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Sample records for nems model involves

  1. National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer-based, energy-economy modeling system of U.S. through 2030. NEMS projects the production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy, subject to assumptions on macroeconomic and financial factors, world energy markets, resource availability and costs, behavioral and technological choice criteria, cost and performance characteristics of energy technologies, and demographics. NEMS was designed and implemented by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). NEMS can be used to analyze the effects of existing and proposed government laws and regulations related to energy production and use; the potential impact of new and advanced energy production, conversion, and consumption technologies; the impact and cost of greenhouse gas control; the impact of increased use of renewable energy sources; and the potential savings from increased efficiency of energy use; and the impact of regulations on the use of alternative or reformulated fuels. NEMS has also been used for a number of special analyses at the request of the Administration, U.S. Congress, other offices of DOE and other government agencies, who specify the scenarios and assumptions for the analysis. Modules allow analyses to be conducted in energy topic areas such as residential demand, industrial demand, electricity market, oil and gas supply, renewable fuels, etc.

  2. NEMS - National Energy Modeling System: An Overview

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2009 a summary description of NEMS and each of its components. NEMS is a computer-based, energy-economy modeling system of energy markets for the midterm period through 2030. The NEMS is used to produce the Annual Energy Outlook.

  3. How to obtain the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2013-01-01

    The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) NEMS is used by the modelers at the U. S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) who understand its structure and programming. NEMS has only been used by a few organizations outside of the EIA, because most people that requested NEMS found out that it was too difficult or rigid to use. NEMS is not typically used for state-level analysis and is poorly suited for application to other countries. However, many do obtain the model simply to use the data in its input files or to examine the source code.

  4. National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling System (NEMS) AgencyCompany Organization: Energy Information Administration Sector: Energy Focus Area: Economic Development Phase: Develop Goals Topics: Policies...

  5. National Energy Modeling System with Hydrogen Model (NEMS-H2)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Modeling System with Hydrogen Model (NEMS-H2) (OnLocation, Inc. 1 ) Objectives Estimate the energy, economic, and environmental impacts of alternative energy policies and different assumptions about energy markets. Key Attributes & Strengths NEMS-H2 is an integrated model that reflects feedbacks within the overall energy system. It is detailed and technology-rich, which allows the testing of various alternative technology assumptions. Platform, Requirements & Availability NEMS-H2 is a

  6. Appendix A - GPRA06 benefits estimates: MARKAL and NEMS model baseline cases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    NEMS is an integrated energy model of the U.S. energy system developed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) for forecasting and policy analysis purposes.

  7. Price Responsiveness in the AEO2003 NEMS Residential and Commercial Buildings Sector Models

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the demand responses to changes in energy prices in the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 versions of the Residential and Commercial Demand Modules of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). It updates a similar paper completed for the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 version of the NEMS.

  8. Modeling Distributed Electricity Generation in the NEMS Buildings Models

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the modeling methodology, projected market penetration, and impact of distributed generation with respect to offsetting future electricity needs and carbon dioxide emissions in the residential and commercial buildings sector in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) reference case.

  9. Integrating Module - NEMS Documentation

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    Provides an overview of the complete National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) model, and includes brief descriptions of the modules with which the Integrating Module interacts. The emphasis and focus, however, is on the structure and function of the Integrating Module of NEMS.

  10. NEMS International Energy Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    EIA NEMS International Energy Module Model Documentation Report vii Mr. G. Daniel Butler U.S. Department of Energy EI-812 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 Tel:...

  11. International Energy Module - NEMS Documentation

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    Summarizes the overall structure of the International Energy Model and its interface with other NEMS modules, mathematical specifications of behavioral relationships, and data sources and estimation methods.

  12. Transportation Sector Module - NEMS Documentation

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model.

  13. Industrial Demand Module - NEMS Documentation

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  14. Residential Demand Module - NEMS Documentation

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

  15. Renewable Fuels Module - NEMS Documentation

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it relates to the production of the Annual Energy Outlook forecasts.

  16. NEMS Freight Transportation Module Improvement Study - Energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and performed independent research to ascertain improvements to the NEMS model structure. ... of industrial output (a key metric used in the travel demand projection methodology). ...

  17. Commercial Demand Module - NEMS Documentation

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

  18. NEMS integrating module documentation report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-14

    The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer modeling system that produces a general equilibrium solution for energy supply and demand in the US energy markets. The model achieves a supply and demand balance in the end-use demand regions, defined as the nine Census Divisions, by solving for the prices of each energy type such that the quantities producers are willing to supply equal the quantities consumers wish to consume. The system reflects market economics, industry structure, and energy policies and regulations that influence market behavior. The NEMS Integrating Module is the central integrating component of a complex modeling system. As such, a thorough understanding of its role in the modeling process can only be achieved by placing it in the proper context with respect to the other modules. To that end, this document provides an overview of the complete NEMS model, and includes brief descriptions of the modules with which the Integrating Module interacts. The emphasis and focus, however, is on the structure and function of the Integrating Module of NEMS.

  19. Macroeconomic Activity Module - NEMS Documentation

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) used to develop the Annual Energy Outlook for 2014 (AEO2014). The report catalogues and describes the module assumptions, computations, methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and mainframe source code

  20. Coal Market Module - NEMS Documentation

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    Documents the objectives and the conceptual and methodological approach used in the development of the National Energy Modeling System's (NEMS) Coal Market Module (CMM) used to develop the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 (AEO2014). This report catalogues and describes the assumptions, methodology, estimation techniques, and source code of CMM's two submodules. These are the Coal Production Submodule (CPS) and the Coal Distribution Submodule (CDS).

  1. nem_slice ver. 3.34

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-06-08

    Nem_slice reads in a finite element model description of the geometry of a problem from an ExodusII file and generates either a nodal or elemental graph of the problem. It then calls Chaco to load balance the graph and then outputs a NemesisI load-balance file.

  2. nem_spread Ver. 5.10

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-06-08

    Nem_spread reads it's input command file (default name nem_spread.inp), takes the named ExodusII geometry definition and spreads out the geometry (and optionally results) contained in that file out to a parallel disk system. The decomposition is taken from a scalar Nemesis load balance file generated by the companion utility nem_slice.

  3. U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2005-07-01

    The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a multi-sector, integrated model of the U.S. energy system put out by the Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration. NEMS is used to produce the annual 20-year forecast of U.S. energy use aggregated to the nine-region census division level. The research objective was to disaggregate this regional energy forecast to the county level for select forecast years, for use in a more detailed and accurate regional analysis of energy usage across the U.S. The process of disaggregation using a geographic information system (GIS) was researched and a model was created utilizing available population forecasts and climate zone data. The model's primary purpose was to generate an energy demand forecast with greater spatial resolution than what is currently produced by NEMS, and to produce a flexible model that can be used repeatedly as an add-on to NEMS in which detailed analysis can be executed exogenously with results fed back into the NEMS data flow. The methods developed were then applied to the study data to obtain residential and commercial electricity demand forecasts. The model was subjected to comparative and statistical testing to assess predictive accuracy. Forecasts using this model were robust and accurate in slow-growing, temperate regions such as the Midwest and Mountain regions. Interestingly, however, the model performed with less accuracy in the Pacific and Northwest regions of the country where population growth was more active. In the future more refined methods will be necessary to improve the accuracy of these forecasts. The disaggregation method was written into a flexible tool within the ArcGIS environment which enables the user to output the results in five year intervals over the period 2000-2025. In addition, the outputs of this tool were used to develop a time-series simulation showing the temporal changes in electricity forecasts in terms of absolute, per capita, and density of demand.

  4. NEMS Buildings Sector Working Group Meeting

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    NEMS Buildings Sector Working Group Meeting Erin Boedecker Owen Comstock Behjat Hojjati Kevin Jarzomski David Peterson Steve Wade October 4, 2012 | Washington, D.C. AEO2013 Preliminary Results WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE Overview Buildings Working Group Forrestal 2E-069 | October 4, 2012 2 * Recap of project list

  5. Integrated NEMS and optoelectronics for sensor applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czaplewski, David A.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Olsson, Roy H., III; Bogart, Gregory R. (Symphony Acoustics, Rio Rancho, NM); Krishnamoorthy, Uma; Warren, Mial E.; Carr, Dustin Wade (Symphony Acoustics, Rio Rancho, NM); Okandan, Murat; Peterson, Kenneth Allen

    2008-01-01

    This work utilized advanced engineering in several fields to find solutions to the challenges presented by the integration of MEMS/NEMS with optoelectronics to realize a compact sensor system, comprised of a microfabricated sensor, VCSEL, and photodiode. By utilizing microfabrication techniques in the realization of the MEMS/NEMS component, the VCSEL and the photodiode, the system would be small in size and require less power than a macro-sized component. The work focused on two technologies, accelerometers and microphones, leveraged from other LDRD programs. The first technology was the nano-g accelerometer using a nanophotonic motion detection system (67023). This accelerometer had measured sensitivity of approximately 10 nano-g. The Integrated NEMS and optoelectronics LDRD supported the nano-g accelerometer LDRD by providing advanced designs for the accelerometers, packaging, and a detection scheme to encapsulate the accelerometer, furthering the testing capabilities beyond bench-top tests. A fully packaged and tested die was never realized, but significant packaging issues were addressed and many resolved. The second technology supported by this work was the ultrasensitive directional microphone arrays for military operations in urban terrain and future combat systems (93518). This application utilized a diffraction-based sensing technique with different optical component placement and a different detection scheme from the nano-g accelerometer. The Integrated NEMS LDRD supported the microphone array LDRD by providing custom designs, VCSELs, and measurement techniques to accelerometers that were fabricated from the same operational principles as the microphones, but contain proof masses for acceleration transduction. These devices were packaged at the end of the work.

  6. Energy Information Administration NEMS Petroleum Market Model...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    lignite, and premium), sulfur content (compliancelow, medium, high), and mining type (deep, surface, above ground, underground). These curves are linked to 14 coal demand...

  7. Investigation of the effects of soluble boron tracking on coupled CTF / NEM, LWR simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biery, M.; Avramova, M.; Ivanov, K.

    2013-07-01

    The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of introducing a boron tracking capability to the COBRA-TF / NEM code coupling. The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) versions of COBRA-TF - CTF, and Nodal Expansion Method (NEM) codes are utilized. Previous implementations of the CTF / NEM coupled code had no capability to model soluble boron feedback effects due to boron transport. This study builds upon the validation and qualification efforts of the boron tracking model implementation in CTF by modeling the boron feedback calculated by the CTF boron tracking model in NEM. The core model chosen for this study is the Purdue MOX/UO{sub 2} core model used in the 2007 OECD/NRC code benchmark study. Following the implementation of an explicit online coupling scheme and accompanying k-search routine, the newly coupled CTF / NEM code version with boron tracking is compared to prior results of the non-boron tracking CTF / NEM code version at steady-state hot full power and hot zero power conditions. It was found that the boron tracking model exhibited little influence on the hot zero power result as expected due to a smaller heat flux, which does not significantly change the moderator density and boron concentration as the moderator travels up the axial core length. Meanwhile the boron tracking model had a much greater impact on the hot full power results, predicting the critical inlet boron concentration to be 9.9 ppm below the non-boron tracking result due to greater and more rapid changes in boron concentration corresponding to the reduction in moderator density from being more rapidly heated. (authors)

  8. Appendix C: Map of NEMS Electricity Market Module Regions

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    U.S. Energy Information Administration | Analysis of Impacts of a Clean Energy Standard as requested by Chairman Bingaman Appendix C: Map of NEMS Electricity Market Module Regions...

  9. Frequency Stabilization in Nonlinear MEMS and NEMS Oscillators | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory Frequency Stabilization in Nonlinear MEMS and NEMS Oscillators Technology available for licensing: a method to create micro- and nanoscale mechanical oscillators with excellent frequency stability. Excellent frequency stability; provides a strategy for optimizing and engineering micro- and nanoscale devices Easy to fabricate at reduced cost PDF icon MEMS_NEMS_oscillators

  10. Liquid Fuels Market Module - NEMS Documentation

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    Defines the objectives of the Liquid Fuels Market Model (LFMM), describes its basic approach, and provides detail on how it works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public.

  11. A sensitivity analysis of the treatment of wind energy in the AEO99 version of NEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborn, Julie G; Wood, Frances; Richey, Cooper; Sanders, Sandy; Short, Walter; Koomey, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Each year, the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA) publishes a forecast of the domestic energy economy in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). During the forecast period of the AEO (currently through 2020), renewable energy technologies have typically not achieved significant growth. The contribution of renewable technologies as electric generators becomes more important, however, in scenarios analyzing greenhouse gas emissions reductions or significant technological advancements. We examined the economic assumptions about wind power used for producing forecasts with the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) to determine their influence on the projected capacity expansion of this technology. This analysis should help illustrate to policymakers what types of issues may affect wind development, and improve the general understanding of the NEMS model itself. Figure 1 illustrates the model structure and factors relevant to wind deployment. We found that NEMS uses various cost multipliers and constraints to represent potential physical and economic limitations to growth in wind capacity, such as resource depletion, costs associated with rapid manufacturing expansion, and grid stability with high levels of capacity from intermittent resources. The model's flexibility allows the user to make alternative assumptions about the magnitude of these factors. While these assumptions have little effect on the Reference Case forecast for the 1999 edition of the AEO, they can make a dramatic difference when wind is more attractive, such as under a carbon permit trading system. With $100/ton carbon permits, the wind capacity projection for 2020 ranges from 15 GW in the unaltered model (AEO99 Reference Case) to 168 GW in the extreme case when all the multipliers and constraints examined in this study are removed. Furthermore, if modifications are made to the model allowing inter-regional transmission of electricity, wind capacity is forecast to reach 214 GW when all limitations are removed. The figures in the upper end of these ranges are not intended to be viewed as reasonable projections, but their magnitude illustrates the importance of the parameters governing the growth of wind capacity and resource availability in forecasts using NEMS. In addition, many uncertainties exist regarding these assumptions that potentially affect the growth of wind power. We suggest several areas in which to focus future research in order to better model the potential development of this resource. Because many of the assumptions related to wind in the model are also used for other renewable technologies, these suggestions could be applied to other renewable resources as well.

  12. Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP results for the base case and scenarios.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plotkin, S. E.; Singh, M. K.; Energy Systems

    2009-12-03

    The NEMS-MP model generates numerous results for each run of a scenario. (This model is the integrated National Energy Modeling System [NEMS] version used for the Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study [MP].) This appendix examines additional findings beyond the primary results reported in the Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study: Vehicle Characterization and Scenario Analyses (Reference 1). These additional results are provided in order to help further illuminate some of the primary results. Specifically discussed in this appendix are: (1) Energy use results for light vehicles (LVs), including details about the underlying total vehicle miles traveled (VMT), the average vehicle fuel economy, and the volumes of the different fuels used; (2) Resource fuels and their use in the production of ethanol, hydrogen (H{sub 2}), and electricity; (3) Ethanol use in the scenarios (i.e., the ethanol consumption in E85 vs. other blends, the percent of travel by flex fuel vehicles on E85, etc.); (4) Relative availability of E85 and H2 stations; (5) Fuel prices; (6) Vehicle prices; and (7) Consumer savings. These results are discussed as follows: (1) The three scenarios (Mixed, (P)HEV & Ethanol, and H2 Success) when assuming vehicle prices developed through literature review; (2) The three scenarios with vehicle prices that incorporate the achievement of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program vehicle cost goals; (3) The three scenarios with 'literature review' vehicle prices, plus vehicle subsidies; and (4) The three scenarios with 'program goals' vehicle prices, plus vehicle subsidies. The four versions or cases of each scenario are referred to as: Literature Review No Subsidies, Program Goals No Subsidies, Literature Review with Subsidies, and Program Goals with Subsidies. Two additional points must be made here. First, none of the results presented for LVs in this section include Class 2B trucks. Results for this class are included occasionally in Reference 1. They represent a small, though noticeable, segment of the 'LV plus 2B' market (e.g., a little more than 3% of today's energy use in that market). We generally do not include them in this discussion, simply because it requires additional effort to combine the NEMS-MP results for them with the results for the other LVs. (Where there is an exception, we will indicate so.) Second, where reference is made to E85, the ethanol content is actually 74%. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) assumes that, to address cold-starting issues, the percent of ethanol in E85 will vary seasonally. The EIA uses an annual average ethanol content of 74% in its forecasts. That assumption is maintained in the NEMS-MP scenario runs.

  13. Large-area low-temperature ultrananocrystaline diamond (UNCD) films and integration with CMOS devices for monolithically integrated diamond MEMD/NEMS-CMOS systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumant, A.V.; Auciello, O.; Yuan, H.-C; Ma, Z.; Carpick, R. W.; Mancini, D. C.; Univ. of Wisconsin; Univ. of Pennsylvania

    2009-05-01

    Because of exceptional mechanical, chemical, and tribological properties, diamond has a great potential to be used as a material for the development of high-performance MEMS and NEMS such as resonators and switches compatible with harsh environments, which involve mechanical motion and intermittent contact. Integration of such MEMS/NEMS devices with complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) microelectronics will provide a unique platform for CMOS-driven commercial MEMS/NEMS. The main hurdle to achieve diamond-CMOS integration is the relatively high substrate temperatures (600-800 C) required for depositing conventional diamond thin films, which are well above the CMOS operating thermal budget (400 C). Additionally, a materials integration strategy has to be developed to enable diamond-CMOS integration. Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD), a novel material developed in thin film form at Argonne, is currently the only microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) grown diamond film that can be grown at 400 C, and still retain exceptional mechanical, chemical, and tribological properties comparable to that of single crystal diamond. We have developed a process based on MPCVD to synthesize UNCD films on up to 200 mm in diameter CMOS wafers, which will open new avenues for the fabrication of monolithically integrated CMOS-driven MEMS/NEMS based on UNCD. UNCD films were grown successfully on individual Si-based CMOS chips and on 200 mm CMOS wafers at 400 C in a MPCVD system, using Ar-rich/CH4 gas mixture. The CMOS devices on the wafers were characterized before and after UNCD deposition. All devices were performing to specifications with very small degradation after UNCD deposition and processing. A threshold voltage degradation in the range of 0.08-0.44V and transconductance degradation in the range of 1.5-9% were observed.

  14. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module - NEMS Documentation

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    Documents the archived version of the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts used in support of the Annual Energy Outlook 2014.

  15. Directory of Energy Information Administration Models 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-06

    This directory contains descriptions about each model, including the title, acronym, purpose, followed by more detailed information on characteristics, uses, and requirements. Sources for additional information are identified. Included in this directory are 35 EIA models active as of May 1, 1993. Models that run on personal computers are identified by ``PC`` as part of the acronym. EIA is developing new models, a National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), and is making changes to existing models to include new technologies, environmental issues, conservation, and renewables, as well as extend forecast horizon. Other parts of the Department are involved in this modeling effort. A fully operational model is planned which will integrate completed segments of NEMS for its first official application--preparation of EIA`s Annual Energy Outlook 1994. Abstracts for the new models will be included in next year`s version of this directory.

  16. Frequency Stabilization in Non-linear MEMS and NEMS Oscillators (IN-11-087)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Energy Innovation Portal Find More Like This Return to Search Frequency Stabilization in Non-linear MEMS and NEMS Oscillators (IN-11-087) A New Strategy for Engineering Low-Frequency Noise Oscillators Argonne National Laboratory Contact ANL About This Technology <p> SEM image of one resonator used in our studies (center) and Finite Element Simulations of the dynamic deformation characteristics of the coupled vibrational modes (left and right side).</p> SEM image of one

  17. The Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration NEMS Transportation Demand Model Documentation Report 2005 25 manufacturing, and design advances. Manufacturing advances can generally be thought of as...

  18. Survey of Emissions Models for Distributed Combined Heat and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oak Ridge Competitive Electric Dispatch (ORCED), and National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) models are addressed. PDF icon surveyofemissionsmodelsfordg.pdf More Documents &...

  19. Modeling of battery energy storage in the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swaminathan, S.; Flynn, W.T.; Sen, R.K.

    1997-12-01

    The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) developed by the U.S. Department of Energy`s Energy Information Administration is a well-recognized model that is used to project the potential impact of new electric generation technologies. The NEMS model does not presently have the capability to model energy storage on the national grid. The scope of this study was to assess the feasibility of, and make recommendations for, the modeling of battery energy storage systems in the Electricity Market of the NEMS. Incorporating storage within the NEMS will allow the national benefits of storage technologies to be evaluated.

  20. Appendix A: GPRA08 benefits estimates: NEMS and MARKAL Model Baseline Cases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    Document summarizes the results of the benefits analysis of EERE’s programs, as described in the FY 2008 Budget Request. EERE estimates benefits for its overall portfolio and nine Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RD3) programs.

  1. Projected Benefits of EERE's Portfolio (by program and model)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-11-17

    This collection of charts shows the benefits metrics for renewable energy technologies in the EERE portfolio for 2010-2050 for both the NEMS and MARKAL models.

  2. Pore scale modeling of reactive transport involved in geologic CO2 sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Qinjin; Lichtner, Peter C; Viswanathan, Hari S; Abdel-fattah, Amr I

    2009-01-01

    We apply a multi-component reactive transport lattice Boltzmann model developed in previolls studies to modeling the injection of a C02 saturated brine into various porous media structures at temperature T=25 and 80 C. The porous media are originally consisted of calcite. A chemical system consisting of Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, H+, CO2(aq), and CI-is considered. The fluid flow, advection and diHusion of aqueous species, homogeneous reactions occurring in the bulk fluid, as weB as the dissolution of calcite and precipitation of dolomite are simulated at the pore scale. The effects of porous media structure on reactive transport are investigated. The results are compared with continuum scale modeling and the agreement and discrepancy are discussed. This work may shed some light on the fundamental physics occurring at the pore scale for reactive transport involved in geologic C02 sequestration.

  3. A 2D/1D coupling neutron transport method based on the matrix MOC and NEM methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, H.; Zheng, Y.; Wu, H.; Cao, L.

    2013-07-01

    A new 2D/1D coupling method based on the matrix MOC method (MMOC) and nodal expansion method (NEM) is proposed for solving the three-dimensional heterogeneous neutron transport problem. The MMOC method, used for radial two-dimensional calculation, constructs a response matrix between source and flux with only one sweep and then solves the linear system by using the restarted GMRES algorithm instead of the traditional trajectory sweeping process during within-group iteration for angular flux update. Long characteristics are generated by using the customization of commercial software AutoCAD. A one-dimensional diffusion calculation is carried out in the axial direction by employing the NEM method. The 2D and ID solutions are coupled through the transverse leakage items. The 3D CMFD method is used to ensure the global neutron balance and adjust the different convergence properties of the radial and axial solvers. A computational code is developed based on these theories. Two benchmarks are calculated to verify the coupling method and the code. It is observed that the corresponding numerical results agree well with references, which indicates that the new method is capable of solving the 3D heterogeneous neutron transport problem directly. (authors)

  4. Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-02-01

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. From 1982 through 1993, the Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS) was used by the EIA for its analyses, and the Gas Analysis Modeling System (GAMS) was used within IFFS to represent natural gas markets. Prior to 1982, the Midterm Energy Forecasting System (MEFS), also referred to as the Project Independence Evaluation System (PIES), was employed. NEMS was developed to enhance and update EIA`s modeling capability by internally incorporating models of energy markets that had previously been analyzed off-line. In addition, greater structural detail in NEMS permits the analysis of a broader range of energy issues. The time horizon of NEMS is the midterm period (i.e., through 2015). In order to represent the regional differences in energy markets, the component models of NEMS function at regional levels appropriate for the markets represented, with subsequent aggregation/disaggregation to the Census Division level for reporting purposes.

  5. Comprehensive Electricity Competition Act: A Comparison of Model Results, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the Energy Information Administration's use of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) to evaluate the effects of the Administration's restructuring proposal using the parameter settings and assumptions from the Policy Office Electricity Modeling System (POEMS) analysis.

  6. The National Energy Modeling System: An overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer-based, energy-economy modeling system of US energy markets for the midterm period of 1990 to 2010. NEMS projects the production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy, subject to assumptions on macroeconomic and financial factors, world energy markets, resource availability and costs, behavioral and technological choice criteria, cost and performance characteristics of energy technologies, and demographics. This report presents an overview of the structure and methodology of NEMS and each of its components. The first chapter provides a description of the design and objectives of the system. The second chapter describes the modeling structure. The remainder of the report summarizes the methodology and scope of the component modules of NEMS. The model descriptions are intended for readers familiar with terminology from economics, operations research, and energy modeling. Additional background on the development of the system is provided in Appendix A of this report, which describes the EIA modeling systems that preceded NEMS. More detailed model documentation reports for all the NEMS modules are also available from EIA.

  7. Genome-Wide Identification and 3D Modeling of Proteins involved in DNA Damage Recognition and Repair (Final Report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruben A. Abagyan, PhD

    2004-04-15

    OAK-B135 DNA Damage Recognition and Repair (DDR and R) proteins play a critical role in cellular responses to low-dose radiation and are associated with cancer. the authors have performed a systematic, genome-wide computational analysis of genomic data for human genes involved in the DDR and R process. The significant achievements of this project include: (1) Construction of the computational pipeline for searching DDR and R genes, building and validation of 3D models of proteins involved in DDR and R; (2) Functional and structural annotation of the 3D models and generation of comprehensive lists of suggested knock-out mutations; (3) Important improvement of macromolecular docking technology and its application to predict the DNA-Protein complex conformation; (4) Development of a new algorithm for improved analysis of high-density oligonucleotide arrays for gene expression profiling; (5) Construction and maintenance of the DNA Damage Recognition and Repair Database; and (6) Producing 14 research papers (10 published and 4 in preparation).

  8. Genome-Wide Identification and 3D Modeling of Proteins involved in DNA Damage Recognition and Repair (Final Report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abagyan, Ruben; An, Jianghong

    2005-08-12

    DNA Damage Recognition and Repair (DDR&R) proteins play a critical role in cellular responses to low-dose radiation and are associated with cancer. We have performed a systematic, genome-wide computational analysis of genomic data for human genes involved in the DDR&R process. The significant achievements of this project include: 1) Construction of the computational pipeline for searching DDR&R genes, building and validation of 3D models of proteins involved in DDR&R; 2) Functional and structural annotation of the 3D models and generation of comprehensive lists of suggested knock-out mutations; and the development of a method to predict the effects of mutations. Large scale testing of technology to identify novel small binding pockets in protein structures leading to new DDRR inhibitor strategies 3) Improvements of macromolecular docking technology (see the CAPRI 1-3 and 4-5 results) 4) Development of a new algorithm for improved analysis of high-density oligonucleotide arrays for gene expression profiling; 5) Construction and maintenance of the DNA Damage Recognition and Repair Database; 6) Producing 15 research papers (12 published and 3 in preparation).

  9. The National Energy Modeling System: An overview 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer-based, energy-economy modeling system of US energy markets for the midterm period through 2020. NEMS projects the production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy, subject to assumptions on macroeconomic and financial factors world energy markets, resource availability and costs, behavior and technological choice criteria, cost and performance characteristics of energy technologies, and demographics. This report presents an overview of the structure and methodology of NEMS and each of its components. The first chapter provides a description of the design and objectives of the system, followed by a chapter on the overall modeling structure and solution algorithm. The remainder of the report summarizes the methodology and scope of the component modules of NEMS. The model descriptions are intended for readers familiar with terminology from economics, operations research, and energy modeling. 21 figs.

  10. DOE/EIA-M062 Model Documentation Natural Gas Transmission and

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its...

  11. Impacts of Modeled Recommendations of the National Commission on Energy Policy

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    This report provides the Energy Information Administration's analysis of those National Commission on Energy Policy (NCEP) energy policy recommendations that could be simulated using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS).

  12. Model documentation, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the objectives and the conceptual and methodological approach used in the development of the National Energy Modeling System`s (NEMS) Coal Market Module (CMM) used to develop the Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98). This report catalogues and describes the assumptions, methodology, estimation techniques, and source code of CMM`s two submodules. These are the Coal Production Submodule (CPS) and the Coal Distribution Submodule (CDS). CMM provides annual forecasts of prices, production, and consumption of coal for NEMS. In general, the CDS integrates the supply inputs from the CPS to satisfy demands for coal from exogenous demand models. The international area of the CDS forecasts annual world coal trade flows from major supply to major demand regions and provides annual forecasts of US coal exports for input to NEMS. Specifically, the CDS receives minemouth prices produced by the CPS, demand and other exogenous inputs from other NEMS components, and provides delivered coal prices and quantities to the NEMS economic sectors and regions.

  13. Model documentation: Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-02-17

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The methodology employed allows the analysis of impacts of regional capacity constraints in the interstate natural gas pipeline network and the identification of pipeline capacity expansion requirements. There is an explicit representation of core and noncore markets for natural gas transmission and distribution services, and the key components of pipeline tariffs are represented in a pricing algorithm. Natural gas pricing and flow patterns are derived by obtaining a market equilibrium across the three main elements of the natural gas market: the supply element, the demand element, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. The NGTDM consists of four modules: the Annual Flow Module, the Capacity F-expansion Module, the Pipeline Tariff Module, and the Distributor Tariff Module. A model abstract is provided in Appendix A.

  14. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. Subsequent chapters of this report provide: an overview of NGTDM; a description of the interface between the NEMS and NGTDM; an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM; the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module; the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module; the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module; the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module; and a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs.

  15. Distributed generation capabilities of the national energy modeling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2003-01-01

    This report describes Berkeley Lab's exploration of how the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) models distributed generation (DG) and presents possible approaches for improving how DG is modeled. The on-site electric generation capability has been available since the AEO2000 version of NEMS. Berkeley Lab has previously completed research on distributed energy resources (DER) adoption at individual sites and has developed a DER Customer Adoption Model called DER-CAM. Given interest in this area, Berkeley Lab set out to understand how NEMS models small-scale on-site generation to assess how adequately DG is treated in NEMS, and to propose improvements or alternatives. The goal is to determine how well NEMS models the factors influencing DG adoption and to consider alternatives to the current approach. Most small-scale DG adoption takes place in the residential and commercial modules of NEMS. Investment in DG ultimately offsets purchases of electricity, which also eliminates the losses associated with transmission and distribution (T&D). If the DG technology that is chosen is photovoltaics (PV), NEMS assumes renewable energy consumption replaces the energy input to electric generators. If the DG technology is fuel consuming, consumption of fuel in the electric utility sector is replaced by residential or commercial fuel consumption. The waste heat generated from thermal technologies can be used to offset the water heating and space heating energy uses, but there is no thermally activated cooling capability. This study consists of a review of model documentation and a paper by EIA staff, a series of sensitivity runs performed by Berkeley Lab that exercise selected DG parameters in the AEO2002 version of NEMS, and a scoping effort of possible enhancements and alternatives to NEMS current DG capabilities. In general, the treatment of DG in NEMS is rudimentary. The penetration of DG is determined by an economic cash-flow analysis that determines adoption based on the n umber of years to a positive cash flow. Some important technologies, e.g. thermally activated cooling, are absent, and ceilings on DG adoption are determined by some what arbitrary caps on the number of buildings that can adopt DG. These caps are particularly severe for existing buildings, where the maximum penetration for any one technology is 0.25 percent. On the other hand, competition among technologies is not fully considered, and this may result in double-counting for certain applications. A series of sensitivity runs show greater penetration with net metering enhancements and aggressive tax credits and a more limited response to lowered DG technology costs. Discussion of alternatives to the current code is presented in Section 4. Alternatives or improvements to how DG is modeled in NEMS cover three basic areas: expanding on the existing total market for DG both by changing existing parameters in NEMS and by adding new capabilities, such as for missing technologies; enhancing the cash flow analysis but incorporating aspects of DG economics that are not currently represented, e.g. complex tariffs; and using an external geographic information system (GIS) driven analysis that can better and more intuitively identify niche markets.

  16. Directory of energy information administration models 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-13

    This updated directory has been published annually; after this issue, it will be published only biennially. The Disruption Impact Simulator Model in use by EIA is included. Model descriptions have been updated according to revised documentation approved during the past year. This directory contains descriptions about each model, including title, acronym, purpose, followed by more detailed information on characteristics, uses, and requirements. Sources for additional information are identified. Included are 37 EIA models active as of February 1, 1995. The first group is the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) models. The second group is all other EIA models that are not part of NEMS. Appendix A identifies major EIA modeling systems and the models within these systems. Appendix B is a summary of the `Annual Energy Outlook` Forecasting System.

  17. Model documentation Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-30

    This report documents objectives and conceptual and methodological approach used in the development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Coal Market Module (CMM) used to develop the Annual Energy Outlook 1996 (AEO96). This report catalogues and describes the assumptions, methodology, estimation techniques, and source code of CMM`s three submodules: Coal Production Submodule, Coal Export Submodule, and Coal Distribution Submodule.

  18. Commitment to Public Involvement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Create a Sustainable Future Commitment to Public Involvement Commitment to Public Involvement LANL is committed to our neighbors August 1, 2013 Lab Director McMillan talks with...

  19. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reacting Flow/Modeling - Modelingadmin2015-10-28T02:39:13+00:00 Turbulence models typically involve coarse-graining and/or time averaging. Though adequate for modeling mean transport, this approach does not address turbulence-microphysics interactions that are important in combustion processes. Subgrid models are developed to represent these interactions. The CRF has developed a fundamentally different representation of these interactions that does not involve distinct coarse-grained and subgrid

  20. A Model of U.S. Commercial Distributed Generation Adoption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Ryan Firestone; Zhou, Nan; Maribu,Karl; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-10

    Small-scale (100 kW-5 MW) on-site distributed generation (DG) economically driven by combined heat and power (CHP) applications and, in some cases, reliability concerns will likely emerge as a common feature of commercial building energy systems over the next two decades. Forecasts of DG adoption published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) are made using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), which has a forecasting module that predicts the penetration of several possible commercial building DG technologies over the period 2005-2025. NEMS is also used for estimating the future benefits of Department of Energy research and development used in support of budget requests and management decisionmaking. The NEMS approach to modeling DG has some limitations, including constraints on the amount of DG allowed for retrofits to existing buildings and a small number of possible sizes for each DG technology. An alternative approach called Commercial Sector Model (ComSeM) is developed to improve the way in which DG adoption is modeled. The approach incorporates load shapes for specific end uses in specific building types in specific regions, e.g., cooling in hospitals in Atlanta or space heating in Chicago offices. The Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) uses these load profiles together with input cost and performance DG technology assumptions to model the potential DG adoption for four selected cities and two sizes of five building types in selected forecast years to 2022. The Distributed Energy Resources Market Diffusion Model (DER-MaDiM) is then used to then tailor the DER-CAM results to adoption projections for the entire U.S. commercial sector for all forecast years from 2007-2025. This process is conducted such that the structure of results are consistent with the structure of NEMS, and can be re-injected into NEMS that can then be used to integrate adoption results into a full forecast.

  1. Public Involvement Plan Public Involvement Plan

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Public Involvement Plan Public Involvement Plan for CERCLA Activities at the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Site for CERCLA Activities at the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Site 2 0 1 3 U p d a t e 2 0 1 3 U p d a t e ii Both the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) and the Federal Facility Agreement require U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Environmental Management (DOE-OREM) to prepare and publish a community relations plan.

  2. Model documentation report: Commercial Sector Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components. The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module is a simulation tool based upon economic and engineering relationships that models commercial sector energy demands at the nine Census Division level of detail for eleven distinct categories of commercial buildings. Commercial equipment selections are performed for the major fuels of electricity, natural gas, and distillate fuel, for the major services of space heating, space cooling, water heating, ventilation, cooking, refrigeration, and lighting. The algorithm also models demand for the minor fuels of residual oil, liquefied petroleum gas, steam coal, motor gasoline, and kerosene, the renewable fuel sources of wood and municipal solid waste, and the minor services of office equipment. Section 2 of this report discusses the purpose of the model, detailing its objectives, primary input and output quantities, and the relationship of the Commercial Module to the other modules of the NEMS system. Section 3 of the report describes the rationale behind the model design, providing insights into further assumptions utilized in the model development process to this point. Section 3 also reviews alternative commercial sector modeling methodologies drawn from existing literature, providing a comparison to the chosen approach. Section 4 details the model structure, using graphics and text to illustrate model flows and key computations.

  3. Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System May 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module Documentation Report i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and

  4. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engine Combustion/Modeling - Modelingadmin2015-10-28T01:54:52+00:00 Modelers at the CRF are developing high-fidelity simulation tools for engine combustion and detailed micro-kinetic, surface chemistry modeling tools for catalyst-based exhaust aftertreatment systems. The engine combustion modeling is focused on developing Large Eddy Simulation (LES). LES is being used with closely coupled key target experiments to reveal new understanding of the fundamental processes involved in engine

  5. Directory of Energy Information Administration Models 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This directory revises and updates the 1993 directory and includes 15 models of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Three other new models in use by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) have also been included: the Motor Gasoline Market Model (MGMM), Distillate Market Model (DMM), and the Propane Market Model (PPMM). This directory contains descriptions about each model, including title, acronym, purpose, followed by more detailed information on characteristics, uses and requirements. Sources for additional information are identified. Included in this directory are 37 EIA models active as of February 1, 1994.

  6. Model documentation: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System; Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-02-24

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is a component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. This report documents the archived version of NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts used in support of the Annual Energy Outlook 1994, DOE/EIA-0383(94). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. It is intended to fulfill the legal obligation of the EIA to provide adequate documentation in support of its models (Public Law 94-385, Section 57.b.2). This report represents Volume 1 of a two-volume set. (Volume 2 will report on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues.) Subsequent chapters of this report provide: (1) an overview of the NGTDM (Chapter 2); (2) a description of the interface between the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and the NGTDM (Chapter 3); (3) an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM (Chapter 4); (4) the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module (Chapter 5); (5) the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module (Chapter 6); (6) the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module (Chapter 7); (7) the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module (Chapter 8); and (8) a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs (Chapter 9).

  7. TPA Public Involvement Survey

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Tri-Party Agencies' Annual Public Involvement Survey Activities for Calendar Year 2008 Nolan Curtis Washington State Department of Ecology Nuclear Waste Program August 5, 2009 BACKGROUND * The Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) agencies - the U.S. Department of Energy, Washington State Department of Ecology and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - conduct an annual evaluation of the overall effectiveness of public involvement activities at Hanford. * The survey was conducted between April 3 and

  8. Model documentation: Renewable Fuels Module of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it related to the production of the 1994 Annual Energy Outlook (AEO94) forecasts. The report catalogues and describes modeling assumptions, computational methodologies, data inputs, and parameter estimation techniques. A number of offline analyses used in lieu of RFM modeling components are also described. This documentation report serves two purposes. First, it is a reference document for model analysts, model users, and the public interested in the construction and application of the RFM. Second, it meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its models. The RFM consists of six analytical submodules that represent each of the major renewable energy resources -- wood, municipal solid waste (MSW), solar energy, wind energy, geothermal energy, and alcohol fuels. Of these six, four are documented in the following chapters: municipal solid waste, wind, solar and biofuels. Geothermal and wood are not currently working components of NEMS. The purpose of the RFM is to define the technological and cost characteristics of renewable energy technologies, and to pass these characteristics to other NEMS modules for the determination of mid-term forecasted renewable energy demand.

  9. MODELING THE DEMAND FOR E85 IN THE UNITED STATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Changzheng; Greene, David L

    2013-10-01

    How demand for E85 might evolve in the future in response to changing economics and policies is an important subject to include in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). This report summarizes a study to develop an E85 choice model for NEMS. Using the most recent data from the states of Minnesota, North Dakota, and Iowa, this study estimates a logit model that represents E85 choice as a function of prices of E10 and E85, as well as fuel availability of E85 relative to gasoline. Using more recent data than previous studies allows a better estimation of non-fleet demand and indicates that the price elasticity of E85 choice appears to be higher than previously estimated. Based on the results of the econometric analysis, a model for projecting E85 demand at the regional level is specified. In testing, the model produced plausible predictions of US E85 demand to 2040.

  10. Commitment to Public Involvement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Create a Sustainable Future » Commitment to Public Involvement Commitment to Public Involvement LANL is committed to our neighbors August 1, 2013 Lab Director McMillan talks with Lab historian Ellen McGhee during Lab tour Lab Director McMillan talks with Lab historian Ellen McGhee during Lab tour RELATED IMAGES http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3815/9442115459_390e5bc841_t.jpg Enlarge http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7111/7650961650_ed1571174f_t.jpg Enlarge

  11. Involvement and Communication Committee.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2016 Public Involvement and Communication Committee Chair 1 : Liz Mattson 4 , Member Vice Chair 1 : Ken Niles 4 , Member Committee Members 2 : Shelley Cimon Peggy Maze Johnson Alissa Cordner Ken Niles Rob Davis Ed Pacheco Tom Galioto Dan Serres Floyd Hodges Jean Vanni Paige Knight Steve White Liz Mattson Unofficial Committee Members or Other Interested Parties 3 : Earl Fordham Gerry Pollet Paige Knight Steve Hudson 4 Susan Leckband 4 Facilitator: Cathy McCague 4 Agency & Technical

  12. Energy Information Administration NEMS Macroeconomic Activity...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of employment by industry is industrial output. Both current and lagged output values enter in the employment specification, reflecting the tendency of firms to hire employees in...

  13. NEMS Freight Transportation Module Improvement Study

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... New process development would be minimal as many of the existing processes would remain ... This change would require minimal effort and it is believed that this change would greatly ...

  14. Public Involvement Committee - Transcribed Flipcharts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 3, 2014 Public Involvement Opportunities * Review of PI materials and agency websites, listservs (use of and purpose of notifications). * CD process - approach to PI meeting opportunity. * Environmental justice issues, making sure Hanford is meeting legal requirements. Page 1 Public Involvement Opportunities (continued) * Public involvement aspect brought into the technical committee presentations. o Determine if PIC should be involved further. * More PIC member involvement directly on

  15. A Good Neighbor: Community Involvement | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Good Neighbor: Community Involvement At NREL, we are dedicated environmental stewards and are committed to making positive contributions in our community. NREL's main campus is a model for environmental protection and sustainable building practices. Photo of a volunteer at the Foothills Animal Shelter. Charitable Contributions Employees are very involved in the community, giving their time, money, and energy. As staff levels have grown, so have contributions, making NREL Jefferson County's

  16. Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model. The NEMS Transportation Model comprises a series of semi-independent models which address different aspects of the transportation sector. The primary purpose of this model is to provide mid-term forecasts of transportation energy demand by fuel type including, but not limited to, motor gasoline, distillate, jet fuel, and alternative fuels (such as CNG) not commonly associated with transportation. The current NEMS forecast horizon extends to the year 2010 and uses 1990 as the base year. Forecasts are generated through the separate consideration of energy consumption within the various modes of transport, including: private and fleet light-duty vehicles; aircraft; marine, rail, and truck freight; and various modes with minor overall impacts, such as mass transit and recreational boating. This approach is useful in assessing the impacts of policy initiatives, legislative mandates which affect individual modes of travel, and technological developments. The model also provides forecasts of selected intermediate values which are generated in order to determine energy consumption. These elements include estimates of passenger travel demand by automobile, air, or mass transit; estimates of the efficiency with which that demand is met; projections of vehicle stocks and the penetration of new technologies; and estimates of the demand for freight transport which are linked to forecasts of industrial output. Following the estimation of energy demand, TRAN produces forecasts of vehicular emissions of the following pollutants by source: oxides of sulfur, oxides of nitrogen, total carbon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds.

  17. Model documentation report: Transportation sector model of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description of TRAN for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirements of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, 57(b)(1)). Third, it permits continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements.

  18. Modeling renewable portfolio standards for the annual energy outlook 1998 - electricity market module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The Electricity Market Module (EMM) is the electricity supply component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The EMM represents the generation, transmission, and pricing of electricity. It consists of four submodules: the Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP) Submodule, the Electricity Fuel Dispatch (EFD) Submodule, the Electricity Finance and Pricing (EFP) Submodule, and the Load and Demand-Side Management (LDSM) Submodule. For the Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98), the EMM has been modified to represent Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS), which are included in many of the Federal and state proposals for deregulating the electric power industry. A RPS specifies that electricity suppliers must produce a minimum level of generation using renewable technologies. Producers with insufficient renewable generating capacity can either build new plants or purchase {open_quotes}credits{close_quotes} from other suppliers with excess renewable generation. The representation of a RPS involves revisions to the ECP, EFD, and the EFP. The ECP projects capacity additions required to meet the minimum renewable generation levels in future years. The EFD determines the sales and purchases of renewable credits for the current year. The EFP incorporates the cost of building capacity and trading credits into the price of electricity.

  19. Public Involvement and Communications Committee:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Roles and Responsibilities of the PIC For discussion purposes only 09.08.15 Excerpt from the HAB Process Manual January 2012 Public Involvement and Communications Committee:  Develops Board Advice for the TPA agencies on the appropriate approach and format for public outreach and involvement activities,  Develops Board Advice for the TPA agencies on long-range, strategic public involvement planning efforts, documents and schedules.  Provides input or develops Board advice to the TPA

  20. Summary Impacts of Modeled Provisions of the 2003 Conference Energy Bill

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2004-01-01

    This service report was undertaken at the February 2, 2004, request of Senator John Sununu to perform an assessment of the Conference Energy Bill of 2003. This report summarizes the CEB provisions that can be analyzed using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and have the potential to affect energy consumption, supply, and prices. The impacts are estimated by comparing the projections with the CEB provisions to the AEO2004 Reference Case.

  1. Public Involvment Plan - Rifle, Colorado

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4-TAR MAC-GWRIF 7.1 UMTRA Ground Water Project Public Involvement Plan for the Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the New and Old Rifle, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Sites May 1999 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Public Involvement Plan for the Rifle UMTRA Sites Page 2 Introduction This Public Involvement Plan is tiered to the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action

  2. Appendix V Public Involvement Plan

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    V Public Involvement Plan Revision No.: 6 February 2008 Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) FFACO, Appendix V February 2008 i FFACO Public Involvement Plan U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Las Vegas, Nevada U.S. Department of Defense Defense Threat Reduction Agency Detachment 1, Nevada Operations Mercury, Nevada U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado FFACO, Appendix V February 2008 ii

  3. Community Involvement Fund | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Community Involvement Fund Overview The success of EM's legacy waste cleanup mission depends largely on the support of informed and engaged stakeholders. Cleanup activities have the potential to affect the health of the public, the environment, and the

  4. Radiative Decays Involving Light Scalar Mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deirdre Black; Masayasu Harada; Joseph Schechter

    2002-09-01

    We present a vector dominance model to describe radiative decays involving the light scalar mesons. Assuming that the light scalar mesons form a nonet this model gives relations among various decay amplitudes of the form S--> gamma gamma, V-->Sgamma and S--> Vgamma, where S and V denote scalar and vector mesons. By comparing with experimental radiative decay rates, including those recently measured for phi--> PP'gamma, we obtain various predictions. We discuss briefly ongoing extensions of the present work in an attempt to describe the radiative phi decay measurements in detail.

  5. Public Involvement Committee - Transcribed Flipcharts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    December 10, 2013 100-F 1. Public involvement/mtg in March - How to sequence Board Review with public comment period * Path 1: Could request comment period extension * Path 2: Could request HAB comments considered post comment period * If comment period starts in March, HAB could request to comment in May (advice) Page 1 What might be topics for policy-level discussions? What might be ways, other than meetings, to solicit involvement? What might be useful to present at March Board mtg? Page 2

  6. A Non-Electrostatic Surface Complexation Approach to Modeling Radionuclide Migration at the Nevada Test Site: II. Aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zavarin, M; Bruton, C J

    2004-12-16

    Reliable quantitative prediction of contaminant transport in subsurface environments is critical to evaluating the risks associated with radionuclide migration. As part of the Underground Test Area (UGTA) program, radionuclide transport away from selected underground nuclear tests conducted in the saturated zone at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is being examined. In the near-field environment, reactive transport simulations must account for changes in water chemistry and mineralogy as a function of time and their effect on radionuclide migration. Unlike the Kd approach, surface complexation reactions, in conjunction with ion exchange and precipitation, can be used to describe radionuclide reactive transport as a function of changing environmental conditions. They provide a more robust basis for describing radionuclide retardation in geochemically dynamic environments. In a companion report (Zavarin and Bruton, 2004), a database of radionuclide surface complexation reactions for calcite and iron oxide minerals was developed. In this report, a second set of reactions is developed: surface complexation (SC) and ion exchange (IE) to aluminosilicate minerals. The most simplified surface complexation model, the one-site non-electrostatic model (NEM), and the Vanselow IE model were used to fit a large number of published sorption data and a reaction constant database was developed. Surface complexation of Am(III), Eu(III), Np(V), Pu(IV), Pu(V), and U(VI) to aluminum oxide, silica, and aluminosilicate minerals was modeled using a generalized approach in which surface complexation to aluminosilicate >SiOH or >AlOH reactive sites was considered equivalent to the reactivity of aluminum oxide and silica reactive sites. Ion exchange was allowed to be mineral-dependent. The generalized NEM approach, in conjunction with Vanselow IE, was able to fit most published sorption data well. Fitting results indicate that surface complexation will dominate over ion exchange at pH >7 for the rare earth and actinide ions examined here. Ion exchange is effectively suppressed due to aqueous speciation at high pH which tends to result in neutral or negatively charged aqueous species that are less likely to undergo ion exchange. The resulting set of average NEM and Vanselow IE constants provides a consistent set of constants for use in reactive transport simulations. The average NEM and Vanselow IE constants were used to predict single-mineral K{sub d}s under conditions similar to K{sub d} measurements reported by the Yucca Mountain site characterization program. In most cases, predicted Kds were consistent with measured K{sub d}s. In some cases, differences could be explained by surface area, mineralogy, or redox state. The NEM and Vanselow IE constants described here are an attempt to arrive at a consistent simplified database of reaction constants to be used in reactive transport simulations in chemically and mineralogically heterogeneous environments. The accuracy of these reaction constants is limited by the quality and quantity of available sorption data and the limitations of the NEM and Vanselow IE approach used. The reactivity and accessibility of natural minerals is complicated and cannot be assumed to behave ideally. Thus, the validity of the NEM and Vanselow IE constants must always be examined for the sediment of interest. For example, Triay et al. (1997) suggested that the weak sorption of Np(V) on tuff containing small amounts of hematite may indicate that the iron oxide mineral is passivated. Thus, the reactive surface area of hematite in these samples may be lower than expected. On the other hand, a limited comparison of NEM and Vanselow IE constants determined here and K{sub d}s reported by Wolfsberg (1978) for alluvium from Frenchman Flat, NTS, suggests that the reaction constants and reactive surface areas developed here would provide a conservative estimate of radionuclide retardation in Frenchman Flat alluvium.

  7. HOW YOU CAN BE INVOLVED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HOW YOU CAN BE INVOLVED www.youtube.com/hanfordsite www.twitter.com/hanfordsite www.facebook.com/hanfordsite The Hanford Site sits on 586-square-miles of shrub-steppe desert in southeastern Washington state. The site was created in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project to produce plutonium for nuclear weapons. Between 1943 and 1963, nine nuclear reactors were built along the banks of the Columbia River. By 1988, all nine reactors were shut down. The weapons material production mission ended in

  8. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- EM Public Involvement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Public Involvement NNSA/NFO Language Options U.S. DOE/NNSA - Nevada Field Office Click to subscribe to NNSS News Public Involvement Public Involvement Outreach Photo An integral component of the Environmental Management Program is the public involvement function. Communication with the public is an essential element in successfully conducting Environmental Management work. Public involvement initiatives include developing and distributing fact sheets, publications, and exhibits as well as

  9. Model documentation report: Residential sector demand module of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document that provides a detailed description for energy analysts, other users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports according to Public Law 93-275, section 57(b)(1). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements.

  10. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PVLibMatlab Permalink Gallery Sandia Labs Releases New Version of PVLib Toolbox Modeling, News, Photovoltaic, Solar Sandia Labs Releases New Version of PVLib Toolbox Sandia has released version 1.3 of PVLib, its widely used Matlab toolbox for modeling photovoltaic (PV) power systems. The version 1.3 release includes the following added functions: functions to estimate parameters for popular PV module models, including PVsyst and the CEC '5 parameter' model a new model of the effects of solar

  11. Strategic Public Involvement Products For Review

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Public Involvement Products For Review PIC Discussion September 4, 2013 1 This list is from July 7, 2010 before we had decided on writing advice and is purely for reference for today's discussion. The work we have done so far is summarized below for reference: Definition of successful public involvement: The art and craft of Public Involvement is successful when clear goals are defined, when stakeholders contribute early to the design and development of the public involvement activity, when that

  12. Public Involvement Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Public Involvement Plan Public Involvement Plan Every three years, the Public Involvement Plan is updated, prepared, and published by the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (DOE-OREM) to communicate to you, as a member of the public, the opportunities you have to participate in decisions and information exchanges regarding the remediation of contaminated areas on the Oak Ridge Site. DOE is committed to fostering meaningful public involvement in all aspects of

  13. Cyber Incidents Involving Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Turk

    2005-10-01

    The Analysis Function of the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has prepared this report to document cyber security incidents for use by the CSSC. The description and analysis of incidents reported herein support three CSSC tasks: establishing a business case; increasing security awareness and private and corporate participation related to enhanced cyber security of control systems; and providing informational material to support model development and prioritize activities for CSSC. The stated mission of CSSC is to reduce vulnerability of critical infrastructure to cyber attack on control systems. As stated in the Incident Management Tool Requirements (August 2005) ''Vulnerability reduction is promoted by risk analysis that tracks actual risk, emphasizes high risk, determines risk reduction as a function of countermeasures, tracks increase of risk due to external influence, and measures success of the vulnerability reduction program''. Process control and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems, with their reliance on proprietary networks and hardware, have long been considered immune to the network attacks that have wreaked so much havoc on corporate information systems. New research indicates this confidence is misplaced--the move to open standards such as Ethernet, Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol, and Web technologies is allowing hackers to take advantage of the control industry's unawareness. Much of the available information about cyber incidents represents a characterization as opposed to an analysis of events. The lack of good analyses reflects an overall weakness in reporting requirements as well as the fact that to date there have been very few serious cyber attacks on control systems. Most companies prefer not to share cyber attack incident data because of potential financial repercussions. Uniform reporting requirements will do much to make this information available to Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and others who require it. This report summarizes the rise in frequency of cyber attacks, describes the perpetrators, and identifies the means of attack. This type of analysis, when used in conjunction with vulnerability analyses, can be used to support a proactive approach to prevent cyber attacks. CSSC will use this document to evolve a standardized approach to incident reporting and analysis. This document will be updated as needed to record additional event analyses and insights regarding incident reporting. This report represents 120 cyber security incidents documented in a number of sources, including: the British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) Industrial Security Incident Database, the 2003 CSI/FBI Computer Crime and Security Survey, the KEMA, Inc., Database, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the Energy Incident Database, the INL Cyber Incident Database, and other open-source data. The National Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism (MIPT) database was also interrogated but, interestingly, failed to yield any cyber attack incidents. The results of this evaluation indicate that historical evidence provides insight into control system related incidents or failures; however, that the limited available information provides little support to future risk estimates. The documented case history shows that activity has increased significantly since 1988. The majority of incidents come from the Internet by way of opportunistic viruses, Trojans, and worms, but a surprisingly large number are directed acts of sabotage. A substantial number of confirmed, unconfirmed, and potential events that directly or potentially impact control systems worldwide are also identified. Twelve selected cyber incidents are presented at the end of this report as examples of the documented case studies (see Appendix B).

  14. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Widespread Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Is the Goal of H2FIRST Project Capabilities, Center for Infrastructure Research and Innovation (CIRI), Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Facilities, Infrastructure Security, Materials Science, Modeling, Modeling & Analysis, News, News & Events, Partnership, Research & Capabilities, Systems Analysis, Systems Engineering, Transportation Energy Widespread Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Is

  15. U.S. Energy Information Administration NEMS Residential Demand...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Geothermal Heat Pump Natural Gas Heat Pump Variables: HSYSSHR 200678,eg,b,r Benchmarking Data from Short-Term Energy Outlook Definition: Housing unit energy consumption by...

  16. EIA Buildings Analysis of Consumer Behavior in NEMS

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... * Minor uses (13%) - ENERGY STAR electronics - Some have efficiency detail (TVs, PCs) and some don't (secondary heating, coffee makers, security systems) * "Everything ...

  17. Overview of NEMS-H2, Version 1.0

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and data that fit it best - Optimization techniques used for electricity ... market segments * Hydrogen stationary fuel cells not yet included OnLocation, Inc., ...

  18. Frequency stabilization in nonlinear MEMS and NEMS oscillators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lopez, Omar Daniel; Antonio, Dario

    2014-09-16

    An illustrative system includes an amplifier operably connected to a phase shifter. The amplifier is configured to amplify a voltage from an oscillator. The phase shifter is operably connected to a driving amplitude control, wherein the phase shifter is configured to phase shift the amplified voltage and is configured to set an amplitude of the phase shifted voltage. The oscillator is operably connected to the driving amplitude control. The phase shifted voltage drives the oscillator. The oscillator is at an internal resonance condition, based at least on the amplitude of the phase shifted voltage, that stabilizes frequency oscillations in the oscillator.

  19. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WVMinputs-outputs Permalink Gallery Sandia Labs releases wavelet variability model (WVM) Modeling, News, Photovoltaic, Solar Sandia Labs releases wavelet variability model (WVM) When a single solar photovoltaic (PV) module is in full sunlight, then is shaded by a cloud, and is back in full sunlight in a matter of seconds, a sharp dip then increase in power output will result. However, over an entire PV plant, clouds will often uncover some modules even as they cover others, [...] By Andrea

  20. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Project Is the ACME of Computer Science to Address Climate Change Analysis, Climate, Global Climate & Energy, Modeling, Modeling & Analysis, News, News & Events, Partnership New Project Is the ACME of Computer Science to Address Climate Change Sandia high-performance computing (HPC) researchers are working with DOE and 14 other national laboratories and institutions to develop and apply the most complete climate and Earth system model, to address the most challenging and

  1. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A rail tank car of the type used to transport crude oil across North America. Recent incidents have raised concerns about the safety of this practice, which the DOE-DOT-sponsored team is investigating. (photo credit: Harvey Henkelmann) Permalink Gallery Expansion of DOE-DOT Tight Oil Research Work Capabilities, Carbon Capture & Storage, Carbon Storage, Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Assurance, Fuel Options, Infrastructure Assurance, Infrastructure Security, Modeling, Modeling, Modeling

  2. Community Involvement | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Involvement Community Involvement Y-12 is committed to keeping the community informed in areas of operations, environmental concerns, safety and emergency preparedness. To facilitate communication between the company and the community, a Community Relations Council was formed in 2002. The council provides feedback to the company regarding our operations and ways to enhance communications and involvement with the community and public at large. The council is composed of members from a cross

  3. Public Involvement and Communications Committee Summaries - Hanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    05, 2012 Final Attachment 1: Tri-Party Agreement Agencies - Public Involvement Calendar Fiscal Year 2012 - not available Attachment 2: PIC Meeting Transcribed Flip Chart Notes...

  4. Central Plateau Principles Public Involvement Advice DETAILED...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    v0, 12914 Central Plateau Principles Public Involvement Advice DETAILED BACKGROUND Cleanup of Hanford's Central Plateau is expected to take another four decades or longer, and...

  5. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: JLA Public Involvement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Purchasing a plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) and installing a charging station has expanded JLA Public Involvement's sustainability efforts and allowed them to achieve Gold ...

  6. Public Involvement and Communications Committee Page 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 2, 2011 FINAL MEETING SUMMARY HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT & COMMUNICATIONS COMMITTEE MEETING November 2, 2011 Kennewick, WA Topics in this Meeting Summary Welcome and Introductions ............................................................................................................ 1 Responses to Board Advice 239 and 240 ....................................................................................... 1 Public Involvement for the Hanford Site-wide Permit

  7. Petroleum Market Model of the National Energy Modeling System

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Expansion) If it is a reporting iteration, the Short Term Energy Outlook (STEO) benchmarking switch is on, and it is NEMS year 13 (2002); then the PMM LP is solved using input...

  8. International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    The NEMS International Energy Module (IEM) simulates the interaction between U.S. and global petroleum markets. It uses assumptions of economic growth and expectations of...

  9. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in warm dense matter experiments with diffuse interface methods in the ALE-AMR code Wangyi Liu ∗ , John Barnard, Alex Friedman, Nathan Masters, Aaron Fisher, Velemir Mlaker, Alice Koniges, David Eder † August 4, 2011 Abstract In this paper we describe an implementation of a single-fluid inter- face model in the ALE-AMR code to simulate surface tension effects. The model does not require explicit information on the physical state of the two phases. The only change to the existing fluid

  10. Public Involvement and Communications Committee Page 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 13, 2011 FINAL MEETING SUMMARY HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT & COMMUNICATIONS COMMITTEE MEETING January 13, 2011 Richland, WA Topics in this Meeting Summary Welcome and Introductions ............................................................................................................ 1 State of the Site Meetings ............................................................................................................... 2 Open Government Plan Advice

  11. Public Involvement and Communications Committee Page 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    said he believes the heart of the Plan is in pages 7 to 11. He said the section uses language that is frequently used by the Board, including public involvement for better long...

  12. Community Involvement and Making a Difference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community Involvement and Making a Difference Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:Mar. 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Community Involvement and Making a Difference A personal message from Kurt Steinhaus, Community Programs Director, Los Alamos National Laboratory July 1, 2014 Kurt Steinhaus, Community Programs Director, Los Alamos National Laboratory Kurt Steinhaus, Community Programs Director, Los Alamos National

  13. FOIASI - Special Inquiry Review of Allegations Involving

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    PotentialMisconduct by a Senior Office of Environmental Management Official | Department of Energy FOIASI - Special Inquiry Review of Allegations Involving PotentialMisconduct by a Senior Office of Environmental Management Official FOIASI - Special Inquiry Review of Allegations Involving PotentialMisconduct by a Senior Office of Environmental Management Official In September 2009, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) received multiple allegations concerning improprieties by a senior

  14. Model documentation report: Transportation sector model of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-02-01

    Over the past year, several modifications have been made to the NEMS Transportation Model, incorporating greater levels of detail and analysis in modules previously represented in the aggregate or under a profusion of simplifying assumptions. This document is intended to amend those sections of the Model Documentation Report (MDR) which describe these superseded modules. Significant changes have been implemented in the LDV Fuel Economy Model, the Alternative Fuel Vehicle Model, the LDV Fleet Module, and the Highway Freight Model. The relevant sections of the MDR have been extracted from the original document, amended, and are presented in the following pages. A brief summary of the modifications follows: In the Fuel Economy Model, modifications have been made which permit the user to employ more optimistic assumptions about the commercial viability and impact of selected technological improvements. This model also explicitly calculates the fuel economy of an array of alternative fuel vehicles (AFV`s) which are subsequently used in the estimation of vehicle sales. In the Alternative Fuel Vehicle Model, the results of the Fuel Economy Model have been incorporated, and the program flows have been modified to reflect that fact. In the Light Duty Vehicle Fleet Module, the sales of vehicles to fleets of various size are endogenously calculated in order to provide a more detailed estimate of the impacts of EPACT legislation on the sales of AFV`s to fleets. In the Highway Freight Model, the previous aggregate estimation has been replaced by a detailed Freight Truck Stock Model, where travel patterns, efficiencies, and energy intensities are estimated by industrial grouping. Several appendices are provided at the end of this document, containing data tables and supplementary descriptions of the model development process which are not integral to an understanding of the overall model structure.

  15. modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    modeling - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  16. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NASA Earth at Night Video EC, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Global, Modeling, News & Events, Solid-State Lighting, Videos NASA Earth at Night Video Have you ever wondered what the Earth looks like at night? NASA provides a clear, cloud-free view of the Earth at night using the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership Satellite. The satellite utilizes an instrument known as the Visible Infrared Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), which allows the satellite to capture images of a "remarkably detailed

  17. Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loth, E.; Tryggvason, G.; Tsuji, Y.; Elghobashi, S. E.; Crowe, Clayton T.; Berlemont, A.; Reeks, M.; Simonin, O.; Frank, Th; Onishi, Yasuo; Van Wachem, B.

    2005-09-01

    Slurry flows occur in many circumstances, including chemical manufacturing processes, pipeline transfer of coal, sand, and minerals; mud flows; and disposal of dredged materials. In this section we discuss slurry flow applications related to radioactive waste management. The Hanford tank waste solids and interstitial liquids will be mixed to form a slurry so it can be pumped out for retrieval and treatment. The waste is very complex chemically and physically. The ARIEL code is used to model the chemical interactions and fluid dynamics of the waste.

  18. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    diffuse interface methods in ALE-AMR code with application in modeling NDCX-II experiments Wangyi Liu 1 , John Barnard 2 , Alex Friedman 2 , Nathan Masters 2 , Aaron Fisher 2 , Alice Koniges 2 , David Eder 2 1 LBNL, USA, 2 LLNL, USA This work was part of the Petascale Initiative in Computational Science at NERSC, supported by the Director, Office of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. This work was performed

  19. Manager`s views of public involvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Branch, K.M.; Heerwagen, J.; Bradbury, J.

    1995-12-01

    Four issues commonly form the framework for debates about the acceptability of proposed projects or technologies--the substantive decision or technological choice; the treatment of the community by the proponent organization; the way the decision-making process has been structured and managed; and the status of institutional safeguards and protection. One of the clear messages of cultural theory is that differences in perspectives are a normal and inevitable part of society, and that attempts to resolve differences by persuasion are not likely to work. These findings are useful when considering the goals and possibilities of public involvement as a decision-making tool, and when designing or evaluating public involvement training programs for managers. The research reported here examines the viewpoints and concerns of managers and decision-makers about the four issues identified above, with particular emphasis on their perspectives and concerns about opening decision-making processes to the public and about managers` roles and responsibilities for structuring and managing open decision-making processes. Implications of these findings for public involvement training for managers is also discussed. The data presented in this paper were obtained from face-to-face interviews with managers and decision-makers with experience managing a variety of hazardous waste management decision-making processes. We conducted these interviews in the course of four separate research projects: needs assessments to support the design and development of a public involvement training program for managers; a study of community residents` and managers` perspectives on the chemical stockpile disposal program; an evaluation of the effectiveness of public involvement training for managers in the Department of Energy; and a study to develop indicators of the benefits and costs of public involvement.

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: About Sandia: Community Involvement:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Education Programs: Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Programs Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Programs Future scientists photo Our science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) programs engage students by linking science to the real world. We offer three unique programs for American Indian students, African American students, and Hispanic students. The programs get students involved in fun, hands-on science and engineering activities and provide an opportunity to

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: About Sandia: Community Involvement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community Involvement Strengthening the community where we live and work Photo of Sandians helping members of the community Giving generously to our neighbors Photo of child and Shoes for Kids program Helping where we are needed Photo of Habitat for Humanity program and Sandians Inspiring the next generation of scientists and engineers Sandia provides exceptional service in the national interest. We bring this same dedication and expertise to our local communities. Our employees and retirees

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: About Sandia: Community Involvement:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contribution Programs Community Involvement Contribution Programs Volunteer Programs Education Programs About Contribution Programs Shoes for Kids photo A tradition of employee giving Sandia National Laboratories employees and retirees are generous, contributing over $6.5 million a year through the United Way of Central New Mexico to non-profits in New Mexico, California, and the nation. Giving is a tradition at Sandia. In the 1960s, employees initiated the Shoes for Kids Program. Rather

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Community Involvement: Volunteer Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community Involvement Contribution Programs Volunteer Programs Education Programs About Volunteer Programs Helping where we are needed Habitat for Humanity Employees and retirees are passionate about volunteering. You'll find Sandians judging science fairs, coaching sports teams, leading scouting troops, sorting food, building houses, and serving on community boards. In support of individual volunteer efforts, Sandia provides a volunteer website to advertise current volunteer opportunities and

  4. EMERGENCY RESPONSE TO A TRANSPORTATION ACCIDENT INVOLVING RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Emer Emer Emer Emer Emergency Response to a T gency Response to a T gency Response to a T gency Response to a T gency Response to a Transportation ransportation ransportation ransportation ransportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER Viewing this video and completing the

  5. Liquid Fuels Market Model (LFMM) Unveiling LFMM

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Implementation of the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) in the Liquid Fuels Market Module (LFMM) of NEMS Michael H. Cole, PhD, PE michael.cole@eia.gov August 1, 2012 | Washington, DC LFMM / NEMS overview 2 M. Cole, EIA Advanced Biofuels Workshop August 1, 2012 | Washington, DC * LFMM is a mathematical representation of the U.S. liquid fuels market (motor gasoline, diesel, biofuels, etc.). EIA analysts use LFMM to project motor fuel prices and production approaches through 2040. * LFMM is a

  6. Apolipoprotein gene involved in lipid metabolism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rubin, Edward; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2007-07-03

    Methods and materials for studying the effects of a newly identified human gene, APOAV, and the corresponding mouse gene apoAV. The sequences of the genes are given, and transgenic animals which either contain the gene or have the endogenous gene knocked out are described. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the gene are described and characterized. It is demonstrated that certain SNPs are associated with diseases involving lipids and triglycerides and other metabolic diseases. These SNPs may be used alone or with SNPs from other genes to study individual risk factors. Methods for intervention in lipid diseases, including the screening of drugs to treat lipid-related or diabetic diseases are also disclosed.

  7. Genomic Aspects of Research Involving Polyploid Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Ye, Chuyu [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Almost all extant plant species have spontaneously doubled their genomes at least once in their evolutionary histories, resulting in polyploidy which provided a rich genomic resource for evolutionary processes. Moreover, superior polyploid clones have been created during the process of crop domestication. Polyploid plants generated by evolutionary processes and/or crop domestication have been the intentional or serendipitous focus of research dealing with the dynamics and consequences of genome evolution. One of the new trends in genomics research is to create synthetic polyploid plants which provide materials for studying the initial genomic changes/responses immediately after polyploid formation. Polyploid plants are also used in functional genomics research to study gene expression in a complex genomic background. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in genomics research involving ancient, young, and synthetic polyploid plants, with a focus on genome size evolution, genomics diversity, genomic rearrangement, genetic and epigenetic changes in duplicated genes, gene discovery, and comparative genomics. Implications on plant sciences including evolution, functional genomics, and plant breeding are presented. It is anticipated that polyploids will be a regular subject of genomics research in the foreseeable future as the rapid advances in DNA sequencing technology create unprecedented opportunities for discovering and monitoring genomic and transcriptomic changes in polyploid plants. The fast accumulation of knowledge on polyploid formation, maintenance, and divergence at whole-genome and subgenome levels will not only help plant biologists understand how plants have evolved and diversified, but also assist plant breeders in designing new strategies for crop improvement.

  8. Surface interactions involved in flashover with high density electronegative gases.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, Keith Conquest; Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Wallace, Zachariah Red; Lehr, Jane Marie

    2010-01-01

    This report examines the interactions involved with flashover along a surface in high density electronegative gases. The focus is on fast ionization processes rather than the later time ionic drift or thermalization of the discharge. A kinetic simulation of the gas and surface is used to examine electron multiplication and includes gas collision, excitation and ionization, and attachment processes, gas photoionization and surface photoemission processes, as well as surface attachment. These rates are then used in a 1.5D fluid ionization wave (streamer) model to study streamer propagation with and without the surface in air and in SF6. The 1.5D model therefore includes rates for all these processes. To get a better estimate for the behavior of the radius we have studied radial expansion of the streamer in air and in SF6. The focus of the modeling is on voltage and field level changes (with and without a surface) rather than secondary effects, such as, velocities or changes in discharge path. An experiment has been set up to carry out measurements of threshold voltages, streamer velocities, and other discharge characteristics. This setup includes both electrical and photographic diagnostics (streak and framing cameras). We have observed little change in critical field levels (where avalanche multiplication sets in) in the gas alone versus with the surface. Comparisons between model calculations and experimental measurements are in agreement with this. We have examined streamer sustaining fields (field which maintains ionization wave propagation) in the gas and on the surface. Agreement of the gas levels with available literature is good and agreement between experiment and calculation is good also. Model calculations do not indicate much difference between the gas alone versus the surface levels. Experiments have identified differences in velocity between streamers on the surface and in the gas alone (the surface values being larger).

  9. Model documentation natural gas transmission and distribution model (NGTDM) of the national energy modeling system. Volume II: Model developer`s report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-03

    To partially fulfill the requirements for {open_quotes}Model Acceptance{close_quotes} as stipulated in EIA Standard 91-01-01 (effective February 3, 1991), the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has conducted tests of the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) for the specific purpose of validating the forecasting model. This volume of the model documentation presents the results of {open_quotes}one-at-a-time{close_quotes} sensitivity tests conducted in support of this validation effort. The test results are presented in the following forms: (1) Tables of important model outputs for the years 2000 and 2010 are presented with respect to change in each input from the reference case; (2) Tables of percent changes from base case results for the years 2000 and 2010 are presented for important model outputs; (3) Tables of conditional sensitivities (percent change in output/percent change in input) for the years 2000 and 2010 are presented for important model outputs; (4) Finally, graphs presenting the percent change from base case results for each year of the forecast period are presented for selected key outputs. To conduct the sensitivity tests, two main assumptions are made in order to test the performance characteristics of the model itself and facilitate the understanding of the effects of the changes in the key input variables to the model on the selected key output variables: (1) responses to the amount demanded do not occur since there are no feedbacks of inputs from other NEMS models in the stand-alone NGTDM run. (2) All the export and import quantities from and to Canada and Mexico, and liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports and exports are held fixed (i.e., there are no changes in imports and exports between the reference case and the sensitivity cases) throughout the forecast period.

  10. Paducah WDA CERCLA Process & Public Involvement | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CERCLA Process & Public Involvement Paducah WDA CERCLA Process & Public Involvement The CERCLA process involves stakeholder education and input throughout the life of the project. (click graphic to enlarge) The CERCLA process involves stakeholder education and input throughout the life of the project. (click graphic to enlarge) DOE is committed to fostering meaningful community involvement in environmental remediation decision making at the site. Interactive communications enable the

  11. Multidomain Carbohydrate-binding Proteins Involved in Bacteroides...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Multidomain Carbohydrate-binding Proteins Involved in Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron Starch Metabolism Authors: Cameron, Elizabeth A. ; Maynard, Mallory A. ; Smith, ...

  12. System Advisor Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-03-01

    The System Advisor Model (SAM) is a performance and economic model designed to facilitate decision making for people involved in the renewable energy industry, ranging from project managers and engineers to incentive program designers, technology developers, and researchers.

  13. Joint Meeting on Hydrogen Delivery Modeling and Analysis, May...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of doughnuts?) - Rural? Interstate? - City clusters? - Look at the CTC, HyTrans and NEMS-H2 approaches Follow-up: All of these will be considered and one or more will be...

  14. Prototype indicators of value added through public involvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lach, D.; Hixson, P.; Ramonas, L.

    1995-12-01

    As more managers realize that public input in public sector decision making is a given in the current political and social climate, many are turning to public involvement as a way to manage input so that it is beneficial to their decisions and projects. Public involvement is starting to become a familiar way of doing business for many Federal agencies and its contractors. Yet, many, if not most agency and contractor managers are still unclear about the value and costs that public involvement adds to their projects. Proponents claim that public involvement increases the acceptability of project goals by increasing stakeholders` knowledge about and involvement in decisions of importance to them. In spite of these assertions avowing the benefits of public involvement, proponents have not generated methods that demonstrate or provide evidence of such value added through incorporating public involvement into projects. As these questions about the value and costs of public involvement efforts increase, there is a pressing need to document the value and costs of public involvement for the participants in these processes--the stakeholders--and to present this information to decision makers in ways that help them assess the value and costs of managing public input through a public involvement program.

  15. Public Involvement in the Environmental Assessment Process | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Involvement in the Environmental Assessment Process Public Involvement in the Environmental Assessment Process A DOE policy regarding the online publication and electronic notification of the availability of draft environmental assessments (EAs) for public comment. PDF icon Public Involvement in the Environmental Assessment Process More Documents & Publications Mini-Guidance Articles from Lessons Learned Quarterly Reports, Dec. 1994 to Sept. 2005 Recommendations for the

  16. Probative Investigation of the Thermal Stability of Wastes Involved...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Probative Investigation of the Thermal Stability of Wastes Involved in February 2014 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Drum Breach Event Probative Investigation of the...

  17. Draft Public Involvement Advice for Central Plateau Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    V0, 12914 Draft Public Involvement Advice for Central Plateau Cleanup Principles Issue managers: Pollet, Mattson, Vanni, Plahuta, Catrell Background The Tri-Party Agencies are...

  18. DOE Involvement in Consensus Negotiations for Energy Conservation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PDF icon DOE Involvement in Consensus Negotiations for Energy Conservation Standards More Documents & Publications 2015-03-26: Miscellaneous Refrigeration Products; Notice of ...

  19. Multidomain Carbohydrate-binding Proteins Involved in Bacteroides

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    thetaiotaomicron Starch Metabolism (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Multidomain Carbohydrate-binding Proteins Involved in Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron Starch Metabolism Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Multidomain Carbohydrate-binding Proteins Involved in Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron Starch Metabolism Authors: Cameron, Elizabeth A. ; Maynard, Mallory A. ; Smith, Christopher J. ; Smith, Thomas J. ; Koropatkin, Nicole M. ; Martens, Eric C. [1] ; Danforth) [2] + Show Author

  20. 10.0 COMMUNITY RELATIONS/PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0-1 10.0 COMMUNITY RELATIONS/PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT 10.1 INTRODUCTION This section describes, in general, the way in which the public will be involved with the implementation of this action plan. The CERCLA, as amended, requires that a community relations plan (CRP) be approved by the EPA prior to initiation of field work related to an RI/FS. The parties have agreed that the CRP is also the proper mechanism to address the public involvement process for all of the RCRA activity to be conducted

  1. Getting Involved in Manufacturing Day – College Educators Edition Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar will help address questions on why and how community colleges, universities, and technical schools can get involved with MFG DAY.  Led by MFG DAY Co-Producers, the webinar will also...

  2. Tri-Party Agreement Hanford Public Involvement Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Excerpts from the Comment and Response Document on the Tri-Party Agreement Hanford Public Involvement Plan The comments submitted by the Hanford Advisory Board (Advice #251) were divided by topic. The topics and associated comments are listed below. The agencies' response to each topic is provided in italicized text. Topic: Proposed Additions to the Plan Comment A: The Board advises that because the Plan is used by the TPA staff for public involvement efforts and is a guide for the public,

  3. Integrated Analysis of Protein Complexes and Regulatory Networks Involved

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in Anaerobic Energy Metabolism of Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Integrated Analysis of Protein Complexes and Regulatory Networks Involved in Anaerobic Energy Metabolism of Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Integrated Analysis of Protein Complexes and Regulatory Networks Involved in Anaerobic Energy Metabolism of Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Anaerobic Nitrate Reduction. Nitrate is an extensive co-contaminant

  4. Metaproteomics Identifies the Protein Machinery Involved in Metal and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Radionuclide Reduction in Subsurface Microbiomes and Elucidates Mechanisms and U(VI) Reduction Immobilization (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Technical Report: Metaproteomics Identifies the Protein Machinery Involved in Metal and Radionuclide Reduction in Subsurface Microbiomes and Elucidates Mechanisms and U(VI) Reduction Immobilization Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Metaproteomics Identifies the Protein Machinery Involved in Metal and

  5. Accurate Numerical Simulations Of Chemical Phenomena Involved in Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Production and Storage with MADNESS and MPQC: ALCF-2 Early Science Program Technical Report (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Accurate Numerical Simulations Of Chemical Phenomena Involved in Energy Production and Storage with MADNESS and MPQC: ALCF-2 Early Science Program Technical Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Accurate Numerical Simulations Of Chemical Phenomena Involved in Energy Production and Storage with MADNESS and MPQC: ALCF-2 Early Science

  6. Draft Public Involvement Advice for Central Plateau Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    V0, 12/9/14 Draft Public Involvement Advice for Central Plateau Cleanup Principles Issue managers: Pollet, Mattson, Vanni, Plahuta, Catrell Background The Tri-Party Agencies are developing principles that will guide the cleanup of Hanford's Central Plateau. The Hanford Advisory Board (HAB) believes that the broader public should be involved in the development of these principles. Hanford's Central Plateau is planned to be the final footprint of the Hanford Site. The Central Plateau contains

  7. The research performed during the last granting period involved trasnscriptomic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    research performed during the last granting period involved trasnscriptomic analysis of extracellular proteins expressed by wood-degrading fungi. Here we studied both the brown rot fungus Postia placenta and white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Our most recent efforts have been on the brown rot fungus. We have grown these fungi on their woody substrates and isolated the mRNA for 454 sequencing. We recognized that this approach could potentially lead to discovery of new enzymes involved

  8. Probative Investigation of the Thermal Stability of Wastes Involved in

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    February 2014 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Drum Breach Event | Department of Energy Probative Investigation of the Thermal Stability of Wastes Involved in February 2014 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Drum Breach Event Probative Investigation of the Thermal Stability of Wastes Involved in February 2014 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Drum Breach Event This document was used to determine facts and conditions during the Department of Energy Accident Investigation

  9. Get Involved with Home Energy Score | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Home Energy Score » Get Involved with Home Energy Score Get Involved with Home Energy Score The Department of Energy's (DOE) Home Energy Score helps homeowners understand the energy performance of their homes and how they compare to other homes nationwide. Energy professionals and organizations can use the Score to promote energy efficiency to homeowners and encourage investments in energy improvements. Information for Homeowners Information for Interested Organizations Information for

  10. DECONTAMINATION DRESSDOWN AT A TRANSPORTATION ACCIDENT INVOLVING RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Video User' s Guide DECONTAMINATION DRESSDOWN AT A TRANSPORTATION ACCIDENT INVOLVING RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL DISCLAIMER Viewing this video and completing the enclosed printed study material do not by themselves provide sufficient skills to safely engage in or perform duties related to emergency response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. Meeting that goal is beyond the scope of this video and requires either additional specific areas of competency or more hours of training

  11. EIA model documentation: Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. Projected production estimates of US crude oil and natural gas are based on supply functions generated endogenously within National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) by the OGSM. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and unconventional gas recovery (UGR) from tight gas formations, Devonian shale and coalbeds. Crude oil and natural gas projects are further disaggregated by geographic region. OGSM projects US domestic oil and gas supply for six Lower 48 onshore regions, three offshore regions, and Alaska. The general methodology relies on forecasted drilling expenditures and average drilling costs to determine exploratory and developmental drilling levels for each region and fuel type. These projected drilling levels translate into reserve additions, as well as a modification of the production capacity for each region. OGSM also represents foreign trade in natural gas, imports and exports by entry region.

  12. Community assessments: Road maps to successful public involvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forrest, C.J.

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents a framework for performing comprehensive community assessments to increase the effectiveness of public involvement efforts. The community assessment process involves systematic and critical examination of beliefs, attitudes, opinions and knowledge of the many groups in the community. A good community assessment gathers information on the concerns or issues directly related to an environmental project as well as other important community issues to ensure development of an effective public involvement program. The framework discusses types of people and organizations that should be included in the community assessment interview process. It also delineates steps that persons charged with performing assessments can take to ensure that the views of all potential stakeholders are included--a necessary consideration in communities that are ethnically, racially, or economically diverse. Lastly, the framework discusses types of written materials that can be analyzed for additional insight into communities. For example, it discusses methods for reviewing past issues of the local newspaper to provide both validation of the information gathered during interviews and an understanding of the ways that community members give and receive information and respond to conflict or perceived threats. This framework is designed to show environmental professionals who are responsible for public involvement how to perform an initial community assessment. It provides illustrations of instances in which information vital to a successful public involvement effort has been uncovered through a careful assessment of the community. Both the U.S. EPA and the public have made clear their intentions to require increased public involvement. Many of these efforts will succeed or fail based on how well those charged with the public involvement component of environmental projects identify community issues and design communications programs that successfully reach all stakeholders.

  13. Final report on the public involvement process phase 1, Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, L.; Shanteau, C.

    1992-12-01

    This report summarizes the pubic involvement component of Phase 1 of the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility (NM) Feasibility Study in San Juan County, Utah. Part of this summary includes background information on the federal effort to locate a voluntary site for temporary storage of nuclear waste, how San Juan County came to be involved, and a profile of the county. The heart of the report, however, summarizes the activities within the public involvement process, and the issues raised in those various forums. The authors have made every effort to reflect accurately and thoroughly all the concerns and suggestions expressed to us during the five month process. We hope that this report itself is a successful model of partnership with the citizens of the county -- the same kind of partnership the county is seeking to develop with its constituents. Finally, this report offers some suggestions to both county officials and residents alike. These suggestions concern how decision-making about the county's future can be done by a partnership of informed citizens and listening decision-makers. In the Appendix are materials relating to the public involvement process in San Juan County.

  14. Final report on the public involvement process phase 1, Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, L.; Shanteau, C.

    1992-12-01

    This report summarizes the pubic involvement component of Phase 1 of the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility (NM) Feasibility Study in San Juan County, Utah. Part of this summary includes background information on the federal effort to locate a voluntary site for temporary storage of nuclear waste, how San Juan County came to be involved, and a profile of the county. The heart of the report, however, summarizes the activities within the public involvement process, and the issues raised in those various forums. The authors have made every effort to reflect accurately and thoroughly all the concerns and suggestions expressed to us during the five month process. We hope that this report itself is a successful model of partnership with the citizens of the county -- the same kind of partnership the county is seeking to develop with its constituents. Finally, this report offers some suggestions to both county officials and residents alike. These suggestions concern how decision-making about the county`s future can be done by a partnership of informed citizens and listening decision-makers. In the Appendix are materials relating to the public involvement process in San Juan County.

  15. Projected Benefits of Federal Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Programs - FY 2004 – FY2020

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2004-04-01

    This report features results and data based on the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) model, as well as EERE's benefits and Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) guidance.

  16. OSPREY Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veronica J. Rutledge

    2013-01-01

    The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior and feedback loops. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes will provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. The specific fuel cycle separation process discussed in this report is the off-gas treatment system. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed within Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Off-gas Separation and REcoverY (OSPREY) models the adsorption of off-gas constituents for dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions. Inputs to the model include gas, sorbent, and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which breakthrough data is obtained. The breakthrough data can be used to determine bed capacity, which in turn can be used to size columns. It also outputs temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. Experimental data and parameters were input into the adsorption model to develop models specific for krypton adsorption. The same can be done for iodine, xenon, and tritium. The model will be validated with experimental breakthrough curves. Customers will be given access to OSPREY to used and evaluate the model.

  17. GC GUIDANCE ON BARTER TRANSACTIONS INVOLVING DOE-OWNED URANIUM

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    GC GUIDANCE ON BARTER TRANSACTIONS INVOLVING DOE-OWNED URANIUM The Department of Energy has on a variety of occasions engaged in transactions under which it bartered uranium to which it has title for goods or services . This guidance memorializes the results of analyses previously directed to individual proposed transactions . For the reasons discussed below, we conclude that the Atomic Energy Act of 1954' , as amended, (AEA), authorizes such barter transactions. Background : DOE Barter

  18. Antitrust aspects of involvement by utilities in residential solar energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurst, T.R.

    1983-01-01

    A utility that merely engages in the sale of solar units produced by independent manufacturers on a nonexclusive basis appears to run little risk of violating federal antitrust laws, but virtually every other unregulated activity would involve enough significant exposure to antitrust liability to preclude a prudent utility from engaging in them on any basis other than one where the state-action exemption clearly shields the utility. The case cited in this review indicates that municipal utilities must be equally cautious when engaging in pro-solar activities that may have an anticompetitive impact on various parties who could become plaintiffs in a private antitrust action. 47 references.

  19. Central Plateau Principles Public Involvement Advice DETAILED BACKGROUND

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    v0, 12/9/14 Central Plateau Principles Public Involvement Advice DETAILED BACKGROUND Cleanup of Hanford's Central Plateau is expected to take another four decades or longer, and cost tens of billions of dollars. The Central Plateau includes the 200 East and 200 West Areas with all of Hanford's High-Level Nuclear Waste Tank Farms, processing plants, sites where over a million gallons of High-Level Nuclear Waste has leaked from Single Shell Tanks (SSTs), and billions of gallons of waste was

  20. Drum Involved in Idaho Incident Not Shippable to WIPP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contacts: Dennis Hurtt U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office (505) 234-7327 Susan Scott Washington TRU Solutions LLC (505) 234-7204 (800) 493-9768 http://www.wipp.carlsbad.nm.us U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office Waste Isolation Pilot Plant P.O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 DOENews For Immediate Release Drum Involved in Idaho Incident Not Shippable to WIPP CARLSBAD, N.M., August 14, 2003, 4:05 p.m. (MDT) - As communicated by the U.S. Department of Energy, and

  1. Report on International Collaboration Involving the FE Heater and HG-A Tests at Mont Terri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houseworth, Jim; Rutqvist, Jonny; Asahina, Daisuke; Chen, Fei; Vilarrasa, Victor; Liu, Hui-Hai; Birkholzer, Jens

    2013-11-06

    Nuclear waste programs outside of the US have focused on different host rock types for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Several countries, including France, Switzerland, Belgium, and Japan are exploring the possibility of waste disposal in shale and other clay-rich rock that fall within the general classification of argillaceous rock. This rock type is also of interest for the US program because the US has extensive sedimentary basins containing large deposits of argillaceous rock. LBNL, as part of the DOE-NE Used Fuel Disposition Campaign, is collaborating on some of the underground research laboratory (URL) activities at the Mont Terri URL near Saint-Ursanne, Switzerland. The Mont Terri project, which began in 1995, has developed a URL at a depth of about 300 m in a stiff clay formation called the Opalinus Clay. Our current collaboration efforts include two test modeling activities for the FE heater test and the HG-A leak-off test. This report documents results concerning our current modeling of these field tests. The overall objectives of these activities include an improved understanding of and advanced relevant modeling capabilities for EDZ evolution in clay repositories and the associated coupled processes, and to develop a technical basis for the maximum allowable temperature for a clay repository. The R&D activities documented in this report are part of the work package of natural system evaluation and tool development that directly supports the following Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) objectives: ? Develop a fundamental understanding of disposal-system performance in a range of environments for potential wastes that could arise from future nuclear-fuel-cycle alternatives through theory, simulation, testing, and experimentation. ? Develop a computational modeling capability for the performance of storage and disposal options for a range of fuel-cycle alternatives, evolving from generic models to more robust models of performance assessment. For the purpose of validating modeling capabilities for thermal-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes, we developed a suite of simulation models for the planned full-scale FE Experiment to be conducted in the Mont Terri URL, including a full three-dimensional model that will be used for direct comparison to experimental data once available. We performed for the first time a THM analysis involving the Barcelona Basic Model (BBM) in a full three-dimensional field setting for modeling the geomechanical behavior of the buffer material and its interaction with the argillaceous host rock. We have simulated a well defined benchmark that will be used for codeto- code verification against modeling results from other international modeling teams. The analysis highlights the complex coupled geomechanical behavior in the buffer and its interaction with the surrounding rock and the importance of a well characterized buffer material in terms of THM properties. A new geomechanical fracture-damage model, TOUGH-RBSN, was applied to investigate damage behavior in the ongoing HG-A test at Mont Terri URL. Two model modifications have been implemented so that the Rigid-Body-Spring-Network (RBSN) model can be used for analysis of fracturing around the HG-A microtunnel. These modifications are (1) a methodology to compute fracture generation under compressive stress conditions and (2) a method to represent anisotropic elastic and strength properties. The method for computing fracture generation under compressive load produces results that roughly follow trends expected for homogeneous and layered systems. Anisotropic properties for the bulk rock were represented in the RBSN model using layered heterogeneity and gave bulk material responses in line with expectations. These model improvements were implemented for an initial model of fracture damage at the HG-A test. While the HG-A test model results show some similarities with the test observations, differences between the model results and observations remain.

  2. Model Wind Ordinance for Local Governments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2006, Pennsylvania developed a model local ordinance for wind energy facilities through a collaborative effort involving several state departments and stakeholder groups. The purpose of the...

  3. Experts Meeting: Behavioral Economics as Applied to Energy Demand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... from the Existing Economic Methodology used in the NEMS Demand Models - ... the UK?" Science and Technology Policy Research Unit (SPRU), Freeman Centre, University ...

  4. Market power and foreign involvement by US multinationals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirschey, M.

    1982-05-01

    This study considers the relationship between market power and multinational involvement through use of a market-valuation approach. Estimation results for a sample of large US multinationals reveal superior valuation effects due to returns from foreign as opposed to domestic operations. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that returns from the US market tend to be less secure, and therefore less valued, than are returns from foreign markets due to both real (market size, entry barriers, etc.) and institutional (antitrust policies, etc.) differences in competitive environments. Such findings are also consistent with previous suggestions that firms develop markets abroad in order to exploit economic-rent opportunities. These findings remain tentative, however, and await verification in future studies of data from both the United States and abroad. 13 references, 1 table.

  5. Modeling U.S. Energy Use Changes with Global Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, Stanton W; Erickson III, David J; Hernandez Figueroa, Jose L

    2006-09-01

    Using a general circulation model of Earth climate (PCM-IBIS) to drive an energy use model (DD-NEMS), we calculated the energy use changes for each year from 2003-2025 for the nine U.S. Census regions. We used five scenarios: 1) a reference with no change in temperatures from the 1970-2003 average, 2) a gradual 1 F rise in temperature by 2025, 3) a gradual 3 F rise by 2025, 4) a climate simulation with low temperature response to CO2 doubling in the atmosphere, and 5) a climate simulation with a more extreme response. The low-?T scenario had a cumulative reduction in energy of 2.1 Quads but an increase in cost of $14.8 billion. The northern states had reductions in cost over the entire period, but most other regions had increases in costs because increases in cooling costs outweighed reductions in heating and other energy uses. Higher temperature sensitivity resulted in increased warming, especially in the winter months. Because heating needs decreased, total energy requirements declined by a cumulative 4.2 Quads. However, total cost still increased $6.1 billion and carbon emissions still rose as coal-based electricity for cooling needs grew.

  6. ABSTRACT: The Community Environmental Monitoring Program: Reducing Public Perception of Risk Through Stakeholder Involvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Hartwell

    2007-02-28

    Between 1951 and 1992, 928 nuclear tests were conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), including 100 atmospheric and 828 underground tests. Initial public reaction to the tests was largely supportive, but by the late 1950s this began to change, largely as a result of fear of the potential for adverse health effects to be caused by exposure to ionizing radiation resulting from the tests. The nuclear power plant accident at Three Mile Island in 1979 served to heighten these fears, as well as foster a general distrust of the federal agencies involved and low public confidence in monitoring results. Modeled after a similar program that involved the public in monitoring activities around the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant, the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) has promoted stakeholder involvement, awareness, and understanding of radiological surveillance in communities surrounding the NTS since 1981. It involves stakeholders in the operation, data collection, and dissemination of information obtained from a network of 29 stations across a wide area of Nevada, Utah, and California. It is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) and administered by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education. Since assuming administration of the program in 2000, DRI has accomplished significant enhancements to the network's data collection and transmission capabilities. A robust datalogging and communications system allows for the near real-time transmission of data to a platform maintained by DRI's Western Regional Climate Center, where the data are uploaded and displayed on a publicly accessible web site (http://cemp.dri.edu/). Additionally, the CEMP can serve as part of an emergency response network in the event of an unplanned radiological release from the NTS, and also provides an excellent platform for testing new environmental sensor technologies. Finally, the CEMP provides training workshops for involved stakeholders, and educational programs, which help to alleviate public perception of risk of health effects from past activities conducted at the NTS.

  7. TEPP Model Needs Assessment Document

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this Model Needs Assessment is to assist state, tribal, or local of?cials in determining emergency responder readiness for response to a transportation accident  involving...

  8. Simple ocean carbon cycle models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldeira, K.; Hoffert, M.I.; Siegenthaler, U.

    1994-02-01

    Simple ocean carbon cycle models can be used to calculate the rate at which the oceans are likely to absorb CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere. For problems involving steady-state ocean circulation, well calibrated ocean models produce results that are very similar to results obtained using general circulation models. Hence, simple ocean carbon cycle models may be appropriate for use in studies in which the time or expense of running large scale general circulation models would be prohibitive. Simple ocean models have the advantage of being based on a small number of explicit assumptions. The simplicity of these ocean models facilitates the understanding of model results.

  9. Representation of analysis results involving aleatory and epistemic uncertainty.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Jay Dean; Helton, Jon Craig; Oberkampf, William Louis; Sallaberry, Cedric J.

    2008-08-01

    Procedures are described for the representation of results in analyses that involve both aleatory uncertainty and epistemic uncertainty, with aleatory uncertainty deriving from an inherent randomness in the behavior of the system under study and epistemic uncertainty deriving from a lack of knowledge about the appropriate values to use for quantities that are assumed to have fixed but poorly known values in the context of a specific study. Aleatory uncertainty is usually represented with probability and leads to cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) or complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) for analysis results of interest. Several mathematical structures are available for the representation of epistemic uncertainty, including interval analysis, possibility theory, evidence theory and probability theory. In the presence of epistemic uncertainty, there is not a single CDF or CCDF for a given analysis result. Rather, there is a family of CDFs and a corresponding family of CCDFs that derive from epistemic uncertainty and have an uncertainty structure that derives from the particular uncertainty structure (i.e., interval analysis, possibility theory, evidence theory, probability theory) used to represent epistemic uncertainty. Graphical formats for the representation of epistemic uncertainty in families of CDFs and CCDFs are investigated and presented for the indicated characterizations of epistemic uncertainty.

  10. Personnel involved in nuclear standards development: 1980 directory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, S.J.

    1980-03-01

    The development of nuclear standards is an active and necessary endeavor that is concerned with the safe, orderly, and economic development of nuclear potential. There are almost 4100 people from the teachnical community who are presently involved either in writing nuclear standards, including codes, or in the management and processing roles necessary for their approval and promulgation. This document identifies the current participation of each individual as member, chairman, cochairman (vice-chairman), or secretary of about 700 standards development committees and groups. The standards committees and groups are identified with the organizations that are responsible for the preparation, review, and maintenance of the standards and that provide support through supervisory committees and headquarters staff. This directory includes four major sections: personnel, employers, committees, and a Key-Word-in-Context (KWIC) Index of committee titles. It can also be used to identify the participation of employers as well as to recognize the contributions of individuals to the often interdisciplinary activity of standards development.

  11. Classroom simulation of public involvement in H.L.W. issues featuring STS concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1996-12-01

    This paper reports on a classroom experiment, now in its third year, conducted by the author for students involvement in High-Level Waste disposal. The project involved designing a methodology for HLW management in the United States.

  12. Discovery of a new ATP-binding motif involved in peptidic azoline...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Discovery of a new ATP-binding motif involved in peptidic azoline biosynthesis Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Discovery of a new ATP-binding motif involved in peptidic ...

  13. Systems Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Model Nambe Pueblo Water Budget Model Hydrogen Futures Simulations Model Barton Springs ... & Analysis Project Algae Biofuels Techno-Economic Modeling and Analysis Project Climate ...

  14. Customer Involvement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Projects Expand Projects Skip navigation links Ancillary and Control Area Services (ACS) Practices Forum Meetings Customer Comments Attachment K 2015 Planning Cycle 2014...

  15. Getting Involved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    received help navigating the draft EIS and asked questions about the project, the EIS process, documentation and how to submit comments on the document. There were no formal...

  16. Involvement & Outreach

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volunteers - Sign Up About Science Bowl Curriculum and Activities How to Build a Motor The Great Marble Drop How to Build a Turbine How to Build a Tower Classroom...

  17. Molecular genetic analysis of activation-tagged transcription factors thought to be involved in photomorphogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neff, Michael M.

    2011-06-23

    This is a final report for Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER15927 entitled “Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-Tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis”. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob1-D mutant, we hypothesized that OBP3 is a transcription factor involved in both phytochrome and cryptochrome-mediated signal transduction. In addition, we hypothesized that OBP3 is involved in auxin signaling and root development. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob2-D mutant, we also hypothesized that a related gene, LEP, is involved in hormone signaling and seedling development.

  18. 01-12-1998 - Bench Top FIre Involving Use of Alcohol and Burner...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1998 - Bench Top FIre Involving Use of Alcohol and Burner Document Number: NA Effective Date: 011998 File (public): PDF icon 01-12-1998...

  19. Involvement of the [beta]3-[alpha]3 Loop of the Proline Dehydrogenase...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Involvement of the beta3-alpha3 Loop of the Proline Dehydrogenase Domain in Allosteric Regulation of Membrane Association of Proline Utilization A Citation Details In-Document ...

  20. Public involvement in the regulatory activities regarding nuclear fuel cycle facilities: A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Austin, D.E.

    1995-12-01

    This paper reviews the involvement of a community-based organization in the activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regarding a uranium conversion facility that operated near Gore, Oklahoma from 1970 until 1992. Effective participation requires access to decision making. Access is a complex phenomenon that includes: (1) opportunity, both procedural and physical, (2) a common language, and (3) time and resources. The paper describes how both the community organization and the NRC responded to these requirements for access, the strategies that were most effective in securing meaningful public involvement in the decision making, and the impacts of that involvement on the organization.

  1. Programming models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Task-based models Task-based models and abstractions (such as offered by CHARM++, Legion and HPX, for example) offer many attractive features for mapping computations onto...

  2. 01-12-1998 - Bench Top FIre Involving Use of Alcohol and Burner | The Ames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory 1998 - Bench Top FIre Involving Use of Alcohol and Burner Document Number: NA Effective Date: 01/1998 File (public): PDF icon 01-12-1998

  3. Public Understanding of Cleanup Levels Discussion Public Involvement Committee Meeting - Hanford Advisory Board

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Discussion Public Involvement Committee Meeting - Hanford Advisory Board Wednesday, October 31, 2012 - Red Lion Hanford House, Richland Page 1 of 4 Cleanup Levels One of the reasons we want public involvement on cleanup decisions is to gather input about what kind of cleanup end-state the public wants, how clean is clean, or put another way, how dirty is acceptable. Cleanup decisions are complicated. Cleanup levels necessary to be protective dictate which cleanup actions are viable to consider.

  4. Involvement of the [beta]3-[alpha]3 Loop of the Proline Dehydrogenase

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Domain in Allosteric Regulation of Membrane Association of Proline Utilization A (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Involvement of the [beta]3-[alpha]3 Loop of the Proline Dehydrogenase Domain in Allosteric Regulation of Membrane Association of Proline Utilization A Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Involvement of the [beta]3-[alpha]3 Loop of the Proline Dehydrogenase Domain in Allosteric Regulation of Membrane Association of Proline Utilization A Authors: Zhu, Weidong ; Haile,

  5. Discovery of a new ATP-binding motif involved in peptidic azoline

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    biosynthesis (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Discovery of a new ATP-binding motif involved in peptidic azoline biosynthesis Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Discovery of a new ATP-binding motif involved in peptidic azoline biosynthesis Authors: Dunbar, Kyle L. ; Chekan, Jonathan R. ; Cox, Courtney L. ; Burkhart, Brandon J. ; Nair, Satish K. ; Mitchell , Douglas A. [1] + Show Author Affiliations (UIUC) Publication Date: 2014-11-20 OSTI Identifier: 1163365 Resource Type: Journal

  6. Structures of the PelD Cyclic Diguanylate Effector Involved in Pellicle

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Structures of the PelD Cyclic Diguanylate Effector Involved in Pellicle Formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structures of the PelD Cyclic Diguanylate Effector Involved in Pellicle Formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Authors: Li, Zhi ; Chen, Jui-Hui ; Hao, Yue ; Nair, Satish K. [1] + Show Author Affiliations UIUC

  7. SO2907, A Putative TonB-dependent Receptor, Is Involved in Dissimilatory

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Iron Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis Strain MR-1 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: SO2907, A Putative TonB-dependent Receptor, Is Involved in Dissimilatory Iron Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis Strain MR-1 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: SO2907, A Putative TonB-dependent Receptor, Is Involved in Dissimilatory Iron Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis Strain MR-1 Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 utilizes soluble and insoluble ferric ions as terminal electron

  8. Conflict-of-Interest/Non-Disclosure Certificate For Reviewers Involved in

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the Selection of Subcontractors for NEUP Research and Development Funds | Department of Energy Conflict-of-Interest/Non-Disclosure Certificate For Reviewers Involved in the Selection of Subcontractors for NEUP Research and Development Funds Conflict-of-Interest/Non-Disclosure Certificate For Reviewers Involved in the Selection of Subcontractors for NEUP Research and Development Funds The Department of Energy has a policy that individuals with a conflict of interest cannot participate in the

  9. De novo transcriptome sequencing in Bixa orellana to identify genes involved in methylerythritol phosphate, carotenoid and bixin biosynthesis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cárdenas-Conejo, Yair; Carballo-Uicab, Víctor; Lieberman, Meric; Aguilar-Espinosa, Margarita; Comai, Luca; Rivera-Madrid, Renata

    2015-10-28

    Bixin or annatto is a commercially important natural orange-red pigment derived from lycopene that is produced and stored in seeds of Bixa orellana L. An enzymatic pathway for bixin biosynthesis was inferred from homology of putative proteins encoded by differentially expressed seed cDNAs. Some activities were later validated in a heterologous system. Nevertheless, much of the pathway remains to be clarified. For example, it is essential to identify the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) and carotenoid pathways genes. In order to investigate the MEP, carotenoid, and bixin pathways genes, total RNA from young leaves and two different developmental stages of seeds frommore » B. orellana were used for the construction of indexed mRNA libraries, sequenced on the Illumina HiSeq 2500 platform and assembled de novo using Velvet, CLC Genomics Workbench and CAP3 software. A total of 52,549 contigs were obtained with average length of 1,924 bp. Two phylogenetic analyses of inferred proteins, in one case encoded by thirteen general, single-copy cDNAs, in the other from carotenoid and MEP cDNAs, indicated that B. orellana is closely related to sister Malvales species cacao and cotton. Using homology, we identified 7 and 14 core gene products from the MEP and carotenoid pathways, respectively. Surprisingly, previously defined bixin pathway cDNAs were not present in our transcriptome. Here we propose a new set of gene products involved in bixin pathway. In conclusion, the identification and qRT-PCR quantification of cDNAs involved in annatto production suggest a hypothetical model for bixin biosynthesis that involve coordinated activation of some MEP, carotenoid and bixin pathway genes. These findings provide a better understanding of the mechanisms regulating these pathways and will facilitate the genetic improvement of B. orellana.« less

  10. Lifecycle Model

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-05-21

    This chapter describes the lifecycle model used for the Departmental software engineering methodology.

  11. NEAMS FPL M2 Milestone Report: Development of a UO? Grain Size Model using Multicale Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael R Tonks; Yongfeng Zhang; Xianming Bai

    2014-06-01

    This report summarizes development work funded by the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling Simulation program's Fuels Product Line (FPL) to develop a mechanistic model for the average grain size in UO? fuel. The model is developed using a multiscale modeling and simulation approach involving atomistic simulations, as well as mesoscale simulations using INL's MARMOT code.

  12. Simple Modular LED Cost Model | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tools » Simple Modular LED Cost Model Simple Modular LED Cost Model The LED Cost Model, developed by the DOE Cost Modeling Working Group, provides a simplified method for analyzing the manufacturing costs of an LED package. The model focuses on the major cost elements and includes preliminary raw data and manufacturing process flow, which provide a starting point and can be customized by the user to model different processes, materials, and equipment. The tool enables those involved in the

  13. Proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2: Public Involvement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1994-01-01

    In regard to the proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project, the goal of the Bonneville Power Administration`s (BPA) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) public involvement process is to determine the issues to be examined and pertinent analyses to be conducted and to solicit comments on the content and quality of information presented in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS). Comments and questions are solicited from the public and government agencies during the scoping process and during the comment period and public hearing on the DEIS, to find out what is of most concern to them. The end product of the public involvement process is the Comment Report which follows in part of this volume on Public Involvement.

  14. Getting the lead out: Citizen involvement in the Williamsburg Bridge lead paint removal project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forker, T.R.

    1997-08-01

    This paper examines the process and results of citizen involvement in developing new environmental control and compliance procedures used by the New York City Department of Transportation (NYC DOT) for lead paint removal on the Williamsburg Bridge and other structures. As a case study of the effects of public involvement in environmental decision-making, the study identifies and discusses the factors that produced failures or successes in satisfying the citizen`s concerns about health risks and the effectiveness of the selected pollution control technology.

  15. Differing Professional Opinions Manual for Technical Issues Involving Environment, Safety, and Health

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-11-16

    This Manual establishes a differing professional opinion (DPO) policy to a Department of Energy (DOE) Differing Professional Opinion (DPO) Process to encourage and facilitate dialogue and resolution on DPOs from employees for technical issues involving environment, safety, and health. Does not cancel other directives. Canceled by DOE O 442.2.

  16. The Impact of Extent and Location of Mediastinal Lymph Node Involvement on Survival in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Definitive Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandes, Annemarie T.; Mitra, Nandita; Xanthopoulos, Eric; Evans, Tracey; Stevenson, James; Langer, Corey; Kucharczuk, John C.; Lin, Lilie; Rengan, Ramesh

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Several surgical series have identified subcarinal, contralateral, and multilevel nodal involvement as predictors of poor overall survival in patients with Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with definitive resection. This retrospective study evaluates the impact of extent and location of mediastinal lymph node (LN) involvement on survival in patients with Stage III NSCLC treated with definitive radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 106 consecutive patients with T1-4 N2-3 Stage III NSCLC treated with definitive radiotherapy at University of Pennsylvania between January 2003 and February 2009. For this analysis, mediastinal LN stations were divided into four mutually exclusive groups: supraclavicular, ipsilateral mediastinum, contralateral mediastinum, and subcarinal. Patients' conditions were then analyzed according to the extent of involvement and location of mediastinal LN stations. Results: The majority (88%) of patients received sequential or concurrent chemotherapy. The median follow-up time for survivors was 32.6 months. By multivariable Cox modeling, chemotherapy use (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.21 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.07-0.63]) was associated with improved overall survival. Increasing primary tumor [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose avidity (HR: 1.11 [CI: 1.06-1.19]), and subcarinal involvement (HR: 2.29 [CI: 1.11-4.73]) were significant negative predictors of overall survival. On univariate analysis, contralateral nodal involvement (HR: 0.70 [CI: 0.33-1.47]), supraclavicular nodal involvement (HR: 0.78 [CI: 0.38-1.67]), multilevel nodal involvement (HR: 0.97 [CI: 0.58-1.61]), and tumor size (HR: 1.04 [CI: 0.94-1.14]) did not predict for overall survival. Patients with subcarinal involvement also had lower rates of 2-year nodal control (51.2% vs. 74.9%, p = 0.047) and 2-year distant control (28.4% vs. 61.2%, p = 0.043). Conclusions: These data suggest that the factors that determine oncologic outcome in Stage III NSCLC patients treated with definitive radiotherapy are distinct from those observed in patients who undergo surgical resection. The ultimate efficacy of radiation in locally advanced NSCLC is dependent on the intrinsic biology of the tumor.

  17. Ventilation Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. Chipman

    2002-10-05

    The purpose of the Ventilation Model is to simulate the heat transfer processes in and around waste emplacement drifts during periods of forced ventilation. The model evaluates the effects of emplacement drift ventilation on the thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts and surrounding rock mass, and calculates the heat removal by ventilation as a measure of the viability of ventilation to delay the onset of peak repository temperature and reduce its magnitude. The heat removal by ventilation is temporally and spatially dependent, and is expressed as the fraction of heat carried away by the ventilation air compared to the fraction of heat produced by radionuclide decay. One minus the heat removal is called the wall heat fraction, or the remaining amount of heat that is transferred via conduction to the surrounding rock mass. Downstream models, such as the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' (BSC 2001), use the wall heat fractions as outputted from the Ventilation Model to initialize their post-closure analyses. The Ventilation Model report was initially developed to analyze the effects of preclosure continuous ventilation in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) emplacement drifts, and to provide heat removal data to support EBS design. Revision 00 of the Ventilation Model included documentation of the modeling results from the ANSYS-based heat transfer model. The purposes of Revision 01 of the Ventilation Model are: (1) To validate the conceptual model for preclosure ventilation of emplacement drifts and verify its numerical application in accordance with new procedural requirements as outlined in AP-SIII-10Q, Models (Section 7.0). (2) To satisfy technical issues posed in KTI agreement RDTME 3.14 (Reamer and Williams 2001a). Specifically to demonstrate, with respect to the ANSYS ventilation model, the adequacy of the discretization (Section 6.2.3.1), and the downstream applicability of the model results (i.e. wall heat fractions) to initialize post-closure thermal models (Section 6.6). (3) To satisfy the remainder of KTI agreement TEF 2.07 (Reamer and Williams 2001b). Specifically to provide the results of post-test ANSYS modeling of the Atlas Facility forced convection tests (Section 7.1.2). This portion of the model report also serves as a validation exercise per AP-SIII.10Q, Models, for the ANSYS ventilation model. (4) To further satisfy KTI agreements RDTME 3.01 and 3.14 (Reamer and Williams 2001a) by providing the source documentation referred to in the KTI Letter Report, ''Effect of Forced Ventilation on Thermal-Hydrologic Conditions in the Engineered Barrier System and Near Field Environment'' (Williams 2002). Specifically to provide the results of the MULTIFLUX model which simulates the coupled processes of heat and mass transfer in and around waste emplacement drifts during periods of forced ventilation. This portion of the model report is presented as an Alternative Conceptual Model with a numerical application, and also provides corroborative results used for model validation purposes (Section 6.3 and 6.4).

  18. The people problems of NEPA: Social impact assessment and the role of public involvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carnes, S.A.

    1989-12-31

    This Chapter of the book `` The Scientific Challenges of NEPA`` discusses the people problems of NEPA and social impact assessment and the role of public involvement in NEPA. When Congress passed the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) in 1969, there was little guidance on the preparation of environmental impact statements (EIS) and the role of the public in the NEPA process. Excepting the statutory language of NEPA, which referred to impacts on the human environment, nowhere was this more evident than with respect to people. Questions such as what impacts on people should be assessed, how impacts on people should be assessed, and how people, including but not limited to those persons potentially impacted, should be involved in the assessment itself as well as NEPA`s associated administrative processes, were simply not addressed.

  19. The value of adding regional to local stakeholder involvement in evaluating the acceptability of innovative technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, T.; McCabe, G.; Niesen, K.; Patricia, S.

    1995-12-01

    Technology is urgently needed to clean up contamination by volatile organic compounds at United States Department of Energy (DOE) and industrial sites throughout the country. In many cases, however, existing technology is too slow, inefficient, or expensive. The record of technology development is similarly disappointing. Remediation technologies developed at great expense and evaluated piecemeal over long periods have not been deployed because, in the end, the public judged them ineffective or unacceptable. The need for remediation is too great and resources too limited to continue with ineffective technology evaluation. Early and continuing stakeholder involvement is essential to developing successful, deployable technologies. In order to make good decisions about which technologies to deploy, remedial project managers need to know stakeholders` requirements for the performance of proposed technologies. Expanding stakeholder involvement regionally identifies the concerns of a broad range of stakeholders at a arid DOE sites throughout the West - issues that must be taken into account if technologies are to be accepted for wide deployment.

  20. Methodology for the Assessment of the Macroeconomic Impacts of Stricter CAFE Standards - Addendum

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This assessment of the economic impacts of Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFÉ) standards marks the first time the Energy Information Administration has used the new direct linkage of the DRI-WEFA Macroeconomic Model to the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) in a policy setting. This methodology assures an internally consistent solution between the energy market concepts forecast by NEMS and the aggregate economy as forecast by the DRI-WEFA Macroeconomic Model of the U.S. Economy.

  1. Tri-Party Agreement Agencies - Public involvement calendar - fiscal year 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    [TRI-PARTY AGREEMENT AGENCIES - PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT CALENDAR - FISCAL YEAR 2015] - SEPTEMBER 2015 EVENTS IN PROGRESS/COMING SOON September 2015 October 2015 November 2015 Tri-Party Agreement milestone change package for M-91 (TRU waste storage, retrieval, and repackaging) July 6 - August 21 September 25 Extended Public meeting August 11, 5:30 pm Richland Public Library Waste Treatment Plant Risk Assessment Work Plan Revision July 20 - September 4 September 25 Extended Closure Plan for FS-1

  2. Temperature of aircraft cargo flame exposure during accidents involving fuel spills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansfield, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes an evaluation of flame exposure temperatures of weapons contained in alert (parked) bombers due to accidents that involve aircraft fuel fires. The evaluation includes two types of accident, collisions into an alert aircraft by an aircraft that is on landing or take-off, and engine start accidents. Both the B-1B and B-52 alert aircraft are included in the evaluation.

  3. LANL gets young women involved in math and science at 31st Expanding Your

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Horizons Conference April 6 31st Expanding Your Horizons Conference LANL gets young women involved in math and science at 31st Expanding Your Horizons Conference April 6 The young women will participate in hands-on activities in such fields as astronomy, robotics, forensics, chemistry, and earth science. March 4, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering

  4. The Department of Energy (DOE) is actively involved in leading the

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (DOE) is actively involved in leading the development of advanced applications and tools to more effectively operate the electricity delivery system by enabling advanced analysis, visualization, monitoring and alarming, and decision support capabilities for grid operators. These applications use-and greatly increase the value of-data coming from high-resolution electrical measuring devices known as phasor measurement units (PMUs), whose deployment is being facilitated by the North American

  5. Quality control procedures for dynamic treatment delivery techniques involving couch motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Fahimian, Benjamin P.; Xing, Lei; Hristov, Dimitre H.

    2014-08-15

    In this study, the authors introduce and demonstrate quality control procedures for evaluating the geometric and dosimetric fidelity of dynamic treatment delivery techniques involving treatment couch motion synchronous with gantry and multileaf collimator (MLC). Tests were designed to evaluate positional accuracy, velocity constancy and accuracy for dynamic couch motion under a realistic weight load. A test evaluating the geometric accuracy of the system in delivering treatments over complex dynamic trajectories was also devised. Custom XML scripts that control the Varian TrueBeam™ STx (Serial #3) axes in Developer Mode were written to implement the delivery sequences for the tests. Delivered dose patterns were captured with radiographic film or the electronic portal imaging device. The couch translational accuracy in dynamic treatment mode was 0.01 cm. Rotational accuracy was within 0.3°, with 0.04 cm displacement of the rotational axis. Dose intensity profiles capturing the velocity constancy and accuracy for translations and rotation exhibited standard deviation and maximum deviations below 3%. For complex delivery involving MLC and couch motions, the overall translational accuracy for reproducing programmed patterns was within 0.06 cm. The authors conclude that in Developer Mode, TrueBeam™ is capable of delivering dynamic treatment delivery techniques involving couch motion with good geometric and dosimetric fidelity.

  6. Kinetics and dynamics of oxidation reactions involving adsorbed CO species on bulk supported Pt and copper oxides. Final project report, January 1, 1991--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conner, Wm.C.; Harold, M.

    1995-02-01

    This research was an integrated experimental and modeling study of oxidation reactions involving CO as a key player - be it a reactant, adsorbed intermediate, and/or partial oxidation product - in the catalytic sequence and chemistry. The reaction systems of interest in the project include CO, formaldehyde, and methanol oxidation by O{sub 2}, and CO oxidation by NO, on both Pt and copper oxide catalysts. These reactions are of importance in automobile exhaust catalysis. There is a paucity of rate data in the literature for these important environmental control reactions. A complicating factor is the propensity of these reactions to exhibit complex steady state and dynamic behavior, including multiple rate controlling steps, steady state multiplicity, and oscillatory phenomena. Such phenomena are rooted in some of the central issues of catalysis, including adsorbate interactions, and catalyst structural instabilities, such as surface reconstruction and surface chemical changes by oxidation- reduction. The goal of this research is to better understand the catalytic chemistry and kinetics of oxidations reactions involving CO as an adsorbed intermediate. Successfully meeting this goal requires an integration of basic kinetic measurements, in situ catalyst surface monitoring, kinetic modeling, and nonlinear mathematical tools. While the kinetics experiments have standard microreactor design, the potential for multiple and periodic rate states demands detailed procedures to pinpoint the bifurcation (ignition, extinction, Hopf) points. Kinetic models are constructed from rational mechanistic sequences and sound surface chemistry.

  7. Impacts of Unconventional Gas Technology in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology used in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) to represent unconventional gas technologies and their impacts on projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000).

  8. International Energy Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    EIA NEMS International Energy Module Model Documentation Report vii Mr. G. Daniel Butler U.S. Department of Energy EI-812 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 Tel:...

  9. Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baulch, Janet

    2013-09-11

    This is a 'glue grant' that was part of a DOE Low Dose project entitled 'Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation'. This collaborative program has involved Drs. David L. Springer from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), John H. Miller from Washington State University, Tri-cities (WSU) and William F. Morgan then from the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB). In July 2008, Dr. Morgan moved to PNNL and Dr. Janet E. Baulch became PI for this project at University of Maryland. In November of 2008, a one year extension with no new funds was requested to complete the proteomic analyses. The project stemmed from studies in the Morgan laboratory demonstrating that genomically unstable cells secret a soluble factor or factors into the culture medium, that cause cytogenetic aberrations and apoptosis in normal parental GM10115 cells. The purpose of this project was to identify the death inducing effect (DIE) factor or factors, estimate their relative abundance, identify the cell signaling pathways involved and finally recapitulate DIE in normal cells by exogenous manipulation of putative DIE factors in culture medium. As reported in detail in the previous progress report, analysis of culture medium from the parental cell line, and stable and unstable clones demonstrated inconsistent proteomic profiles as relate to candidate DIE factors. While the proposed proteomic analyses did not provide information that would allow DIE factors to be identified, the analyses provided another important set of observations. Proteomic analysis suggested that proteins associated with the cellular response to oxidative stress and mitochondrial function were elevated in the medium from unstable clones in a manner consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction. These findings correlate with previous studies of these clones that demonstrated functional differences between the mitochondria of stable and unstable clones. These mitochondrial abnormalities in the unstable clones contributes to oxidative stress.

  10. Models Datasets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    iteration by iteration. RevSim is an Excel 2010 based model. Much of the logic is VBA code (Visual Basic for Applications); the user does not need to know VBA to run the...

  11. Electric-field enhanced performance in catalysis and solid-state devices involving gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blackburn, Bryan M.; Wachsman, Eric D.; Van Assche, IV, Frederick Martin

    2015-05-19

    Electrode configurations for electric-field enhanced performance in catalysis and solid-state devices involving gases are provided. According to an embodiment, electric-field electrodes can be incorporated in devices such as gas sensors and fuel cells to shape an electric field provided with respect to sensing electrodes for the gas sensors and surfaces of the fuel cells. The shaped electric fields can alter surface dynamics, system thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, and adsorption/desorption processes. In one embodiment, ring-shaped electric-field electrodes can be provided around sensing electrodes of a planar gas sensor.

  12. Fatal accidents involving roof falls in coal mining, 1996--1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1999-01-01

    This publication presents information on fatalities involving roof and rib falls that occurred in coal mining operations from January 1996 through December 1998. It includes statistics for the fatalities, as well as abstracts, best practices and illustrations. Conclusion statements have been substituted for best practices where no Title 30 Code of Regulations violations were cited during the accident investigation. From January 1996 through December 1998, 36 miners died at coal operations from accidents classified as roof falls. The information in the report is based on statistics taken from the 1996 through 1998 MSHA Fatal Illustration Programs: Roof Fall Fatalities by District.

  13. Fatal accidents involving roof falls in coal mining, 1996--1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-11-01

    This publication presents information on fatalities involving roof and rib falls that occurred in coal mining operations from January 1996 through December 1998. It includes statistics for the fatalities, as well as abstracts, best practices and illustrations. Conclusion statements have been substituted for best practices where no Title 30 Code of Regulations violations were cited during the accident investigation. From January 1996 through December 1998, 36 miners died at coal operations from accidents classified as roof falls. The information in the report is based on statistics taken from the 1996 through 1998 MSHA Fatal Illustration Programs: Roof Fall Fatalities by District.

  14. Dr. Googin and his early days at Y-12, conclusion and community involvement „

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    conclusion and community involvement - A 'larger than life' figure at work ... and in his community We have now looked closely at Dr. John Googin's early years at Y-12, concentrating on his first few months but including some observations made later in his career. He was immediately aware of the mission for Y-12 and understood much of the overall process. His role was first in the feed material portion of the Y-12 operation in what was called Bulk Treatment, but he eventually became the

  15. Autonomie Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Autonomie Model (Argonne National Laboratory) Objectives Perform simulations to assess the energy consumption and performance of advanced component and powertrain technologies in a vehicle system context. Key Attributes & Strengths Developed over the past 15 years, Autonomie has been validated using component and vehicle test data, providing confidence in the results. Thus, the tool is widely accepted by the industry and has been licensed to more than 150 organizations worldwide. The model

  16. Hot Water Distribution System Model Enhancements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoeschele, M.; Weitzel, E.

    2012-11-01

    This project involves enhancement of the HWSIM distribution system model to more accurately model pipe heat transfer. Recent laboratory testing efforts have indicated that the modeling of radiant heat transfer effects is needed to accurately characterize piping heat loss. An analytical methodology for integrating radiant heat transfer was implemented with HWSIM. Laboratory test data collected in another project was then used to validate the model for a variety of uninsulated and insulated pipe cases (copper, PEX, and CPVC). Results appear favorable, with typical deviations from lab results less than 8%.

  17. EIS-0467: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and Notice of Floodplains and Wetlands Involvement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Acquisition of a Natural Gas Pipeline and Natural Gas Utility Service at the Hanford Site, Richland, WA, and Notice of Floodplains and Wetlands Involvement

  18. Pseudobond parameters for QM/MM studies involving nucleosides, nucleotides, and their analogs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaudret, Robin; Parks, Jerry M; Yang, Weitao

    2013-01-01

    In biological systems involving nucleosides, nucleotides, or their respective analogs, the ribose sugar moiety is the most common reaction site, for example, during DNA replication and repair. How- ever, nucleic bases, which comprise a sizable portion of nucleotide molecules, are usually unreactive during such processes. In quantum mechanical/molecular simulations of nucleic acid reactivity, it may therefore be advantageous to describe specific ribosyl or ribosyl phosphate groups quantum me- chanically and their respective nucleic bases with a molecular mechanics potential function. Here, we have extended the pseudobond approach to enable quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations involving nucleotides, nucleosides, and their analogs in which the interface between the two subsystems is located between the sugar and the base, namely, the C(sp3) N(sp2) bond. The pseudobond parameters were optimized on a training set of 10 molecules representing several nu- cleotide and nucleoside bases and analogs, and they were then tested on a larger test set of 20 diverse molecules. Particular emphasis was placed on providing accurate geometries and electrostatic prop- erties, including electrostatic potential, natural bond orbital (NBO) and atoms in molecules (AIM) charges and AIM first moments. We also tested the optimized parameters on five nucleotide and nu- cleoside analogues of pharmaceutical relevance and a small polypeptide (triglycine). Accuracy was maintained for these systems, which highlights the generality and transferability of the pseudobond approach. 2013 American Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4772182

  19. Phenomenological Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Phenomenological Modeling - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  20. Criticality Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Alsaed

    2004-09-14

    The ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003) presents the methodology for evaluating potential criticality situations in the monitored geologic repository. As stated in the referenced Topical Report, the detailed methodology for performing the disposal criticality analyses will be documented in model reports. Many of the models developed in support of the Topical Report differ from the definition of models as given in the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management procedure AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models'', in that they are procedural, rather than mathematical. These model reports document the detailed methodology necessary to implement the approach presented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report and provide calculations utilizing the methodology. Thus, the governing procedure for this type of report is AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''. The ''Criticality Model'' is of this latter type, providing a process evaluating the criticality potential of in-package and external configurations. The purpose of this analysis is to layout the process for calculating the criticality potential for various in-package and external configurations and to calculate lower-bound tolerance limit (LBTL) values and determine range of applicability (ROA) parameters. The LBTL calculations and the ROA determinations are performed using selected benchmark experiments that are applicable to various waste forms and various in-package and external configurations. The waste forms considered in this calculation are pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA), Enrico Fermi, Shippingport pressurized water reactor, Shippingport light water breeder reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, Melt and Dilute, and Fort Saint Vrain Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The scope of this analysis is to document the criticality computational method. The criticality computational method will be used for evaluating the criticality potential of configurations of fissionable materials (in-package and external to the waste package) within the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada for all waste packages/waste forms. The criticality computational method is also applicable to preclosure configurations. The criticality computational method is a component of the methodology presented in ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003). How the criticality computational method fits in the overall disposal criticality analysis methodology is illustrated in Figure 1 (YMP 2003, Figure 3). This calculation will not provide direct input to the total system performance assessment for license application. It is to be used as necessary to determine the criticality potential of configuration classes as determined by the configuration probability analysis of the configuration generator model (BSC 2003a).

  1. Wind Technology Modeling Within the System Advisor Model (SAM) (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, N.; Dobos, A.; Ferguson, T.; Freeman, J.; Gilman, P.; Whitmore, J.

    2014-05-01

    This poster provides detail for implementation and the underlying methodology for modeling wind power generation performance in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) System Advisor Model (SAM). SAM's wind power model allows users to assess projects involving one or more large or small wind turbines with any of the detailed options for residential, commercial, or utility financing. The model requires information about the wind resource, wind turbine specifications, wind farm layout (if applicable), and costs, and provides analysis to compare the absolute or relative impact of these inputs. SAM is a system performance and economic model designed to facilitate analysis and decision-making for project developers, financers, policymakers, and energy researchers. The user pairs a generation technology with a financing option (residential, commercial, or utility) to calculate the cost of energy over the multi-year project period. Specifically, SAM calculates the value of projects which buy and sell power at retail rates for residential and commercial systems, and also for larger-scale projects which operate through a power purchase agreement (PPA) with a utility. The financial model captures complex financing and rate structures, taxes, and incentives.

  2. Systems Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  3. Nuclear Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fossion, Ruben [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, Mexico D. F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico)

    2010-09-10

    The atomic nucleus is a typical example of a many-body problem. On the one hand, the number of nucleons (protons and neutrons) that constitute the nucleus is too large to allow for exact calculations. On the other hand, the number of constituent particles is too small for the individual nuclear excitation states to be explained by statistical methods. Another problem, particular for the atomic nucleus, is that the nucleon-nucleon (n-n) interaction is not one of the fundamental forces of Nature, and is hard to put in a single closed equation. The nucleon-nucleon interaction also behaves differently between two free nucleons (bare interaction) and between two nucleons in the nuclear medium (dressed interaction).Because of the above reasons, specific nuclear many-body models have been devised of which each one sheds light on some selected aspects of nuclear structure. Only combining the viewpoints of different models, a global insight of the atomic nucleus can be gained. In this chapter, we revise the the Nuclear Shell Model as an example of the microscopic approach, and the Collective Model as an example of the geometric approach. Finally, we study the statistical properties of nuclear spectra, basing on symmetry principles, to find out whether there is quantum chaos in the atomic nucleus. All three major approaches have been rewarded with the Nobel Prize of Physics. In the text, we will stress how each approach introduces its own series of approximations to reduce the prohibitingly large number of degrees of freedom of the full many-body problem to a smaller manageable number of effective degrees of freedom.

  4. Competency Models

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An industry-validated competency model is an excellent tool for identifying the skills needed to succeed in a particular job, developing curricula to teach them, and benchmarking their attainment. Particularly valuable in dynamic industries like solar energy, a competency framework is critical to any training program attempting to advance lower-skilled workers into navigable career pathways, or transition higher skilled workers into new industry sectors.

  5. VISION Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    VISION Model (Argonne National Laboratory) Objectives To provide estimates of the potential energy use, oil use, and carbon emission impacts of advanced light- and heavy-duty highway vehicle technologies and alternative fuels, up to the year 2100. Key Attributes & Strengths Uses vehicle survival and age-dependent usage characteristics to project total light- and heavy-vehicle stock, total vehicle miles of travel, and total energy use by technology and fuel type by year, given market

  6. Success stories? an analysis of stakeholder involvement in the Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, D.M.; Kelly, C.; Forbes, E.

    1995-12-01

    In several studies conducted by the Office of Environmental Management, the Department of Energy (DOE) has begun its first analysis of the benefits of stakeholder involvement. The studies seek to determine how public participation in DOE activities has contributed to cost savings, has changed the course of action for environmental projects, and has influenced the priorities of a national environmental program. This presentation will discuss the results and conclusions of following three studies: Stakeholder Survey of Trust and Confidence; the Success Stories study; and the Site-Specific Advisory Board Evaluation. These studies are taking their data from environmental management projects at Department of Energy sites throughout the United States. The studies of stakeholder involvement are currently analyzing the role of several variables in stakeholder involvement including the climate surrounding the environmental project or decision, the strategies used by DOE, the nature of the actual interactions, the attempts to reach consensus among interested parties, the role played by primary decision-makers, the goals set by the Department or by its stakeholders, and the revision of strategies during the stakeholder involvement process. Based on this analysis the planning and execution of future stakeholder involvement activities in Environmental Management will be improved. The study goal of establishing a set of factors that characterize successful stakeholder involvement within the Environmental Management program, will allow inference as to stakeholder involvement in other Federal and private environmental projects.

  7. Maturity Model for Advancing Smart Grid Interoperability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, Mark; Widergren, Steven E.; Mater, J.; Montgomery, Austin

    2013-10-28

    Abstract—Interoperability is about the properties of devices and systems to connect and work properly. Advancing interoperability eases integration and maintenance of the resulting interconnection. This leads to faster integration, lower labor and component costs, predictability of projects and the resulting performance, and evolutionary paths for upgrade. When specifications are shared and standardized, competition and novel solutions can bring new value streams to the community of stakeholders involved. Advancing interoperability involves reaching agreement for how things join at their interfaces. The quality of the agreements and the alignment of parties involved in the agreement present challenges that are best met with process improvement techniques. The GridWise® Architecture Council (GWAC) sponsored by the United States Department of Energy is supporting an effort to use concepts from capability maturity models used in the software industry to advance interoperability of smart grid technology. An interoperability maturity model has been drafted and experience is being gained through trials on various types of projects and community efforts. This paper describes the value and objectives of maturity models, the nature of the interoperability maturity model and how it compares with other maturity models, and experiences gained with its use.

  8. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Pub

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 2015 (AEO2015), prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term annual projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2040. The projections, focused on U.S. energy markets, are based on results from EIA's National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). NEMS enables EIA to make projections under alternative, internally-consistent sets of assumptions, the results of which are presented as cases. The analysis in AEO2015 focuses on

  9. Levelized Cost and Levelized Avoided Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy Outlook 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 2015 Levelized Cost and Levelized Avoided Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy Outlook 2015 This paper presents average values of levelized costs for generating technologies that are brought online in 2020 1 as represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for the Annual Energy Outlook 2015 (AEO2015) Reference case. 2 Both national values and the minimum and maximum values across the 22 U.S. regions of the NEMS electricity market module are presented. Levelized

  10. Endovascular Treatment of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Lesions With or Without Common Iliac Artery Involvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oender, Hakan; Oguzkurt, Levent; Guer, Serkan; Tekbas, Gueven; Guerel, Kamil; Coskun, Isa; Oezkan, Ugur

    2013-02-15

    To evaluate the results of stent placement for obstructive atherosclerotic aortic disease with or without involvement of the common iliac artery. Forty patients had self-expanding stents primarily or after balloon dilatation in the abdominal aorta between January 2005 and May 2011. All patients had trouble walking. Follow-up examinations were performed with clinical visits; these included color Doppler ultrasonography and computed tomographic angiography. Technical, clinical, and hemodynamic success was achieved in all patients. None of the patients underwent reintervention during the follow-up period, which ranged from 3 months to 6 years (median 24 months). Nine complications occurred in six patients. Of the nine complications, four were distal thromboembolisms, which were successfully treated with catheter-directed thrombolysis or anticoagulation therapy. Endovascular treatment of the obstructive aortic disease using self-expanding stents was safe and effective, with high technical success and long-term patency. Thromboembolic complications were high even though direct stenting was considered protective for thromboembolism formation. Particularly for infrarenal aortic stenosis, it can be recommended as the first-line treatment option for patients with obstructive atherosclerotic aortic disease.

  11. Identification of a Xylogalacturonan Xylosyltransferase Involved in Pectin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pauly, Markus; Sorensen, Susanne Oxenboll; Harholt, Jesper; Geshi, Naomi; Sakuragi, Yumiko; Moller, Isabel; Zandleven, Joris; Bernal, Adriana J.; Jensen, Niels Bjerg; Sorensen, Charlotte; Jensen, Jacob K.; Beldman, Gerrit; Willats, William G.T.; Scheller, Henrik

    2009-08-19

    Xylogalacturonan (XGA) is a class of pectic polysaccharide found in plant cell walls. The Arabidopsis thaliana locus At5g33290 encodes a predicted Type II membrane protein, and insertion mutants of the At5g33290 locus had decreased cell wall xylose. Immunological studies, enzymatic extraction of polysaccharides, monosaccharide linkage analysis, and oligosaccharide mass profiling were employed to identify the affected cell wall polymer. Pectic XGA was reduced to much lower levels in mutant than in wild-type leaves, indicating a role of At5g33290 in XGA biosynthesis. The mutated gene was designated xylogalacturonan deficient1 (xgd1). Transformation of the xgd1-1 mutant with the wild-type gene restored XGA to wild-type levels. XGD1 protein heterologously expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana catalyzed the transfer of xylose from UDP-xylose onto oligogalacturonides and endogenous acceptors. The products formed could be hydrolyzed with an XGA-specific hydrolase. These results confirm that the XGD1 protein is a XGA xylosyltransferase. The protein was shown by expression of a fluorescent fusion protein in N. benthamiana to be localized in the Golgi vesicles as expected for a glycosyltransferase involved in pectin biosynthesis.

  12. Macro System Model (MSM)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Objectives Perform rapid cross-cutting analysis that utilizes and links other models. ... MSM is a static, cross-cutting model which links models from various modeling platforms. ...

  13. Investigations of the Fundamental Surface Reactions Involved in the Sorption and Desorption of Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czerwinski, Ken; Heske, Clemens; Moser, Duane; Misra, Mnoranjan; McMillion, Glen

    2011-04-20

    Models for describing solution- and surface-phase reactions have been used for 30 years, but only recently applicable to complex surfaces. Duff et al., using micro-XANES, found that Pu was concentrated on Mn-oxide and smectite phases of zeolitic tuff, providing an evaluation of contaminant speciation on surfaces for modeling. Experiments at Los Alamos demonstrated that actinides display varying surface residence time distributions, probably reflective of mineral surface heterogeneity. We propose to investigate the sorption/desorption behavior of radionuclides from mineral surfaces, as effected by microorganisms, employing isolates from Nevada Test Site deep alluvium as a model system. Characterizations will include surface area, particle size distribution, x-ray diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis, extractions, and microbiology. Surface interactions will be assessed by electron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS), X-ray emission spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Desert Research Institute (DRI), University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), and University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) researchers will collaborate to enhance scientific infrastructure and the understanding of contaminant behavior on surfaces, with broader implications for the management of DOE sites.

  14. Extension of DOE N 206.5, Response and Notification Procedures for Data Breaches Involving Personally Identifiable Information

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-10-09

    This Notice extends DOE N 206.5, Response and Notification Procedures for Data Breaches Involving Personally Identifiable Information, dated 10-9-07, until 1-9-09.

  15. Consent Versus Consensus - Stakehold Involvement in the Identification of Necessary and Sufficient Transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fawcett, Ricky Lee; Kramer, George Leroy Jr.

    2003-03-01

    Transportation (DOT) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to provide for the protection of the public and the environment; historically these regulations have proven quite sufficient. Even so, when the Department of Energy (DOE) makes radioactive materials shipments, that are deemed to be a major federal activity, regulations under the National Environmental Policy Act require that public input on safety issues be sought. This requirement leads to interactions with State, Tribal and local stakeholders that often result in the imposition of extra-regulatory requirements – requirements beyond those prescribed by DOT and NRC regulations. Unfortunately, these additional requirements virtually always increase costs and delay schedules, and usually do so without significantly increasing, and possibly even decreasing overall transportation safety. We believe that this problem arises because of efforts to achieve stakeholder consensus rather than stakeholder consent, where “consensus” connotes universal agreement with all aspects of the program, while “consent”, as used here, is simple agreement with the overall course of action. Gaining consensus entails extensive negotiations because all aspects and requirements of the project must be agreed to by each stakeholder. Gaining consent, on the other hand, requires only that stakeholders be satisfied that the project, as planned, provides adequately for their safety needs. This article addresses the issue of consent versus consensus and proposes a systematic, decision science process for reaching consent. Key steps in this proposed process are early identification and involvement of stakeholders, compilation of their concerns, perceptions, needs, causes, and translation of that information into an appropriate set of “derived requirements.” These derived requirements, along with already-established DOT and NRC regulatory requirements, form the necessary and sufficient conditions for safe transportation and for obtaining stakeholder consent.

  16. Top decays in extended models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaitan, R.; Miranda, O. G.; Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.

    2009-04-20

    Top quark decays are interesting as a mean to test the Standard Model (SM) predictions. The Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM)-suppressed process t{yields}cWW, and the rare decays t{yields}cZ, t{yields}H{sup 0}+c, and t{yields}c{gamma} an excellent window to probe the predictions of theories beyond the SM. We evaluate the flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) decay t{yields}H{sup 0}+c in the context of Alternative Left-Right symmetric Models (ALRM) with extra isosinglet heavy fermions; the FCNC decays may place at tree level and are only supressed by the mixing between ordinary top and charm quarks. We also comment on the decay process t{yields}c+{gamma}, which involves radiative corrections.

  17. Moist multi-scale models for the hurricane embryo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majda, Andrew J. [New York University; Xing, Yulong [ORNL; Mohammadian, Majid [University of Ottawa, Canada

    2010-01-01

    Determining the finite-amplitude preconditioned states in the hurricane embryo, which lead to tropical cyclogenesis, is a central issue in contemporary meteorology. In the embryo there is competition between different preconditioning mechanisms involving hydrodynamics and moist thermodynamics, which can lead to cyclogenesis. Here systematic asymptotic methods from applied mathematics are utilized to develop new simplified moist multi-scale models starting from the moist anelastic equations. Three interesting multi-scale models emerge in the analysis. The balanced mesoscale vortex (BMV) dynamics and the microscale balanced hot tower (BHT) dynamics involve simplified balanced equations without gravity waves for vertical vorticity amplification due to moist heat sources and incorporate nonlinear advective fluxes across scales. The BMV model is the central one for tropical cyclogenesis in the embryo. The moist mesoscale wave (MMW) dynamics involves simplified equations for mesoscale moisture fluctuations, as well as linear hydrostatic waves driven by heat sources from moisture and eddy flux divergences. A simplified cloud physics model for deep convection is introduced here and used to study moist axisymmetric plumes in the BHT model. A simple application in periodic geometry involving the effects of mesoscale vertical shear and moist microscale hot towers on vortex amplification is developed here to illustrate features of the coupled multi-scale models. These results illustrate the use of these models in isolating key mechanisms in the embryo in a simplified content.

  18. Decoupling and Utility Business Model Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Decoupling and Utility Business Model Resources Decoupling and Utility Business Model Resources Energy efficiency measures result in decreased energy use, which may be contrary to a utility whose business model involves increasing revenue through increased energy demand. Decoupling is a rate adjustment mechanism that breaks the link between the amount of energy a utility sells and the revenue it collects to recover the fixed costs of providing service to customers, This ensures that the

  19. Systematic identification of genes and transduction pathways involved in radio-adaptive response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Honglu

    2015-05-22

    Low doses of radiation have been shown to protect against the biological effects of later exposure to toxic levels of radiation. In this study, we propose to identify the molecular mechanisms of this adaptive response by systematically identifying the genes that play a role in radio-protection. In the original proposal, a human cell line that is well-documented to exhibit the radio-adaptive effect was to be used. In this revised study plan, we will use a mouse model, C57BL/6, which has also been well investigated for radio-adaptation. The goal of the proposed study is to enhance our understanding of cellular responses to low doses of radiation exposure at the molecular level.

  20. On computing stress in polymer systems involving multi-body potentials from molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Yao E-mail: jhsong@cec.sc.edu; Song, Jeong-Hoon E-mail: jhsong@cec.sc.edu

    2014-08-07

    Hardy stress definition has been restricted to pair potentials and embedded-atom method potentials due to the basic assumptions in the derivation of a symmetric microscopic stress tensor. Force decomposition required in the Hardy stress expression becomes obscure for multi-body potentials. In this work, we demonstrate the invariance of the Hardy stress expression for a polymer system modeled with multi-body interatomic potentials including up to four atoms interaction, by applying central force decomposition of the atomic force. The balance of momentum has been demonstrated to be valid theoretically and tested under various numerical simulation conditions. The validity of momentum conservation justifies the extension of Hardy stress expression to multi-body potential systems. Computed Hardy stress has been observed to converge to the virial stress of the system with increasing spatial averaging volume. This work provides a feasible and reliable linkage between the atomistic and continuum scales for multi-body potential systems.

  1. Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study: Vehicle Characterization and Scenario Analyses. Appendix E. Other NEMS-MP Results or the Base Case and Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plotkin, Steve; Singh, Margaret; Patterson, Phil; Ward, Jake; Wood, Frances; Kydes, Niko; Holte, John; Moore, Jim; Miller, Grant; Das, Sujit; Greene, David

    2009-07-22

    This appendix examines additional findings beyond the primary results reported in the report for Phase 2 of the Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study.

  2. Macro-System Model: A Federated Object Model for Cross-Cutting Analysis of Hydrogen Production, Delivery, Consumption and Associated Emissions; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruth, M.; Diakov, V.; Goldsby, M. E.; Sa, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    It is commonly accepted that the introduction of hydrogen as an energy carrier for light-duty vehicles involves concomitant technological development of infrastructure elements, such as production, delivery, and consumption, all associated with certain emission levels. To analyze these at a system level, the suite of corresponding models developed by the United States Department of Energy and involving several national laboratories is combined in one macro-system model (MSM). The macro-system model is being developed as a cross-cutting analysis tool that combines a set of hydrogen technology analysis models. Within the MSM, a federated simulation framework is used for consistent data transfer between the component models. The framework is built to suit cross-model as well as cross-platform data exchange and involves features of 'over-the-net' computation.

  3. Modeling and low-level waste management: an interagency workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Little, C.A.; Stratton, L.E.

    1980-01-01

    The interagency workshop on Modeling and Low-Level Waste Management was held on December 1-4, 1980 in Denver, Colorado. Twenty papers were presented at this meeting which consisted of three sessions. First, each agency presented its point of view concerning modeling and the need for models in low-level radioactive waste applications. Second, a larger group of more technical papers was presented by persons actively involved in model development or applications. Last of all, four workshops were held to attempt to reach a consensus among participants regarding numerous waste modeling topics. Abstracts are provided for the papers presented at this workshop.

  4. Climate Change Scenario Planning in Alaska's National Parks: Stakeholder Involvement in the Decision-Making Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernst, Kathleen M; Van Riemsdijk, Dr. Micheline

    2013-01-01

    This article studies the participation of stakeholders in climate change decision-making in Alaska s National Parks. We place stakeholder participation within literatures on environmental and climate change decision-making. We conducted participant observation and interviews in two planning workshops to investigate the decision-making process, and our findings are three-fold. First, the inclusion of diverse stakeholders expanded climate change decision-making beyond National Park Service (NPS) institutional constraints. Second, workshops of the Climate Change Scenario Planning Project (CCSPP) enhanced institutional understandings of participants attitudes towards climate change and climate change decision-making. Third, the geographical context of climate change influences the decision-making process. As the first regional approach to climate change decision-making within the NPS, the CCSPP serves as a model for future climate change planning in public land agencies. This study shows how the participation of stakeholders can contribute to robust decisions, may move climate change decision-making beyond institutional barriers, and can provide information about attitudes towards climate change decision-making.

  5. Climate change scenario planning in Alaska's National Parks: Stakeholder involvement in the decision-making process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernst, Kathleen M; Van Riemsdijk, Dr. Micheline

    2013-01-01

    This article studies the participation of stakeholders in climate change decision-making in Alaska s National Parks. We place stakeholder participation within literatures on environmental and climate change decision-making. We conducted participant observation and interviews in two planning workshops to investigate the decision-making process, and our findings are three-fold. First, the inclusion of diverse stakeholders expanded climate change decision-making beyond National Park Service (NPS) institutional constraints. Second, workshops of the Climate Change Scenario Planning Project (CCSPP) enhanced institutional understandings of participants attitudes towards climate change and climate change decision-making. Third, the geographical context of climate change influences the decisionmaking process. As the first regional approach to climate change decision-making within the NPS, the CCSPP serves as a model for future climate change planning in public land agencies. This study shows how the participation of stakeholders can contribute to robust decisions, may move climate change decision-making beyond institutional barriers, and can provide information about attitudes towards climate change decision-making.

  6. Model Verification and Validation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the decision-making process. Validation should therefore involve the code developers, computer scientists, experimentalists, statisticians, analysts, and application owners....

  7. Microsoft Word - PNNL 24125 Probative Investigation of the Thermal Stability of Wastes Involved in February 2014 WIPP Waste Dru

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    PNNL-24125 Limited Distribution Probative Investigation of the Thermal Stability of Wastes Involved in February 2014 WIPP Waste Drum Breach Event March 2015 RD Scheele JM Schwantes BK McNamara MJ Minette DT Hobbs (SRNL) CA Barrett PNNL-24125 Limited Distribution Probative Investigation of the Thermal Stability of Wastes Involved in February 2014 WIPP Waste Drum Breach Event RD Scheele JM Schwantes BK McNamara MJ Minette DT Hobbs (SRNL) CA Barrett March 2015 Prepared for the U.S. Department of

  8. Sandia Energy - Phenomenological Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Phenomenological Modeling Home Stationary Power Nuclear Fuel Cycle Nuclear Energy Safety Technologies Phenomenological Modeling Phenomenological ModelingTara Camacho-Lopez2015-05-1...

  9. MODELING HUMAN RELIABILITY ANALYSIS USING MIDAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald L. Boring; Donald D. Dudenhoeffer; Bruce P. Hallbert; Brian F. Gore

    2006-05-01

    This paper summarizes an emerging collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory and NASA Ames Research Center regarding the utilization of high-fidelity MIDAS simulations for modeling control room crew performance at nuclear power plants. The key envisioned uses for MIDAS-based control room simulations are: (i) the estimation of human error with novel control room equipment and configurations, (ii) the investigative determination of risk significance in recreating past event scenarios involving control room operating crews, and (iii) the certification of novel staffing levels in control rooms. It is proposed that MIDAS serves as a key component for the effective modeling of risk in next generation control rooms.

  10. I&C Modeling in SPAR Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John A. Schroeder

    2012-06-01

    The Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models for the U.S. commercial nuclear power plants currently have very limited instrumentation and control (I&C) modeling [1]. Most of the I&C components in the operating plant SPAR models are related to the reactor protection system. This was identified as a finding during the industry peer review of SPAR models. While the Emergency Safeguard Features (ESF) actuation and control system was incorporated into the Peach Bottom Unit 2 SPAR model in a recent effort [2], various approaches to expend resources for detailed I&C modeling in other SPAR models are investigated.

  11. Reformulated Gasoline Complex Model

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Refiners Switch to Reformulated Gasoline Complex Model Contents * Summary * Introduction o Table 1. Comparison of Simple Model and Complex Model RFG Per Gallon Requirements * Statutory, Individual Refinery, and Compliance Baselines o Table 2. Statutory Baseline Fuel Compositions * Simple Model * Complex Model o Table 3. Complex Model Variables * Endnotes Related EIA Short-Term Forecast Analysis Products * RFG Simple and Complex Model Spreadsheets * Areas Particpating in the Reformulated Gasoline

  12. Low-Dose Involved-Field Radiation in the Treatment of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: Predictors of Response and Treatment Failure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russo, Andrea L.; Chen, Yu-Hui; Martin, Neil E.; Vinjamoori, Anant; Luthy, Sarah K.; Freedman, Arnold; Michaelson, Evan M.; Silver, Barbara; Mauch, Peter M.; Ng, Andrea K.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate clinical and pathologic factors significant in predicting local response and time to further treatment after low-dose involved-field radiation therapy (LD-IFRT) for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Methods and Materials: Records of NHL patients treated at a single institution between April 2004 and September 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Low-dose involved-field radiation therapy was given as 4 Gy in 2 fractions over 2 consecutive days. Treatment response and disease control were determined by radiographic studies and/or physical examination. A generalized estimating equation model was used to assess the effect of tumor and patient characteristics on disease response. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to assess time to further treatment. Results: We treated a total of 187 sites in 127 patients with LD-IFRT. Histologies included 66% follicular, 9% chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)/small lymphocytic lymphoma, 10% marginal zone, 6% mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), and 8% other. Median follow-up time was 23.4 months (range, 0.03-92.2 months). The complete response, partial response, and overall response rates were 57%, 25%, and 82%, respectively. A CLL histology was associated with a lower response rate (odds ratio 0.2, 95% confidence interval 0.1-0.5, P=.02). Tumor size, site, age at diagnosis, and prior systemic therapy were not associated with response. The median time to first recurrence was 13.6 months. Those with CLL and age ?50 years at diagnosis had a shorter time to further treatment for local failures (hazard ratio [HR] 3.63, P=.01 and HR 5.50, P=.02, respectively). Those with CLL and MCL had a shorter time to further treatment for distant failures (HR 11.1 and 16.3, respectively, P<.0001). Conclusions: High local response rates were achieved with LD-IFRT across most histologies. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia and MCL histologies and age ?50 years at diagnosis had a shorter time to further treatment after LD-IFRT.

  13. DOE-STD-1055-93; DOE Standard Guideline to Good Practices For Maintenance Management Involvement at DOE Nuclear Facilities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1055-93 March 1993 DOE STANDARD GUIDELINE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT INVOLVEMENT AT DOE NUCLEAR FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MNTY Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge,

  14. SECURITY MODELING FOR MARITIME PORT DEFENSE RESOURCE ALLOCATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, S.; Dunn, D.

    2010-09-07

    Redeployment of existing law enforcement resources and optimal use of geographic terrain are examined for countering the threat of a maritime based small-vessel radiological or nuclear attack. The evaluation was based on modeling conducted by the Savannah River National Laboratory that involved the development of options for defensive resource allocation that can reduce the risk of a maritime based radiological or nuclear threat. A diverse range of potential attack scenarios has been assessed. As a result of identifying vulnerable pathways, effective countermeasures can be deployed using current resources. The modeling involved the use of the Automated Vulnerability Evaluation for Risks of Terrorism (AVERT{reg_sign}) software to conduct computer based simulation modeling. The models provided estimates for the probability of encountering an adversary based on allocated resources including response boats, patrol boats and helicopters over various environmental conditions including day, night, rough seas and various traffic flow rates.

  15. Continuous Evaluation of Fast Processes in Climate Models Using Arm

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurements (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Continuous Evaluation of Fast Processes in Climate Models Using Arm Measurements Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Continuous Evaluation of Fast Processes in Climate Models Using Arm Measurements Under the support of this grant, we investigated the fast process of interaction of clouds, shallow convection, and boundary layer turbulence and their parameterizations. Main accomplishments involve two things. One is the understanding of

  16. NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Advanced Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Users The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are an input-output based model designed to provide estimates for project impacts. Due to the many variables involved with developing and analyzing projects of this type, these impact estimates are not intended to be viewed as exact impacts, but rather as reasonable estimates given the available data. To the extent users can use the detailed, local cost data and local share values, the results will be more specific to the

  17. Modeling Blast Loading on Buried Reinforced Concrete Structures with Zapotec

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bessette, Greg C.

    2008-01-01

    A coupled Euler-Lagrange solution approach is used to model the response of a buried reinforced concrete structure subjected to a close-in detonation of a high explosive charge. The coupling algorithm is discussed along with a set of benchmark calculations involving detonations in clay and sand.

  18. Second-order model selection in mixture experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redgate, P.E.; Piepel, G.F.; Hrma, P.R.

    1992-07-01

    Full second-order models for q-component mixture experiments contain q(q+l)/2 terms, which increases rapidly as q increases. Fitting full second-order models for larger q may involve problems with ill-conditioning and overfitting. These problems can be remedied by transforming the mixture components and/or fitting reduced forms of the full second-order mixture model. Various component transformation and model reduction approaches are discussed. Data from a 10-component nuclear waste glass study are used to illustrate ill-conditioning and overfitting problems that can be encountered when fitting a full second-order mixture model. Component transformation, model term selection, and model evaluation/validation techniques are discussed and illustrated for the waste glass example.

  19. Combustion instability modeling and analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santoro, R.J.; Yang, V.; Santavicca, D.A.; Sheppard, E.J.

    1995-12-31

    It is well known that the two key elements for achieving low emissions and high performance in a gas turbine combustor are to simultaneously establish (1) a lean combustion zone for maintaining low NO{sub x} emissions and (2) rapid mixing for good ignition and flame stability. However, these requirements, when coupled with the short combustor lengths used to limit the residence time for NO formation typical of advanced gas turbine combustors, can lead to problems regarding unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, as well as the occurrence of combustion instabilities. The concurrent development of suitable analytical and numerical models that are validated with experimental studies is important for achieving this objective. A major benefit of the present research will be to provide for the first time an experimentally verified model of emissions and performance of gas turbine combustors. The present study represents a coordinated effort between industry, government and academia to investigate gas turbine combustion dynamics. Specific study areas include development of advanced diagnostics, definition of controlling phenomena, advancement of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities, and assessment of the current status of our ability to apply these tools to practical gas turbine combustors. The present work involves four tasks which address, respectively, (1) the development of a fiber-optic probe for fuel-air ratio measurements, (2) the study of combustion instability using laser-based diagnostics in a high pressure, high temperature flow reactor, (3) the development of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities for describing combustion instability which will be validated against experimental data, and (4) the preparation of a literature survey and establishment of a data base on practical experience with combustion instability.

  20. Sandia Modeling Tool Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Webinar attendees will learn what collaborative, stakeholder-driven modeling is, how the models developed have been and could be used, and how specifically this process and resulting models might...

  1. Modeling direct interband tunneling. I. Bulk semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Andrew; Chui, Chi On

    2014-08-07

    Interband tunneling is frequently studied using the semiclassical Kane model, despite uncertainty about its validity. Revisiting the physical basis of this formula, we find that it neglects coupling to other bands and underestimates transverse tunneling. As a result, significant errors can arise at low and high fields for small and large gap materials, respectively. We derive a simple multiband tunneling model to correct these defects analytically without arbitrary parameters. Through extensive comparison with band structure and quantum transport calculations for bulk InGaAs, InAs, and InSb, we probe the accuracy of the Kane and multiband formulas and establish the superiority of the latter. We also show that the nonlocal average electric field should be used when applying either of these models to nonuniform potentials. Our findings are important for efficient analysis and simulation of bulk semiconductor devices involving tunneling.

  2. GABA/sub B/ receptor activation inhibits Ca/sup 2 +/-activated potassium channels in synaptosomes: involvement of G-proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ticku, M.K.; Delgado, A.

    1989-01-01

    /sup 86/Rb-efflux assay from preloaded synaptosomes of rat cerebral cortex was developed to study the effect of GABA/sub B/ receptor agonist baclofen on Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels. Depolarization of /sup 86/Rb-loaded synaptosomes in physiological buffer increased Ca/sup 2 +/-activated /sup 86/Rb-efflux by 400%. The /sup 86/Rb-efflux was blocked by quinine sulfate, tetraethylammonium, and La/sup 3 +/ indicating the involvement of Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels. (-)Baclofen inhibited Ca/sup 2 +/-activated /sup 86/Rb-efflux in a stereospecific manner. The inhibitory effect of (-)baclofen was mediated by GABA/sub B/ receptor activation, since it was blocked by GABA/sub B/ antagonist phaclofen, but not by bicuculline. Further, pertussis toxin also blocked the ability of baclofen or depolarizing action to affect Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels. These results suggest that baclofen inhibits Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels in synaptosomes and these channels are regulated by G-proteins. This assay may provide an ideal in vitro model to study GABA/sub B/ receptor pharmacology.

  3. Involvement and Communication Committee.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5, 2016 Budget and Contracts Committee Chair 1 : Jerry Peltier 4 , Member Vice Chair 1 : Ed Revell 4 , Member Committee Members 2 : Don Bouchey Jerry Peltier Gary Garnant Gerry Pollet Susan Leckband 4 Ed Revell Ken Niles Gene Van Liew Unofficial Committee Members or Other Interested Parties 3 : Earl Fordham Steve Hudson 4 Facilitator: Cathy McCague 4 Agency and Technical Support: Kris Holmes 4 DOE-RL Melinda Brown 4 Ecology Sharon Braswell DOE-ORP Emy Laija 4

  4. Involvement and Communication Committee.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2, 2016 Health, Safety, Environmental Protection Chair 1 : Becky Holland 4 , Member Vice Chair 1 : Richard Bloom 4 , Alternate Committee Members 2 : Richard Bloom Becky Holland Antone Brooks Steve Hudson 4 Jan Catrell Mike Korenko Lynn Davison Bob Legard Sam Dechter Peggy Maze Johnson Dirk Dunning Margery Swint Unofficial Committee Members or Other Interested Parties 3 : Pam Larsen Susan Leckband 4 Mike Priddy Facilitator: Cathy McCague 4 Agency & Technical Support: Kris Holmes 4 DOE-RL Beth

  5. Involvement and Communication Committee.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    River and Plateau Committee Chair 1 : Pam Larsen 4 , Member Vice Chair 1 : Gary Garnant 4 , Alternate Committee Members 2 : Don Bouchey Liz Mattson Jan Catrell Emmett Moore Shelley Cimon Jerry Peltier Rob Davis Gerry Pollet Dale Engstrom Ed Revell Gary Garnant Dan Serres Floyd Hodges Dick Smith John Howieson Bob Suyama Alex Klementiev Gene Van Liew Pam Larsen Jean Vanni Susan Leckband 4 Dawn Wellman Larry Lockrem Steve White Unofficial Committee Members or Other Interested Parties 3 : Dirk

  6. Involvement and Communication Committee.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tank Waste Committee Chair 1 : Bob Suyama 4 , Member Vice Chair 1 : Melanie Meyers 4 , Member Committee Members 2 : David Bernhard Larry Lockrem Amoret Bunn Liz Matson Shelley Cimon Kristen McNall Shannon Cram Melanie Myers-Magnuson Rob Davis Bob Parks Dirk Dunning Mecal Seppalainen Floyd Hodges Dan Serres Becky Holland Dick Smith Paul Kison Bob Suyama Paige Knight Margery Swint Mike Korenko Jean Vanni Pam Larsen Dawn Wellman Unofficial Committee Members or Other Interested Parties 3 : Steve

  7. CAMPUS ENERGY MODEL

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003655IBMPC00 Campus Energy Model for Control and Performance Validation  https://github.com/NREL/CampusEnergyModeling/releases/tag/v0.2.1 

  8. Fuel Model | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuels Model This model informs analyses of the availability of transportation fuel in the event the fuel supply chain is disrupted. The portion of the fuel supply system...

  9. Multiscale Subsurface Biogeochemical Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biogeochemical Modeling Multiscale Subsurface Biogeochemical Modeling ScheibeSmaller.jpg Simulation of flow inside an experimental packed bed, performed on Franklin Key...

  10. Building Energy Modeling Library

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Energy Modeling (BEM) Library * Define and develop a best-practices BEM knowledge ... Links within modeling process for informing design Terms Methods Project Phase Key ...

  11. Single-Column Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The model contains a full set of modern GCM parameterizations of subgrid physical processes. To force the model, the...

  12. Modeling and Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE modeling and analysis activities focus on reducing uncertainties and improving transparency in photovoltaics (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) performance modeling. The overall goal of...

  13. Involved-Site Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Versus 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in Early Stage Supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Ciammella, Patrizia; Piva, Cristina; Ragona, Riccardo; Botto, Barbara; Gavarotti, Paolo; Merli, Francesco; Vitolo, Umberto; Iotti, Cinzia; Ricardi, Umberto

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) allows for margin reduction and highly conformal dose distribution, with consistent advantages in sparing of normal tissues. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare involved-site IG-IMRT with involved-site 3D conformal RT (3D-CRT) in the treatment of early stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) involving the mediastinum, with efficacy and toxicity as primary clinical endpoints. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 90 stage IIA HL patients treated with either involved-site 3D-CRT or IG-IMRT between 2005 and 2012 in 2 different institutions. Inclusion criteria were favorable or unfavorable disease (according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria), complete response after 3 to 4 cycles of an adriamycin- bleomycin-vinblastine-dacarbazine (ABVD) regimen plus 30 Gy as total radiation dose. Exclusion criteria were chemotherapy other than ABVD, partial response after ABVD, total radiation dose other than 30 Gy. Clinical endpoints were relapse-free survival (RFS) and acute toxicity. Results: Forty-nine patients were treated with 3D-CRT (54.4%) and 41 with IG-IMRT (45.6%). Median follow-up time was 54.2 months for 3D-CRT and 24.1 months for IG-IMRT. No differences in RFS were observed between the 2 groups, with 1 relapse each. Three-year RFS was 98.7% for 3D-CRT and 100% for IG-IMRT. Grade 2 toxicity events, mainly mucositis, were recorded in 32.7% of 3D-CRT patients (16 of 49) and in 9.8% of IG-IMRT patients (4 of 41). IG-IMRT was significantly associated with a lower incidence of grade 2 acute toxicity (P=.043). Conclusions: RFS rates at 3 years were extremely high in both groups, albeit the median follow-up time is different. Acute tolerance profiles were better for IG-IMRT than for 3D-CRT. Our preliminary results support the clinical safety and efficacy of advanced RT planning and delivery techniques in patients affected with early stage HL, achieving complete response after ABVD-based chemotherapy.

  14. Best Practices for Emergency Response to Incidents Involving Electric Vehicles Battery Hazards: A Report on Full-Scale Testing Results

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Best Practices for Emergency Response to Incidents Involving Electric Vehicles Battery Hazards: A Report on Full-Scale Testing Results Final Report Prepared by: R. Thomas Long Jr., P.E., CFEI Andrew F. Blum, P.E., CFEI Thomas J. Bress, Ph.D., P.E., CRE Benjamin R.T. Cotts, Ph.D. Exponent, Inc. 17000 Science Drive, Suite 200 Bowie, MD 20715 © June 2013 Fire Protection Research Foundation THE FIRE PROTECTION RESEARCH FOUNDATION ONE BATTERYMARCH PARK QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS, U.S.A. 02169-7471

  15. DOE Technical Standards List: Directory of DOE and Contractor Personnel Involved in Non-Government Standards Activities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    4-99 May 1999 Superseding DOE-TSL-4-98 May 1998 DOE TECHNICAL STANDARDS LIST DIRECTORY OF DOE AND CONTRACTOR PERSONNEL INVOLVED IN NON- GOVERNMENT STANDARDS ACTIVITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA SDMP Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375,

  16. Activation of eNOS in endothelial cells exposed to ionizing radiation involves components of the DNA damage response pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Sakai, Yuri; Yamamori, Tohru; Niwa, Koichi; Hattori, Yuichi; Kondo, Takashi; Inanami, Osamu

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • eNOS activity is increased in BAECs exposed to X-rays. • ATM is involved in this increased eNOS activity. • HSP90 modulates the radiation-induced activation of ATM and eNOS. - Abstract: In this study, the involvement of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase and heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation was investigated in X-irradiated bovine aortic endothelial cells. The activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and the phosphorylation of serine 1179 of eNOS (eNOS-Ser1179) were significantly increased in irradiated cells. The radiation-induced increases in NOS activity and eNOS-Ser1179 phosphorylation levels were significantly reduced by treatment with either an ATM inhibitor (Ku-60019) or an HSP90 inhibitor (geldanamycin). Geldanamycin was furthermore found to suppress the radiation-induced phosphorylation of ATM-Ser1181. Our results indicate that the radiation-induced eNOS activation in bovine aortic endothelial cells is regulated by ATM and HSP90.

  17. Model reduction of systems with localized nonlinearities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Segalman, Daniel Joseph

    2006-03-01

    An LDRD funded approach to development of reduced order models for systems with local nonlinearities is presented. This method is particularly useful for problems of structural dynamics, but has potential application in other fields. The key elements of this approach are (1) employment of eigen modes of a reference linear system, (2) incorporation of basis functions with an appropriate discontinuity at the location of the nonlinearity. Galerkin solution using the above combination of basis functions appears to capture the dynamics of the system with a small basis set. For problems involving small amplitude dynamics, the addition of discontinuous (joint) modes appears to capture the nonlinear mechanics correctly while preserving the modal form of the predictions. For problems involving large amplitude dynamics of realistic joint models (macro-slip), the use of appropriate joint modes along with sufficient basis eigen modes to capture the frequencies of the system greatly enhances convergence, though the modal nature the result is lost. Also observed is that when joint modes are used in conjunction with a small number of elastic eigen modes in problems of macro-slip of realistic joint models, the resulting predictions are very similar to those of the full solution when seen through a low pass filter. This has significance both in terms of greatly reducing the number of degrees of freedom of the problem and in terms of facilitating the use of much larger time steps.

  18. modeling-sediment-html

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling of Sediment Transport and Porous Medium Response Under Current ad Waves

  19. Biomass Scenario Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-09-01

    The Biomass Scenario Model (BSM) is a unique, carefully validated, state-of-the-art dynamic model of the domestic biofuels supply chain which explicitly focuses on policy issues, their feasibility, and potential side effects. It integrates resource availability, physical/technological/economic constraints, behavior, and policy. The model uses a system dynamics simulation (not optimization) to model dynamic interactions across the supply chain.

  20. Dynamic cable analysis models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palo, P.A.; Meggitt, D.J.; Nordell, W.J.

    1983-05-01

    This paper presents a summary of the development and validation of undersea cable dynamics computer models by the Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory (NCEL) under the sponsorship of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command. These models allow for the analysis of both small displacement (strumming) and large displacement (static and dynamic) deformations of arbitrarily configured cable structures. All of the large displacement models described in this paper are available to the public. This paper does not emphasize the theoretical development of the models (this information is available in other references) but emphasizes the various features of the models, the comparisons between model output and experimental data, and applications for which the models have been used.

  1. Hydrologic Modeling Capabilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Understanding complex hydrologic systems requires the ability to develop, utilize, and interpret both numerical and analytical models. The Defense Waste Management Programs has both experience and technical knowledge to use and develop Earth systems models. Hydrological Modeling Models are simplified representations of reality, which we accept do not capture every detail of reality. Mathematical and numerical models can be used to rigorously test geologic and hydrologic assumptions, determine

  2. Microsoft Word - Modeling Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Estimated Onsite worker and offsite public dose Modeling has been done to estimate onsite worker and offsite public dose that may have resulted from the February 14, 2014, event. The results of the modeling indicate that all potential doses were well below the applicable regulatory limits (see results below). The modeling results are consistent with actual worker bioassay results. For modeling data see: (http://www.wipp.energy.gov/Special/Modeling Results.pdf) Estimated Dose Applicable

  3. Surface photovoltage measurements and finite element modeling of SAW devices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donnelly, Christine

    2012-03-01

    Over the course of a Summer 2011 internship with the MEMS department of Sandia National Laboratories, work was completed on two major projects. The first and main project of the summer involved taking surface photovoltage measurements for silicon samples, and using these measurements to determine surface recombination velocities and minority carrier diffusion lengths of the materials. The SPV method was used to fill gaps in the knowledge of material parameters that had not been determined successfully by other characterization methods. The second project involved creating a 2D finite element model of a surface acoustic wave device. A basic form of the model with the expected impedance response curve was completed, and the model is ready to be further developed for analysis of MEMS photonic resonator devices.

  4. TEPP Planning Products Model Needs Assessment Self Assessment Document

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Planning Products Model Needs Assessment Self Assessment Document Prepared for the Department of Energy Office of Transportation and Emergency Management 02B00215-13.p65 1 Model Needs Assessment R E V 8 - 0 7 / 2 0 1 2 T r a n s p o r t a t i o n E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s P r o g r a m PURPOSE The purpose of this Model Needs Assessment is to assist state, tribal, or local officials in determining emergency responder readiness for response to a transportation accident involving

  5. Bringing Alaska North Slope Natural Gas to Market (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    At least three alternatives have been proposed over the years for bringing sizable volumes of natural gas from Alaska's remote North Slope to market in the lower 48 states: a pipeline interconnecting with the existing pipeline system in central Alberta, Canada; a gas-to-liquids (GTL) plant on the North Slope; and a large liquefied natural gas (LNG) export facility at Valdez, Alaska. The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) explicitly models the pipeline and GTL options. The what if LNG option is not modeled in NEMS.

  6. DOE Technical Standards List. Directory of DOE and contractor personnel involved in non-government standards activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    This is a periodic report on the level of agency participation in non-Government standards activities. This technical standards list is intended to assist US Department of Energy (DOE) management and other personnel involved in the DOE technical Standards Program by identifying those participating individuals. The body of this document contains a listing of DOE employees and DOE contractors who have submitted a Record of Non-Government Standards Activity. Additional names were added from rosters supplied by non-Government standards bodies. Appendices to this document are provided to list the information by parent employment organization, by non-Government standards activity, and by the proper names of the non-Government standards organizations and committees.

  7. DNA rearrangement in human follicular lymphoma can involve the 5' or the 3' region of the bcl-2 gene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsujimoto, Y.; Bashir, M.M.; Givol, I.; Cossman, J.; Jaffe, E.; Croce, C.M.

    1987-03-01

    In most human lymphomas, the chromosome translocation t(14;18) occurs within two breakpoint clustering regions on chromosome 18, the major one at the 3' untranslated region of the bcl-2 gene and the minor one at 3' of the gene. Analysis of a panel of follicular lymphoma DNAs using probes for the first exon of the bcl-2 gene indicates that DNA rearrangements may also occur 5' to the involved bcl-2 gene. In this case the IgH locus and the bcl-2 gene are found in an order suggesting that an inversion also occurred during the translocation process. The coding region of the bcl-2 gene, however, are left intact in all cases of follicular lymphoma studied to date.

  8. Selection of potential IAEA inspection strategies involving cascade access at the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-04-13

    This report has been prepared as a US contribution to Team 4 of the Hexapartite Safeguards Project. It provides to the Team 4 participants one example of an approach, which has been used in the United States, to developing a range of safeguards strategies involving differing degrees of access to cascade areas of centrifuge enrichment plants. Its purpose is to facilitate the work of other Hexapartite participants in completing Task II of Team 4's terms of reference. The scope of this report is limited to identifying safeguards approaches for the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP) which involve differing degrees of access to the cascade area. This report provides a method for selecting cascade access inspection strategies at GCEP which appear promising for more detailed evaluation. It is quite important to note, however, that the effectiveness and practicability of these strategies have not been established at the present. In addition, some strategies have been included on the basis of very preliminary calculations and considerations which have not been validated. Thus, some of these strategies may ultimately be rejected because they prove to be impracticable. Considerations of cost and the possible transfer of information and technology related to the production of enriched uranium will also be pertinent in considering the degrees and frequency of access to the cascade areas of centrifuge enrichment plants. This report describes the process for combining technical measures, implementation approaches and objectives to arrive at the total number of theoretically possible combinations. It then describes how these combinations may be reduced in a series of steps to a number that is more manageable for detailed evaluation. The process is shown schematically.

  9. Expediting environmental cleanup--nationwide stakeholder involvement in U.S. Department of Energy`s plume focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCabe, G.H.; Stein, S.L.; Serie, P.J.

    1995-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) faces a major challenge in cleaning up its contaminated sites throughout the United States. One major area of concern is the plumes in soil and ground water, contaminated with a myriad of different pollutants. DOE recently established the Plume Focus Area to address these problems. The mission of the Plume Focus Area is to enhance the deployment of innovative technologies for containing and cleaning up contaminant plumes in ground water and soil at all DOE sites. By involving a range of stakeholders in the selection, demonstration, and evaluation of new technologies, the deployment of these technologies can be enhanced. Through this strategy, technology users join with other stakeholders to assess the appropriateness of new technologies for addressing plume contamination, and characterize the conditions under which those emerging technologies will be acceptable. If new plume cleanup technologies are to be deployable, they must improve on today`s baseline technologies. If sites and their stakeholders understood the technologies, recognize that their concerns are reflected in the evaluations and demonstrations, and participate in assessing how technology performance addresses their concerns, the likelihood of acceptance of those technologies is greater. Thus, broad stakeholder acceptance becomes part of the definition of an improved technology, evaluated in parallel with technical performance, cost, and other traditional parameters. This paper further describes the goals and objectives of the Plume Focus Area and emphasizes the importance of stakeholder involvement in achieving them. The process of coordinating with DOE sites is described to highlight how stakeholder input is considered throughout the Plume Focus Area decision-making process in selecting, developing, demonstrating, and evaluating innovative technologies to address plume problems.

  10. Ensemble Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Addis, R.P.

    2002-06-24

    Prognostic atmospheric dispersion models are used to generate consequence assessments, which assist decision-makers in the event of a release from a nuclear facility. Differences in the forecast wind fields generated by various meteorological agencies, differences in the transport and diffusion models, as well as differences in the way these models treat the release source term, result in differences in the resulting plumes. Even dispersion models using the same wind fields may produce substantially different plumes. This talk will address how ensemble techniques may be used to enable atmospheric modelers to provide decision-makers with a more realistic understanding of how both the atmosphere and the models behave.

  11. Working memory, situation models, and synesthesia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Radvansky, Gabriel A.; Gibson, Bradley S.; McNerney, M. Windy

    2013-03-04

    Research on language comprehension suggests a strong relationship between working memory span measures and language comprehension. However, there is also evidence that this relationship weakens at higher levels of comprehension, such as the situation model level. The current study explored this relationship by comparing 10 grapheme–color synesthetes who have additional color experiences when they read words that begin with different letters and 48 normal controls on a number of tests of complex working memory capacity and processing at the situation model level. On all tests of working memory capacity, the synesthetes outperformed the controls. Importantly, there was no carryover benefitmore » for the synesthetes for processing at the situation model level. This reinforces the idea that although some aspects of language comprehension are related to working memory span scores, this applies less directly to situation model levels. As a result, this suggests that theories of working memory must take into account this limitation, and the working memory processes that are involved in situation model construction and processing must be derived.« less

  12. Enterprise Risk Management Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Model The Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) Model is a system used to analyze the cost and benefit of addressing risks inherent in the work performed by the Department of Energy....

  13. Multifamily Envelope Leakage Model

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Multifamily Envelope Leakage Model © Steven Winter Associates, Inc. 2013 Acknowledgements * Sponsored by Department of Energy's Building America Program © Steven Winter Associates, Inc. 2013 NEW YORK, NY | WASHINGTON, DC | NORWALK, CT CALL US 866.676.1972 | SWINTER.COM Outline/Agenda * Introduce multifamily air leakage testing * Statement of the problem * Steps taken for a solution * Model results * Applying the model * Benefits of the model © Steven Winter Associates, Inc. 2013 NEW YORK, NY

  14. Modeling & Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A view upwind of SWIS' aerosol-generating system. Permalink Gallery Sandia Wake-Imaging System Successfully Deployed at Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility Analysis, Capabilities, Energy, Facilities, Modeling, Modeling, Modeling & Analysis, Modeling & Analysis, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Research & Capabilities, SWIFT, Systems Analysis, Technical Highlights, Wind Energy, Wind News Sandia Wake-Imaging System Successfully Deployed at Scaled Wind Farm

  15. Model for spectral and chromatographic data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jarman, Kristin [Richland, WA; Willse, Alan [Richland, WA; Wahl, Karen [Richland, WA; Wahl, Jon [Richland, WA

    2002-11-26

    A method and apparatus using a spectral analysis technique are disclosed. In one form of the invention, probabilities are selected to characterize the presence (and in another form, also a quantification of a characteristic) of peaks in an indexed data set for samples that match a reference species, and other probabilities are selected for samples that do not match the reference species. An indexed data set is acquired for a sample, and a determination is made according to techniques exemplified herein as to whether the sample matches or does not match the reference species. When quantification of peak characteristics is undertaken, the model is appropriately expanded, and the analysis accounts for the characteristic model and data. Further techniques are provided to apply the methods and apparatuses to process control, cluster analysis, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, and other procedures involving multiple comparisons of indexed data.

  16. Model Fire Protection Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To facilitate conformance with its fire safety directives and the implementation of a comprehensive fire protection program, DOE has developed a number of "model" program documents. These include a comprehensive model fire protection program, model fire hazards analyses and assessments, fire protection system inspection and testing procedures, and related material.

  17. IR DIAL performance modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharlemann, E.T.

    1994-07-01

    We are developing a DIAL performance model for CALIOPE at LLNL. The intent of the model is to provide quick and interactive parameter sensitivity calculations with immediate graphical output. A brief overview of the features of the performance model is given, along with an example of performance calculations for a non-CALIOPE application.

  18. Transportation Systems Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TRACC RESEARCH Computational Fluid Dynamics Computational Structural Mechanics Transportation Systems Modeling TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS MODELING Overview of TSM Transportation systems modeling research at TRACC uses the TRANSIMS (Transportation Analysis SIMulation System) traffic micro simulation code developed by the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT). The TRANSIMS code represents the latest generation of traffic simulation codes developed jointly under multiyear programs by USDOT, the

  19. CONTENT MODEL HOW-TO

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003241MLTPL00 Content Model Guidelines  https://github.com/usgin/usginspecs/wiki/Content-Model-Guidelines 

  20. Novel mechanism for scavenging of hypochlorite involving a periplasmic methionine-rich peptide and methionine sulfoxide reductase

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Melnyk, Ryan A.; Youngblut, Matthew D.; Clark, Iain C.; Carlson, Hans K.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Lavarone, Anthony T.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.; Coates, John D.

    2015-05-12

    Reactive chlorine species (RCS) defense mechanisms are important for bacterial fitness in diverse environments. In addition to the anthropogenic use of RCS in the form of bleach, these compounds are also produced naturally through photochemical reactions of natural organic matter and in vivo by the mammalian immune system in response to invading microorganisms. To gain insight into bacterial RCS defense mechanisms, we investigated Azospira suillum strain PS, which produces periplasmic RCS as an intermediate of perchlorate respiration. Our studies identified an RCS response involving an RCS stress-sensing sigma/anti-sigma factor system (SigF/NrsF), a soluble hypochlorite-scavenging methionine-rich periplasmic protein (MrpX), and amore » putative periplasmic methionine sulfoxide reductase (YedY1). We investigated the underlying mechanism by phenotypic characterization of appropriate gene deletions, chemogenomic profiling of barcoded transposon pools, transcriptome sequencing, and biochemical assessment of methionine oxidation. Our results demonstrated that SigF was specifically activated by RCS and initiated the transcription of a small regulon centering around yedY1 and mrpX. A yedY1 paralog (yedY2) was found to have a similar fitness to yedY1 despite not being regulated by SigF. Markerless deletions of yedY2 confirmed its synergy with the SigF regulon. MrpX was strongly induced and rapidly oxidized by RCS, especially hypochlorite. Our results suggest a mechanism involving hypochlorite scavenging by sacrificial oxidation of the MrpX in the periplasm. Reduced MrpX is regenerated by the YedY methionine sulfoxide reductase activity. The phylogenomic distribution of this system revealed conservation in several Proteobacteria of clinical importance, including uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Brucella spp., implying a putative role in immune response evasion in vivo. In addition, bacteria are often stressed in the environment by reactive chlorine species (RCS) of either anthropogenic or natural origin, but little is known of the defense mechanisms they have evolved. Using a microorganism that generates RCS internally as part of its respiratory process allowed us to uncover a novel defense mechanism based on RCS scavenging by reductive reaction with a sacrificial methionine-rich peptide and redox recycling through a methionine sulfoxide reductase. As a result, this system is conserved in a broad diversity of organisms, including some of clinical importance, invoking a possible important role in innate immune system evasion.« less

  1. Novel mechanism for scavenging of hypochlorite involving a periplasmic methionine-rich peptide and methionine sulfoxide reductase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melnyk, Ryan A.; Youngblut, Matthew D.; Clark, Iain C.; Carlson, Hans K.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Lavarone, Anthony T.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.; Coates, John D.

    2015-05-12

    Reactive chlorine species (RCS) defense mechanisms are important for bacterial fitness in diverse environments. In addition to the anthropogenic use of RCS in the form of bleach, these compounds are also produced naturally through photochemical reactions of natural organic matter and in vivo by the mammalian immune system in response to invading microorganisms. To gain insight into bacterial RCS defense mechanisms, we investigated Azospira suillum strain PS, which produces periplasmic RCS as an intermediate of perchlorate respiration. Our studies identified an RCS response involving an RCS stress-sensing sigma/anti-sigma factor system (SigF/NrsF), a soluble hypochlorite-scavenging methionine-rich periplasmic protein (MrpX), and a putative periplasmic methionine sulfoxide reductase (YedY1). We investigated the underlying mechanism by phenotypic characterization of appropriate gene deletions, chemogenomic profiling of barcoded transposon pools, transcriptome sequencing, and biochemical assessment of methionine oxidation. Our results demonstrated that SigF was specifically activated by RCS and initiated the transcription of a small regulon centering around yedY1 and mrpX. A yedY1 paralog (yedY2) was found to have a similar fitness to yedY1 despite not being regulated by SigF. Markerless deletions of yedY2 confirmed its synergy with the SigF regulon. MrpX was strongly induced and rapidly oxidized by RCS, especially hypochlorite. Our results suggest a mechanism involving hypochlorite scavenging by sacrificial oxidation of the MrpX in the periplasm. Reduced MrpX is regenerated by the YedY methionine sulfoxide reductase activity. The phylogenomic distribution of this system revealed conservation in several Proteobacteria of clinical importance, including uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Brucella spp., implying a putative role in immune response evasion in vivo. In addition, bacteria are often stressed in the environment by reactive chlorine species (RCS) of either anthropogenic or natural origin, but little is known of the defense mechanisms they have evolved. Using a microorganism that generates RCS internally as part of its respiratory process allowed us to uncover a novel defense mechanism based on RCS scavenging by reductive reaction with a sacrificial methionine-rich peptide and redox recycling through a methionine sulfoxide reductase. As a result, this system is conserved in a broad diversity of organisms, including some of clinical importance, invoking a possible important role in innate immune system evasion.

  2. An improved multiscale model for dilute turbulent gas particle flows based

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    on the equilibration of energy concept (Thesis/Dissertation) | SciTech Connect Thesis/Dissertation: An improved multiscale model for dilute turbulent gas particle flows based on the equilibration of energy concept Citation Details In-Document Search Title: An improved multiscale model for dilute turbulent gas particle flows based on the equilibration of energy concept Many particle-laden flows in engineering applications involve turbulent gas flows. Modeling multiphase turbulent flows is an

  3. Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL, LBNL and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    SNL for the Used Fuel Disposition Program | Department of Energy Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL, LBNL and SNL for the Used Fuel Disposition Program Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL, LBNL and SNL for the Used Fuel Disposition Program The report summarizes laboratory and field observations and numerical modeling related to coupled processes involving brine and vapor migration in geologic salt, focusing on recent developments and studies

  4. UZ Colloid Transport Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. McGraw

    2000-04-13

    The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations.

  5. Foam process models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moffat, Harry K.; Noble, David R.; Baer, Thomas A.; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Mondy, Lisa Ann

    2008-09-01

    In this report, we summarize our work on developing a production level foam processing computational model suitable for predicting the self-expansion of foam in complex geometries. The model is based on a finite element representation of the equations of motion, with the movement of the free surface represented using the level set method, and has been implemented in SIERRA/ARIA. An empirically based time- and temperature-dependent density model is used to encapsulate the complex physics of foam nucleation and growth in a numerically tractable model. The change in density with time is at the heart of the foam self-expansion as it creates the motion of the foam. This continuum-level model uses an homogenized description of foam, which does not include the gas explicitly. Results from the model are compared to temperature-instrumented flow visualization experiments giving the location of the foam front as a function of time for our EFAR model system.

  6. Model development for household waste prevention behaviour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bortoleto, Ana Paula; Kurisu, Kiyo H.; Hanaki, Keisuke

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model waste prevention behaviour using structure equation modelling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We merge attitude-behaviour theories with wider models from environmental psychology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Personal norms and perceived behaviour control are the main behaviour predictors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental concern, moral obligation and inconvenience are the main influence on the behaviour. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Waste prevention and recycling are different dimensions of waste management behaviour. - Abstract: Understanding waste prevention behaviour (WPB) could enable local governments and decision makers to design more-effective policies for reducing the amount of waste that is generated. By merging well-known attitude-behaviour theories with elements from wider models from environmental psychology, an extensive cognitive framework that provides new and valuable insights is developed for understanding the involvement of individuals in waste prevention. The results confirm the usefulness of the theory of planned behaviour and of Schwartz's altruistic behaviour model as bases for modelling participation in waste prevention. A more elaborate integrated model of prevention was shown to be necessary for the complete analysis of attitudinal aspects associated with waste prevention. A postal survey of 158 respondents provided empirical support for eight of 12 hypotheses. The proposed structural equation indicates that personal norms and perceived behaviour control are the main predictors and that, unlike the case of recycling, subjective norms have a weak influence on WPB. It also suggests that, since social norms have not presented a direct influence, WPB is likely to be influenced by a concern for the environment and the community as well by perceptions of moral obligation and inconvenience. Results also proved that recycling and waste prevention represent different dimensions of waste management behaviour requiring particular approaches to increase individuals' engagement in future policies.

  7. Nuclear substructure reorganization during late stageerythropoiesis is selective and does not involve caspase cleavage ofmajor nuclear substructural proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Lo, Annie J.; Short, Sarah A.; Koury, MarkJ.; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2005-04-06

    Enucleation, a rare feature of mammalian differentiation, occurs in three cell types: erythroblasts, lens epithelium and keratinocytes. Previous investigations suggest that caspase activation functions in lens epithelial and keratinocyte enucleation, as well as in early erythropoiesis encompassing BFU-E differentiation to proerythroblast. To determine whether caspase activation contributes to later erythropoiesis and whether nuclear substructures other than chromatin reorganize, we analyzed distributions of nuclear subcompartment proteins and assayed for caspase-induced cleavage of subcompartmental target proteins in mouse erythroblasts. We found that patterns of lamin B in the filamentous network interacting with both the nuclear envelope and DNA, nuclear matrix protein NuMA, and splicing factors Sm and SC35 persisted during nuclear condensation, consistent with effective transcription of genes expressed late in differentiation. Thus nuclear reorganization prior to enucleation is selective, allowing maintenance of critical transcriptional processes independent of extensive chromosomal reorganization. Consistent with these data, we found no evidence for caspase-induced cleavage of major nuclear subcompartment proteins during late erythropoiesis, in contrast to what has been observed in early erythropoiesis and in lens epithelial and keratinocyte differentiation. These findings imply that nuclear condensation and extrusion during terminal erythroid differentiation involve novel mechanisms that do not entail major activation of apoptotic machinery.

  8. Visible light stimulating dual-wavelength emission and O vacancy involved energy transfer behavior in luminescence for coaxial nanocable arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Lei, E-mail: nanoyang@qq.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Hunan Province Key Laboratory for Spray Deposition Technology and Application, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Dong, Jiazhang; Jiang, Zhongcheng [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Pan, Anlian; Zhuang, Xiujuan [Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Physics and Technology of Hunan Province, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2014-06-14

    We report a strategy to investigate O vacancy (V{sub O}) involved energy transfer and dual-wavelength yellow emission in coaxial nanocable. By electric field deposition and subsequent sol-gel template approach, ZnO:Tb/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu coaxial nanocable arrays are synthesized. After visible light excitation, system is promoted to O vacancy charge transfer state of V{sub O}(0/+). In the following cross relaxation, energy transfer from V{sub O} to the excitation energy level of Tb{sup 3+} in ZnO:Tb core area. While in Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu shell area, energy transfer to the excitation energy level of Eu{sup 3+}. Subsequently, dual-wavelength emission is observed. By constructing nanocable with dual-wavelength emission, yellow luminescence is obtained. Adjust doping concentration of Eu{sup 3+} or Tb{sup 3+} in the range of 0.01–0.05, chromaticity coordinates of ZnO:Tb/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu nanocable stably stays at yellow region in color space except ZnO:Tb{sub 0.01}/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sub 0.01}. As Vo states act as media in energy transfer process in nanocablers, visible light can stimulate dual-wavelength emissions. Yellow luminescent nanocable arrays will have great applications in light-emitting diode luminescence.

  9. Evidence of extra-telomeric effects of hTERT and its regulation involving a feedback loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Serene R.; Cunningham, Amanda P.; Huynh, Vu Q.; Andrews, Lucy G.; Tollefsbol, Trygve O. . E-mail: trygve@uab.edu

    2007-01-15

    The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is the catalytic subunit of the enzyme telomerase which is responsible for telomeric maintenance and extension. Using RNA interference to knock down hTERT mRNA expression, we provide evidence that hTERT exerts extra-telomeric effects on the cell cycle and on its own regulatory proteins, specifically: p53 and p21. We tested our hypothesis that hTERT regulates its own expression through effects on upstream regulatory genes using transformed human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) cells, p53 and p16 {sup INK4a} null human ovarian cancer SKOV-3 cells, and p53-null MDA-MB-157 human mammary cancer cells. In HEK 293 cells, hTERT knockdown resulted in elevated p53 and p21 transcription and a decrease in cellular proliferation. Similar results were observed in the MDA-MB-157 cell line where p21 was upregulated, correlating with cell growth inhibition. In contrast, we observed a decrease in expression of p21 in SKOV-3 cells with hTERT knockdown and cell growth appeared to be unaffected. These findings suggest that hTERT may be involved in a feedback loop system, thereby playing a role in its own regulation.

  10. G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 is involved in brain development during zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Yanan; Liu, Xiaochun; Zhu, Pei; Li, Jianzhen; Sham, Kathy W.Y.; Cheng, Shuk Han; Li, Shuisheng; Zhang, Yong; Cheng, Christopher H.K.; Lin, Haoran; College of Ocean, Hainan University, Haikou 570228, Hainan

    2013-05-24

    Highlights: •The Gper expression was detected in the developing brain of zebrafish. •Gper morpholino knockdown induced apoptosis of brain cells. •Gper morpholino knockdown reduced expression in neuron markers. •Zebrafish Gper may be involved in neuronal development. -- Abstract: G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (Gper, formerly known as GPR30) is found to be a trophic and protective factor in mediating action of estrogen in adult brain, while its role in developing brain remains to be elucidated. Here we present the expression pattern of Gper and its functions during embryogenesis in zebrafish. Both the mRNA and protein of Gper were detected throughout embryogenesis. Whole mount in situ hybridization (WISH) revealed a wide distribution of gper mRNAs in various regions of the developing brain. Gper knockdown by specific morpholinos resulted in growth retardation in embryos and morphological defects in the developing brain. In addition, induced apoptosis, decreased proliferation of the brain cells and maldevelopment of sensory and motor neurons were also found in the morphants. Our results provide novel insights into Gper functions in the developing brain, revealing that Gper can maintain the survival of the brain cells, and formation and/or differentiation of the sensory and motor neurons.

  11. H2-M polymorphism in mice susceptible to collagen-induced arthritis involves the peptide binding groove

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, W.; Loos, M.; Maeurer, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    The ability to develop type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice is associated with the major histocompatibility I-A gene and with as yet poorly defined regulatory molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen processing and presentation pathway. H2-M molecules are thought to be involved in the loading of antigenic peptides into the MHC class II binding cleft. We sequenced H2-Ma, H2-Mb1, and H2-Mb2 genes from CIA-susceptible and -resistant mouse strains and identified four different Ma and Mb2 alleles, and three different Mb1 alleles defined by polymorphic residues within the predicted peptide binding groove. Most CIA-resistant mouse strains share common Ma, Mb1, and Mb2 alleles. In contrast, H2-M alleles designated Ma-III, Ma-IV, Mb1-III, and Mb2-IV could be exclusively identified in the CIA-susceptible H2{sup r} and H2{sup q} haplotypes, suggesting that allelic H2-M molecules may modulate the composition of different CII peptides loaded onto MHC class II molecules, presumably presenting {open_quotes}arthritogenic{close_quotes} epitopes to T lymphocytes. 42 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Innovative mathematical modeling in environmental remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeh, Gour T.; Gwo, Jin Ping; Siegel, Malcolm D.; Li, Ming-Hsu; Fang, Yilin; Zhang, Fan; Luo, Wensui; Yabusaki, Steven B.

    2013-05-01

    There are two different ways to model reactive transport: ad hoc and innovative reaction-based approaches. The former, such as the Kd simplification of adsorption, has been widely employed by practitioners, while the latter has been mainly used in scientific communities for elucidating mechanisms of biogeochemical transport processes. It is believed that innovative mechanistic-based models could serve as protocols for environmental remediation as well. This paper reviews the development of a mechanistically coupled fluid flow, thermal transport, hydrologic transport, and reactive biogeochemical model and example-applications to environmental remediation problems. Theoretical bases are sufficiently described. Four example problems previously carried out are used to demonstrate how numerical experimentation can be used to evaluate the feasibility of different remediation approaches. The first one involved the application of a 56-species uranium tailing problem to the Melton Branch Subwatershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the parallel version of the model. Simulations were made to demonstrate the potential mobilization of uranium and other chelating agents in the proposed waste disposal site. The second problem simulated laboratory-scale system to investigate the role of natural attenuation in potential off-site migration of uranium from uranium mill tailings after restoration. It showed inadequacy of using a single Kd even for a homogeneous medium. The third example simulated laboratory experiments involving extremely high concentrations of uranium, technetium, aluminum, nitrate, and toxic metals (e.g.,Ni, Cr, Co).The fourth example modeled microbially-mediated immobilization of uranium in an unconfined aquifer using acetate amendment in a field-scale experiment. The purposes of these modeling studies were to simulate various mechanisms of mobilization and immobilization of radioactive wastes and to illustrate how to apply reactive transport models for environmental remediation.The second problem simulated laboratory-scale system to investigate the role of natural attenuation in potential off-site migration of uranium from uranium mill tailings after restoration. It showed inadequacy of using a single Kd even for a homogeneous medium.

  13. Ventilation Model Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. Chipman; J. Case

    2002-12-20

    The purpose of the Ventilation Model is to simulate the heat transfer processes in and around waste emplacement drifts during periods of forced ventilation. The model evaluates the effects of emplacement drift ventilation on the thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts and surrounding rock mass, and calculates the heat removal by ventilation as a measure of the viability of ventilation to delay the onset of peak repository temperature and reduce its magnitude. The heat removal by ventilation is temporally and spatially dependent, and is expressed as the fraction of heat carried away by the ventilation air compared to the fraction of heat produced by radionuclide decay. One minus the heat removal is called the wall heat fraction, or the remaining amount of heat that is transferred via conduction to the surrounding rock mass. Downstream models, such as the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' (BSC 2001), use the wall heat fractions as outputted from the Ventilation Model to initialize their post-closure analyses. The Ventilation Model report was initially developed to analyze the effects of preclosure continuous ventilation in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) emplacement drifts, and to provide heat removal data to support EBS design. Revision 00 of the Ventilation Model included documentation of the modeling results from the ANSYS-based heat transfer model. Revision 01 ICN 01 included the results of the unqualified software code MULTIFLUX to assess the influence of moisture on the ventilation efficiency. The purposes of Revision 02 of the Ventilation Model are: (1) To validate the conceptual model for preclosure ventilation of emplacement drifts and verify its numerical application in accordance with new procedural requirements as outlined in AP-SIII-10Q, Models (Section 7.0). (2) To satisfy technical issues posed in KTI agreement RDTME 3.14 (Reamer and Williams 2001a). Specifically to demonstrate, with respect to the ANSYS ventilation model, the adequacy of the discretization (Section 6.2.3.1), and the downstream applicability of the model results (i.e. wall heat fractions) to initialize post-closure thermal models (Section 6.6). (3) To satisfy the remainder of KTI agreement TEF 2.07 (Reamer and Williams 2001b). Specifically to provide the results of post-test ANSYS modeling of the Atlas Facility forced convection tests (Section 7.1.2). This portion of the model report also serves as a validation exercise per AP-SIII.10Q, Models, for the ANSYS ventilation model. (4) To asses the impacts of moisture on the ventilation efficiency.

  14. HIA, the next step: Defining models and roles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Putters, Kim . E-mail: k.putters@uvt.nl

    2005-10-15

    If HIA is to be an effective instrument for optimising health interests in the policy making process it has to recognise the different contests in which policy is made and the relevance of both technical rationality and political rationality. Policy making may adopt a rational perspective in which there is a systematic and orderly progression from problem formulation to solution or a network perspective in which there are multiple interdependencies, extensive negotiation and compromise, and the steps from problem to formulation are not followed sequentially or in any particular order. Policy problems may be simple with clear causal pathways and responsibilities or complex with unclear causal pathways and disputed responsibilities. Network analysis is required to show which stakeholders are involved, their support for health issues and the degree of consensus. From this analysis three models of HIA emerge. The first is the phases model which is fitted to simple problems and a rational perspective of policymaking. This model involves following structured steps. The second model is the rounds (Echternach) model that is fitted to complex problems and a network perspective of policymaking. This model is dynamic and concentrates on network solutions taking these steps in no particular order. The final model is the 'garbage can' model fitted to contexts which combine simple and complex problems. In this model HIA functions as a problem solver and signpost keeping all possible solutions and stakeholders in play and allowing solutions to emerge over time. HIA models should be the beginning rather than the conclusion of discussion the worlds of HIA and policymaking.

  15. A View on Future Building System Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetter, Michael

    2011-04-01

    This chapter presents what a future environment for building system modeling and simulation may look like. As buildings continue to require increased performance and better comfort, their energy and control systems are becoming more integrated and complex. We therefore focus in this chapter on the modeling, simulation and analysis of building energy and control systems. Such systems can be classified as heterogeneous systems because they involve multiple domains, such as thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer, electrical systems, control systems and communication systems. Also, they typically involve multiple temporal and spatial scales, and their evolution can be described by coupled differential equations, discrete equations and events. Modeling and simulating such systems requires a higher level of abstraction and modularisation to manage the increased complexity compared to what is used in today's building simulation programs. Therefore, the trend towards more integrated building systems is likely to be a driving force for changing the status quo of today's building simulation programs. Thischapter discusses evolving modeling requirements and outlines a path toward a future environment for modeling and simulation of heterogeneous building systems.A range of topics that would require many additional pages of discussion has been omitted. Examples include computational fluid dynamics for air and particle flow in and around buildings, people movement, daylight simulation, uncertainty propagation and optimisation methods for building design and controls. For different discussions and perspectives on the future of building modeling and simulation, we refer to Sahlin (2000), Augenbroe (2001) and Malkawi and Augenbroe (2004).

  16. Combined Estimation of Hydrogeologic Conceptual Model and Parameter Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Philip D.; Ye, Ming; Neuman, Shlomo P.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2004-03-01

    The objective of the research described in this report is the development and application of a methodology for comprehensively assessing the hydrogeologic uncertainties involved in dose assessment, including uncertainties associated with conceptual models, parameters, and scenarios. This report describes and applies a statistical method to quantitatively estimate the combined uncertainty in model predictions arising from conceptual model and parameter uncertainties. The method relies on model averaging to combine the predictions of a set of alternative models. Implementation is driven by the available data. When there is minimal site-specific data the method can be carried out with prior parameter estimates based on generic data and subjective prior model probabilities. For sites with observations of system behavior (and optionally data characterizing model parameters), the method uses model calibration to update the prior parameter estimates and model probabilities based on the correspondence between model predictions and site observations. The set of model alternatives can contain both simplified and complex models, with the requirement that all models be based on the same set of data. The method was applied to the geostatistical modeling of air permeability at a fractured rock site. Seven alternative variogram models of log air permeability were considered to represent data from single-hole pneumatic injection tests in six boreholes at the site. Unbiased maximum likelihood estimates of variogram and drift parameters were obtained for each model. Standard information criteria provided an ambiguous ranking of the models, which would not justify selecting one of them and discarding all others as is commonly done in practice. Instead, some of the models were eliminated based on their negligibly small updated probabilities and the rest were used to project the measured log permeabilities by kriging onto a rock volume containing the six boreholes. These four projections, and associated kriging variances, were averaged using the posterior model probabilities as weights. Finally, cross-validation was conducted by eliminating from consideration all data from one borehole at a time, repeating the above process, and comparing the predictive capability of the model-averaged result with that of each individual model. Using two quantitative measures of comparison, the model-averaged result was superior to any individual geostatistical model of log permeability considered.

  17. Runtime Tracing of The Community Earth System Model: Feasibility and Benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Dali [ORNL] [ORNL; Domke, Jens [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Community Earth System Models (CESM) is one of US's leading earth system modeling systems, which has over decades of development history and embraced by large, active user communities. In this paper, we first review the history of CESM software development and layout the general objectives of performance analysis. Then we present an offline global community land model simulation within the CESM framework to demonstrate the procedure of runtime tracing of CESM using the Vampir toolset. Finally, we explain the benefits of runtime tracing to the general earth system modeling community. We hope those considerations can also be beneficial to many other modeling research programs involving legacy high-performance computing applications.

  18. A Double Scattering Analytical Model For Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barradas, N. P.; Lorenz, K.; Alves, E.; Darakchieva, V.

    2011-06-01

    We present an analytical model for calculation of double scattering in elastic recoil detection measurements. Only events involving the beam particle and the recoil are considered, i.e. 1) an ion scatters off a target element and then produces a recoil, and 2) an ion produces a recoil which then scatters off a target element. Events involving intermediate recoils are not considered, i.e. when the primary ion produces a recoil which then produces a second recoil. If the recoil element is also present in the stopping foil, recoil events in the stopping foil are also calculated. We included the model in the standard code for IBA data analysis NDF, and applied it to the measurement of hydrogen in Si.

  19. The model coupling toolkit.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, J. W.; Jacob, R. L.; Foster, I.; Guo, J.

    2001-04-13

    The advent of coupled earth system models has raised an important question in parallel computing: What is the most effective method for coupling many parallel models to form a high-performance coupled modeling system? We present our solution to this problem--The Model Coupling Toolkit (MCT). We explain how our effort to construct the Next-Generation Coupler for NCAR Community Climate System Model motivated us to create this toolkit. We describe in detail the conceptual design of the MCT and explain its usage in constructing parallel coupled models. We present preliminary performance results for the toolkit's parallel data transfer facilities. Finally, we outline an agenda for future development of the MCT.

  20. Mitochondrial remodeling following fission inhibition by 15d-PGJ2 involves molecular changes in mitochondrial fusion protein OPA1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kar, Rekha; Department of Biochemistry, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 ; Mishra, Nandita; Singha, Prajjal K.; Venkatachalam, Manjeri A.; Department of Biochemistry, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 ; Saikumar, Pothana

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Chemical inhibition of fission protein Drp1 leads to mitochondrial fusion. {yields} Increased fusion stimulates molecular changes in mitochondrial fusion protein OPA1. {yields} Proteolysis of larger isoforms, new synthesis and ubiquitination of OPA1 occur. {yields} Loss of mitochondrial tubular rigidity and disorganization of cristae. {yields} Generation of large swollen dysfunctional mitochondria. -- Abstract: We showed earlier that 15 deoxy {Delta}{sup 12,14} prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) inactivates Drp1 and induces mitochondrial fusion . However, prolonged incubation of cells with 15d-PGJ2 resulted in remodeling of fused mitochondria into large swollen mitochondria with irregular cristae structure. While initial fusion of mitochondria by 15d-PGJ2 required the presence of both outer (Mfn1 and Mfn2) and inner (OPA1) mitochondrial membrane fusion proteins, later mitochondrial changes involved increased degradation of the fusion protein OPA1 and ubiquitination of newly synthesized OPA1 along with decreased expression of Mfn1 and Mfn2, which likely contributed to the loss of tubular rigidity, disorganization of cristae, and formation of large swollen degenerated dysfunctional mitochondria. Similar to inhibition of Drp1 by 15d-PGJ2, decreased expression of fission protein Drp1 by siRNA also resulted in the loss of fusion proteins. Prevention of 15d-PGJ2 induced mitochondrial elongation by thiol antioxidants prevented not only loss of OPA1 isoforms but also its ubiquitination. These findings provide novel insights into unforeseen complexity of molecular events that modulate mitochondrial plasticity.

  1. Generation IV benchmarking of TRISO fuel performance models under accident conditions. Modeling input data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaise Collin

    2014-09-01

    This document presents the benchmark plan for the calculation of particle fuel performance on safety testing experiments that are representative of operational accidental transients. The benchmark is dedicated to the modeling of fission product release under accident conditions by fuel performance codes from around the world, and the subsequent comparison to post-irradiation experiment (PIE) data from the modeled heating tests. The accident condition benchmark is divided into three parts: the modeling of a simplified benchmark problem to assess potential numerical calculation issues at low fission product release; the modeling of the AGR-1 and HFR-EU1bis safety testing experiments; and, the comparison of the AGR-1 and HFR-EU1bis modeling results with PIE data. The simplified benchmark case, thereafter named NCC (Numerical Calculation Case), is derived from ''Case 5'' of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on coated particle fuel technology [IAEA 2012]. It is included so participants can evaluate their codes at low fission product release. ''Case 5'' of the IAEA CRP-6 showed large code-to-code discrepancies in the release of fission products, which were attributed to ''effects of the numerical calculation method rather than the physical model''[IAEA 2012]. The NCC is therefore intended to check if these numerical effects subsist. The first two steps imply the involvement of the benchmark participants with a modeling effort following the guidelines and recommendations provided by this document. The third step involves the collection of the modeling results by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the comparison of these results with the available PIE data. The objective of this document is to provide all necessary input data to model the benchmark cases, and to give some methodology guidelines and recommendations in order to make all results suitable for comparison with each other. The participants should read this document thoroughly to make sure all the data needed for their calculations is provided in the document. Missing data will be added to a revision of the document if necessary.

  2. Modeling & Simulation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling & Simulation Modeling & Simulation Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise David Harradine Physical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy Email Josh Smith Chemistry Communications Email The inherent knowledge of transformation has beguiled sorcerers and scientists alike. Data Analysis and Modeling & Simulation for the Chemical Sciences Project Description Almos every

  3. PV modules modelling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the Environmental Sciences / Group of Energy / PVsyst Modeling Systems Losses in PVsyst André Mermoud Institute of the Environmental Sciences Group of energy - PVsyst andre.mermoud@unige.ch Institute of the Environmental Sciences / Group of Energy / PVsyst Summary Losses in a PV system simulation may be: - Determined by specific models (shadings) - Interpretations of models (PV module behaviour) - User's parameter specifications (soiling, wiring, etc). PVsyst provides a detailed analysis of

  4. Modeling & Simulation publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling & Simulation » Modeling & Simulation Publications Modeling & Simulation publications Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise David Harradine Physical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy Email Josh Smith Chemistry Email The inherent knowledge of transformation has beguiled sorcerers and scientists alike. D.A. Horner, F. Lambert, J.D. Kress, and L.A. Collins,

  5. Liftoff Model for MELCOR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Michael F.

    2015-07-01

    Aerosol particles that deposit on surfaces may be subsequently resuspended by air flowing over the surface. A review of models for this liftoff process is presented and compared to available data. Based on this review, a model that agrees with existing data and is readily computed is presented for incorporation into a system level code such as MELCOR. Liftoff Model for MELCOR July 2015 4 This page is intentionally blank

  6. A simple model for amplified spontaneous emission in dyes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, J.C.; Hong, Chung Ki; Nathel, H.

    1990-01-09

    Amplified spontaneous emission in dyes is modelled by replacing the actual molecular spectrum by an effective four-level atom which includes the levels involved in pumping and stimulated emission. Propagation of the signal and pump waves is described in the slowly varying envelope approximation. It is shown that the saturation intensity of the signal depends on the pump intensity, and reciprocally that the pump saturation intensity depends on the signal intensity. 1 fig.

  7. Scale Models & Wind Turbines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Turbines * Readings about Cape Wind and other offshore and onshore siting debates for wind farms * Student Worksheet * A number of scale model items: Ken, Barbie or other dolls...

  8. Multifamily Envelope Leakage Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faakye, O.; Griffiths, D.

    2015-05-01

    The objective of the 2013 research project was to develop the model for predicting fully guarded test results (FGT), using unguarded test data and specific building features of apartment units. The model developed has a coefficient of determination R2 value of 0.53 with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.13. Both statistical metrics indicate that the model is relatively strong. When tested against data that was not included in the development of the model, prediction accuracy was within 19%, which is reasonable given that seasonal differences in blower door measurements can vary by as much as 25%.

  9. The Standard Model

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-12

    Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln describes the Standard Model of particle physics, covering both the particles that make up the subatomic realm and the forces that govern them.

  10. Severe Accident Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Severe Accident Modeling - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power ...

  11. Power Sector Modeling 101

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    given assumptions about future electricity demand, fuel prices, technology cost ... * Production Cost (Grid OperationsUnit Commitment and Dispatch) Models * Network ...

  12. VISION Model: Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    Description of VISION model, which is used to estimate the impact of highway vehicle technologies and fuels on energy use and carbon emissions to 2050.

  13. Sandia Energy » Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ?p34831 http:energy.sandia.govwave-energy-device-modeling-developing-a-117-scaled-modelfeed 0 New Small Business Voucher Pilot Opens http:energy.sandia.gov...

  14. Photovoltaics Business Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frantzis, L.; Graham, S.; Katofsky, R.; Sawyer, H.

    2008-02-01

    This report summarizes work to better understand the structure of future photovoltaics business models and the research, development, and demonstration required to support their deployment.

  15. PV Reliability & Performance Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... PV Reliability & Performance Model HomeStationary PowerEnergy Conversion ... such as module output degradation over time or disruptions such as electrical grid outages. ...

  16. Sandia Energy - Reference Model Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Documents Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Water Power Reference Model Project (RMP) Reference Model Documents Reference Model DocumentsTara Camacho-Lopez2015-05-...

  17. Biosphere Process Model Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Schmitt

    2000-05-25

    To evaluate the postclosure performance of a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) will be conducted. Nine Process Model Reports (PMRs), including this document, are being developed to summarize the technical basis for each of the process models supporting the TSPA model. These reports cover the following areas: (1) Integrated Site Model; (2) Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport; (3) Near Field Environment; (4) Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport; (5) Waste Package Degradation; (6) Waste Form Degradation; (7) Saturated Zone Flow and Transport; (8) Biosphere; and (9) Disruptive Events. Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs) contain the more detailed technical information used to support TSPA and the PMRs. The AMRs consists of data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documentation that will be used to defend the applicability of each process model for evaluating the postclosure performance of the potential Yucca Mountain repository system. This documentation will ensure the traceability of information from its source through its ultimate use in the TSPA-Site Recommendation (SR) and in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analysis processes. The objective of the Biosphere PMR is to summarize (1) the development of the biosphere model, and (2) the Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) developed for use in TSPA. The Biosphere PMR does not present or summarize estimates of potential radiation doses to human receptors. Dose calculations are performed as part of TSPA and will be presented in the TSPA documentation. The biosphere model is a component of the process to evaluate postclosure repository performance and regulatory compliance for a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The biosphere model describes those exposure pathways in the biosphere by which radionuclides released from a potential repository could reach a human receptor. Collectively, the potential human receptor and exposure pathways form the biosphere model. More detailed technical information and data about potential human receptor groups and the characteristics of exposure pathways have been developed in a series of AMRs and Calculation Reports.

  18. PROJECT PROFILE: System Advisor Model (SuNLaMP)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project focuses on the System Advisor Model (SAM) software created by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). SAM is a performance and finance model designed to facilitate decision making for people involved in the renewable energy industry. SAM makes performance predictions and cost of energy estimates for grid-connected power projects based on installation, operating costs, and system design parameters that users enter into the tool. This project will improve and maintain many features of the tool that has been instrumental in advancing the solar industry. Basic maintenance for the PVWatts Calculator tool will also be completed.

  19. Sensitivity analysis of the fission gas behavior model in BISON.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Pastore, Giovanni; Perez, Danielle; Williamson, Richard

    2013-05-01

    This report summarizes the result of a NEAMS project focused on sensitivity analysis of a new model for the fission gas behavior (release and swelling) in the BISON fuel performance code of Idaho National Laboratory. Using the new model in BISON, the sensitivity of the calculated fission gas release and swelling to the involved parameters and the associated uncertainties is investigated. The study results in a quantitative assessment of the role of intrinsic uncertainties in the analysis of fission gas behavior in nuclear fuel.

  20. Development of long-term performance models for radioactive waste forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, Diana H.; Pierce, Eric M.

    2011-03-22

    The long-term performance of solid radioactive waste is measured by the release rate of radionuclides into the environment, which depends on corrosion or weathering rates of the solid waste form. The reactions involved depend on the characteristics of the solid matrix containing the radioactive waste, the radionuclides of interest, and their interaction with surrounding geologic materials. This chapter describes thermo-hydro-mechanical and reactive transport models related to the long-term performance of solid radioactive waste forms, including metal, ceramic, glass, steam reformer and cement. Future trends involving Monte-Carlo simulations and coupled/multi-scale process modeling are also discussed.

  1. An extracytoplasmic function sigma factor-dependent periplasmic glutathione peroxidase is involved in oxidative stress response of Shewanella oneidensis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dai, Jingcheng; Wei, Hehong; Tian, Chunyuan; Damron, Fredrick; Zhou, Jizhong; Qiu, Dongru

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacteria use alternative sigma factors (σs) to regulate condition-specific gene expression for survival and Shewanella harbors multiple ECF (extracytoplasmic function) σ genes and cognate anti-sigma factor genes. Here we comparatively analyzed two of the rpoE-like operons in the strain MR-1: rpoE-rseA-rseB-rseC and rpoE2-chrR. Results: RpoE was important for bacterial growth at low and high temperatures, in the minimal medium, and high salinity. The degP/htrA orthologue, required for growth of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at high temperature, is absent in Shewanella, while the degQ gene is RpoE-regulated and is required for bacterial growth at high temperature. RpoE2 was essentialmore » for the optimal growth in oxidative stress conditions because the rpoE2 mutant was sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and paraquat. The operon encoding a ferrochelatase paralogue (HemH2) and a periplasmic glutathione peroxidase (PgpD) was identified as RpoE2-dependent. PgpD exhibited higher activities and played a more important role in the oxidative stress responses than the cytoplasmic glutathione peroxidase CgpD under tested conditions. The rpoE2-chrR operon and the identified regulon genes, including pgpD and hemH2, are coincidently absent in several psychrophilic and/or deep-sea Shewanella strains. Conclusion: In S. oneidensis MR-1, the RpoE-dependent degQ gene is required for optimal growth under high temperature. The rpoE2 and RpoE2-dependent pgpD gene encoding a periplasmic glutathione peroxidase are involved in oxidative stress responses. But rpoE2 is not required for bacterial growth at low temperature and it even affected bacterial growth under salt stress, indicating that there is a tradeoff between the salt resistance and RpoE2-mediated oxidative stress responses.« less

  2. Modeling for Insights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Gretchen Matthern

    2007-04-01

    System Dynamics is a computer-aided approach to evaluating the interrelationships of different components and activities within complex systems. Recently, System Dynamics models have been developed in areas such as policy design, biological and medical modeling, energy and the environmental analysis, and in various other areas in the natural and social sciences. The real power of System Dynamic modeling is gaining insights into total system behavior as time, and system parameters are adjusted and the effects are visualized in real time. System Dynamic models allow decision makers and stakeholders to explore long-term behavior and performance of complex systems, especially in the context of dynamic processes and changing scenarios without having to wait decades to obtain field data or risk failure if a poor management or design approach is used. The Idaho National Laboratory recently has been developing a System Dynamic model of the US Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The model is intended to be used to identify and understand interactions throughout the entire nuclear fuel cycle and suggest sustainable development strategies. This paper describes the basic framework of the current model and presents examples of useful insights gained from the model thus far with respect to sustainable development of nuclear power.

  3. Canister Model, Systems Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-09-29

    This packges provides a computer simulation of a systems model for packaging nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel in canisters. The canister model calculates overall programmatic cost, number of canisters, and fuel and waste inventories for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (other initial conditions can be entered).

  4. Delayed energy injection model for gamma-ray burst afterglows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geng, J. J.; Huang, Y. F.; Yu, Y. B. [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wu, X. F., E-mail: hyf@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: xfwu@pmo.ac.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2013-12-10

    The shallow decay phase and flares in the afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are widely believed to be associated with the later activation of the central engine. Some models of energy injection involve a continuous energy flow since the GRB trigger time, such as the magnetic dipole radiation from a magnetar. However, in the scenario involving a black hole accretion system, the energy flow from the fall-back accretion may be delayed for a fall-back time ?t {sub fb}. Thus, we propose a delayed energy injection model. The delayed energy would cause a notable rise to the Lorentz factor of the external shock, which will 'generate' a bump in the multiple band afterglows. If the delayed time is very short, our model degenerates to the previous models. Our model can explain the significant re-brightening in the optical and infrared light curves of GRB 081029 and GRB 100621A. A considerable fall-back mass is needed to provide the later energy; this indicates that GRBs accompanied with fall-back material may be associated with a low energy supernova so that the fraction of the envelope can survive during eruption. The fall-back time can give meaningful information on the properties of GRB progenitor stars.

  5. XAFS Model Compound Library

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Newville, Matthew

    The XAFS Model Compound Library contains XAFS data on model compounds. The term "model" compounds refers to compounds of homogeneous and well-known crystallographic or molecular structure. Each data file in this library has an associated atoms.inp file that can be converted to a feff.inp file using the program ATOMS. (See the related Searchable Atoms.inp Archive at http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/adb/) This Library exists because XAFS data on model compounds is useful for several reasons, including comparing to unknown data for "fingerprinting" and testing calculations and analysis methods. The collection here is currently limited, but is growing. The focus to date has been on inorganic compounds and minerals of interest to the geochemical community. [Copied, with editing, from http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/ModelLib/

  6. Varicella infection modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Katherine A.; Finley, Patrick D.; Moore, Thomas W.; Nozick, Linda Karen; Martin, Nathaniel; Bandlow, Alisa; Detry, Richard Joseph; Evans, Leland B.; Berger, Taylor Eugen

    2013-09-01

    Infectious diseases can spread rapidly through healthcare facilities, resulting in widespread illness among vulnerable patients. Computational models of disease spread are useful for evaluating mitigation strategies under different scenarios. This report describes two infectious disease models built for the US Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) motivated by a Varicella outbreak in a VA facility. The first model simulates disease spread within a notional contact network representing staff and patients. Several interventions, along with initial infection counts and intervention delay, were evaluated for effectiveness at preventing disease spread. The second model adds staff categories, location, scheduling, and variable contact rates to improve resolution. This model achieved more accurate infection counts and enabled a more rigorous evaluation of comparative effectiveness of interventions.

  7. VENTILATION MODEL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. Chipman

    2002-10-31

    The purpose of the Ventilation Model is to simulate the heat transfer processes in and around waste emplacement drifts during periods of forced ventilation. The model evaluates the effects of emplacement drift ventilation on the thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts and surrounding rock mass, and calculates the heat removal by ventilation as a measure of the viability of ventilation to delay the onset of peak repository temperature and reduce its magnitude. The heat removal by ventilation is temporally and spatially dependent, and is expressed as the fraction of heat carried away by the ventilation air compared to the fraction of heat produced by radionuclide decay. One minus the heat removal is called the wall heat fraction, or the remaining amount of heat that is transferred via conduction to the surrounding rock mass. Downstream models, such as the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' (BSC 2001), use the wall heat fractions as outputted from the Ventilation Model to initialize their postclosure analyses.

  8. Integrated Environmental Control Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-09-03

    IECM is a powerful multimedia engineering software program for simulating an integrated coal-fired power plant. It provides a capability to model various conventional and advanced processes for controlling air pollutant emissions from coal-fired power plants before, during, or after combustion. The principal purpose of the model is to calculate the performance, emissions, and cost of power plant configurations employing alternative environmental control methods. The model consists of various control technology modules, which may be integratedmore » into a complete utility plant in any desired combination. In contrast to conventional deterministic models, the IECM offers the unique capability to assign probabilistic values to all model input parameters, and to obtain probabilistic outputs in the form of cumulative distribution functions indicating the likelihood of dofferent costs and performance results. A Graphical Use Interface (GUI) facilitates the configuration of the technologies, entry of data, and retrieval of results.« less

  9. Interleukin 6 promotes endometrial cancer growth through an autocrine feedback loop involving ERK–NF-?B signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Che, Qi; Liu, Bin-Ya; Wang, Fang-Yuan; He, Yin-Yan; Lu, Wen; Liao, Yun; Gu, Wei; Wan, Xiao-Ping

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • IL-6 could promote endometrial cancer cells proliferation. • IL-6 promotes its own production through an autocrine feedback loop. • ERK and NF-?B pathway inhibitors inhibit IL-6 production and tumor growth. • IL-6 secretion relies on the activation of ERK–NF-?B pathway axis. • An orthotopic nude endometrial carcinoma model confirms the effect of IL-6. - Abstract: Interleukin (IL)-6 as an inflammation factor, has been proved to promote cancer proliferation in several human cancers. However, its role in endometrial cancer has not been studied clearly. Previously, we demonstrated that IL-6 promoted endometrial cancer progression through local estrogen biosynthesis. In this study, we proved that IL-6 could directly stimulate endometrial cancer cells proliferation and an autocrine feedback loop increased its production even after the withdrawal of IL-6 from the medium. Next, we analyzed the mechanism underlying IL-6 production in the feedback loop and found that its production and IL-6-stimulated cell proliferation were effectively blocked by pharmacologic inhibitors of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) and extra-cellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Importantly, activation of ERK was upstream of the NF-?B pathways, revealing the hierarchy of this event. Finally, we used an orthotopic nude endometrial carcinoma model to confirm the effects of IL-6 on the tumor progression. Taken together, these data indicate that IL-6 promotes endometrial carcinoma growth through an expanded autocrine regulatory loop and implicate the ERK–NF-?B pathway as a critical mediator of IL-6 production, implying IL-6 to be an important therapeutic target in endometrial carcinoma.

  10. Computer support to run models of the atmosphere. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fung, I.

    1996-08-30

    This research is focused on a better quantification of the variations in CO{sub 2} exchanges between the atmosphere and biosphere and the factors responsible for these exchangers. The principal approach is to infer the variations in the exchanges from variations in the atmospheric CO{sub 2} distribution. The principal tool involves using a global three-dimensional tracer transport model to advect and convect CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere. The tracer model the authors used was developed at the Goddard institute for Space Studies (GISS) and is derived from the GISS atmospheric general circulation model. A special run of the GCM is made to save high-frequency winds and mixing statistics for the tracer model.

  11. Nanomechanical switch for integration with CMOS logic.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Wolfley, Steven L.; Baker, Michael Sean; Czaplewski, David A.; Wendt, Joel Robert; Kraus, Garth Merlin; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Patrizi, Gary A.

    2008-11-01

    We designed, fabricated and measured the performance of nanoelectromechanical (NEMS) switches. Initial data are reported with one of the switch designs having a measured switching time of 400 ns and an operating voltage of 5 V. The switches operated laterally with unmeasurable leakage current in the 'off' state. Surface micromachining techniques were used to fabricate the switches. All processing was CMOS compatible. A single metal layer, defined by a single mask step, was used as the mechanical switch layer. The details of the modeling, fabrication and testing of the NEMS switches are reported.

  12. A summary of recent refinements to the WAKE dispersion model, a component of the HGSYSTEM/UF{sub 6} model suite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yambert, M.W.; Lombardi, D.A.; Goode, W.D. Jr.; Bloom, S.G.

    1998-08-01

    The original WAKE dispersion model a component of the HGSYSTEM/UF{sub 6} model suite, is based on Shell Research Ltd.`s HGSYSTEM Version 3.0 and was developed by the US Department of Energy for use in estimating downwind dispersion of materials due to accidental releases from gaseous diffusion plant (GDP) process buildings. The model is applicable to scenarios involving both ground-level and elevated releases into building wake cavities of non-reactive plumes that are either neutrally or positively buoyant. Over the 2-year period since its creation, the WAKE model has been used to perform consequence analyses for Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) associated with gaseous diffusion plants in Portsmouth (PORTS), Paducah (PGDP), and Oak Ridge. These applications have identified the need for additional model capabilities (such as the treatment of complex terrain and time-variant releases) not present in the original utilities which, in turn, has resulted in numerous modifications to these codes as well as the development of additional, stand-alone postprocessing utilities. Consequently, application of the model has become increasingly complex as the number of executable, input, and output files associated with a single model run has steadily grown. In response to these problems, a streamlined version of the WAKE model has been developed which integrates all calculations that are currently performed by the existing WAKE, and the various post-processing utilities. This report summarizes the efforts involved in developing this revised version of the WAKE model.

  13. Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic Using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassano, John

    2013-06-30

    The primary research task completed for this project was the development of the Regional Arctic Climate Model (RACM). This involved coupling existing atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land models using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) coupler (CPL7). RACM is based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model, the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) ocean model, the CICE sea ice model, and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land model. A secondary research task for this project was testing and evaluation of WRF for climate-scale simulations on the large pan-Arctic model domain used in RACM. This involved identification of a preferred set of model physical parameterizations for use in our coupled RACM simulations and documenting any atmospheric biases present in RACM.

  14. SPAR Model Structural Efficiencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Schroeder; Dan Henry

    2013-04-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) are supporting initiatives aimed at improving the quality of probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs). Included in these initiatives are the resolution of key technical issues that are have been judged to have the most significant influence on the baseline core damage frequency of the NRC’s Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models and licensee PRA models. Previous work addressed issues associated with support system initiating event analysis and loss of off-site power/station blackout analysis. The key technical issues were: • Development of a standard methodology and implementation of support system initiating events • Treatment of loss of offsite power • Development of standard approach for emergency core cooling following containment failure Some of the related issues were not fully resolved. This project continues the effort to resolve outstanding issues. The work scope was intended to include substantial collaboration with EPRI; however, EPRI has had other higher priority initiatives to support. Therefore this project has addressed SPAR modeling issues. The issues addressed are • SPAR model transparency • Common cause failure modeling deficiencies and approaches • Ac and dc modeling deficiencies and approaches • Instrumentation and control system modeling deficiencies and approaches

  15. Study of behavior and determination of customer lifetime value(CLV) using Markov chain model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Permana, Dony; Indratno, Sapto Wahyu; Pasaribu, Udjianna S.

    2014-03-24

    Customer Lifetime Value or CLV is a restriction on interactive marketing to help a company in arranging financial for the marketing of new customer acquisition and customer retention. Additionally CLV can be able to segment customers for financial arrangements. Stochastic models for the fairly new CLV used a Markov chain. In this model customer retention probability and new customer acquisition probability play an important role. This model is originally introduced by Pfeifer and Carraway in 2000 [1]. They introduced several CLV models, one of them only involves customer and former customer. In this paper we expand the model by adding the assumption of the transition from former customer to customer. In the proposed model, the CLV value is higher than the CLV value obtained by Pfeifer and Caraway model. But our model still requires a longer convergence time.

  16. Sandia Material Model Driver

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-09-28

    The Sandia Material Model Driver (MMD) software package allows users to run material models from a variety of different Finite Element Model (FEM) codes in a standalone fashion, independent of the host codes. The MMD software is designed to be run on a variety of different operating system platforms as a console application. Initial development efforts have resulted in a package that has been shown to be fast, convenient, and easy to use, with substantialmore » growth potential.« less

  17. Autotune Building Energy Models

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Autotune Building Energy Models Joshua New Oak Ridge National Laboratory newjr@ornl.gov, 865-241-8783 April 2, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * "All (building energy) models are wrong, but some are useful" - 22%-97% different from utility data for 3,349 buildings * More accurate models are more useful - Error from inputs and algorithms for practical reasons - Useful for cost-effective energy efficiency (EE) at speed and

  18. Development of Reference Models and Design Tools (LCOE Models) | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Development of Reference Models and Design Tools (LCOE Models) Development of Reference Models and Design Tools (LCOE Models) Development of Reference Models and Design Tools (LCOE Models) Office presentation icon 17_reference_model_snl_jepsen.ppt More Documents & Publications FY 09 Lab Call: Research & Assessment for MHK Development 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review Compiled Presentations: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies Effects on the Physical Environment

  19. The selection of turbulence models for prediction of room airflow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, P.V.

    1998-10-01

    The airflow in buildings involves a combination of many different flow elements. It is, therefore, difficult to find an adequate, all-round turbulence model covering all aspects. Consequently, it is appropriate and economical to choose turbulence models according to the situation that is to be predicted. This paper discusses the use of different turbulence models and their advantages in given situations. As an example, it is shown that a simple zero-equation model can be used for the prediction of special situations as flow with a low level of turbulence. A zero-equation model with compensation for room dimensions and velocity level also is discussed. A {kappa}-{epsilon} model expanded by damping functions is used to improve the prediction of the flow in a room ventilated by displacement ventilation. The damping functions especially take into account the turbulence level and the vertical temperature gradient. Low Reynolds number models (LNR models) are used to improve the prediction of evaporation-controlled emissions from building material, which is shown by an example. Finally, large eddy simulation (LES) of room airflow is discussed and demonstrated.

  20. System Dynamics Model | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamics Model content top Chemical Supply Chain Analysis Posted by Admin on Mar 1, 2012 in | Comments 0 comments Chemical Supply Chain Analysis NISAC has developed a range of...

  1. Customer Prepay Impact Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Instructions for Use Inputs 1. To use this model, you will need to unprotect the workbook, by going to Select "Unprotect Workbook", and enter the password "bpa". 2. The Input...

  2. Refining climate models

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Warren, Jeff; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Ricciuto, Daniel

    2014-06-26

    Using dogwood trees, Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers are gaining a better understanding of the role photosynthesis and respiration play in the atmospheric carbon dioxide cycle. Their findings will aid computer modelers in improving the accuracy of climate simulations.

  3. HOMER® Energy Modeling Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2000-12-31

    The HOMER® energy modeling software is a tool for designing and analyzing hybrid power systems, which contain a mix of conventional generators, cogeneration, wind turbines, solar photovoltaic, hydropower, batteries, fuel cells, hydropower, biomass and other inputs.

  4. Battery Life Predictive Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-12-31

    The Software consists of a model used to predict battery capacity fade and resistance growth for arbitrary cycling and temperature profiles. It allows the user to extrapolate from experimental data to predict actual life cycle.

  5. Advanced Target Effects Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Target Effects Modeling for Ion Accelerators and other High-Energy-Density Experiments Alice Koniges 1,a , Wangyi Liu 1 , Steven Lidia 1 , Thomas Schenkel 1 , John Barnard...

  6. Renewable Model Documentation

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    sites is calculated by constructing a model of a representative 100-acre by 50-feet deep landfill site and by applying methane emission factors for high, low, and very low...

  7. Model Wind Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In July, 2008 the North Carolina Wind Working Group, a coalition of state government, non-profit and wind industry organizations, published a model wind ordinance to provide guidance for...

  8. Theory, Modeling and Computation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    modeling and simulation will be enhanced not only by the wealth of data available from MaRIE but by the increased computational capacity made possible by the advent of extreme...

  9. Refining climate models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Jeff; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Ricciuto, Daniel

    2012-10-31

    Using dogwood trees, Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers are gaining a better understanding of the role photosynthesis and respiration play in the atmospheric carbon dioxide cycle. Their findings will aid computer modelers in improving the accuracy of climate simulations.

  10. Community Atmosphere Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-10-18

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) is an atmospheric general circulation model that solves equations for atmospheric dynamics and physics. CAM is an outgrowth of the Community Climate Model at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and was developed as a joint collaborative effort between NCAR and several DOE laboratories, including LLNL. CAM contains several alternative approaches for advancing the atmospheric dynamics. One of these approaches uses a finite-volume method originally developed by personnel atmore » NASNGSFC, We have developed a scalable version of the finite-volume solver for massively parallel computing systems. FV-CAM is meant to be used in conjunction with the Community Atmosphere Model. It is not stand-alone.« less

  11. Models and Datasets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    iteration by iteration. RevSim is an Excel 2010 based model. Much of the logic is VBA code (Visual Basic for Applications); the user does not need to know VBA to run the...

  12. HyPRO Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HyPRO Model (Strategic Analysis, Inc.) Objectives Provide a modeling tool to develop an understanding of how the hydrogen production infrastructure might evolve in the United States and determine the factors that will drive infrastructure development. Key Attributes & Strengths HyPRO provides a transparent enumeration of production, delivery and dispensing costs for comparison of different options. It also provides a graphical projection of production, delivery and dispensing infrastructure

  13. Theory Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shlachter, Jack

    2012-08-23

    Los Alamos has a long history in theory, modeling and simulation. We focus on multidisciplinary teams that tackle complex problems. Theory, modeling and simulation are tools to solve problems just like an NMR spectrometer, a gas chromatograph or an electron microscope. Problems should be used to define the theoretical tools needed and not the other way around. Best results occur when theory and experiments are working together in a team.

  14. integrated-transportation-models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Training Archive Integrated Transportation Models Workshop at ITM 2012 April 29, 2012 Hyatt Regency Tampa Hosted by: The Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center at Argonne National Laboratory This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. The aim of the workshop was to provide an opportunity for researchers and practitioners to discuss recent research results that can support a wider application of integrated transportation models,

  15. HTL Model Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1.3.4.100 HTL Model Development MARCH 24, 2015 ALGAE Sue Jones Yunhua Zhu, Lesley Snowden-Swan, Dan Anderson, Rich Hallen, Karl Albrecht, Doug Elliott, Andy Schmidt Pacific Northwest National Laboratory This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Goal Statement for HTL Model 2 GOAL: Enable R&D to produce sustainable, economic liquid fuels through targeted research coupled with techno-economic analysis (TEA) leading to optimized algal

  16. OCH Strap Model Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, K.; /Fermilab

    1987-08-26

    The OCH Model was stacked using the appropriate spacers between each absorber plate. Steel bars measuring 3-inch wide by 1/4-inch thick were welded, using 1/8-inch fillet weld, along all the corner edges, except the outer radius edges. On the outer radius, the straps were bolted to the end plates and to plates 9 and 17. The straps on the outer radius were also set in towards the center by approximately 3-inches. The spacers were then knocked out. Twelve strain gauges were mounted on the model. See figure 1 and the OCH strap Model log book for locations. Each rosette was centered in the gap between two absorber plates. The finite element plate model can predict the primary deformations of the OH module in both the cantilever and crushing modes to within 11% of the measured values. The primary stresses away from the support plate for the cantilever mode can be predicted to within 13% by this model. Near the support plate where large shear stresses exists, ANSYS will overpredict the measured stresses substantially. This is probably due to the models inherent inability to allow for shear stress concentrations at the welds. The same over-prediction was seen in the side straps during the OH crush test comparison and is probably attributable to the high shear force in this mode. The simple finite element plate model will provide suitable model of OH module stiffness for use in the analysis of the module assembly. The calculation of shear stresses can be improved by applying the ANSYS calculated inter-element forces to traditional weld strength calculations

  17. Modeling & Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers Modeling & Analysis Home/Tag:Modeling & Analysis - Electricity use by water service sector and county. Shown are electricity use by (a) large-scale conveyance, (b) groundwater irrigation pumping, (c) surface water irrigation pumping, (d) drinking water, and (e) wastewater. Aggregate electricity use across these sectors (f) is also mapped. Permalink Gallery Sandians Recognized in Environmental Science & Technology's Best Paper

  18. WEC Model Development at Sandia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2C Marine and Hydrokinetic Instrumentation, Measurement & Computer Modeling Workshop - Broomfield, CO July 9 th , 2012 Wave Energy Converter Model Development at Sandia Outline  Overview of SNL's WEC Modeling Activities * Wave Energy Development Roadmap * MHK Reference Models - Diana Bull * WEC Model Tool Development - Kelley Ruehl Reference Models and SNL Array Modeling presented in next session Wave Energy Development Roadmap Overall Goal and Motivation  Goal: Develop a suggested

  19. R&D for computational cognitive and social models : foundations for model evaluation through verification and validation (final LDRD report).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slepoy, Alexander; Mitchell, Scott A.; Backus, George A.; McNamara, Laura A.; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2008-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is investing in projects that aim to develop computational modeling and simulation applications that explore human cognitive and social phenomena. While some of these modeling and simulation projects are explicitly research oriented, others are intended to support or provide insight for people involved in high consequence decision-making. This raises the issue of how to evaluate computational modeling and simulation applications in both research and applied settings where human behavior is the focus of the model: when is a simulation 'good enough' for the goals its designers want to achieve? In this report, we discuss two years' worth of review and assessment of the ASC program's approach to computational model verification and validation, uncertainty quantification, and decision making. We present a framework that extends the principles of the ASC approach into the area of computational social and cognitive modeling and simulation. In doing so, we argue that the potential for evaluation is a function of how the modeling and simulation software will be used in a particular setting. In making this argument, we move from strict, engineering and physics oriented approaches to V&V to a broader project of model evaluation, which asserts that the systematic, rigorous, and transparent accumulation of evidence about a model's performance under conditions of uncertainty is a reasonable and necessary goal for model evaluation, regardless of discipline. How to achieve the accumulation of evidence in areas outside physics and engineering is a significant research challenge, but one that requires addressing as modeling and simulation tools move out of research laboratories and into the hands of decision makers. This report provides an assessment of our thinking on ASC Verification and Validation, and argues for further extending V&V research in the physical and engineering sciences toward a broader program of model evaluation in situations of high consequence decision-making.

  20. Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Buscheck

    2004-10-12

    The purpose of the multiscale thermohydrologic model (MSTHM) is to predict the possible range of thermal-hydrologic conditions, resulting from uncertainty and variability, in the repository emplacement drifts, including the invert, and in the adjoining host rock for the repository at Yucca Mountain. Thus, the goal is to predict the range of possible thermal-hydrologic conditions across the repository; this is quite different from predicting a single expected thermal-hydrologic response. The MSTHM calculates the following thermal-hydrologic parameters: temperature, relative humidity, liquid-phase saturation, evaporation rate, air-mass fraction, gas-phase pressure, capillary pressure, and liquid- and gas-phase fluxes (Table 1-1). These thermal-hydrologic parameters are required to support ''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504]). The thermal-hydrologic parameters are determined as a function of position along each of the emplacement drifts and as a function of waste package type. These parameters are determined at various reference locations within the emplacement drifts, including the waste package and drip-shield surfaces and in the invert. The parameters are also determined at various defined locations in the adjoining host rock. The MSTHM uses data obtained from the data tracking numbers (DTNs) listed in Table 4.1-1. The majority of those DTNs were generated from the following analyses and model reports: (1) ''UZ Flow Model and Submodels'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]); (2) ''Development of Numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling'' (BSC 2004); (3) ''Calibrated Properties Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169857]); (4) ''Thermal Conductivity of the Potential Repository Horizon'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169854]); (5) ''Thermal Conductivity of the Non-Repository Lithostratigraphic Layers'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170033]); (6) ''Ventilation Model and Analysis Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169862]); (7) ''Heat Capacity Analysis Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170003]).

  1. Generic CSP Performance Model for NREL's System Advisor Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, M. J.; Zhu, G.

    2011-08-01

    The suite of concentrating solar power (CSP) modeling tools in NREL's System Advisor Model (SAM) includes technology performance models for parabolic troughs, power towers, and dish-Stirling systems. Each model provides the user with unique capabilities that are catered to typical design considerations seen in each technology. Since the scope of the various models is generally limited to common plant configurations, new CSP technologies, component geometries, and subsystem combinations can be difficult to model directly in the existing SAM technology models. To overcome the limitations imposed by representative CSP technology models, NREL has developed a 'Generic Solar System' (GSS) performance model for use in SAM. This paper discusses the formulation and performance considerations included in this model and verifies the model by comparing its results with more detailed models.

  2. Off-gas Adsorption Model and Simulation - OSPREY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veronica J Rutledge

    2013-10-01

    The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes is expected to provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. To support this capability, a modeling effort focused on the off-gas treatment system of a used nuclear fuel recycling facility is in progress. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed within Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Off-gas Separation and REcoverY (OSPREY) models the adsorption of offgas constituents for dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions. Inputs to the model include gas composition, sorbent and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which breakthrough data can be obtained. The breakthrough data can be used to determine bed capacity, which in turn can be used to size columns. In addition to concentration data, the model predicts temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. A description of the OSPREY model, results from krypton adsorption modeling and plans for modeling the behavior of iodine, xenon, and tritium will be discussed.

  3. Next Generation Calibration Models with Dimensional Modeling | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Calibration Models with Dimensional Modeling Next Generation Calibration Models with Dimensional Modeling Incorporates dimensional modeling with engine empirical framework for engine calibration PDF icon p-01_brahma.pdf More Documents & Publications Reduction of Transient Particulate Matter Spikes with Decision Tree Based Control Model-Based Transient Calibration Optimization for Next Generation Diesel Engines An Accelerated Aging Method for Diesel Exhaust Aftertreatment

  4. Climate Model Output Rewriter

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-06-21

    CMOR comprises a set of FORTRAN 90 dunctions that can be used to produce CF-compliant netCDF files. The structure of the files created by CMOR and the metadata they contain fulfill the requirements of many of the climate community’s standard model experiments (which are referred to here as "MIPS", which stands for "model intercomparison project", including, for example, AMIP, CMIP, CFMIP, PMIP, APE, and IPCC scenario runs), CMOR was not designed to serve as anmore » all-purpose wfiter of CF-compliant netCDF files, but simply to reduce the effort required to prepare and manage MIP data. Although MIPs encourage systematic analysis of results across models, this is only easy to do if the model output is written in a common format with files structured similarly and with sufficient metadata uniformly stored according to a common standard. Individual modeling groups store their data in different ways. but if a group can read its own data with FORTRAN, then it should easily be able to transform the data, using CMOR, into the common format required by the MIPs, The adoption of CMOR as a standard code for exchanging climate data will facilitate participation in MIPs because after learning how to satisfy the output requirements of one MIP, it will be easy to prepare output for the other MIPs.« less

  5. Modeling Fluid Flow in Natural Systems, Model Validation and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Modeling Fluid Flow in Natural Systems, Model Validation and Demonstration Clay and granitic units are potential host media for future repositories for used nuclear fuel. The ...

  6. Turning Bayesian model averaging into Bayesian model combination...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Turning Bayesian model averaging into Bayesian model combination Authors: Carroll, James 1 ; Monteith, Kristine 2 ; Seppi, Kevin 2 ; Martinez, Tony 2 + Show Author...

  7. Parametric Thermal Models of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley K. Heath

    2014-03-01

    This work supports the restart of transient testing in the United States using the Department of Energy’s Transient Reactor Test Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory. It also supports the Global Threat Reduction Initiative by reducing proliferation risk of high enriched uranium fuel. The work involves the creation of a nuclear fuel assembly model using the fuel performance code known as BISON. The model simulates the thermal behavior of a nuclear fuel assembly during steady state and transient operational modes. Additional models of the same geometry but differing material properties are created to perform parametric studies. The results show that fuel and cladding thermal conductivity have the greatest effect on fuel temperature under the steady state operational mode. Fuel density and fuel specific heat have the greatest effect for transient operational model. When considering a new fuel type it is recommended to use materials that decrease the specific heat of the fuel and the thermal conductivity of the fuel’s cladding in order to deal with higher density fuels that accompany the LEU conversion process. Data on the latest operating conditions of TREAT need to be attained in order to validate BISON’s results. BISON’s models for TREAT (material models, boundary convection models) are modest and need additional work to ensure accuracy and confidence in results.

  8. DEM Particle Fracture Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Boning; Herbold, Eric B.; Homel, Michael A.; Regueiro, Richard A.

    2015-12-01

    An adaptive particle fracture model in poly-ellipsoidal Discrete Element Method is developed. The poly-ellipsoidal particle will break into several sub-poly-ellipsoids by Hoek-Brown fracture criterion based on continuum stress and the maximum tensile stress in contacts. Also Weibull theory is introduced to consider the statistics and size effects on particle strength. Finally, high strain-rate split Hopkinson pressure bar experiment of silica sand is simulated using this newly developed model. Comparisons with experiments show that our particle fracture model can capture the mechanical behavior of this experiment very well, both in stress-strain response and particle size redistribution. The effects of density and packings o the samples are also studied in numerical examples.

  9. 2-Stage Classification Modeling

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-11-01

    CIRCUIT2.4 is used to design optimum two-stage classification configurations and operating conditions for energy conservation. It permits simulation of five basic grinding-classification circuits, including one single-stage and four two-stage classification arrangements. Hydrocyclones, spiral classifiers, and sieve band screens can be simulated, and the user may choose the combination of devices for the flowsheet simulation. In addition, the user may select from four classification modeling methods to achieve the goals of a simulation project using themore » most familiar concepts. Circuit performance is modeled based on classification parameters or equipment operating conditions. A modular approach was taken in designing the program, which allows future addition of other models with relatively minor changes.« less

  10. Progress in Initiator Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrousis, C A; Christensen, J S

    2009-05-04

    There is great interest in applying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation techniques to the designs of electrical high explosive (HE) initiators, for the purpose of better understanding a design's sensitivities, optimizing its performance, and/or predicting its useful lifetime. Two MHD-capable LLNL codes, CALE and ALE3D, are being used to simulate the process of ohmic heating, vaporization, and plasma formation in the bridge of an initiator, be it an exploding bridgewire (EBW), exploding bridgefoil (EBF) or slapper type initiator. The initiation of the HE is simulated using Tarver Ignition & Growth reactive flow models. 1-D, 2-D and 3-D models have been constructed and studied. The models provide some intuitive explanation of the initiation process and are useful for evaluating the potential impact of identified aging mechanisms (such as the growth of intermetallic compounds or powder sintering). The end product of this work is a simulation capability for evaluating margin in proposed, modified or aged initiation system designs.

  11. Critical Infrastructure Modeling System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-10-01

    The Critical Infrastructure Modeling System (CIMS) is a 3D modeling and simulation environment designed to assist users in the analysis of dependencies within individual infrastructure and also interdependencies between multiple infrastructures. Through visual cuing and textual displays, a use can evaluate the effect of system perturbation and identify the emergent patterns that evolve. These patterns include possible outage areas from a loss of power, denial of service or access, and disruption of operations. Method ofmore » Solution: CIMS allows the user to model a system, create an overlay of information, and create 3D representative images to illustrate key infrastructure elements. A geo-referenced scene, satellite, aerial images or technical drawings can be incorporated into the scene. Scenarios of events can be scripted, and the user can also interact during run time to alter system characteristics. CIMS operates as a discrete event simulation engine feeding a 3D visualization.« less

  12. Sandia Energy - PV Modeling & Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PV Modeling & Analysis Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Photovoltaics PV Modeling & Analysis PV Modeling & AnalysisTara Camacho-Lopez2015-05-11T20:03...

  13. On Reflexive Data Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrov, S.

    2000-08-20

    An information system is reflexive if it stores a description of its current structure in the body of stored information and is acting on the base of this information. A data model is reflexive, if its language is meta-closed and can be used to build such a system. The need for reflexive data models in new areas of information technology applications is argued. An attempt to express basic notions related to information systems is made in the case when the system supports and uses meta-closed representation of the data.

  14. Analysis of FERC's Final EIS for Electricity Open Access & Recovery of Stranded Costs

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1996-01-01

    Reviews the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) prepared by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for its electricity transmission system open access prepared in April 1996 and uses the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) to analyze the open access rule (Orders 888 and 889).

  15. Projected Benefits of EERE's Portfolio - FY 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-11-17

    This collection of data tables and charts shows the benefits metrics related to energy security, environmental impacts, and economic impacts for the entire EERE portfolio of renewable energy technologies. Data are presented for the years 2015, 2020, 2030, and 2050, for both the NEMS and MARKAL models.

  16. Projected Benefits of Individual EERE Programs (primary and secondary)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-11-01

    This collection of data tables shows the benefits metrics related to energy security, environmental impacts, and economic impacts for individual renewable energy technologies in the EERE portfolio. Data are presented for the years 2015, 2020, 2030, and 2050, for both the NEMS and MARKAL models.

  17. Projected Benefits of EERE’s Portfolio. FY 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2011-11-17

    This collection of data tables and charts shows the benefits metrics related to energy security, environmental impacts, and economic impacts for the entire EERE portfolio of renewable energy technologies. Data are presented for the years 2015, 2020, 2030, and 2050, for both the NEMS and MARKAL models.

  18. EERE Portfolio. Primary Benefits Metrics for FY09

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-11-01

    This collection of data tables shows the benefits metrics related to energy security, environmental impacts, and economic impacts for both the entire EERE portfolio of renewable energy technologies as well as the individual technologies. Data are presented for the years 2015, 2020, 2030, and 2050, for both the NEMS and MARKAL models.

  19. Program Benefits of Individual EERE Programs. FY 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2011-11-01

    This collection of data tables shows the benefits metrics related to energy security, environmental impacts, and economic impacts for individual renewable energy technologies in the EERE portfolio. Data are presented for the years 2015, 2020, 2030, and 2050, for both the NEMS and MARKAL models.

  20. Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-03-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO2009), prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030, based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). EIA published an “early release” version of the AEO2009 reference case in December 2008.

  1. Scalar mesons in three-flavor linear sigma models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deirdre Black; Amir H. Fariborz; Sherif Moussa; Salah Nasri; Joseph Schrechter

    2001-09-01

    The three flavor linear sigma model is studied in order to understand the role of possible light scalar mesons in the pi-pi, pi-K and pi-eta elastic scattering channels. The K-matrix prescription is used to unitarize tree-level amplitudes and, with a sufficiently general model, we obtain reasonable ts to the experimental data. The effect of unitarization is very important and leads to the emergence of a nonet of light scalars, with masses below 1 GeV. We compare with a scattering treatment using a more general non-linear sigma model approach and also comment upon how our results t in with the scalar meson puzzle. The latter involves a preliminary investigation of possible mixing between scalar nonets.

  2. Advanced Modeling for Particle Accelerators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    multiphysics, multi-bunch modeling of injectors, boosters, and debunchers for performance optimization. These applications include large-scale electromagnetic modeling of...

  3. Physics Beyond the Standard Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Beyond the Standard Model 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:October 2015 past issues All Issues submit Physics Beyond the Standard Model...

  4. Sandia Energy - Wind Generator Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Generator Modeling Home Infrastructure Security Renewable Energy Energy Surety Energy Grid Integration News Wind Energy News & Events SMART Grid Systems Analysis Modeling...

  5. Extreme Conditions Modeling Workshop Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Met-ocean modeling: This group discussed current practices and new developments in estimating extreme sea states (ESS) through met-ocean measurements and modeling. Each breakout ...

  6. Air Transport Optimization Model | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NISACAir Transport Optimization Model content top Network Optimization Models (RNAS and ATOM) Posted by Admin on Mar 1, 2012 in | Comments 0 comments Many critical infrastructures...

  7. COMMUTER Model | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    computer model that estimates the travel and emissions impacts of transportation air quality programs focused on commuting. The model is particularly useful for programs...

  8. FIREPLUME model for plume dispersion from fires: Application to uranium hexafluoride cylinder fires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D.F.; Dunn, W.E.; Policastro, A.J.; Maloney, D.

    1997-06-01

    This report provides basic documentation of the FIREPLUME model and discusses its application to the prediction of health impacts resulting from releases of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) in fires. The model application outlined in this report was conducted for the Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted UF{sub 6}. The FIREPLUME model is an advanced stochastic model for atmospheric plume dispersion that predicts the downwind consequences of a release of toxic materials from an explosion or a fire. The model is based on the nonbuoyant atmospheric dispersion model MCLDM (Monte Carlo Lagrangian Dispersion Model), which has been shown to be consistent with available laboratory and field data. The inclusion of buoyancy and the addition of a postprocessor to evaluate time-varying concentrations lead to the current model. The FIREPLUME model, as applied to fire-related UF{sub 6} cylinder releases, accounts for three phases of release and dispersion. The first phase of release involves the hydraulic rupture of the cylinder due to heating of the UF{sub 6} in the fire. The second phase involves the emission of material into the burning fire, and the third phase involves the emission of material after the fire has died during the cool-down period. The model predicts the downwind concentration of the material as a function of time at any point downwind at or above the ground. All together, five fire-related release scenarios are examined in this report. For each scenario, downwind concentrations of the UF{sub 6} reaction products, uranyl fluoride and hydrogen fluoride, are provided for two meteorological conditions: (1) D stability with a 4-m/s wind speed, and (2) F stability with a 1-m/s wind speed.

  9. Modeling the earth system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojima, D.

    1992-12-31

    The 1990 Global Change Institute (GCI) on Earth System Modeling is the third of a series organized by the Office for Interdisciplinary Earth Studies to look in depth at particular issues critical to developing a better understanding of the earth system. The 1990 GCI on Earth System Modeling was organized around three themes: defining critical gaps in the knowledge of the earth system, developing simplified working models, and validating comprehensive system models. This book is divided into three sections that reflect these themes. Each section begins with a set of background papers offering a brief tutorial on the subject, followed by working group reports developed during the institute. These reports summarize the joint ideas and recommendations of the participants and bring to bear the interdisciplinary perspective that imbued the institute. Since the conclusion of the 1990 Global Change Institute, research programs, nationally and internationally, have moved forward to implement a number of the recommendations made at the institute, and many of the participants have maintained collegial interactions to develop research projects addressing the needs identified during the two weeks in Snowmass.

  10. Reference Model Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jepsen, Richard

    2011-11-02

    Presentation from the 2011 Water Peer Review in which principal investigator discusses project progress to develop a representative set of Reference Models (RM) for the MHK industry to develop baseline cost of energy (COE) and evaluate key cost component/system reduction pathways.

  11. Biomass Scenario Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biomass Scenario Model 24 March 2015 BETO Analysis Platform Peer Review Brian Bush National Renewable Energy Laboratory This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information 3 Government Policies Analysis Implications Inclusion decisions/scope Marketplace Structure Producer/Consumer exchanges Investment Financial decisions Input Scenarios Feedstock demand Oil prices Learning curves Evolution of Supply Chain for Biofuels Goals and Objectives *

  12. World Natural Gas Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-12-01

    RAMSGAS, the Research and Development Analysis Modeling System World Natural Gas Model, was developed to support planning of unconventional gaseoues fuels research and development. The model is a scenario analysis tool that can simulate the penetration of unconventional gas into world markets for oil and gas. Given a set of parameter values, the model estimates the natural gas supply and demand for the world for the period from 1980 to 2030. RAMSGAS is based onmore » a supply/demand framwork and also accounts for the non-renewable nature of gas resources. The model has three fundamental components: a demand module, a wellhead production cost module, and a supply/demand interface module. The demand for gas is a product of total demand for oil and gas in each of 9 demand regions and the gas share. Demand for oil and gas is forecast from the base year of 1980 through 2030 for each demand region, based on energy growth rates and price-induced conservation. For each of 11 conventional and 19 unconventional gas supply regions, wellhead production costs are calculated. To these are added transportation and distribution costs estimates associated with moving gas from the supply region to each of the demand regions and any economic rents. Based on a weighted average of these costs and the world price of oil, fuel shares for gas and oil are computed for each demand region. The gas demand is the gas fuel share multiplied by the total demand for oil plus gas. This demand is then met from the available supply regions in inverse proportion to the cost of gas from each region. The user has almost complete control over the cost estimates for each unconventional gas source in each year and thus can compare contributions from unconventional resources under different cost/price/demand scenarios.« less

  13. DRI Model of the U.S. Economy -- Model Documentation:

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1993-01-01

    Provides documentation on Data Resources, Inc., DRI Model of the U.S. Economy and the DRI Personal Computer Input/Output Model. It also describes the theoretical basis, structure and functions of both DRI models; and contains brief descriptions of the models and their equations.

  14. Modeling the mechanical response of PBX 9501

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ragaswamy, Partha; Lewis, Matthew W; Liu, Cheng; Thompson, Darla G

    2010-01-01

    An engineering overview of the mechanical response of Plastic-Bonded eXplosives (PBXs), specifically PBX 9501, will be provided with emphasis on observed mechanisms associated with different types of mechanical testing. Mechanical tests in the form of uniaxial tension, compression, cyclic loading, creep (compression and tension), and Hopkinson bar show strain rate and temperature dependence. A range of mechanical behavior is observed which includes small strain recoverable response in the form of viscoelasticity; change in stiffness and softening beyond peak strength due to damage in the form microcracks, debonding, void formation and the growth of existing voids; inelastic response in the form of irrecoverable strain as shown in cyclic tests, and viscoelastic creep combined with plastic response as demonstrated in creep and recovery tests. The main focus of this paper is to elucidate the challenges and issues involved in modeling the mechanical behavior of PBXs for simulating thermo-mechanical responses in engineering components. Examples of validation of a constitutive material model based on a few of the observed mechanisms will be demonstrated against three point bending, split Hopkinson pressure bar and Brazilian disk geometry.

  15. GROUT HOPPER MODELING STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.

    2011-08-30

    The Saltstone facility has a grout hopper tank to provide agitator stirring of the Saltstone feed materials. The tank has about 300 gallon capacity to provide a larger working volume for the grout slurry to be held in case of a process upset, and it is equipped with a mechanical agitator, which is intended to keep the grout in motion and agitated so that it won't start to set up. The dry feeds and the salt solution are already mixed in the mixer prior to being transferred to the hopper tank. The hopper modeling study through this work will focus on fluid stirring and agitation, instead of traditional mixing in the literature, in order to keep the tank contents in motion during their residence time so that they will not be upset or solidified prior to transferring the grout to the Saltstone disposal facility. The primary objective of the work is to evaluate the flow performance for mechanical agitators to prevent vortex pull-through for an adequate stirring of the feed materials and to estimate an agitator speed which provides acceptable flow performance with a 45{sup o} pitched four-blade agitator. In addition, the power consumption required for the agitator operation was estimated. The modeling calculations were performed by taking two steps of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling approach. As a first step, a simple single-stage agitator model with 45{sup o} pitched propeller blades was developed for the initial scoping analysis of the flow pattern behaviors for a range of different operating conditions. Based on the initial phase-1 results, the phase-2 model with a two-stage agitator was developed for the final performance evaluations. A series of sensitivity calculations for different designs of agitators and operating conditions have been performed to investigate the impact of key parameters on the grout hydraulic performance in a 300-gallon hopper tank. For the analysis, viscous shear was modeled by using the Bingham plastic approximation. Steady state analyses with a two-equation turbulence model were performed with the FLUENT{trademark} codes. All analyses were based on three-dimensional results. Recommended operational guidance was developed by using the basic concept that local shear rate profiles and flow patterns can be used as a measure of hydraulic performance and spatial stirring. Flow patterns were estimated by a Lagrangian integration technique along the flow paths from the material feed inlet. The modeling results show that when the two-stage agitator consisting of a 45{sup o} pitched propeller and radial flat-plate blades is run at 140 rpm speed with 28 in diameter, the agitator provides an adequate stirring of the feed materials for a wide range of yield stresses (1 to 21 Pa) and the vortex system is shed into the remote region of the tank boundary by the blade passage in an efficient way. The results of this modeling study were used to develop the design guidelines for the agitator stirring and dispersion of the Saltstone feed materials in a hopper tank.

  16. Modeling Fluid Flow in Natural Systems, Model Validation and Demonstration

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    | Department of Energy Modeling Fluid Flow in Natural Systems, Model Validation and Demonstration Modeling Fluid Flow in Natural Systems, Model Validation and Demonstration Clay and granitic units are potential host media for future repositories for used nuclear fuel. The report addresses the representation and characterization of flow in these two media within numerical process models. In low permeability crystalline rock, flow is primarily in relatively sparse networks of fractures.

  17. Davis-Bacon Act Wage Rates for ARRA-Funded Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants Program Projects Involving Residential Weatherization Work

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS PROGRAM NOTICE 10-012 EFFECTIVE DATE: May 6, 2010 SUBJECT: DAVIS-BACON ACT WAGE RATES FOR ARRA-FUNDED ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS PROGRAM PROJECTS INVOLVING RESIDENTIAL WEATHERIZATION WORK PURPOSE: To provide guidance on using appropriate prevailing wage rates for Davis-Bacon Act (DBA) covered weatherization work performed under the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Program using American Recovery and

  18. Drift Scale THM Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Rutqvist

    2004-10-07

    This model report documents the drift scale coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes model development and presents simulations of the THM behavior in fractured rock close to emplacement drifts. The modeling and analyses are used to evaluate the impact of THM processes on permeability and flow in the near-field of the emplacement drifts. The results from this report are used to assess the importance of THM processes on seepage and support in the model reports ''Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse'' and ''Abstraction of Drift Seepage'', and to support arguments for exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the analysis reports ''Features, Events, and Processes in Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport and Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events''. The total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations do not use any output from this report. Specifically, the coupled THM process model is applied to simulate the impact of THM processes on hydrologic properties (permeability and capillary strength) and flow in the near-field rock around a heat-releasing emplacement drift. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in elevated rock temperatures for thousands of years after waste emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, resulting in water redistribution and altered flow paths. These temperatures will also cause thermal expansion of the rock, with the potential of opening or closing fractures and thus changing fracture permeability in the near-field. Understanding the THM coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally induced permeability changes potentially effect the magnitude and spatial distribution of percolation flux in the vicinity of the drift, and hence the seepage of water into the drift. This is important because a sufficient amount of water must be available within a drift to transport any exposed radionuclides out of the drift to the groundwater below, and eventually to people within the accessible environment. Absent sufficient water, radionuclides cannot be transported and there would be no significant health effect on people, even if radioactive waste containers were damaged or corroded to such an extent that radionuclides were exposed to water.

  19. An ortholog of farA of Aspergillus nidulans is implicated in the transcriptional activation of genes involved in fatty acid utilization in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poopanitpan, Napapol; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Fukuda, Ryouichi; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Ohta, Akinori

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} POR1 is a Yarrowia lipolytica ortholog of farA involved in fatty acid response in A. nidulans. {yields} Deletion of POR1 caused growth defects on fatty acids. {yields} {Delta}por1 strain exhibited defects in the induction of genes involved in fatty acid utilization. -- Abstract: The yeast Yarrowia lipolytica effectively utilizes hydrophobic substrates such as fatty acids and n-alkanes. To identify a gene(s) regulating fatty acid utilization in Y. lipolytica, we first studied homologous genes to OAF1 and PIP2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but their disruption did not change growth on oleic acid at all. We next characterized a Y. lipolytica gene, POR1 (primary oleate regulator 1), an ortholog of farA encoding a transcriptional activator that regulates fatty acid utilization in Aspergillus nidulans. The deletion mutant of POR1 was defective in the growth on various fatty acids, but not on glucose, glycerol, or n-hexadecane. It exhibited slight defect on n-decane. The transcriptional induction of genes involved in {beta}-oxidation and peroxisome proliferation by oleate was distinctly diminished in the {Delta}por1 strains. These data suggest that POR1 encodes a transcriptional activator widely regulating fatty acid metabolism in Y. lipolytica.

  20. Jobs and Economic Development Modeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Project objective: Develop models to estimate jobs and economic impacts from geothermal project development and operation.

  1. LEDCOM Model | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    LEDCOM Model LEDCOM Model Zip file containing the LEDCOM model as an excel worksheet, the backend database, and an operating information document. Extract all files to the same local directory on your computer. Package icon LEDCOM Model More Documents & Publications UPF R&amp;OM Management DHW Event Schedule Generator Building America DHW Event Schedule Generator

  2. Probability of detection models for eddy current NDE methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajesh, S.N.

    1993-04-30

    The development of probability of detection (POD) models for a variety of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods is motivated by a desire to quantify the variability introduced during the process of testing. Sources of variability involved in eddy current methods of NDE include those caused by variations in liftoff, material properties, probe canting angle, scan format, surface roughness and measurement noise. This thesis presents a comprehensive POD model for eddy current NDE. Eddy current methods of nondestructive testing are used widely in industry to inspect a variety of nonferromagnetic and ferromagnetic materials. The development of a comprehensive POD model is therefore of significant importance. The model incorporates several sources of variability characterized by a multivariate Gaussian distribution and employs finite element analysis to predict the signal distribution. The method of mixtures is then used for estimating optimal threshold values. The research demonstrates the use of a finite element model within a probabilistic framework to the spread in the measured signal for eddy current nondestructive methods. Using the signal distributions for various flaw sizes the POD curves for varying defect parameters have been computed. In contrast to experimental POD models, the cost of generating such curves is very low and complex defect shapes can be handled very easily. The results are also operator independent.

  3. SDI CFD MODELING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.

    2011-05-05

    The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Organization requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) develop a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method to mix and blend the miscible contents of the blend tanks to ensure the contents are properly blended before they are transferred from the blend tank; such as, Tank 50H, to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) feed tank. The work described here consists of two modeling areas. They are the mixing modeling analysis during miscible liquid blending operation, and the flow pattern analysis during transfer operation of the blended liquid. The transient CFD governing equations consisting of three momentum equations, one mass balance, two turbulence transport equations for kinetic energy and dissipation rate, and one species transport were solved by an iterative technique until the species concentrations of tank fluid were in equilibrium. The steady-state flow solutions for the entire tank fluid were used for flow pattern analysis, for velocity scaling analysis, and the initial conditions for transient blending calculations. A series of the modeling calculations were performed to estimate the blending times for various jet flow conditions, and to investigate the impact of the cooling coils on the blending time of the tank contents. The modeling results were benchmarked against the pilot scale test results. All of the flow and mixing models were performed with the nozzles installed at the mid-elevation, and parallel to the tank wall. From the CFD modeling calculations, the main results are summarized as follows: (1) The benchmark analyses for the CFD flow velocity and blending models demonstrate their consistency with Engineering Development Laboratory (EDL) and literature test results in terms of local velocity measurements and experimental observations. Thus, an application of the established criterion to SRS full scale tank will provide a better, physically-based estimate of the required mixing time, and elevation of transfer pump for minimum sludge disturbance. (2) An empirical equation for a tank with no cooling coils agrees reasonably with the current modeling results for the dual jet. (3) From the sensitivity study of the cooling coils, it was found that the tank mixing time for the coiled tank was about two times longer than that of the tank fluid with no coils under the 1/10th scale, while the coiled tank required only 50% longer than the one without coils under the full scale Tank 50H. In addition, the time difference is reduced when the pumping U{sub o}d{sub o} value is increased for a given tank. (4) The blending time for T-shape dual jet pump is about 20% longer than that of 15{sup o} upward V-shape pump under the 1/10th pilot-scale tank, while the time difference between the two pumps is about 12% for the full-scale Tank 50H. These results are consistent with the literature information. (5) A transfer pump with a solid-plate suction screen operating at 130 gpm can be located 9.5 inches above settled sludge for 2 in screen height in a 85 ft waste tank without disturbing any sludge. Detailed results are summarized in Table 13. Final pump performance calculations were made by using the established CW pump design, and operating conditions to satisfy the two requirements of minimum sludge disturbance, and adequate blending of tank contents. The final calculation results show that the blending times for the coiled and uncoiled tanks coupled with the CW pump design are 159 and 83 minutes, respectively. All the results are provided in Table 16.

  4. Decision Impact Assessment Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1991-08-01

    DIAMOND represents the decision-making environment that utility planners and executives face. Users interact with the model after every year or two of simulation, which provides an opportunity to modify past decisions as well as to make new decisions. For example, construction of a power plant can be started one year, and if circumstances change, the plant can be accelerated, mothballed, cancelled, or continued as originally planned. Similarly, the marketing and financial incentives for demand-side managementmore » programs can be changed from year to year. This frequent user interaction with the model, an operational game, should build greater understanding and insights among utility planners about the risks associated with different types of resources.« less

  5. Simplified tritium permeation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longhurst, G.R.

    1993-09-17

    In this model I seek to provide a simplified approach to solving permeation problems addressed by TMAP4. I will assume that there are m one-dimensional segments with thickness L{sub i}, i = 1, 2, {hor_ellipsis}, m, joined in series with an implantation flux, J{sub i}, implanting at the single depth, {delta}, in the first segment. From material properties and heat transfer considerations, I calculate temperatures at each face of each segment, and from those temperatures I find local diffusivities and solubilities. I assume recombination coefficients K{sub r}{sub 1} and K{sub r}{sub 2} are known at the upstream and downstream faces, respectively, but the model will generate Baskes recombination coefficient values on demand. Here I first develop the steady-state concentration equations and then show how trapping considerations can lead to good estimates of permeation transient times.

  6. Model Analysis ToolKit

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-05-15

    MATK provides basic functionality to facilitate model analysis within the Python computational environment. Model analysis setup within MATK includes: - define parameters - define observations - define model (python function) - define samplesets (sets of parameter combinations) Currently supported functionality includes: - forward model runs - Latin-Hypercube sampling of parameters - multi-dimensional parameter studies - parallel execution of parameter samples - model calibration using internal Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm - model calibration using lmfit package - modelmore » calibration using levmar package - Markov Chain Monte Carlo using pymc package MATK facilitates model analysis using: - scipy - calibration (scipy.optimize) - rpy2 - Python interface to R« less

  7. Theory & Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Theory & Modeling - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  8. EIN Cash Flow Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EIN Cash Flow Model [Energy Independence Now (EIN)] Objectives Identify financial risks in early hydrogen infrastructure systems and illustrate hydrogen station cash flows under a variety of market scenarios. Explore solutions by quantifying impact of various incentives on these cash flows and quantify cost of incentives. Key Attributes & Strengths Market segmented into "core," "emerging," and "network support stations." Vehicle fueling, sales patterns and

  9. Severe Accident Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Severe Accident Modeling - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  10. Modeling & Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nrt_blade_tip Permalink Gallery National Rotor Testbed aerodynamic design complete Modeling & Analysis, News, Renewable Energy, SWIFT, Wind Energy, Wind News National Rotor Testbed aerodynamic design complete The aerodynamic design of the National Rotor Testbed (NRT) blade has been completed (see example, above). The goal of the NRT rotor is to replicate the wake characteristics of a utility-scale rotor at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) test site. This will allow researchers at

  11. Modeling & Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NearyFig1 Permalink Gallery University of Illinois uses Sandia Labs' reference hydrokinetic turbine to study potential bed erosion effects Energy, Modeling & Analysis, News, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Water Power University of Illinois uses Sandia Labs' reference hydrokinetic turbine to study potential bed erosion effects Sandia Labs Water Power Technologies Department promotes open-source marine hydrokinetic research by disseminating information on MHK technology designs initially

  12. High-fidelity Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fidelity Modeling of Local Effects of Damage for Derated Offshore Wind Turbines Phillip W. Richards Graduate Research Assistant, Daniel Guggenheim School of Aerospace Engineering. Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0150 E-mail: phillip@gatech.edu D. Todd Griffith Principal Member of the Technical Staff. Associate Fellow, AIAA. Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia

  13. Reference Model Project (RMP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Model Project (RMP) - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  14. improve combustion models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    combustion models - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  15. travel-demand-modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Travel Demand Modeling for a Small sized MPO Using TRANSIMS Mohammad Sharif Ullah Champaign County Regional Planning Commission 1776 E Washington Street, Urbana, IL 61802 Phone: 217 328 3313 Ext 124 Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. List of Authors ================ Mohammad Sharif Ullah, Senior Transportation Engineer, CCRPC, Urbana, IL Asadur Rahman, PhD student, IIT, Chicago, IL Rita Morocoima-Black, Planning & Comm.

  16. Extreme Conditions Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conditions Modeling - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  17. Combustion and Emissions Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Combustion and Emissions Modeling This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. - Computational Fluid Dynamics Project Leader Background Modern transportation engines are designed to use the available fuel resources efficiently and minimize harmful emissions. Optimization of these designs is based on a wealth of practical design, construction and operating experiences, and use of modern testing facilities and sophisticated analyses of the combustion

  18. Economic Model | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NISACEconomic Model content top Chemical Supply Chain Analysis Posted by Admin on Mar 1, 2012 in | Comments 0 comments Chemical Supply Chain Analysis NISAC has developed a range of capabilities for analyzing the consequences of disruptions to the chemical manufacturing industry. Each capability provides a different but complementary perspective on the questions of interest-questions like Given an event, will the entire chemical sector be impacted or just parts? Which chemicals, plants, and

  19. CEC Array Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CEC Array Modeling - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  20. Models & Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Models & Tools - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  1. Modeling & Simulation | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NISACModeling & Simulation content top Overview Posted by Admin on Feb 13, 2012 in | Comments 0 comments NISAC experts analyze-using modeling and simulation capabilities-critical infrastructure, along with their interdependencies, vulnerabilities, and complexities. Their analyses are used to aid decisionmakers with policy assessment, mitigation planning, education, and training and provide near-real-time assistance to crisis-response organizations. Infrastructure systems are large, complex,

  2. Biomass Feedstock Supply Modeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6, 2015 Feedstock Supply and Logistics PI: Erin Webb Shahab Sokhansanj Michael Hilliard Craig Brandt Anthony Turhollow Oak Ridge National Laboratory 1.2.3.1 Biomass Feedstock Supply Modeling 2 | Bioenergy Technologies Office Perform experiments to test equipment designs and supply chain configurations Characterize impacts of variability and uncertainty Identify risk-reduction strategies Optimize feedstock supply logistics Goal Statement Build and apply simulations of biomass supply chains

  3. Real-World Models

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Real-World Models DOE and its national labs currently engage in a number of consortia with industry aimed at different targets for different technologies. To illustrate how different consortia organize to achieve these targets, Table 1 outlines the essential components and characteristics of several successful DOE consortia. Table 1. Summary of Consortia Advanced Engine Combustion Consortium (AEC) Lead Organization Membership Combustion Research Facility (CRF) at Sandia National Laboratories

  4. Strategic Analysis and Modeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Strategic Analysis and Modeling Mary J. Biddy, Ling Tao, Eric Tan, Yimin Zhang National Renewable Energy Laboratory March 24, 2015 Analysis and Sustainability Peer Review 2015 DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Project Peer Review 2 Goal Statement * Develop tools and perform analyses to address key questions in support of

  5. Project Evaluation Models

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Project Evaluation Models Ian Baring-Gould Alaska Native Village Energy Development Workshop April 30, 2014 2 Why do we need options analysis? 3 There are many different energy resources Which ones are available in Alaska? 4 photovoltaics fuel cells wind turbines batteries diesels microturbines small hydro small modular biomass grid connection ...and many energy conversion technologies 5 ...which have different operating requirements, advantages, disadvantages, costs, etc. Diesel generators Wind

  6. Dispersion Modeling Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Dispersion Modeling Project Nuclear & Criticality Safety Engineering Andrew Vincent Germantown, MD DOE Workshop Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC June, 2012 SRNS- F3200-2012-00027 2 the Issue * Direction was coming regarding deposition velocity (DV) * Discovery - questioning meteorological data assumptions as specific calculation of DV being pursued (normalization, EPA vs. RG 1.23) * Plan Development and Concurrence * Plan Execution * Potential Impacts Executing the Plan * HSS Bulletin

  7. Radiolysis Process Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, Edgar C.; Wittman, Richard S.; Skomurski, Frances N.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.

    2012-07-17

    Assessing the performance of spent (used) nuclear fuel in geological repository requires quantification of time-dependent phenomena that may influence its behavior on a time-scale up to millions of years. A high-level waste repository environment will be a dynamic redox system because of the time-dependent generation of radiolytic oxidants and reductants and the corrosion of Fe-bearing canister materials. One major difference between used fuel and natural analogues, including unirradiated UO2, is the intense radiolytic field. The radiation emitted by used fuel can produce radiolysis products in the presence of water vapor or a thin-film of water (including OH• and H• radicals, O2-, eaq, H2O2, H2, and O2) that may increase the waste form degradation rate and change radionuclide behavior. H2O2 is the dominant oxidant for spent nuclear fuel in an O2 depleted water environment, the most sensitive parameters have been identified with respect to predictions of a radiolysis model under typical conditions. As compared with the full model with about 100 reactions it was found that only 30-40 of the reactions are required to determine [H2O2] to one part in 10–5 and to preserve most of the predictions for major species. This allows a systematic approach for model simplification and offers guidance in designing experiments for validation.

  8. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

  9. Electricity Portfolio Simulation Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-09-01

    Stakeholders often have competing interests when selecting or planning new power plants. The purpose of developing this preliminary Electricity Portfolio Simulation Model (EPSim) is to provide a first cut, dynamic methodology and approach to this problem, that can subsequently be refined and validated, that may help energy planners, policy makers, and energy students better understand the tradeoffs associated with competing electricity portfolios. EPSim allows the user to explore competing electricity portfolios annually from 2002 tomore » 2025 in terms of five different criteria: cost, environmental impacts, energy dependence, health and safety, and sustainability. Four additional criteria (infrastructure vulnerability, service limitations, policy needs and science and technology needs) may be added in future versions of the model. Using an analytic hierarchy process (AHP) approach, users or groups of users apply weights to each of the criteria. The default energy assumptions of the model mimic Department of Energy’s (DOE) electricity portfolio to 2025 (EIA, 2005). At any time, the user can compare alternative portfolios to this reference case portfolio.« less

  10. Borehole Fluid Conductivity Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-03-15

    Dynamic wellbore electrical conductivity logs provide a valuable means to determine the flow characteristics of fractures intersectin a wellbore, in order to study the hydrologic behavior of fractured rocks. To expedite the analysis of log data, a computer program called BORE II has been deveoloped that considers multiple inflow or outflow points along the wellbore, including the case of horizontal flow across the wellbore, BORE II calculates the evolution of fluid electrical conducivity (FEC) profilesmore »in a wellbore or wellbore section, which may be pumped at a low rate, and compares model results to log data in a variety of ways. FEC variations may arise from inflow under natural-state conditions or due to tracer injected in a neighboring well (interference tests). BORE II has an interactive, graphical user interface and runs on a personal computer under the Windows operating system. BORE II is a modification and extension of older codes called BORE and BOREXT, which considered inflow points only. Finite difference solution of the one-dimensional advection-diffusion equation with explicit time stepping; feed points treated as prescribed-mass sources or sinks; assume quadratic relationship between fluid electrical conductivity and ion consentration. Graphical user interface; interactive modification of model parameters and graphical display of model results and filed data in a variety of ways. Can examine horizontal flow or arbitarily complicated combination of upflow, downflow, and horizontal flow. Feed point flow rate and/or concentration may vary in time.« less

  11. LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-09-24

    The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

  12. Slurry fired heater cold-flow modelling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moujaes, S.F.

    1983-07-01

    This report summarizes the experimental and theoretical work leading to the scale-up of the SRC-I Demonstration Plant slurry fired heater. The scale-up involved a theoretical model using empirical relations in the derivation, and employed variables such as flow conditions, liquid viscosity, and slug frequency. Such variables have been shown to affect the heat transfer characteristics ofthe system. The model assumes that, if all other variables remain constant, the heat transfer coefficient can be scaled up proportional to D/sup -2/3/ (D = inside diameter of the fired heater tube). All flow conditions, liquid viscosities, and pipe inclinations relevant to the demonstration plant have indicated a slug flow regime in the slurry fired heater. The annular and stratified flow regimes should be avoided to minimize the potential for excessive pipe erosion and to decrease temperature gradients along the pipe cross section leading to coking and thermal stresses, respectively. Cold-flow studies in 3- and 6.75-in.-inside-diameter (ID) pipes were conducted to determine the effect of scale-up on flow regime, slug frequency, and slug dimensions. The developed model assumes that conduction heat transfer occurs through the liquid film surrounding the gas slug and laminar convective heat transfer to the liquid slug. A weighted average of these two heat transfer mechanisms gives a value for the average pipe heat transfer coefficient. The cold-flow work showed a decrease in the observed slug frequency between the 3- and 6.75-ID pipes. Data on the ratio of gas to liquid slug length in the 6.75-in. pipe are not yet complete, but are expected to yield generally lower values than those obtained in the 3-in. pipe; this will probably affect the scale-up to demonstration plant conditions. 5 references, 15 figures, 7 tables.

  13. Modeling aspects of the dynamic response of heterogeneous materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ionita, Axinte; Clements, Brad; Mas, Eric

    2009-01-01

    In numerical simulations of engineering applications involving heterogeneous materials capturing the local response coming from a distribution of heterogeneities can lead to a very large model thus making simulations difficult. The use of homogenization techniques can reduce the size of the problem but will miss the local effects. Homogenization can also be difficult if the constituents obey different types of constitutive laws. Additional complications arise if inelastic deformation. In such cases a two-scale approach is prefened and tills work addresses these issues in the context of a two-scale Finite Element Method (FEM). Examples of using two-scale FEM approaches are presented.

  14. Two Applications of Bilevel Programming in Energy Modeling | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leadership Computing Facility Two Applications of Bilevel Programming in Energy Modeling Event Sponsor: Mathematics and Computer Science Division LANS Seminar Start Date: Mar 1 2016 - 10:30am Building/Room: Building 240/Room 4301 Location: Argonne National Laboratory Speaker(s): Patrice Marcotte Speaker(s) Title: Université de Montréal Host: François Gilbert Event Website: http://www.mcs.anl.gov/research/LANS/events/listn/ The energy sector involves agents that are maybe non cooperating

  15. Two Applications of Bilevel Programming in Energy Modelling | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leadership Computing Facility Modelling Event Sponsor: Mathematics and Computer Science Division Start Date: Mar 1 2016 - 10:30am Building/Room: Building 240/Room 4301 Location: Argonne National Laboratory Speaker(s): Patrice Marcotte Speaker(s) Title: Université de Montréal Host: François Gilbert Event Website: http://www.mcs.anl.gov/research/LANS/events/listn/ The energy sector involves agents that are maybe non cooperating or partially cooperating. In this context, it is natural to

  16. Bio-butanol: Combustion properties and detailed chemical kinetic model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, G.; Curran, H.J.; Pichon, S.; Simmie, J.M.; Zhukov, V.

    2010-02-15

    Autoignition delay time measurements were performed at equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1 and 2 for butan-1-ol at reflected shock pressures of 1, 2.6 and 8 atm at temperatures from 1100 to 1800 K. High-level ab initio calculations were used to determine enthalpies of formation and consequently bond dissociation energies for each bond in the alcohol. A detailed chemical kinetic model consisting of 1399 reactions involving 234 species was constructed and tested against the delay times and also against recent jet-stirred reactor speciation data with encouraging results. The importance of enol chemistry is highlighted. (author)

  17. Sorption Modeling and verification for Off-Gas Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tavlarides, Lawrence L.; Lin, Ronghong; Nan, Yue; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas; Ladshaw, Austin; Sharma, Ketki; Gabitto, Jorge; DePaoli, David

    2015-04-29

    The project has made progress toward developing a comprehensive modeling capability for the capture of target species in off gas evolved during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel. The effort has integrated experimentation, model development, and computer code development for adsorption and absorption processes. For adsorption, a modeling library has been initiated to include (a) equilibrium models for uptake of off-gas components by adsorbents, (b) mass transfer models to describe mass transfer to a particle, diffusion through the pores of the particle and adsorption on the active sites of the particle, and (c) interconnection of these models to fixed bed adsorption modeling which includes advection through the bed. For single-component equilibria, a Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) code was developed to represent experimental data from a broad range of isotherm types; this is equivalent to a Langmuir isotherm in the two-parameter case, and was demonstrated for Kr on INL engineered sorbent HZ PAN, water sorption on molecular sieve 3A sorbent material (MS3A), and Kr and Xe capture on metal-organic framework (MOF) materials. The GSTA isotherm was extended to multicomponent systems through application of a modified spreading pressure surface activity model and generalized predictive adsorbed solution theory; the result is the capability to estimate multicomponent adsorption equilibria from single-component isotherms. This advance, which enhances the capability to simulate systems related to off-gas treatment, has been demonstrated for a range of real-gas systems in the literature and is ready for testing with data currently being collected for multicomponent systems of interest, including iodine and water on MS3A. A diffusion kinetic model for sorbent pellets involving pore and surface diffusion as well as external mass transfer has been established, and a methodology was developed for determining unknown diffusivity parameters from transient uptake data. Two parallel approaches have been explored for integrating the kernels described above into a mass-transport model for adsorption in fixed beds. In one, the GSTA isotherm kernel has been incorporated into the MOOSE framework; in the other approach, a focused finite-difference framework and PDE kernels have been developed. Issues, including oscillatory behavior in MOOSE solutions to advection-diffusion problems, and opportunities have been identified for each approach, and a path forward has been identified toward developing a stronger modeling platform. Experimental systems were established for collection of microscopic kinetics and equilibria data for single and multicomponent uptake of gaseous species on solid sorbents. The systems, which can operate at ambient temperature to 250°C and dew points from -69 to l7°C, are useful for collecting data needed for modeling performance of sorbents of interest. Experiments were conducted to determine applicable models and parameters for isotherms and mass transfer for water and/or iodine adsorption on MS3A. Validation experiments were also conducted for water adsorption on fixed beds ofMS3A. For absorption, work involved modeling with supportive experimentation. A dynamic model was developed to simulate C02 absorption with chemical reaction using high alkaline content water solutions. A computer code was developed to implement the model based upon transient mass and energy balances. Experiments were conducted in a laboratory-scale column to determine model parameters. The influence of geometric parameters and operating variables on C02 absorption was studied over a wide range of conditions. This project has resulted in 7 publications, with 3 manuscripts in preparation. Also, 15 presentations were given at national meetings of ANS and AIChE and at Material Recovery and Waste Forms Campaign Working Group meetings.

  18. Towards an explicit model of D-brane inflation (Journal Article) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Towards an explicit model of D-brane inflation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Towards an explicit model of D-brane inflation We present a detailed analysis of an explicit model of warped D-brane inflation, incorporating the effects of moduli stabilization. We consider the potential for D3-brane motion in a warped conifold background that includes fluxes and holomorphically embedded D7-branes involved in moduli stabilization. Although the D7-branes significantly modify the

  19. Climate Models from the Joint Global Change Research Institute

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Staff at the Joint Institute develop and use models to simulate the economic and physical impacts of global change policy options. The GCAM, for example, gives analysts insight into how regional and national economies might respond to climate change mitigation policies including carbon taxes, carbon trading, and accelerated deployment of energy technology. Three available models are Phoenix, GCAM, and EPIC. Phoenix is a global, dynamic recursive, computable general equilibrium model that is solved in five-year time steps from 2005 through 2100 and divides the world into twenty-four regions. Each region includes twenty-six industrial sectors. Particular attention is paid to energy production in Phoenix. There are nine electricity-generating technologies (coal, natural gas, oil, biomass, nuclear, hydro, wind, solar, and geothermal) and four additional energy commodities: crude oil, refined oil products, coal, and natural gas. Phoenix is designed to answer economic questions related to international climate and energy policy and international trade. Phoenix replaces the Second Generation Model (SGM) that was formerly used for general equilibrium analysis at JGCRI. GCAM is the Global Change Assessment Model, a partial equilibrium model of the world with 14 regions. GCAM operates in 5 year time steps from 1990 to 2095 and is designed to examine long-term changes in the coupled energy, agriculture/land-use, and climate system. GCAM includes a 151-region agriculture land-use module and a reduced form carbon cycle and climate module in addition to its incorporation of demographics, resources, energy production and consumption. The model has been used extensively in a number of assessment and modeling activities such as the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF), the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program, and the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and IPCC assessment reports. GCAM is now freely available as a community model. The Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) Model is a process-based agricultural systems model composed of simulation components for weather, hydrology, nutrient cycling, pesticide fate, tillage, crop growth, soil erosion, crop and soil management and economics. Staff at PNNL have been involved in the development of this model by integrating new sub-models for soil carbon dynamics and nitrogen cycling.

  20. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HVAC Contractor Business Model Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: HVAC Contractor Business Model Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models ...

  1. Hydrogen Delivery Analysis Models | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Models Hydrogen Delivery Analysis Models DOE H2A Delivery Models: Components Model ...interstate markets and demand levels, market penetration) PDF icon ...

  2. Category:Modeling Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Analytical Modeling 1 pages C Conceptual Model 1 pages M Modeling-Computer Simulations 1 pages N Numerical Modeling 1 pages P Portfolio Risk...

  3. Sequence modelling and an extensible data model for genomic database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Peter Wei-Der Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1992-01-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) plans to sequence the human genome by the beginning of the next century. It will generate DNA sequences of more than 10 billion bases and complex marker sequences (maps) of more than 100 million markers. All of these information will be stored in database management systems (DBMSs). However, existing data models do not have the abstraction mechanism for modelling sequences and existing DBMS's do not have operations for complex sequences. This work addresses the problem of sequence modelling in the context of the HGP and the more general problem of an extensible object data model that can incorporate the sequence model as well as existing and future data constructs and operators. First, we proposed a general sequence model that is application and implementation independent. This model is used to capture the sequence information found in the HGP at the conceptual level. In addition, abstract and biological sequence operators are defined for manipulating the modelled sequences. Second, we combined many features of semantic and object oriented data models into an extensible framework, which we called the Extensible Object Model'', to address the need of a modelling framework for incorporating the sequence data model with other types of data constructs and operators. This framework is based on the conceptual separation between constructors and constraints. We then used this modelling framework to integrate the constructs for the conceptual sequence model. The Extensible Object Model is also defined with a graphical representation, which is useful as a tool for database designers. Finally, we defined a query language to support this model and implement the query processor to demonstrate the feasibility of the extensible framework and the usefulness of the conceptual sequence model.

  4. Sequence modelling and an extensible data model for genomic database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Peter Wei-Der |

    1992-01-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) plans to sequence the human genome by the beginning of the next century. It will generate DNA sequences of more than 10 billion bases and complex marker sequences (maps) of more than 100 million markers. All of these information will be stored in database management systems (DBMSs). However, existing data models do not have the abstraction mechanism for modelling sequences and existing DBMS`s do not have operations for complex sequences. This work addresses the problem of sequence modelling in the context of the HGP and the more general problem of an extensible object data model that can incorporate the sequence model as well as existing and future data constructs and operators. First, we proposed a general sequence model that is application and implementation independent. This model is used to capture the sequence information found in the HGP at the conceptual level. In addition, abstract and biological sequence operators are defined for manipulating the modelled sequences. Second, we combined many features of semantic and object oriented data models into an extensible framework, which we called the ``Extensible Object Model``, to address the need of a modelling framework for incorporating the sequence data model with other types of data constructs and operators. This framework is based on the conceptual separation between constructors and constraints. We then used this modelling framework to integrate the constructs for the conceptual sequence model. The Extensible Object Model is also defined with a graphical representation, which is useful as a tool for database designers. Finally, we defined a query language to support this model and implement the query processor to demonstrate the feasibility of the extensible framework and the usefulness of the conceptual sequence model.

  5. Public Involvement Committee - Transcribed Flipcharts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 5, 2014 State of the Site (SOS) Meetings * HAB - all four meetings o Doesn't have to be manned o What HAB materials should be available?  HAB values paper o Have info available for the public (table idea) o Need to coordinate display board at each meeting * Have table/poster available for public to make suggestions on cleanup topics (next to display board) o Fact sheets of specific projects available o Briefing document of important website pages/links to important issues. * Suggest not

  6. Strategic Public Involvement ? Tool Time!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    bureau. Encourage conversation & engagement with the public on hot topics through social media Social Media Post regularly (preferably daily) Include photos,...

  7. Classified Visits Involving Foreign Nationals

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-01-13

    The Order establishes a program to manage the Department-wide program to facilitate, document, and assure accountability when approving foreign national access to classified DOE programs and facilities. Cancels portions of Chapter VIII, of DOE O 470.1 that pertain to foreign nationals who visit DOE sitess and require access to classified information. Canceled by DOE O 470.4B.

  8. B Decays Involving Light Mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eschrich, Ivo Gough; /UC, Irvine

    2007-01-09

    Recent BABAR results for decays of B-mesons to combinations of non-charm mesons are presented. This includes B decays to two vector mesons, B {yields} {eta}{prime}({pi}, K, {rho}) modes, and a comprehensive Dalitz Plot analysis of B {yields} KKK decays.

  9. NEPA-Related Public Involvement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Loan Programs Office’s NEPA-related hearings, public meetings, and public notices (e.g. public scoping meeting, public hearing, notice of proposed floodplain or wetland action) are presented...

  10. Safety Success Through Employee Involvement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenters: James Pollard, Monica Lewis, Michael Hendrix, Stacy Miller, Y-12 National Security Complex Track 2-2

  11. Who's Involved | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2014 DOE CFC Campaign Leadership Chair Ernest Moniz, Secretary of Energy Vice Chair Dot Harris, Director, Office of Economic Impact and Diversity Champion David M. Klaus, Deputy Under Secretary for Management and Performance Loaned Executive Kendra Riley, CFC National Capital Area Campaign Manager Neil Schuldenfrei, Office of Economic Impact and Diversity Deputy Campaign Manager Amanda Quinones, Office of Economic Impact and Diversity Project Manager Andre Sayles, Office of Economic Impact and

  12. Chemical kinetics modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J.

    1993-12-01

    This project emphasizes numerical modeling of chemical kinetics of combustion, including applications in both practical combustion systems and in controlled laboratory experiments. Elementary reaction rate parameters are combined into mechanisms which then describe the overall reaction of the fuels being studied. Detailed sensitivity analyses are used to identify those reaction rates and product species distributions to which the results are most sensitive and therefore warrant the greatest attention from other experimental and theoretical research programs. Experimental data from a variety of environments are combined together to validate the reaction mechanisms, including results from laminar flames, shock tubes, flow systems, detonations, and even internal combustion engines.

  13. Ranking and Sequencing Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-08-13

    This database application (commonly called the Supermodel) provides a repository for managing critical facility/project information, allows the user to subjectively an objectively assess key criteria , quantify project risks, develop ROM cost estimates, determine facility/project end states, ultimately performing risk-based modeling to rank facilities/project based on risk, sequencing project schedules and provides an optimized recommended sequencing/scheduling of these projects which maximize the S&M cost savings to perform closure projects which benefit all stakeholders.

  14. Model WC-18000

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Model WC-18000 by NuPac . VOLUME REDUCTION means ravings in transportation and burial. l AIR FILTRATION SYSTEM l 18000 lb. COMPACTION 0 ELECTRO-MECHANICAL OPERATION l OVER 20 UNITS IN OPERATION NUCLEAR PACKAGING INC. 815 South 28th St. Tacoma, Washington 98409 (2061572.7775 or 838-1243 See w at Booth 58 HP Society Annusl Meetllng isotope ; & radiation COMPLIANCE Radiography firm loses license Oflicial ilc,i<m 10uwtl American X- Ray and Inspcclion Inc.. of Farmington Hills. htich.. wnlinwd

  15. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Coal Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) Coal Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  16. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Refinery Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) Refinery Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  17. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Residential Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) Residential Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  18. International Natural Gas Model 2011, Model Documentation Report

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2013-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the International Natural Gas Model (INGM). It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  19. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Transportation Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) International Transportation model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  20. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: World Electricity Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) World Electricity Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  1. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Commercial Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) Commercial Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  2. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: District Heat Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) District Heat Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  3. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Natural Gas Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) Natural Gas Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  4. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Greenhouse Gases Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) Greenhouse Gases Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  5. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Main Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) Main Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  6. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Industrial Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) World Industrial Model (WIM). It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  7. Comparison of Photovoltaic Models in the System Advisor Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, N. J.; Dobos, A. P.; Gilman, P.

    2013-08-01

    The System Advisor Model (SAM) is free software developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for predicting the performance of renewable energy systems and analyzing the financial feasibility of residential, commercial, and utility-scale grid-connected projects. SAM offers several options for predicting the performance of photovoltaic (PV) systems. The model requires that the analyst choose from three PV system models, and depending on that choice, possibly choose from three module and two inverter component models. To obtain meaningful results from SAM, the analyst must be aware of the differences between the model options and their applicability to different modeling scenarios. This paper presents an overview the different PV model options and presents a comparison of results for a 200-kW system using different model options.

  8. Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report summarizes research activities on engineered barrier system (EBS) model integration with the generic disposal system model (GDSM), and used fuel degradation and radionuclide mobilization (RM) in support of the EBS evaluation and tool development within the UFD campaign.

  9. Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate perturbs the expression of genes involved in immune response and lipid and steroid metabolism in chicken embryos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farhat, Amani; Buick, Julie K.; Williams, Andrew; Yauk, Carole L.; O'Brien, Jason M.; Crump, Doug; Williams, Kim L.; Chiu, Suzanne; Kennedy, Sean W.

    2014-03-01

    We previously demonstrated that in ovo exposure to the flame retardant tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP) decreased plasma thyroxine levels, reduced growth parameters, and decreased gallbladder size in chicken embryos. In the current study DNA microarrays were used to evaluate global mRNA expression in liver tissue of male chicken embryos that exhibited the above mentioned effects. Injected doses were dimethyl sulfoxide vehicle control, 7.6 or 45 ?g TDCPP/g egg. TDCPP caused significant changes in the expression of five genes at the low dose and 47 genes at the high dose (False Discovery Rate p ? 0.1, fold change ? 1.5). The gene expression analysis suggested a compromised immune function, a state of cholestatic liver/biliary fibrosis, and disrupted lipid and steroid metabolism. Circulating bile acid levels were elevated, which is an indication of liver dysfunction, and plasma cholesterol levels were reduced; however, hepatic bile acid and cholesterol levels were unaltered. Interactome analyses identified apolipoprotein E, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha as key regulatory molecules involved in the effects of TDCPP. Our results demonstrate a targeted effect of TDCPP toxicity on lipid metabolism, including cholesterol, that helps explain the aforementioned phenotypic effects, as chicken embryos are highly dependent on yolk lipids for growth and maintenance throughout development. Finally, our results are in concordance with the literature that describes TDCPP as a cancer-causing agent, since the majority of dysregulated genes were involved in cancer pathways. - Highlights: • TDCPP dysregulates genes involved in immune function and lipid metabolism. • A targeted effect of TDCPP toxicity on cholesterol metabolism is apparent. • A state of cholestatic liver fibrosis is suggested by the expression profile. • Elevated plasma bile acids suggest that TDCPP causes liver dysfunction.

  10. Optimized Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Versus 3D-CRT for Early Stage Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma Without Axillary Involvement: A Comparison of Second Cancers and Heart Disease Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Ragona, Riccardo; Piva, Cristina; Scafa, Davide; Fiandra, Christian; Fusella, Marco; Giglioli, Francesca Romana; Lohr, Frank; Ricardi, Umberto

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risks of second cancers and cardiovascular diseases associated with an optimized volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning solution in a selected cohort of stage I/II Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients treated with either involved-node or involved-site radiation therapy in comparison with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: Thirty-eight patients (13 males and 25 females) were included. Disease extent was mediastinum alone (n=8, 21.1%); mediastinum plus unilateral neck (n=19, 50%); mediastinum plus bilateral neck (n=11, 29.9%). Prescription dose was 30 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Only 5 patients had mediastinal bulky disease at diagnosis (13.1%). Anteroposterior 3D-CRT was compared with a multiarc optimized VMAT solution. Lung, breast, and thyroid cancer risks were estimated by calculating a lifetime attributable risk (LAR), with a LAR ratio (LAR{sub VMAT}-to-LAR{sub 3D-CRT}) as a comparative measure. Cardiac toxicity risks were estimated by calculating absolute excess risk (AER). Results: The LAR ratio favored 3D-CRT for lung cancer induction risk in mediastinal alone (P=.004) and mediastinal plus unilateral neck (P=.02) presentations. LAR ratio for breast cancer was lower for VMAT in mediastinal plus bilateral neck presentations (P=.02), without differences for other sites. For thyroid cancer, no significant differences were observed, regardless of anatomical presentation. A significantly lower AER of cardiac (P=.038) and valvular diseases (P<.0001) was observed for VMAT regardless of disease extent. Conclusions: In a cohort of patients with favorable characteristics in terms of disease extent at diagnosis (large prevalence of nonbulky presentations without axillary involvement), optimized VMAT reduced heart disease risk with comparable risks of thyroid and breast cancer, with an increase in lung cancer induction probability. The results are however strongly influenced by the different anatomical presentations, supporting an individualized approach.

  11. Generalized Environment for Modeling Systems

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-02-07

    GEMS is an integrated environment that allows technical analysts, modelers, researchers, etc. to integrate and deploy models and/or decision tools with associated data to the internet for direct use by customers. GEMS does not require that the model developer know how to code or script and therefore delivers this capability to a large group of technical specialists. Customers gain the benefit of being able to execute their own scenarios directly without need for technical support.more » GEMS is a process that leverages commercial software products with specialized codes that add connectivity and unique functions to support the overall capability. Users integrate pre-existing models with a commercial product and store parameters and input trajectories in a companion commercial database. The model is then exposed into a commercial web environment and a graphical user interface (GUI) is applied by the model developer. Users execute the model through the web based GUI and GEMS manages supply of proper inputs, execution of models, routing of data to models and display of results back to users. GEMS works in layers, the following description is from the bottom up. Modelers create models in the modeling tool of their choice such as Excel, Matlab, or Fortran. They can also use models from a library of previously wrapped legacy codes (models). Modelers integrate the models (or a single model) by wrapping and connecting the models using the Phoenix Integration tool entitled ModelCenter. Using a ModelCenter/SAS plugin (DOE copyright CW-10-08) the modeler gets data from either an SAS or SQL database and sends results back to SAS or SQL. Once the model is working properly, the ModelCenter file is saved and stored in a folder location to which a SharePoint server tool created at INL is pointed. This enables the ModelCenter model to be run from SharePoint. The modeler then goes into Microsoft SharePoint and creates a graphical user interface (GUI) using the ModelCenter WebPart (CW-12-04) created at INL to work inside SharePoint. The GUI tool links slider bars and drop downs to specific inputs and output of the ModelCenter model that is executable from SharePoint. The modeler also creates in SAS, dashboards, graphs and tables that are exposed by links and SAS and ModelCenter Web Parts into the SharePoint system. The user can then log into SharePoint, move slider bars and select drop down lists to configure the model parameters, click to run the model, and then view the output results that are based on their particular input choices. The main point is that GEMS eliminates the need for a programmer to connect and create the web artifacts necessary to implement and deliver an executable model or decision aid to customers.« less

  12. As you may kn&<' the~de&tment of &~er& (D&j 1s involved'in'a pronram

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    As you may kn&<' the~de&tment of &~er& (D&j 1s involved'in'a pronram '. to'chiiracterlze the radjologital cbndif~on of ,sites formerly used byythe . . . ., Manhattan Engineer Dlstrlct (NED) and/or Atomjc Energy Co$n~~lssiqq (AEC); in.. the development of 'nuclear energy.. As part..of this -programi' DOE is 1~ I+ preparing, ,a' series of. brJef~ summaries ,-of .the' history:. of' tho ,#D/AEC~ : : ..; 'i ..relatecl activities and 'Conditions at .thc. sneclfic. sites. The

  13. Global Energy Futures Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-01-01

    The Global Energy Futures Model (GEFM) is a demand-based, gross domestic product (GDP)-driven, dynamic simulation tool that provides an integrated framework to model key aspects of energy, nuclear-materials storage and disposition, environmental effluents from fossil and non fossil energy and global nuclear-materials management. Based entirely on public source data, it links oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear and renewable energy dynamically to greenhouse-gas emissions and 13 other measures of environmental impact. It includes historical data frommore » 1990 to 2000, is benchmarked to the DOE/EIA/IEO 2002 [5] Reference Case for 2000 to 2020, and extrapolates energy demand through the year 2050. The GEFM is globally integrated, and breaks out five regions of the world: United States of America (USA), the Peoples Republic of China (China), the former Soviet Union (FSU), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) nations excluding the USA (other industrialized countries), and the rest of the world (ROW) (essentially the developing world). The GEFM allows the user to examine a very wide range of what ir scenarios through 2050 and to view the potential effects across widely dispersed, but interrelated areas. The authors believe that this high-level learning tool will help to stimulate public policy debate on energy, environment, economic and national security issues.« less

  14. Factory Cost Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-12-17

    The Factory Cost Model (FCM) is an economic analysis tool intended to provide flat panel display (FPD) and other similar discrete component manufacturers with the ability to make first-order estimates of the cost of unit production. This software has several intended uses. Primary among these is the ability to provide first-order economic analysis for future factories. Consequently, the model requires a minimal level of input detail, and accomodates situations where actual production data are notmore » available. This software is designed to be activity based such that most of the calculated direct costs are associated with the steps of a manufacturibg process. The FCM architecture has the ability to accomodate the analysis of existing manufacturing facilities. The FCM can provide assistance with strategic economic decisions surrounding production related matters. For instance, the program can project the effect on costs and resources of a new product''s introduction, or it can assess the potential cost reduction produced by step yield improvements in the manufacturing process.« less

  15. Low Dose Radiation Cancer Risks: Epidemiological and Toxicological Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David G. Hoel, PhD

    2012-04-19

    The basic purpose of this one year research grant was to extend the two stage clonal expansion model (TSCE) of carcinogenesis to exposures other than the usual single acute exposure. The two-stage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis incorporates the biological process of carcinogenesis, which involves two mutations and the clonal proliferation of the intermediate cells, in a stochastic, mathematical way. The current TSCE model serves a general purpose of acute exposure models but requires numerical computation of both the survival and hazard functions. The primary objective of this research project was to develop the analytical expressions for the survival function and the hazard function of the occurrence of the first cancer cell for acute, continuous and multiple exposure cases within the framework of the piece-wise constant parameter two-stage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis. For acute exposure and multiple exposures of acute series, it is either only allowed to have the first mutation rate vary with the dose, or to have all the parameters be dose dependent; for multiple exposures of continuous exposures, all the parameters are allowed to vary with the dose. With these analytical functions, it becomes easy to evaluate the risks of cancer and allows one to deal with the various exposure patterns in cancer risk assessment. A second objective was to apply the TSCE model with varing continuous exposures from the cancer studies of inhaled plutonium in beagle dogs. Using step functions to estimate the retention functions of the pulmonary exposure of plutonium the multiple exposure versions of the TSCE model was to be used to estimate the beagle dog lung cancer risks. The mathematical equations of the multiple exposure versions of the TSCE model were developed. A draft manuscript which is attached provides the results of this mathematical work. The application work using the beagle dog data from plutonium exposure has not been completed due to the fact that the research project did not continue beyond its first year.

  16. On the formulation of a crystal plasticity model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marin, Esteban B.

    2006-08-01

    This report presents the formulation of a crystal elasto-viscoplastic model and the corresponding integration scheme. The model is suitable to represent the isothermal, anisotropic, large deformation of polycrystalline metals. The formulation is an extension of a rigid viscoplastic model to account for elasticity effects, and incorporates a number of changes with respect to a previous formulation [Marin & Dawson, 1998]. This extension is formally derived using the well-known multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into an elastic and plastic components, where the elastic part is additionally decomposed into the elastic stretch V{sup e} and the proper orthogonal R{sup e} tensors. The constitutive equations are written in the intermediate, stress-free configuration obtained by unloading the deformed crystal through the elastic stretch V{sup e-}. The model is framed in a thermodynamic setting, and developed initially for large elastic strains. The crystal equations are then specialized to the case of small elastic strains, an assumption typically valid for metals. The developed integration scheme is implicit and proceeds by separating the spherical and deviatoric crystal responses. An ''approximate'' algorithmic material moduli is also derived for applications in implicit numerical codes. The model equations and their integration procedure have been implemented in both a material point simulator and a commercial finite element code. Both implementations are validated by solving a number of examples involving aggregates of either face centered cubic (FCC) or hexagonal close-packed (HCP) crystals subjected to different loading paths.

  17. Application of nuclear models to neutron nuclear cross section calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, P.G.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear theory is used increasingly to supplement and extend the nuclear data base that is available for applied studies. Areas where theoretical calculations are most important include the determination of neutron cross sections for unstable fission products and transactinide nuclei in fission reactor or nuclear waste calculations and for meeting the extensive dosimetry, activation, and neutronic data needs associated with fusion reactor development, especially for neutron energies above 14 MeV. Considerable progress has been made in the use of nuclear models for data evaluation and, particularly, in the methods used to derive physically meaningful parameters for model calculations. Theoretical studies frequently involve use of spherical and deformed optical models, Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory, preequilibrium theory, direct-reaction theory, and often make use of gamma-ray strength function models and phenomenological (or microscopic) level density prescriptions. The development, application, and limitations of nuclear models for data evaluation are discussed, with emphasis on the 0.1 to 50 MeV energy range. (91 references).

  18. Transient Inverse Calibration of Hanford Site-Wide Groundwater Model to Hanford Operational Impacts - 1943 to 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Charles R.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Thorne, Paul D.; Orr, Samuel; Mckinley, Mathew I.

    2001-05-31

    This report describes a new initiative to strengthen the technical defensibility of predictions made with the Hanford site-wide groundwater flow and transport model. The focus is on characterizing major uncertainties in the current model. PNNL will develop and implement a calibration approach and methodology that can be used to evaluate alternative conceptual models of the Hanford aquifer system. The calibration process will involve a three-dimensional transient inverse calibration of each numerical model to historical observations of hydraulic and water quality impacts to the unconfined aquifer system from Hanford operations since the mid-1940s.

  19. Business Model Guide Executive Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Business Model Guide Executive Summary by the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program.

  20. National Transportation Fuels Model | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NISACCapabilitiesNational Transportation Fuels Model content top National Transportation Fuels Model This model informs analyses of the availability of transportation fuel in the event the fuel supply chain is disrupted. The portion of the fuel supply system represented by the network model (see figure) spans from oil fields to fuel distribution terminals. Different components of this system (e.g., crude oil import terminals, refineries, transmission pipelines, and tank farms) can be disrupted,