which allow to define polynomial invariants for unoriented knots in an analogous way that the Kauffman polynomial is derived from the BMW algebra. The idea originates from the Yokonuma--Hecke algebra, built from the classical Hecke algebra by adding framing generators and changing the Hecke algebra quadratic relation by a new quadratic relation which involves the framing generators. Using the Yokonuma--Hecke algebras and a Markov trace constructed on them\\cite{...

Juyumaya, Jesus

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Modular Power Converters for PV Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes technical opportunities to serve as parts of a technological roadmap for Shoals Technologies Group in power electronics for PV applications. There are many different power converter circuits that can be used for solar inverter applications. The present applications do not take advantage of the potential for using common modules. We envision that the development of a power electronics module could enable higher reliability by being durable and flexible. Modules would have fault current limiting features and detection circuits such that they can limit the current through the module from external faults and can identify and isolate internal faults such that the remaining modules can continue to operate with only minimal disturbance to the utility or customer. Development of a reliable, efficient, low-cost, power electronics module will be a key enabling technology for harnessing more power from solar panels and enable plug and play operation. Power electronics for computer power supplies, communication equipment, and transportation have all targeted reliability and modularity as key requirements and have begun concerted efforts to replace monolithic components with collections of common smart modules. This is happening on several levels including (1) device level with intelligent control, (2) functional module level, and (3) system module. This same effort is needed in power electronics for solar applications. Development of modular units will result in standard power electronic converters that will have a lower installed and operating cost for the overall system. These units will lead to increased adaptability and flexibility of solar inverters. Incorporating autonomous fault current limiting and reconfiguration capabilities into the modules and having redundant modules will lead to a durable converter that can withstand the rigors of solar power generation for more than 30 years. Our vision for the technology roadmap is that there is no need for detailed design of new power converters for each new application or installation. One set of modules and controllers can be pre-developed and the only design question would be how many modules need to be in series or parallel for the specific power requirement. Then, a designer can put the modules together and add the intelligent reconfigurable controller. The controller determines how many modules are connected, but it might also ask for user input for the specific application during setup. The modules include protection against faults and can reset it, if necessary. In case of a power device failure, the controller reconfigures itself to continue limited operation until repair which might be as simple as taking the faulty module out and inserting a new module. The result is cost savings in design, maintenance, repair, and a grid that is more reliable and available. This concept would be a perfect fit for the recently announced funding opportunity announcement (DE-FOA-0000653) on Plug and Play Photovoltaics.

Ozpineci, Burak [ORNL; Tolbert, Leon M [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Innovative safety features of the modular HTGR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is an advanced reactor concept under development through a cooperative program involving the US Government, the nuclear industry, and the utilities. Near-term development is focused on electricity generation. The top-level safety requirement is that the plant's operation not disturb the normal day-to-day activities of the public. Quantitatively, this requires that the design meet the US Environmental Protection Agency's Protective Action Guides at the site boundary and hence preclude the need for sheltering or evacuation of the public. To meet these stringent safety requirements and at the same time provide a cost competitive design requires the innovative use of the basic high temperature gas-cooled reactor features of ceramic fuel, helium coolant, and a graphite moderator. The specific fuel composition and core size and configuration have been selected to the use the natural characteristics of these materials to develop significantly higher margins of safety. In this document the innovative safety features of the MHTGR are reviewed by examining the safety response to events challenging the functions relied on to retain radionuclides within the coated fuel particles. A broad range of challenges to core heat removal are examined, including a loss of helium pressure of a simultaneous loss of forced cooling of the core. The challenges to control of heat generation consider not only the failure to insert the reactivity control systems but also the withdrawal of control rods. Finally, challenges to control of chemical attack of the ceramic-coated fuel are considered, including catastrophic failure of the steam generator, which allows water ingress, or failure of the pressure vessels, which allows air ingress. The plant's response to these extreme challenges is not dependent on operator action, and the events considered encompass conceivable operator errors.

Silady, F.A.; Simon, W.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Innovative safety features of the modular HTGR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is an advanced reactor concept under development through a cooperative program involving the US Government, the nuclear industry, and the utilities. Near-term development is focused on electricity generation. The top-level safety requirement is that the plant`s operation not disturb the normal day-to-day activities of the public. Quantitatively, this requires that the design meet the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Protective Action Guides at the site boundary and hence preclude the need for sheltering or evacuation of the public. To meet these stringent safety requirements and at the same time provide a cost competitive design requires the innovative use of the basic high temperature gas-cooled reactor features of ceramic fuel, helium coolant, and a graphite moderator. The specific fuel composition and core size and configuration have been selected to the use the natural characteristics of these materials to develop significantly higher margins of safety. In this document the innovative safety features of the MHTGR are reviewed by examining the safety response to events challenging the functions relied on to retain radionuclides within the coated fuel particles. A broad range of challenges to core heat removal are examined, including a loss of helium pressure of a simultaneous loss of forced cooling of the core. The challenges to control of heat generation consider not only the failure to insert the reactivity control systems but also the withdrawal of control rods. Finally, challenges to control of chemical attack of the ceramic-coated fuel are considered, including catastrophic failure of the steam generator, which allows water ingress, or failure of the pressure vessels, which allows air ingress. The plant`s response to these extreme challenges is not dependent on operator action, and the events considered encompass conceivable operator errors.

Silady, F.A.; Simon, W.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Side-by-Side Thermal Tests of Modular Offices: A Validation Study of the STEM Method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two modular office units were tested at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to establish each unit's thermal performance. The two units were nearly identical in appearance, but one was built with structural insulating panels (SIP), and the other was built using standard frame construction. The primary objective of these tests was to compare the thermal performance of buildings using SIP and standard frame construction. Both units were tested under carefully controlled steady-state conditions in the NREL large-scale environmental enclosure. They were then moved outdoors where Short-Term Energy Monitoring (STEM) tests were performed, and long-term heating and cooling energy use was measured. A secondary objective was to evaluate the accuracy of the NREL STEM method by comparing the results of outdoor STEM tests to steady-state indoor test results. STEM is a method developed by NREL to determine key thermal parameters of a building in-situ, based on a 3-day test sequence. The indoor test facility also provided the opportunity to investigate the phenomenon of infiltration heat recovery in a real building, under carefully controlled conditions, to evaluate the stability of the concentration decay method of tracer gas-based infiltration monitoring, and to compare the blower-door method with the tracer-gas technique in determining infiltration.This project was a cooperative effort with the Structural Insulated Panel Association, the Modular Building Institute, All-American Modular (AAM, the manufacturer of the units), and GE Capitol (the owner of the units). Richard Harmon, the president of AAM, requested NREL's assistance in exploring the feasibility of converting his manufacturing process to SIP construction. His engineering staff needed to assess which comfort and energy benefits might be associated with this new technology. AAM manufactured the two units, and NREL tested the modules for 8 months.

Judkoff, R.; Balcomb, J.D.; Hancock, C.E.; Barker, G.; Subbarao, K.

2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

127

Manufacturing Development of the NCSX Modular Coil Windings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The modular coils on the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) present a number of significant engineering challenges due to their complex shapes, requirements for high dimensional accuracy and the high current density required in the modular coils due to space constraints. In order to address these challenges, an R&D program was established to develop the conductor, insulation scheme, manufacturing techniques, and procedures. A prototype winding named Twisted Racetrack Coil (TRC) was of particular importance in dealing with these challenges. The TRC included a complex shaped winding form, conductor, insulation scheme, leads and termination, cooling system and coil clamps typical of the modular coil design. Even though the TRC is smaller in size than a modular coil, its similar complex geometry provided invaluable information in developing the final design, metrology techniques and development of manufacturing procedures. In addition a discussion of the development of the copper rope conductor including "Keystoning" concerns; the epoxy impregnation system (VPI) plus the tooling and equipment required to manufacture the modular coils will be presented.

Chrzanowsk, J. H.; Fogarty, P. J.; Heitzenroeder, P. J.; Meighan, T.; Nelson, B.; Raftopoulos, S.; Williamson, D.

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

128

A Network Approach to Define Modularity of Components in Complex Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modularity has been defined at the product and system levels. However, little effort has gone into defining and quantifying modularity at the component level. We consider complex products as a network of components that ...

Sosa, Manuel E.

129

ANALYSIS OF SEPCTRUM CHOICES FOR SMALL MODULAR REACTORS-PERFORMANCE AND DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The research mainly focused on producing a small modular reactor (Pebble Bed Modular Reactor) design to analyze the fuel depletion and plutonium and minor actinide accumulation with varying power densities. The reactors running at low power densities were found...

Kafle, Nischal

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

130

Advancing Small Modular Reactors: How We're Supporting Next-Gen...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Advancing Small Modular Reactors: How We're Supporting Next-Gen Nuclear Energy Technology Advancing Small Modular Reactors: How We're Supporting Next-Gen Nuclear Energy Technology...

131

What exactly is Product Modularity? The answer depends on who you ask  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'Product modularity' has recently experienced a significant increase in interest in the academic literature. While the concept of product modularity is used across a wide range of academic research areas, substantial ...

Fixson, Sebastian K.

2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

132

Performance Evaluation for Modular, Scalable Liquid-Rack Cooling Systems in Data Centers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the modular liquid cooling system with varying supply waterinlet supply air temperature, while modular system coolingcooling needed (up to 9.8 kW/rack) at various supply water

Xu, TengFang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The Los Alamos VXI-based modular RF control system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the design and implementation of the Los Alamos modular RF control system, which provides high-performance feedback and/or feedforward control of RF accelerator cavities. This is a flexible, modular control system which has been realized in the industry-standard VXI cardmodular format. A wide spectrum of system functionality can be accommodated simply by incorporating only those modules and features required for a particular application. The fundamental principles of the design approach are discussed. Details of the VXI implementation are given, including the system architecture and interfaces, performance capabilities, and available features.

Jachim, S.P.; Ziomek, C.; Natter, E.F.; Regan, A.H.; Hill, J.; Eaton, L.; Gutscher, W.D.; Curtin, M.; Denney, P.; Hansberry, E.; Brooks, T.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

The Los Alamos VXI-based modular RF control system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the design and implementation of the Los Alamos modular RF control system, which provides high-performance feedback and/or feedforward control of RF accelerator cavities. This is a flexible, modular control system which has been realized in the industry-standard VXI cardmodular format. A wide spectrum of system functionality can be accommodated simply by incorporating only those modules and features required for a particular application. The fundamental principles of the design approach are discussed. Details of the VXI implementation are given, including the system architecture and interfaces, performance capabilities, and available features.

Jachim, S.P.; Ziomek, C.; Natter, E.F.; Regan, A.H.; Hill, J.; Eaton, L.; Gutscher, W.D.; Curtin, M.; Denney, P.; Hansberry, E.; Brooks, T.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Modularity, quaternion-Khler spaces, and mirror symmetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We provide an explicit twistorial construction of quaternion-Khler manifolds obtained by deformation of c-map spaces and carrying an isometric action of the modular group SL(2,Z). The deformation is not assumed to preserve any continuous isometry and therefore this construction presents a general framework for describing NS5-brane instanton effects in string compactifications with N= 2 supersymmetry. In this context the modular invariant parametrization of twistor lines found in this work yields the complete non-perturbative mirror map between type IIA and type IIB physical fields.

Alexandrov, Sergei; Banerjee, Sibasish [Universit Montpellier 2, Laboratoire Charles Coulomb UMR 5221, F-34095 Montpellier (France)] [Universit Montpellier 2, Laboratoire Charles Coulomb UMR 5221, F-34095 Montpellier (France)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

The Langlands Program and String Modular K3 Surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A number theoretic approach to string compactification is developed for Calabi-Yau hypersurfaces in arbitrary dimensions. The motivic strategy involved is illustrated by showing that the Hecke eigenforms derived from Galois group orbits of the holomorphic two-form of a particular type of K3 surfaces can be expressed in terms of modular forms constructed from the worldsheet theory. The process of deriving string physics from spacetime geometry can be reversed, allowing the construction of K3 surface geometry from the string characters of the partition function. A general argument for K3 modularity follows from mirror symmetry, in combination with the proof of the Shimura-Taniyama conjecture.

Rolf Schimmrigk

2006-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

137

Solid oxide fuel cell generator with removable modular fuel cell stack configurations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature solid oxide fuel cell generator produces electrical power from oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel gases such as natural gas, or conditioned fuel gases, such as carbon monoxide or hydrogen, with oxidant gases, such as air or oxygen. This electrochemical reaction occurs in a plurality of electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells bundled and arrayed in a unitary modular fuel cell stack disposed in a compartment in the generator container. The use of a unitary modular fuel cell stack in a generator is similar in concept to that of a removable battery. The fuel cell stack is provided in a pre-assembled self-supporting configuration where the fuel cells are mounted to a common structural base having surrounding side walls defining a chamber. Associated generator equipment may also be mounted to the fuel cell stack configuration to be integral therewith, such as a fuel and oxidant supply and distribution systems, fuel reformation systems, fuel cell support systems, combustion, exhaust and spent fuel recirculation systems, and the like. The pre-assembled self-supporting fuel cell stack arrangement allows for easier assembly, installation, maintenance, better structural support and longer life of the fuel cells contained in the fuel cell stack. 8 figs.

Gillett, J.E.; Dederer, J.T.; Zafred, P.R.; Collie, J.C.

1998-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

138

Solid oxide fuel cell generator with removable modular fuel cell stack configurations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature solid oxide fuel cell generator produces electrical power from oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel gases such as natural gas, or conditioned fuel gases, such as carbon monoxide or hydrogen, with oxidant gases, such as air or oxygen. This electrochemical reaction occurs in a plurality of electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells bundled and arrayed in a unitary modular fuel cell stack disposed in a compartment in the generator container. The use of a unitary modular fuel cell stack in a generator is similar in concept to that of a removable battery. The fuel cell stack is provided in a pre-assembled self-supporting configuration where the fuel cells are mounted to a common structural base having surrounding side walls defining a chamber. Associated generator equipment may also be mounted to the fuel cell stack configuration to be integral therewith, such as a fuel and oxidant supply and distribution systems, fuel reformation systems, fuel cell support systems, combustion, exhaust and spent fuel recirculation systems, and the like. The pre-assembled self-supporting fuel cell stack arrangement allows for easier assembly, installation, maintenance, better structural support and longer life of the fuel cells contained in the fuel cell stack.

Gillett, James E. (Greensburg, PA); Dederer, Jeffrey T. (Valencia, PA); Zafred, Paolo R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Collie, Jeffrey C. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Model-Based Testing for the Second Generation of Integrated Modular Avionics Christof Efkemann, Jan Peleska  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

activities regarding automated testing of Integrated Modular Avionics controllers in the European research, specialised electronics devices, many of them with cus- tom interfaces. In the Integrated Modular AvionicsModel-Based Testing for the Second Generation of Integrated Modular Avionics Christof Efkemann, Jan

Peleska, Jan - Fachbereich 3

140

Modular architecture of isospin, color, and generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Starting from the vacuum, iterated Grassmann-algebra formation consecutively introduces vector spaces and groups with the structure first of charge, then of isospin, then of color.

David Ritz Finkelstein

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems modular structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Modular Verification of Timed Circuits Using Automatic Abstraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modular Verification of Timed Circuits Using Automatic Abstraction Hao Zheng, Eric Mercer, Member for verification of timed circuits using automatic abstraction. This approach partitions the design into modules by the RAPPID instruction length decoder designed at Intel [2]. This design was 3 times faster while using only

Zheng, Hao

142

Modular Termination Analysis for java bytecode by Term Rewriting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modular Termination Analysis for java bytecode by Term Rewriting J¨urgen Giesl LuFG Informatik 2, RWTH Aachen University, Germany joint work with C. Otto and M. Brockschmidt #12;Automated Termination (Eindhoven) TTT (Innsbruck) VMTL (Vienna) #12;Automated Termination Tools for TRSs AProVE (Aachen) CARIBOO

Ábrahám, Erika

143

Automated Modular Termination Proofs for Real Prolog Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automated Modular Termination Proofs for Real Prolog Programs Martin Muller Thomas Gla Karl the termination of Prolog programs that can be automated and is scalable. Furthermore, the proposed method can of complexity to predicate calls. Then termination of a program is shown by proving this measure

Stroetmann, Karl

144

Modular Power Architectures for Microgrid Clusters Invited Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modular Power Architectures for Microgrid Clusters ­ Invited Paper ­ Hengwei Lin1 , Chengxi Liu1 - Microgrids Research Programme, Aalborg University, 9220 Aalborg East, Denmark 2 Energinet.dk, Denmark Emails: {hwe,cli,joz,juq,tdr}@et.aau.dk www.microgrids.et.aau.dk Abstract-- One of the most important elements

Vasquez, Juan Carlos

145

Rough-Fuzzy MLP: Modular Evolution, Rule Generation, and Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Terms--Soft computing, knowledge-based fuzzy networks, rough sets, genetic algorithms, pattern recently for pattern classification, is such an example combining both rough sets and fuzzy setsRough-Fuzzy MLP: Modular Evolution, Rule Generation, and Evaluation Sankar K. Pal, Fellow, IEEE

Mitra, Sushmita

146

Online Scheduling in Modular Multimedia Systems with Stream Reuse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of services (for each combination of modules), some systems [13, 14, 10] automate the construction of pipelin-21 Abstract When properly constructed, a modular multimedia system can satisfy a client's request in multiple platform. Categories and Subject Descriptors: C.4: Design Studies General Terms: Algorithms, Design

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

147

Analysis of Modular Arithmetic MARKUS MULLER-OLM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of Modular Arithmetic MARKUS M¨ULLER-OLM Westf¨alische Wilhelms-Universit¨at M and Necula 2003; Leroux 2003; Reps et al. 2003; M¨uller-Olm and Seidl 2004d,2004b]. With the notable where Author's address: Markus M¨uller-Olm, Westf¨alische Wilhelms-Universit¨at M¨unster, Institut f

Seidl, Helmut

148

Modularization of the DADAISM Ada Database System Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the modularization of a new data- base management system architecture. This DBMS is not intended to be viewed 22, 1986 at Beijing, China. of modulespeci cations for a DBMS, which can be used to support any implemen- tation paradigm is necessary to handle the evolution of database systems over the next few

Keller, Arthur M.

149

Modularization of the DADAISM Ada Database System Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the modularization of a new data­ base management system architecture. This DBMS is not intended to be viewed--22, 1986 at Beijing, China. of module specifications for a DBMS, which can be used to support any of those implemen­ tation paradigm is necessary to handle the evolution of database systems over the next few

Keller, Arthur M.

150

Development and Features EatSafe: Modular Portable Food Sensor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The convenience of the EatSafe Sensor allows for this. PRONE TO FOOD-POISONING Seniors, children, pregnant womenDevelopment and Features EatSafe: Modular Portable Food Sensor ECE-Rady Design Competition FOOD INDUSTRY Every year >76 million people become sick from the consumption of contaminated food. PACKAGING

California at San Diego, University of

151

a Modular, Multi-Engine Simulator for Heterogeneous Swarm Robotics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARGoS: a Modular, Multi-Engine Simulator for Heterogeneous Swarm Robotics Carlo Pinciroli, Vito, Gianni Di Caro, Frederick Ducatelle, Timothy Stirling, Alvaro Gutierrez, Luca Maria Gambardella. A unique feature of ARGoS is the possibility to use multiple physics engines of different types

Libre de Bruxelles, Universit

152

Modular Algorithms for Transient Semiconductor Device Simulation, Part I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modular Algorithms for Transient Semiconductor Device Simulation, Part I: Analysis of the Outer, is introduced at dis- crete time steps for the one-dimensional semiconductor device model. The it- eration as approximate Newton iterations. Continuation is employed as the time-stepping bridge. 1 Introduction In Part I

Jerome, Joseph W.

153

Modular and Generic Control Software System for Scalable Automation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modular and Generic Control Software System for Scalable Automation Christian Brecher, Martin.freundt@ipt.fraunhofer.de Abstract. The development of automated production systems is subdivided in two mayor tasks. One production with a high rate of changes, this is why fully automated solutions don't pay off and manual

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

154

Modular PM Motor Drives for Automotive Traction Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents modular permanent magnet (PM) motor drives for automotive traction applications. A partially modularized drive system consisting of a single PM motor and multiple inverters is described. The motor has multiple three-phase stator winding sets and each winding set is driven with a separate three-phase inverter module. A truly modularized inverter and motor configuration based on an axial-gap PM motor is then introduced, in which identical PM motor modules are mounted on a common shaft and each motor module is powered by a separate inverter module. The advantages of the modular approach for both inverter and motor include: (1) power rating scalability--one design meets different power requirements by simply stacking an adequate number of modules, thus avoiding redesigning and reducing the development cost, (2) increased fault tolerance, and (3) easy repairing. A prototype was constructed by using two inverters and an axial-gap PM motor with two sets of three-phase stat or windings, and it is used to assist the diesel engine in a hybrid electric vehicle converted from a Chevrolet Suburban. The effect of different pulse-width-modulation strategies for both motoring and regenerative modes on current control is analyzed. Torque and regenerative control algorithms are implemented with a digital signal processor. Analytical and initial testing results are included in the paper.

Su, G.J.

2001-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

155

Modular Pebble Bed Reactor High Temperature Gas Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modular Pebble Bed Reactor High Temperature Gas Reactor Andrew C Kadak Massachusetts Institute For 1150 MW Combined Heat and Power Station Oil Refinery Hydrogen Production Desalinization Plant VHTR/Graphite Discrimination system Damaged Sphere ContainerGraphiteReturn FuelReturn Fresh Fuel Container Spent Fuel Tank #12

156

Fredericton, New Brunswick, 5 June 2010 CMS Summer Meeting slide 1 Modular Invariant Theory of the Cyclic Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fredericton, New Brunswick, 5 June 2010 CMS Summer Meeting ­ slide 1 Modular Invariant Theory Some Consequences Fredericton, New Brunswick, 5 June 2010 CMS Summer Meeting ­ slide 2 Modular 2010 CMS Summer Meeting ­ slide 3 #12;The Modular Group of Prime Order Modular Representation Theory

Wehlau, David

157

Modular cathode assemblies and methods of using the same for electrochemical reduction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Modular cathode assemblies are useable in electrolytic reduction systems and include a basket through which fluid electrolyte may pass and exchange charge with a material to be reduced in the basket. The basket can be divided into upper and lower sections to provide entry for the material. Example embodiment cathode assemblies may have any shape to permit modular placement at any position in reduction systems. Modular cathode assemblies include a cathode plate in the basket, to which unique and opposite electrical power may be supplied. Example embodiment modular cathode assemblies may have standardized electrical connectors. Modular cathode assemblies may be supported by a top plate of an electrolytic reduction system. Electrolytic oxide reduction systems are operated by positioning modular cathode and anode assemblies at desired positions, placing a material in the basket, and charging the modular assemblies to reduce the metal oxide.

Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Barnes, Laurel A; Williamson, Mark A; Willit, James L

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

158

Definition of Systematic, Approximately Separable and Modular Internal Coordinates (SASMIC) for macromolecular simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A set of rules is defined to systematically number the groups and the atoms of organic molecules and, particularly, of polypeptides in a modular manner. Supported by this numeration, a set of internal coordinates is defined. These coordinates (termed Systematic, Approximately Separable and Modular Internal Coordinates, SASMIC) are straightforwardly written in Z-matrix form and may be directly implemented in typical Quantum Chemistry packages. A number of Perl scripts that automatically generate the Z-matrix files for polypeptides are provided as supplementary material. The main difference with other Z-matrix-like coordinates normally used in the literature is that normal dihedral angles (``principal dihedrals'' in this work) are only used to fix the orientation of whole groups and a somewhat non-standard type of dihedrals, termed ``phase dihedrals'', are used to describe the covalent structure inside the groups. This physical approach allows to approximately separate soft and hard movements of the molecule using only topological information and to directly implement constraints. As an application, we use the coordinates defined and ab initio quantum mechanical calculations to assess the commonly assumed approximation of the free energy, obtained from ``integrating out'' the side chain degree of freedom chi, by the Potential Energy Surface (PES) in the protected dipeptide HCO-L-Ala-NH2. We also present a sub-box of the Hessian matrix in two different sets of coordinates to illustrate the approximate separation of soft and hard movements when the coordinates defined in this work are used.

Pablo Echenique; J. L. Alonso

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

159

Modular low-aspect-ratio high-beta torsatron  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fusion-reactor device is described which the toroidal magnetic field and at least a portion of the poloidal magnetic field are provided by a single set of modular coils. The coils are arranged on the surface of a low-aspect-ratio toroid in planed having the cylindrical coordinate relationship phi = phi/sub i/ + kz, where k is a constant equal to each coil's pitch and phi/sub i/ is the toroidal angle at which the i'th coil intersects the z = o plane. The toroid defined by the modular coils preferably has a race track minor cross section. When vertical field coils and, preferably, a toroidal plasma current are provided for magnetic-field-surface closure within the toroid, a vacuum magnetic field of racetrack-shaped minor cross section with improved stability and beta valves is obtained.

Sheffield, G.V.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Steam generator design considerations for modular HTGR plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies are in progress to develop a standard High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant design that is amenable to serial production and is licensable. Based on the results of trade studies performed in the DOE-funded HTGR program, activities are being focused to emphasize a modular concept based on a 350 MW(t) annular reactor core with prismatic fuel elements. Utilization of a multiplicity of the standard module affords flexibility in power rating for utility electricity generation. The selected modular HTGR concept has the reactor core and heat transport systems housed in separate steel vessels. This paper highlights the steam generator design considerations for the reference plant, and includes a discussion of the major features of the heat exchanger concept and the technology base existing in the US.

McDonald, C.F.; DeFur, D.D.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems modular structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Lessons Learned During the Manufacture of the NCSX Modular Coils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Compact Stellarator Experiment's (NCSX) modular coils presented a number of engineering and manufacturing challenges due to their complex shapes, requirements for high dimensional accuracy and high current density requirements due to space constraints. Being the first of their kind, these coils required the implementation of many new manufacturing and measuring techniques and procedures. This was the first time that these manufacturing techniques and methods were applied in the production of coils at the laboratory. This resulted in a steep learning curve for the first several coils. Through the effective use of procedures, tooling modifications, involvement and ownership by the manufacturing workforce, and an emphasis on safety, the assembly team was able to reduce the manufacturing times and improve upon the manufacturing methods. This paper will discuss the learning curve and steps that were taken to improve the manufacturing efficiency and reduce the manufacturing times for the modular coils without forfeiting quality.

James H. Chrzanowski,Thomas G. Meighan, Steven Raftopoulos and Lawrence Dudek and Paul J. Fogarty

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

A GLUING LEMMA AND OVERCONVERGENT MODULAR FORMS PAYMAN L KASSAEI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to p, and m1 and k integers. Let K be a finite extension of Qp. Let X1(Npm)K denote the modular curve of level 1(Npm) over K, and let be the invertible sheaf on X1(Npm)K which on the non-cuspidal locus is the push- forward of the sheaf of invariant differentials of the universal elliptic curve. Let X1(Npm) an K

Kassaei, Payman L.

163

Hybrid energy systems (HESs) using small modular reactors (SMRs)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large-scale nuclear reactors are traditionally operated for a singular purpose: steady-state production of dispatchable baseload electricity that is distributed broadly on the electric grid. While this implementation is key to a sustainable, reliable energy grid, small modular reactors (SMRs) offer new opportunities for increased use of clean nuclear energy for both electric and thermal ap plications in more locations while still accommodating the desire to support renewable production sources.

S. Bragg-Sitton

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Modular initiator with integrated optical diagnostic  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A slapper detonator which integrally incorporates an optical wavequide structure for determining whether there has been degradation of the explosive in the explosive device that is to be initiated by the detonator. Embodiments of this invention take advantage of the barrel-like character of a typical slapper detonator design. The barrel assembly, being in direct contact with the energetic material, incorporates an optical diagnostic device into the barrel assembly whereby one can monitor the state of the explosive material. Such monitoring can be beneficial because the chemical degradation of the explosive plays an important in achieving proper functioning of a detonator/initiator device.

Alam, M. Kathleen (Cedar Crest, NM); Schmitt, Randal L. (Tijeras, NM); Welle, Eric J. (Niceville, FL); Madden, Sean P. (Arlington, MA)

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

165

Advanced Control and Protection system Design Methods for Modular HTGRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project supported the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in identifying and evaluating the regulatory implications concerning the control and protection systems proposed for use in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The NGNP, using modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology, is to provide commercial industries with electricity and high-temperature process heat for industrial processes such as hydrogen production. Process heat temperatures range from 700 to 950 C, and for the upper range of these operation temperatures, the modular HTGR is sometimes referred to as the Very High Temperature Reactor or VHTR. Initial NGNP designs are for operation in the lower temperature range. The defining safety characteristic of the modular HTGR is that its primary defense against serious accidents is to be achieved through its inherent properties of the fuel and core. Because of its strong negative temperature coefficient of reactivity and the capability of the fuel to withstand high temperatures, fast-acting active safety systems or prompt operator actions should not be required to prevent significant fuel failure and fission product release. The plant is designed such that its inherent features should provide adequate protection despite operational errors or equipment failure. Figure 1 shows an example modular HTGR layout (prismatic core version), where its inlet coolant enters the reactor vessel at the bottom, traversing up the sides to the top plenum, down-flow through an annular core, and exiting from the lower plenum (hot duct). This research provided NRC staff with (a) insights and knowledge about the control and protection systems for the NGNP and VHTR, (b) information on the technologies/approaches under consideration for use in the reactor and process heat applications, (c) guidelines for the design of highly integrated control rooms, (d) consideration for modeling of control and protection system designs for VHTR, and (e) input for developing the bases for possible new regulatory guidance to assist in the review of an NGNP license application. This NRC project also evaluated reactor and process heat application plant simulation models employed in the protection and control system designs for various plant operational modes and accidents, including providing information about the models themselves, and the appropriateness of the application of the models for control and protection system studies. A companion project for the NRC focused on the potential for new instrumentation that would be unique to modular HTGRs, as compared to light-water reactors (LWRs), due to both the higher temperature ranges and the inherent safety features.

Ball, Sydney J [ORNL; Wilson Jr, Thomas L [ORNL; Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Energy Department Announces New Investment in U.S. Small Modular...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

role to play in America's energy future," said Secretary Chu. "Restarting the nation's nuclear industry and advancing small modular reactor technologies will help create new...

167

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing modular concepts Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the modular FORTRAN... . This program simulates the engine cycle, determines basic aerodynamic parameters and ... Source: Qubec, Universit du - cole de technologie...

168

Fusion Algebras Induced by Representations of the Modular Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the representation theory of the subgroups SL_2(Z_p) of the modular group we investigate the induced fusion algebras in some simple examples. Only some of these representations lead to 'good' fusion algebras. Furthermore, the conformal dimensions and the central charge of the corresponding rational conformal field theories are calculated. Two series of representations which can be realized by unitary theories are presented. We show that most of the fusion algebras induced by admissible representations are realized in well known rational models.

W. Eholzer

1992-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

169

NUHOMS modular spent-fuel storage system: Performance testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a heat transfer and shielding performance evaluation of the NUTECH HOrizontal MOdular Storage (NUHOMS{reg sign}) System utilized by the Carolina Power and Light Co. (CP L) in an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) licensed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The ISFSI is located at CP L's H. B. Robinson Nuclear Plant (HBR) near Hartsville, South Carolina. The demonstration included testing of three modules, first with electric heaters and then with spent fuel. The results indicated that the system was conservatively designed, with all heat transfer and shielding design criteria easily met. 5 refs., 45 figs., 9 tabs.

Strope, L.A.; McKinnon, M.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Dyksterhouse, D.J.; McLean, J.C. (Carolina Power and Light Co., Raleigh, NC (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Modular CHP System for Utica College: Design Specification, March 2007 |  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't32Department of Energy Modular CHP System for Utica College:

171

TR-IIS-06-001 On the Satisfiability of Modular  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR-IIS-06-001 On the Satisfiability of Modular Arithmetic Formula Bow-Yaw Wang January 24, 2006 the Satisfiability of Modular Arithmetic Formula Bow-Yaw Wang Institute of Information Science Academia Sinica Taiwan used in the design of cryptosystems and pseudo random number generators. In the RSA public key system

Chen, Sheng-Wei

172

Flexible casting of modular self-aligning microfluidic assembly blocks Sean M. Langelier,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of microfluidic technologies toward modularized ``plug and play'' construction reflects the steadily increasing is prohibitively complex and/or expensive. In this work, we present an advanced modular microfluidic construction.11 Glennon et al. went further, moving to direct printing of the lithographic mold--laser toner

Walter, Nils G.

173

MODULAR DECOMPOSITION OF THE NORTSUM MULTIPLEVALUED PLA T. KALGANOVA P , N. LIPNITSKAYA P , G. HOLOWINSKI k  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODULAR DECOMPOSITION OF THE NOR­TSUM MULTIPLE­VALUED PLA T. KALGANOVA P , N. LIPNITSKAYA P , G PLA­based combinational circuits by modular decomposition is presented. Main subjects are 1) Specific of variables, 3) Realization of functions by multiple­valued PLA­based combinational circuits, 4) Comparison

Kalganova, Tatiana

174

Compositionality in Synchronous Data Flow: Modular Code Generation from Hierarchical SDF Graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compositionality in Synchronous Data Flow: Modular Code Generation from Hierarchical SDF Graphs in Synchronous Data Flow: Modular Code Generation from Hierarchical SDF Graphs Stavros Tripakis, Dai Bui, Bert of California, Berkeley stavros, daib, eal@eecs.berkeley.edu October 20, 2009 Abstract Hierarchical SDF models

175

Abductive Analysis of Modular Logic ROBERTO GIACOBAZZI, Dipartimento di Informatica, Universit`a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abductive Analysis of Modular Logic Programs ROBERTO GIACOBAZZI, Dipartimento di Informatica a practical method for abductive analysis of modular logic programs. This is obtained by reversing knowledge this is the first application of abductive reasoning in dataflow analysis of logic programs

Giacobazzi, Roberto

176

Modular Electric Vehicle Program (MEVP). Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Modular Electric Vehicle Program (MEVP) was an EV propulsion system development program in which the technical effort was contracted by DOE to Ford Motor Company. The General Electric Company was a major subcontractor to Ford for the development of the electric subsystem. Sundstrand Power Systems was also a subcontractor to Ford, providing a modified gas turbine engine APU for emissions and performance testing as well as a preliminary design and producibility study for a Gas Turbine-APU for potential use in hybrid/electric vehicles. The four-year research and development effort was cost-shared between Ford, General Electric, Sundstrand Power Systems and DOE. The contract was awarded in response to Ford`s unsolicited proposal. The program objective was to bring electric vehicle propulsion system technology closer to commercialization by developing subsystem components which can be produced from a common design and accommodate a wide range of vehicles; i.e., modularize the components. This concept would enable industry to introduce electric vehicles into the marketplace sooner than would be accomplished via traditional designs in that the economies of mass production could be realized across a spectrum of product offerings. This would eliminate the need to dedicate the design and capital investment to a limited volume product offering which would increase consumer cost and/or lengthen the time required to realize a return on the investment.

NONE

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Microcomputer applications of, and modifications to, the modular fault trees  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LaSalle Probabilistic Risk Assessment was the first major application of the modular logic fault trees after the IREP program. In the process of performing the analysis, many errors were discovered in the fault tree modules that led to difficulties in combining the modules to form the final system fault trees. These errors are corrected in the revised modules listed in this report. In addition, the application of the modules in terms of editing them and forming them into the system fault trees was inefficient. Originally, the editing had to be done line by line and no error checking was performed by the computer. This led to many typos and other logic errors in the construction of the modular fault tree files. Two programs were written to help alleviate this problem: (1) MODEDIT - This program allows an operator to retrieve a file for editing, edit the file for the plant specific application, perform some general error checking while the file is being modified, and store the file for later use, and (2) INDEX - This program checks that the modules that are supposed to form one fault tree all link up appropriately before the files are,loaded onto the mainframe computer. Lastly, the modules were not designed for relay type logic common in BWR designs but for solid state type logic. Some additional modules were defined for modeling relay logic, and an explanation and example of their use are included in this report.

Zimmerman, T.L.; Graves, N.L.; Payne, A.C. Jr.; Whitehead, D.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Prognostics Health Management for Advanced Small Modular Reactor Passive Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States, sustainable nuclear power to promote energy security is a key national energy priority. Advanced small modular reactors (AdvSMR), which are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts using non-light-water reactor (LWR) coolants such as liquid metal, helium, or liquid salt may provide a longer-term alternative to more conventional LWR-based concepts. The economics of AdvSMRs will be impacted by the reduced economy-of-scale savings when compared to traditional LWRs and the controllable day-to-day costs of AdvSMRs are expected to be dominated by operations and maintenance costs. Therefore, achieving the full benefits of AdvSMR deployment requires a new paradigm for plant design and management. In this context, prognostic health management of passive components in AdvSMRs can play a key role in enabling the economic deployment of AdvSMRs. In this paper, the background of AdvSMRs is discussed from which requirements for PHM systems are derived. The particle filter technique is proposed as a prognostics framework for AdvSMR passive components and the suitability of the particle filter technique is illustrated by using it to forecast thermal creep degradation using a physics-of-failure model and based on a combination of types of measurements conceived for passive AdvSMR components.

Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Coble, Jamie B.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Wootan, David W.; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Berglin, Eric J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Henager, Charles H.

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

179

646 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION, VOL. 13, NO. 5, OCTOBER 1997 Design of Assembly Systems for Modular Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systems for Modular Products David W. He and Andrew Kusiak, Member, IEEE Abstract--To respond systems. Given a family of modular products, designing low cost assembly systems is an important problem. In this paper, an approach for the design of assembly systems for modular products is proposed. The assembly

Kusiak, Andrew

180

Overview of the Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor building layout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) is an 800 MWt (>225 MWe) integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR), in which all of the components typically associated with the nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) of a nuclear power plant are incorporated within a single reactor pressure vessel. This paper is the third in a series of four papers, which describe the design and functionality of the Westinghouse SMR. It focuses in particular upon the plant building layout and modular design of the Westinghouse SMR. In the development of small modular reactors, the building layout is an area where the safety of the plant can be improved by applying new design approaches. This paper will present an overview of the Westinghouse SMR building layout and indicate how the design features improve the safety and robustness of the plant. The Westinghouse SMR is designed with no shared systems between individual reactor units. The main buildings inside the security fence are the nuclear island, the rad-waste building, the annex building, and the turbine building. All safety related equipment is located in the nuclear island, which is a seismic class 1 building. To further enhance the safety and robustness of the design, the reactor, containment, and most of the safety related equipment are located below grade on the nuclear island. This reduces the possibility of severe damage from external threats or natural disasters. Two safety related ultimate heat sink (UHS) water tanks that are used for decay heat removal are located above grade, but are redundant and physically separated as far as possible for improved safety. The reactor and containment vessel are located below grade in the center of the nuclear island. The rad-waste and other radioactive systems are located on the bottom floors to limit the radiation exposure to personnel. The Westinghouse SMR safety trains are completely separated into four unconnected quadrants of the building, with access between quadrants only allowed above grade. This is an improvement to conventional reactor design since it prevents failures of multiple trains during floods or fires and other external events. The main control room is located below grade, with a remote shutdown room in a different quadrant. All defense in depth systems are placed on the nuclear island, primarily above grade, while the safety systems are located on lower floors. The economics of the Westinghouse SMR challenges the established approach of large Light Water Reactors (LWR) that utilized the economies of scale to reach economic competitiveness. To serve the market expectation of smaller capital investment and cost competitive energy, a modular design approach is implemented within the Westinghouse SMR. The Westinghouse SMR building layout integrates the three basic design constraints of modularization; transportation, handling and module-joining technology. (authors)

Cronje, J. M. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Centurion (South Africa); Van Wyk, J. J.; Memmott, M. J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Cranberry Township, PA (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems modular structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Development of a system model for advanced small modular reactors.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a system model that can be used to analyze three advance small modular reactor (SMR) designs through their lifetime. Neutronics of these reactor designs were evaluated using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX/6). The system models were developed in Matlab and Simulink. A major thrust of this research was the initial scoping analysis of Sandia's concept of a long-life fast reactor (LLFR). The inherent characteristic of this conceptual design is to minimize the change in reactivity over the lifetime of the reactor. This allows the reactor to operate substantially longer at full power than traditional light water reactors (LWRs) or other SMR designs (e.g. high temperature gas reactor (HTGR)). The system model has subroutines for lifetime reactor feedback and operation calculations, thermal hydraulic effects, load demand changes and a simplified SCO2 Brayton cycle for power conversion.

Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Modular Energy Storage System for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to develop technologies, specifically power electronics, energy storage electronics and controls that provide efficient and effective energy management between electrically powered devices in alternative energy vehicles ?? plug-in electric vehicles, hybrid vehicles, range extended vehicles, and hydrogen-based fuel cell vehicles. The in-depth research into the complex interactions between the lower and higher voltage systems from data obtained via modeling, bench testing and instrumented vehicle data will allow an optimum system to be developed from a performance, cost, weight and size perspective. The subsystems are designed for modularity so that they may be used with different propulsion and energy delivery systems. This approach will allow expansion into new alternative energy vehicle markets.

Janice Thomas

2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

Baseline Concept Description of a Small Modular High Temperature Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to provide a description of generic small modular high temperature reactors (herein denoted as an smHTR), summarize their distinguishing attributes, and lay out the research and development (R&D) required for commercialization. The generic concepts rely heavily on the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor designs developed in the 1980s which were never built but for which pre-licensing or certification activities were conducted. The concept matured more recently under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, specifically in the areas of fuel and material qualification, methods development, and licensing. As all vendor-specific designs proposed under NGNP were all both small or medium-sized and modular by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Department of Energy (DOE) standards, the technical attributes, challenges, and R&D needs identified, addressed, and documented under NGNP are valid and appropriate in the context of Small Modular Reactor (SMR) applications. Although the term High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is commonly used to denote graphite-moderated, thermal spectrum reactors with coolant temperatures in excess of 650oC at the core outlet, in this report the historical term High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) will be used to distinguish the gas-cooled technology described herein from its liquid salt-cooled cousin. Moreover, in this report it is to be understood that the outlet temperature of the helium in an HTGR has an upper limit of 950 degrees C which corresponds to the temperature to which certain alloys are currently being qualified under DOEs ARC program. Although similar to the HTGR in just about every respect, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) may have an outlet temperature in excess of 950 degrees C and is therefore farther from commercialization because of the challenges posed to materials exposed to these temperatures. The VHTR is the focus of R&D under the Generation IV program and its specific R&D needs will be included in this report when appropriate for comparison. The distinguishing features of the HTGR are the refractory (TRISO) coated particle fuel, the low-power density, graphite-moderated core, and the high outlet temperature of the inert helium coolant. The low power density and fuel form effectively eliminate the possibility of core melt, even upon a complete loss of coolant pressure and flow. The graphite, which constitutes the bulk of the core volume and mass, provides a large thermal buffer that absorbs fission heat such that thermal transients occur over a timespan of hours or even days. As chemically-inert helium is already a gas, there is no coolant temperature or void feedback on the neutronics and no phase change or corrosion product that could degrade heat transfer. Furthermore, the particle coatings and interstitial graphite retain fission products such that the source terms at the plant boundary remain well below actionable levels under all anticipated nominal and off-normal operating conditions. These attributes enable the reactor to supply process heat to a collocated industrial plant with negligible risk of contamination and minimal dynamic coupling of the facilities (Figure 1). The exceptional retentive properties of coated particle fuel in a graphite matrix were first demonstrated in the DRAGON reactor, a European research facility that began operation in 1964.

Hans Gougar

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Proliferation resistant fuel for pebble bed modular reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that it is possible to denature the Plutonium produced in Pebble Bed Modular Reactors (PBMR) by doping the nuclear fuel with either 3050 ppm of {sup 237}Np or 2100 ppm of Am vector. A correct choice of these isotopes concentration yields denatured Plutonium with isotopic ratio {sup 238}Pu/Pu {>=} 6%, for the entire fuel burnup cycle. The penalty for introducing these isotopes into the nuclear fuel is a subsequent shortening of the fuel burnup cycle, with respect to a non-doped reference fuel, by 41.2 Full Power Days (FPDs) and 19.9 FPDs, respectively, which correspond to 4070 MWd/ton and 1965 MWd/ton reduction in fuel discharge burnup. (authors)

Ronen, Y.; Aboudy, M.; Regev, D.; Gilad, E. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Evaluation of the Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent advances in gas-turbine and heat exchanger technology have enhanced the potential for a Modular Helium Reactor (MHR) incorporating a direct gas turbine (Brayton) cycle for power conversion. The resulting Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) power plant combines the high temperature capabilities of the MHR with the efficiency and reliability of modern gas turbines. While the passive safety features of the steam cycle MHR (SC-MHR) are retained, generation efficiencies are projected to be in the range of 48% and steam power conversion systems, with their attendant complexities, are eliminated. Power costs are projected to be reduced by about 20%, relative to the SC-MHR or coal. This report documents the second, and final, phase of a two-part evaluation that concluded with a unanimous recommendation that the direct cycle (DC) variant of the GT-MHR be established as the commercial objective of the US Gas-Cooled Reactor Program. This recommendation has been endorsed by industrial and utility participants and accepted by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The Phase II effort, documented herein, concluded that the DC GT-MHR offers substantial technical and economic advantages over both the IDC and SC systems. Both the DC and IDC were found to offer safety advantages, relative to the SC, due to elimination of the potential for water ingress during power operations. This is the dominant consequence event for the SC. The IDC was judged to require somewhat less development than the direct cycle, while the SC, which has the greatest technology base, incurs the least development cost and risk. While the technical and licensing requirements for the DC were more demanding, they were judged to be incremental and feasible. Moreover, the DC offers significant performance and cost improvements over the other two concepts. Overall, the latter were found to justify the additional development needs.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

The Power of Integrality: Linkages between Product Architecture, Innovation, and Industry Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A substantial literature stream suggests that many products are becoming more modular over time, and that this development is often associated with a change in industry structure towards higher degrees of specialization. ...

Fixson, Sebastian K.

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

187

RAMANUJAN AND THE MODULAR j-INVARIANT BRUCE C. BERNDT AND HENG HUAT CHAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RAMANUJAN AND THE MODULAR j-INVARIANT BRUCE C. BERNDT AND HENG HUAT CHAN Abstract. A new infinite. BERNDT AND HENG HUAT CHAN At the top of page 392 in [21, vol. 2], which inexplicably is printed upside

Berndt, Bruce C.

188

Abstract--We present progress on a comprehensive, modular, interactive modeling environment centered on overall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a cell membrane ion transport protein. In this paper, we present progress on a comprehensive, modular, epithelial transport, or even whole organ physiology, there is presently, no comprehensive, organism

Boyer, Edmond

189

Order and diversity within a modular system for housing : a computational approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis introduces elements of a methodology to achieve order and diversity in the systematic design of street facades within a modular system for housing. In its context both order and diversity refer to the spatial ...

Duarte, Jos Pinto

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Design of electronics for a high-resolution, multi-material, and modular 3D printer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electronics for a high-resolution, multi-material, and modular 3D printer were designed and implemented. The driver for a piezoelectric inkjet print head can fire its nozzles with one of three droplet sizes ranging from 6 ...

Kwan, Joyce G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Design, analysis and optimization of the power conversion system for the Modular Pebble Bed Reactor System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Modular Pebble Bed Reactor system (MPBR) requires a gas turbine cycle (Brayton cycle) as the power conversion system for it to achieve economic competitiveness as a GenIV nuclear system. The availability of controllable ...

Wang, Chunyun, 1968-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Design and analysis of a concrete modular housing system constructed with 3D panels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An innovative modular house system design utilizing an alternative concrete residential building system called 3D panels is presented along with an overview of 3D panels as well as relevant methods and markets. The proposed ...

Sarcia, Sam Rhea, 1982-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Nestedness versus modularity in ecological networks: two sides of the same coin?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nestedness versus modularity in ecological networks: two sides of the same coin? Miguel A. Fortuna1 al. 2003; Teng & McCann 2004; Fortuna & Bascompte 2006; Bascompte, Jordano & Olesen 2006; Rooney et

Stouffer, Daniel B.

194

Road Map for a Modular Magnetic Fusion Program Dale M. Meade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are now being done at the energy production scale. This paper describes a modular approach that addresses were described in John Lawson's original paper[1] describing the conditions for energy production

195

A Multiprocessor Architecture Using Modular Arithmetic for Very High Precision Computation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We outline a multiprocessor architecture that uses modular arithmetic to implement numerical computation with 900 bits of intermediate precision. A proposed prototype, to be implemented with off-the-shelf parts, will ...

Wu, Henry M.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Optimal self assembly of modular manipulators with active and passive modules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, we describe algorithms to build self-assembling robot systems composed of active modular robots and passive bars. The robotic module is the Shady3D robot and the passive component is a rigid bar with embedded ...

Yun, Seung-kook

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Design principles of mammalian signaling networks : emergent properties at modular and global scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis utilizes modeling approaches rooted in statistical physics and physical chemistry to investigate several aspects of cellular signal transduction at both the modular and global levels. Design principles of ...

Locasale, Jason W

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Modularity of the MIT Pebble Bed Reactor for use by the commercial power industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Modular Pebble Bed Reactor is a small high temperature helium cooled reactor that is being considered for both electric power and hydrogen production. Pebble bed reactors are being developed in South Africa, China and ...

Hanlon-Hyssong, Jaime E

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Design and fabrication of a modular multi-material 3D printer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents 3DP-0, a modular, multi-material 3D printer. Currently, 3D printers available on the market are typically expensive and difficult to develop. In addition, the simultaneous use of multiple materials in ...

Lan, Justin (Justin T.)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Offsite Construction Comparative Study of Panelized and Modular Construction for Rio Mesa Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Offsite Construction Comparative Study of Panelized and Modular Construction: This research is to evaluate the opportunities of prefabricated construction for remote the logistics of prefab construction on the Rio Mesa site, we hope that this project

Tipple, Brett

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems modular structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

E-Print Network 3.0 - area modular baf2 Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

using the modified Shiraki method... by illuminating the MQW sample surface with a near-infrared IR diode laser with emission at 976 nm. A modular FTIR... incident on...

202

Modular Lorentz force actuators for efficient biomimetic propulsion of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, we developed a highly scalable design for modular Lorentz force actuators for use in segmented flexible-hull undersea vehicles such as the RoboTuna being developed at Franklin W, Olin College of Engineering. ...

Church, Joseph Christopher

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

A Comparative Study of Modular Axial Flux Podded Generators for Marine Current Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Comparative Study of Modular Axial Flux Podded Generators for Marine Current Turbines Sofiane turbines (MCTs). Due to the submarine environment, maintenance operations are very hard, very costly current turbine, axial flux permanent magnet generator, design, optimization. Nomenclature MCT = Marine

Brest, Université de

204

Abductive Analysis of Modular Logic ROBERTO GIACOBAZZI, Dipartimento di Informatica, Universit`a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

___________________________________________________________________________ Abductive a practical method for abductive analysis of modular logic program* *s. This is obtained by reversing k* *nowledge this is the first application of abductive reasoning in dataflow analysis of lo* *gic

Giacobazzi, Roberto

205

NEMS Freight Transportation Module Improvement Study  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

basic shapes 33. Articles of base metal 41. Waste and scrap 3. Processed food 5. Meat, fish, seafood, and their preparations 6. Milled grain products and preparations, and bakery...

206

Site Suitability and Hazard Assessment Guide for Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercial nuclear reactor projects in the U.S. have traditionally employed large light water reactors (LWR) to generate regional supplies of electricity. Although large LWRs have consistently dominated commercial nuclear markets both domestically and abroad, the concept of small modular reactors (SMRs) capable of producing between 30 MW(t) and 900 MW(t) to generating steam for electricity is not new. Nor is the idea of locating small nuclear reactors in close proximity to and in physical connection with industrial processes to provide a long-term source of thermal energy. Growing problems associated continued use of fossil fuels and enhancements in efficiency and safety because of recent advancements in reactor technology suggest that the likelihood of near-term SMR technology(s) deployment at multiple locations within the United States is growing. Many different types of SMR technology are viable for siting in the domestic commercial energy market. However, the potential application of a particular proprietary SMR design will vary according to the target heat end-use application and the site upon which it is proposed to be located. Reactor heat applications most commonly referenced in connection with the SMR market include electric power production, district heating, desalinization, and the supply of thermal energy to various processes that require high temperature over long time periods, or a combination thereof. Indeed, the modular construction, reliability and long operational life purported to be associated with some SMR concepts now being discussed may offer flexibility and benefits no other technology can offer. Effective siting is one of the many early challenges that face a proposed SMR installation project. Site-specific factors dealing with support to facility construction and operation, risks to the plant and the surrounding area, and the consequences subsequent to those risks must be fully identified, analyzed, and possibly mitigated before a license will be granted to construct and operate a nuclear facility. Examples of significant site-related concerns include area geotechnical and geological hazard properties, local climatology and meteorology, water resource availability, the vulnerability of surrounding populations and the environmental to adverse effects in the unlikely event of radionuclide release, the socioeconomic impacts of SMR plant installation and the effects it has on aesthetics, proximity to energy use customers, the topography and area infrastructure that affect plant constructability and security, and concerns related to the transport, installation, operation and decommissioning of major plant components.

Wayne Moe

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Two low-cost, modular sub-? test cryostats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two general-purpose liquid helium (LHe) test cryostats have been developed in support of a major upgrade to the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The cryostats are capable of sustained operation below 1.8 K and currently support tests of prototype superconducting rf (srf) cavities for the APS Upgrades Short Pulse X-ray (SPX) initiative. To save cost, two existing test vessels were reconditioned: one bucket dewar supporting bare cavity tests and one shielded vacuum vessel with an integral LHe reservoir for jacketed/dressed cavity tests. A new feedbox containing a heat exchanger and associated valves was also designed and fabricated to support either cryostat. The resulting modular design permits tests on a wide variety of srf cavities in various states of completion, minimizing cost and maximizing use of the hardware. Together with a dedicated vacuum pump, control system, and helium supply via storage dewar or cryoplant, these cryostats are vital to the srf cavity development effort within the APS Upgrade.

Fuerst, J. D.; Kaluzny, J. A. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

208

Johnson Noise Thermometry for Advanced Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature is a key process variable at any nuclear power plant (NPP). The harsh reactor environment causes all sensor properties to drift over time. At the higher temperatures of advanced NPPs the drift occurs more rapidly. The allowable reactor operating temperature must be reduced by the amount of the potential measurement error to assure adequate margin to material damage. Johnson noise is a fundamental expression of temperature and as such is immune to drift in a sensor s physical condition. In and near core, only Johnson noise thermometry (JNT) and radiation pyrometry offer the possibility for long-term, high-accuracy temperature measurement due to their fundamental natures. Small, Modular Reactors (SMRs) place a higher value on long-term stability in their temperature measurements in that they produce less power per reactor core and thus cannot afford as much instrument recalibration labor as their larger brethren. The purpose of this project is to develop and demonstrate a drift free Johnson noise-based thermometer suitable for deployment near core in advanced SMR plants.

Britton Jr, Charles L [ORNL; Roberts, Michael [ORNL; Bull, Nora D [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Johnson Noise Thermometry for Advanced Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature is a key process variable at any nuclear power plant (NPP). The harsh reactor environment causes all sensor properties to drift over time. At the higher temperatures of advanced NPPs the drift occurs more rapidly. The allowable reactor operating temperature must be reduced by the amount of the potential measurement error to assure adequate margin to material damage. Johnson noise is a fundamental expression of temperature and as such is immune to drift in a sensors physical condition. In and near the core, only Johnson noise thermometry (JNT) and radiation pyrometry offer the possibility for long-term, high-accuracy temperature measurement due to their fundamental natures. Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) place a higher value on long-term stability in their temperature measurements in that they produce less power per reactor core and thus cannot afford as much instrument recalibration labor as their larger brethren. The purpose of the current ORNL-led project, conducted under the Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) research pathway of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced SMR Research and Development (R&D) program, is to develop and demonstrate a drift free Johnson noise-based thermometer suitable for deployment near core in advanced SMR plants.

Britton, C.L.,Jr.; Roberts, M.; Bull, N.D.; Holcomb, D.E.; Wood, R.T.

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key area of the Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) strategy is the development of methodologies and tools that will be used to predict the safety, security, safeguards, performance, and deployment viability of SMRs. The goal of the SMR PRA activity will be to develop quantitative methods and tools and the associated analysis framework for assessing a variety of risks. Development and implementation of SMR-focused safety assessment methods may require new analytic methods or adaptation of traditional methods to the advanced design and operational features of SMRs. We will need to move beyond the current limitations such as static, logic-based models in order to provide more integrated, scenario-based models based upon predictive modeling which are tied to causal factors. The development of SMR-specific safety models for margin determination will provide a safety case that describes potential accidents, design options (including postulated controls), and supports licensing activities by providing a technical basis for the safety envelope. This report documents the progress that was made to implement the PRA framework, specifically by way of demonstration of an advanced 3D approach to representing, quantifying and understanding flooding risks to a nuclear power plant.

Curtis Smith; Steven Prescott; Tony Koonce

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Human Factors Issues For Multi-Modular Reactor Units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Smaller and multi-modular reactor (MMR) will be highly technologically-advanced systems allowing more system flexibility to reactors configurations (e.g., addition/deletion of reactor units). While the technical and financial advantages of systems may be numerous, MMR presents many human factors challenges that may pose vulnerability to plant safety. An important human factors challenge in MMR operation and performance is the monitoring of data from multiple plants from centralized control rooms where human operators are responsible for interpreting, assessing, and responding to different systems states and failures (e.g., simultaneously monitoring refueling at one plant while keeping an eye on another plants normal operating state). Furthermore, the operational, safety, and performance requirements for MMR can seriously change current staffing models and roles, the mode in which information is displayed, procedures and training to support and guide operators, and risk analysis. For these reasons, addressing human factors concerns in MMR are essential in reducing plant risk.

Tuan Q Tran; Humberto E. Garcia; Ronald L. Boring; Jeffrey C. Joe; Bruce P. Hallbert

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Role of Nuclear Grade Graphite in Oxidation in Modular HTGRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The passively safe High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design is one of the primary concepts considered for Generation IV and Small Modular Reactor (SMR) programs. The helium cooled, nuclear grade graphite moderated core achieves extremely high operating temperatures allowing either industrial process heat or electricity generation at high efficiencies. In addition to their neutron moderating properties, nuclear grade graphite core components provide excellent high temperature stability, thermal conductivity, and chemical compatibility with the high temperature nuclear fuel form. Graphite has been continuously used in nuclear reactors since the 1940s and has performed remarkably well over a wide range of core environments and operating conditions. Graphite moderated, gas-cooled reactor designs have been safely used for research and power production purposes in multiple countries since the inception of nuclear energy development. However, graphite is a carbonaceous material, and this has generated a persistent concern that the graphite components could actually burn during either normal or accident conditions [ , ]. The common assumption is that graphite, since it is ostensibly similar to charcoal and coal, will burn in a similar manner. While charcoal and coal may have the appearance of graphite, the internal microstructure and impurities within these carbonaceous materials are very different. Volatile species and trapped moisture provide a source of oxygen within coal and charcoal allowing them to burn. The fabrication process used to produce nuclear grade graphite eliminates these oxidation enhancing impurities, creating a dense, highly ordered form of carbon possessing high thermal diffusivity and strongly (covalently) bonded atoms.

Willaim Windes; G. Strydom; J. Kane; R. Smith

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Modular Inspection System for a Complete IN-Service Examination of Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel, Including Beltline Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final Report for a DOE Phase II Contract Describing the design and fabrication of a reactor inspection modular rover prototype for reactor vessel inspection.

David H. Bothell

2000-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

214

Safety approaches for high power modular laser operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 20 years ago, a program was initiated at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study the feasibility of using lasers to separate isotopes of uranium and other materials. Of particular interest has been the development of a uranium enrichment method for the production of commercial nuclear power reactor fuel to replace current more expensive methods. The Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) Program has progressed to the point where a plant-scale facility to demonstrate commercial feasibility has been built and is being tested. The U-AVLIS Program uses copper vapor lasers which pump frequency selective dye lasers to photoionize uranium vapor produced by an electron beam. The selectively ionized isotopes are electrostatically collected. The copper lasers are arranged in oscillator/amplifier chains. The current configuration consists of 12 chains, each with a nominal output of 800 W for a system output in excess of 9 kW. The system requirements are for continuous operation (24 h a day, 7 days a week) and high availability. To meet these requirements, the lasers are designed in a modular form allowing for rapid change-out of the lasers requiring maintenance. Since beginning operation in early 1985, the copper lasers have accumulated over 2 million unit hours at a >90% availability. The dye laser system provides approximately 2.5 kW average power in the visible wavelength range. This large-scale laser system has many safety considerations, including high-power laser beams, high voltage, and large quantities ({approximately}3000 gal) of ethanol dye solutions. The Laboratory`s safety policy requires that safety controls be designed into any process, equipment, or apparatus in the form of engineering controls. Administrative controls further reduce the risk to an acceptable level. Selected examples of engineering and administrative controls currently being used in the U-AVLIS Program are described.

Handren, R.T.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

An Overview of the Safety Case for Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several small modular reactor (SMR) designs emerged in the late 1970s and early 1980s in response to lessons learned from the many technical and operational challenges of the large Generation II light-water reactors. After the accident at the Three Mile Island plant in 1979, an ensuing reactor redesign effort spawned the term inherently safe designs, which later evolved into passively safe terminology. Several new designs were engineered to be deliberately small in order to fully exploit the benefits of passive safety. Today, new SMR designs are emerging with a similar philosophy of offering highly robust and resilient designs with increased safety margins. Additionally, because these contemporary designs are being developed subsequent to the September 11, 2001, terrorist attack, they incorporate a number of intrinsic design features to further strengthen their safety and security. Several SMR designs are being developed in the United States spanning the full spectrum of reactor technologies, including water-, gas-, and liquid-metal-cooled ones. Despite a number of design differences, most of these designs share a common set of design principles to enhance plant safety and robustness, such as eliminating plant design vulnerabilities where possible, reducing accident probabilities, and mitigating accident consequences. An important consequence of the added resilience provided by these design approaches is that the individual reactor units and the entire plant should be able to survive a broader range of extreme conditions. This will enable them to not only ensure the safety of the general public but also help protect the investment of the owner and continued availability of the power-generating asset. Examples of typical SMR design features and their implications for improved plant safety are given for specific SMR designs being developed in the United States.

Ingersoll, Daniel T [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Nuclear Safeguards Considerations For The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High temperature reactors (HTRs) have been considered since the 1940s, and have been constructed and demonstrated in the United Kingdom (Dragon), United States (Peach Bottom and Fort Saint Vrain), Japan (HTTR), Germany (AVR and THTR-300), and have been the subject of conceptual studies in Russia (VGM). The attraction to these reactors is that they can use a variety of reactor fuels, including abundant thorium, which upon reprocessing of the spent fuel can produce fissile U-233. Hence, they could extend the stocks of available uranium, provided the fuel is reprocessed. Another attractive attribute is that HTRs typically operate at a much higher temperature than conventional light water reactors (LWRs), because of the use of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide coated (TRISO) fuel particles embedded in ceramic graphite. Rather than simply discharge most of the unused heat from the working fluid in the power plant to the environment, engineers have been designing reactors for 40 years to recover this heat and make it available for district heating or chemical conversion plants. Demonstrating high-temperature nuclear energy conversion was the purpose behind Fort Saint Vrain in the United States, THTR-300 in Germany, HTTR in Japan, and HTR-10 and HTR-PM, being built in China. This resulted in nuclear reactors at least 30% or more thermodynamically efficient than conventional LWRs, especially if the waste heat can be effectively utilized in chemical processing plants. A modern variant of high temperature reactors is the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). Originally developed in the United States and Germany, it is now being redesigned and marketed by the Republic of South Africa and China. The team examined historical high temperature and high temperature gas reactors (HTR and HTGR) and reviewed safeguards considerations for this reactor. The following is a preliminary report on this topic prepared under the ASA-100 Advanced Safeguards Project in support of the NNSA Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI).

Phillip Casey Durst; David Beddingfield; Brian Boyer; Robert Bean; Michael Collins; Michael Ehinger; David Hanks; David L. Moses; Lee Refalo

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Conceptual designs for modular OTEC SKSS. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume presents the results of the first phase of the Station Keeping Subsystem (SKSS) design study for 40 MW/sub e/ capacity Modular Experiment OTEC Platforms. The objectives of the study were: (1) establishment of basic design requirements; (2) verification of technical feasibility of SKSS designs; (3) identification of merits and demerits; (4) estimates of sizes for major components; (5) estimates of life cycle costs; (6) deployment scenarios and time/cost/risk assessments; (7) maintenance/repair and replacement scenarios; (8) identifications of interface with other OTEC subsystems; (9) recommendations for and major problems in preliminary design; and (10) applicability of concepts to commercial plant SKSS designs. A brief site suitability study was performed with the objective of determining the best possible location at the Punta Tuna (Puerto Rico) site from the standpoint of anchoring. This involved studying the vicinity of the initial location in relation to the prevailing bottom slopes and distances from shore. All subsequent studies were performed for the final selected site. The two baseline OTEC platforms were the APL BARGE and the G and C SPAR. The results of the study are presented in detail. The overall objective of developing two conceptual designs for each of the two baseline OTEC platforms has been accomplished. Specifically: (1) a methodology was developed for conceptual designs and followed to the extent possible. At this stage, a full reliability/performance/optimization analysis based on a probabilistic approach was not used due to the numerous SKSS candidates to be evaluated. A deterministic approach was used. (2) For both of the two baseline platforms, the APL BARGE and the G and C SPAR, all possible SKSS candidate concepts were considered and matrices of SKSS concepts were developed.

None

1980-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

218

Router-level community structure of the Internet Autonomous Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Internet is composed of routing devices connected between them and organized into independent administrative entities: the Autonomous Systems. The existence of different types of Autonomous Systems (like large connectivity providers, Internet Service Providers or universities) together with geographical and economical constraints, turns the Internet into a complex modular and hierarchical network. This organization is reflected in many properties of the Internet topology, like its high degree of clustering and its robustness. In this work, we study the modular structure of the Internet router-level graph in order to assess to what extent the Autonomous Systems satisfy some of the known notions of community structure. We show that the modular structure of the Internet is much richer than what can be captured by the current community detection methods, which are severely affected by resolution limits and by the heterogeneity of the Autonomous Systems. Here we overcome this issue by using a multiresolution d...

Beir, Mariano G; Alvarez-Hamelin, J Ignacio

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor balance of plant and supporting systems design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) is an 800 MWt (>225 MWe) integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR), in which all of the components typically associated with the nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) of a nuclear power plant are incorporated within a single reactor pressure vessel. This paper is the second in a series of four papers which describe the design and functionality of the Westinghouse SMR. It focuses, in particular, upon the supporting systems and the balance of plant (BOP) designs of the Westinghouse SMR. Several Westinghouse SMR systems are classified as safety, and are critical to the safe operation of the Westinghouse SMR. These include the protection and monitoring system (PMS), the passive core cooling system (PXS), and the spent fuel cooling system (SFS) including pools, valves, and piping. The Westinghouse SMR safety related systems include the instrumentation and controls (I and C) as well as redundant and physically separated safety trains with batteries, electrical systems, and switch gears. Several other incorporated systems are non-safety related, but provide functions for plant operations including defense-in-depth functions. These include the chemical volume control system (CVS), heating, ventilation and cooling (HVAC) systems, component cooling water system (CCS), normal residual heat removal system (RNS) and service water system (SWS). The integrated performance of the safety-related and non-safety related systems ensures the safe and efficient operation of the Westinghouse SMR through various conditions and transients. The turbine island consists of the turbine, electric generator, feedwater and steam systems, moisture separation systems, and the condensers. The BOP is designed to minimize assembly time, shipping challenges, and on-site testing requirements for all structures, systems, and components. (authors)

Memmott, M. J.; Stansbury, C.; Taylor, C. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 600 Cranberry Woods Drive, Cranberry Twp. PA 16066 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Duality and Modularity in Elliptic Integrable Systems and Vacua of N=1* Gauge Theories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study complexified elliptic Calogero-Moser integrable systems. We determine the value of the potential at isolated extrema, as a function of the modular parameter of the torus on which the integrable system lives. We calculate the extrema for low rank B,C,D root systems using a mix of analytical and numerical tools. For so(5) we find convincing evidence that the extrema constitute a vector valued modular form for a congruence subgroup of the modular group. For so(7) and so(8), the extrema split into two sets. One set contains extrema that constitute vector valued modular forms for congruence subgroups, and a second set contains extrema that exhibit monodromies around points in the interior of the fundamental domain. The former set can be described analytically, while for the latter, we provide an analytic value for the point of monodromy for so(8), as well as extensive numerical predictions for the Fourier coefficients of the extrema. Our results on the extrema provide a rationale for integrality properties observed in integrable models, and embed these into the theory of vector valued modular forms. Moreover, using the data we gather on the modularity of complexified integrable system extrema, we analyse the massive vacua of mass deformed N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theories with low rank gauge group of type B,C and D. We map out their transformation properties under the infrared electric-magnetic duality group as well as under triality for N=1* with gauge algebra so(8). We compare the exact massive vacua to those found in a semi-classical analysis, and find surprising properties of the quantum gauge theories.

Antoine Bourget; Jan Troost

2015-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

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221

Final report on the use of the modular-logic-nomenclature approach for the N-reactor probabilistic risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The N-Reactor probabilistic risk assessment adaption of the modular logic approach for fault tree modeling has led to the update of the master logic diagram (MLD) nomenclature to conform with a standard modular-logic-model-nomeclature format. This report describes the MLD nomenclature system and provides a listing of the updated MLD label codes, along with the original codes.

NONE

1986-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

222

342 IEEE/ASME TRANSACTIONS ON MECHATRONICS, VOL. 8, NO. 3, SEPTEMBER 2003 Novel Active Connector for Modular  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

represent the current response of the robotics industry to the shift from product-oriented toward client of the modules in a modular robot. In many applications such as robotic systems that operate in remote for Modular Robotic Systems Mircea Badescu and Constantinos Mavroidis, Member, IEEE Abstract--In this paper

Mavroidis, Constantinos

223

Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor nuclear steam supply system design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) is an 800 MWt (>225 MWe) integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR), in which all of the components typically associated with the nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) of a nuclear power plant are incorporated within a single reactor pressure vessel. This paper is the first in a series of four papers which describe the design and functionality of the Westinghouse SMR. Also described in this series are the key drivers influencing the design of the Westinghouse SMR and the unique passive safety features of the Westinghouse SMR. Several critical motivators contributed to the development and integration of the Westinghouse SMR design. These design driving motivators dictated the final configuration of the Westinghouse SMR to varying degrees, depending on the specific features under consideration. These design drivers include safety, economics, AP1000{sup R} reactor expertise and experience, research and development requirements, functionality of systems and components, size of the systems and vessels, simplicity of design, and licensing requirements. The Westinghouse SMR NSSS consists of an integral reactor vessel within a compact containment vessel. The core is located in the bottom of the reactor vessel and is composed of 89 modified Westinghouse 17x17 Robust Fuel Assemblies (RFA). These modified fuel assemblies have an active core length of only 2.4 m (8 ft) long, and the entirety of the core is encompassed by a radial reflector. The Westinghouse SMR core operates on a 24 month fuel cycle. The reactor vessel is approximately 24.4 m (80 ft) long and 3.7 m (12 ft) in diameter in order to facilitate standard rail shipping to the site. The reactor vessel houses hot and cold leg channels to facilitate coolant flow, control rod drive mechanisms (CRDM), instrumentation and cabling, an intermediate flange to separate flow and instrumentation and facilitate simpler refueling, a pressurizer, a straight tube, recirculating steam generator, and eight reactor coolant pumps (RCP). The containment vessel is 27.1 m (89 ft) long and 9.8 m (32 ft) in diameter, and is designed to withstand pressures up to 1.7 MPa (250 psi). It is completely submerged in a pool of water serving as a heat sink and radiation shield. Housed within the containment are four combined core makeup tanks (CMT)/passive residual heat removal (PRHR) heat exchangers, two in-containment pools (ICP), two ICP tanks and four valves which function as the automatic depressurization system (ADS). The PRHR heat exchangers are thermally connected to two different ultimate heat sink (UHS) tanks which provide transient cooling capabilities. (authors)

Memmott, M. J.; Harkness, A. W.; Van Wyk, J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 600 Cranberry Woods Drive, Cranberry Twp. PA 16066 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 1: Cost Estimates of Small Modular Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This deliverable is the Final Report for Task 1, Cost Estimates of Small Modular Systems, as part of NREL Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Subtask 1.1 looked into processes and technologies that have been commercially built at both large and small scales, with three technologies, Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) of refinery gas oil, Steam Methane Reforming (SMR) of Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids (NGL) Expanders, chosen for further investigation. These technologies were chosen due to their applicability relative to other technologies being considered by NREL for future commercial applications, such as indirect gasification and fluidized bed tar cracking. Research in this subject is driven by an interest in the impact that scaling has on the cost and major process unit designs for commercial technologies. Conclusions from the evaluations performed could be applied to other technologies being considered for modular or skid-mounted applications.

Nexant Inc.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Technical Needs for Enhancing Risk Monitors with Equipment Condition Assessment for Advanced Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced small modular reactors (aSMRs) can provide the United States with a safe, sustainable, and carbon-neutral energy source. The controllable day-to-day costs of aSMRs are expected to be dominated by operation and maintenance costs. Health and condition assessment coupled with online risk monitors can potentially enhance affordability of aSMRs through optimized operational planning and maintenance scheduling. Currently deployed risk monitors are an extension of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). For complex engineered systems like nuclear power plants, PRA systematically combines event likelihoods and the probability of failure (POF) of key components, so that when combined with the magnitude of possible adverse consequences to determine risk. Traditional PRA uses population-based POF information to estimate the average plant risk over time. Currently, most nuclear power plants have a PRA that reflects the as-operated, as-modified plant; this model is updated periodically, typically once a year. Risk monitors expand on living PRA by incorporating changes in the day-by-day plant operation and configuration (e.g., changes in equipment availability, operating regime, environmental conditions). However, population-based POF (or population- and time-based POF) is still used to populate fault trees. Health monitoring techniques can be used to establish condition indicators and monitoring capabilities that indicate the component-specific POF at a desired point in time (or over a desired period), which can then be incorporated in the risk monitor to provide a more accurate estimate of the plant risk in different configurations. This is particularly important for active systems, structures, and components (SSCs) proposed for use in aSMR designs. These SSCs may differ significantly from those used in the operating fleet of light-water reactors (or even in LWR-based SMR designs). Additionally, the operating characteristics of aSMRs can present significantly different requirements, including the need to operate in different coolant environments, higher operating temperatures, and longer operating cycles between planned refueling and maintenance outages. These features, along with the relative lack of operating experience for some of the proposed advanced designs, may limit the ability to estimate event probability and component POF with a high degree of certainty. Incorporating real-time estimates of component POF may compensate for a relative lack of established knowledge about the long-term component behavior and improve operational and maintenance planning and optimization. The particular eccentricities of advanced reactors and small modular reactors provide unique challenges and needs for advanced instrumentation, control, and human-machine interface (ICHMI) techniques such as enhanced risk monitors (ERM) in aSMRs. Several features of aSMR designs increase the need for accurate characterization of the real-time risk during operation and maintenance activities. A number of technical gaps in realizing ERM exist, and these gaps are largely independent of the specific reactor technology. As a result, the development of a framework for ERM would enable greater situational awareness regardless of the specific class of reactor technology. A set of research tasks are identified in a preliminary research plan to enable the development, testing, and demonstration of such a framework. Although some aspects of aSMRs, such as specific operational characteristics, will vary and are not now completely defined, the proposed framework is expected to be relevant regardless of such uncertainty. The development of an ERM framework will provide one of the key technical developments necessary to ensure the economic viability of aSMRs.

Coble, Jamie B.; Coles, Garill A.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Berglin, Eric J.; Wootan, David W.; Mitchell, Mark R.

2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

226

Ris-R-1202(EN) IAU 00-A-891 Modular supervisory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diesel generators. Nevertheless hybrid power systems may constitute the most economical solution in manyRisø-R-1202(EN) IAU 00-A-891 Modular supervisory controller for hybrid power systems Alexandre de;Abstract The power supply of remote places has been commonly provided by thermal power plants, usually

227

Modular Termination of Basic Narrowing Maria Alpuente, Santiago Escobar, and Jose Iborra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modular Termination of Basic Narrowing Mar´ia Alpuente, Santiago Escobar, and Jos´e Iborra theories. Another application is analyzing ter- mination of narrowing by checking the termination of basic narrowing, as done in pioneering work by Hullot. In this work, we study the modu- larity of termination

Escobar, Santiago

228

To appear in the Journal of Symbolic Computation Modular Termination Proofs for Rewriting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To appear in the Journal of Symbolic Computation Modular Termination Proofs for Rewriting Using Recently, Arts and Giesl developed the dependency pair approach which allows automated termination and innermost termination proofs for many term rewriting systems for which such proofs were not possible before

Ábrahám, Erika

229

RAMANUJAN AND THE MODULAR j-INVARIANT BRUCE C. BERNDT AND HENG HUAT CHAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RAMANUJAN AND THE MODULAR j-INVARIANT BRUCE C. BERNDT AND HENG HUAT CHAN Abstract. A new infinite­functions, Hilbert class fields. 1 #12; 2 BRUCE C. BERNDT AND HENG HUAT CHAN At the top of page 392 in [21, vol. 2

Berndt, Bruce C.

230

Conceptual Design of a 100 MWe Modular Molten Salt Power Tower Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A conceptual design of a 100 MWe modular molten salt solar power tower plant has been developed which can provide capacity factors in the range of 35 to 75%. Compared to single tower plants, the modular design provides a higher degree of flexibility in achieving the desired customer's capacity factor and is obtained simply by adjusting the number of standard modules. Each module consists of a standard size heliostat field and receiver system, hence reengineering and associated unacceptable performance uncertainties due to scaling are eliminated. The modular approach with multiple towers also improves plant availability. Heliostat field components, receivers and towers are shop assembled allowing for high quality and minimal field assembly. A centralized thermal-storage system stores hot salt from the receivers, allowing nearly continuous power production, independent of solar energy collection, and improved parity with the grid. A molten salt steam generator converts the stored thermal energy into steam, which powers a steam turbine generator to produce electricity. This paper describes the conceptual design of the plant, the advantages of modularity, expected performance, pathways to cost reductions, and environmental impact.

James E. Pacheco; Carter Moursund, Dale Rogers, David Wasyluk

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

231

MODULAR MULTI-LEVEL CONVERTER BASED HVDC SYSTEM FOR GRID CONNECTION OF OFFSHORE WIND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODULAR MULTI-LEVEL CONVERTER BASED HVDC SYSTEM FOR GRID CONNECTION OF OFFSHORE WIND POWER PLANT U off-shore wind power plants. The MMC consists of a large number of simple voltage sourced converter offshore wind power plants (WPP) because they offer higher energy yield due to a superior wind profile

Chaudhary, Sanjay

232

CENTRAL CHARACTERS FOR SMOOTH IRREDUCIBLE MODULAR REPRESENTATIONS OF GL2(Qp)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CENTRAL CHARACTERS FOR SMOOTH IRREDUCIBLE MODULAR REPRESENTATIONS OF GL2(Qp) by Laurent Berger irreducible Fp-linear representation of GL2(Qp) admits a central character. Introduction Let be a representation of GL2(Qp). We say that is smooth, if the stabilizer of any v is an open subgroup of GL2(Qp

Berger, Laurent

233

An approach for improving Fault-Tolerance in Automotive Modular Embedded Software*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An approach for improving Fault-Tolerance in Automotive Modular Embedded Software* * This work has transportation research programme PREDIT) focused on robustness of executive software in critical automotive.killijian}@laas.fr Abstract Error detection and error recovery mechanism must be carefully selected in automotive embedded

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

234

Prediction of Protein Subcellular Multi-locations with a Min-Max Modular  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-location problem. In addition, there are a large portion of proteins lack the information like GO and FunPrediction of Protein Subcellular Multi-locations with a Min-Max Modular Support Vector Machine subcellular multi-locations of proteins with machine learning techniques is a challenging problem

Lu, Bao-Liang

235

Energy Conservation Through the Use of Modular Refractory Fiber Linings - An Unexpected Divided  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperature, heat loss, velocity, etc.), and was free of operation failures. These efforts produced the Z-BLOK* Module Refractory Fiber Lining, which was first installed in an operating furnace in April, 1975. After obtaining a patent for this unique modular...

Kleeman, L. A.; Mewhinney, T. R.; Proctor, S. J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

CONDENSATION OF INDUCED REPRESENTATIONS AND AN APPLICATION: THE 2-MODULAR DECOMPOSITION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONDENSATION OF INDUCED REPRESENTATIONS AND AN APPLICATION: THE 2-MODULAR DECOMPOSITION an algorithm to condense induced modules for a finite group over a finite field. It is built. Introduction In recent years, condensation has become one of the most valuable tools in computational

Mueller, Jürgen

237

CONDENSATION OF INDUCED REPRESENTATIONS AND AN APPLICATION: THE 2-MODULAR DECOMPOSITION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONDENSATION OF INDUCED REPRESENTATIONS AND AN APPLICATION: THE 2-MODULAR DECOMPOSITION NUMBERS OF Co 2 J  URGEN M  ULLER AND JENS ROSENBOOM Abstract. We present an algorithm to condense induced, condensation has become one of the most valuable tools in computational representation theory of #12;nite

Mueller, Jürgen

238

CONDENSATION OF INDUCED REPRESENTATIONS AND AN APPLICATION: THE 2-MODULAR DECOMPOSITION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONDENSATION OF INDUCED REPRESENTATIONS AND AN APPLICATION: THE 2-MODULAR DECOMPOSITION NUMBERS OF Co2 J¨URGEN M¨ULLER AND JENS ROSENBOOM Abstract. We present an algorithm to condense induced modules, condensation has become one of the most valuable tools in computational representation theory of finite groups

Mueller, Jürgen

239

Analysis of Modular Arithmetic Markus MullerOlm 1 and Helmut Seidl 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of Modular Arithmetic Markus M?uller­Olm 1 and Helmut Seidl 2 1 Universit?at Dortmund, Fachbereich Informatik, LS 5 Baroper Str. 301, 44221 Dortmund, Germany markus.mueller­olm@cs.uni­dortmund.de 2

Müller-Olm, Markus

240

Z-Tiles: Building Blocks for Modular, Pressure-Sensing Floorspaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Z-Tiles: Building Blocks for Modular, Pressure-Sensing Floorspaces Bruce Richardson, Krispin Leydon, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland {bruce.richardson | krispin.leydon | mikael.fernstrom}@ul.ie Joseph acting parallel to the z axis. Copyright is held by the author/owner(s). CHI 2004, April 24-29, 2004

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems modular structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A Modular Approach to Redox-active Multimetallic Amphiphiles of Discotic Topology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new modular [Fe{sup II}(Fe{sup III}L{sup 2}){sub 3}](PF{sub 6}){sub 2} species with discoid (disk-like) topology exhibits redox and surfactant properties and points to a new approach for multimetallic Langmuir film precursors.

F Lesh; R Shanmugam; M Allard; M Lanznaster; M Hegg; M Rodgers; J Shearer; C Verani

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

242

Modular Formalization of Reactive Modules in Ming-Hsien Tsai1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modular Formalization of Reactive Modules in COQ Ming-Hsien Tsai1,2 and Bow-Yaw Wang1 1 Institute systems in proof assistants consists of several tedious tasks. Firstly, system behavior has, interleaving versus concur- rent semantics need be resolved in behavioral specification. Secondly, system

Wang, Bow-Yaw

243

Metastability and chimera states in modular delay and pulse-coupled oscillator Mark Wildiea)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metastability and chimera states in modular delay and pulse-coupled oscillator networks Mark of a large number of "chimera" states characterized by coexistent synchronized and desynchronized subsystems, and a critical region is found that maximizes indices of both metastability and the prevalence of chimera states

Shanahan, Murray

244

Development of Modular Real-Time Software for the TALARIS Lunar Hopper Testbed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Michael C. Johnson, David W. Miller June 2011 SSL #6-11 #12;2 #12;Development of Modular Real 2011 SSL #6-11 This work is based on the unaltered text of the thesis by Christopher J. Han submitted

245

Towards Energy Homeostasis in an Autonomous Self-Reconfigurable Modular Robotic Organism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to adapt to new scenarios overtime [6]. This paper focuses on an artificial energy homeostasis systemTowards Energy Homeostasis in an Autonomous Self-Reconfigurable Modular Robotic Organism Raja Humza Department of Electronics University of York York, United Kingdom {mm520, jt517, amt}@ohm.york.ac.uk Abstract

Timmis, Jon

246

Modular Operational Test Plans for Inferences on Software Reliability Based on a Markov Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modular Operational Test Plans for Inferences on Software Reliability Based on a Markov Model reliabilities. An operational test procedure is considered in which only the individual modules are tested and the system is considered acceptable if, and only if, no failures are observed. The minimum number of tests

Mazumdar, Mainak

247

UCD 2006/7/non-Modular Page 1 of X WINTER EXAMINATIONS -2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

principles for computer network software are hierarchical modularity, encapsulation, and distributed scripts. Briefly explain these principles in the context of layered computer network architectures. (1-b) 200 nodes/second, where the average frame length is 2,000 bits. The transmission rate at each node is 100 Mbps (where 1

Murphy, John

248

UCD 2006/7/non-Modular Page 1 of X AUTUMN EXAMINATIONS 2006/2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

architectural principles for computer network software are hierarchical modularity and distributed scripts. Briefly explain these principles in the context of layered computer network architectures. (1-b) Briefly no collisions among the nodes' transmissions. (1-d) 100 nodes are connected to a 1,000 metre length of coaxial

Murphy, John

249

TESLA Report 2005-04 Modular & reconfigurable common PCB-platform of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TESLA Report 2005-04 Modular & reconfigurable common PCB-platform of FPGA based LLRF control system for TESLA Test Facility Krzysztof T. Pozniak, Ryszard S. Romaniuk Institute of Electronic Systems in a universal motherboard (MB) for the next generation of LLRF control system for TESLA. The motherboard bases

250

Modularity and Integration in the Design of a Socially Interactive Robot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modularity and Integration in the Design of a Socially Interactive Robot Franc¸ois Michaud, Yannick Brosseau, Carle C^ot´e, Dominic L´etourneau, Pierre Moisan, Arnaud Ponchon, Cl´ement Ra¨ievsky, Jean:{laborius-challenge}@listes.USherbrooke.ca Abstract-- Designing robots that are capable of interacting with humans in real life settings

Kabanza, Froduald

251

A modular object-oriented framework for hierarchical multi-resolution robot simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a commercial industrial robot. KEYWORDS: Robot simulation; Object orientation; Hierarchical simulation. 1 available today are more concerned with robot task programming applications rather than design. WhileA modular object-oriented framework for hierarchical multi- resolution robot simulation Sanghoon

Treuille, Adrien

252

Modular Topology Control and Energy Model for Wireless Ad Hoc Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modular Topology Control and Energy Model for Wireless Ad Hoc Sensor Networks Niranjan in a harsh terrain typically are battery operated and, therefore, require energy efficient network protocols. In order to ease the analysis of the energy usage of proposed network protocols, this paper proposes

Jay Yang, Shanchieh

253

Towards a Minimal Architecture for a Printable, Modular, and Robust Sensing Skin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Bachrach, and R.S. Fearing Abstract-- This work presents a low-complexity modular sensor grid architecture to provide a smart skin to non-convex shapes, such as a robot body and legs. To configure a sensing skin shaped by arbitrary cuts and rapid changes in designs, we use a wavefront planning approach to generate

Fearing, Ron

254

EEL 4712 Digital Design 1. Catalog Description (3 credits) Advanced modular logic design, design languages,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EEL 4712 Digital Design 1. Catalog Description ­ (3 credits) Advanced modular logic design, design systems, using the state of the art technologies and design environments and tools. 4. Contribution containing an Altera Cyclone II EP2C8T144C8 FPGA (will be provided to you, included in lab fee) 13

Fang, Yuguang "Michael"

255

Large-Scale Patent Classification with Min-Max Modular Support Vector Machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large-Scale Patent Classification with Min-Max Modular Support Vector Machines Xiao-Lei Chu, Chao Ma, Jing Li, Bao-Liang Lu Senior Member, IEEE, Masao Utiyama, and Hitoshi Isahara Abstract-- Patent-world patent classification typically exceeds one million, and this number increases every year. An effective

Lu, Bao-Liang

256

MIT Modular Pebble Bed Reactor (MPBR) A Summary of Research Activities and Accomplishments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turbine Hall Boundary Admin Training Control Bldg. Maintenance Parts / Tools 10 9 8 7 6 4 2 5 3 1 0 20 40 Independently · Indirect Gas Cycle · Real Modularity · High Automation · License by Test #12;Project Overview.71MPa 69.7 C 4.67MPa Cooling RPV #12;BOP System Analysis and Dynamic Simulation Model Development

257

Modular Dual Coolant Pb-17Li Blanket Design For ARIES-CS Compact Stellarator Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the study. The preferred blanket concept is a dual coolant blanket with a He- cooled ferritic steel firstModular Dual Coolant Pb-17Li Blanket Design For ARIES-CS Compact Stellarator Power Plant X.R. Wanga from the engineering effort during the second phase of ARIES-CS study on the conceptual design

Raffray, A. René

258

Deep-Burn Modular Helium Reactor Fuel Development Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the workscope, schedule and cost for the technology development tasks needed to satisfy the fuel and fission product transport Design Data Needs (DDNs) for the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR), operating in its role of transmuting transuranic (TRU) nuclides in spent fuel discharged from commercial light-water reactors (LWRs). In its application for transmutation, the GT-MHR is referred to as the Deep-Burn MHR (DB-MHR). This Fuel Development Plan (FDP) describes part of the overall program being undertaken by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), utilities, and industry to evaluate the use of the GT-MHR to transmute transuranic nuclides from spent nuclear fuel. The Fuel Development Plan (FDP) includes the work on fuel necessary to support the design and licensing of the DB-MHR. The FDP is organized into ten sections. Section 1 provides a summary of the most important features of the plan, including cost and schedule information. Section 2 describes the DB-MHR concept, the features of its fuel and the plan to develop coated particle fuel for transmutation. Section 3 describes the knowledge base for fabrication of coated particles, the experience with irradiation performance of coated particle fuels, the database for fission product transport in HTGR cores, and describes test data and calculations for the performance of coated particle fuel while in a repository. Section 4 presents the fuel performance requirements in terms of as-manufactured quality and performance of the fuel coatings under irradiation and accident conditions. These requirements are provisional because the design of the DB-MHR is in an early stage. However, the requirements are presented in this preliminary form to guide the initial work on the fuel development. Section 4 also presents limits on the irradiation conditions to which the coated particle fuel can be subjected for the core design. These limits are based on past irradiation experience. Section 5 describes the Design Data Needs to: (1) fabricate the coated particle fuel, (2) predict its performance in the reactor core, (3) predict the radionuclide release rates from the reactor core, and (4) predict the performance of spent fuel in a geological repository. The heart of this fuel development plan is Section 6, which describes the development activities proposed to satisfy the DDNs presented in Section 5. The development scope is divided into Fuel Process Development, Fuel Materials Development, Fission Product Transport, and Spent Fuel Disposal. Section 7 describes the facilities to be used. Generally, this program will utilize existing facilities. While some facilities will need to be modified, there is no requirement for major new facilities. Section 8 states the Quality Assurance requirements that will be applied to the development activities. Section 9 presents detailed costs organized by WBS and spread over time. Section 10 presents a list of the types of deliverables that will be prepared in each of the WBS elements. Four Appendices contain supplementary information on: (a) design data needs, (b) the interface with the separations plant, (c) the detailed development schedule, and (d) the detailed cost estimate.

McEachern, D

2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

259

MODULAR AND FULL SIZE SIMPLIFIED BOILING WATER REACTOR DESIGN WITH FULLY PASSIVE SAFETY SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK B204 The overall goal of this three-year research project was to develop a new scientific design of a compact modular 200 MWe and a full size 1200 MWe simplified boiling water reactors (SBWR). Specific objectives of this research were: (1) to perform scientific designs of the core neutronics and core thermal-hydraulics for a small capacity and full size simplified boiling water reactor, (2) to develop a passive safety system design, (3) improve and validate safety analysis code, (4) demonstrate experimentally and analytically all design functions of the safety systems for the design basis accidents (DBA) and (5) to develop the final scientific design of both SBWR systems, 200 MWe (SBWR-200) and 1200 MWe (SBWR-1200). The SBWR combines the advantages of design simplicity and completely passive safety systems. These advantages fit well within the objectives of NERI and the Department of Energy's focus on the development of Generation III and IV nuclear power. The 3-year research program was structured around seven tasks. Task 1 was to perform the preliminary thermal-hydraulic design. Task 2 was to perform the core neutronic design analysis. Task 3 was to perform a detailed scaling study and obtain corresponding PUMA conditions from an integral test. Task 4 was to perform integral tests and code evaluation for the DBA. Task 5 was to perform a safety analysis for the DBA. Task 6 was to perform a BWR stability analysis. Task 7 was to perform a final scientific design of the compact modular SBWR-200 and the full size SBWR-1200. A no cost extension for the third year was requested and the request was granted and all the project tasks were completed by April 2003. The design activities in tasks 1, 2, and 3 were completed as planned. The existing thermal-hydraulic information, core physics, and fuel lattice information was collected on the existing design of the simplified boiling water reactor. The thermal-hydraulic design were developed. Based on a detailed integral system scaling analysis, design parameters were obtained and designs of the compact modular 200 MWe SBWR and the full size 1200 MWe SBWR were developed. These reactors are provided with passive safety systems. A new passive vacuum breaker check valve was designed to replace the mechanical vacuum beaker check valve. The new vacuum breaker check valve was based on a hydrostatic head, and was fail safe. The performance of this new valve was evaluated both by the thermal-hydraulic code RELAP5 and by the experiments in a scaled SBWR facility, PUMA. In the core neutronic design a core depletion model was implemented to PARCS code. A lattice design for the SBWR fuel assemblies was performed. Design improvements were made to the neutronics/thermal-hydraulics models of SBWR-200 and SBWR-1200, and design analyses of these reactors were performed. The design base accident analysis and evaluation of all the passive safety systems were completed as scheduled in tasks 4 and 5. Initial conditions for the small break loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) and large break LOCA using REALP5 code were obtained. Small and large break LOCA tests were performed and the data was analyzed. An anticipated transient with scram was simulated using the RELAP5 code for SBWR-200. The transient considered was an accidental closure of the main steam isolation valve (MSIV), which was considered to be the most significant transient. The evaluation of the RELAP5 code against experimental data for SBWR-1200 was completed. In task 6, the instability analysis for the three SBWR designs (SBWR-1200, SBWR-600 and SBWR-200) were simulated for start-up transients and the results were similar. Neither the geysering instability, nor the loop type instability was predicted by RAMONA-4B in the startup simulation following the recommended procedure by GE. The density wave oscillation was not observed at all because the power level used in the simulation was not high enough. A study was made of the potential instabilities by imposing an unrealistically high power ramp in a short time period, as suggested by GE. RAMON

M. Ishii; S. T. Revankar; T. Downar; Y. Xu, H. J. Yoon; D. Tinkler; U. S. Rohatgi

2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

260

Modular robots for making and climbing 3-D trusses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A truss climbing robot has been extensively investigated because of its wide range of promising applications such as construction and inspection of truss structures. It is designed to have degrees of freedom to move in ...

Yoon, Yeoreum

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems modular structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Modular Process Equipment for Low Cost Manufacturing of High...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

For the high capacity, we have developed CuSnFe electro-deposition process and obtained nano-structure alloy for high loading NMC CuSnFe cell testing. 4 5132013 - 2013 DOE AMR...

262

Modular Process Equipment for Low Cost Manufacturing of High...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

For the high capacity, we have developed CuSnFe electro-deposition process and obtained nano-structure alloy for high loading NMC CuSnFe cell testing. Technical Summary 6...

263

Structural and Damage Assessment of Multi-Section Modular Hybrid Composite Wind Turbine Blade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the size of wind turbines to generate higher power output. Typically, the larger/longer blade designs rely on hybrid material systems such as carbon and/or glass fiber (CF/GF) reinforced polymers to improve specific stiffness/strength and damage tolerance...

Nanami, Norimichi

2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

264

Performance Evaluation for Modular, Scalable Overhead Cooling Systems In Data Centers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scientific and enterprise data centers, IT equipment product development, and research data center laboratories typically require continuous cooling to control inlet air temperatures within recommended operating levels for the IT equipment. The consolidation and higher density aggregation of slim computing, storage and networking hardware has resulted in higher power density than what the raised-floor system design, coupled with commonly used computer rack air conditioning (CRAC) units, was originally conceived to handle. Many existing data centers and newly constructed data centers adopt CRAC units, which inherently handle heat transfer within data centers via air as the heat transfer media. This results in energy performance of the ventilation and cooling systems being less than optimal. Understanding the current trends toward higher power density in IT computing, more and more IT equipment manufacturers are designing their equipment to operate in 'conventional' data center environments, while considering provisions of alternative cooling solutions to either their equipment or supplemental cooling in rack or row systems. Naturally, the trend toward higher power density resulting from current and future generations of servers has, in the meanwhile, created significant opportunities for precision cooling suppliers to engineer and manufacture packaged modular and scalable systems. The modular and scalable cooling systems aim at significantly improving efficiency while addressing the thermal challenges, improving reliability, and allowing for future needs and growth. Such pre-engineered and manufactured systems may be a significant improvement over current design; however, without an energy efficiency focus, their applications could also lead to even lower energy efficiencies in the overall data center infrastructure. The overall goal of the project supported by California Energy Commission was to characterize four commercially available, modular cooling systems installed in a data center. Such modular cooling systems are all scalable localized units, and will be evaluated in terms of their operating energy efficiency in a real data center, respectively, as compared to the energy efficiency of traditional legacy data center cooling systems. The technical objective of this project was to evaluate the energy performance of one of the four commercially available modular cooling systems installed in a data center in Sun Microsystems, Inc. This report is the result of a test plan that was developed with the industrial participants' input, including specific design and operating characteristics of the selected modular localized cooling solution provided by vendor 1. The technical evaluation included monitoring and measurement of selected parameters, and establishing and calculating energy efficiency metrics for the selected cooling product, which is a modular, scalable overhead cooling system. The system was tested in a hot/cold aisle environment without separation, or containment or the hot or cold aisles. The scope of this report is to quantify energy performance of the modular cooling unit in operation as it corresponds to a combination of varied server loads and inlet air temperatures. The information generated from this testing when combined with a concurrent research study to document the energy efficiency of the host data center's central chilled water cooling plant can be used to estimate potential energy savings from implementing modular cooling compared to conventional cooling in data centers.

Xu, TengFang T.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY WITH POLYMER COMPONENTS WITHIN MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The first deployment target for the technology is within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the facility. This report provides the data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The test was conducted over six months. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers present in MCU (i.e., PEEK, Grafoil{reg_sign}, Tefzel{reg_sign} and Isolast{reg_sign}) in the modified NGS (where the concentration of the guanidine suppressor and MaxCalix was varied systematically) showed that guanidine (LIX{reg_sign}79) selectively affected Tefzel{reg_sign} (by an increase in size and lowering its density). The copolymer structure of Tefzel{reg_sign} and possibly its porosity allows for the easier diffusion of guanidine. Tefzel{reg_sign} is used as the seat material in some of the valves at MCU. Long term exposure to guanidine, may make the valves hard to operate over time due to the seat material (Tefzel{reg_sign}) increasing in size. However, since the physical changes of Tefzel{reg_sign} in the improved solvent are comparable to the changes in the CSSX baseline solvent, no design changes are needed with respect to the Tefzel{reg_sign} seating material. PEEK, Grafoil{reg_sign} and Isolast{reg_sign} were not affected by guanidine and MaxCalix within six months of exposure. The initial rapid weight gain observed in every polymer is assigned to the finite and limited uptake of Isopar{reg_sign} L/Modifier by the polymers probably due to the polymers porosity and rough surfaces. Spectroscopic data on the organic liquid and the polymer surfaces showed no preferential adsorption of any component in the NGS to the polymers and no leachate was observed in the NGS from any of the polymers studied.

Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.; Fink, S.

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

266

Analysis of community structure in networks of correlated data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a reformulation of modularity that allows the analysis of the community structure in networks of correlated data. The new modularity preserves the probabilistic semantics of the original definition even when the network is directed, weighted, signed, and has self-loops. This is the most general condition one can find in the study of any network, in particular those defined from correlated data. We apply our results to a real network of correlated data between stores in the city of Lyon (France).

Gomez, S.; Jensen, P.; Arenas, A.

2008-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

267

ARIES-CS MAGNET CONDUCTOR AND STRUCTURE EVALUATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the conceptual de- sign and assessment of a compact stellarator power plant identified the important advantages of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 h ARIES Power Plant Studies, University of California, San Diego superconductors have been ex- plored. The coil structure design approach adopted is to wind all six modular coils

268

The design of a reduced diameter Pebble Bed Modular Reactor for reactor pressure vessel transport by railcar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many desirable locations for Pebble Bed Modular Reactors are currently out of consideration as construction sites for current designs due to limitations on the mode of transportation for large RPVs. In particular, the ...

Everson, Matthew S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Feasibility, benefits and challenges of modular construction in high rise development in the United States : a developer's perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modular construction has long been utilized in the construction of residential and many other commercial product types as a means for potentially quicker construction delivery times. Over the past 5 years this construction ...

Velamati, Sri

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Conceptual modular description of the high-level waste management system for system studies model development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents modular descriptions of possible alternative components of the federal high-level radioactive waste management system and the procedures for combining these modules to obtain descriptions for alternative configurations of that system. The 20 separate system component modules presented here can be combined to obtain a description of any of the 17 alternative system configurations (i.e., scenarios) that were evaluated in the MRS Systems Studies program (DOE 1989a). First-approximation descriptions of other yet-undefined system configurations could also be developed for system study purposes from this database. The descriptions include, in a modular format, both functional descriptions of the processes in the waste management system, plus physical descriptions of the equipment and facilities necessary for performance of those functions.

McKee, R.W.; Young, J.R.; Konzek, G.J.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Passive compact molten salt reactor (PCMSR), modular thermal breeder reactor with totally passive safety system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Design Study Passive Compact Molten Salt Reactor (PCMSR) with totally passive safety system has been performed. The term of Compact in the PCMSR name means that the reactor system is designed to have relatively small volume per unit power output by using modular and integral concept. In term of modular, the reactor system consists of three modules, i.e. reactor module, turbine module and fuel management module. The reactor module is an integral design that consists of reactor, primary and intermediate heat exchangers and passive post shutdown cooling system. The turbine module is an integral design of a multi heating, multi cooling, regenerative gas turbine. The fuel management module consists of all equipments related to fuel preparation, fuel reprocessing and radioactive handling. The preliminary calculations show that the PCMSR has negative temperature and void reactivity coefficient, passive shutdown characteristic related to fuel pump failure and possibility of using natural circulation for post shutdown cooling system.

Harto, Andang Widi [Engineering Physics Department, Faculty of Engineering, Gadjah Mada University (Indonesia)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

272

Modular Approach for Continuous Cell-Level Balancing to Improve Performance of Large Battery Packs: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy storage systems require battery cell balancing circuits to avoid divergence of cell state of charge (SOC). A modular approach based on distributed continuous cell-level control is presented that extends the balancing function to higher level pack performance objectives such as improving power capability and increasing pack lifetime. This is achieved by adding DC-DC converters in parallel with cells and using state estimation and control to autonomously bias individual cell SOC and SOC range, forcing healthier cells to be cycled deeper than weaker cells. The result is a pack with improved degradation characteristics and extended lifetime. The modular architecture and control concepts are developed and hardware results are demonstrated for a 91.2-Wh battery pack consisting of four series Li-ion battery cells and four dual active bridge (DAB) bypass DC-DC converters.

Muneed ur Rehman, M.; Evzelman, M.; Hathaway, K.; Zane, R.; Plett, G. L.; Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Maksimovic, D.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Demonstration of a Small Modular Biopower System Using Poultry Litter-Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On-farm conversion of poultry litter into energy is a unique market connected opportunity for commercialization of small modular bioenergy systems. The United States Department of Energy recognized the need in the poultry industry for alternative litter management as an opportunity for bioenergy. The DOE created a relevant topic in the December 2000 release of the small business innovative research (SBIR) grant solicitation. Community Power Corporation responded to this solicitation by proposing the development of a small modular gasification and gas cleanup system to produce separate value streams of clean producer gas and mineral rich solids. This phase II report describes our progress in the development of an on-farm litter to energy system.

John Reardon; Art Lilley

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Population Sensitivity Evaluation of Two Proposed Hampton Roads Area Sites for a Possible Small Modular Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research project is to use the OR-SAGE tool to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) in evaluating future electrical generation deployment options for small modular reactors (SMRs) in areas with significant energy demand from the federal sector. Deployment of SMRs in zones with high federal energy use can provide a means of meeting federal clean energy goals.

Belles, R. J. [ORNL; Omitaomu, O. A. [ORNL

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Construction and properties of the modules for patching (Modularity 5.20.10)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1, 2010 1 Introduction/Motivation Recall that our ultimate goal is to prove a modularity lifting will describe later. We'll construct maps Rn Tn lifting R0 T0 , and certain Rn -modules Mn . By a pigeonhole by the Tv for v (U). (It comes from the double coset Uv 1 0 0 v Uv.) Now let's fix the "ground level" U

Conrad, Brian

276

Modular symbols for reductive groups and p-adic Rankin-Selberg convolutions over number fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We give a construction of a wide class of modular symbols attached to reductive groups. As an application we construct a p-adic distribution interpolating the special values of the twisted Rankin-Selberg L-function attached to cuspidal automorphic representations of GL(n) and GL(n-1) over number fields. If the representations are ordinary at p, our distribution is bounded and gives rise to a p-adic L-function.

Januszewski, Fabian

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Reference modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Plant: Concept description report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a summary description of the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) concept and interim results of assessments of costs, safety, constructibility, operability, maintainability, and availability. Conceptual design of this concept was initiated in October 1985 and is scheduled for completion in 1987. Participating industrial contractors are Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation (SWEC), GA Technologies, Inc. (GA), General Electric Co. (GE), and Combustion Engineering, Inc. (C-E).

Not Available

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Studies on the closed-loop digital control of multi-modular reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the theoretical development and the evaluation via both experiment and simulation of digital methods for the closed-loop control of power, temperature, and steam generator level in multi-modular reactors. The major conclusion of the research reported here is that the technology is currently available to automate many aspects of the operation of multi-modular plants. This will in turn minimize the number of required personnel and thus contain both operating and personnel costs, allow each module to be operated at a different power level thereby staggering the times at which refuelings would be needed, and maintain the competitiveness of US industry relative to foreign vendors who are developing and applying advanced control concepts. The technology described in this report is appropriate to the proposed multi-modular reactor designs and to present-generation pressurized water reactors. Its extension to boiling water reactors is possible provided that the commitment is made to create a real-time model of a BWR. The work reported here was performed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) under contract to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and to the United States Department of Energy (Division of Industry and University Programs, Contract No. DE-FG07-90ER12930.)

Bernard, J.A. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Nuclear Reactor Lab.); Henry, A.F.; Lanning, D.D.; Meyer, J.E. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Studies on the closed-loop digital control of multi-modular reactors. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the theoretical development and the evaluation via both experiment and simulation of digital methods for the closed-loop control of power, temperature, and steam generator level in multi-modular reactors. The major conclusion of the research reported here is that the technology is currently available to automate many aspects of the operation of multi-modular plants. This will in turn minimize the number of required personnel and thus contain both operating and personnel costs, allow each module to be operated at a different power level thereby staggering the times at which refuelings would be needed, and maintain the competitiveness of US industry relative to foreign vendors who are developing and applying advanced control concepts. The technology described in this report is appropriate to the proposed multi-modular reactor designs and to present-generation pressurized water reactors. Its extension to boiling water reactors is possible provided that the commitment is made to create a real-time model of a BWR. The work reported here was performed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) under contract to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and to the United States Department of Energy (Division of Industry and University Programs, Contract No. DE-FG07-90ER12930.)

Bernard, J.A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Nuclear Reactor Lab.; Henry, A.F.; Lanning, D.D.; Meyer, J.E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Design, fabrication, and certification of advanced modular PV power systems. Final technical progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar Electric Specialties Company (SES) has completed a two and a half year effort under the auspices of the US Department of Energy (DOE) PVMaT (Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology) project. Under Phase 4A1 of the project for Product Driven System and Component Technology, the SES contract ``Design, Fabrication and Certification of Advanced Modular PV Power Systems`` had the goal to reduce installed system life cycle costs through development of certified (Underwriters Laboratories or other listing) and standardized prototype products for two of the product lines, MAPPS{trademark} (Modular Autonomous PV Power Supply) and Photogensets{trademark}. MAPPS are small DC systems consisting of Photovoltaic modules, batteries and a charge controller and producing up to about a thousand watt-hours per day. Photogensets are stand-alone AC systems incorporating a generator as backup for the PV in addition to a DC-AC inverter and battery charger. The program tasks for the two-year contract consisted of designing and fabricating prototypes of both a MAPPS and a Photogenset to meet agency listing requirements using modular concepts that would support development of families of products, submitting the prototypes for listing, and performing functionality testing at Sandia and NREL. Both prototypes were candidates for UL (Underwriters Laboratories) listing. The MAPPS was also a candidate for FM (Factory Mutual) approval for hazardous (incendiary gases) locations.

Lambarski, T.; Minyard, G. [Solar Electric Specialties Co., Willits, CA (United States)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems modular structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Modular Process Equipment for Low Cost Manufacturing of High Capacity Prismatic Li-Ion Cell Alloy Anodes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Applied Materials at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about modular process equipment...

282

A new, very massive modular Liquid Argon Imaging Chamber to detect low energy off-axis neutrinos from the CNGS beam. (Project MODULAr)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper is considering an opportunity for the CERN/GranSasso (CNGS) neutrino complex, concurrent time-wise with T2K and NOvA, to search for theta_13 oscillations and CP violation. Compared with large water Cherenkov (T2K) and fine grained scintillators (NOvA), the LAr-TPC offers a higher detection efficiency and a lower backgrounds, since virtually all channels may be unambiguously recognized. The present proposal, called MODULAr, describes a 20 kt fiducial volume LAr-TPC, following very closely the technology developed for the ICARUS-T60o, and is focused on the following activities, for which we seek an extended international collaboration: (1) the neutrino beam from the CERN 400 GeV proton beam and an optimised horn focussing, eventually with an increased intensity in the framework of the LHC accelerator improvement program; (2) A new experimental area LNGS-B, of at least 50000 m3 at 10 km off-axis from the main Laboratory, eventually upgradable to larger sizes. A location is under consideration at about 1.2 km equivalent water depth; (3) A new LAr Imaging detector of at least 20 kt fiducial mass. Such an increase in the volume over the current ICARUS T600 needs to be carefully considered. It is concluded that a very large mass is best realised with a set of many identical, independent units, each of 5 kt, "cloning" the technology of the T600. Further phases may foresee extensions of MODULAr to meet future physics goals. The experiment might reasonably be operational in about 4/5 years, provided a new hall is excavated in the vicinity of the Gran Sasso Laboratory and adequate funding and participation are made available.

B. Baibussinov; M. Baldo Ceolin; G. Battistoni; P. Benetti; A. Borio; E. Calligarich; M. Cambiaghi; F. Cavanna; S. Centro; A. G. Cocco; R. Dolfini; A. Gigli Berzolari; C. Farnese; A. Fava; A. Ferrari; G. Fiorillo; D. Gibin; A. Guglielmi; G. Mannocchi; F. Mauri; A. Menegolli; G. Meng; C. Montanari; O. Palamara; L. Periale; A. Piazzoli; P. Picchi; F. Pietropaolo; A. Rappoldi; G. L. Raselli; C. Rubbia; P. Sala; G. Satta; F. Varanini; S. Ventura; C. Vignoli

2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

283

Convectively cooled electrical grid structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Undesirable distortions of electrical grid conductors from thermal cycling are minimized and related problems such as unwanted thermionic emission and structural failure from overheating are avoided by providing for a flow of fluid coolant within each conductor. The conductors are secured at each end to separate flexible support elements which accommodate to individual longitudinal expansion and contraction of each conductor while resisting lateral displacements, the coolant flow preferably being directed into and out of each conductor through passages in the flexible support elements. The grid may have a modular or divided construction which facilitates manufacture and repairs.

Paterson, J.A.; Koehler, G.W.

1980-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

284

Modular Sampling and Analysis Techniques for the Real-Time Analysis of Human Breath  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At LLNL and UC Davis, we are developing several techniques for the real-time sampling and analysis of trace gases, aerosols and exhaled breath that could be useful for a modular, integrated system for breath analysis. Those techniques include single-particle bioaerosol mass spectrometry (BAMS) for the analysis of exhaled aerosol particles or droplets as well as breath samplers integrated with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or MEMS-based differential mobility spectrometry (DMS). We describe these techniques and present recent data obtained from human breath or breath condensate, in particular, addressing the question of how environmental exposure influences the composition of breath.

Frank, M; Farquar, G; Adams, K; Bogan, M; Martin, A; Benner, H; Spadaccini, C; Steele, P; Davis, C; Loyola, B; Morgan, J; Sankaran, S

2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

285

Modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor plant design duty cycle. Revision 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document defines the Plant Design Duty Cycle (PCDC) for the Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (MHTGR). The duty cycle is a set of events and their design number of occurrences over the life of the plant for which the MHTGR plant shall be designed to ensure that the plant meets all the top-level requirements. The duty cycle is representative of the types of events to be expected in multiple reactor module-turbine plant configurations of the MHTGR. A synopsis of each PDDC event is presented to provide an overview of the plant response and consequence. 8 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Chan, T.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

286

Electrical machines and assemblies including a yokeless stator with modular lamination stacks  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrical machine includes a rotor with an inner rotor portion and an outer rotor portion, and a double-sided yokeless stator. The yokeless stator includes modular lamination stacks and is configured for radial magnetic flux flow. The double-sided yokeless stator is concentrically disposed between the inner rotor portion and the outer rotor portion of the electrical machine. Examples of particularly useful embodiments for the electrical machine include wind turbine generators, ship propulsion motors, switch reluctance machines and double-sided synchronous machines.

Qu, Ronghai; Jansen, Patrick Lee; Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumar; Carl Jr., Ralph James; Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya; Lopez, Fulton Jose

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

287

Note: Hollow cathode lamp with integral, high optical efficiency isolation valve: A modular vacuum ultraviolet source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design and operating conditions of a hollow cathode discharge lamp for the generation of vacuum ultraviolet radiation, suitable for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) application, are described in detail. The design is easily constructed, and modular, allowing it to be adapted to different experimental requirements. A thin isolation valve is built into one of the differential pumping stages, isolating the discharge section from the UHV section, both for vacuum safety and to allow lamp maintenance without venting the UHV chamber. The lamp has been used both for ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of surfaces and as a soft photoionization source for gas-phase mass spectrometry.

Sloan Roberts, F.; Anderson, Scott L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, 315 S. 1400 E., Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, 315 S. 1400 E., Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Potential Application of Electrical Signature Analysis Methods for Monitoring Small Modular Reactor Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will describe the technical basis behind ESA and why we consider it a viable SMR condition monitoring technology. Concepts are presented of how ESA could be applied to monitor two candidate small modular reactor components: the main coolant pumps and the control rod drives. We believe the general health of these two components can be monitored and trended over time, using ESA methods. Our optimism is based on over two decades of ESA development and testing on a wide variety of components and systems, many of which have similar operational features to the main coolant pumps and control rod drives.

Damiano, Brian [ORNL] [ORNL; Tucker Jr, Raymond W [ORNL] [ORNL; Haynes, Howard D [ORNL] [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

MHTGR (modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor) control: A non-safety related system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) design meets stringent top-level safety regulatory criteria and user requirements that call for high plant availability and no disruption of the public's day to day activities during normal and off-normal operation of the plant. These requirements lead to a plant design that relies mainly on physical properties and passive design features to ensure plant safety regardless of operator actions, plus simplicity and automation to ensure high plant availability and lower cost of operations. The plant does not require safety-related operator actions, and it does not require the control room to be safety related.

Rodriguez, C.; Swart, F.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Centralized and Modular Architectures for Photovoltaic Panels with Improved Efficiency: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most common type of photovoltaic installation in residential applications is the centralized architecture, but the performance of a centralized architecture is adversely affected when it is subject to partial shading effects due to clouds or surrounding obstacles, such as trees. An alternative modular approach can be implemented using several power converters with partial throughput power processing capability. This paper presents a detailed study of these two architectures for the same throughput power level and compares the overall efficiencies using a set of rapidly changing real solar irradiance data collected by the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Dhakal, B.; Mancilla-David, F.; Muljadi, E.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

A Modular, Energy-Based Approach to the Development of Nickel Containing Molecular Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Production and Oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This review discusses the development of molecular electrocatalysts for H2 production and oxidation based on nickel. A modular approach is used in which the structure of the catalyst is divided into first second and outer coordination spheres. The first coordination sphere consists of the ligands bound directly to the metal center, and this coordination sphere can be used to control such factors as the presence or absence of vacant coordination sites, redox potentials, hydride acceptor abilities and other important thermodynamic parameters. The second coordination sphere is defined as functional groups such as pendant acids or bases that can interact with bound substrates such as H2 molecules and hydride ligands, but that do not form strong bonds with the metal center. These functional groups can play diverse roles such as assisting the heterolytic cleavage of H2, controlling intra- and intermolecular proton transfer reactions, and provide a physical pathway for coupling proton and electron transfer reactions. By controlling both the hydride donor/acceptor ability of the catalysts using the first coordination sphere and the proton acceptor/donor abilities of the functional groups in the second coordination sphere, catalysts can be designed that are biased toward H2 production, H2 oxidation, or that are bidirectional (catalyzing both H2 oxidation and production). The outer coordination sphere is defined as that portion of the catalytic system that are not in the first and second coordination spheres. This coordination sphere can assist in the delivery of protons and electrons to and from the catalytically active site, thereby adding another important avenue for controlling catalytic activity. Many features of these simple catalytic systems are good models for enzymes and they provide the opportunity to probe certain aspects of catalysis that may be difficult in enzymes themselves, but that can provide insights into enzyme function and reactivity.

Shaw, Wendy J.; Helm, Monte L.; DuBois, Daniel L.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Journal of NUCLEAR SCIENCE and TECHNOLOGY, Vol. 39, No. 11, p. 11691181 (November 2002) Conceptual Design of a Modular Island Core Fast Breeder Reactor "RAPID-M"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of NUCLEAR SCIENCE and TECHNOLOGY, Vol. 39, No. 11, p. 1169­1181 (November 2002) Conceptual Design of a Modular Island Core Fast Breeder Reactor "RAPID-M" Mitsuru KAMBE Central Research Institute and accepted September 10, 2002) A metal fueled modular island core sodium cooled fast breeder reactor concept

Laughlin, Robert B.

293

Modular Inverter for Advanced Control Applications In the fall of 2003, a team of graduate students was assembled to design and construct a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a set of well-documented inverters of various ratings capable of quickly implementing a new control-powernts2\\ece power design archives\\documents\\specification documents\\sd00004-001 modular inverter systemModular Inverter for Advanced Control Applications May 2006 In the fall of 2003, a team of graduate

Kimball, Jonathan W.

294

Numerical Study on Crossflow Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger for Advanced Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various fluids such as water, gases (helium), molten salts (FLiNaK, FLiBe) and liquid metal (sodium) are used as a coolant of advanced small modular reactors (SMRs). The printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) has been adopted as the intermediate and/or secondary heat exchanger of SMR systems because this heat exchanger is compact and effective. The size and cost of PCHE can be changed by the coolant type of each SMR. In this study, the crossflow PCHE analysis code for advanced small modular reactor has been developed for the thermal design and cost estimation of the heat exchanger. The analytical solution of single pass, both unmixed fluids crossflow heat exchanger model was employed to calculate a two dimensional temperature profile of a crossflow PCHE. The analytical solution of crossflow heat exchanger was simply implemented by using built in function of the MATLAB program. The effect of fluid property uncertainty on the calculation results was evaluated. In addition, the effect of heat transfer correlations on the calculated temperature profile was analyzed by taking into account possible combinations of primary and secondary coolants in the SMR systems. Size and cost of heat exchanger were evaluated for the given temperature requirement of each SMR.

Su-Jong Yoon [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Piyush Sabharwall [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Eung-Soo Kim [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

A Modular Building Controls Virtual Test Bed for the Integrations of Heterogeneous Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the Building Controls Virtual Test Bed (BCVTB) that is currently under development at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. An earlier prototype linked EnergyPlus with controls hardware through embedded SPARK models and demonstrated its value in more cost-effective envelope design and improved controls sequences for the San Francisco Federal Building. The BCVTB presented here is a more modular design based on a middleware that we built using Ptolemy II, a modular software environment for design and analysis of heterogeneous systems. Ptolemy II provides a graphical model building environment, synchronizes the exchanged data and visualizes the system evolution during run-time. Our additions to Ptolemy II allow users to couple to Ptolemy II a prototype version of EnergyPlus,MATLAB/Simulink or other simulation programs for data exchange during run-time. In future work we will also implement a BACnet interface that allows coupling BACnet compliant building automation systems to Ptolemy II. We will present the architecture of the BCVTB and explain how users can add their own simulation programs to the BCVTB. We will then present an example application in which the building envelope and the HVAC system was simulated in EnergyPlus, the supervisory control logic was simulated in MATLAB/Simulink and Ptolemy II was used to exchange data during run-time and to provide realtime visualization as the simulation progresses.

Wetter, Michael; Wetter, Michael; Haves, Philip

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

296

Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Safety Basis and Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various international efforts are underway to assess the safety of advanced nuclear reactor designs. For example, the International Atomic Energy Agency has recently held its first Consultancy Meeting on a new cooperative research program on high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) safety. Furthermore, the Generation IV International Forum Reactor Safety Working Group has recently developed a methodology, called the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology, for use in Generation IV advanced reactor technology development, design, and design review. A risk and safety assessment white paper is under development with respect to the Very High Temperature Reactor to pilot the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology and to demonstrate its validity and feasibility. To support such efforts, this information paper on the modular HTGR safety basis and approach has been prepared. The paper provides a summary level introduction to HTGR history, public safety objectives, inherent and passive safety features, radionuclide release barriers, functional safety approach, and risk-informed safety approach. The information in this paper is intended to further the understanding of the modular HTGR safety approach. The paper gives those involved in the assessment of advanced reactor designs an opportunity to assess an advanced design that has already received extensive review by regulatory authorities and to judge the utility of recently proposed new methods for advanced reactor safety assessment such as the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology.

David Petti; Jim Kinsey; Dave Alberstein

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Modular Hybrid Plasma Reactor for Low Cost Bulk Production of Nanomaterials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

INL developed a bench scale modular hybrid plasma system for gas phase nanomaterials synthesis. The system was being optimized for WO3 nanoparticles production and scale model projection to a 300 kW pilot system. During the course of technology development many modifications had been done to the system to resolve technical issues that had surfaced and also to improve the performance. All project tasks had been completed except 2 optimization subtasks. These 2 subtasks, a 4-hour and an 8-hour continuous powder production runs at 1 lb/hr powder feeding rate, were unable to complete due to technical issues developed with the reactor system. The 4-hour run had been attempted twice and both times the run was terminated prematurely. The modular electrode for the plasma system was significantly redesigned to address the technical issues. Fabrication of the redesigned modular electrodes and additional components had been completed at the end of the project life. However, not enough resource was available to perform tests to evaluate the performance of the new modifications. More development work would be needed to resolve these problems prior to scaling. The technology demonstrated a surprising capability of synthesizing a single phase of meta-stable delta-Al2O3 from pure alpha-phase large Al2O3 powder. The formation of delta-Al2O3 was surprising because this phase is meta-stable and only formed between 973-1073 K, and delta-Al2O3 is very difficult to synthesize as a single phase. Besides the specific temperature window to form this phase, this meta-stable phase may have been stabilized by nanoparticle size formed in a high temperature plasma process. This technology may possess the capability to produce unusual meta-stable nanophase materials that would be otherwise difficult to produce by conventional methods. A 300 kW INL modular hybrid plasma pilot scale model reactor had been projected using the experimental data from PPG Industries 300 kW hot wall plasma reactor. The projected size of the INL 300 kW pilot model reactor would be about 15% that of the PPG 300 kW hot wall plasma reactor. Including the safety net factor the projected INL pilot reactor size would be 25-30% of the PPG 300 kW hot wall plasma pilot reactor. Due to the modularity of the INL plasma reactor and the energy cascading effect from the upstream plasma to the downstream plasma the energy utilization is more efficient in material processing. It is envisioning that the material through put range for the INL pilot reactor would be comparable to the PPG 300 kW pilot reactor but the energy consumption would be lower. The INL hybrid plasma technology is rather close to being optimized for scaling to a pilot system. More near term development work is still needed to complete the process optimization before pilot scaling.

Peter C. Kong

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Modular approach for modelling a multi-energy district boiler Julien Eynard, Stphane Grieu1 and Monique Polit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modular approach for modelling a multi-energy district boiler Julien Eynard, Stéphane Grieu1 with the modelling of a district boiler (city of La Rochelle, west coast of France), as part of the OptiEnR research project. This "multi- energy" boiler supplies domestic hot water and heats residential and public

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

299

Effects of Levels of Automation for Advanced Small Modular Reactors: Impacts on Performance, Workload, and Situation Awareness  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Human-Automation Collaboration (HAC) research effort is a part of the Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored Advanced Small Modular Reactor (AdvSMR) program conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The DOE AdvSMR program focuses on plant design and management, reduction of capital costs as well as plant operations and maintenance costs (O&M), and factory production costs benefits.

Johanna Oxstrand; Katya Le Blanc

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

2428 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS, VOL. 23, NO. 5, SEPTEMBER 2008 A Modular Strategy for Control and Voltage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, voltage balancing. I. INTRODUCTION WITH THE advancement of power electronics and emer- gence of new.1109/TPEL.2008.2002055 The CHB converters can be used as inverters in ac motor drives, high power2428 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS, VOL. 23, NO. 5, SEPTEMBER 2008 A Modular Strategy

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems modular structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Modular Multi-ported SRAM-based Memories Ameer M.S. Abdelhadi and Guy G.F. Lemieux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modular Multi-ported SRAM-based Memories Ameer M.S. Abdelhadi and Guy G.F. Lemieux Department,lemieux}@ece.ubc.ca ABSTRACT Multi-ported RAMs are essential for high-performance parallel computation systems. VLIW and vector processors, CGRAs, DSPs, CMPs and other processing systems often rely upon multi-ported memories for parallel

Lemieux, Guy

302

Random Walks, Markov Processes and the Multiscale Modular Organization of Complex Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most methods proposed to uncover communities in complex networks rely on combinatorial graph properties. Usually an edge-counting quality function, such as modularity, is optimized over all partitions of the graph compared against a null random graph model. Here we introduce a systematic dynamical framework to design and analyze a wide variety of quality functions for community detection. The quality of a partition is measured by its Markov Stability, a time-parametrized function defined in terms of the statistical properties of a Markov process taking place on the graph. The Markov process provides a dynamical sweeping across all scales in the graph, and the time scale is an intrinsic parameter that uncovers communities at different resolutions. This dynamic-based community detection leads to a compound optimization, which favours communities of comparable centrality (as defined by the stationary distribution), and provides a unifying framework for spectral algorithms, as well as different heuristics for com...

Lambiotte, Renaud; Barahona, Mauricio

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

A Framework to Expand and Advance Probabilistic Risk Assessment to Support Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the early development of nuclear power plants, researchers and engineers focused on many aspects of plant operation, two of which were getting the newly-found technology to work and minimizing the likelihood of perceived accidents through redundancy and diversity. As time, and our experience, has progressed, the realization of plant operational risk/reliability has entered into the design, operation, and regulation of these plants. But, to date, we have only dabbled at the surface of risk and reliability technologies. For the next generation of small modular reactors (SMRs), it is imperative that these technologies evolve into an accepted, encompassing, validated, and integral part of the plant in order to reduce costs and to demonstrate safe operation. Further, while it is presumed that safety margins are substantial for proposed SMR designs, the depiction and demonstration of these margins needs to be better understood in order to optimize the licensing process.

Curtis Smith; David Schwieder; Robert Nourgaliev; Cherie Phelan; Diego Mandelli; Kellie Kvarfordt; Robert Youngblood

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

The Production Phase for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) Modular Coil Winding Forms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production phase for the NCSX modular coil winding forms has been underway for approximately one year as of this date. This is the culmination of R&D efforts performed in 2001-4. The R&D efforts included limited manufacturing studies while NCSX was in its conceptual design phase followed by more detailed manufacturing studies by two teams which included the fabrication of full scale prototypes. This provided the foundation necessary for the production parts to be produced under a firm price and schedule contract that was issued in September 2004. This paper will describe the winding forms, the production team and team management, details of the production process, and the achievements for the first year.

Heitzenroeder, P.; Brown, T.; Neilson, G.; Malinowski, F.; Sutton, L.; Nelson, B.; Williamson, D.; Horton, N.; Goddard, B.; Edwards, J.; Bowling, K.; Hatzilias, K.

2005-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

305

Modular bioreactor for the remediation of liquid streams and methods for using the same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a bioreactor system for the remediation of contaminated liquid streams. The bioreactor system is composed of at least one and often a series of sub-units referred to as bioreactor modules. The modular nature of the system allows bioreactor systems be subdivided into smaller units and transported to waste sites where they are combined to form bioreactor systems of any size. The bioreactor modules further comprises reactor fill materials in the bioreactor module that remove the contaminants from the contaminated stream. To ensure that the stream thoroughly contacts the reactor fill materials, each bioreactor module comprises means for directing the flow of the stream in a vertical direction and means for directing the flow of the stream in a horizontal direction. In a preferred embodiment, the reactor fill comprises a sulfate reducing bacteria which is particularly useful for precipitating metals from acid mine streams.

Noah, Karl S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sayer, Raymond L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thompson, David N. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Subcontract Report: Modular Combined Heat & Power System for Utica College: Design Specification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utica College, located in Utica New York, intends to install an on-site power/cogeneration facility. The energy facility is to be factory pre-assembled, or pre- assembled in modules, to the fullest extent possible, and ready to install and interconnect at the College with minimal time and engineering needs. External connections will be limited to fuel supply, electrical output, potable makeup water as required and cooling and heat recovery systems. The proposed facility will consist of 4 self-contained, modular Cummins 330kW engine generators with heat recovery systems and the only external connections will be fuel supply, electrical outputs and cooling and heat recovery systems. This project was eventually cancelled due to changing DOE budget priorities, but the project engineers produced this system design specification in hopes that it may be useful in future endeavors.

Rouse, Greg [Gas Technology Institute

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Large Scale Modular Quantum Computer Architecture with Atomic Memory and Photonic Interconnects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The practical construction of scalable quantum computer hardware capable of executing non-trivial quantum algorithms will require the juxtaposition of different types of quantum systems. We analyze a modular ion trap quantum computer architecture with a hierarchy of interactions that can scale to very large numbers of qubits. Local entangling quantum gates between qubit memories within a single register are accomplished using natural interactions between the qubits, and entanglement between separate registers is completed via a probabilistic photonic interface between qubits in different registers, even over large distances. We show that this architecture can be made fault-tolerant, and demonstrate its viability for fault-tolerant execution of modest size quantum circuits.

C. Monroe; R. Raussendorf; A. Ruthven; K. R. Brown; P. Maunz; L. -M. Duan; J. Kim

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

308

Helium circulator design considerations for modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efforts are in progress to develop a standard modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) plant that is amenable to design certification and serial production. The MHTGR reference design, based on a steam cycle power conversion system, utilizes a 350 MW(t) annular reactor core with prismatic fuel elements. Flexibility in power rating is afforded by utilizing a multiplicity of the standard module. The circulator, which is an electric motor-driven helium compressor, is a key component in the primary system of the nuclear plant, since it facilitates thermal energy transfer from the reactor core to the steam generator; and, hence, to the external turbo-generator set. This paper highlights the helium circulator design considerations for the reference MHTGR plant and includes a discussion on the major features of the turbomachine concept, operational characteristics, and the technology base that exists in the U.S.

McDonald, C.F.; Nichols, M.K.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Helium circulator design considerations for modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efforts are in progress to develop a standard modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) plant that is amenable to design certification and serial production. The MHTGR reference design, based on a steam cycle power conversion system, utilizes a 350 MW(t) annular reactor core with prismatic fuel elements. Flexibility in power rating is afforded by utilizing a multiplicity of the standard module. The circulator, which is an electric motor-driven helium compressor, is a key component in the primary system of the nuclear plant, since it facilitates thermal energy transfer from the reactor core to the steam generator; and, hence, to the external turbo-generator set. This paper highlights the helium circulator design considerations for the reference MHTGR plant and includes a discussion on the major features of the turbomachine concept, operational characteristics, and the technology base that exists in the US.

McDonald, C.F.; Nichols, M.K.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Technical Exchange Meeting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During FY13, the INL developed an advanced SMR PRA framework which has been described in the report Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Detailed Technical Framework Specification, INL/EXT-13-28974 (April 2013). In this framework, the various areas are considered: Probabilistic models to provide information specific to advanced SMRs Representation of specific SMR design issues such as having co-located modules and passive safety features Use of modern open-source and readily available analysis methods Internal and external events resulting in impacts to safety All-hazards considerations Methods to support the identification of design vulnerabilities Mechanistic and probabilistic data needs to support modeling and tools In order to describe this framework more fully and obtain feedback on the proposed approaches, the INL hosted a technical exchange meeting during August 2013. This report describes the outcomes of that meeting.

Curtis Smith

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Demonstration of a Small Modular BioPower System Using Poultry Litter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to assess poultry grower residue, or litter (manure plus absorbent biomass), as a fuel source for Community Power Corporation's small modular biopower system (SMB). A second objective was to assess the poultry industry to identify potential ''on-site'' applications of the SMB system using poultry litter residue as a fuel source, and to adapt CPC's existing SMB to generate electricity and heat from the poultry litter biomass fuel. Bench-scale testing and pilot testing were used to gain design information for the SMB retrofit. System design approach for the Phase II application of the SMB was the goal of Phase I testing. Cost estimates for an onsite poultry litter SMB were prepared. Finally, a market estimate was prepared for implementation of the on-farm SMB using poultry litter.

John P. Reardon; Art Lilley; Jim Wimberly; Kingsbury Browne; Kelly Beard; Jack Avens

2002-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

312

Title: Time to scale-up. Standfirst: The construction of modular and scalable synthetic gene networks is now a goal within  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Time to scale-up. Standfirst: The construction of modular and scalable synthetic gene demonstrated. Next, they scaled up the system by constructing a circuit with three inputs to execute a pre

Babu, M. Madan

313

Frequency stabilization in nonlinear MEMS and NEMS oscillators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An illustrative system includes an amplifier operably connected to a phase shifter. The amplifier is configured to amplify a voltage from an oscillator. The phase shifter is operably connected to a driving amplitude control, wherein the phase shifter is configured to phase shift the amplified voltage and is configured to set an amplitude of the phase shifted voltage. The oscillator is operably connected to the driving amplitude control. The phase shifted voltage drives the oscillator. The oscillator is at an internal resonance condition, based at least on the amplitude of the phase shifted voltage, that stabilizes frequency oscillations in the oscillator.

Lopez, Omar Daniel; Antonio, Dario

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

314

Appendix C: Map of NEMS Electricity Market Module Regions  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion CubicCubic Feet)Year Jan FebForeign Distribution66 U.S. U.S.

315

Analysis and Representation of Miscellaneous Electric Loads in NEMS -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone:shortOil and Natural Gas AEO2015Energy

316

U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Administration. 2004a. Annual Energy Outlook 2004. U.S.Assumptions of the Annual Energy Outlook 2004. DOE/EIA-0554(and Definitions AEO Annual Energy Outlook ArcGIS - ESRI

Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocus AreaDataBus Jump to:NSTARNamibia-UNEPProgrammesSystem

318

Frequency Stabilization in Nonlinear MEMS and NEMS Oscillators | Argonne  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityFieldMinds"Office | Department- Energy

319

NEMS Freight Transportation Module Improvement Study - Energy Information  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Opticalhttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gif Directorate - EventsNEET Benefits

320

EIA Buildings Analysis of Consumer Behavior in NEMS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 PV Wind Natural gas Other For more information 15 Behavioral Economics Experts Meeting,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems modular structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Three-Phase Modular Cascaded H-Bridge Multilevel Inverter with Individual MPPT for Grid-Connected Photovoltaic Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A three-phase modular cascaded H-bridge multilevel inverter for a grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) system is presented in this paper. To maximize the solar energy extraction of each PV string, an individual maximum power point tracking (MPPT) control scheme is applied, which allows the independent control of each dc-link voltage. PV mismatches may introduce unbalanced power supplied to the three-phase system. To solve this issue, a control scheme with modulation compensation is proposed. The three-phase modular cascaded multilevel inverter prototype has been built. Each H-bridge is connected to a 185 W solar panel. Simulation and experimental results are presented to validate the proposed ideas.

Xiao, Bailu [ORNL; Hang, Lijun [ORNL; Riley, Cameron [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Tolbert, Leon M [ORNL; Ozpineci, Burak [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

The gas turbine-modular helium reactor (GT-MHR), high efficiency, cost competitive, nuclear energy for the next century  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) is the result of coupling the evolution of a small passively safe reactor with key technology developments in the US during the last decade: large industrial gas turbines, large active magnetic bearings, and compact, highly effective plate-fin heat exchangers. The GT-MHR is the only reactor concept which provides a step increase in economic performance combined with increased safety. This is accomplished through its unique utilization of the Brayton cycle to produce electricity directly with the high temperature helium primary coolant from the reactor directly driving the gas turbine electrical generator. This cannot be accomplished with another reactor concept. It retains the high levels of passive safety and the standardized modular design of the steam cycle MHTGR, while showing promise for a significant reduction in power generating costs by increasing plant net efficiency to a remarkable 47%.

Zgliczynski, J.B.; Silady, F.A.; Neylan, A.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Final report on the development of a 250-kW modular, factory-assembled battery energy storage system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A power management energy storage system was developed for stationary applications such as peak shaving, voltage regulation, and spinning reserve. Project activities included design, manufacture, factory testing, and field installation. The major features that characterize the development are the modularity of the production, its transportability, the power conversion method that aggregates power on the AC side of the converter, and the use of commonly employed technology for system components. 21 figs.

Porter, D. [Omnion Power Engineering Corp., East Troy, WI (United States); Nerbun, W. [AC Battery Corp., East Troy, WI (United States); Corey, G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Energy Storage Systems Analysis and Development Dept.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Development of the Mathematics of Learning Curve Models for Evaluating Small Modular Reactor Economics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cost of nuclear power is a straightforward yet complicated topic. It is straightforward in that the cost of nuclear power is a function of the cost to build the nuclear power plant, the cost to operate and maintain it, and the cost to provide fuel for it. It is complicated in that some of those costs are not necessarily known, introducing uncertainty into the analysis. For large light water reactor (LWR)-based nuclear power plants, the uncertainty is mainly contained within the cost of construction. The typical costs of operations and maintenance (O&M), as well as fuel, are well known based on the current fleet of LWRs. However, the last currently operating reactor to come online was Watts Bar 1 in May 1996; thus, the expected construction costs for gigawatt (GW)-class reactors in the United States are based on information nearly two decades old. Extrapolating construction, O&M, and fuel costs from GW-class LWRs to LWR-based small modular reactors (SMRs) introduces even more complication. The per-installed-kilowatt construction costs for SMRs are likely to be higher than those for the GW-class reactors based on the property of the economy of scale. Generally speaking, the economy of scale is the tendency for overall costs to increase slower than the overall production capacity. For power plants, this means that doubling the power production capacity would be expected to cost less than twice as much. Applying this property in the opposite direction, halving the power production capacity would be expected to cost more than half as much. This can potentially make the SMRs less competitive in the electricity market against the GW-class reactors, as well as against other power sources such as natural gas and subsidized renewables. One factor that can potentially aid the SMRs in achieving economic competitiveness is an economy of numbers, as opposed to the economy of scale, associated with learning curves. The basic concept of the learning curve is that the more a new process is repeated, the more efficient the process can be made. Assuming that efficiency directly relates to cost means that the more a new process is repeated successfully and efficiently, the less costly the process can be made. This factor ties directly into the factory fabrication and modularization aspect of the SMR paradigmmanufacturing serial, standardized, identical components for use in nuclear power plants can allow the SMR industry to use the learning curves to predict and optimize deployment costs.

Harrison, T. J. [ORNL

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Incorporating Equipment Condition Assessment in Risk Monitors for Advanced Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced small modular reactors (aSMRs) can complement the current fleet of large light-water reactors in the USA for baseload and peak demand power production and process heat applications (e.g., water desalination, shale oil extraction, hydrogen production). The day-to-day costs of aSMRs are expected to be dominated by operations and maintenance (O&M); however, the effect of diverse operating missions and unit modularity on O&M is not fully understood. These costs could potentially be reduced by optimized scheduling, with risk-informed scheduling of maintenance, repair, and replacement of equipment. Currently, most nuclear power plants have a living probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), which reflects the as-operated, as-modified plant and combine event probabilities with population-based probability of failure (POF) for key components. Risk monitors extend the PRA by incorporating the actual and dynamic plant configuration (equipment availability, operating regime, environmental conditions, etc.) into risk assessment. In fact, PRAs are more integrated into plant management in todays nuclear power plants than at any other time in the history of nuclear power. However, population-based POF curves are still used to populate fault trees; this approach neglects the time-varying condition of equipment that is relied on during standard and non-standard configurations. Equipment condition monitoring techniques can be used to estimate the component POF. Incorporating this unit-specific estimate of POF in the risk monitor can provide a more accurate estimate of risk in different operating and maintenance configurations. This enhanced risk assessment will be especially important for aSMRs that have advanced component designs, which dont have an available operating history to draw from, and often use passive design features, which present challenges to PRA. This paper presents the requirements and technical gaps for developing a framework to integrate unit-specific estimates of POF into risk monitors, resulting in enhanced risk monitors that support optimized operation and maintenance of aSMRs.

Coble, Jamie B.; Coles, Garill A.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Westinghouse Modular Grinding Process - Enhancement of Volume Reduction for Hot Resin Supercompaction - 13491  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In nuclear power plants (NPP) ion exchange (IX) resins are used in several systems for water treatment. Spent resins can contain a significant amount of contaminates which makes treatment for disposal of spent resins mandatory. Several treatment processes are available such as direct immobilization with technologies like cementation, bitumisation, polymer solidification or usage of a high integrity container (HIC). These technologies usually come with a significant increase in final waste volume. The Hot Resin Supercompaction (HRSC) is a thermal treatment process which reduces the resin waste volume significantly. For a mixture of powdered and bead resins the HRSC process has demonstrated a volume reduction of up to 75 % [1]. For bead resins only the HRSC process is challenging because the bead resins compaction properties are unfavorable. The bead resin material does not form a solid block after compaction and shows a high spring back effect. The volume reduction of bead resins is not as good as for the mixture described in [1]. The compaction properties of bead resin waste can be significantly improved by grinding the beads to powder. The grinding also eliminates the need for a powder additive.Westinghouse has developed a modular grinding process to grind the bead resin to powder. The developed process requires no circulation of resins and enables a selective adjustment of particle size and distribution to achieve optimal results in the HRSC or in any other following process. A special grinding tool setup is use to minimize maintenance and radiation exposure to personnel. (authors)

Fehrmann, Henning [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Dudenstr. 44, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany)] [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Dudenstr. 44, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Aign, Joerg [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Global D and D and Waste Management, Tarpenring 6, D-22419 Hamburg (Germany)] [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Global D and D and Waste Management, Tarpenring 6, D-22419 Hamburg (Germany)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Manual represents Revision 5 of the user documentation for the modular code system referred to as SCALE. The history of the SCALE code system dates back to 1969 when the current Computational Physics and Engineering Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) began providing the transportation package certification staff at the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission with computational support in the use of the new KENO code for performing criticality safety assessments with the statistical Monte Carlo method. From 1969 to 1976 the certification staff relied on the ORNL staff to assist them in the correct use of codes and data for criticality, shielding, and heat transfer analyses of transportation packages. However, the certification staff learned that, with only occasional use of the codes, it was difficult to become proficient in performing the calculations often needed for an independent safety review. Thus, shortly after the move of the certification staff to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the NRC staff proposed the development of an easy-to-use analysis system that provided the technical capabilities of the individual modules with which they were familiar. With this proposal, the concept of the Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) code system was born. This manual covers an array of modules written for the SCALE package, consisting of drivers, system libraries, cross section and materials properties libraries, input/output routines, storage modules, and help files.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

NRC Reviewer Aid for Evaluating the Human Factors Engineering Aspects of Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small modular reactors (SMRs) are a promising approach to meeting future energy needs. Although the electrical output of an individual SMR is relatively small compared to that of typical commercial nuclear plants, they can be grouped to produce as much energy as a utility demands. Furthermore, SMRs can be used for other purposes, such as producing hydrogen and generating process heat. The design characteristics of many SMRs differ from those of current conventional plants and may require a distinct concept of operations (ConOps). The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) conducted research to examine the human factors engineering (HFE) and the operational aspects of SMRs. The research identified thirty potential human-performance issues that should be considered in the NRC's reviews of SMR designs and in future research activities. The purpose of this report is to support NRC HFE reviewers of SMR applications by identifying some of the questions that can be asked of applicants whose designs have characteristics identified in the issues. The questions for each issue were identified and organized based on the review elements and guidance contained in Chapter 18 of the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800), and the Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model (NUREG-0711).

OHara J. M.; Higgins, J.C.

2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

329

Congruences among modular forms on U(2,2) and the Bloch-Kato conjecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Let k be a positive integer divisible by 4, l>k a prime, and f an elliptic cuspidal eigenform of weight k-1, level 4, and non-trivial character. Let \\rho_f be the l-adic Galois representation attached to f. In this paper we provide evidence for the Bloch-Kato conjecture for a twist of the adjoint motif of \\rho_f in the following way. Let L(f,s) denote the symmetric square L-function of f. We prove that (under certain conditions) the l-adic valuation of the algebraic part of L(f, k) is no greater than the l-adic valuation of the order of S, where S is (the Pontryagin dual of) the Selmer group attached to the Galois module \\ad^0\\rho_f|_{G_K} (-1), and K= Q(i). Our method uses an idea of Ribet in that we introduce an intermediate step and produce congruences between CAP and non-CAP modular forms on the unitary group U(2,2).

Klosin, Krzysztof

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

WARP: A modular wind power system for distributed electric utility application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steady development of wind turbine technology, and the accumulation of wind farm operating experience, have resulted in the emergence of wind power as a potentially attractive source of electricity for utilities. Since wind turbines are inherently modular, with medium-sized units typically in the range of a few hundred kilowatts each, they lend themselves well to distributed generation service. A patented wind power technology, the Toroidal Accelerator Rotor Platform (TARP) Windframe, forms the basis for a proposed network-distributed, wind power plant combining electric generation and transmission. While heavily building on proven wind turbine technology, this system is projected to surpass traditional configuration windmills through a unique distribution/transmission combination, superior performance, user-friendly operation and maintenance, and high availability and reliability. Furthermore, its environmental benefits include little new land requirements, relatively attractive appearance, lower noise and EMI/TV interference, and reduced avian (bird) mortality potential. Its cost of energy is projected to be very competitive, in the range of from approximately 2{cents}/kWh to 5{cents}/kWh, depending on the wind resource.

Weisbrich, A.L. [ENECO, West Simsbury, CT (United States)] [ENECO, West Simsbury, CT (United States); Ostrow, S.L.; Padalino, J.P. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, New York, NY (United States)] [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, New York, NY (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Life Extension Program for the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit at Savannah River Site - 13179  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) is currently used at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) for removal of cesium from the high-level salt-wastes stored in underground tanks. Currently, the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the CSSX process are deployed in the (ARP)/Modular CSSX Unit (MCU), to process salt waste for permanent disposition. The CSSX technology utilizes a multi-component organic solvent and annular centrifugal contactors to extract cesium from alkaline salt waste. The original plant was permitted for a three year design life; however, given the successful operation of the plant, a life extension program was completed to continue operations. The program included detailed engineering analyses of the life-expectancy of passive and active components, resulting in component replacement and/or maintenance and monitoring program improvements. The program also included a review of the operations and resulted in a series of operational improvements. Since the improvements have been made, an accelerated processing rate has been demonstrated. In addition, plans for instituting a next-generation solvent are in place and will enhance the decontamination factors. (author)

Samadi, Azadeh [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Steam generator conceptual design for the modular HTGR - Dissimilar metal weld considerations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The steam generator for the current Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) has evolved from a technology basis developed in U.S. and European gas-cooled reactor programs. The MHTGR steam generator is a vertically-oriented, counterflow, shell-and-tube, once-through, non-reheat, helical heat exchanger with helium on the shell side and water/steam in the tubes. In the MHTGR applications, the normal operating temperatures of the steam generator tubes can be as high as 638/sup 0/C (1180/sup 0/F). Concerns such as cost, creep strength, steam side scaling and stress corrosion cracking often lead to a design decision to use two different tube materials, one for the evaporating portion and another for the superheating portion of the steam generator. The current MHTGR steam generator design utilizes 2 1/4 CR - 1 Mo material for the economizer/evaporator/initial superheater tube section and Alloy 800H material for the finishing superheat tube section. Therefore, a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) is incorporated in each tube circuit. This feature of the design imposes certain important constraints on the steam generator designer. This paper presents an overview of the MHTGR steam generator conceptual design, and then focuses on the DMW considerations and how these have influenced the design configuration.

Spring, A.H.; Basol, M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

A multi-purpose modular system for high-resolution microscopy at high hydrostatic pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have developed a modular system for high-resolution microscopy at high hydrostatic pressure. The system consists of a pressurised cell of volume ~100 microlitres, a temperature controlled holder, a ram and a piston. We have made each of these components in several versions which can be interchanged to allow a wide range of applications. Here, we report two pressure cells with pressure ranges 0.1-700MPa and 0.1-100MPa, which can be combined with hollow or solid rams and pistons. Our system is designed to work with fluorescent samples (using a confocal or epifluorescence microscope), but also allows for transmitted light microscopy via the hollow ram and piston. The system allows precise control of pressure and temperature [-20-70C], as well as rapid pressure quenching. We demonstrate its performance and versatility with two applications: time-resolved imaging of colloidal phase transitions caused by pressure changes between 0.1MPa and 101MPa, and imaging the growth of Escherichia coli bacteria at 50MPa. We ...

Vass, Hugh; Herzig, Eva M; Ward, F Bruce; Clegg, Paul S; Allen, Rosalind J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Identification of Selected Areas to Support Federal Clean Energy Goals Using Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beginning in late 2008, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) responded to ongoing internal and external studies addressing key questions related to our national electrical energy supply. This effort has led to the development and refinement of Oak Ridge Siting Analysis for power Generation Expansion (OR-SAGE), a tool to support power plant siting evaluations. The objective in developing OR-SAGE was to use industry-accepted approaches and/or develop appropriate criteria for screening sites and employ an array of geographic information systems (GIS) data sources at ORNL to identify candidate areas for a power generation technology application. The basic premise requires the development of exclusionary, avoidance, and suitability criteria for evaluating sites for a given siting application, such as siting small modular reactors (SMRs). For specific applications of the tool, it is necessary to develop site selection and evaluation criteria (SSEC) that encompass a number of key benchmarks that essentially form the site environmental characterization for that application. These SSEC might include population density, seismic activity, proximity to water sources, proximity to hazardous facilities, avoidance of protected lands and floodplains, susceptibility to landslide hazards, and others.

Belles, R. J. [ORNL; Mays, G. T. [ORNL; Omitaomu, O. A. [ORNL; Poore, W. P. [ORNL

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

335

Multi-unit Operations in Non-Nuclear Systems: Lessons Learned for Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear-power community has reached the stage of proposing advanced reactor designs to support power generation for decades to come. Small modular reactors (SMRs) are one approach to meet these energy needs. While the power output of individual reactor modules is relatively small, they can be grouped to produce reactor sites with different outputs. Also, they can be designed to generate hydrogen, or to process heat. Many characteristics of SMRs are quite different from those of current plants and may be operated quite differently. One difference is that multiple units may be operated by a single crew (or a single operator) from one control room. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is examining the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of SMRs to support licensing reviews. While we reviewed information on SMR designs to obtain information, the designs are not completed and all of the design and operational information is not yet available. Nor is there information on multi-unit operations as envisioned for SMRs available in operating experience. Thus, to gain a better understanding of multi-unit operations we sought the lesson learned from non-nuclear systems that have experience in multi-unit operations, specifically refineries, unmanned aerial vehicles and tele-intensive care units. In this paper we report the lessons learned from these systems and the implications for SMRs.

OHara J. M.; Higgins, J.; DAgostino, A.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

336

Modular glovebox connector and associated good practices for control of radioactive and chemically toxic materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Design and associated good practices are described for a modular glovebox connector to improve control of radioactive and chemically toxic materials. The connector consists of an anodized aluminum circular port with a mating spacer, gaskets, and retaining rings for joining two parallel ends of commercially available or custom-manufactured glovebox enclosures. Use of the connector allows multiple gloveboxes to be quickly assembled or reconfigured in functional units. Connector dimensions can be scaled to meet operational requirements for access between gloveboxes. Options for construction materials are discussed, along with recommendations for installation of the connector in new or retrofitted systems. Associated good practices include application of surface coatings and caulking, use of disposable glovebags, and proper selection and protection of gasket and glove materials. Use of the connector at an inhalation toxicology research facility has reduced the time and expense required to reconfigure equipment for changing operational requirements, the dispersion of contamination during reconfigurations, and the need for decommissioning and disposal of contaminated enclosures.

Hoover, M.D.; Mewhinney, C.J.; Newton, G.J. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Design, Fabrication, and Certification of Advanced Modular PV Power Systems Final Technical Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the overall accomplishments and benefits of Solar Electric Specialties Co. (SES) under this Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) subcontract. SES addressed design issues related to their modular autonomous PV power supply (MAPPS) and a mobile photogenset. MAPPS investigations included gel-cell batteries mounted horizontally; redesign of the SES power supply; modified battery enclosure for increased safety and reduced cost; programmable, interactive battery charge controllers; and UL and FM listings. The photogenset systems incorporate generators, battery storage, and PV panels for a mobile power supply. The unit includes automatic oil-change systems for the propane generators, collapsible array mounts for the PV enclosure, and internal stowage of the arrays. Standardizing the products resulted in product lines of MAPPS and Photogensets that can be produced more economically and with shorter lead times, while increasing product quality and reliability. Product assembly and quality control have also been improved and streamlined with the development of standardized assembly processes and QC testing procedures. SES offers the UL-listed MAPPS at about the same price as its previous non-standardized, unlisted products.

Lambarski, T.; Minyard, G. (Solar Electric Specialties Co., Willits, California)

1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

338

Power converter having improved terminal structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A terminal structure for power electronics circuits reduces the need for a DC bus and thereby the incidence of parasitic inductance. The structure is secured to a support that may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as by direct contact between the terminal assembly and AC and DC circuit components. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Kannenberg, Daniel G.; Phillips, Mark G.; Kaishian, Steven C.

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

339

Depletion Analysis of Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Loaded with LEU/Thorium Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thorium based fuel has been considered as an option to uranium-based fuel, based on considerations of resource utilization (Thorium is more widely available when compared to Uranium). The fertile isotope of Thorium (Th-232) can be converted to fissile isotope U-233 by neutron capture during the operation of a suitable nuclear reactor such as High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR). However, the fertile Thorium needs a fissile supporter to start and maintain the conversion process such as U-235 or Pu-239. This report presents the results of a study that analyzed the thorium utilization in a prismatic HTGR, namely Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) that was designed by General Atomics (GA). The collected for the modeling of this design come from Chapter 4 of MHTGR Preliminary Safety Information Document that GA sent to Department of Energy (DOE) on 1995. Both full core and unit cell models were used to perform this analysis using SCALE 6.1 and Serpent 1.1.18. Because of the long mean free paths (and migration lengths) of neutrons in HTRs, using a unit cell to represent a whole core can be non-trivial. The sizes of these cells were set to match the spectral index between unit cell and full core domains. It was found that for the purposes of this study an adjusted unit cell model is adequate. Discharge isotopics and one-group cross-sections were delivered to the transmutation analysis team. This report provides documentation for these calculations

Sonat Sen; Gilles Youinou

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

A Single Tower Configuration of the Modular Gamma Box Counter System - 13392  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Canberra's Standard Gamma Box Counter System is designed to perform accurate quantitative assays of gamma emitting nuclides for a wide range of large containers including B-25 crates and ISO shipping containers. Using a modular building-block approach, the system offers tremendous flexibility for a variety of measurement situations with wide ranges of sample activities and throughput requirements, as well as the opportunity to modify the configuration for other applications at a later date. The typical configuration consists of two opposing towers each equipped with two high purity germanium detectors, and an automated container trolley. This paper presents a modified configuration, consisting of a single tower placed inside a measurement trailer with three detector assemblies, allowing for additional vertical segmentation as well as a viewing a container outside the trailer through the trailer wall. An automatic liquid nitrogen fill system is supplied for each of the detectors. The use of a forklift to move the container for horizontal segmentation is accommodated by creating an additional operational and calibration set-up in the NDA 2000 software to allow for the operator to rotate the container and assay the opposite side, achieving the same sensitivity as a comparable two-tower system. This Segmented Gamma Box Counter System retains the core technologies and design features of the standard configuration. The detector assemblies are shielded to minimize interference from environmental and plant background, and are collimated to provide segmentation of the container. The assembly positions can also be modified in height and distance from the container. The ISOCS calibration software provides for a flexible approach to providing the calibrations for a variety of measurement geometries. The NDA 2000 software provides seamless operation with the current configuration, handling the data acquisition and analysis. In this paper, an overview of this system is discussed, along with the measured performance results, calibration methodology and verification, and minimum detectable activity levels. (authors)

Morris, K.; Nakazawa, D.; Francalangia, J.; Gonzalez, H. [Canberra Industries Inc., 800 Research Parkway, Meriden, CT, 06450 (United States)] [Canberra Industries Inc., 800 Research Parkway, Meriden, CT, 06450 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems modular structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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341

Safety aspects of the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is an advanced reactor concept under development through a cooperative program involving the US Government, the nuclear industry and the utilities. The design utilizes the basic high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) features of ceramic fuel, helium coolant, and a graphite moderator. The qualitative top-level safety requirement is that the plant's operation not disturb the normal day-to-day activities of the public. The MHTGR safety response to events challenging the functions relied on to retain radionuclides within the coated fuel particles has been evaluated. A broad range of challenges to core heat removal have been examined which include a loss of helium pressure and a simultaneous loss of forced cooling of the core. The challenges to control of heat generation have considered not only the failure to insert the reactivity control systems, but the withdrawal of control rods. Finally, challenges to control chemical attack of the ceramic coated fuel have been considered, including catastrophic failure of the steam generator allowing water ingress or of the pressure vessels allowing air ingress. The plant's response to these extreme challenges is not dependent on operator action and the events considered encompass conceivable operator errors. In the same vein, reliance on radionuclide retention within the full particle and on passive features to perform a few key functions to maintain the fuel within acceptable conditions also reduced susceptibility to external events, site-specific events, and to acts of sabotage and terrorism. 4 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

Silady, F.A.; Millunzi, A.C.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT-MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY WITH POLYMER COMPONENTS WITHIN MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT (FINAL REPORT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The first deployment target for the technology is within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the facility. This report provides the data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The test was conducted over six months. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers present in MCU (i.e., PEEK, Grafoil, Tefzel and Isolast) in the modified NGS (where the concentration of LIX{reg_sign}79 and MaxCalix was varied systematically) showed that LIX{reg_sign}79 selectively affected Tefzel and its different grades (by an increase in size and lowering its density). The copolymer structure of Tefzel and possibly its porosity allows for the easier diffusion of LIX{reg_sign}79. Tefzel is used as the seat material in some of the valves at MCU. Long term exposure to LIX{reg_sign}79, may make the valves hard to operate over time due to the seat material (Tefzel) increasing in size. However, since the physical changes of Tefzel in the improved solvent are comparable to the changes in the CSSX baseline solvent, no design changes are needed with respect to the Tefzel seating material. PEEK, Grafoil and Isolast were not affected by LIX{reg_sign}79 and MaxCalix within six months of exposure. The initial rapid weight gain observed in every polymer is assigned to the finite and limited uptake of Isopar{reg_sign} L/Modifier by the polymers probably due to the polymers porosity and rough surfaces. Spectroscopic data on the organic liquid and the polymer surfaces showed no preferential adsorption of any component in the NGS to the polymers and with the exception of CPVC, no leachate was observed in the NGS from any of the polymers studied. The testing shows no major concerns for compatibility over the short duration of these tests but does indicate that longer duration exposure studies are warranted, especially for Tefzel. However, the physical changes experienced by Tefzel in the improved solvent were comparable to the physical changes obtained when Tefzel is placed in CSSX baseline solvent. Therefore, there is no effect of the improved solvent beyond those observed in CSSX baseline solvent.

Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.; Fink, S.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

343

Enabling pulse compression and proton acceleration in a modular ICF driver for nuclear and particle physics applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The existence of efficient ion acceleration regimes in collective laser-plasma interactions opens up the possibility to develop high-energy physics facilities in conjunction with projects for inertial confinement nuclear fusion (ICF) and neutron spallation sources. In this paper, we show that the pulse compression requests to make operative these acceleration mechanisms do not fall in contradiction with current technologies for high repetition rate ICF drivers. In particular, we discuss explicitly a solution that exploits optical parametric chirped pulse amplification and the intrinsic modularity of the lasers aimed at ICF.

F. Terranova; S. V. Bulanov; J. L. Collier; H. Kiriyama; F. Pegoraro

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

344

BeamDyn: A High-Fidelity Wind Turbine Blade Solver in the FAST Modular Framework: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BeamDyn, a Legendre-spectral-finite-element implementation of geometrically exact beam theory (GEBT), was developed to meet the design challenges associated with highly flexible composite wind turbine blades. In this paper, the governing equations of GEBT are reformulated into a nonlinear state-space form to support its coupling within the modular framework of the FAST wind turbine computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool. Different time integration schemes (implicit and explicit) were implemented and examined for wind turbine analysis. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the capability of this new beam solver. An example analysis of a realistic wind turbine blade, the CX-100, is also presented as validation.

Wang, Q.; Sprague, M.; Jonkman, J.; Johnson, N.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor short term thermal response to flow and reactivity transients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The analyses reported here have been conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) Division of Regulatory Applications of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The short-term thermal response of the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is analyzed for a range of flow and reactivity transients. These include loss of forced circulation (LOFC) without scram, moisture ingress, spurious withdrawal of a control rod group, hypothetical large and rapid positive reactivity insertion, and a rapid core cooling event. The coupled heat transfer-neutron kinetics model is also described.

Cleveland, J.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Optimization of a Small Modular Lead Fast Reactor with Steam Cycle for Remote Siting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Parametric thermal-hydraulic studies needed to develop and optimize the design of a small modular 25 MWt lead-bismuth reactor plant have been performed. The starting point was the design of a liquid metal version of the secure transportable autonomous reactor (STAR-LM) plant of 300 to 400 MWt with a steam power cycle.1 The primary flow is driven entirely by natural convection. The new plant is to be extremely small so that its main components can be transported to the reactor site by truck. The analytical model includes the two major components of the primary loop, the reactor and a once-through steam generator, which is a shell-and-tube heat exchanger with straight vertical tubes. The modeling includes the changes between the beginning and the end of plant life due to the gradual buildup of a layer of magnetite on the surfaces of the fuel pins and on the outer surfaces of the steam generator tubes. Three reactor parametric studies were performed-one for each of three sets of reactor geometric parameters. In each study the pin-bundle pressure drop, the vertical height of the primary loop, the hydraulic diameter of the core, the number of fuel pins, and peak fuel and cladding temperatures were determined for a range of values of fuel pin linear power. Four steam generator parametric studies were performed. The first three have fixed tube inner diameters of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 cm, respectively. In the fourth study the tube inner diameter was allowed to vary and the margin to critical heat flux, CHF, was maintained at 20%. In the steam generator studies the independent parameters include tube length and tube-bundle pitch-to-diameter ratio and the dependent variables include steam generator cross-sectional area, the number of tubes, the vertical height of the primary loop, and the steam generator pressure drop. The results show that an acceptable optimum thermal-hydraulic design for a 25 MWt STAR-LM is feasible. (authors)

Feldman, Earl E.; Wei, Thomas Y. C.; Sienicki, James J. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Life extension program for the modular caustic side solvent extraction unit at Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) is currently used at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) for removal of cesium from the high-level salt-wastes stored in underground tanks. At SRS, the CSSX process is deployed in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). The CSSX technology utilizes a multi-component organic solvent and annular centrifugal contactors to extract cesium from alkaline salt waste. Coalescers and decanters process the Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS) and Strip Effluent (SE) streams to allow recovery and reuse of the organic solvent and to limit the quantity of solvent transferred to the downstream facilities. MCU is operated in series with the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) which removes strontium and actinides from salt waste utilizing monosodium titanate. ARP and MCU were developed and implemented as interim salt processing until future processing technology, the CSSX-based Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), is operational. SWPF is slated to come on-line in October 2014. The three year design life of the ARP/MCU process, however, was reached in April 2011. Nevertheless, most of the individual process components are capable of operating longer. An evaluation determined ARP/MCU can operate until 2015 before major equipment failure is expected. The three year design life of the ARP/MCU Life Extension (ARP/MCU LE) program will bridge the gap between current ARP/MCU operations and the start of SWPF operation. The ARP/MCU LE program introduces no new technologies. As a portion of this program, a Next Generation Solvent (NGS) and corresponding flowsheet are being developed to provide a major performance enhancement at MCU. This paper discusses all the modifications performed in the facility to support the ARP/MCU Life Extension. It will also discuss the next generation chemistry, including NGS and new stripping chemistry, which will increase cesium removal efficiency in MCU. Possible implementation of the NGS chemistry in MCU accomplishes two objectives. MCU serves as a demonstration facility for improved flowsheet deployment at SWPF; operating with NGS and boric acid validates improved cesium removal performance and increased throughput as well as confirms Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) ability to vitrify waste streams containing boron. NGS implementation at MCU also aids the ARP/MCU LE operation, mitigating the impacts of delays and sustaining operations until other technology is able to come on-line.

Samadi-Dezfouli, Azadeh

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

348

Small Modular Reactor: First of a Kind (FOAK) and Nth of a Kind (NOAK) Economic Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small modular reactors (SMRs) refer to any reactor design in which the electricity generated is less than 300 MWe. Often medium sized reactors with power less than 700 MWe are also grouped into this category. Internationally, the development of a variety of designs for SMRs is booming with many designs approaching maturity and even in or nearing the licensing stage. It is for this reason that a generalized yet comprehensive economic model for first of a kind (FOAK) through nth of a kind (NOAK) SMRs based upon rated power, plant configuration, and the fiscal environment was developed. In the model, a particular projects feasibility is assessed with regards to market conditions and by commonly utilized capital budgeting techniques, such as the net present value (NPV), internal rate of return (IRR), Payback, and more importantly, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for comparison to other energy production technologies. Finally, a sensitivity analysis was performed to determine the effects of changing debt, equity, interest rate, and conditions on the LCOE. The economic model is primarily applied to the near future water cooled SMR designs in the United States. Other gas cooled and liquid metal cooled SMR designs have been briefly outlined in terms of how the economic model would change. FOAK and NOAK SMR costs were determined for a site containing seven 180 MWe water cooled SMRs and compared to a site containing one 1260 MWe reactor. With an equal share of debt and equity and a 10% cost of debt and equity, the LCOE was determined to be $79 $84/MWh and $80/MWh for the SMR and large reactor sites, respectively. With a cost of equity of 15%, the SMR LCOE increased substantially to $103 $109/MWh. Finally, an increase in the equity share to 70% at the 15% cost of equity resulted in an even higher LCOE, demonstrating the large variation in results due to financial and market factors. The NPV and IRR both decreased with increasing LCOE. Unless the price of electricity increases along with the LCOE, the projects may become unprofitable. This is the case at the LCOE of $103 $109/MW, in which the NPV became negative. The IRR increased with increasing electricity price. Three cases, electric only base, storagecompressed air energy storage or pumped hydro, and hydrogen production, were performed incorporating SMRs into a nuclear wind natural gas hybrid energy system for the New York West Central region. The operational costs for three cases were calculated as $27/MWh, $25/MWh, and $28/MWh, respectively. A 3% increase in profits was demonstrated for the storage case over the electric only base case.

Lauren M. Boldon; Piyush Sabharwall

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT (MCU) GAMMA MONITORS SYSTEM FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) selected Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) as the preferred technology for the removal of radioactive cesium from High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Before the full-scale Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) becomes operational, the Closure Business Unit (CBU) plans to process a portion of dissolved saltcake waste through a Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). This work was derived from Technical Task Request SP-TTR-2004-00013, ''Gamma Monitor for MCU''. The deliverables for this task are the hardware and software for the gamma monitors and a report summarizing the testing and acceptance of this equipment for use in the MCU. Gamma-ray monitors are required to: (1) Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the decontaminated salt solution before entering the DSS (Decontaminated Salt Solution) Hold Tank, (2) Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the strip effluent before entering the Strip Effluent Hold Tank, (3) Verify proper operation of the solvent extraction system by verifying material balance within the process (The DSS Hold Tank Cs-137 concentration will be very low and the Cs-137 concentration in the Strip Effluent Hold Tank will be fifteen times higher than the Cs-137 concentration in the Feed Tank.) Sodium iodide monitors are used to measure the Cs-137 concentration in the piping before the DSS Hold tank, while GM monitors are used for Cs-137 measurements before the Strip Effluent Hold Tank. Tungsten shields were designed using Monte Carlo calculations and fabricated to reduce the process background radiation at the detector positions. These monitors were calibrated with NIST traceable standards that were specially made to be the same as the piping being monitored. Since this gamma ray monitoring system is unique, specially designed software was written and acceptance tested by Savannah River National Laboratory personnel. The software is a LabView-based application that serves as a unified interface for controlling the monitor hardware and communicating with the host Distributed Control System (DCS). In order to provide user friendly software for the process personnel, the software was broken down into just a few software modules. These software modules are the Application Window, Detector Selection, Detector Configuration Settings, Background Counting, and Routine Data Acquisition. Instructions for using the software have been included in a user's manual that is appended to this report. The work presented in this report meets all of the requirements set forth in the project task plan to design and implement gamma ray monitors for the MCU. Additional setup and testing of the system will be required when it implemented in the process.

Casella, V

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

INITIATORS AND TRIGGERING CONDITIONS FOR ADAPTIVE AUTOMATION IN ADVANCED SMALL MODULAR REACTORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is anticipated that Advanced Small Modular Reactors (AdvSMRs) will employ high degrees of automation. High levels of automation can enhance system performance, but often at the cost of reduced human performance. Automation can lead to human out-of the loop issues, unbalanced workload, complacency, and other problems if it is not designed properly. Researchers have proposed adaptive automation (defined as dynamic or flexible allocation of functions) as a way to get the benefits of higher levels of automation without the human performance costs. Adaptive automation has the potential to balance operator workload and enhance operator situation awareness by allocating functions to the operators in a way that is sensitive to overall workload and capabilities at the time of operation. However, there still a number of questions regarding how to effectively design adaptive automation to achieve that potential. One of those questions is related to how to initiate (or trigger) a shift in automation in order to provide maximal sensitivity to operator needs without introducing undesirable consequences (such as unpredictable mode changes). Several triggering mechanisms for shifts in adaptive automation have been proposed including: operator initiated, critical events, performance-based, physiological measurement, model-based, and hybrid methods. As part of a larger project to develop design guidance for human-automation collaboration in AdvSMRs, researchers at Idaho National Laboratory have investigated the effectiveness and applicability of each of these triggering mechanisms in the context of AdvSMR. Researchers reviewed the empirical literature on adaptive automation and assessed each triggering mechanism based on the human-system performance consequences of employing that mechanism. Researchers also assessed the practicality and feasibility of using the mechanism in the context of an AdvSMR control room. Results indicate that there are tradeoffs associated with each mechanism, but that some are more applicable to the AdvSMR domain. The two mechanisms that consistently improve performance in laboratory studies are operator initiated adaptive automation based on hierarchical task delegation and the Electroencephalogram(EEG) based measure of engagement. Current EEG methods are intrusive and require intensive analysis; therefore it is not recommended for an AdvSMR control rooms at this time. Researchers also discuss limitations in the existing empirical literature and make recommendations for further research.

Katya L Le Blanc; Johanna h Oxstrand

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Mobile/Modular Deployment Project-Enhancing Efficiencies within the National Transuranic Waste Program.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1999, the National Transuranic (TRU) Waste Program (NTP) achieved two significant milestones. First, the Waste Isolation Plant (WIPP) opened in March for the permanent disposal of TRU waste generated by, and temporarily stored at, various sites supporting the nation's defense programs. Second, the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, issued by the New Mexico Environment Department, for WIPP became effective in November. While the opening of WIPP brought to closure a number of scientific, engineering, regulatory, and political challenges, achieving this major milestone led to a new set of challenges-how to achieve the Department of Energy's (DOE's) NTP end-state vision: All TRU waste from DOE sites scheduled for closure is removed All legacy TRU waste from DOE sites with an ongoing nuclear mission is disposed 0 All newly generated TRU waste is disposed as it is generated The goal is to operate the national TRU waste program safely, cost effectively, in compliance with applicable regulations and agreements, and at full capacity in a fully integrated mode. The existing schedule for TRU waste disposition would achieve the NTP vision in 2034 at an estimated life-cycle cost of $16B. The DOE's Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) seeks to achieve this vision early-by at least 10 years- while saving the nation an estimated $48 to $6B. CBFO's approach is to optimize, or to make as functional as possible, TRU waste disposition. That is, to remove barriers that impede waste disposition, and increase the rate and cost efficiency of waste disposal at WIPP, while maintaining safety. The Mobile/Modular Deployment Project (MMDP) is the principal vehicle for implementing DOE's new commercial model of using best business practices of national authorization basis, standardization, and economies of scale to accelerate the completion of WIPP's mission. The MMDP is one of the cornerstones of the National TRU Waste System Optimization Project (1). The objective of the MMDP is to increase TRU waste shipment and disposal rates from currently certified sites as well as to provide a means to remove TRU waste from sites that have no characterization capability.

Triay, I. R. (Ines R.); Basabilvazo, G. B. (George B.); Countiss, S. (Sue); Moody, D. C. (David C.); Behrens, R. G. (Robert G.); Lott, S. A. (Sheila A.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Integrating Safety, Operations, Security, and Safeguards (ISOSS) into the design of small modular reactors : a handbook.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The existing regulatory environment for nuclear reactors impacts both the facility design and the cost of operations once the facility is built. Delaying the consideration of regulatory requirements until late in the facility design - or worse, until after construction has begun - can result in costly retrofitting as well as increased operational costs to fulfill safety, security, safeguards, and emergency readiness requirements. Considering the scale and scope, as well as the latest design trends in the next generation of nuclear facilities, there is an opportunity to evaluate the regulatory requirements and optimize the design process for Small Modular Reactors (SMRs), as compared to current Light Water Reactors (LWRs). To this end, Sandia has embarked on an initiative to evaluate the interactions of regulations and operations as an approach to optimizing the design of SMR facilities, supporting operational efficiencies, as well as regulatory requirements. The early stages of this initiative consider two focus areas. The first focus area, reported by LaChance, et al. (2007), identifies the regulatory requirements established for the current fleet of LWR facilities regarding Safety, Security, Operations, Safeguards, and Emergency Planning, and evaluates the technical bases for these requirements. The second focus area, developed in this report, documents the foundations for an innovative approach that supports a design framework for SMR facilities that incorporates the regulatory environment, as well as the continued operation of the facility, into the early design stages, eliminating the need for costly retrofitting and additional operating personnel to fulfill regulatory requirements. The work considers a technique known as Integrated Safety, Operations, Security and Safeguards (ISOSS) (Darby, et al., 2007). In coordination with the best practices of industrial operations, the goal of this effort is to develop a design framework that outlines how ISOSS requirements can be incorporated into the pre-conceptual through early facility design stages, seeking a cost-effective design that meets both operational efficiencies and the regulatory environment. The larger scope of the project, i.e., in future stages, includes the identification of potentially conflicting requirements identified by the ISOSS framework, including an analysis of how regulatory requirements may be changed to account for the intrinsic features of SMRs.

Middleton, Bobby D.; Mendez, Carmen Margarita [Sociotecnia Solutions] [Sociotecnia Solutions

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 48, NO. 1, JANUARY 2013 229 A Modular 1 mm Die-Stacked Sensing Platform  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 48, NO. 1, JANUARY 2013 229 A Modular 1 mm Die with compatibility to commercial C protocols. A self-adapting power management unit is proposed for efficient battery voltage down conversion for wide range of battery voltages and load current. The power man- agement unit

Dutta, Prabal

354

Figure 1: The MRI robot controller system we developed a modular control system including a set of 4-ch low noise, high-power, waveform synthesizers that  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the accuracy limits of traditional mechanical templates (5mm resolution), 2) robots can be designed for interventional procedures. We have developed a modular MRI robot controller (Fig. 1) designed for operating all. The robot, shown in Fig. 2 (right), provides for three axes of Cartesian positioning (2-DOF lateral

Camesano, Terri

355

Task Priority Grasping and Locomotion Control of Modular Robot G. Salvietti, H.X. Zhang, J. Gonzalez-G`omez, D. Prattichizzo, J.W. Zhang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capabilities for robots. The former is necessary for robotic arms and industrial fixed manipulators; while the latter is the lowest basic functionality of the mobile robot systems for various applications. The lastTask Priority Grasping and Locomotion Control of Modular Robot G. Salvietti, H.X. Zhang, J

Siena, Università di

356

Product-Line Technology Recommendations for Integrated Modular Systems Zo Stephenson, Mark Nicholson, John McDermid; University of York Department of Computer Science;  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Product-Line Technology Recommendations for Integrated Modular Systems Zoë Stephenson, Mark product-line engineering to IMS evolution. An IMS is a networked computer systems providing (potentially detection system. Introduction Embedded software systems are nearly always good examples of product lines

Nicholson, Mark

357

Active Modular Elastomer Sleeve for Soft Wearable Assistance Robots Yong-Lae Park, Bor-rong Chen, Carmel Majidi, Robert J. Wood, Radhika Nagpal, and Eugene Goldfield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Active Modular Elastomer Sleeve for Soft Wearable Assistance Robots Yong-Lae Park, Bor-rong Chen orthotic device performs motion sensing and production of assistive forces with a mod- ular, pneumatically and physical dependency [2]. Assistive technologies such as electrically powered pros- thetics [3], [4], [5

Park, Yong-Lae

358

Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor passive safety system response to postulated events  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) is an 800 MWt (>225 MWe) integral pressurized water reactor. This paper is part of a series of four describing the design and safety features of the Westinghouse SMR. This paper focuses in particular upon the passive safety features and the safety system response of the Westinghouse SMR. The Westinghouse SMR design incorporates many features to minimize the effects of, and in some cases eliminates the possibility of postulated accidents. The small size of the reactor and the low power density limits the potential consequences of an accident relative to a large plant. The integral design eliminates large loop piping, which significantly reduces the flow area of postulated loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs). The Westinghouse SMR containment is a high-pressure, compact design that normally operates at a partial vacuum. This facilitates heat removal from the containment during LOCA events. The containment is submerged in water which also aides the heat removal and provides an additional radionuclide filter. The Westinghouse SMR safety system design is passive, is based largely on the passive safety systems used in the AP1000{sup R} reactor, and provides mitigation of all design basis accidents without the need for AC electrical power for a period of seven days. Frequent faults, such as reactivity insertion events and loss of power events, are protected by first shutting down the nuclear reaction by inserting control rods, then providing cold, borated water through a passive, buoyancy-driven flow. Decay heat removal is provided using a layered approach that includes the passive removal of heat by the steam drum and independent passive heat removal system that transfers heat from the primary system to the environment. Less frequent faults such as loss of coolant accidents are mitigated by passive injection of a large quantity of water that is readily available inside containment. An automatic depressurization system is used to reduce the reactor pressure in a controlled manner to facilitate the passive injection. Long-term decay heat removal is accomplished using the passive heat removal systems augmented by heat transfer through the containment vessel to the environment. The passive injection systems are designed so that the fuel remains covered and effectively cooled throughout the event. Like during the frequent faults, the passive systems provide effective cooling without the need for ac power for seven days following the accident. Connections are available to add additional water to indefinitely cool the plant. The response of the safety systems of the Westinghouse SMR to various initiating faults has been examined. Among them, two accidents; an extended station blackout event, and a LOCA event have been evaluated to demonstrate how the plant will remain safe in the unlikely event that either should occur. (authors)

Smith, M. C.; Wright, R. F. [Westinghouse Electric Company, 600 Cranberry Woods Drive (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

LITERATURE REVIEWS TO SUPPORT ION EXCHANGE TECHNOLOGY SELECTION FOR MODULAR SALT PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of literature reviews conducted to support the selection of a cesium removal technology for application in a small column ion exchange (SCIX) unit supported within a high level waste tank. SCIX is being considered as a technology for the treatment of radioactive salt solutions in order to accelerate closure of waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as part of the Modular Salt Processing (MSP) technology development program. Two ion exchange materials, spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (RF) and engineered Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST), are being considered for use within the SCIX unit. Both ion exchange materials have been studied extensively and are known to have high affinities for cesium ions in caustic tank waste supernates. RF is an elutable organic resin and CST is a non-elutable inorganic material. Waste treatment processes developed for the two technologies will differ with regard to solutions processed, secondary waste streams generated, optimum column size, and waste throughput. Pertinent references, anticipated processing sequences for utilization in waste treatment, gaps in the available data, and technical comparisons will be provided for the two ion exchange materials to assist in technology selection for SCIX. The engineered, granular form of CST (UOP IE-911) was the baseline ion exchange material used for the initial development and design of the SRS SCIX process (McCabe, 2005). To date, in-tank SCIX has not been implemented for treatment of radioactive waste solutions at SRS. Since initial development and consideration of SCIX for SRS waste treatment an alternative technology has been developed as part of the River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) Research and Technology program (Thorson, 2006). Spherical RF resin is the baseline media for cesium removal in the RPP-WTP, which was designed for the treatment of radioactive waste supernates and is currently under construction in Hanford, WA. Application of RF for cesium removal in the Hanford WTP does not involve in-riser columns but does utilize the resin in large scale column configurations in a waste treatment facility. The basic conceptual design for SCIX involves the dissolution of saltcake in SRS Tanks 1-3 to give approximately 6 M sodium solutions and the treatment of these solutions for cesium removal using one or two columns supported within a high level waste tank. Prior to ion exchange treatment, the solutions will be filtered for removal of entrained solids. In addition to Tanks 1-3, solutions in two other tanks (37 and 41) will require treatment for cesium removal in the SCIX unit. The previous SCIX design (McCabe, 2005) utilized CST for cesium removal with downflow supernate processing and included a CST grinder following cesium loading. Grinding of CST was necessary to make the cesium-loaded material suitable for vitrification in the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Because RF resin is elutable (and reusable) and processing requires conversion between sodium and hydrogen forms using caustic and acidic solutions more liquid processing steps are involved. The WTP baseline process involves a series of caustic and acidic solutions (downflow processing) with water washes between pH transitions across neutral. In addition, due to resin swelling during conversion from hydrogen to sodium form an upflow caustic regeneration step is required. Presumably, one of these basic processes (or some variation) will be utilized for MSP for the appropriate ion exchange technology selected. CST processing involves two primary waste products: loaded CST and decontaminated salt solution (DSS). RF processing involves three primary waste products: spent RF resin, DSS, and acidic cesium eluate, although the resin is reusable and typically does not require replacement until completion of multiple treatment cycles. CST processing requires grinding of the ion exchange media, handling of solids with high cesium loading, and handling of liquid wash and conditioning solutions. RF processing requires h

King, W

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

360

User's guide for the BNW-III optimization code for modular dry/wet-cooled power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This user's guide describes BNW-III, a computer code developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the Dry Cooling Enhancement Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The BNW-III code models a modular dry/wet cooling system for a nuclear or fossil fuel power plant. The purpose of this guide is to give the code user a brief description of what the BNW-III code is and how to use it. It describes the cooling system being modeled and the various models used. A detailed description of code input and code output is also included. The BNW-III code was developed to analyze a specific cooling system layout. However, there is a large degree of freedom in the type of cooling modules that can be selected and in the performance of those modules. The costs of the modules are input to the code, giving the user a great deal of flexibility.

Braun, D.J.; Faletti, D.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems modular structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Magnitude and reactivity consequences of moisture ingress into the modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor core  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inadvertent admission of moisture into the primary system of a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor has been identified in US Department of Energy-sponsored studies as an important safety concern. The work described here develops an analytical methodology to quantify the pressure and reactivity consequences of steam-generator tube rupture and other moisture-ingress-related incidents. Important neutronic and thermohydraulic processes are coupled with reactivity feedback and safety and control system responses. The rate and magnitude of steam buildup are found to be dominated by major system features such as break size compared with safety valve capacity and reliability and less sensitive to factors such as heat transfer coefficients. The results indicate that ingress transients progress at a slower pace than previously predicted by bounding analyses, with milder power overshoots and more time for operator or automatic corrective actions.

Smith, O.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

MORECA: A computer code for simulating modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core heatup accidents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design features of the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) have the potential to make it essentially invulnerable to damage from postulated core heatup accidents. This report describes the ORNL MORECA code, which was developed for analyzing postulated long-term core heatup scenarios for which active cooling systems used to remove afterheat following the accidents can be assumed to the unavailable. Simulations of long-term loss-of-forced-convection accidents, both with and without depressurization of the primary coolant, have shown that maximum core temperatures stay below the point at which any significant fuel failures and fission product releases are expected. Sensitivity studies also have been done to determine the effects of errors in the predictions due both to uncertainties in the modeling and to the assumptions about operational parameters. MORECA models the US Department of Energy reference design of a standard MHTGR.

Ball, S.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Fukushima Nuclear Crisis Recovery: A Modular Water Treatment System Deployed in Seven Weeks - 12489  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On March 11, 2011, the magnitude 9.0 Great East Japan earthquake, Tohoku, hit off the Fukushima coast of Japan. This was one of the most powerful earthquakes in recorded history and the most powerful one known to have hit Japan. The ensuing tsunami devastated a huge area resulting in some 25,000 persons confirmed dead or missing. The perfect storm was complete when the tsunami then found the four reactor, Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Station directly in its destructive path. While recovery systems admirably survived the powerful earthquake, the seawater from the tsunami knocked the emergency cooling systems out and did extensive damage to the plant and site. Subsequent hydrogen generation caused explosions which extended this damage to a new level and further flooded the buildings with highly contaminated water. Some 2 million people were evacuated from a fifty mile radius of the area and evaluation and cleanup began. Teams were assembled in Tokyo the first week of April to lay out potential plans for the immediate treatment of some 63 million gallons (a number which later exceeded 110 million gallons) of highly contaminated water to avoid overflow from the buildings as well as supply the desperately needed clean cooling water for the reactors. A system had to be deployed with a very brief cold shake down and hot startup before the rainy season started in early June. Joined by team members Toshiba (oil removal system), AREVA (chemical precipitation system) and Hitachi-GE (RO system), Kurion (cesium removal system following the oil separator) proposed, designed, fabricated, delivered and started up a one of a kind treatment skid and over 100 metric tons of specially engineered and modified Ion Specific Media (ISM) customized for this very challenging seawater/oil application, all in seven weeks. After a very short cold shake down, the system went into operation on June 17, 2011 on actual waste waters far exceeding 1 million Bq/mL in cesium and many other isotopes. One must remember that, in addition to attempting to do isotope removal in the competition of seawater (as high as 18,000 ppm sodium due to concentration), some 350,000 gallons of turbine oil was dispersed into the flooded buildings as well. The proposed system consisted of a 4 guard vessel skid for the oil and debris, 4 skids containing 16 cesium towers in a lead-lag layout with removable vessels (sent to an interim storage facility), and a 4 polishing vessel skid for iodine removal and trace cesium levels. At a flow rate of at least 220 gallons per minute, the system has routinely removed over 99% of the cesium, the main component of the activity, since going on line. To date, some 50% of the original activity has been removed and stabilized and cold shutdown of the plant was announced on December 10, 2011. In March and April alone, 10 cubic feet of Engineered Herschelite was shipped to Seabrook Nuclear Power Plant, NPP, to support the April 1, 2011 outage cleanup; 400 cubic feet was shipped to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for strontium (Sr-90) ground water remediation; and 6000 cubic feet (100 metric tons, MT, or 220,400 pounds) was readied for the Fukushima Nuclear Power Station with an additional 100 MT on standby for replacement vessels. This experience and accelerated media production in the U.S. bore direct application to what was to soon be used in Fukushima. How such a sophisticated and totally unique system and huge amount of media could be deployable in such a challenging and changing matrix, and in only seven weeks, is outlined in this paper as well as the system and operation itself. As demonstrated herein, all ten major steps leading up to the readiness and acceptance of a modular emergency technology recovery system were met and in a very short period of time, thus utilizing three decades of experience to produce and deliver such a system literally in seven weeks: - EPRI - U.S. Testing and Experience Leading to Introduction to EPRI - Japan and Subsequently TEPCO Emergency Meetings - Three Mile Island (TMI) Media and Vitrification Experience

Denton, Mark S.; Mertz, Joshua L. [Kurion, Inc., P.O. Box 5901, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Bostick, William D. [Materials and Chemistry Laboratory, Inc. (MCL) ETTP, Building K-1006, 2010 Highway 58, Suite 1000, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Ultralight Modular Robotic Building Blocks for the Rapid Deployment of Planetary Outposts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Mars to establish automated facilities for gathering in-situ resources such as fuel, water and oxygen a significant design challenge. Structural systems tend to be large and heavy, making them expensive to launch factory and a supply of lightweight materials would be shipped from earth with each robotic mission

Goldstein, Seth Copen

365

Modular Semantic Tagging of Medline Abstracts and its Use in Inferring Regulatory Networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe MedstractPlus, a resource for mining relations from the Medline bibliographic database that is currently under construction. It was built on the remains of Medstract, a previously created resource that included a biorelation server and an acronym database. MedstractPlus uses simple and scalable natural language processing modules to structure text, is designed with reusability and extendibility in mind, and adheres to the philosophy of the Linguistic Annotation Framework. We show how MedstractPlus has been used to provide seeds for a novel approach to inferring transcriptional regulatory networks from gene expression data.

Verhagen, Marc; Pustejovsky, James; Taylor, Ronald C.; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

366

Modularity Approach Modular Pebble Bed Reactor (MPBR)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NED MPBR 1150 MW Combined Heat and Power Station Turbine Hall Boundary Admin Training Control Bldg material limitations #12;4/23/03 MIT NED MPBR Design Elements Assembly Self-locating Space

367

Computational studies of stress and structure development resulting from the coalescence of metallic islands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thin film component properties are critical design elements in almost all industries. These films are particularly important in the performance of micro- and nano-electromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS). Residual stress ...

Takahashi, Andrew Rikio

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

COE projection for the modular WARP{trademark} wind power system for wind farms and electric utility power transmission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind power has emerged as an attractive alternative source of electricity for utilities. Turbine operating experience from wind farms has provided corroborating data of wind power potential for electric utility application. Now, a patented modular wind power technology, the Toroidal Accelerator Rotor Platform (TARP{trademark}) Windframe{trademark}, forms the basis for next generation megawatt scale wind farm and/or distributed wind power plants. When arranged in tall vertically clustered TARP{trademark} module stacks, such power plant units are designated Wind Amplified Rotor Platform (WARP{trademark}) Systems. While heavily building on proven technology, these systems are projected to surpass current technology windmills in terms of performance, user-friendly operation and ease of maintenance. In its unique generation and transmission configuration, the WARP{trademark}-GT System combines both electricity generation through wind energy conversion and electric power transmission. Furthermore, environmental benefits include dramatically less land requirement, architectural appearance, lower noise and EMI/TV interference, and virtual elimination of bird mortality potential. Cost-of-energy (COE) is projected to be from under $0.02/kWh to less than $0.05/kWh in good to moderate wind resource sites.

Weisbrich, A.L. [ENECO, West Simsbury, CT (United States); Ostrow, S.L.; Padalino, J. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, New York, NY (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Benefit/cost framework for evaluating modular energy storage : a study for the DOE energy storage systems program.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work documented in this report represents another step in the ongoing investigation of innovative and potentially attractive value propositions for electricity storage by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Energy Storage Systems (ESS) Program. This study uses updated cost and performance information for modular energy storage (MES) developed for this study to evaluate four prospective value propositions for MES. The four potentially attractive value propositions are defined by a combination of well-known benefits that are associated with electricity generation, delivery, and use. The value propositions evaluated are: (1) transportable MES for electric utility transmission and distribution (T&D) equipment upgrade deferral and for improving local power quality, each in alternating years, (2) improving local power quality only, in all years, (3) electric utility T&D deferral in year 1, followed by electricity price arbitrage in following years; plus a generation capacity credit in all years, and (4) electric utility end-user cost management during times when peak and critical peak pricing prevail.

Eyer, James M. (Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA); Schoenung, Susan M. (Longitude 122 West, Inc., Menlo Park, CA)

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Design of a Modular Multilevel Converter as an Active Front-End for a magnet supply application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aim of this work is to describe the general design procedure of a Modular Multilevel Converter (MMC) applied as an Active Front-End (AFE) for a magnet supply for beam accelerators. The dimensioning criteria for the converter and the dc-link capacitance are presented and the grid transformer requirements are set. Considering the converter design, the arm inductance calculation is based on the specifications for the arm-current ripple and the DC-link fault tolerance, but, also, on the limitation of the second harmonic and the second-order LC resonance of the arm current. The module capacitance value is evaluated by focusing on the required switching dynamics and the capacitor-voltage ripple according to a newly proposed graphical method. The loading of each semiconductor in the half bridge is calculated via simulation, indicating the unsymmetrical current distribution. It is concluded that the current distribution for each semiconductor depends on the mode of operation of the converter. The different criter...

Panagiotis, Asimakopoulos; Massimo, Bongiorno

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation: Functional modules, F9-F11  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Manual represents Revision 5 of the user documentation for the modular code system referred to as SCALE. The history of the SCALE code system dates back to 1969 when the current Computational Physics and Engineering Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) began providing the transportation package certification staff at the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission with computational support in the use of the new KENO code for performing criticality safety assessments with the statistical Monte Carlo method. From 1969 to 1976 the certification staff relied on the ORNL staff to assist them in the correct use of codes and data for criticality, shielding, and heat transfer analyses of transportation packages. However, the certification staff learned that, with only occasional use of the codes, it was difficult to become proficient in performing the calculations often needed for an independent safety review. Thus, shortly after the move of the certification staff to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the NRC staff proposed the development of an easy-to-use analysis system that provided the technical capabilities of the individual modules with which they were familiar. With this proposal, the concept of the Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) code system was born. This volume consists of the section of the manual dealing with three of the functional modules in the code. Those are the Morse-SGC for the SCALE system, Heating 7.2, and KENO V.a. The manual describes the latest released versions of the codes.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation. Control modules -- Volume 1, Revision 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automate the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.2 of the system. This manual is divided into three volumes: Volume 1--for the control module documentation, Volume 2--for the functional module documentation, and Volume 3 for the documentation of the data libraries and subroutine libraries.

Landers, N.F.; Petrie, L.M.; Knight, J.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Optimizing a Modular Expansion of a Wastewater Treatment Plant Using Option Theory and Moment Matching Approximation Abstract  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a municipality faced with the question of how big to make their new wastewater treatment facility to meet the demand of 10 % expected growth in the number of new connections. Previously, we developed a real options framework for determining optimal plant size and showed that the model takes on the form of an Asian option. Furthermore, it was shown that if the connection rate growths are closely correlated with the market growth, then the penalty costs associated with having insufficient capacity to treat the wastewater can be effectively hedged, significantly reducing overall expected costs. In this study, we introduce an approximate analytical solution and optimize the plant size of a staged / modular expansion. Based on the given construction cost estimates, we show that a staged expansion has a minimal (expected) savings when connection growth rates are closely correlated to the market growth rates. However, as the correlation decreases to zero, or, alternatively, no attempt is made to hedge the penalty costs, a staged expansion has an expected savings of 20%.

Yuri Lawryshyn; Sebastian Jaimungal

374

SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation. Miscellaneous -- Volume 3, Revision 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice; (2) automate the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System developments has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.2 of the system. This manual is divided into three volumes: Volume 1--for the control module documentation, Volume 2--for the functional module documentation, and Volume 3--for the data libraries and subroutine libraries.

Petrie, L.M.; Jordon, W.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Edwards, A.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Technical Readiness and Gaps Analysis of Commercial Optical Materials and Measurement Systems for Advanced Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report intends to support Department of Energys Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap and industry stakeholders by evaluating optical-based instrumentation and control (I&C) concepts for advanced small modular reactor (AdvSMR) applications. These advanced designs will require innovative thinking in terms of engineering approaches, materials integration, and I&C concepts to realize their eventual viability and deployability. The primary goals of this report include: 1. Establish preliminary I&C needs, performance requirements, and possible gaps for AdvSMR designs based on best available published design data. 2. Document commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) optical sensors, components, and materials in terms of their technical readiness to support essential AdvSMR in-vessel I&C systems. 3. Identify technology gaps by comparing the in-vessel monitoring requirements and environmental constraints to COTS optical sensor and materials performance specifications. 4. Outline a future research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) program plan that addresses these gaps and develops optical-based I&C systems that enhance the viability of future AdvSMR designs. The development of clean, affordable, safe, and proliferation-resistant nuclear power is a key goal that is documented in the Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap. This roadmap outlines RD&D activities intended to overcome technical, economic, and other barriers, which currently limit advances in nuclear energy. These activities will ensure that nuclear energy remains a viable component to this nations energy security.

Anheier, Norman C.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Qiao, Hong (Amy); Andersen, Eric S.; Berglin, Eric J.; Bliss, Mary; Cannon, Bret D.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Mendoza, Albert; Sheen, David M.

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

376

SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation: Functional modules F1-F8  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Manual represents Revision 5 of the user documentation for the modular code system referred to as SCALE. The history of the SCALE code system dates back to 1969 when the current Computational Physics and Engineering Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) began providing the transportation package certification staff at the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission with computational support in the use of the new KENO code for performing criticality safety assessments with the statistical Monte Carlo method. From 1969 to 1976 the certification staff relied on the ORNL staff to assist them in the correct use of codes and data for criticality, shielding, and heat transfer analyses of transportation packages. However, the certification staff learned that, with only occasional use of the codes, it was difficult to become proficient in performing the calculations often needed for an independent safety review. Thus, shortly after the move of the certification staff to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the NRC staff proposed the development of an easy-to-use analysis system that provided the technical capabilities of the individual modules with which they were familiar. With this proposal, the concept of the Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) code system was born. This volume consists of the section of the manual dealing with eight of the functional modules in the code. Those are: BONAMI - resonance self-shielding by the Bondarenko method; NITAWL-II - SCALE system module for performing resonance shielding and working library production; XSDRNPM - a one-dimensional discrete-ordinates code for transport analysis; XSDOSE - a module for calculating fluxes and dose rates at points outside a shield; KENO IV/S - an improved monte carlo criticality program; COUPLE; ORIGEN-S - SCALE system module to calculate fuel depletion, actinide transmutation, fission product buildup and decay, and associated radiation source terms; ICE.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

THE CHEMICAL AND RADIATION RESISTANCE OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIIDE AS ENCOUNTERED IN THE MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) is a semicrystalline polymer with excellent engineering plastic properties and suitable processing temperatures. PPS can also be made containing branches (using a trifunctional monomer) and with crosslinked microstructure (when curing the monomer at high temperature in the presence of oxygen). PPS is made from the condensation reaction between para-dichlorobenzene and sodium sulfide with the assistance of a catalyst (to lower the activation barrier). The synthesis conditions for making PPS has evolved since its invention in the 1960's to the optimal conditions developed by the Philips Corporation in the 1970's. The resulting polymer consists of chemically stable molecular moieties such as benzene rings and ether like sulfur linkages between the aromatic rings. Polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) is extremely resistant to gamma irradiation, caustic solution, and dilute nitric acid. PPS is the material of construction for the coalescers used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). After applying the equivalent of 3.3 E8 rad (330 Mrad), or the equivalent of 11 years of gamma irradiation (assuming a stripping solution concentration of 7.5 Ci/gal), and several months of exposures to 3M caustic solution and caustic salt simulant, no dimensional changes nor chemical changes were detected in PPS whether the PPS was in fiber form or in a composite with E-glass fibers. However, PPS acts as a media for heterogeneous nucleation. In particular, PPS appears to favor aluminosilicate formation in saturated solutions of aluminum and silicon in caustic environments. Parallel testing, in progress, is examining the stability of PPS when exposed to the new solvent formulation under development for MCU. Preliminary data, after two months of exposure, demonstrates PPS is stable to the new solvent.

Fondeur, F.; Herman, D.; Poirier, M.; Fink, S.

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

378

Method of orbit sums in the theory of modular vector invariants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Let F be a field, V a finite-dimensional F-vector space, G{<=}GL{sub F}(V) a finite group, and V{sup m}=V+...+V the m-fold direct sum with the diagonal action of G. The group G acts naturally on the symmetric graded algebra A{sub m}=F[V{sup m}] as a group of non-degenerate linear transformations of the variables. Let A{sub m}{sup G} be the subalgebra of invariants of the polynomial algebra A{sub m} with respect to G. A classical result of Noether [1] says that if charF=0, then A{sub m}{sup G} is generated as an F-algebra by homogeneous polynomials of degree at most |G|, no matter how large m can be. On the other hand, it was proved by Richman [2], [3] that this result does not hold when the characteristic of F is positive and divides the order |G| of G. Let p, p>2, be a prime number, F=F{sub p} a finite field of p elements, V a linear F{sub p}-vector space of dimension n, and H{<=}GL{sub F{sub p}}(V) a cyclic group of order p generated by a matrix {gamma} of a certain special form. In this paper we describe explicitly (Theorem 1) one complete set of generators of A{sub m}{sup H}. After that, for an arbitrary complete set of generators of this algebra we find a lower bound for the highest degree of the generating elements of this algebra. This is a significant extension of the corresponding result of Campbell and Hughes [4] for the particular case of n=2. As a consequence we show (Theorem 3) that if m>n and G{>=}H is an arbitrary finite group, then each complete set of generators of A{sub m}{sup G} contains an element of degree at least 2(m-n+2r)(p-1)/r, where r=r(H) is a positive integer dependent on the structure of the generating matrix {gamma} of the group H. This result refines considerably the earlier lower bound obtained by Richman [3].

Stepanov, S A [Institute for Information Transmission Problems Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

379

Applying Modular Networks and Fuzzy-Logic controllers to nonlinear Flexible Hava T. SiegeImam*, Azmon Ofki**, Hugo Guterman+  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

effort in the tuning stage. 1. Introduction Flexible structures such as solar panels, large antennas and huge frame truss structures mounted on space stations are designated as large space structures (LSS low damping. The decrease in the weight of a LSS affects its flexibility, which in turn demands

Siegelmann , Hava T

380

Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2.3: Sulfur Primer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This deliverable is Subtask 2.3 of Task 2, Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates, of NREL Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Subtask 2.3 builds upon the sulfur removal information first presented in Subtask 2.1, Gas Cleanup Technologies for Biomass Gasification by adding additional information on the commercial applications, manufacturers, environmental footprint, and technical specifications for sulfur removal technologies. The data was obtained from Nexant's experience, input from GTI and other vendors, past and current facility data, and existing literature.

Nexant Inc.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems modular structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Electric utility transmission and distribution upgrade deferral benefits from modular electricity storage : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work documented in this report was undertaken as part of an ongoing investigation of innovative and potentially attractive value propositions for electricity storage by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Electricity Storage Systems (ESS) Program. This study characterizes one especially attractive value proposition for modular electricity storage (MES): electric utility transmission and distribution (T&D) upgrade deferral. The T&D deferral benefit is characterized in detail. Also presented is a generalized framework for estimating the benefit. Other important and complementary (to T&D deferral) elements of possible value propositions involving MES are also characterized.

Eyer, James M. (Distributed Utility Associates, Inc., Livermore, CA)

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Visible structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

All architecture is the interplay between structure, surface and ornament. Traditionally, ornament adorned structure thereby giving it its meaning. A society with its intellectual foundations resting in faith or the abstract ...

Conway, Helene Marie

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Modular Coil Sys Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALCTBD Leads EM/Struct Analysis CALCTBD Mod Coil Interface Welded Joint CALC1400500 NCSX Magnet Fault Tube Block Clamp Asm SE140030R0 Clamp Block SE140027R0 Jumpers Base Block SE142C047R1 Jumpers Ins Sheet Conductor Cable Connect SE142C059R2 Insul Sheet Detail SE142C211R1 Insulating Spacer SE142C212R1 Lead Block

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

384

Modular sensor network node  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A distributed wireless sensor network node is disclosed. The wireless sensor network node includes a plurality of sensor modules coupled to a system bus and configured to sense a parameter. The parameter may be an object, an event or any other parameter. The node collects data representative of the parameter. The node also includes a communication module coupled to the system bus and configured to allow the node to communicate with other nodes. The node also includes a processing module coupled to the system bus and adapted to receive the data from the sensor module and operable to analyze the data. The node also includes a power module connected to the system bus and operable to generate a regulated voltage.

Davis, Jesse Harper Zehring (Berkeley, CA); Stark, Jr., Douglas Paul (Tracy, CA); Kershaw, Christopher Patrick (Hayward, CA); Kyker, Ronald Dean (Livermore, CA)

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

385

Small Modular Reactors - SRSCRO  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearchScheduled System Highlights Success StoriesSiteTransfersmr

386

Modular Integrated Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the Ft. Bragg site consists of a gas turbine-generator, a heat recovery steam generator, and a waste heat buildings with steam for heating and domestic hot water, and chilled water for cooling. This project, the Honeywell Energy Services Team at Ft. Bragg is also collaborating with the U.S. DOE's Federal Energy

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

387

Modular Integrated Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consists of a gas turbine-generator, a heat recovery steam generator, and a waste heat fired absorption. Bragg, NC. The 82nd plant serves a large number of barracks and other buildings with steam for heating. Bragg is also collaborating with the U.S. DOE's Federal Energy Management (FEMP) Program (thru Oak Ridge

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

388

Software design implementation document for TRAC-M data structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC)-M system-wide and component data structures are to be reimplemented by using the new features of Fortran 90 (F90). There will be no changes to the conceptual design, data flow, or computational flow with respect to the current TRAC-P, except that readability, maintainability, and extensibility will be improved. However, the task described here is a basic step that does not meet all future needs of the code, especially regarding extensibility. TRAC-M will be fully functional and will produce null computational changes with respect to TRAC-P, Version 5.4.25; computational efficiency will not be degraded significantly. The existing component and functional modularity and possibilities for coarse-grained parallelism will be retained.

Jolly-Woodruff, S. [Ogden Environmental and Energy Services (United States); Mahaffy, J. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Giguere, P.; Dearing, J.; Boyack, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

asce structural division: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ABSTRACT Using modular construction equipment and additive manufacturing (3D printing) techniques large-scale 3D printing have been developed and tested in earth-based...

390

Representative Source Terms and the Influence of Reactor Attributes on Functional Containment in Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGRs) offer a high degree of passive safety. The low power density of the reactor and the high heat capacity of the graphite core result in slow transients that do not challenge the integrity of the robust TRISO fuel. Another benefit of this fuel form and the surrounding graphite is their superior ability to retain fission products under all anticipated normal and off-normal conditions, which limits reactor accident source terms to very low values. In this paper, we develop estimates of the source term for a generic MHTGR to illustrate the performance of the radionuclide barriers that comprise the MHTGR functional containment. We also examine the influence of initial fuel quality, fuel performance/failure, reactor outlet temperature, and retention outside of the reactor core on the resultant source term to the environment.

D. A. Petti; Hans Gougar; Dick Hobbins; Pete Lowry

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

SCALE: A modular code system for performing Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation. Volume 1, Part 2: Control modules S1--H1; Revision 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automated the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.3 of the system.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

SCALE: A modular code system for performing Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation. Volume 2, Part 3: Functional modules F16--F17; Revision 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automated the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.3 of the system.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Design, fabrication, and certification of advanced modular PV power systems. Annual technical progress report, 8 September 1995--7 September 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities performed during the first year of a nominal 2-year effort by Solar Electric Specialties Company (SES) under the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project of the National Photovoltaic Program. The goal of the SES contract is to reduce the installed system life-cycle costs by developing certified and standardized prototype products for two SES product lines--MAPPS{trademark} and Photogenset{trademark}. The MAPPS (modular autonomous PV power supply) systems are used for DC applications up to about a thousand watt-hours. The Photogensets are hybrid PV/generator systems for AC applications. SES expects these products to provide the basis for future commercial product lines of standardized certified, packaged systems.

Lambarski, T.; Minyard, G. [Solar Electric Specialties, Willits, CA (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Deployable structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis has the purpose of describing the meaning and applications of deployable structures (making emphasis in the scissor-hinged and sliding mechanisms.) and the development of new geometries, details, and mechanisms ...

Hernndez Merchan, Carlos Henrique

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

A SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS OF THE TREATMENT OF WIND ENERGY IN THE AEO99 VERSION OF NEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory University of California Berkeley, CA 94720 and National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole limitations on growth in capacity; these limitations include depletion of resources, costs of rapid of the other renewable technologies, such as solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), our findings may

396

tera, 4 de Outubro de 2011 Teoria de Valores Extremos: porque nem tudo Normal!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2008 e princípios de 2009, despoletada pela defunta Lehmann Brothers, e a turbulência dos mercados desde então. Para o leigo tremores de terra, furacões, e os episódios de crash no mercado bolsista são)exemplo disso: esses cisnes negros podem surgir em bandos. Existirá um padrão escondido subjacente a todo o tipo

Alves, Maria Isabel Fraga

397

Overview of NEMS-H2, Version 1.0 Frances Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pipeline Compr. H2 Truck Electrolysis Coal Gasification Biomass Gasification Small City Station Rural sequestration) · Coal Gasification (with and without sequestration) · Biomass Gasification · Electrolysis (grid

398

Review: Besedotvorni tematski blok na petnajstem mednarodnem slvisti?nem kongresu v Minsku (2013)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#20;#19;#28; 2FHQH#15;#3;]DSLVNL#15;#3;SRURLOD#3;#3;5HYLHZV#15;#3;1RWHV#15;#3;5HSRUWV Y#3; HNVSUHVLRQLVWLQR#3; VWLOQR#3; SDUDGLJPR#3; #11;#20;#28;#20;#23;#20;#28;#21;#22;#12;#3;RSUDYLOD#3;L]MHPQR#3;]DKWHYQR#3; LQ#3; REVHQR#3;GHOR#17;#3...;8VSHOR#3; ML#3; MH#3; ]DSROQLWL#3; YU]HO#3;PHG#3;HNVSUHVLRQLVWLQR#3;SRH]LMR#3; LQ#3; GUDPDWLNR#15;#3; GR#3; VHGDM#3; EROM#3; UD]LVNDQLPD#3; SRGURMHPD#17;#3; WXGLMH#3; V#3; SRGURMD#3;PHWD- IRULNH#3;]JRGQMH#3;HNVSUHVLRQLVWLQH#3;NUDWNH#3; SUR]H#3;XYU...

Voric, Ines; Stramlji? Breznik, Irena

2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

399

National Energy Modeling System with Hydrogen Model (NEMS-H2)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy HealthCommentsAugust 2012NEVADA SPARKSNV EnergyDepartment ofRFI

400

A sensitivity analysis of the treatment of wind energy in the AEO99 version of NEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Documentation Report: Wind Energy Submodule (WES). DOE/EIA-The Economic Value of Wind Energy at High Power Systemthe characterization of wind energy in the model as used for

Osborn, Julie G.; Wood, Frances; Richey, Cooper; Sanders, Sandy; Short, Walter; Koomey, Jonathan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems modular structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A sensitivity analysis of the treatment of wind energy in the AEO99 version of NEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Administration. 1998. Annual Energy Outlook 1999: WithDepartment of Energys Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) forecastDepartment of Energys Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99)

Osborn, Julie G.; Wood, Frances; Richey, Cooper; Sanders, Sandy; Short, Walter; Koomey, Jonathan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Learning and cost reductions for generating technologies in the national energy modeling system (NEMS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001. Report#:DOE/ENDOGENOUS LEARNING IN THE ANNUAL ENERGY OUTLOOK REFERENCEDepartment of Energys Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), which is

Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Frequency Stabilization in Non-linear MEMS and NEMS Oscillators (IN-11-087)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityFieldMinds"Office | Department- Energy Innovation

404

U.S. Department Of Energy Advanced Small Modular Reactor R&D Program: Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interfaces (ICHMI) are essential enabling technologies that strongly influence nuclear power plant performance and operational costs. The nuclear power industry is currently engaged in a transition from traditional analog-based instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interface systems to implementations employing digital technologies. This transition has primarily occurred in an ad hoc fashion through individual system upgrades at existing plants and has been constrained by licenseability concerns. Although the recent progress in constructing new plants has spurred design of more fully digital plant-wide ICHMI systems, the experience base in the nuclear power application domain is limited. Additionally, development of advanced reactor concepts, such as Generation IV designs and small modular reactors, introduces different plant conditions (e.g., higher temperatures, different coolants, etc.) and unique plant configurations (e.g., multiunit plants with shared systems, balance of plant architectures with reconfigurable co-generation options) that increase the need for enhanced ICHMI capabilities to fully achieve industry goals related to economic competitiveness, safety and reliability, sustainability, and proliferation resistance and physical protection. As a result, significant challenges remain to be addressed to enable the nuclear power industry to complete the transition to safe and comprehensive use of modern ICHMI technology. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized that ICHMI research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) is needed to resolve the technical challenges that may compromise the effective and efficient utilization of modern ICHMI technology and consequently inhibit realization of the benefits offered by expanded utilization of nuclear power. Consequently, several DOE programs have substantial ICHMI RD&D elements within their respective research portfolios. This paper describes current ICHMI research in support of advanced small modular reactors. The objectives that can be achieved through execution of the defined RD&D are to provide optimal technical solutions to critical ICHMI issues, resolve technology gaps arising from the unique measurement and control characteristics of advanced reactor concepts, provide demonstration of needed technologies and methodologies in the nuclear power application domain, mature emerging technologies to facilitate commercialization, and establish necessary technical evidence and application experience to enable timely and predictable licensing. 1 Introduction Instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interfaces are essential enabling technologies that strongly influence nuclear power plant performance and operational costs. The nuclear power industry is currently engaged in a transition from traditional analog-based instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interface (ICHMI) systems to implementations employing digital technologies. This transition has primarily occurred in an ad hoc fashion through individual system upgrades at existing plants and has been constrained by licenseability concerns. Although the recent progress in constructing new plants has spurred design of more fully digital plant-wide ICHMI systems, the experience base in the nuclear power application domain is limited. Additionally, development of advanced reactor concepts, such as Generation IV designs and small modular reactors, introduces different plant conditions (e.g., higher temperatures, different coolants, etc.) and unique plant configurations (e.g., multiunit plants with shared systems, balance of plant architectures with reconfigurable co-generation options) that increase the need for enhanced ICHMI capabilities to fully achieve industry goals related to economic competitiveness, safety and reliability, sustainability, and proliferation resistance and physical protection. As a result, significant challenges remain to be addressed to enable the nuclear power industry to complete the transition to safe and comprehensive use of m

Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Hierarchical Network Structure Promotes Dynamical Robustness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The analysis of dynamical systems that attempts to model chemical reaction, gene-regulatory, population, and ecosystem networks all rely on models having interacting components. When the details of these interactions are unknown for biological systems of interest, one effective approach is to study the dynamical properties of an ensemble of models determined by evolutionary constraints that may apply to all such systems. One such constraint is that of dynamical robustness. Despite previous investigations, the relationship between dynamical robustness-an important functional characteristic of many biological systems-and network structure is poorly understood. Here we analyze the stability and robustness of a large class of dynamical systems and demonstrate that the most hierarchical network structures, those equivalent to the total ordering, are the most robust. In particular, we determine the probability distribution of robustness over system connectivity and show that robustness is maximized by maximizing the number of links between strongly connected components of the graph representing the underlying system connectivity. We demonstrate that this can be understood in terms of the fact that permutation of strongly connected components is a fundamental symmetry of dynamical robustness, which applies to networks of any number of components and is independent of the distribution from which the strengths of interconnection among components are sampled. The classification of dynamical robustness based upon a purely topological property provides a fundamental organizing principle that can be used in the context of experimental validation to select among models that break or preserve network hierarchy. This result contributes to an explanation for the observation of hierarchical modularity in biological networks at all scales.

Cameron Smith; Raymond S. Puzio; Aviv Bergman

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Superconducting structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

Kwon, Chuhee (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Terminal structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A terminal structure (2) for a superconducting cable (1) is described. It consists of a conductor (2a) and an insulator (2b) that surrounds the conductor (2a), wherein the superconducting cable (1) has a core with a superconducting conductor (5) and a layer of insulation that surrounds the conductor (5), and wherein the core is arranged in such a way that it can move longitudinally in a cryostat. The conductor (2a) of the terminal structure (2) is electrically connected with the superconducting conductor (5) or with a normal conductor (6) that is connected with the superconducting conductor (5) by means of a tubular part (7) made of an electrically conductive material, wherein the superconducting conductor (5) or the normal conductor (6) can slide in the part (7) in the direction of the superconductor.

Schmidt, Frank (Langenhagen, DE); Allais, Arnaud (Hannover, DE); Mirebeau, Pierre (Villebon sur Yvette, FR); Ganhungu, Francois (Vieux-Reng, FR); Lallouet, Nicolas (Saint Martin Boulogne, FR)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

408

Superconducting Structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

Kwon, Chuhee (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

409

Airfoil structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Past airfoil configurations have been used to improve aerodynamic performance and engine efficiencies. The present airfoil configuration further increases component life and reduces maintenance by reducing internal stress within the airfoil itself. The airfoil includes a chord and a span. Each of the chord and the span has a bow being summed to form a generally ``C`` configuration of the airfoil. The generally ``C`` configuration includes a compound bow in which internal stresses resulting from a thermal temperature gradient are reduced. The structural configuration reduces internal stresses resulting from thermal expansion. 6 figs.

Frey, G.A.; Twardochleb, C.Z.

1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

410

Airfoil structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Past airfoil configurations have been used to improve aerodynamic performance and engine efficiencies. The present airfoil configuration further increases component life and reduces maintenance by reducing internal stress within the airfoil itself. The airfoil includes a chord and a span. Each of the chord and the span has a bow being summed to form a generally "C" configuration of the airfoil. The generally "C" configuration includes a compound bow in which internal stresses resulting from a thermal temperature gradient are reduced. The structural configuration reduces internal stresses resulting from thermal expansion.

Frey, Gary A. (Poway, CA); Twardochleb, Christopher Z. (Alpine, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Evaluation of the applicability of existing nuclear power plant regulatory requirements in the U.S. to advanced small modular reactors.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current wave of small modular reactor (SMR) designs all have the goal of reducing the cost of management and operations. By optimizing the system, the goal is to make these power plants safer, cheaper to operate and maintain, and more secure. In particular, the reduction in plant staffing can result in significant cost savings. The introduction of advanced reactor designs and increased use of advanced automation technologies in existing nuclear power plants will likely change the roles, responsibilities, composition, and size of the crews required to control plant operations. Similarly, certain security staffing requirements for traditional operational nuclear power plants may not be appropriate or necessary for SMRs due to the simpler, safer and more automated design characteristics of SMRs. As a first step in a process to identify where regulatory requirements may be met with reduced staffing and therefore lower cost, this report identifies the regulatory requirements and associated guidance utilized in the licensing of existing reactors. The potential applicability of these regulations to advanced SMR designs is identified taking into account the unique features of these types of reactors.

LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wheeler, Timothy A.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Middleton, Bobby D.; Jordan, Sabina Erteza; Duran, Felicia Angelica; Baum, Gregory A.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation. Functional modules F9--F16 -- Volume 2, Part 2, Revision 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automate the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.2 of the system. The manual is divided into three volumes: Volume 1--for the control module documentation, Volume 2--for functional module documentation; and Volume 3--for documentation of the data libraries and subroutine libraries. This volume discusses the following functional modules: MORSE-SGC; HEATING 7.2; KENO V.a; JUNEBUG-II; HEATPLOT-S; REGPLOT 6; PLORIGEN; and OCULAR.

West, J.T.; Hoffman, T.J.; Emmett, M.B.; Childs, K.W.; Petrie, L.M.; Landers, N.F.; Bryan, C.B.; Giles, G.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation. Functional modules F1--F8 -- Volume 2, Part 1, Revision 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automate the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.2 of the system. The manual is divided into three volumes: Volume 1--for the control module documentation; Volume 2--for functional module documentation; and Volume 3--for documentation of the data libraries and subroutine libraries.

Greene, N.M.; Petrie, L.M.; Westfall, R.M.; Bucholz, J.A.; Hermann, O.W.; Fraley, S.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Modular Isotopic Thermoelectric Generator (MITG) Design and Development, Part A-E. Original was presented at 1983 Intersociety Energy Conversion Engineering Conference (IECEC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced RTG concepts utilizing improved thermoelectric materials and converter concepts are under study at Fairchild for DOE. The design described here is based on DOE's newly developed radioisotope heat source, and on an improved silicon-germanium material and a multicouple converter module under development at Syncal. Fairchild's assignment was to combine the above into an attractive power system for use in space, and to assess the specific power and other attributes of that design. The resultant design is highly modular, consisting of standard RTG slices, each producing 24 watts at the desired output voltage of 28 volt. Thus, the design could be adapted to various space missions over a wide range of power levels, with little or no redesign. Each RTG slice consists of a 250-watt heat source module, eight multicouple thermoelectric modules, and standard sections of insulator, housing, radiator fins, and electrical circuit. The design makes it possible to check each thermoelectric module for electrical performance, thermal contact, leaktightness, and performance stability, after the generator is fully assembled; and to replace any deficient modules without disassembling the generator or perturbing the others. The RTG end sections provide the spring-loaded supports required to hold the free-standing heat source stack together during launch vibration. Detailed analysis indicates that the present generation of RTGs, using the same heat source modules. There is a duplicate copy of this document. OSTI has a copy of this paper.

Schock, A.

1983-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

415

Armor structures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An armor structure includes first and second layers individually containing a plurality of i-beams. Individual i-beams have a pair of longitudinal flanges interconnected by a longitudinal crosspiece and defining opposing longitudinal channels between the pair of flanges. The i-beams within individual of the first and second layers run parallel. The laterally outermost faces of the flanges of adjacent i-beams face one another. One of the longitudinal channels in each of the first and second layers faces one of the longitudinal channels in the other of the first and second layers. The channels of the first layer run parallel with the channels of the second layer. The flanges of the first and second layers overlap with the crosspieces of the other of the first and second layers, and portions of said flanges are received within the facing channels of the i-beams of the other of the first and second layers.

Chu, Henry Shiu-Hung [Idaho Falls, ID; Lacy, Jeffrey M [Idaho Falls, ID

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Preliminary Dynamic Siol-Structure-Interaction Analysis for the Waste Handling Building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this analysis package is to document a preliminary dynamic seismic evaluation of a simplified design concept of the Wade Handling Building (WHB). Preliminary seismic ground motions and soil data will be used. Loading criteria of the WHB System Design Description will be used. Detail design of structural members will not be performed.. The results of the analysis will be used to determine preliminary sizes of structural concrete and steel members and to determine whether the seismic response of the structure is within an acceptable level for future License Application design of safety related facilities. In order to complete this preliminary dynamic evaluation to meet the Site Recommendation (SR) schedule, the building configuration was ''frozen in time'' as the conceptual design existed in October 1999. Modular design features and dry or wet waste storage features were intentionally excluded from this preliminary dynamic seismic evaluation. The document was prepared in accordance with the Development Plan for the ''Preliminary/Dynamic Soil Structure Interaction Analysis for the Waste Handling Building'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b), which was completed, in accordance with AP-2.13Q, ''Technical Product Development Planning''.

G. Wagenblast

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE R. B. Firestone and E.11089 NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE by R.B. Firestone and E.iii- NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE R.B Firestone and E. Browne

Firestone, R.B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

structural biology | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

structural biology structural biology Leads No leads are available at this time. Improved protocol to purify untagged amelogenin - Application to murine amelogenin containing the...

419

Modular architecture in biological networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the past decade, biology has been revolutionized by an explosion in the availability of data. Translating this new wealth of information into meaningful biological insights and clinical breakthroughs will require a ...

Ramachandran, Gopal (Gopal Sebastian)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Modularized training for technical editors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper outlines the editorial services provided at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), sketches a syllabus of basic training for technical editors, describes the approach being used to develop this cost-effective individualized instruction for editors (experienced or not) new to work at LLNL, and enumerates the advantages of this approach. 8 refs.

Murphy, P.W.

1988-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems modular structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Semi-finished modular cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis subject is a pre-fabricated element (cell): a system that employs natural, light, and economic materials to produce a near-finished portion of a building. The intent is to introduce sustainable design into ...

Bachelder, Laura Govoni, 1971-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Modular design of biological systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The focus of my research is the development of technology for building compound biological systems from simpler pieces. I designed BioScaffold parts, a family of variable regions that can be inserted into a DNA sequence ...

Norville, Julie Erin, 1980-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Modular Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte GmbHMilo,Energy Information Modoc High School Space HeatingWind

424

Earth Structure Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Earth Structure Introduction Earth Structure (2nd Edition), 2004 W.W. Norton & Co, New York Slide show by Ben van der Pluijm © WW Norton, unless noted otherwise #12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed) 210/4/2010 Aerial views #12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed) 310/4/2010 http://www.globalchange.umich.edu/Ben/ES/ #12

425

PROTOPLANETARY DISK STRUCTURE WITH GRAIN EVOLUTION: THE ANDES MODEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a self-consistent model of a protoplanetary disk: 'ANDES' ('AccretioN disk with Dust Evolution and Sedimentation'). ANDES is based on a flexible and extendable modular structure that includes (1) a 1+1D frequency-dependent continuum radiative transfer module, (2) a module to calculate the chemical evolution using an extended gas-grain network with UV/X-ray-driven processes and surface reactions, (3) a module to calculate the gas thermal energy balance, and (4) a 1+1D module that simulates dust grain evolution. For the first time, grain evolution and time-dependent molecular chemistry are included in a protoplanetary disk model. We find that grain growth and sedimentation of large grains onto the disk midplane lead to a dust-depleted atmosphere. Consequently, dust and gas temperatures become higher in the inner disk (R {approx}< 50 AU) and lower in the outer disk (R {approx}> 50 AU), in comparison with the disk model with pristine dust. The response of disk chemical structure to the dust growth and sedimentation is twofold. First, due to higher transparency a partly UV-shielded molecular layer is shifted closer to the dense midplane. Second, the presence of big grains in the disk midplane delays the freeze-out of volatile gas-phase species such as CO there, while in adjacent upper layers the depletion is still effective. Molecular concentrations and thus column densities of many species are enhanced in the disk model with dust evolution, e.g., CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 2}CN, HNO, H{sub 2}O, HCOOH, HCN, and CO. We also show that time-dependent chemistry is important for a proper description of gas thermal balance.

Akimkin, V.; Wiebe, D.; Pavlyuchenkov, Ya. [Institute of Astronomy of the RAS, Pyatnitskaya str. 48, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [Institute of Astronomy of the RAS, Pyatnitskaya str. 48, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zhukovska, S.; Semenov, D.; Henning, Th. [Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Vasyunin, A. [Department of Chemistry, The University of Virginia, VA (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, The University of Virginia, VA (United States); Birnstiel, T., E-mail: akimkin@inasan.ru, E-mail: dwiebe@inasan.ru, E-mail: pavyar@inasan.ru, E-mail: zhukovska@mpia.de, E-mail: semenov@mpia.de, E-mail: henning@mpia.de, E-mail: anton.vasyunin@gmail.com, E-mail: tbirnstiel@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

426

Crystal Structure of Cascade  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ribbon-like structure (Figure 1). This structure is facilitated by rotation of nucleotides out of the duplex region at six base pair intervals and stabilized by the highly...

427

Structuring beyond architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis explores the layering and negotiation of structural devices in urban settings. Its point of departure is a series of patterns of how structural design and urban design interact and overlap, from which are ...

Foxe, David M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Neutron reflecting supermirror structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources.

Wood, James L. (Drayton Plains, MI)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Neutron reflecting supermirror structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. 2 figs.

Wood, J.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Structural system identification: Structural dynamics model validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural system identification is concerned with the development of systematic procedures and tools for developing predictive analytical models based on a physical structure`s dynamic response characteristics. It is a multidisciplinary process that involves the ability (1) to define high fidelity physics-based analysis models, (2) to acquire accurate test-derived information for physical specimens using diagnostic experiments, (3) to validate the numerical simulation model by reconciling differences that inevitably exist between the analysis model and the experimental data, and (4) to quantify uncertainties in the final system models and subsequent numerical simulations. The goal of this project was to develop structural system identification techniques and software suitable for both research and production applications in code and model validation.

Red-Horse, J.R.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

REL ATRIO DE DESENVOLVIMENTO HUMANO 2007/2008 1 "O progresso humano no automtico nem inevitvel. Somos actualmente con ontados  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pobres do mundo, milhões de pessoas são já obrigadas a lidar com os impactos das alterações climáticas. Esses impactos não captam uma atenção de destaque nos meios de comunicação mundiais en- quanto eventos número de situações de seca, de tempestades mais violentas, de cheias, e de stress ambiental está

432

Nano-Electro-Mechanical (NEM) Relay Devices and Technology for Ultra-Low Energy Digital Integrated Circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

substrate, a layer of phosphosilicate glass is deposited atand drive-in anneal. Phosphosilicate glass (PSG) is then

Nathanael, Rhesa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Nano-Electro-Mechanical (NEM) Relay Devices and Technology for Ultra-Low Energy Digital Integrated Circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

II, Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems, vol. 12, no.Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems, vol. 6, no. 2,Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems, vol. 16, no. 1,

Nathanael, Rhesa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Structural health monitoring for ship structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently the Office of Naval Research is supporting the development of structural health monitoring (SHM) technology for U.S. Navy ship structures. This application is particularly challenging because of the physical size of these structures, the widely varying and often extreme operational and environmental conditions associated with these ships missions, lack of data from known damage conditions, limited sensing that was not designed specifically for SHM, and the management of the vast amounts of data that can be collected during a mission. This paper will first define a statistical pattern recognition paradigm for SHM by describing the four steps of (1) Operational Evaluation, (2) Data Acquisition, (3) Feature Extraction, and (4) Statistical Classification of Features as they apply to ship structures. Note that inherent in the last three steps of this process are additional tasks of data cleansing, compression, normalization and fusion. The presentation will discuss ship structure SHM challenges in the context of applying various SHM approaches to sea trials data measured on an aluminum multi-hull high-speed ship, the HSV-2 Swift. To conclude, the paper will discuss several outstanding issues that need to be addressed before SHM can make the transition from a research topic to actual field applications on ship structures and suggest approaches for addressing these issues.

Farrar, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Angel, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bement, Matthew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salvino, Liming [NSWC, CADEROCK

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Structural genomics - A goldmine of blueprints for structure...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- A goldmine of blueprints for structure-based drug design. Structural genomics - A goldmine of blueprints for structure-based drug design. Abstract: In late 2007 the National...

436

Cosmogony of Generic Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The problem of formation of generic structures in the Universe is addressed, whereby first the kinematics of inertial continua for coherent initial data is considered. The generalization to self--gravitating continua is outlined focused on the classification problem of singularities and metamorphoses arising in the density field. Self--gravity gives rise to an internal hierarchy of structures, and, dropping the assumption of coherence, also to an external hierarchy of structures dependent on the initial power spectrum of fluctuations.

T. Buchert

1994-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

437

Structural Health Monitoring  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Test Structures & Applications Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Professional Staff Assistant Jutta Kayser...

438

Structural Health Monitoring  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

regarding the integrity of the structure. Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Professional Staff...

439

Novel Composite Cathode Structures  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division Argonne National Laboratory May 16, 2012 Novel Composite Cathode Structures This presentation does not contain any proprietary or...

440

EMSL - structural biology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

structural-biology en Improved protocol to purify untagged amelogenin - Application to murine amelogenin containing the equivalent P70 ? T point http:www.emsl.pnl.gov...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems modular structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Structural building response review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The integrity of a nuclear power plant during a postulated seismic event is required to protect the public against radiation. Therefore, a detailed set of seismic analyses of various structures and equipment is performed while designing a nuclear power plant. This report describes the structural response analysis method, including the structural model, soil-structure interaction as it relates to structural models, methods for seismic structural analysis, numerical integration methods, methods for non-seismic response analysis approaches for various response combinations, structural damping values, nonlinear response, uncertainties in structural properties, and structural response analysis using random properties. The report describes the state-of-the-art in these areas for nuclear power plants. It also details the past studies made at Sargent and Lundy to evaluate different alternatives and the conclusions reached for the specific purposes that those studies were intended. These results were incorporated here because they fall into the general scope of this report. The scope of the present task does not include performing new calculations.

Not Available

1980-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Photovoltaic Cell Structure Basics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The actual structural design of a photovoltaic (PV), or solar cell, depends on the limitations of the material used in the PV cell.

443

Neutron reflecting supermirror structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. One layer of each set of bilayers consist of titanium, and the second layer of each set of bilayers consist of an alloy of nickel with carbon interstitially present in the nickel alloy.

Wood, James L. (Drayton Plains, MI)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Wednesday, 25 April 2007 00:00 Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has...

445

Protein Structure Prediction and Structural Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sequencing projects are producing linear amino acid sequences, but full understanding of the biological role, building a model, and assessing the model (1). The templates for modeling may be found by sequence folds. Each sequence-structure alignment is as- sessed by the energy of a corresponding coarse model

Batzoglou, Serafim

446

Piecewise training for structured prediction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

margin methods for structured prediction. In Internationalaccuracy computational gene prediction. PLoS Computationaltraining for structured prediction Charles Sutton Andrew

Sutton, Charles; McCallum, Andrew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

AC 2007-2731: THE ACADEMY OF COURAGEOUS MINORITY ENGINEERS: A MODEL FOR SUPPORTING MINORITY GRADUATE STUDENTS IN THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on micromachining integrated NanoElectroMechanical (NEM) High-Index-Contrast (HIC) thin film structures. Lincoln the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical-Florida State University College of Engineering. She also completed

448

& Education Structure 2 Parking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cinema East Hall University Technology Services Honors Stratford Building Parkway Science Building 1N Kononia House Fourth Ave Building Art Building Science & Education Center Parking Structure 2 Helen Gordon Child Center Science Research & Teaching Center Parking Structure 3 Ho man Hall West

Caughman, John

449

Calcium silicate insulation structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An insulative structure including a powder-filled evacuated casing utilizes a quantity of finely divided synthetic calcium silicate having a relatively high surface area. The resultant structure-provides superior thermal insulating characteristics over a broad temperature range and is particularly well-suited as a panel for a refrigerator or freezer or the insulative barrier for a cooler or a insulated bottle.

Kollie, Thomas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Optoelectronic Mounting Structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optoelectronic mounting structure is provided that may be used in conjunction with an optical transmitter, receiver or transceiver module. The mounting structure may be a flexible printed circuit board. Thermal vias or heat pipes in the head region may transmit heat from the mounting structure to the heat spreader. The heat spreader may provide mechanical rigidity or stiffness to the heat region. In another embodiment, an electrical contact and ground plane may pass along a surface of the head region so as to provide an electrical contact path to the optoelectronic devices and limit electromagnetic interference. In yet another embodiment, a window may be formed in the head region of the mounting structure so as to provide access to the heat spreader. Optoelectronic devices may be adapted to the heat spreader in such a manner that the devices are accessible through the window in the mounting structure.

Anderson, Gene R. (Albuquerque, NM); Armendariz, Marcelino G. (Albuquerque, NM); Baca, Johnny R. F. (Albuquerque, NM); Bryan, Robert P. (Albuquerque, NM); Carson, Richard F. (Albuquerque, NM); Chu, Dahwey (Albuquerque, NM); Duckett, III, Edwin B. (Albuquerque, NM); McCormick, Frederick B. (Albuquerque, NM); Peterson, David W. (Sandia Park, NM); Peterson, Gary D. (Albuquerque, NM); Reber, Cathleen A. (Corrales, NM); Reysen, Bill H. (Lafayette, CO)

2004-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

451

Structural Health Monitoring Tools  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Security, LLC 1 LA-CC-10-032 LA-UR 10-01259 1 Introduction to SHMTools SHMTools is a MATLAB package that facilitates the construction of structural health monitoring (SHM)...

452

Tseltal clause structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation examines the syntax of clausal structure in Tseltal (Mayan) with a particular focus on agreement phenomena. The first domain of investigation is the External Possession Construction, in which the clausal ...

Shklovsky, Kirill

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Structural traps 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book contains studies of oil and gas fields that are mainly structural in nature. Stratigraphy controls the extend of the reservoir in the traps of several fields, but overall, the main trapping features within the group of fields in this volume are structural. Fields covered in this volume include: Endicott Field, Point Arguello Field, West Puerto Chiquito Field, Dukhan Field, Sendji Field, Ruston Field, Raudhatain Field, Hassi Messaoud Field, Snapper Field, Tirrawarra Field, and Sacha Field.

Foster, N.H.; Beaumont, E.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Structured luminescence conversion layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus device such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer deposited on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains regions such as color-changing and non-color-changing regions with particular shapes arranged in a particular pattern.

Berben, Dirk; Antoniadis, Homer; Jermann, Frank; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Von Malm, Norwin; Zachau, Martin

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

455

Chiral Interactions and Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The chiral structure of liquid crystalline phases arises due to the intrinsic chirality of the constituent mesogens. While it is seemingly straightforward to quantify the macroscopic chirality by using, for instance, the cholesteric pitch or the optical rotatory power, it is not as simple to quantify the chirality of a single molecule. I will discuss a systematic quantification of molecular chirality and show how the resulting chiral parameters may be used to predict macroscopic chiral structure.

Randall D. Kamien

1999-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

456

Structure function monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus for a structure function monitor provide for generation of parameters characterizing a refractive medium. In an embodiment, a structure function monitor acquires images of a pupil plane and an image plane and, from these images, retrieves the phase over an aperture, unwraps the retrieved phase, and analyzes the unwrapped retrieved phase. In an embodiment, analysis yields atmospheric parameters measured at spatial scales from zero to the diameter of a telescope used to collect light from a source.

McGraw, John T. (Placitas, NM); Zimmer, Peter C. (Albuquerque, NM); Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

457

Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. From 1982 through 1993, the Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS) was used by the EIA for its analyses, and the Gas Analysis Modeling System (GAMS) was used within IFFS to represent natural gas markets. Prior to 1982, the Midterm Energy Forecasting System (MEFS), also referred to as the Project Independence Evaluation System (PIES), was employed. NEMS was developed to enhance and update EIA`s modeling capability by internally incorporating models of energy markets that had previously been analyzed off-line. In addition, greater structural detail in NEMS permits the analysis of a broader range of energy issues. The time horizon of NEMS is the midterm period (i.e., through 2015). In order to represent the regional differences in energy markets, the component models of NEMS function at regional levels appropriate for the markets represented, with subsequent aggregation/disaggregation to the Census Division level for reporting purposes.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Fire protection for relocatable structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This standard supersedes DOE/EV-0043, ``Standard on Fire Protection for Portable Structures.`` It was revised to address the numerous types of relocatable structures, such as trailers, tension-supported structures, and tents being used by DOE and contractors.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Investigating the durability of structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The durability of structures is one of primary concerns in the engineering industry. Poor durability in design may result in a structure losing its performance to the extent where structural integrity is no longer satisfied ...

Saba, Dana (Dana Walid)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Structure of a novel dodecaheme cytochrome c from Geobacter sulfurreducens reveals an extended 12 nm protein with interacting hemes.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multiheme cytochromes c are important in electron transfer pathways in reduction of both soluble and insoluble Fe(III) by Geobacter sulfurreducens. We determined the crystal structure at 3.2 {angstrom} resolution of the first dodecaheme cytochrome c (GSU1996) along with its N-terminal and C-terminal hexaheme fragments at 2.6 and 2.15 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The macroscopic reduction potentials of the full-length protein and its fragments were measured. The sequence of GSU1996 can be divided into four c{sub 7}-type domains (A, B, C and D) with homology to triheme cytochromes c{sub 7}. In cytochromes c{sub 7} all three hemes are bis-His coordinated, whereas in c{sub 7}-type domains the last heme is His-Met coordinated. The full-length GSU1996 has a 12 nm long crescent shaped structure with the 12 hemes arranged along a polypeptide to form a 'nanowire' of hemes; it has a modular structure. Surprisingly, while the C-terminal half of the protein consists of two separate c{sub 7}-type domains (C and D) connected by a small linker, the N-terminal half of the protein has two c{sub 7}-type domains (A and B) that form one structural unit. This is also observed in the AB fragment. There is an unexpected interaction between the hemes at the interface of domains A and B, which form a heme-pair with nearly parallel stacking of their porphyrin rings. The hemes adjacent to each other throughout the protein are within van der Waals distance which enables efficient electron exchange between them. For the first time, the structural details of c{sub 7}-type domains from one multiheme protein were compared.

Pokkuluri, P. R.; Londer, Y. Y.; Duke, N. E. C.; Pessanha, M.; Yang, X.; Orshonsky, V.; Orshonsky, L.; Erickson, J.; Zagyansky, Y.; Salgueiro, C. A.; Schiffer, M. (Biosciences Division); (Requimte-CQFB); (Univ. nova de Lisboa)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems modular structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

New Structural-Dynamics Module for Offshore Multimember Substructures within the Wind Turbine Computer-Aided Engineering Tool FAST: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FAST, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is a computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool for aero-hydro-servo-elastic analysis of land-based and offshore wind turbines. This paper discusses recent upgrades made to FAST to enable loads simulations of offshore wind turbines with fixed-bottom, multimember support structures (e.g., jackets and tripods, which are commonly used in transitional-depth waters). The main theory and strategies for the implementation of the multimember substructure dynamics module (SubDyn) within the new FAST modularization framework are introduced. SubDyn relies on two main engineering schematizations: 1) a linear frame finite-element beam (LFEB) model and 2) a dynamics system reduction via Craig-Bampton's method. A jacket support structure and an offshore system consisting of a turbine atop a jacket substructure were simulated to test the SubDyn module and to preliminarily assess results against results from a commercial finite-element code.

Song, H.; Damiani, R.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Structural power flow measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous investigations of structural power flow through beam-like structures resulted in some unexplained anomalies in the calculated data. In order to develop structural power flow measurement as a viable technique for machine tool design, the causes of these anomalies needed to be found. Once found, techniques for eliminating the errors could be developed. Error sources were found in the experimental apparatus itself as well as in the instrumentation. Although flexural waves are the carriers of power in the experimental apparatus, at some frequencies longitudinal waves were excited which were picked up by the accelerometers and altered power measurements. Errors were found in the phase and gain response of the sensors and amplifiers used for measurement. A transfer function correction technique was employed to compensate for these instrumentation errors.

Falter, K.J.; Keltie, R.F.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Underground waste barrier structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

Saha, Anuj J. (Hamburg, NY); Grant, David C. (Gibsonia, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Tailoring PDC speckle structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Speckle structure of parametric down conversion light has recently received a large attention due to relevance in view of applications to quantum imaging The possibility of tailoring the speckle size by acting on the pump properties is an interesting tool for the applications to quantum imaging and in particular to the detection of weak object under shot-noise limit. Here we present a systematic detailed experimental study of the speckle structure produced in type II PDC with particular attention to its variation with pump beam properties.

G. Brida; M. Genovese; A. Meda; I. Ruo-Berchera; E. Predazzi

2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

465

Tailoring PDC speckle structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Speckle structure of parametric down conversion light has recently received a large attention due to relevance in view of applications to quantum imaging The possibility of tailoring the speckle size by acting on the pump properties is an interesting tool for the applications to quantum imaging and in particular to the detection of weak object under shot-noise limit. Here we present a systematic detailed experimental study of the speckle structure produced in type II PDC with particular attention to its variation with pump beam properties

Brida, G; Meda, A; Predazzi, E; Ruo-Berchera, I

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

The National Energy Modeling System: An overview 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer-based, energy-economy modeling system of US energy markets for the midterm period through 2020. NEMS projects the production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy, subject to assumptions on macroeconomic and financial factors world energy markets, resource availability and costs, behavior and technological choice criteria, cost and performance characteristics of energy technologies, and demographics. This report presents an overview of the structure and methodology of NEMS and each of its components. The first chapter provides a description of the design and objectives of the system, followed by a chapter on the overall modeling structure and solution algorithm. The remainder of the report summarizes the methodology and scope of the component modules of NEMS. The model descriptions are intended for readers familiar with terminology from economics, operations research, and energy modeling. 21 figs.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Search for Turing structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Albeit their prediction by Turing, chemical periodic stationary patterns under far from equilibrium conditions, which are considered as prototypes of dissipative structures, have not yet been observed in a clear-cut way. The authors here assess the situation and discuss the perturbative influence of convection on their formation and selection mechanisms.

Borckmans, P.; Dewel, G.; Walgraef, D.; Katayama, Y.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Project Structure Elke Karrenberg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Structure Elke Karrenberg Project Manager, Head of Personnel Development Phone +49 6131 39-20634 Dr. Jana Leipold Project Staff, Personnel Development Consultant Phone +49 6131 39-25433 Antje Swietlik Project Staff Phone +49 6131 39-20140 Project Office JGU Leadership Forum Universitatis 3, Room 00

Kaus, Boris

469

Biomembrane Structure Unit, Biochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and membrane proteins. However, the lack of essential high-resolution structural details at the molecular level Watts Abstract | Observing drugs and ligands at their site of action in membrane proteins is now targets in the future will be membrane proteins. This is, perhaps, not surprising, as most (~85

Watts, Anthony

470

Air cathode structure manufacture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved air cathode structure for use in primary batteries and the like. The cathode structure includes a matrix active layer, a current collector grid on one face of the matrix active layer, and a porous, nonelectrically conductive separator on the opposite face of the matrix active layer, the collector grid and separator being permanently bonded to the matrix active layer. The separator has a preselected porosity providing low IR losses and high resistance to air flow through the matrix active layer to maintain high bubble pressure during operation of the battery. In the illustrated embodiment, the separator was formed of porous polypropylene. A thin hydrophobic film is provided, in the preferred embodiment, on the current collecting metal grid.

Momyer, William R. (Palo Alto, CA); Littauer, Ernest L. (Los Altos Hills, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Structured wafer for device processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A structured wafer that includes through passages is used for device processing. Each of the through passages extends from or along one surface of the structured wafer and forms a pattern on a top surface area of the structured wafer. The top surface of the structured wafer is bonded to a device layer via a release layer. Devices are processed on the device layer, and are released from the structured wafer using etchant. The through passages within the structured wafer allow the etchant to access the release layer to thereby remove the release layer.

Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

472

FUNCTIONAL AND SMART MATERIALS -Structural evolution and structure analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FUNCTIONAL AND SMART MATERIALS -Structural evolution and structure analysis by Z.L. Wang and Z.C. Kang Georgia Institute of Technology Introduction Smart systems and smart materials Smart structures) a biological pattern of functioning (Spillman et al., 1996). Smart materials are a subset of the smart system

Wang, Zhong L.

473

Explicit construction of universal structures Jan Hubicka  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Explicit construction of universal structures Jan Hubicka Charles University Prague Joint work with Jarik Nesetril Workshop on Homogeneous Structures 2011 Jan Hubicka Explicit construction of universal Explicit construction of universal structures #12;Universal relational structures By relational structures

St Andrews, University of

474

Regulation of Tall Structures (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A permit from the Department of Transportation is required for the construction or alteration of any structure higher than 200 feet above ground level, or structures near airports, highways,...

475

Undergraduate Program Salary Structure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof2014National Nuclear SecuritySalary Structure

476

Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2Workshops01Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

477

Structural Health Monitoring  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutronStrategic PlanStructural

478

Structural Health Monitoring  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutronStrategic PlanStructuralMethodology Contact Institute

479

Structural Health Monitoring  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutronStrategic PlanStructuralMethodology Contact

480

Structural Health Monitoring  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutronStrategic PlanStructuralMethodology ContactTest

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems modular structure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Structural Health Monitoring Tools  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutronStrategic PlanStructuralMethodology ContactTestHealth

482

Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutronStrategicOur Mission Our Mission The SSRL Structural

483

Structural Health Monitoring  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout » Staff125,849| OSTI, US AboutStructural Health

484

Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout » Staff125,849| OSTI, US AboutStructural HealthToggle

485

Structure/Function Relationships  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout » Staff125,849| OSTI,StructureofStructure/Function

486

The National Energy Modeling System: An overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer-based, energy-economy modeling system of US energy markets for the midterm period of 1990 to 2010. NEMS projects the production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy, subject to assumptions on macroeconomic and financial factors, world energy markets, resource availability and costs, behavioral and technological choice criteria, cost and performance characteristics of energy technologies, and demographics. This report presents an overview of the structure and methodology of NEMS and each of its components. The first chapter provides a description of the design and objectives of the system. The second chapter describes the modeling structure. The remainder of the report summarizes the methodology and scope of the component modules of NEMS. The model descriptions are intended for readers familiar with terminology from economics, operations research, and energy modeling. Additional background on the development of the system is provided in Appendix A of this report, which describes the EIA modeling systems that preceded NEMS. More detailed model documentation reports for all the NEMS modules are also available from EIA.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Modular fuel-cell stack assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel cell assembly having a plurality of fuel cells arranged in a stack. An end plate assembly abuts the fuel cell at an end of said stack. The end plate assembly has an inlet area adapted to receive an exhaust gas from the stack, an outlet area and a passage connecting the inlet area and outlet area and adapted to carry the exhaust gas received at the inlet area from the inlet area to the outlet area. A further end plate assembly abuts the fuel cell at a further opposing end of the stack. The further end plate assembly has a further inlet area adapted to receive a further exhaust gas from the stack, a further outlet area and a further passage connecting the further inlet area and further outlet area and adapted to carry the further exhaust gas received at the further inlet area from the further inlet area to the further outlet area.

Patel, Pinakin (Danbury, CT)

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

488

VAX online System - a modular approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An approach to developing Online Systems for the VAX, under VMS, is described. A framework for integrating separate and diverse programs into a unified whole is described. Included in this is a scheme which permits multiple VAX processes to share the same terminal in an organized way. This makes use of a menu package, (MENCOM), which also permits a command line mode of operation, with dynamic switching between menu and command line mode. A single DISPLAY program can display the histograms of any program in the system, both the in-memory histograms and those previously stored on disk. A centralized message system is designed to handle all error and status messages. A general buffer scheme used to enter data from any input stream and to access data selectively is briefly described. This buffer scheme is covered in more detail, by D. Quarrie in his CDF Data Acquisition System paper, given at this conference.

White, V.; Constanta-Fanourakis, P.; Heinicke, P.; Petravick, D.; Quigg, L.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Protective, Modular Wave Power Generation System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of small wave energy conversion modules that can be built into large, scalable arrays, in the same vein as solar panels, has been developed. This innovation lends itself to an organic business and development model, and enables the use of large-run manufacturing technology to reduce system costs. The first prototype module has been built to full-scale, and tested in a laboratory wave channel. The device has been shown to generate electricity and dissipate wave energy. Improvements need to be made to the electrical generator and a demonstration of an array of modules should be made in natural conditions.

Vvedensky, Jane M.; Park, Robert Y.

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

490

Prismatic modular reactor analysis with melcor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be validated and applied to design and evaluate VHTRs under operation conditions and accident scenarios. In this thesis, MELCOR, a severe accident code, was used to analyze one of the VHTR designs a prismatic core Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP...

Zhen, Ni

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z<