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1

National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer-based, energy-economy modeling system of U.S. through 2030. NEMS projects the production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy, subject to assumptions on macroeconomic and financial factors, world energy markets, resource availability and costs, behavioral and technological choice criteria, cost and performance characteristics of energy technologies, and demographics. NEMS was designed and implemented by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). NEMS can be used to analyze the effects of existing and proposed government laws and regulations related to energy production and use; the potential impact of new and advanced energy production, conversion, and consumption technologies; the impact and cost of greenhouse gas control; the impact of increased use of renewable energy sources; and the potential savings from increased efficiency of energy use; and the impact of regulations on the use of alternative or reformulated fuels. NEMS has also been used for a number of special analyses at the request of the Administration, U.S. Congress, other offices of DOE and other government agencies, who specify the scenarios and assumptions for the analysis. Modules allow analyses to be conducted in energy topic areas such as residential demand, industrial demand, electricity market, oil and gas supply, renewable fuels, etc.

2

How to obtain the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) NEMS is used by the modelers at the U. S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) who understand its structure and programming. NEMS has only been used by a few organizations outside of the EIA, because most people that requested NEMS found out that it was too difficult or rigid to use. NEMS is not typically used for state-level analysis and is poorly suited for application to other countries. However, many do obtain the model simply to use the data in its input files or to examine the source code.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Agency/Company /Organization: Energy Information Administration Sector: Energy Focus Area: Economic Development Phase: Develop Goals Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.eia.gov/oiaf/aeo/overview/index.html OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, National Energy Modeling System, NEMS Language: English References: The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview[1] Project the production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy, subject to assumptions on macroeconomic and financial factors, world energy markets, resource availability and costs, behavioral and

4

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Overview of NEMS  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NEMS represents domestic energy markets by explicitly representing the economic decision making involved in the production, conversion, and consumption of energy products. Where possible, NEMS includes explicit representation of energy technologies and their characteristics. NEMS represents domestic energy markets by explicitly representing the economic decision making involved in the production, conversion, and consumption of energy products. Where possible, NEMS includes explicit representation of energy technologies and their characteristics. Since energy costs and availability and energy-consuming characteristics can vary widely across regions, considerable regional detail is included. Other details of production and consumption categories are represented to facilitate policy analysis and ensure the validity of the results. A summary of the detail provided in NEMS is shown below. Summary Table Major Assumptions Each module of NEMS embodies many assumptions and data to characterize the future production, conversion, or consumption of energy in the United States. Two major assumptions concern economic growth in the United States and world oil prices, as determined by world oil supply and demand.

5

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Overview of NEMS  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

OVERVIEW OF NEMS OVERVIEW OF NEMS blueball.gif (205 bytes) Major Assumptions blueball.gif (205 bytes) NEMS Modular Structure blueball.gif (205 bytes) Integrating Module NEMS represents domestic energy markets by explicitly representing the economic decisionmaking involved in the production, conversion, and consumption of energy products. For example, the penetration of a new or advanced technology for electricity generation is projected only if the technology is deemed to be economic when considering the cost-minimizing mix of fuels over the life of the equipment. Since energy costs and availability and energy- consuming characteristics can vary widely across regions, considerable regional detail is included. Other details of production and consumption categories are represented to

6

Comparison of Bottom-Up and Top-Down Forecasts: Vision Industry Energy Forecasts with ITEMS and NEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technologies, EIA extracted energy use infonnation from the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) - 2000 (8) for each of the seven # The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle Memorial Institute...-6, 2000 NEMS The NEMS industrial module is the official forecasting model for EIA and thus the Department of Energy. For this reason, the energy prices and output forecasts used to drive the ITEMS model were taken from EIA's AEO 2000. Understanding...

Roop, J. M.; Dahowski, R. T

7

A sensitivity analysis of the treatment of wind energy in the AEO99 version of NEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

other assumptions for wind power to determine which onesused in NEMS regarding wind power to determine their impact

Osborn, Julie G.; Wood, Frances; Richey, Cooper; Sanders, Sandy; Short, Walter; Koomey, Jonathan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

NEMS integrating module documentation report  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer-based, energy-economy modeling system of U.S. energy markets for the midterm period. NEMS projects the production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy, subject to a variety of assumptions. The assumptions encompass macroeconomic and financial factors, world energy markets, resource availability and costs, behavioral and technological choice criteria, technology characteristics, and demographics. NEMS produces a general equilibrium solution for energy supply and demand in the U.S. energy markets on an annual basis through 2015. Baseline forecasts from NEMS are published in the Annual Energy Outlook. Analyses are also prepared in response to requests by the U.S. Congress, the DOE Office of Policy, and others. NEMS was first used for forecasts presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1994.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Nano-Electro-Mechanical (NEM) Relay Devices and Technology for Ultra-Low Energy Digital Integrated Circuits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology 3.1 Introduction Nano-electro-mechanical (NEM)improvements, a scaled nano-relay technology with optimizedNano-Electro-Mechanical (NEM) Relay Devices and Technology

Nathanael, Rhesa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

A SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS OF THE TREATMENT OF WIND ENERGY IN THE AEO99 VERSION OF NEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory University of California Berkeley, CA 94720 and National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole limitations on growth in capacity; these limitations include depletion of resources, costs of rapid of the other renewable technologies, such as solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), our findings may

11

Overview of NEMS-H2, Version 1.0  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NEMS-H2, Version 1.0 NEMS-H2, Version 1.0 Frances Wood OnLocation, Inc., Energy Systems Consulting (fwood@onlocationinc.com) January 26, 2006 OnLocation, Inc., Energy Systems Consulting 2 Today's Presentation * Overview of NEMS-H2 Structure * Current Status * New Hydrogen Market Module (HMM) * Transportation Module Modifications * Preliminary Test Runs * Looking Ahead to Next Phase OnLocation, Inc., Energy Systems Consulting 3 NEMS Overview * The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) was developed and is maintained by EIA - Annual Energy Outlook projections - Congressional as well as agency requests * NEMS has also been used extensively outside of EIA - Various National Laboratories studies - National Commission on Energy Policy - Program offices within DOE for R&D benefits estimation * Modular structure allows each sector to be represented by

12

EIA Buildings Analysis of Consumer Behavior in NEMS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings Analysis of Consumer Buildings Analysis of Consumer Behavior in NEMS Behavioral Economics Experts Meeting July 17, 2013 | Washington, DC David Peterson Buildings Energy Consumption and Efficiency Analysis Overview Behavioral Economics Experts Meeting, Washington DC, July 17, 2013 2 * NEMS Structure * Housing/floorspace and service demand in Residential Demand Module (RDM) and Commercial Demand Module (CDM) * Market share calculation for equipment in RDM and CDM * Price responses / elasticities * Distributed generation (DG) & combined heat and power (CHP) NEMS Structure Behavioral Economics Experts Meeting, Washington DC, July 17, 2013 3 * Represents energy supply, conversion, and demand in a unified, but modular system * Detailed structural and process models in most energy sectors

13

NEMS Freight Transportation Module Improvement Study  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) contracted with IHS Global, Inc. (IHS) to analyze the relationship between the value of industrial output, physical output, and freight movement in the United States for use in updating analytic assumptions and modeling structure within the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) freight transportation module, including forecasting methodologies and processes to identify possible alternative approaches that would improve multi-modal freight flow and fuel consumption estimation.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Integrated NEMS and optoelectronics for sensor applications.  

SciTech Connect

This work utilized advanced engineering in several fields to find solutions to the challenges presented by the integration of MEMS/NEMS with optoelectronics to realize a compact sensor system, comprised of a microfabricated sensor, VCSEL, and photodiode. By utilizing microfabrication techniques in the realization of the MEMS/NEMS component, the VCSEL and the photodiode, the system would be small in size and require less power than a macro-sized component. The work focused on two technologies, accelerometers and microphones, leveraged from other LDRD programs. The first technology was the nano-g accelerometer using a nanophotonic motion detection system (67023). This accelerometer had measured sensitivity of approximately 10 nano-g. The Integrated NEMS and optoelectronics LDRD supported the nano-g accelerometer LDRD by providing advanced designs for the accelerometers, packaging, and a detection scheme to encapsulate the accelerometer, furthering the testing capabilities beyond bench-top tests. A fully packaged and tested die was never realized, but significant packaging issues were addressed and many resolved. The second technology supported by this work was the ultrasensitive directional microphone arrays for military operations in urban terrain and future combat systems (93518). This application utilized a diffraction-based sensing technique with different optical component placement and a different detection scheme from the nano-g accelerometer. The Integrated NEMS LDRD supported the microphone array LDRD by providing custom designs, VCSELs, and measurement techniques to accelerometers that were fabricated from the same operational principles as the microphones, but contain proof masses for acceleration transduction. These devices were packaged at the end of the work.

Czaplewski, David A.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Olsson, Roy H., III; Bogart, Gregory R. (Symphony Acoustics, Rio Rancho, NM); Krishnamoorthy, Uma; Warren, Mial E.; Carr, Dustin Wade (Symphony Acoustics, Rio Rancho, NM); Okandan, Murat; Peterson, Kenneth Allen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Price Responsiveness in the AEO2003 NEMS Residential and Commercial Buildings Sector Models  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper describes the demand responses to changes in energy prices in the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 versions of the Residential and Commercial Demand Modules of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). It updates a similar paper completed for the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 version of the NEMS.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

NEMS Freight Transportation Module Improvement Study  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and forecast accuracy. Challenges might include new skill development within EIA, contracting for additional commercial services, and possibly altering the manner in which NEMS...

17

U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a multi-sector, integrated model of the U.S. energy system put out by the Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration. NEMS is used to produce the annual 20-year forecast of U.S. energy use aggregated to the nine-region census division level. The research objective was to disaggregate this regional energy forecast to the county level for select forecast years, for use in a more detailed and accurate regional analysis of energy usage across the U.S. The process of disaggregation using a geographic information system (GIS) was researched and a model was created utilizing available population forecasts and climate zone data. The model's primary purpose was to generate an energy demand forecast with greater spatial resolution than what is currently produced by NEMS, and to produce a flexible model that can be used repeatedly as an add-on to NEMS in which detailed analysis can be executed exogenously with results fed back into the NEMS data flow. The methods developed were then applied to the study data to obtain residential and commercial electricity demand forecasts. The model was subjected to comparative and statistical testing to assess predictive accuracy. Forecasts using this model were robust and accurate in slow-growing, temperate regions such as the Midwest and Mountain regions. Interestingly, however, the model performed with less accuracy in the Pacific and Northwest regions of the country where population growth was more active. In the future more refined methods will be necessary to improve the accuracy of these forecasts. The disaggregation method was written into a flexible tool within the ArcGIS environment which enables the user to output the results in five year intervals over the period 2000-2025. In addition, the outputs of this tool were used to develop a time-series simulation showing the temporal changes in electricity forecasts in terms of absolute, per capita, and density of demand.

Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Investigation of residential central air conditioning load shapes in NEMS  

SciTech Connect

This memo explains what Berkeley Lab has learned about how the residential central air-conditioning (CAC) end use is represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). NEMS is an energy model maintained by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) that is routinely used in analysis of energy efficiency standards for residential appliances. As part of analyzing utility and environmental impacts related to the federal rulemaking for residential CAC, lower-than-expected peak utility results prompted Berkeley Lab to investigate the input load shapes that characterize the peaky CAC end use and the submodule that treats load demand response. Investigations enabled a through understanding of the methodology by which hourly load profiles are input to the model and how the model is structured to respond to peak demand. Notably, it was discovered that NEMS was using an October-peaking load shape to represent residential space cooling, which suppressed peak effects to levels lower than expected. An apparent scaling down of the annual load within the load-demand submodule was found, another significant suppressor of the peak impacts. EIA promptly responded to Berkeley Lab's discoveries by updating numerous load shapes for the AEO2002 version of NEMS; EIA is still studying the scaling issue. As a result of this work, it was concluded that Berkeley Lab's customary end-use decrement approach was the most defensible way for Berkeley Lab to perform the recent CAC utility impact analysis. This approach was applied in conjunction with the updated AEO2002 load shapes to perform last year's published rulemaking analysis. Berkeley Lab experimented with several alternative approaches, including modifying the CAC efficiency level, but determined that these did not sufficiently improve the robustness of the method or results to warrant their implementation. Work in this area will continue in preparation for upcoming rulemakings for the other peak coincident end uses, commercial air conditioning and distribution transformers.

Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Marnay, Chris; Gumerman, Etan; Chan, Peter; Rosenquist, Greg; Osborn, Julie

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Analysis and Representation of Miscellaneous Electric Loads in NEMS -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis and Representation of Miscellaneous Electric Loads in NEMS Analysis and Representation of Miscellaneous Electric Loads in NEMS Release date: January 6, 2014 Miscellaneous Electric Loads (MELs) comprise a growing portion of delivered energy consumption in residential and commercial buildings. Recently, the growth of MELs has offset some of the efficiency gains made through technology improvements and standards in major end uses such as space conditioning, lighting, and water heating. Miscellaneous end uses, including televisions, personal computers, security systems, data center servers, and many other devices, have continued to penetrate into building-related market segments. Part of this proliferation of devices and equipment can be attributed to increased service demand for entertainment, computing, and convenience appliances.

20

Building Component Library | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Component Library Building Component Library Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Building Component Library Agency/Company /Organization: NREL Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings Phase: Create a Vision, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan Topics: Resource assessment, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Dataset Website: bcl.nrel.gov Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): buildings, nrel, data, component Language: English Building Component Library Screenshot References: Buildings Component Library[1] The Building Component Library is a repository of building data used to create building energy models. The Building Component Library is a repository of building data used to create building energy models. The data are broken down into separate

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems energy components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NEMS overview and brief description of cases NEMS overview and brief description of cases On This Page The National Energy Modeling... Component modules Annual Energy Outlook 2011... The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 (AEO2011) are generated from the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) [1], developed and maintained by the Office of Energy Analysis (OEA), formerly known as the Office Integrated Analysis and Forecasting (OIAF), of the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) [2]. In addition to its use in developing the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections, NEMS is also used to complete analytical studies for the U.S. Congress, the Executive Office of the President, other offices within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and other Federal agencies. NEMS is also used by other nongovernment groups,

22

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NEMS overview and brief description of cases NEMS overview and brief description of cases JUMP TO: The National Energy Modeling System | Component modules | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 cases The National Energy Modeling System Projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) are generated using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) [148], developed and maintained by the Office of Energy Analysis of the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). In addition to its use in developing the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections, NEMS is also used to complete analytical studies for the U.S. Congress, the Executive Office of the President, other offices within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and other Federal agencies. NEMS is also used by other nongovernment groups, such as the Electric Power Research Institute, Duke University, and Georgia Institute

23

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NEMS overview and brief description of cases NEMS overview and brief description of cases JUMP TO: The National Energy Modeling System | Component modules | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 cases The National Energy Modeling System Projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) are generated using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) [148], developed and maintained by the Office of Energy Analysis of the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). In addition to its use in developing the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections, NEMS is also used to complete analytical studies for the U.S. Congress, the Executive Office of the President, other offices within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and other Federal agencies. NEMS is also used by other nongovernment groups, such as the Electric Power Research Institute, Duke University, and Georgia Institute

24

U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS National Climatic Data Center.with Changing Boundaries." Use of GIS to Understand Socio-Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS Appendix A. Map Results Gallery

Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer-based, energy-economy modeling system of U.S. energy markets for the midterm period through 2020. NEMS projects the production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy, subject to assumptions on macroeconomic and financial factors, world energy markets, resource availability and costs, behavioral and technological choice criteria, cost and performance characteristics of energy technologies, and demographics. NEMS was designed and implemented by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer-based, energy-economy modeling system of U.S. energy markets for the midterm period through 2020. NEMS projects the production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy, subject to assumptions on macroeconomic and financial factors, world energy markets, resource availability and costs, behavioral and technological choice criteria, cost and performance characteristics of energy technologies, and demographics. NEMS was designed and implemented by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview presents an overview of the structure and methodology of NEMS and each of its components. This chapter provides a description of the design and objectives of the system, followed by a chapter on the overall modeling structure and solution algorithm. The remainder of the report summarizes the methodology and scope of the component modules of NEMS. The model descriptions are intended for readers familiar with terminology from economics, operations research, and energy modeling. More detailed model documentation reports for all the NEMS modules are also available from EIA (Appendix, “Bibliography”).

26

Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. From 1982 through 1993, the Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS) was used by the EIA for its analyses, and the Gas Analysis Modeling System (GAMS) was used within IFFS to represent natural gas markets. Prior to 1982, the Midterm Energy Forecasting System (MEFS), also referred to as the Project Independence Evaluation System (PIES), was employed. NEMS was developed to enhance and update EIA`s modeling capability by internally incorporating models of energy markets that had previously been analyzed off-line. In addition, greater structural detail in NEMS permits the analysis of a broader range of energy issues. The time horizon of NEMS is the midterm period (i.e., through 2015). In order to represent the regional differences in energy markets, the component models of NEMS function at regional levels appropriate for the markets represented, with subsequent aggregation/disaggregation to the Census Division level for reporting purposes.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 Introduction The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer-based, energy-economy modeling system of U.S. energy markets for the midterm period through 2025. NEMS projects the production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy, subject to assumptions on macroeconomic and financial factors, world energy markets, resource availability and costs, behavioral and technological choice criteria, cost and performance characteristics of energy technologies, and demographics. NEMS was designed and implemented by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 presents an overview of the structure and methodology of NEMS and each of its components. This chapter provides a description of the design and objectives of the system, followed by a chapter on the overall modeling structure and solution algorithm. The remainder of the report summarizes the methodology and scope of the component modules of NEMS. The model descriptions are intended for readers familiar with terminology from economics, operations research, and energy modeling. More detailed model documentation reports for all the NEMS modules are also available from EIA (Appendix, “Bibliography”).

28

NREL: Energy Systems Integration Facility - Prototype and Component...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DC systems such as commercial microgrids Long-duration reliability and safety tests of battery and energy storage system components Thermal energy storage materials testing...

29

The National Energy Modeling System: An overview  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer-based, energy-economy modeling system of US energy markets for the midterm period of 1990 to 2010. NEMS projects the production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy, subject to assumptions on macroeconomic and financial factors, world energy markets, resource availability and costs, behavioral and technological choice criteria, cost and performance characteristics of energy technologies, and demographics. This report presents an overview of the structure and methodology of NEMS and each of its components. The first chapter provides a description of the design and objectives of the system. The second chapter describes the modeling structure. The remainder of the report summarizes the methodology and scope of the component modules of NEMS. The model descriptions are intended for readers familiar with terminology from economics, operations research, and energy modeling. Additional background on the development of the system is provided in Appendix A of this report, which describes the EIA modeling systems that preceded NEMS. More detailed model documentation reports for all the NEMS modules are also available from EIA.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Overview of NEMS-H2, Version 1.0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation on Overview of NEMS-H2, Version 1.0 given by Frances Wood of OnLocation during the DOE Hydrogen Transition Analysis Workshop on January 26, 2006.

31

Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study: Vehicle Characterization and Scenario Analyses - Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP Results for the Base Case and Scenarios  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP Results Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP Results for the Base Case and Scenarios Energy Systems Division Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available on paper to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, for a processing fee, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62

32

Method and apparatus for component separation using microwave energy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for separating and recovering components includes the steps of providing at least a first component bonded to a second component by a microwave absorbent adhesive bonding material at a bonding area to form an assembly, the bonding material disposed between the components. Microwave energy is directly and selectively applied to the assembly so that substantially only the bonding material absorbs the microwave energy until the bonding material is at a debonding state. A separation force is applied while the bonding material is at the debonding state to permit disengaging and recovering the components. In addition, an apparatus for practicing the method includes holders for the components.

Morrow, Marvin S. (Kingston, TN); Schechter, Donald E. (Ten Mile, TN); Calhoun, Jr., Clyde L. (Knoxville, TN)

2001-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

33

Property:Component Integration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Component Integration Component Integration Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. The allowed values for this property are: Customer Assembled Factory Integrated Pages using the property "Component Integration" Showing 22 pages using this property. D Distributed Generation Study/10 West 66th Street Corp + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/615 kW Waukesha Packaged System + Factory Integrated + Distributed Generation Study/Aisin Seiki G60 at Hooligans Bar and Grille + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/Arrow Linen + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/Dakota Station (Minnegasco) + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/Elgin Community College + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/Emerling Farm + Factory Integrated +

34

NREL's Building Component Library for Use with Energy Models  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Building Component Library (BCL) is the U.S. Department of Energys comprehensive online searchable library of energy modeling building blocks and descriptive metadata. Novice users and seasoned practitioners can use the freely available and uniquely identifiable components to create energy models and cite the sources of input data, which will increase the credibility and reproducibility of their simulations. The BCL contains components which are the building blocks of an energy model. They can represent physical characteristics of the building such as roofs, walls, and windows, or can refer to related operational information such as occupancy and equipment schedules and weather information. Each component is identified through a set of attributes that are specific to its type, as well as other metadata such as provenance information and associated files. The BCL also contains energy conservation measures (ECM), referred to as measures, which describe a change to a building and its associated model. For the BCL, this description attempts to define a measure for reproducible application, either to compare it to a baseline model, to estimate potential energy savings, or to examine the effects of a particular implementation. The BCL currently contains more than 30,000 components and measures. A faceted search mechanism has been implemented on the BCL that allows users to filter through the search results using various facets. Facet categories include component and measure types, data source, and energy modeling software type. All attributes of a component or measure can also be used to filter the results.

35

Assessment and Suggestions to Improve the Commercial Building Module of EIA-NEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

use from the base case divided by the total change in lighting electricity use from the base case. VI LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Impact of lighting energy reduction on heating and cooling energy use in the large office building Figure 2. Impact...-South-Central) for the Commercial Sector Demand Module of NEMS. Units are in MBtu/sq.ft./year. E = Electricity NG = Natural Gas O = Other LA This was usually done by metering consumption before and after the retrofit and then analyzing the data to account for weather and changes...

O'Neal, D. L.; Reddy, T. A.; Sucher, B.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Renewable Portfolio Standards - Energy Efficiency Component | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Portfolio Standards - Energy Efficiency Component Renewable Portfolio Standards - Energy Efficiency Component Renewable Portfolio Standards - Energy Efficiency Component < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal Utility Retail Supplier Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Energy Efficiency Resource Standard Provider Public Utilities Regulatory Authority Established in 1998 and subsequently revised several times, Connecticut's renewables portfolio standard (RPS) requires each electric supplier and each electric distribution company wholesale supplier to obtain at least 23% of its retail load by using renewable energy by January 1, 2020. Specific to energy efficiency, the RPS also requires each electric supplier and each electric distribution company wholesale supplier to obtain at least 4% of its retail load by using combined heat and power (CHP) systems

37

Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP results for the base case and scenarios.  

SciTech Connect

The NEMS-MP model generates numerous results for each run of a scenario. (This model is the integrated National Energy Modeling System [NEMS] version used for the Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study [MP].) This appendix examines additional findings beyond the primary results reported in the Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study: Vehicle Characterization and Scenario Analyses (Reference 1). These additional results are provided in order to help further illuminate some of the primary results. Specifically discussed in this appendix are: (1) Energy use results for light vehicles (LVs), including details about the underlying total vehicle miles traveled (VMT), the average vehicle fuel economy, and the volumes of the different fuels used; (2) Resource fuels and their use in the production of ethanol, hydrogen (H{sub 2}), and electricity; (3) Ethanol use in the scenarios (i.e., the ethanol consumption in E85 vs. other blends, the percent of travel by flex fuel vehicles on E85, etc.); (4) Relative availability of E85 and H2 stations; (5) Fuel prices; (6) Vehicle prices; and (7) Consumer savings. These results are discussed as follows: (1) The three scenarios (Mixed, (P)HEV & Ethanol, and H2 Success) when assuming vehicle prices developed through literature review; (2) The three scenarios with vehicle prices that incorporate the achievement of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program vehicle cost goals; (3) The three scenarios with 'literature review' vehicle prices, plus vehicle subsidies; and (4) The three scenarios with 'program goals' vehicle prices, plus vehicle subsidies. The four versions or cases of each scenario are referred to as: Literature Review No Subsidies, Program Goals No Subsidies, Literature Review with Subsidies, and Program Goals with Subsidies. Two additional points must be made here. First, none of the results presented for LVs in this section include Class 2B trucks. Results for this class are included occasionally in Reference 1. They represent a small, though noticeable, segment of the 'LV plus 2B' market (e.g., a little more than 3% of today's energy use in that market). We generally do not include them in this discussion, simply because it requires additional effort to combine the NEMS-MP results for them with the results for the other LVs. (Where there is an exception, we will indicate so.) Second, where reference is made to E85, the ethanol content is actually 74%. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) assumes that, to address cold-starting issues, the percent of ethanol in E85 will vary seasonally. The EIA uses an annual average ethanol content of 74% in its forecasts. That assumption is maintained in the NEMS-MP scenario runs.

Plotkin, S. E.; Singh, M. K.; Energy Systems

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

38

All-nanophotonic NEMS biosensor on a chip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated chemical and biological sensors give advantages in cost, size and weight reduction and open new prospects for parallel monitoring and analysis. Biosensors based on nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) are the most attractive candidates for the integrated platform. However, actuation and transduction techniques (e.g. electrostatic, magnetomotive, thermal or piezoelectric) limit their operation to laboratory conditions. All-optical approach gives the possibility to overcome this problem, nevertheless, the existing schemes are either fundamentally macroscopic or excessively complicated and expensive in mass production. Here we propose a novel scheme of extremely compact NEMS biosensor monolithically integrated on a chip with all-nanophotonic transduction and actuation. It consists of the photonic waveguide and the nanobeam cantilever placed above the waveguide, both fabricated in the same CMOS-compatible process. Being in the near field of the strongly confined photonic mode, cantilever is efficiently...

Fedyanin, Dmitry Yu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Model documentation report: Industrial sector demand module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description of the NEMS Industrial Model for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its models. Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects. The NEMS Industrial Demand Model is a dynamic accounting model, bringing together the disparate industries and uses of energy in those industries, and putting them together in an understandable and cohesive framework. The Industrial Model generates mid-term (up to the year 2015) forecasts of industrial sector energy demand as a component of the NEMS integrated forecasting system. From the NEMS system, the Industrial Model receives fuel prices, employment data, and the value of industrial output. Based on the values of these variables, the Industrial Model passes back to the NEMS system estimates of consumption by fuel types.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20021 (AEO2002), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview.3 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2002 were produced with the National Energy Modeling System. NEMS is developed and maintained by the Office of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems energy components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Outlook2001 Outlook2001 Supplemental Data to the AEO2001 NEMS Conference To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20011 (AEO2001), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview.3 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2001 were produced with the National Energy

42

Lower-Energy Energy Storage System (LEESS) Component Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Alternate hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) energy storage systems (ESS) such as lithium-ion capacitors (LICs) and electrochemical double-layer capacitor (EDLC) modules have the potential for improved life, superior cold temperature performance, and lower long-term cost projections relative to traditional battery storage systems. If such lower-energy ESS (LEESS) devices can also be shown to maintain high HEV fuel savings, future HEVs designed with these devices could have an increased value proposition relative to conventional vehicles. NREL's vehicle test platform is helping validate the in-vehicle performance capability of alternative LEESS devices and identify unforeseen issues. NREL created the Ford Fusion Hybrid test platform for in-vehicle evaluation of such alternative LEESS devices, bench testing of the initial LIC pack, integration and testing of the LIC pack in the test vehicle, and bench testing and installation of an EDLC module pack. EDLC pack testing will continue in FY15. The in-vehicle LIC testing results suggest technical viability of LEESS devices to support HEV operation. Several LIC configurations tested demonstrated equivalent fuel economy and acceleration performance as the production nickel-metal-hydride ESS configuration across all tests conducted. The lowest energy LIC scenario demonstrated equivalent performance over several tests, although slightly higher fuel consumption on the US06 cycle and slightly slower acceleration performance. More extensive vehicle-level calibration may be able to reduce or eliminate these performance differences. The overall results indicate that as long as critical attributes such as engine start under worst case conditions can be retained, considerable ESS downsizing may minimally impact HEV fuel savings.

Gonder, J.; Cosgrove, J.; Shi, Y.; Saxon, A.; Pesaran, A.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Scientific Solutions (TRL 5 6 Component)- Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Network for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Scientific Solutions (TRL 5 6 Component) - Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Network for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

44

Energy Spectrum of the Soft Component near Sea Level  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An analysis of the transition curves of Carmichael and Steljes has been carried out to yield the transition curves in lead of ion-chamber bursts produced by cascades initiated by the electrons and photons of the soft component incident from the atmosphere. From the rates at the maxima of these transition curves, the absolute omnidirectional integral energy spectrum of the electrons and photons of the soft component at sea level, in the energy range from about 100 Mev to 100 Bev, is deduced. Incident electrons and photons associated with extensive air showers, as identified by coincidences with a nearby larger ion chamber, are excluded. An additional single experimental point on the integral spectrum (8.410-3 per sphere of unit area per sec) is obtained from the observed rate of electrons of all energies greater than 1 Mev which intersect the unshielded ion chamber. Since a quantitative relation from electromagnetic cascade theory is made use of in the derivation of the energy spectrum, and since this relation is at present uncertain for lead in the energy range involved, the possible error of the flux in the energy spectrum (100%) is much larger than that of the observed rates of occurrence of bursts (5%). In this respect the spectrum is preliminary only. In the energy range below 400 Mev the integral spectrum is in agreement with previous absolute measurements; below 2 Bev it is in conformity with a previous relative measurement; from 1.6 Bev to 100 Bev, where there are no previous determinations, it obeys a power law of exponent -2.00 and the rate for 1.6 Bev is 2.410-5 per sphere of unit area per sec.

Hugh Carmichael

1957-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Model documentation Renewable Fuels Module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analaytical approach and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it relates to the production of the 1996 Annual Energy Outlook forecasts. The report catalogues and describes modeling assumptions, computational methodologies, data inputs, and parameter estimation techniques. A number of offline analyses used in lieu of RFM modeling components are also described.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Energy Department Announces $8 Million to Develop Advanced Components for Wave, Tidal, and Current Energy Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Energy Department today announced $8 million in available funding to spur innovation in next-generation marine and hydrokinetic control and component technologies. In the United States, waves, tides, and ocean currents represent a largely untapped renewable energy resource that could provide clean, affordable energy to homes and businesses across the country's coastal regions.

47

Annual Energy Outlook 96 Assumptions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for for the Annual Energy Outlook 1996 January 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Introduction This paper presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 1996 (AEO96). In this context, assumptions include general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports listed in the Appendix. 1 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview. The National Energy Modeling System The projections

48

Durability of ACERT Engine Components | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Washington D.C. pmp11lin.pdf More Documents & Publications Durability of ACERT Engine Components Durability of ACERT Engine Components Materials for Advanced Engine Valve Train...

49

Miracle Wind Power Components Manufacture Co Ltd | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Miracle Wind Power Components Manufacture Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Miracle Wind Power Components Manufacture Co Ltd Place: Wuxi, Jiangsu Province, China Sector:...

50

AVTA Vehicle Component Cost Model | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Vehicle Component Cost Model AVTA Vehicle Component Cost Model 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010...

51

Fuel Cell Subsystems and Components | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Cell Subsystems and Components Fuel Cell Subsystems and Components As recommended by the 2004 National Research Council report, the program continues to increase its support...

52

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20061 (AEO2006), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview3, which is updated once every few years. The National Energy Modeling System

53

Design of an autarkic water and energy supply driven by renewable energy using commercially available components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Around the world there are a lot of remote coastal areas suffering from natural drinking water resources and a lack of energy. These locations ask for new innovations for an environmentally friendly solution represented by the combination of RO desalination plants and renewable energy sources like wind. But how to combine a desalination plant with fluctuating energy source like wind? How to store energy? Are the components already applied in practice and commercially available? What about the costs? The R&D department of ENERCON did a lot of work in this field and brings the 3 important components together: wind energy converters (WEC), RO desalination plants and stand-alone systems for energy management. Related to wind energy, the ENERCON \\{WECs\\} are well known for their performance and quality. The R&D department also developed new innovations in the design of RO desalination plants: The ENERCON Energy Recovery System for very low energy consumption, high flexibility, efficient combination with fluctuating energy sources and no use of chemicals. In belongings to the third important field, energy storing and stand alone systems ENERCON developed a system which provides 100% energy supply by wind energy all over the year on the island Utsira in Norway for 2 years now. Aiming at the goal of sustainable development these systems fulfil all requirements for environmentally friendly and economic operation: no use of fossil fuels and therefore no CO2 emissions/no use of chemicals and therefore no negative impact to the marine environment.

Kay Paulsen; Frank Hensel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Non-destructive component separation using infrared radiant energy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for separating a first component and a second component from one another at an adhesive bond interface between the first component and second component. Typically the method involves irradiating the first component with infrared radiation from a source that radiates substantially only short wavelengths until the adhesive bond is destabilized, and then separating the first component and the second component from one another. In some embodiments an assembly of components to be debonded is placed inside an enclosure and the assembly is illuminated from an IR source that is external to the enclosure. In some embodiments an assembly of components to be debonded is simultaneously irradiated by a multi-planar array of IR sources. Often the IR radiation is unidirectional. In some embodiments the IR radiation is narrow-band short wavelength infrared radiation.

Simandl, Ronald F. (Knoxville, TN); Russell, Steven W. (Knoxville, TN); Holt, Jerrid S. (Knoxville, TN); Brown, John D. (Harriman, TN)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Recycling Guide: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Recycling Information Call 301-496-7990 or visit the NEMS Website at http://www.nems.nih.gov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recycling Guide: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Recycling Information ­ Call 301-496-7990 or visit the NEMS in COMMINGLED bin Rinse food/beverage containers before recycling No Pyrex or Styrofoam Printer and Copier Toner Cartridges in TONER CARTRIDGE bin Recycle packaging material in appropriate bin NIH charities

Baker, Chris I.

56

Mobile-component housing and solar energy: the possibilities  

SciTech Connect

The possibilities for acceptance of PV among different modes of housing construction are considered. The focus is on that form of housing production defined as mobile-component housing, a type of housing built in a factory to a single national construction standard. The first section describes the structure of the manufactured housing industry. It provides definitions and terminology necessary to a discussion of mobile-component housing. It then reviews the production activity and approach, distribution, consumer and financing for this mode of housing. The second section presents the product characteristics of mobile-component housing. The third section reviews solar technologies, and discusses their relation to mobile-component housing. The fourth section focuses specifically on factors influencing receptivity to solar by the mobile-component housing industry. The conclusion summarizes the analysis as it relates to the possibilities for photovoltaics in mobile-component housing.

Nutt-Powell, T.E.; Furlong, M.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

NDE DEVELOPMENT FOR ACERT ENGINE COMPONENTS | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation pm024sun2011p.pdf More Documents & Publications NDE Development for ACERT Engine Components...

58

Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information Administration...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of NEMS that project energy consumption for marketed energy sources plus distributed solar and geothermal energy. Both the RDM and CDM include projections of energy...

59

Model documentation, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives and the conceptual and methodological approach used in the development of the National Energy Modeling System`s (NEMS) Coal Market Module (CMM) used to develop the Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98). This report catalogues and describes the assumptions, methodology, estimation techniques, and source code of CMM`s two submodules. These are the Coal Production Submodule (CPS) and the Coal Distribution Submodule (CDS). CMM provides annual forecasts of prices, production, and consumption of coal for NEMS. In general, the CDS integrates the supply inputs from the CPS to satisfy demands for coal from exogenous demand models. The international area of the CDS forecasts annual world coal trade flows from major supply to major demand regions and provides annual forecasts of US coal exports for input to NEMS. Specifically, the CDS receives minemouth prices produced by the CPS, demand and other exogenous inputs from other NEMS components, and provides delivered coal prices and quantities to the NEMS economic sectors and regions.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Component and System Qualification Workshop- Presentations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These presentations were given at the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Component and System Qualification Workshop held November 4, 2010 in Livermore, CA.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems energy components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

NDE Development for ACERT Engine Components | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. pmp18sun.pdf More Documents & Publications NDE Development for ACERT Engine Components NDE...

62

NDE Development for ACERT Engine Components | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. pm024sun2010p.pdf More Documents & Publications NDE DEVELOPMENT FOR ACERT ENGINE COMPONENTS...

63

Workshop on Opportunities for Magnetism in MEMS/NEMS, April 16-17, 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities for Magnetism in MEMS/NEMS Opportunities for Magnetism in MEMS/NEMS Argonne National Laboratory - April 16-17, 2010 Sponsored by NSF, NIST and Argonne National Laboratory Friday, April 16 13:00 Welcome and Introduction Chair: John Moreland 13:10 Pritiraj Mohanty Boston University "Study of Spin Dynamics using Nanomechanics" 13:50 T. Mitch Wallis NIST, Boulder "Measurement of the Einstein-de Haas Effect with a Microcantilever" 14:30 Albrecht Jander Oregon State University "Application of Torques to Nanostructures using Ferromagnetic Resonance" 15:10 Coffee Break Chair: Dennis Greywall 15:30 Rassul Karabalin Caltech "Next-Generation NEMS Functionality Enable by Advances in Novel Materials"

64

On UHECR energy estimation algorithms based on the measurement of electromagnetic component parameters in EAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model calculations are performed of extensive air shower (EAS) component energies using a variety of hadronic interaction parameters. A conversion factor from electromagnetic component energy to the energy of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) and its model and primary mass dependence is studied. It is shown that model dependence of the factor minimizes under the necessary condition of the same maximum position and muon content of simulated showers.

A. A. Ivanov

2007-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

65

Fusion: A necessary component of US energy policy  

SciTech Connect

US energy policy must ensure that its security, its economy, or its world leadership in technology development are not compromised by failure to meet the nation's electrical energy needs. Increased concerns over the greenhouse effect from fossil-fuel combustion mean that US energy policy must consider how electrical energy dependence on oil and coal can be lessened by conservation, renewable energy sources, and advanced energy options (nuclear fission, solar energy, and thermonuclear fusion). In determining how US energy policy is to respond to these issues, it will be necessary to consider what role each of the three advanced energy options might play, and to determine how these options can complement one another. This paper reviews and comments on the principal US studies and legislation that have addressed fusion since 1980, and then suggests a research, development, and demonstration program that is consistent with the conclusions of those prior authorities and that will allow us to determine how fusion technology can fit into a US energy policy that takes a balanced, long term view of US needs. 17 refs.

Correll, D.L. Jr.

1989-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

66

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 1 (AEO2007), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant to formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports. 2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 3 , which is updated once every few years. The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2007 were produced with the National Energy Modeling System. NEMS is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the long term and

67

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 Preface The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 provides a summary description of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), which was used to generate the forecasts of energy production, demand, imports, and prices through the year 2025 for the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 (AEO2003), (DOE/EIA-0383(2003)), released in January 2003. AEO2003 presents national forecasts of energy markets for five primary cases—a reference case and four additional cases that assume higher and lower economic growth and higher and lower world oil prices than in the reference case. The Overview presents a brief description of the methodology and scope of each of the component modules of NEMS. The model documentation reports listed in the appendix of this document provide further details.

68

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20041 (AEO2004), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview3, which is updated once every two years. The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2004 were produced with the National Energy Modeling System. NEMS is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the midterm time period and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers in the U.S. Congress, the Administration, including DOE Program Offices, and other government agencies.

69

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20031 (AEO2003), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview.3 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2003 were produced with the National Energy Modeling System. NEMS is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the midterm time period and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers and analysts in the U.S. Congress, the Department of Energy’s Office of Policy and International Affairs, other DOE offices, and other government agencies.

70

Components Mobility for Energy Efficiency of Digital Home Rmi Druilhe*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, increasing the part of the Digital Home in the electric power demand. Reducing the overall energy con the distribution plan to increase inactive devices. But, allowing a dynamic modifi- cation of the distribution plan of a distribution plan. Thus, the system must consider these events to always adapt the distribution plan

Boyer, Edmond

71

The National Energy Modeling System: An Ocerview 2000 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview provides a summary description of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), which was used to generate the forecasts of energy production, demand, imports, and prices through the year 2020 for the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000), (DOE/EIA-0383(2000)), released in November 1999. AEO2000 presents national forecasts of energy markets for five cases—a reference case and four additional cases that assume higher and lower economic growth and higher and lower world oil prices than in the reference case. The Overview presents a brief description of the methodology and scope of each of the component modules of NEMS. The model documentation reports listed in the appendix of this document provide further details.

72

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

RESIDENTIAL DEMAND MODULE RESIDENTIAL DEMAND MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Housing Stock Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Appliance Stock Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Technology Choice Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Shell Integrity Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Fuel Consumption Submodule The residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar thermal and geothermal energy. The RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the residential housing stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. The components of the RDM and its interactions with the NEMS system are shown in Figure 5. NEMS provides forecasts of residential energy prices, population, and housing starts,

73

Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systems Process and Systems Process and Components Laboratory may include: * CSP technology developers * Utilities * Certification laboratories * Government agencies * Universities * Other National laboratories Contact Us If you are interested in working with NREL's Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory, please contact: ESIF Manager Carolyn Elam Carolyn.Elam@nrel.gov 303-275-4311 Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory The focus of the Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) is to research, develop, test, and evaluate new techniques for thermal energy storage systems that are relevant to utility-scale concentrating solar power plants. The laboratory holds

74

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

link.gif (1946 bytes) link.gif (1946 bytes) bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Assumptions to the AEO99 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Supplemental Tables to the AEO99 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) To Forecasting Home Page bullet1.gif (843 bytes) EIA Homepage introduction.gif (4117 bytes) This paper presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 19991 (AEO99), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview.3

75

Princeton Power Systems (TRL 5 6 Component)- Marine High-Voltage Power Conditioning and Transmission System with Integrated Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Princeton Power Systems (TRL 5 6 Component) - Marine High-Voltage Power Conditioning and Transmission System with Integrated Energy Storage

76

Model documentation: Renewable Fuels Module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it related to the production of the 1994 Annual Energy Outlook (AEO94) forecasts. The report catalogues and describes modeling assumptions, computational methodologies, data inputs, and parameter estimation techniques. A number of offline analyses used in lieu of RFM modeling components are also described. This documentation report serves two purposes. First, it is a reference document for model analysts, model users, and the public interested in the construction and application of the RFM. Second, it meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its models. The RFM consists of six analytical submodules that represent each of the major renewable energy resources -- wood, municipal solid waste (MSW), solar energy, wind energy, geothermal energy, and alcohol fuels. Of these six, four are documented in the following chapters: municipal solid waste, wind, solar and biofuels. Geothermal and wood are not currently working components of NEMS. The purpose of the RFM is to define the technological and cost characteristics of renewable energy technologies, and to pass these characteristics to other NEMS modules for the determination of mid-term forecasted renewable energy demand.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction This paper presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20001 (AEO2000), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 A synopsis of NEMS, the model components, and the interrelationships of the modules is presented in The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview.3 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2000 were produced with the National Energy Modeling System. NEMS is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the midterm time period and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers and analysts in the U.S. Congress, the Department of Energy’s Office of Policy, other DOE offices, and other government agencies.

78

Independent components in acoustic emission energy signals from large diesel engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Independent components in acoustic emission energy signals from large diesel engines Niels Henrik-Sørensen et al. [5], to acoustic emission (AE) energy signals obtained from a large diesel engine acquired from the two stroke MAN B&W test bed engine in Copenhagen. The signals were sampled at 20 KHz

79

NEM modication prevents high-anity ATP binding to the rst nucleotide binding fold of the sulphonylurea receptor, SUR1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NEM modi¢cation prevents high-a¤nity ATP binding to the ¢rst nucleotide binding fold, UK Received 7 July 1999; received in revised form 11 August 1999 Abstract Pancreatic LL-cell ATP WWM 8-azido- [KK-32 P]ATP or 8-azido-[QQ-32 P]ATP was inhibited by NEM with Ki of 1.8 WWM and 2.4 WWM

Tucker, Stephen J.

80

Model documentation renewable fuels module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it relates to the production of the 1995 Annual Energy Outlook (AEO95) forecasts. The report catalogues and describes modeling assumptions, computational methodologies, data inputs, and parameter estimation techniques. A number of offline analyses used in lieu of RFM modeling components are also described. The RFM consists of six analytical submodules that represent each of the major renewable energy resources--wood, municipal solid waste (MSW), solar energy, wind energy, geothermal energy, and alcohol fuels. The RFM also reads in hydroelectric facility capacities and capacity factors from a data file for use by the NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM). The purpose of the RFM is to define the technological, cost and resource size characteristics of renewable energy technologies. These characteristics are used to compute a levelized cost to be competed against other similarly derived costs from other energy sources and technologies. The competition of these energy sources over the NEMS time horizon determines the market penetration of these renewable energy technologies. The characteristics include available energy capacity, capital costs, fixed operating costs, variable operating costs, capacity factor, heat rate, construction lead time, and fuel product price.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems energy components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Step 5. Determine Crucial Components of the Energy Code: Scope and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5. Determine Crucial Components of the Energy Code: Scope and 5. Determine Crucial Components of the Energy Code: Scope and Applicability, Format, Adoption Date, and Effective Date Description There are four crucial components that must be considered during the adoption process: scope and applicability, format, adoption date and effective date. The scope of a code dictates which requirements will be covered by the code while the format relates to the manner in which code requirements are presented. Based on the energy goals of a state or jurisdiction, the scope and format of a code will greatly influence which code is selected for adoption and the adoption process used. For example, if a jurisdiction wishes to include only the HVAC system in its local code, a national model code may be amended to reflect these changes or a locally

82

Free Flow Energy (TRL 1 2 3 Component)- Design and Development of a Cross-Platform Submersible Generator Optimized for the Conditions of Current Energy Conversion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Free Flow Energy (TRL 1 2 3 Component) - Design and Development of a Cross-Platform Submersible Generator Optimized for the Conditions of Current Energy Conversion

83

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Overview of  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Overview of NEMS Overview of NEMS The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 Overview of NEMS NEMS represents domestic energy markets by explicitly representing the economic decision making involved in the production, conversion, and consumption of energy products. Where possible, NEMS includes explicit representation of energy technologies and their characteristics. Summary of NEMS Detail Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Figure 1. Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 2. National Energy Modeling System. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Since energy costs and availability and energy-consuming characteristics

84

A prompt extra component in the high energy spectrum of GRB 131108A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The high-fluence GRB131108A at redshift z=2.4, was detected by the Mini-Calorimeter (MCAL, 0.35-100 MeV) and the Gamma- Ray Imaging Detector (GRID, 30 MeV - 30 GeV) onboard the AGILE satellite. The burst emission consisted of a very bright initial peak,lasting 0.1 s, followed by a fainter emission detected for ~25 s with the MCAL and ~80 s with the GRID. The AGILE spectra, when compared with those reported at lower energies, indicate the presence of a prominent high-energy component with peak energy in the 10-20 MeV region. Contrary to other GRBs, this high-energy component is present also during the initial peak, with power law photon index of about -1.6 below 10 MeV and -2.35+-0.2 above 30 MeV.

Giuliani, A; Marisaldi, M; Longo, F; Del Monte, E; Pittori, C; Verrecchia, F; Tavani, M; Cattaneo, P; Pacciani, L; Vercellone, S; Rappoldi, A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Model-Based Sensor Placement for Component Condition Monitoring and Fault Diagnosis in Fossil Energy Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensor Placement for Sensor Placement for Component Condition Monitoring and Fault Diagnosis in Fossil Energy Systems Background Fossil fuel power plants generate approximately two-thirds of the world's total electricity and are expected to continue this important role in the years ahead. Increasing global energy demands, aging and inefficient power plants, and increasingly stricter emission requirements will require high levels of performance, available capacity, efficiency, and

86

Task 39 Exhibition Assembly of Polymeric Components for a New Generation of Solar Thermal Energy Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract IEA SHC Task 39 is dedicated to the development, optimization and deployment of materials and designs for polymer based solar thermal systems and components. To increase the confidence in polymeric solar thermal applications, Task 39 actively supports international research activities and seeks to promote successful applications and state-of-the-art products. For the SHC conference 2013, different polymeric components suitable for domestic hot water preparation and space heating were singled out for an exhibition. Promising polymeric collectors, air collectors, thermosiphons, storage tanks and other components from industrial partners all over the world were brought to Freiburg and assembled at the Fraunhofer-Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE. The resulting SHC Task 39 Exhibition of polymeric components shows the feasibility of all-polymeric solar thermal systems and highlights their potential, especially as scalable and modular applications for building integration or as export products to sunny regions.

Michael Koehl; Sandrin Saile; Andreas Piekarczyk; Stephan Fischer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Building Component Library: An Online Repository to Facilitate Building Energy Model Creation: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Component Library: Component Library: An Online Repository to Facilitate Building Energy Model Creation Preprint Katherine Fleming, Nicholas Long, and Alex Swindler To be presented at the ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Pacific Grove, California August 12-17, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-54710 May 2012 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

88

The ENERGY STAR Plant Label: A Valuable Component of Strategic Corporate Energy Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENERGY STAR is the national symbol for energy efficiency and environmental performance recognized by roughly 70% of the American people. In September 2006, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) extend the brand to industrial plants...

Tunnessen, W.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. Subsequent chapters of this report provide: an overview of NGTDM; a description of the interface between the NEMS and NGTDM; an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM; the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module; the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module; the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module; the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module; and a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

The National Energy Modeling System The  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2000 2000 (AEO2000) are generated from the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), developed and main- tained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Fore- casting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). In addition to its use in the development of the AEO projections, NEMS is also used in analytical studies for the U.S. Congress and other offices within the Department of Energy. The AEO forecasts are also used by analysts and planners in other govern- ment agencies and outside organizations. The projections in NEMS are developed with the use of a market-based approach to energy analysis. For each fuel and consuming sector, NEMS balances the energy supply and demand, accounting for the eco- nomic competition between the various energy fuels and sources. The time horizon of NEMS is the mid- term period, approximately 20 years in the future. In order to represent the regional differences

91

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar and geothermal energy. RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the residential housing stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. The components of RDM and its interactions with the NEMS system are shown in Figure 5. NEMS provides forecasts of residential energy prices, population, and housing starts, which are used by RDM to develop forecasts of energy consumption by fuel and Census division. residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar and geothermal energy. RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the residential housing stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. The components of RDM and its interactions with the NEMS system are shown in Figure 5. NEMS provides forecasts of residential energy prices, population, and housing starts, which are used by RDM to develop forecasts of energy consumption by fuel and Census division. Figure 5. Residential Demand Module Structure RDM incorporates the effects of four broadly-defined determinants of energy consumption: economic and demographic effects, structural effects, technology turnover and advancement effects, and energy market effects. Economic and demographic effects include the number, dwelling type (single-family, multi-family or mobile homes), occupants per household, and location of housing units. Structural effects include increasing average dwelling size and changes in the mix of desired end-use services provided by energy (new end uses and/or increasing penetration of current end uses, such as the increasing popularity of electronic equipment and computers). Technology effects include changes in the stock of installed equipment caused by normal turnover of old, worn out equipment with newer versions which tend to be more energy efficient, the integrated effects of equipment and building shell (insulation level) in new construction, and in the projected availability of even more energy-efficient equipment in the future. Energy market effects include the short-run effects of energy prices on energy demands, the longer-run effects of energy prices on the efficiency of purchased equipment and the efficiency of building shells, and limitations on minimum levels of efficiency imposed by legislated efficiency standards.

92

Free energy of alternating two-component polymer brushes on cylindrical templates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use computer simulations to investigate the stability of a two-component polymer brush de-mixing on a curved template into phases of different morphological properties. It has been previously shown via molecular dynamics simulations that immiscible chains having different length and anchored to a cylindrical template will phase separate into striped phases of different widths oriented perpendicularly to the cylindrical axis. We calculate free energy differences for a variety of stripe widths, and extract simple relationships between the sizes of the two polymers, N_1 and N_2, and the free energy dependence on the stripe width. We explain these relationships using simple physical arguments based upon previous theoretical work on the free energy of polymer brushes.

William L. Miller; Behnaz Bozorgui; Katherine Klymko; Angelo Cacciuto

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

93

Comparative Study of Hybrid Powertrains on Fuel Saving, Emissions, and Component Energy Loss in HD Trucks  

SciTech Connect

We compared parallel and series hybrid powertrains on fuel economy, component energy loss, and emissions control in Class 8 trucks over both city and highway driving. A comprehensive set of component models describing battery energy, engine fuel efficiency, emissions control, and power demand interactions for heavy duty (HD) hybrids has been integrated with parallel and series hybrid Class 8 trucks in order to identify the technical barriers of these hybrid powertrain technologies. The results show that series hybrid is absolutely negative for fuel economy benefit of long-haul trucks due to an efficiency penalty associated with the dual-step conversions of energy (i.e. mechanical to electric to mechanical). The current parallel hybrid technology combined with 50% auxiliary load reduction could elevate 5-7% fuel economy of long-haul trucks, but a profound improvement of long-haul truck fuel economy requires additional innovative technologies for reducing aerodynamic drag and rolling resistance losses. The simulated emissions control indicates that hybrid trucks reduce more CO and HC emissions than conventional trucks. The simulated results further indicate that the catalyzed DPF played an important role in CO oxidations. Limited NH3 emissions could be slipped from the Urea SCR, but the average NH3 emissions are below 20 ppm. Meanwhile our estimations show 1.5-1.9% of equivalent fuel-cost penalty due to urea consumption in the simulated SCR cases.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

On the electrostatic component of protein-protein binding free energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

entries at 95% sequence identity level. To avoid the bias toward overrepresented com- plexes, the entries were purged with CD-hit[55] at 40% sequence identity level for all components of the hetero-complexes, including monomers that belong to the same... of the internal dielectric con- stant within the range 1.08.0 cause dramatic changes in the mean of the energy distributions for all types of complexes. In contrast, an increasing the magnitude of the internal dielectric constant above 8.0 does not cause much...

Talley, Kemper; Ng, Carmen; Shoppell, Michael; Kundrotas, Petras J.; Alexov, Emil

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

95

Reconstructing equation of state of dark energy with principal component analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We represent a method to reconstruct the equation of state for dark energy directly from observational Hubble parameter data in a nonparametric way. We use principal component analysis (PCA) to extract the signal from data with noise. In addition, we modify Akaike information criteria (AIC) to guarantee the quality of reconstruction and avoid over-fitting simultaneously. The results show that our method is robust in reconstruction of dark energy equation of state. Although current observational Hubble parameter data alone can not give a strong constraint yet, future observations with more accurate data can help to improve the quality of reconstruction significantly, which is consistent with the results of H.-R. Yu et al.

Qin, Hao-Feng; Wan, Hao-Yi; Zhang, Tong-Jie

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

EVIDENCE FOR A SECOND COMPONENT IN THE HIGH-ENERGY CORE EMISSION FROM CENTAURUS A?  

SciTech Connect

We report on an analysis of Fermi Large Area Telescope data from four years of observations of the nearby radio galaxy Centaurus A (Cen A). The increased photon statistics results in a detection of high-energy (>100 MeV) gamma-rays up to 50 GeV from the core of Cen A, with a detection significance of about 44{sigma}. The average gamma-ray spectrum of the core reveals evidence for a possible deviation from a simple power law. A likelihood analysis with a broken power-law model shows that the photon index becomes harder above E{sub b} {approx_equal} 4 GeV, changing from {Gamma}{sub 1} = 2.74 {+-} 0.03 below to {Gamma}{sub 2} = 2.09 {+-} 0.20 above. This hardening could be caused by the contribution of an additional high-energy component beyond the common synchrotron self-Compton jet emission. No clear evidence for variability in the high-energy domain is seen. We compare our results with the spectrum reported by H.E.S.S. in the TeV energy range and discuss possible origins of the hardening observed.

Sahakyan, N. [ICRANet, Piazz della Repubblica 10, I-65122 Pescara (Italy); Yang, R. [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008 (China); Aharonian, F. A. [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Rieger, F. M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, P.O. Box 103980, D-69029 Heidelberg (Germany)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

97

Efficient energy based modeling and experimental validation of liquid filling in planar micro-fluidic components and networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient energy based modeling and experimental validation of liquid filling in planar micro-fluidic components and networks I. Treise, N. Fortner, B. Shapiro* and A. Hightower Received 25th June 2004, Accepted409680k This paper presents a model that describes how liquid flow fills micro-fluidic components

Shapiro, Benjamin

98

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 9 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 20). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region levels; energy consumption at the Census Division level is allocated by using the SEDS24 data. The energy-intensive industries (food and kindred products, paper and allied products, bulk chemicals, glass and glass products, hydraulic cement, blast furnace and basic steel products, and aluminum) are modeled in considerable detail. Each industry is modeled as three separate but interrelated components consisting of the Process Assembly (PA) Component, the Buildings Component (BLD), and the Boiler/Steam/Cogenera- tion (BSC) Component. The BSC Component satisfies the steam demand from the PA and BLD Components. In some industries, the PA Component produces byproducts that are consumed in the BSC Component. For the manufacturing industries, the PA Component is separated into the major production processes or end uses.

99

Estimation of the energy of the electron-photon component of cosmic rays on the basis of data for Cherenkov light from ultrahigh-energy extensive air showers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy fraction E em/E 0 dissipated to the electron-photon component of extensive air showers (EASs) for E 0=1015?1019 eV is estimated using data on Cherenkov r...

S. P. Knurenko; A. A. Ivanov; I. E. Sleptsov; A. V. Sabourov

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

DOE/EIA-0581(2000) The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NEMS NEMS represents domestic energy markets by ex- plicitly representing the economic decision making involved in the production, conversion, and con- sumption of energy products. Where possible, NEMS includes explicit representation of energy technolo- gies and their characteristics. Since energy costs and availability and en- ergy-consuming characteristics can vary widely across regions, considerable regional detail is in- cluded. Other details of production and consumption cate- gories are represented to facilitate policy analysis and en- sure the validity of the results. A summary of the detail provided in NEMS is shown below. Major Assumptions Each module of NEMS embodies many assumptions and data to characterize the future production, conversion, or consumption of energy in the United States. Two major Energy Information Administration/The National Energy Modeling

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems energy components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Model documentation report: Commercial Sector Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components. The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module is a simulation tool based upon economic and engineering relationships that models commercial sector energy demands at the nine Census Division level of detail for eleven distinct categories of commercial buildings. Commercial equipment selections are performed for the major fuels of electricity, natural gas, and distillate fuel, for the major services of space heating, space cooling, water heating, ventilation, cooking, refrigeration, and lighting. The algorithm also models demand for the minor fuels of residual oil, liquefied petroleum gas, steam coal, motor gasoline, and kerosene, the renewable fuel sources of wood and municipal solid waste, and the minor services of office equipment. Section 2 of this report discusses the purpose of the model, detailing its objectives, primary input and output quantities, and the relationship of the Commercial Module to the other modules of the NEMS system. Section 3 of the report describes the rationale behind the model design, providing insights into further assumptions utilized in the model development process to this point. Section 3 also reviews alternative commercial sector modeling methodologies drawn from existing literature, providing a comparison to the chosen approach. Section 4 details the model structure, using graphics and text to illustrate model flows and key computations.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Impacts of Modeled Recommendations of the National Commission on Energy Policy  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report provides the Energy Information Administration's analysis of those National Commission on Energy Policy (NCEP) energy policy recommendations that could be simulated using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS).

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Stack Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stack Components Stack Components Nancy L. Garland Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Fuel Cell Team FORS 5G-086 (202) 586-5673 nancy.garland@ee.doe.gov Stack Components F u e l P r o c e s s o r Bipolar Plate Cathode + Anode - Electrolyte H+ H+ HYDROGEN OXYGEN Example shown is for acidic electrolytes Bipolar Plate e - e - O 2 O 2 O 2 e - H+ Bipolar Plate Bipolar Plate Cathode + Anode - Electrolyte H+ H+ H+ H+ HYDROGEN OXYGEN Example shown is for acidic electrolytes Bipolar Plate Bipolar Plate e - e - e - e - O 2 O 2 O 2 O 2 O 2 O 2 e - e - H+ H+ Power Stack Component Barriers $10 Other Bipolar Plates Membranes Electrodes $25 $5 $5 Fuel Cell Power Systems $45/kW BARRIERS * Stack material cost/manufacturing * Durability * Electrode performance * Thermal and water management Stack Component Targets

104

Principal components of dark energy with Supernova Legacy Survey supernovae: The effects of systematic errors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the effects of systematic errors in Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) measurements on dark energy (DE) constraints using current data from the Supernova Legacy Survey. We consider how SN systematic errors affect constraints from combined SN Ia, baryon acoustic oscillations, and cosmic microwave background data, given that SNe Ia still provide the strongest constraints on DE but are arguably subject to more significant systematics than the latter two probes. We focus our attention on the temporal evolution of DE described in terms of principal components (PCs) of the equation of state, though we examine a few of the more common, simpler parametrizations as well. We find that the SN Ia systematics degrade the total generalized figure of merit, which characterizes constraints in multidimensional DE parameter space, by a factor of 3 to 4. Nevertheless, overall constraints obtained on roughly five PCs are very good even with current data and systematics. We further show that current constraints are robust to allowing for the finite detection significance of the baryon acoustic oscillations feature in galaxy surveys.

Eduardo J. Ruiz; Daniel L. Shafer; Dragan Huterer; Alexander Conley

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

105

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The International Energy Module (IEM) performs two tasks in all NEMS runs. First, the module reads The International Energy Module (IEM) performs two tasks in all NEMS runs. First, the module reads exogenously derived supply curves, initial price paths and international regional supply and demand levels into NEMS. These quantities are not modeled directly in NEMS because NEMS is not an international model. Previous versions of the IEM adjusted these quantities after reading in initial values. In an attempt to more closely integrate the AEO2007 with the IEO2006 and the STEO some functionality was removed from the IEM. More analyst time was devoted to analyzing price relationships between marker crude oils and refined products. A new exogenous oil supply model, Generate World Oil Balances (GWOB), was also developed to incorporate actual investment occurring in the international oil market through 2015

106

Modulational instability of two pairs of counter-propagating waves and energy exchange in two-component media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modulational instability of two pairs of counter-propagating waves and energy exchange in two-propagating waves in two-component media is considered within the framework of two generally nonintegrable coupled Sine-Gordon equations. We consider the dynamics of weakly nonlinear wave packets, and using

107

Components Makeover Gives Concentrating Solar Power a Boost (Fact Sheet), The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Components Makeover Gives Components Makeover Gives Concentrating Solar Power a Boost Parabolic trough technology is the most mature of the various concentrating solar power (CSP) options. But scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) continue to make advances on trough systems through innovative research on various components in industrial partnerships with Acciona Solar Power, SkyFuel, Schott Solar, and others. The results are leading to improved system efficiencies and lower costs for CSP plants. Space Frames for Lower Costs To maximize the overall efficiency of the conventional glass-mirror trough system, NREL worked with Acciona Solar Power-then known as Solargenix Energy-to improve vari- ous system components. A key focus was the structural framework that holds the mirrors

108

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

INTRODUCTION INTRODUCTION blueball.gif (205 bytes) Purpose of NEMS blueball.gif (205 bytes) Representations of Energy Market blueball.gif (205 bytes) Technology Representation blueball.gif (205 bytes) External Availability The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer-based, energy-economy modeling system of U.S. energy markets for the midterm period through 2020. NEMS projects the production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy, subject to assumptions on macroeconomic and financial factors, world energy markets, resource availability and costs, behavioral and technological choice criteria, cost and performance characteristics of energy technologies, and demographics. NEMS was designed and implemented by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S.

109

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each projection year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution

110

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and distribution Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each projection year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution

111

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Natural Gas Transmission and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model Regions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution

112

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and distribution Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each projection year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and

113

US Synthetic Corp (TRL 4 Component)- The Development of Open, Water Lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings for use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

US Synthetic Corp (TRL 4 Component) - The Development of Open, Water Lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings for use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

114

H2A Delivery Components Model and Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

H2A Delivery Components Model and Analysis for the DOE Hydrogen Delivery High-Pressure Tanks and Analysis Project Review Meeting held February 8-9, 2005 at Argonne National...

115

Origin of the high energy proton component below the geomagnetic cutoff in near earth orbit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The high flux proton component observed by AMS below the geomagnetic cutoff can be well accounted for by assuming these particles to be secondaries originating from the interaction of Cosmic Ray protons with the atmosphere. Simulation results are reported

L. Derome; M. Buenerd; A. Barrau; A. Bouchet; A. Menchaca-Rocha; T. Thuillier

2000-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

116

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 International Energy Module The International Energy Module (IEM) performs two tasks in all NEMS runs. First, the module reads exogenously derived supply curves, initial price paths and international regional supply and demand levels into NEMS. These quantities are not modeled directly in NEMS because NEMS is not an international model. Previous versions of the IEM adjusted these quantities after reading in initial values. In an attempt to more closely integrate the AEO2007 with the IEO2006 and the STEO some functionality was removed from the IEM. More analyst time was devoted to analyzing price relationships between marker crude oils and refined products. A new exogenous oil supply model, Generate World Oil Balances (GWOB), was also developed to incorporate actual investment occurring in the international oil market through 2015 and resource assumptions through 2030. The GWOB model provides annual country level oil production detail for eight conventional and unconventional oils.

117

Solubilization of Biomass Components with Ionic Liquids Toward Biomass Energy Conversions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cellulosic biomass essentially consists of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. To obtain energy from cellulosic biomass with minimum given energy, following three steps are required, namely...3, 4...]. Since or...

Mitsuru Abe; Hiroyuki Ohno

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Data Collection for Current U.S. Wind Energy Projects: Component Costs, Financing, Operations, and Maintenance; January 2011 - September 2011  

SciTech Connect

DNV Renewables (USA) Inc. (DNV) used an Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Cost Model to evaluate ten distinct cost scenarios encountered under variations in wind turbine component failure rates. The analysis considers: (1) a Reference Scenario using the default part failure rates within the O&M Cost Model, (2) High Failure Rate Scenarios that increase the failure rates of three major components (blades, gearboxes, and generators) individually, (3) 100% Replacement Scenarios that model full replacement of these components over a 20 year operating life, and (4) Serial Failure Scenarios that model full replacement of blades, gearboxes, and generators in years 4 to 6 of the wind project. DNV selected these scenarios to represent a broad range of possible operational experiences. Also in this report, DNV summarizes the predominant financing arrangements used to develop wind energy projects over the past several years and provides summary data on various financial metrics describing those arrangements.

Martin-Tretton, M.; Reha, M.; Drunsic, M.; Keim, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

National Energy Modeling System (United States) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Energy Modeling System (United States) National Energy Modeling System (United States) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: National Energy Modeling System (United States) Focus Area: Biomass Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.eia.gov/oiaf/aeo/overview/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/national-energy-modeling-system-unite Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance Regulations: Utility/Electricity Service Costs The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer-based, energy-economy modelling system of the United States through 2030. NEMS

120

DISCOVERY OF AN EXTRA HARD SPECTRAL COMPONENT IN THE HIGH-ENERGY AFTERGLOW EMISSION OF GRB 130427A  

SciTech Connect

The extended high-energy gamma-ray (>100 MeV) emission which occurs after prompt gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is usually characterized by a single power-law spectrum, which has been explained as the afterglow synchrotron radiation. The afterglow inverse Compton emission has long been predicted to be able to produce a high-energy component as well, but previous observations have not clearly revealed such a signature, probably due to the small number of >10 GeV photons even for the brightest GRBs known so far. In this Letter, we report on the Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of the >100 MeV emission from the very bright and nearby GRB 130427A. We characterize the time-resolved spectra of the GeV emission from the GRB onset to the afterglow phase. By performing time-resolved spectral fits of GRB 130427A, we found strong evidence of an extra hard spectral component that exists in the extended high-energy emission of this GRB. We argue that this hard component may arise from the afterglow inverse Compton emission.

Tam, Pak-Hin Thomas [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Tang Qingwen; Liu Ruoyu; Wang Xiangyu [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Hou Shujin, E-mail: phtam@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: xywang@nju.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems energy components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Identifying Opportunities for Swedish Component and Service Suppliers within the US Wind Energy Industry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This master thesis provides an overview of the US wind energy industry through an innovation system analysis thus covering both policy development as well as (more)

Nachemson, Louise

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

See most recent version of AEO See most recent version of AEO Annual Energy Outlook Products - Archive Annual Energy Outlook Supplement Tables Assumptions NEM System (NEMS): An Overview NEMS Retrospective Early Release HTML PDF HTML PDF HTML PDF HTML PDF HTML PDF HTML PDF 2013 2013 2013 2013 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2009 2008 2008 2008 2008 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007

123

Focus measure based on the energy of high-frequency components in the S transform  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Focus measure plays a fundamental role in the shape from focus technique. In this Letter, we suggest a focus measure in the S-transform domain that is based on the energy of...

Mahmood, MuhammadTariq; Choi, Tae-Sun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Estimation of land surface water and energy balance flux components and closure relation using conditional sampling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Models of terrestrial water and energy balance include numerical treatment of heat and moisture diffusion in the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum. These two diffusion and exchange processes are linked only at a few ...

Farhadi, Leila

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Interim storage of dismantled nuclear weapon components at the U.S. Department of Energy Pantex Plant  

SciTech Connect

Following the events of 1989 and the subsequent cessation of production of new nuclear weapons by the US, the mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Weapons Complex has shifted from production to dismantlement of retired weapons. The sole site in the US for accomplishing the dismantlement mission is the DOE Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. Pending a national decision on the ultimate storage and disposition of nuclear components form the dismantled weapons, the storage magazines within the Pantex Plant are serving as the interim storage site for pits--the weapon plutonium-bearing component. The DOE has stipulated that Pantex will provide storage for up to 12,000 pits pending a Record of Decision on a comprehensive site-wide Environmental Impact Statement in November 1996.

Guidice, S.J.; Inlow, R.O. [USDOE Albuquerque Operations Office, NM (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - National Gas Transmission  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 National Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution

127

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy SMARRT): Manufacturing Advanced Engineered Components Using Lost Foam Casting Technology  

SciTech Connect

This project was a subtask of Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (?¢????Energy SMARRT?¢???) Program. Through this project, technologies, such as computer modeling, pattern quality control, casting quality control and marketing tools, were developed to advance the Lost Foam Casting process application and provide greater energy savings. These technologies have improved (1) production efficiency, (2) mechanical properties, and (3) marketability of lost foam castings. All three reduce energy consumption in the metals casting industry. This report summarizes the work done on all tasks in the period of January 1, 2004 through June 30, 2011. Current (2011) annual energy saving estimates based on commercial introduction in 2011 and a market penetration of 97% by 2020 is 5.02 trillion BTU?¢????s/year and 6.46 trillion BTU?¢????s/year with 100% market penetration by 2023. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology. The average annual estimate of CO2 reduction per year through 2020 is 0.03 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Equivalent (MM TCE).

Harry Littleton; John Griffin

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

128

Predictions on the transverse momentum spectra for charged particle production at LHC-energies from a two component model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transverse momentum spectra, $d^2\\sigma/(d\\eta dp_T^2)$, of charged hadron production in $pp$-collisions are considered in terms of a recently introduced two component model. The shapes of the particle distributions vary as a function of c.m.s. energy in the collision and the measured pseudorapidity interval. In order to extract predictions on the double-differential cross-sections $d^2\\sigma/(d\\eta dp_T^2)$ of hadron production for future LHC-measurements the different sets of available experimental data have been used in this study.

Bylinkin, Alexander; Rostovtsev, Andrei

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Ultrahigh heat flux plasma-facing components for magnetic fusion energy  

SciTech Connect

Sandia and Ultramet partnered to design and test refractory metal plasma-facing components and heat exchangers for advanced, high-temperature power conversion systems. These devices consisted of high-temperature helium-to-helium and lithium-to-helium heat exchangers that operate with high efficiency due to the porous foam inserts used in the gas stream, which promote turbulence and provide extended surface area for enhanced convection. Single- and multi-channel helium panels and the Li-He heat exchanger were fabricated from either pure molybdenum, TZM, or tungsten. The design was carried out through an Ultramet subcontractor. The flow path was carefully tailored to minimize the pressure drop while maximizing the heat transfer. The single- and multi-channel helium panels were tested at Sandia's PMTF using an electron beam system and the closed helium flow loop. In 2006, a single-channel tungsten tube was successfully tested to an average heat flux of 14 MW/m{sup 2} with a localized peak of 22 MW/m{sup 2} along the axial centerline at the outer radius. Under this CRADA, multiple square-channel molybdenum components were successfully tested to heat flux levels approaching 8.5 MW/m{sup 2}. The three multi-channel prototypes experienced mechanical failure due to issues related to the design of the large unsupported span of the heated faceplates in combination with prototype material and braze selection. The Li-He heat exchanger was both designed and partially tested at the PMTF for helium and lithium flow.

Youchison, D. L.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Impact of Component Sizing in Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles for Energy Resource and Greenhouse Emissions Reduction  

SciTech Connect

Widespread use of alternative hybrid powertrains currently appears inevitable and many opportunities for substantial progress remain. The necessity for environmentally friendly vehicles, in conjunction with increasing concerns regarding U.S. dependency on foreign oil and climate change, has led to significant investment in enhancing the propulsion portfolio with new technologies. Recently, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have attracted considerable attention due to their potential to reduce petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the transportation sector. PHEVs are especially appealing for short daily commutes with excessive stop-and-go driving. However, the high costs associated with their components, and in particular, with their energy storage systems have been significant barriers to extensive market penetration of PEVs. In the research reported here, we investigated the implications of motor/generator and battery size on fuel economy and GHG emissions in a medium duty PHEV. An optimization framework is proposed and applied to two different parallel powertrain configurations, pre-transmission and post-transmission, to derive the Pareto frontier with respect to motor/generator and battery size. The optimization and modeling approach adopted here facilitates better understanding of the potential benefits from proper selection of motor/generator and battery size on fuel economy and GHG emissions. This understanding can help us identify the appropriate sizing of these components and thus reducing the PHEV cost. Addressing optimal sizing of PHEV components could aim at an extensive market penetration of PHEVs.

Malikopoulos, Andreas [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Energy of mixing and magnetic state of components of Fe-Mn alloys: A first-principles calculation for the ground state  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methods of first-principles computer simulation have been used to calculate the magnetic moments at the component atoms and the energies of mixing in substitutional fcc and bcc solid solutions ... iron. It has be...

A. A. Mirzoev; M. M. Yalalov; D. A. Mirzaev

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Nano-Electro-Mechanical (NEM) Relay Devices and Technology for Ultra-Low Energy Digital Integrated Circuits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

substrate, a layer of phosphosilicate glass is deposited atand drive-in anneal. Phosphosilicate glass (PSG) is then

Nathanael, Rhesa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Multi-component self-consistent nuclear energy system: protected plutonium production (P3)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The research activity on Protected Plutonium Production (P3) has been performed in the framework of MC-SCNES that simultaneously achieves four requirements ?? energy production, fuel production, burning of radioactive wastes and safety by the combination of fission, spallation and fusion neutron sources. The increase of a fraction of 238Pu provides an essential protective measure to plutonium against the proliferation due to its high decay heat and spontaneous fission neutrons. It is discussed that 238Pu production by the transmutation of MA in both critical and sub-critical operation modes. The demonstration of P3 mechanisms in the reactor will provide a big possibility of new reactor markets in the world.

Masaki Saito

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Polarization components in ?0 photoproduction at photon energies up to 5.6 GeV  

SciTech Connect

We present new data for the polarization observables of the final state proton in the 1H(? ?, ? p)?0 reaction. These data can be used to test predictions based on hadron helicity conservation (HHC) and perturbative QCD (pQCD). These data have both small statistical and systematic uncertainties, and were obtained with beam energies between 1.8 and 5.6 GeV and for ?0 scattering angles larger than 75{sup o} in center-of-mass (c.m.) frame. The data extend the polarization measurements data base for neutral pion photoproduction up to E? = 5.6 GeV. The results show non-zero induced polarization above the resonance region. The polarization transfer components vary rapidly with the photon energy and ?0 scattering angle in the center-of-mass frame. This indicates that HHC does not hold and that the pQCD limit is still not reached in the energy regime of this experiment.

Luo, W; Brash, E J; Gilman, R; Jones, M K; Meziane, M; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C F; Puckett, A.J.R.; Punjabi,; Wesselmann, F R; Marsh,; Matulenko, Y; Maxwell, J; Meekins, D; Melnik, Y; Miller, J; Mkrtchyan, A; Mkrtchyan, H; Moffit, B; Moreno, O; Mulholland, J; Narayan, A; Nuruzzaman,; Nedev, S; Piasetzky, E; Pierce, W; Piskunov, N M; Prok, Y; Ransome, R D; Razin, D S; Reimer, P E; Reinhold, J; Rondon, O; Shabestari, M; Shahinyan, A; Shestermanov, K; Sirca, S; Sitnik, I; Smykov, L; Smith, G; Solovyev, L; Solvignon, P; Strakovsky, I I; Subedi, R; Suleiman, R; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E; Vasiliev, A; Veilleux, M; Wood, S; Ye, Z; Zanevsky, Y; Zhang, X; Zhang, Y; Zheng, X; Zhu, L; Ahmidouch, A; Albayrak, I; Aniol, K A; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, A; Ates, O; Baghdasaryan, H; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bimbot, L; Bosted, P; Boeglin, W; Butuceanu, C; Carter, P; Chernenko, S; Christy, M E; Commisso, M; Cornejo, J C; Covrig, S; Danagoulian, S; Daniel, A; Davidenko, A; Day, D; Dhamija, S; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Frullani, S; Fenker, H; Frlez, E; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gilad, S; Goncharenko, Y; Hafidi, K; Hamilton, D; Higinbotham, D W; Hinton, W; Horn, T; Hu, B; Huang, J; Huber, G M; Jensen, E; Kang, H; Keppel, C; Khandaker, M; King, P; Kirillov, D; Kohl, M; Kravtsov, V; Kumbartzki, G; Li, Y; Mamyan, V; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

14 - Graphene nanoelectromechanics (NEMS)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: The use of graphene in the development of nanoscale mechanical structures is reviewed. The recent development of graphene resonators and techniques used to fabricate and characterise them is described. Some applications in sensor technology are highlighted.

Z. Moktadir

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Model documentation report: Commercial Sector Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components. This report serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, section 57(b)(1)). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Model documentation renewable fuels module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it relates to the production of the 1997 Annual Energy Outlook forecasts. The report catalogues and describes modeling assumptions, computational methodologies, data inputs. and parameter estimation techniques. A number of offline analyses used in lieu of RFM modeling components are also described. This documentation report serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document for model analysts, model users, and the public interested in the construction and application of the RFM. Second, it meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its models. Finally, such documentation facilitates continuity in EIA model development by providing information sufficient to perform model enhancements and data updates as part of EIA`s ongoing mission to provide analytical and forecasting information systems.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Model documentation report: Commercial sector demand module of the national energy modeling system  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports. Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects.

NONE

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

State Energy Efficiency Program Evaluation Inventory  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The focus of this inventory, some of which has been placed into a searchable spreadsheet, is to support the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and to research cost information in state-mandated energy efficiency program evaluations e.g., for use in updating analytic and modeling assumptions used by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA).

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030  

SciTech Connect

The Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO2009), prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030, based on results from EIAs National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). EIA published an early release version of the AEO2009 reference case in December 2008.

None

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems energy components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 This report provides a summary description of the NEMS which was used to generate the projections of energy production, demand, imports, and prices through the year 2025 for the Annual Energy Outlook 2003. Preface Introduction Overview of NEMS Carbon Dioxide and Methane Emissions Macroeconomic Activity Module International Energy Module Residential Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Electricity Market Module Renewable Fuels Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Petroleum Market Module Coal Market Module Bibliography Download the Report NEMS: An Overview 2003 Cover. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

142

The energy components of stacked chromatin layers explain the morphology, dimensions and mechanical properties of metaphase chromosomes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to the amount of energy required to increase S T and S L by unit area. Considering...during friction measurements, the kinetic energy of the AFM tip produce...text, 1 arbitrary unit 1.2 1017 J. The total surface energy (E T+L = E T...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 23 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 International Energy Module The NEMS International Energy Module (IEM) simulates the interaction between U.S. and global petroleum markets. It uses assumptions of economic growth and expectations of future U.S. and world crude-like liquids production and consumption to estimate the effects of changes in U.S. liquid fuels markets on the international petroleum market. For each year of the forecast, the NEMS IEM computes world oil prices, provides a supply curve of world crude-like liquids, generates a worldwide oil supply- demand balance with regional detail, and computes quantities of crude oil and light and heavy petroleum products imported into

144

Assumptions to Annual Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Assumptions to AEO2013 Assumptions to AEO2013 Release Date: May 14, 2013 | Next Release Date: May 2014 | full report Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [1] (AEO2013), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports [2]. The National Energy Modeling System Projections in the AEO2013 are generated using the NEMS, developed and maintained by the Office of Energy Analysis of the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). In addition to its use in developing the Annual

145

Assumptions to Annual Energy Outlook - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to AEO2012 Assumptions to AEO2012 Release Date: August 2, 2012 | Next Release Date: August 2013 | Full report Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 [1] (AEO2012), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports [2]. The National Energy Modeling System The projections in AEO2012 are generated using the NEMS, developed and maintained by the Office of Energy Analysis (OEA) of the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). In addition to its use in developing the

146

What is there in the black box of dark energy: variable cosmological parameters or multiple (interacting) components?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The coincidence problems and other dynamical features of dark energy are studied in cosmological models with variable cosmological parameters and in models with the composite dark energy. It is found that many of the problems usually considered to be cosmological coincidences can be explained or significantly alleviated in the aforementioned models.

Javier Grande; Joan Sola; Hrvoje Stefancic

2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

147

Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Outlook Outlook 2010 Restrospective Review July 2011 www.eia.gov U.S. Depa rtment of Energy W ashington, DC 20585 This page inTenTionally lefT blank 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review While the integrated nature of NEMS may result in some feedback that slightly modifies the initial assumptions about world oil price and the macroeconomic growth environment, these feedbacks tend to be relatively small, so that the initial assumptions for world oil price and the macroeconomic growth environment largely determine the overall projection environ- ment. To the extent that this general environment deviates from the initial assumptions, the NEMS projection results will also deviate. Table 2 provides a summary of the percentage of years in

148

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Key Assumptions Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2000 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2000 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). HEM uses the consumption forecast by NEMS for the residential and transportation sectors as inputs to the disaggregation algorithm that results in the direct fuel expenditure analysis. Household end-use and personal transportation service consumption are obtained by HEM from the NEMS Residential and Transportation Demand Modules. Household disposable income is adjusted with forecasts of total disposable income from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module.

149

Feasibility of Using Measurements of Internal Components of Tankless Water Heaters for Field Monitoring of Energy and Water Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

speed motor that modulates the blower speed, this watermotor amps Energy Efficiency versus gas input for both waterWater flow versus gas input At this site we also compared gas consumption to blower motor

Lutz, Jim

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. In addition, natural gas flow patterns are a function of the pattern in the previous year, coupled with the relative prices of gas supply options as translated to the represented market “hubs.” The major assumptions used within the NGTDM are grouped into five general categories. They relate to (1) the classification of demand into core and noncore transportation service classes, (2) the pricing of transmission and distribution services, (3) pipeline and storage capacity expansion and utilization, and (4) the implementation of recent regulatory reform. A complete listing of NGTDM assumptions and in-depth methodology descriptions are presented in Model Documentation: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System, Model Documentation 2003, DOE/EIA- M062(2003) (Washington, DC, January 2003).

151

Annual Energy Outlook 2001-Appendix G: Major Assumptions for the Forecasts  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Forecasts Forecasts Summary of the AEO2001 Cases/ Scenarios - Appendix Table G1 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Model Results (Formats - PDF, ZIP) - Appendix Tables - Reference Case - 1998 to 2020 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Download Report - Entire AEO2001 (PDF) - AEO2001 by Chapters (PDF) bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Acronyms bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Contacts Related Links bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Assumptions to the AEO2001 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Supplemental Data to the AEO2001 (Only available on the Web) - Regional and more detailed AEO 2001 Reference Case Results - 1998, 2000 to 2020 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) NEMS Conference bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Forecast Homepage bullet1.gif (843 bytes) EIA Homepage Appendix G Major Assumptions for the Forecasts Component Modules Major Assumptions for the Annual Energy Outlook 2001

152

Feasibility of Using Measurements of Internal Components ofTankless Water Heaters for Field Monitoring of Energy and Water Use  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to determine if it was feasible to collect information regarding energy use and hot water delivery from tankless gas water heaters using the sensors and controls built into the water heaters. This could then be used to determine the water heater efficiency ? the ratio of energy out (hot water delivered) to energy in (energy in the gas) in actual residential installations. The goal was to be as unobtrusive as possible, and to avoid invalidating warranties or exposing researchers to liability issues. If feasible this approach would reduce the costs of instrumentation.This paper describes the limited field and laboratory investigations to determine if using the sensors and controls built into tankless water heaters is feasible for field monitoring.It was more complicated to use the existing gas flow, water and temperature sensors than was anticipated. To get the signals from the existing sensors and controls is difficult and may involve making changes that would invalidate manufacturer warrantees. The procedures and methods for using signals from the existing gas valves, water flow meters and temperature sensors will vary by model. To be able to monitor different models and brands would require detailed information about each model and brand.Based on these findings, we believe that for field monitoring projects it would be easier, quicker and safer to connect external meters to measure the same parameters rather than using the sensors and controls built into tankless water heaters.

Lutz, Jim; Biermayer, Peter

2008-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

153

Energy budget of the bifurcated component in the radio pulsar profile of PSR J1012+5307  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......1982) suggest that deltatheta does not exceed few hundredths of...the energy content of the BEC does not break any strict upper limits...the Goldreich-Julian density does in equation (3). 5 Prompted...Lorimer D. R. , Kramer M. Handbook of Pulsar Astronomy (2005......

J. Dyks; B. Rudak

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 International Energy Module The NEMS International Energy Module (IEM) simulates the interaction between U.S. and global petroleum markets. It uses assumptions of economic growth and expectations of future U.S. and world crude-like liquids production and consumption to estimate the effects of changes in U.S. liquid fuels markets on the international petroleum market. For each year of the forecast, the NEMS IEM computes oil prices, provides a supply curve of world crude-like liquids, generates a worldwide oil supply- demand balance with regional detail, and computes quantities of crude oil and light and heavy petroleum products imported into the United States by export region. Changes in the oil price (WTI), which is defined as the price of light, low-sulfur crude oil delivered to Cushing, Oklahoma in

155

Two dark matter components in dark matter extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model and the high energy positron spectrum in PAMELA/HEAT data  

SciTech Connect

We present a dark matter extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model to give the recent trend of the high energy positron spectrum of the PAMELA/HEAT experiments. If the trend is caused indeed by dark matter, the minimal supersymmetric standard model needs to be extended. Here, we minimally extend the minimal supersymmetric standard model with one more dark matter component N together with a heavy lepton E and introduce the coupling e{sub R}E{sub R}{sup c}N{sub R}. This coupling naturally appears in the flipped SU(5) grand unification models. We also present the needed parameter ranges of these additional particles.

Huh, Ji-Haeng; Kim, Jihn E.; Kyae, Bumseok [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Theoretical Physics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

Modeling Interregional Transmission Congestion in the NationalEnergy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

Congestion analysis using National Energy Modeling National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) or NEMS-derivatives, such as LBNL-NEMS, is subject to significant caveats because the generation logic inherent in NEMS limits the extent to which interregional transmission can be utilized and intraregional transmission is not represented at all. The EMM is designed primarily to represent national energy markets therefore regional effects may be simplified in ways that make congestion analysis harder. Two ways in particular come to mind. First, NEMS underutilizes the capability of the traditional electric grid as it builds the dedicated and detached grid. Second, it also undervalues the costs of congestion by allowing more transmission than it should, due to its use of a transportation model rather than a transmission model. In order to evaluate benefits of reduced congestion using LBNL-NEMS, Berkeley Lab identified three possible solutions: (1) implement true simultaneous power flow, (2) always build new plants within EMM regions even to serve remote load, and (3) the dedicated and detached grid should be part of the known grid. Based on these findings, Berkeley Lab recommends the following next steps: (1) Change the build logic that always places new capacity where it is needed and allow the transmission grid to be expanded dynamically. (2) The dedicated and detached grid should be combined with the traditional grid. (3) Remove the bias towards gas fired combine cycle and coal generation, which are the only types of generation currently allowed out of region. (4) A power flow layer should be embedded in LBNL-NEMS to appropriately model and limit transmission.

Gumerman, Etan; Chan, Peter; Lesieutre, Bernard; Marnay, Chris; Wang, Juan

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

157

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction This page inTenTionally lefT blank 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [1] (AEO2013), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports [2]. The National Energy Modeling System Projections in the AEO2013 are generated using the NEMS, developed and maintained by the Office of Energy Analysis of the U.S.

158

IEA Task 27 BUILDING ENVELOPE COMPONENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IEA Task 27 BUILDING ENVELOPE COMPONENTS Performance, durability and sustainability of advanced windows and solar components for building envelopes Energy Performance Assessment Methodology Starting................................................................................................................................................. 3 2 Concepts of Energy Performance Assessment of Building Envelopes

159

Distributed generation capabilities of the national energy modeling system  

SciTech Connect

This report describes Berkeley Lab's exploration of how the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) models distributed generation (DG) and presents possible approaches for improving how DG is modeled. The on-site electric generation capability has been available since the AEO2000 version of NEMS. Berkeley Lab has previously completed research on distributed energy resources (DER) adoption at individual sites and has developed a DER Customer Adoption Model called DER-CAM. Given interest in this area, Berkeley Lab set out to understand how NEMS models small-scale on-site generation to assess how adequately DG is treated in NEMS, and to propose improvements or alternatives. The goal is to determine how well NEMS models the factors influencing DG adoption and to consider alternatives to the current approach. Most small-scale DG adoption takes place in the residential and commercial modules of NEMS. Investment in DG ultimately offsets purchases of electricity, which also eliminates the losses associated with transmission and distribution (T&D). If the DG technology that is chosen is photovoltaics (PV), NEMS assumes renewable energy consumption replaces the energy input to electric generators. If the DG technology is fuel consuming, consumption of fuel in the electric utility sector is replaced by residential or commercial fuel consumption. The waste heat generated from thermal technologies can be used to offset the water heating and space heating energy uses, but there is no thermally activated cooling capability. This study consists of a review of model documentation and a paper by EIA staff, a series of sensitivity runs performed by Berkeley Lab that exercise selected DG parameters in the AEO2002 version of NEMS, and a scoping effort of possible enhancements and alternatives to NEMS current DG capabilities. In general, the treatment of DG in NEMS is rudimentary. The penetration of DG is determined by an economic cash-flow analysis that determines adoption based on the n umber of years to a positive cash flow. Some important technologies, e.g. thermally activated cooling, are absent, and ceilings on DG adoption are determined by some what arbitrary caps on the number of buildings that can adopt DG. These caps are particularly severe for existing buildings, where the maximum penetration for any one technology is 0.25 percent. On the other hand, competition among technologies is not fully considered, and this may result in double-counting for certain applications. A series of sensitivity runs show greater penetration with net metering enhancements and aggressive tax credits and a more limited response to lowered DG technology costs. Discussion of alternatives to the current code is presented in Section 4. Alternatives or improvements to how DG is modeled in NEMS cover three basic areas: expanding on the existing total market for DG both by changing existing parameters in NEMS and by adding new capabilities, such as for missing technologies; enhancing the cash flow analysis but incorporating aspects of DG economics that are not currently represented, e.g. complex tariffs; and using an external geographic information system (GIS) driven analysis that can better and more intuitively identify niche markets.

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Follow-up on the Department of Energy's Implementation of the Advanced Batteries and Hybrid Components Program Funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, OAS-RA-L-12-05  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Follow-up on the Department of Follow-up on the Department of Energy's Implementation of the Advanced Batteries and Hybrid Components Program Funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act OAS-RA-L-12-05 July 2012 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 July 10, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE DIRECTOR, NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY FROM: Joanne Hill, Director Central Audits Division Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Follow-up on the Department of Energy's Implementation of the Advanced Batteries and Hybrid Components Program Funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act" BACKGROUND Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, the Department of Energy's Advanced Batteries and Hybrid Components Program (Advanced Batteries Program) received

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems energy components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - International Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 International Energy Module The International Energy Module (IEM) performs two tasks in all NEMS runs. First, the module reads exogenously global and U.S.A. petroleum liquids supply and demand curves (1 curve per year; 2008-2030; approximated, isoelastic fit to previous NEMS results). These quantities are not modeled directly in NEMS. Previous versions of the IEM adjusted these quantities after reading in initial values. In an attempt to more closely integrate the AEO2008 with IEO2007 and the STEO some functionality was removed from IEM while a new algorithm was implemented. Based on the difference between U.S. total petroleum liquids production (consumption) and the expected U.S. total liquids production (consumption) at the current WTI price, curves for global petroleum liquids consumption (production) were adjusted for each year. According to previous operations, a new WTI price path was generated. An exogenous oil supply module, Generate World Oil Balances (GWOB), was also used in IEM to provide annual regional (country) level production detail for conventional and unconventional liquids.

162

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Natural Gas Transmission  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by obtaining market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. In addition, natural gas flow patterns are a function of the pattern in the previous year, coupled with the relative prices of gas supply options as translated to the represented market “hubs.” The major assumptions used within the NGTDM are grouped into five general categories. They relate to (1) the classification of demand into core and noncore transportation service classes, (2) the pricing of transmission and distribution services, (3) pipeline and storage capacity expansion and utilization, (4) the implementation of recent regulatory reform, and (5) the implementation of provisions of the Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP). A complete listing of NGTDM assumptions and in-depth methodology descriptions are presented in Model Documentation Report: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-MO62/1, January 1999.

163

Laser ultrasonic multi-component imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Techniques for ultrasonic determination of the interfacial relationship of multi-component systems are discussed. In implementations, a laser energy source may be used to excite a multi-component system including a first component and a second component at least in partial contact with the first component. Vibrations resulting from the excitation may be detected for correlation with a resonance pattern indicating if discontinuity exists at the interface of the first and second components.

Williams, Thomas K. (Federal Way, WA); Telschow, Kenneth (Des Moines, WA)

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

164

Model documentation Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents objectives and conceptual and methodological approach used in the development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Coal Market Module (CMM) used to develop the Annual Energy Outlook 1996 (AEO96). This report catalogues and describes the assumptions, methodology, estimation techniques, and source code of CMM`s three submodules: Coal Production Submodule, Coal Export Submodule, and Coal Distribution Submodule.

NONE

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

165

International energy outlook 1996  

SciTech Connect

This International Energy Outlook presents historical data from 1970 to 1993 and EIA`s projections of energy consumption and carbon emissions through 2015 for 6 country groups. Prospects for individual fuels are discussed. Summary tables of the IEO96 world energy consumption, oil production, and carbon emissions projections are provided in Appendix A. The reference case projections of total foreign energy consumption and of natural gas, coal, and renewable energy were prepared using EIA`s World Energy Projection System (WEPS) model. Reference case projections of foreign oil production and consumption were prepared using the International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Nuclear consumption projections were derived from the International Nuclear Model, PC Version (PC-INM). Alternatively, nuclear capacity projections were developed using two methods: the lower reference case projections were based on analysts` knowledge of the nuclear programs in different countries; the upper reference case was generated by the World Integrated Nuclear Evaluation System (WINES)--a demand-driven model. In addition, the NEMS Coal Export Submodule (CES) was used to derive flows in international coal trade. As noted above, foreign projections of electricity demand are now projected as part of the WEPS. 64 figs., 62 tabs.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Macroeconomic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic assessment at EIA involves several modes of analysis. The first type of analysis, used in forecasting the Annual Energy Outlook where energy prices change, uses kernel regression and response surface techniques to mimic the response of larger macroeconomic and industrial models. This mode of analysis requires a given economic baseline and then calculates the economic impacts of changing energy prices, calculated from the chosen growth path. The economic growth cases are derived from the larger core models and can reflect either high, low, or reference case growth assumptions. Analyzing economic impacts from energy price changes uses the macroeconomic activity module (MAM) within NEMS and provides a subset of the macroeconomic variables available in the larger core models. The composition of the subset is determined by the other energy modules in NEMS, as they use various macroeconomic concepts as assumptions to their particular energy model.

167

International Energy Outlook 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ieo99cvr.gif (8385 bytes) ieo99cvr.gif (8385 bytes) Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues. The International Energy Outlook 1999 (IEO99) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2020. The report is an extension of EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). U.S. projections appearing in IEO99 are consistent with those published in AEO99. IEO99 is provided as a statistical service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private

168

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 (IEO2006) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administra- tion (EIA) of the outlook for international energy mar- kets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2006 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006), which was pre- pared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2006 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associa- tions, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of Energy Orga- nization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). IEO2006 focuses exclusively on marketed energy. Non- marketed energy sources, which continue to play an important role in some developing countries, are not included

169

Women @ Energy: Carrie Milton | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carrie Milton Carrie Milton Women @ Energy: Carrie Milton March 28, 2013 - 10:15am Addthis Carrie Milton is an operations research analyst for the Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Analysis at the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Carrie Milton is an operations research analyst for the Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Analysis at the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Check out other profiles in the Women @ Energy series and share your favorites on Pinterest. Carrie Milton is an operations research analyst for the Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Analysis at the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Her work involves incorporating collected data from multiple sources into the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)

170

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Footnotes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Feedback Feedback Related Links Annual Energy Outlook2001 Supplemental Data to the AEO2001 NEMS Conference To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage FOOTNOTES [1] Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2001 (AEO2001), DOE/EIA-0383(2001), (Washington, DC, December 2000). [2] NEMS documentation reports are available on the EIA CD-ROM and the EIA Homepage (http://www.eia.gov/bookshelf.html). For ordering information on the CD-ROM, contact STAT-USA's toll free order number: 1-800-STAT-USA or by calling (202) 482-1986. [3] Energy Information Administration, The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000, DOE/EIA-0581(2000), (Washington, DC, March 2000). [4] The underlying macroeconomic growth cases use Standard and Poor’s DRI February 2000 T250200 and February TO250299 and TP250299.

171

Directory of Energy Information Administration Models 1993  

SciTech Connect

This directory contains descriptions about each model, including the title, acronym, purpose, followed by more detailed information on characteristics, uses, and requirements. Sources for additional information are identified. Included in this directory are 35 EIA models active as of May 1, 1993. Models that run on personal computers are identified by ``PC`` as part of the acronym. EIA is developing new models, a National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), and is making changes to existing models to include new technologies, environmental issues, conservation, and renewables, as well as extend forecast horizon. Other parts of the Department are involved in this modeling effort. A fully operational model is planned which will integrate completed segments of NEMS for its first official application--preparation of EIA`s Annual Energy Outlook 1994. Abstracts for the new models will be included in next year`s version of this directory.

Not Available

1993-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

172

Directory of energy information administration models 1995  

SciTech Connect

This updated directory has been published annually; after this issue, it will be published only biennially. The Disruption Impact Simulator Model in use by EIA is included. Model descriptions have been updated according to revised documentation approved during the past year. This directory contains descriptions about each model, including title, acronym, purpose, followed by more detailed information on characteristics, uses, and requirements. Sources for additional information are identified. Included are 37 EIA models active as of February 1, 1995. The first group is the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) models. The second group is all other EIA models that are not part of NEMS. Appendix A identifies major EIA modeling systems and the models within these systems. Appendix B is a summary of the `Annual Energy Outlook` Forecasting System.

NONE

1995-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

173

Model documentation, Renewable Fuels Module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it relates to the production of the Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98) forecasts. The report catalogues and describes modeling assumptions, computational methodologies, data inputs, and parameter estimation techniques. A number of offline analyses used in lieu of RFM modeling components are also described. For AEO98, the RFM was modified in three principal ways, introducing capital cost elasticities of supply for new renewable energy technologies, modifying biomass supply curves, and revising assumptions for use of landfill gas from municipal solid waste (MSW). In addition, the RFM was modified in general to accommodate projections beyond 2015 through 2020. Two supply elasticities were introduced, the first reflecting short-term (annual) cost increases from manufacturing, siting, and installation bottlenecks incurred under conditions of rapid growth, and the second reflecting longer term natural resource, transmission and distribution upgrade, and market limitations increasing costs as more and more of the overall resource is used. Biomass supply curves were also modified, basing forest products supplies on production rather than on inventory, and expanding energy crop estimates to include states west of the Mississippi River using information developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Finally, for MSW, several assumptions for the use of landfill gas were revised and extended.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Annual Energy Outlook 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2020 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an “Overview” summarizing the AEO2000 reference case. The next section, “Legislation and Regulations,” describes the assumptions made with regard to laws that affect energy markets and discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues. “Issues in Focus” discusses current energy issues—appliance standards, gasoline and diesel fuel standards, natural gas industry expansion, competitive electricity pricing, renewable portfolio standards, and carbon emissions. It is followed by the analysis of energy market trends.

175

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Completed Copy in PDF Format Completed Copy in PDF Format Related Links Annual Energy Outlook2001 Supplemental Data to the AEO2001 NEMS Conference To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Household Expenditures Module Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2001 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2001 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). HEM uses the consumption forecast by NEMS for the residential and

176

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Comleted Copy in PDF Format Comleted Copy in PDF Format Related Links Annual Energy Outlook 2001 Supplemental Data to the AEO 2001 NEMS Conference To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 9 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The distinction between the two sets of manufacturing industries pertains to the level of modeling. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 19). The

177

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Appendix:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

APPENDIX: APPENDIX: BIBLIOGRAPHY The National Energy Modeling System is documented in a series of model documentation reports, available by contacting the National Energy Information Center (202/586-8800). Energy Information Administration, National Energy Modeling System Integrating Module Documentation Report, DOE/EIA-M057(97) (Washington, DC, May 1997). Energy Information Administration, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(97) (Washington, DC, December 1996). Energy Information Administration, Model Developer's Appendix to the Model Documentation Report: NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module, DOE/EIA-M065A (Washington, DC, July 1994). Energy Information Administration, Documentation of the DRI Model of the

178

Annual energy outlook 1997 with projections to 2015  

SciTech Connect

The Annual Energy Outlook 1997 (AEO97) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2015 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). These projections are based on results of EIA`s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). This report begins with a summary of the reference case, followed by a discussion of the legislative assumptions and evolving legislative and regulatory issues. ``Issues in Focus`` discusses emerging energy issues and other topics of particular interest. It is followed by the analysis of energy market trends. The analysis in AEO97 focuses primarily on a reference case and four other cases that assume higher and lower economic growth and higher and lower world oil prices than in the reference case. Forecast tables for these cases are provided in Appendixes A through C. Appendixes D and E present summaries of the reference case forecasts in units of oil equivalence and household energy expenditures. Twenty-three other cases explore the impacts of varying key assumptions in NEMS--generally, technology penetration, with the major results shown in Appendix F. Appendix G briefly describes NEMS and the major AEO97 assumptions, with a summary table. 114 figs., 22 tabs.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 (IEO2007) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Admin- istration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2007 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007), which was pre- pared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2007 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associa- tions, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of Energy Orga- nization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). Projections in IEO2007 are divided according to Organi- zation for Economic Cooperation and Development members (OECD) and non-members (non-OECD). There are

180

Annual Energy Outlook 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage Annual Energy Outlook 2001 With Projections to 2020 Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 2001 (AEO2001) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2020 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an “Overview” summarizing the AEO2001 reference case. The next section, “Legislation and Regulations,” discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues. “Issues in Focus” discusses the macroeconomic projections, world oil and natural gas markets, oxygenates in gasoline, distributed electricity generation, electricity industry restructuring, and carbon dioxide emissions. It is followed by the analysis of energy market trends.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems energy components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface International Energy Outlook 2006 Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2030, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and associated carbon dioxide emissions. The International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2006 are consistent with those published in EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2006 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade

182

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Macroeconomic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) links NEMS to the rest of the economy by providing projections of economic driver variables for use by the supply, demand, and conversion modules of NEMS. The derivation of the baseline macroeconomic forecast lays a foundation for the determination of the energy demand and supply forecast. MAM is used to present alternative macroeconomic growth cases to provide a range of uncertainty about the growth potential for the economy and its likely consequences for the energy system. MAM is also able to address the macroeconomic impacts associated with changing energy market conditions, such as alternative world oil price assumptions. Outside of the Annual Energy Outlook setting, MAM represents a system of linked modules which can assess the potential impacts on the economy of changes in energy events or policy proposals. These economic impacts then feed back into NEMS for an integrated solution. MAM consists of five modules:

183

An Energy Based Fatigue Lifing Method for In-Service Components and Numerical Assessment of U10Mo Alloy Based Fuel Mini Plates.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An energy based fatigue life prediction framework has been developed for calculation of remaining fatigue life of in service gas turbine materials. The purpose of (more)

Ozaltun, Hakan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Can the Organization of a Binary Mix Be Predicted from the Surface Energy, Cohesion Parameter and Particle Size of Its Components?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose.... The aim of this study was to relate the organization of several binary mixes with three physical parameters (surface energy, cohesion parameter, and particle size) of...

J. Barra; F. Lescure; F. Falson-Rieg; E. Doelker

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

available in PDF available in PDF Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Release date: January 28, 2013 This paper presents average levelized costs for generating technologies that are brought on line in 20181 as represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) Early Release Reference case.2 Both national values and the minimum and maximum values across the 22 U.S. regions of the NEMS electricity market module are presented. Levelized cost is often cited as a convenient summary measure of the overall competiveness of different generating technologies. It represents the per-kilowatthour cost (in real dollars) of building and operating a generating plant over an assumed financial life and duty cycle. Key inputs

186

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

‹ Analysis & Projections ‹ Analysis & Projections AEO2013 Early Release Overview Release Date: December 5, 2012 | Full Report Release Date: Spring 2013 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383ER(2013) available in PDF Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Release date: January 28, 2013 This paper presents average levelized costs for generating technologies that are brought on line in 20181 as represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) Early Release Reference case.2 Both national values and the minimum and maximum values across the 22 U.S. regions of the NEMS electricity market module are presented. Levelized cost is often cited as a convenient summary measure of the overall competiveness of different generating technologies. It represents

187

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and issues related to electricity, transportation, and the environment. The International Energy Outlook 2001 (IEO2001) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2020. The report is an extension of the EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2001 (AEO2001), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). U.S. projections appearing in the IEO2001 are consistent with those published in the AEO2001. IEO2001 is provided as a statistical service to energy managers and analysts, both in

188

Scientific Solutions (TRL 5 6 Component) - Underwater Active...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Scientific Solutions (TRL 5 6 Component) - Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Network for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy 40aamssistein.ppt More Documents &...

189

Annual Energy Review 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2002 125 a Unfinished oils, motor gasoline blending components, aviation gasoline blending components, and other...

190

EIA - Forecasts and Analysis of Energy Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The International Energy Outlook 2005 (IEO2005) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2025. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2005 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO2005), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The International Energy Outlook 2005 (IEO2005) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2025. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2005 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO2005), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Table of Contents Projection Tables Reference Case High Economic Growth Case Low Economic Growth Case Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production in Three Cases Projections of Nuclear Generating Capacity Highlights World Energy and Economic Outlook Outlook for World Energy Consumption World Economic Outlook Alternative Growth Cases

191

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - International Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 International Energy Module Figure 2. World Oil Prices in three Cases, 1995-2030 (2006 dollars per barrel). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 3. OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1995-2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 4. Non-OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1995-2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data The International Energy Module (IEM) performs two tasks in all NEMS runs. First, the module reads exogenously global and U.S.A. petroleum liquids

192

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 This report presents major assumptions of NEMS that are used to generate the projections in the AEO2006. Contents (Complete Report) Download complete Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Introduction Introduction Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Introduction Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

193

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2006 International Energy Outlook 2006 International Energy Outlook 2006 The International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2006 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Projection Tables Appendix A: Reference Case Appendix B: High Economic Growth Case Appendix C: Low Economic Growth Case Appendix D: Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Appendix E: Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production in Three Cases Appendix F: Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel

194

International Energy Outlook - Table of Contents  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook International Energy Outlook EIA Glossary International Energy Outlook 2004 Report #: DOE/EIA-0484(2004) Release date: April 2004 Next release date: July 2005 The International Energy Outlook 2004 (IEO2004) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2025. U.S.projections appearing in IEO2004 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2004 (AEO2004), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Table of Contents Appendixes Highlights World Energy and Economic Outlook Outlook for Primary Energy Consumption Energy End Use Outlook for Carbon Dioxide Emissions World Economic Outlook Alternative Growth Case Trends in Energy Intensity

195

Scenarios for Benefits Analysis of Energy Research, Development,Demonstration and Deployment  

SciTech Connect

For at least the last decade, evaluation of the benefits of research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RD3) by the U.S. Department of Energy has been conducted using deterministic forecasts that unrealistically presume we can precisely foresee our future 10, 25,or even 50 years hence. This effort tries, in a modest way, to begin a process of recognition that the reality of our energy future is rather one rife with uncertainty. The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is used by the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE) and Fossil Energy (FE) for their RD3 benefits evaluation. In order to begin scoping out the uncertainty in these deterministic forecasts, EE and FE designed two futures that differ significantly from the basic NEMS forecast. A High Fuel Price Scenario and a Carbon Cap Scenario were envisioned to forecast alternative futures and the associated benefits. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) implemented these scenarios into its version of NEMS,NEMS-LBNL, in late 2004, and the Energy Information Agency created six scenarios for FE in early 2005. The creation and implementation of the EE-FE scenarios are explained in this report. Both a Carbon Cap Scenario and a High Fuel Price Scenarios were implemented into the NEMS-LBNL. EIA subsequently modeled similar scenarios using NEMS. While the EIA and LBNL implementations were in some ways rather different, their forecasts do not significantly diverge. Compared to the Reference Scenario, the High Fuel Price Scenario reduces energy consumption by 4 percent in 2025, while in the EIA fuel price scenario (known as Scenario 4) reduction from its corresponding reference scenario (known as Scenario 0) in 2025 is marginal. Nonetheless, the 4 percent demand reduction does not lead to other cascading effects that would significantly differentiate the two scenarios. The LBNL and EIA carbon scenarios were mostly identical. The only major difference was that LBNL started working with the AEO 2004NEMS code and EIA was using AEO 2005 NEMS code. Unlike the High Price Scenario the Carbon Cap scenario gives a radically different forecast than the Reference Scenario. NEMS-LBNL proved that it can handle these alternative scenarios. However, results are price inelastic (for both oil and natural gas prices) within the price range evaluated. Perhaps even higher price paths would lead to a distinctly different forecast than the Reference Scenario. On the other hand, the Carbon Cap Scenario behaves more like an alternative future. The future in the Carbon Cap Scenario has higher electricity prices, reduced driving, more renewable capacity, and reduced energy consumption. The next step for this work is to evaluate the EE benefits under each of the three scenarios. Comparing those three sets of predicted benefits will indicate how much uncertainty is inherent within this sort of deterministic forecasting.

Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

196

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NEMS overview and brief description of cases NEMS overview and brief description of cases Table E1. Summary of the AEO2011 cases Reference Baseline economic growth (2.7 percent per year from 2009 through 2035), world oil price, and technology assumptions. Complete projection tables in Appendix A. World light, sweet crude oil prices rise to about $125 per barrel by 2035 in year 2009 dollars. Assumes RFS target to be met as soon as possible. Fully integrated Low Economic Growth Real GDP grows at an average annual rate of 2.1 percent from 2009 to 2035. Other energy market assumptions are the same as in the Reference case. Partial projection tables in Appendix B. Fully integrated High Economic Growth Real GDP grows at an average annual rate of 3.2 percent from 2009 to 2035. Other energy market assumptions are the same as in the Reference case. Partial projection tables in Appendix B. Fully integrated

197

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 The commercial module forecasts consumption by fuel 13 at the Census division level using prices from the NEMS energy supply modules, and macroeconomic variables from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM), as well as external data sources (technology characterizations, for example). Energy demands are forecast for ten end-use services 14 for eleven building categories 15 in each of the nine Census divisions (see Figure 5). The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division combinations. Next, the ten end-use service demands required for the projected floorspace are developed. The electricity generation and water and space heating supplied by distributed generation and combined heat and power technologies are projected. Technologies are then

198

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NEMS overview and brief description of cases NEMS overview and brief description of cases Table E1. Summary of the AEO2012 cases Reference Baseline economic growth (2.5 percent per year from 2010 through 2035), oil price, and technology assumptions. Complete projection tables in Appendix A. Light, sweet crude oil prices rise to about $145 per barrel (2010 dollars) in 2035. Assumes RFS target to be met as soon as possible. Low Economic Growth Real GDP grows at an average annual rate of 2.0 percent from 2010 to 2035. Other energy market assumptions are the same as in the Reference case. Partial projection tables in Appendix B.. High Economic Growth Real GDP grows at an average annual rate of 3.0 percent from 2010 to 2035. Other energy market assumptions are the same as in the Reference case. Partial projection tables in Appendix B.

199

X-ray lasers and methods utilizing two component driving illumination provided by optical laser means of relatively low energy and small physical size  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An X-ray laser (10), and related methodology, are disclosed wherein an X-ray laser target (12) is illuminated with a first pulse of optical laser radiation (14) of relatively long duration having scarcely enough energy to produce a narrow and linear cool plasma of uniform composition (38). A second, relatively short pulse of optical laser radiation (18) is uniformly swept across the length, from end to end, of the plasma (38), at about the speed of light, to consecutively illuminate continuously succeeding portions of the plasma (38) with optical laser radiation having scarcely enough energy to heat, ionize, and invert them into the continuously succeeding portions of an X-ray gain medium. This inventive double pulse technique results in a saving of more than two orders of magnitude in driving optical laser energy, when compared to the conventional single pulse approach.

Rosen, Mordecai D. (Berkeley, CA); Matthews, Dennis L. (El Granada, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Standard Test Method for Application of Ionization Chambers to Assess the Low Energy Gamma Component of Cobalt-60 Irradiators Used in Radiation-Hardness Testing of Silicon Electronic Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 Low energy components in the photon energy spectrum of Co-60 irradiators lead to absorbed dose enhancement effects in the radiation-hardness testing of silicon electronic devices. These low energy components may lead to errors in determining the absorbed dose in a specific device under test. This method covers procedures for the use of a specialized ionization chamber to determine a figure of merit for the relative importance of such effects. It also gives the design and instructions for assembling this chamber. 1.2 This method is applicable to measurements in Co-60 radiation fields where the range of exposure rates is 7 10 ?6 to 3 10?2 C kg ?1 s?1 (approximately 100 R/h to 100 R/s). For guidance in applying this method to radiation fields where the exposure rate is >100 R/s, see Appendix X1. Note 1See Terminology E170 for definition of exposure and its units. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information onl...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems energy components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

T T he NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 21 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS 25 data.

202

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 This report summarizes the major assumptions used in the NEMS to generate the AEO2010 projections. Introduction Macroeconomic Activity Module International Energy Module Residential Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Electricity Market Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Petroleum Market Module Coal Market Module Renewable Fuels Module PDF (GIF) Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation In the Annual Energy Outlook Past Assumptions Editions Download the Report Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Report Cover. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

203

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 9 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The distinction between the two sets of manufacturing industries pertains to the level of modeling. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 19). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region levels; energy consumption at the Census Division level is allocated

204

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 12 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS27 data.

205

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.14

206

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment

207

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface International Energy Outlook 2007 Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2030, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and associated carbon dioxide emissions. The International Energy Outlook 2007 (IEO2007) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2007 are consistent with those published in EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2007 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade

208

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface International Energy Outlook 2008 Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2030, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and associated carbon dioxide emissions. The International Energy Outlook 2008 (IEO2008) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2008 are consistent with those published in EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO2008), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2008 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade

209

National Energy Modeling System: An Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) Distribution Category UC-950 The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview March 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. PREFACE The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview (Overview) provides a summary description of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), which was used to generate the forecasts of energy production, demand, imports, and prices through the year 2015 for the Annual Energy Outlook 1996 (AEO96), (DOE/EIA- 0383(96)), released in January

210

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2002, DOE/EIA- M068(2002) January 2002. Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are

211

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2001, DOE/EIA- M068(2001) January 2001. Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are

212

Directory of Energy Information Administration Models 1994  

SciTech Connect

This directory revises and updates the 1993 directory and includes 15 models of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Three other new models in use by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) have also been included: the Motor Gasoline Market Model (MGMM), Distillate Market Model (DMM), and the Propane Market Model (PPMM). This directory contains descriptions about each model, including title, acronym, purpose, followed by more detailed information on characteristics, uses and requirements. Sources for additional information are identified. Included in this directory are 37 EIA models active as of February 1, 1994.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Electronic Component Obsolescence  

SciTech Connect

Electronic component obsolescence occurs when parts are no longer available to support the manufacture and/or repair of equipment still in service. Future instrumentation containing complex components WILL face obsolescence issues as technology advances. This paper describes hardware and software obsolescence as well as factors to consider when designing new instrumentation.

Sohns, Carl William [ORNL; Ward, Christina D [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 The Early Release for next year's Annual Energy Outlook will be presented at the John Hopkins Kenney Auditorium on December 14th This report summarizes the major assumptions used in the NEMS to generate the AEO2009 projections. Introduction Macroeconomic Activity Module International Energy Module Residential Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Electricity Market Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Petroleum Market Module Coal Market Module Renewable Fuels Module PDF (GIF) Appendix A: Handling of Federal and Selected State Legislation and Regulation In the Annual Energy Outlook Past Assumptions Editions

215

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 This report summarizes the major assumptions used in the NEMS to generate the AEO2007 projections. Contents (Complete Report) Download complete Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Introduction Introduction Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Introduction Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Macroeconomic Activity Module Macroeconomic Activity Module Section to the Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

216

Building and Connecting Components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While equations are an essential part of model development, it quickly becomes tedious to write out all the equations for the components in a system. In this chapter, we show how to reuse constitutive equation...

Michael Tiller Ph.D.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Integrating Program Component Executables  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrating Integrating Program Component Executables on Distributed Memory Architectures via MPH Chris Ding and Yun He Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA chqding@lbl.gov, yhe@lbl.gov Abstract A growing trend in developing large and complex ap- plications on today's Teraflop computers is to integrate stand-alone and/or semi-independent program components into a comprehensive simulation package. One example is the climate system model which consists of atmosphere, ocean, land-surface and sea-ice. Each component is semi- independent and has been developed at different institu- tions. We study how this multi-component multi-executable application can run effectively on distributed memory archi- tectures. We identify five effective execution modes and de- velop the MPH library to support

218

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2006, DOE/EIA- M068(2006). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

219

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption isthe sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

220

LMFBR fuel component costs  

SciTech Connect

A significant portion of the cost of fabricating LMFBR fuels is in the non-fuel components such as fuel pin cladding, fuel assembly ducts and end fittings. The contribution of these to fuel fabrication costs, based on FFTF experience and extrapolated to large LMFBR fuel loadings, is discussed. The extrapolation considers the expected effects of LMFBR development programs in progress on non-fuel component costs.

Epperson, E.M.; Borisch, R.R.; Rice, L.H.

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems energy components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

International Energy Outlook - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface International Energy Outlook 2004 Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2025, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and issues related to electricity and the environment. The International Energy Outlook 2004 (IEO2004) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2025. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2004 are consistent with those published in EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2004 (AEO2004), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2004 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). The IEO2004 projections are based on U.S. and foreign government laws in effect on October 1, 2003.

222

Extrapolating Environmental Benefits from IGCC in NEMS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 2008 (April August 2008 (April 2009 Revision) DOE/NETL-402/080108 Water Requirements for Existing and Emerging Thermoelectric Plant Technologies Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or

223

NEMS Buildings Sector Working Group Meeting  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

20 * Photovoltaic system cost path - Updated 2010 system costs based on Tracking the Sun IV (LBNL, 2011) * No change from AEO2012 for residential, 7% lower for commercial -...

224

Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy newsroomassetsimagesenergy-icon.png Energy Research into alternative forms of energy, and improving and securing the power grid, is a major national security...

225

H2A Delivery Components Model and Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydrogen Delivery Components Model Matt Ringer National Renewable Energy Laboratory February 8, 2005 Other Team Members: Mark Paster: DOE Marianne Mintz, Jerry Gillette, Jay Burke:...

226

US Synthetic Corp (TRL 4 Component) - The Development of Open...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings for use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines US Synthetic Corp (TRL 4 Component) - The Development of Open, Water Lubricated...

227

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Household Expenditures Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Expenditures Module Household Expenditures Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Household Expenditures Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. The Household Expenditures Module (HEM) constructs household energy expenditure profiles using historical survey data on household income, population and demographic characteristics, and consumption and expenditures for fuels for various end-uses. These data are combined with NEMS forecasts of household disposable income, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures by end-use and household type. The HEM disaggregation algorithm uses these combined results to forecast household fuel consumption and expenditures by income quintile and Census Division (see

228

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Policy Analysts Policy Analysts This page features the most requested EIA reports and features for policy analysts. If you can't find what you're looking for, please contact the EIA Information Center. Featured Links Responses to Congressional and other requests Congressional testimony Analysis papers from Annual Energy Outlook Financial data and analysis Environmental data and analysis National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) documentation Energy in Brief Maps Featured Reports Annual Energy Outlook International Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook The Availability and Price of Petroleum and Petroleum Products Produced in Countries Other Than Iran Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets Effect of Increased Natural Gas Exports on Domestic Energy Markets

229

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO2008), prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030. The projections are based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). EIA published an “early release” version of the AEO2008 reference case in December 2007; however, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA2007), which was enacted later that month, will have a major impact on energy markets, and given the year-long life of AEO2008 and its use as a baseline for analyses of proposed policy changes, EIA decided to update the reference case to reflect the provisions of EISA2007.

230

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2007 International Energy Outlook 2007 The International Energy Outlook 2007 (IEO2007) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2007 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report is also released in print. Projection Tables Appendix A. Reference Case Appendix B. High Economic Growth Case Appendix C. Low Economic Growth Case Appendix D. High World Oil Price Case Appendix E. Low World Oil Price Case Appendix F. Reference Case Projections by End Use Appendix G. Projections of Petroleum and Other Liquids Productions in Three Cases

231

Annual Energy Outlook 1998 Forecasts - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1998 With Projections to 2020 1998 With Projections to 2020 Annual Energy Outlook 1999 Report will be Available on December 9, 1998 Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2020 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA's National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an “Overview” summarizing the AEO98 reference case. The next section, “Legislation and Regulations,” describes the assumptions made with regard to laws that affect energy markets and discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues. “Issues in Focus” discusses three current energy issues—electricity restructuring, renewable portfolio standards, and carbon emissions. It is followed by the analysis

232

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assumptions to the nnual Energy Outlook Assumptions to the nnual Energy Outlook EIA Glossary Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 Report #: DOE/EIA-0554(2004) Release date: February 2004 Next release date:February 2005 The Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook. Table of Contents Introduction Macroeconomic Activity Module International Energy Module Household Expenditures Module Residential Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Electricity Market Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Petroleum Market Module Coal Market Module Renewable Fuels Module Appendix A Adobe Acrobat Logo

233

NREL: Learning - Advanced Vehicle Systems and Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Vehicle Systems and Components Advanced Vehicle Systems and Components Photo of a man checking out an advanced battery using testing equipment that includes a long metal tube on a table top. NREL's researchers test new batteries developed for hybrid electric vehicles. Credit: Warren Gretz Researchers and engineers at the NREL work closely with those in the automotive industry to develop new technologies, such as advanced batteries, for storing energy in cars, trucks, and buses. They also help to develop and test new technologies for using that energy more efficiently. And they work on finding new, energy-efficient ways to reduce the amount of fuel needed to heat and cool the interiors, or cabins, of vehicles. To help develop these new technologies, NREL's researchers are improving the efficiency of vehicle systems and components like these:

234

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 [1] (AEO2010), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports [2]. The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2010 were produced with the NEMS, which is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the long term and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers in the White House, U.S. Congress, offices within the Department of Energy, including DOE Program Offices, and other government agencies. The Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections are also used by analysts and planners in other government agencies and outside organizations.

235

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO2009),1 including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2009 were produced with the NEMS, which is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the long term and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers in the White House, U.S. Congress, offices within the Department of Energy, including DOE Program Offices, and other government agencies. The Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections are also used by analysts and planners in other government agencies and outside organizations.

236

Greenhouse Gas Initiatives - Analysis of McCain-Lieberman Bill S.280 The ClimateStewardship and Innovation Act of 2007 Using the National Energy Modeling System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assumptions to SAIC-NEMS. Some key technical, societal and political uncertainties include: (1) the number of new nuclear generation builds, (2) availability of renewable generation (bio-power and wind power), (3) the technological development...) Installed Electric Generating Capacity, (3) Produced Electric Energy, (4) Prices of CO 2 Offsets and Permits (5) Natural Gas Prices, (6) Electricity Prices, and (7) Other Energy Prices. While the study ran seven scenarios for each focus area, two...

Ellsworth, C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Demand Module Demand Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 27 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" (UEC) by appliance (in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing

238

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 53 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module (IDM) estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are subdivided further into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure. The non-manufacturing industries are modeled with less detail because processes are simpler and there is less available data. The petroleum refining

239

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Acronyms Acronyms List of Acronyms AEO Annual Energy Outlook LDV Light-duty vehicle AEO2013 Annual Energy Outlook 2013 LED Light emitting diode AEO20014 Annual Energy Outlook 2014 LNG Liquefied natural gas ATRA American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 LPG Liquefied petroleum gases bbl Barrels LRG Liquefied refinery gases Btu British thermal units MATS Mercury and Air Toxics Standards CAFE Corporate Average Fuel Economy MECS Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey CAIR Clean Air Interstate Rule MMbbl/d Million barrels per day CO2 Carbon dioxide MMBtu Million Btu CTL Coal-to-liquids MMst Million short tons DOE U.S. Department of Energy NEMS National Energy Modeling System E85 Motor fuel containing up to 85% ethanol NGL Natural gas liquids

240

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 20081 (AEO2008), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2008 were produced with the NEMS, which is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the long term and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers in the White House, U.S. Congress, offices within the Department of Energy, including DOE Program Offices, and other government agencies. The AEO projections are also used by analysts and planners in other government agencies and outside organizations.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems energy components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

BNL CRCR LEAF Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A detailed description of the LEAF facility is given in Rev. Sci. Inst. 75, A detailed description of the LEAF facility is given in Rev. Sci. Inst. 75, 4359-4366 (2004), which can be found by following this link. Accelerator System Components The LEAF facility layout indicates the locations of the laser system, the RF components, the electron gun and the beam lines. RF System The modulator cabinet and S-band (2.856 GHz) klystron are located in the laser room. A copper waveguide carries the 15 MW RF pulse from the klystron to the electron gun in the accelerator vault. (A klystron is a high-power RF amplifier. You can visit the ALS MicroWorlds site for more information on klystrons and the principles of RF particle acceleration.) Electron Gun Accelerator and Beam Line 5 psec beam line The electron gun (link to picture) is located in the southwest corner of

242

Injection molded component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An intermediate component includes a first wall member, a leachable material layer, and a precursor wall member. The first wall member has an outer surface and first connecting structure. The leachable material layer is provided on the first wall member outer surface. The precursor wall member is formed adjacent to the leachable material layer from a metal powder mixed with a binder material, and includes second connecting structure.

James, Allister W; Arrell, Douglas J

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

243

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Petroleum Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Petroleum Market Module Figure 8. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) forecasts petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, other refinery inputs including alcohols, ethers, and bioesters natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates capacity expansion and fuel consumption of domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming representation of U.S. refining

244

Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Tables Tables Appendix C-Map of NEMS Electricity Market Module Regions Updates Scenario Case Data With Without HCES HCES Reference case Nuclear low cost Nuclear high cost Renewable low cost Renewable high cost Natural gas low cost Natural gas high cost Coal low cost Coal high cost See interactive table viewer Analysis of Impacts of a Clean Energy Standard as requested by Chairman Hall Release date: October 25, 2011 Introduction This report responds to a request from Chairman Ralph M. Hall for an analysis of the impacts of a Clean Energy Standard (CES). The request, as outlined in the letter included in Appendix A, sets out specific

245

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3) 3) The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 March 2003 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/aeo/overview/index.html The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 provides a summary description of the National En- ergy Modeling System (NEMS), which was used to generate the forecasts of energy production, demand, im- ports, and

246

Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy ... Scientific Challenges in Sustainable Energy Technology, by Nathan S. Lewis of the California Institute of Technology, summarizes data on energy resources and analyses the implications for human society. ... ConfChem Conference on Educating the Next Generation: Green and Sustainable ChemistrySolar Energy: A Chemistry Course on Sustainability for General Science Education and Quantitative Reasoning ...

John W. Moore

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Astraeus Wind Energy Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector: Wind energy Product: Michigan-based manufacturer of large scale, advanced composite wind blades and hub-related components. References: Astraeus Wind Energy Inc1 This...

248

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Demand Module Demand Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 39 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2040. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial.

249

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply on a regional basis (Figure 7). A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2006), (Washington, DC, 2006). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural

250

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Residential  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 Residential Demand Module Figure 5. Residential Demand Module Structure. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Residential Demand Module Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. NEMS Residential Module Equipment Summary Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Characteristics of Selected Equipment Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version The residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar and geothermal energy. RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from

251

Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles - PHEV Modeling - Component Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Impact on Fuel Efficiency Technologies Impact on Fuel Efficiency One of the main objectives of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) R&D Plan (2.2Mb pdf) is to "determine component development requirements" through simulation analysis. Overall fuel efficiency is affected by component technologies from a component sizing and efficiency aspect. To properly define component requirements, several technologies for each of the main components (energy storage, engine and electric machines) are being compared at Argonne using PSAT. Per the R&D plan, several Li-ion battery materials are being modeled to evaluate their impacts on fuel efficiency and vehicle mass. Different Power to Energy ratios are being considered to understand the relative impact of power and energy.

252

Molecular Components of Catalytic Selectivity  

SciTech Connect

Selectivity, that is, to produce one molecule out of many other thermodynamically feasible product molecules, is the key concept to develop 'clean manufacturing' processes that do not produce byproducts (green chemistry). Small differences in potential energy barriers for elementary reaction steps control which reaction channel is more likely to yield the desired product molecule (selectivity), instead of the overall activation energy for the reaction that controls turnover rates (activity). Recent studies have demonstrated the atomic- or molecular-level tailoring of parameters such as the surface structures of active sites that give rise to nanoparticle size and shape dependence of turnover rates and reaction selectivities. Here, we highlight seven molecular components that influence reaction selectivities. These include: surface structure, adsorbate-induced restructuring, adsorbate mobility, reaction intermediates, surface composition, charge transport, and oxidation states for model metal single crystal and colloid nanoparticle catalysts. We show examples of their functioning and describe in-situ instruments that permit us to investigate their roles in surface reactions.

Somorjai, Gabor A.; Park, Jeong Y.

2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

253

Component failure data handbook  

SciTech Connect

This report presents generic component failure rates that are used in reliability and risk studies of commercial nuclear power plants. The rates are computed using plant-specific data from published probabilistic risk assessments supplemented by selected other sources. Each data source is described. For rates with four or more separate estimates among the sources, plots show the data that are combined. The method for combining data from different sources is presented. The resulting aggregated rates are listed with upper bounds that reflect the variability observed in each rate across the nuclear power plant industry. Thus, the rates are generic. Both per hour and per demand rates are included. They may be used for screening in risk assessments or for forming distributions to be updated with plant-specific data.

Gentillon, C.D.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Sprayed skin turbine component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fabricating a turbine component (50) by casting a core structure (30), forming an array of pits (24) in an outer surface (32) of the core structure, depositing a transient liquid phase (TLP) material (40) on the outer surface of the core structure, the TLP containing a melting-point depressant, depositing a skin (42) on the outer surface of the core structure over the TLP material, and heating the assembly, thus forming both a diffusion bond and a mechanical interlock between the skin and the core structure. The heating diffuses the melting-point depressant away from the interface. Subsurface cooling channels (35) may be formed by forming grooves (34) in the outer surface of the core structure, filling the grooves with a fugitive filler (36), depositing and bonding the skin (42), then removing the fugitive material.

Allen, David B

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

255

Precision Cleaning Titanium Components  

SciTech Connect

Clean bond surfaces are critical to the operation of diffusion bonded titanium engine components. These components can be contaminated with machining coolant, shop dirt, and fingerprints during normal processing and handling. These contaminants must be removed to achieve acceptable bond quality. As environmental concerns become more important in manufacturing, elimination of the use of hazardous materials is desired. For this reason, another process (not using nitric-hydrofluoric acid solution) to clean titanium parts before bonding was sought. Initial cleaning trials were conducted at Honeywell to screen potential cleaning techniques and chemistries. During the initial cleaning process screening phase, Pratt and Whitney provided Honeywell with machined 3 inch x 3 inch x 1 inch titanium test blocks. These test blocks were machined with a water-based machining coolant and exposed to a normal shop environment and handling. (Honeywell sectioned one of these blocks into smaller samples to be used for additional cleanliness verification analyses.) The sample test blocks were ultrasonically cleaned in alkaline solutions and AUGER analysis was used by Honeywell FM and T to validate their cleanliness. This information enabled selection of final cleaning techniques and solutions to be used for the bonding trials. To validate Honeywell's AUGER data and to verify the cleaning processes in actual situations, additional sample blocks were cleaned (using the chosen processes) and then bonded. The bond quality of the test blocks was analyzed according to Pratt and Whitney's requirements. The Charpy impact testing was performed according to ASTM procedure {number_sign}E-23. Bond quality was determined by examining metallographic samples of the bonded test blocks for porosity along the bondline.

Hand, T.E.; Bohnert, G.W.

2000-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

256

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review Table 2. Summary of the number o fover-estimated results between AEO Reference cases and realized Outcomes All AEOs NEMS AEOs Percent of Projections Over-Estimated Percent of Projections Over-Estimated Table 3. Gross Domestic Product, (Average Cumulative Growth) Actual vs. Projected 24% 37% Table 4. World Oil Prices, Actual vs. Projected 52% 24% Table 5. Total Petroleum Consumption, Actual vs. Projected 44% 61% Table 6. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Actual vs. Projected 59% 65% Table 7. Petroleum Net Imports, Actual vs. Projected 56% 61% Table 8. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Actual vs. Projected 54% 23% Table 9. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Actual vs. Projected

257

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Natural Gas Transmission  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. In addition, natural gas flow patterns are a function of the pattern in the previous year, coupled with the relative prices of gas supply options as translated to the represented market

258

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Natural Gas Transmission  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module The NEMS Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module (NGTDM) derives domestic natural gas production, wellhead and border prices, end-use prices, and flows of natural gas through the regional interstate network, for both a peak (December through March) and off peak period during each forecast year. These are derived by solving for the market equilibrium across the three main components of the natural gas market: the supply component, the demand component, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. In addition, natural gas flow patterns are a function of the pattern in the previous year, coupled with the relative prices of gas supply options as translated to the represented market

259

Process management using component thermal-hydraulic function classes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process management expert system where following malfunctioning of a component, such as a pump, for determining system realignment procedures such as for by-passing the malfunctioning component with on-line speeds to maintain operation of the process at full or partial capacity or to provide safe shut down of the system while isolating the malfunctioning component. The expert system uses thermal-hydraulic function classes at the component level for analyzing unanticipated as well as anticipated component malfunctions to provide recommended sequences of operator actions. Each component is classified according to its thermal-hydraulic function, and the generic and component-specific characteristics for that function. Using the diagnosis of the malfunctioning component and its thermal hydraulic class, the expert system analysis is carried out using generic thermal-hydraulic first principles. One aspect of the invention employs a qualitative physics-based forward search directed primarily downstream from the malfunctioning component in combination with a subsequent backward search directed primarily upstream from the serviced component. Generic classes of components are defined in the knowledge base according to the three thermal-hydraulic functions of mass, momentum and energy transfer and are used to determine possible realignment of component configurations in response to thermal-hydraulic function imbalance caused by the malfunctioning component. Each realignment to a new configuration produces the accompanying sequence of recommended operator actions. All possible new configurations are examined and a prioritized list of acceptable solutions is produced. 5 figs.

Morman, J.A.; Wei, T.Y.C.; Reifman, J.

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

260

Process management using component thermal-hydraulic function classes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process management expert system where following malfunctioning of a component, such as a pump, for determining system realignment procedures such as for by-passing the malfunctioning component with on-line speeds to maintain operation of the process at full or partial capacity or to provide safe shut down of the system while isolating the malfunctioning component. The expert system uses thermal-hydraulic function classes at the component level for analyzing unanticipated as well as anticipated component malfunctions to provide recommended sequences of operator actions. Each component is classified according to its thermal-hydraulic function, and the generic and component-specific characteristics for that function. Using the diagnosis of the malfunctioning component and its thermal hydraulic class, the expert system analysis is carried out using generic thermal-hydraulic first principles. One aspect of the invention employs a qualitative physics-based forward search directed primarily downstream from the malfunctioning component in combination with a subsequent backward search directed primarily upstream from the serviced component. Generic classes of components are defined in the knowledge base according to the three thermal-hydraulic functions of mass, momentum and energy transfer and are used to determine possible realignment of component configurations in response to thermal-hydraulic function imbalance caused by the malfunctioning component. Each realignment to a new configuration produces the accompanying sequence of recommended operator actions. All possible new configurations are examined and a prioritized list of acceptable solutions is produced.

Morman, James A. (Woodridge, IL); Wei, Thomas Y. C. (Downers Grove, IL); Reifman, Jaques (Western Springs, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems energy components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Federal, State, local, and foreign governments, EIA survey respondents, and the media. For further information, and for answers to questions on energy statistics, please...

262

Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Energy Energy Express Licensing Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Of Spent Fuel Elements Express Licensing Acid-catalyzed dehydrogenation of amine-boranes Express Licensing Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Express Licensing Aligned Crystalline Semiconducting Film On A Glass Substrate And Method Of Making Express Licensing Anion-Conducting Polymer, Composition, And Membrane Express Licensing Apparatus for Producing Voltage and Current Pulses Express Licensing Biaxially oriented film on flexible polymeric substrate Express Licensing Corrosion Test Cell For Bipolar Plates Express Licensing Device for hydrogen separation and method Negotiable Licensing Durable Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) Express Licensing Energy Efficient Synthesis Of Boranes Express Licensing

263

Accounting for Innovation in Energy Efficiency Regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the New Energy Technologies." Bell Journal of Economicslearning curves for energy technology policy: A component-publicly supported energy technologies." Energy Policy 37(

Taylor, Margaret

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Fast-Tracking Drivetrain Electrification - Component Technology Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The four main components used in drivetrain electrification The four main components used in drivetrain electrification are energy storage systems, power electronics, electric machines/gearboxes, and control systems. Argonne is actively pursuing increased performance and efficiency of these components along with reducing manufacturing costs. Cost reduction is addressed by reducing materials cost/ quantity, reducing labor/processing steps, increasing performance for the same components, and optimizing efficiency for the same materials cost. Energy Storage System Components Argonne has partnered with Maxwell Technologies to investigate the benefits of actively combining high power density ultracapacitors via power electronics with high energy density Li-Ion (or other future chemistry) batteries. This combination potentially reduces the net ESS cost and provides full acceleration and braking power at low

265

Table 11.3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002;" 3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,"Renewable Energy",," " " "," ",,,"(excluding Wood",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total Onsite",,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.9,0.8,1.1,1.3

266

Table 11.4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002;" 4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Onsite-Generation Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " ",,,"Renewable Energy" ,,,"(excluding Wood",,"RSE" "Economic","Total Onsite",,"and",,"Row" "Characteristic(a)","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.8,0.8,1.1,1.4 "Value of Shipments and Receipts"

267

From Multi-Component Gas Streams Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Separation of CO Separation of CO 2 From Multi-Component Gas Streams Opportunity Research is active on the patent-pending technology, titled "Apparatus and Process for the Separation of Gases Using Supersonic Expansion and Oblique Shock Wave Compression." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview The separation of a gaseous mixture into constituent gases has proven to be useful for a variety of industrial and commercial applications. Currently CO 2 can be separated from multi- component gas streams using compression and refrigeration techniques in order to condense the CO 2 out of a vapor phase so that it can be mechanically separated from the stream.

268

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

269

Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Technical Workshop on Behavior Economics Presentations Technical Workshop on Behavior Economics Presentations November 15, 2013 About the workshop The U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA) conducted a technical workshop on July 17, 2013 in Washington, D.C. to assess recent methodological developments in the field of behavioral economics as applied to energy demand analysis and energy efficiency programs. This meeting supports the EIA goal of updating its analytic assumptions and methods associated with the modeling of changing energy markets for purposes of public information and policy analysis. The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is the primary technical system used by EIA for domestic, long term forecasting and analysis. Ultimate objectives include enhancing the quality of EIA products through improved consumer behavior

270

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 21 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module projects energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region projection using the SEDS1 data.

271

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 9 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The distinction between the two sets of manufacturing industries pertains to the level of modeling. The energy-intensive industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow accounting procedure, whereas the nonenergy-intensive and the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 14). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region levels; energy consumption at the Census Division level is allocated by using the SEDS24 data.

272

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Residential Demand Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" by appliance (or UEC-in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock,

273

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

274

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

275

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services [1].

276

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Industrial Demand Module Table 6.1. Industry Categories. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 6.2.Retirement Rates. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting

277

Component framework for coupled integrated fusion plasma simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Successful simulation of the complex physics that affect magnetically confined fusion plasma remains an important target milestone towards the development of viable fusion energy. Major advances in the underlying physics formulations, mathematical modeling, ... Keywords: components, coupled simulation, framework, fusion

Wael R. Elwasif; David E. Bernholdt; Lee A. Berry; Donald B. Batchelor

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2003, DOE/EIA-M068(2003) April 2003. Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

279

Durability of ACERT Engine Components  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

strength data from with FE model "load factors" and stress field to estimate fast fracture strength and fatigue resistance of design component Determination of FE model "load...

280

Macroencapsulation Equivalency Guidance for Classified Weapon Components and NNSSWAC Compliance  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex has a surplus of classified legacy weapon components generated over the years with no direct path for disposal. The majority of the components have been held for uncertainty of future use or no identified method of sanitization or disposal. As more weapons are retired, there is an increasing need to reduce the amount of components currently in storage or on hold. A process is currently underway to disposition and dispose of the legacy/retired weapons components across the DOE complex.

Poling, J.

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems energy components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Energy  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

..) ".. ..) ".. _,; ,' . ' , ,; Depar?.me.nt ,of.' Energy Washington; DC 20585 : . ' , - $$ o"\ ' ~' ,' DEC ?;$ ;y4,,, ~ ' .~ The Honorable John Kalwitz , 200 E. Wells Street Milwaukee, W~isconsin 53202, . . i :. Dear,Mayor 'Kalwitz: " . " Secretary of Energy Hazel' O'Leary has announceha new,approach 'to,openness in " the Department of Ene~rgy (DOE) and its communications with'the public. In -. support of~this initiative, we areipleased to forward the enclosed information related to the Milwaukee Ai.rport site in your jurisdiction that performed work, for DOE orits predecessor agencies. information; use, and retention. ., This information .is provided for your '/ ,' DOE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial:'Action~'Prog&is responsible for ,"'

282

System diagnostics using qualitative analysis and component functional classification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for detecting and identifying faulty component candidates during off-normal operations of nuclear power plants involves the qualitative analysis of macroscopic imbalances in the conservation equations of mass, energy and momentum in thermal-hydraulic control volumes associated with one or more plant components and the functional classification of components. The qualitative analysis of mass and energy is performed through the associated equations of state, while imbalances in momentum are obtained by tracking mass flow rates which are incorporated into a first knowledge base. The plant components are functionally classified, according to their type, as sources or sinks of mass, energy and momentum, depending upon which of the three balance equations is most strongly affected by a faulty component which is incorporated into a second knowledge base. Information describing the connections among the components of the system forms a third knowledge base. The method is particularly adapted for use in a diagnostic expert system to detect and identify faulty component candidates in the presence of component failures and is not limited to use in a nuclear power plant, but may be used with virtually any type of thermal-hydraulic operating system.

Reifman, Jaques (Lisle, IL); Wei, Thomas Y. C. (Downers Grove, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

System diagnostics using qualitative analysis and component functional classification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for detecting and identifying faulty component candidates during off-normal operations of nuclear power plants involves the qualitative analysis of macroscopic imbalances in the conservation equations of mass, energy and momentum in thermal-hydraulic control volumes associated with one or more plant components and the functional classification of components. The qualitative analysis of mass and energy is performed through the associated equations of state, while imbalances in momentum are obtained by tracking mass flow rates which are incorporated into a first knowledge base. The plant components are functionally classified, according to their type, as sources or sinks of mass, energy and momentum, depending upon which of the three balance equations is most strongly affected by a faulty component which is incorporated into a second knowledge base. Information describing the connections among the components of the system forms a third knowledge base. The method is particularly adapted for use in a diagnostic expert system to detect and identify faulty component candidates in the presence of component failures and is not limited to use in a nuclear power plant, but may be used with virtually any type of thermal-hydraulic operating system. 5 figures.

Reifman, J.; Wei, T.Y.C.

1993-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

284

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for

285

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025- Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 2004 (AEO2004) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2025 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA's National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an "Overview" summarizing the AEO2004 reference case. The next section, "Legislation and Regulations," discusses evolving legislation and regulatory issues. "Issues in Focus" includes discussions of future labor productivity growth; lower 48 natural gas depletion and productive capacity; natural gas supply options, with a focus on liquefied natural gas; natural gas demand for Canadian oil sands production; National Petroleum Council forecasts for natural gas; natural gas consumption in the industrial and electric power sectors; nuclear power plant construction costs; renewable electricity tax credits; and U.S. greenhouse gas intensity. It is followed by a discussion of "Energy Market Trends."

286

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for

287

Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary Table Summary Table Appendix B-Estimating Price Impacts of the BCES12 Small Retailer Exemption Appendix C-Map of NEMS Electricity Market Module Regions Appendix D-Request Letter and Bill Updates Scenario Case Data Reference case Clean energy standard Clean energy standard, constrained nuclear See interactive table viewer Analysis of the Clean Energy Standard Act of 2012 Release date: May 2, 2012 Background This report responds to a request from Senator Jeff Bingaman, Chairman of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, for an analysis of the Clean Energy Standard (CES) Act of 2012. The request letter and the text of the proposed legislation are provided in Appendix D. The request

288

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Footnotes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

footnote.gif (3505 bytes) footnote.gif (3505 bytes) [1] Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99), DOE/EIA-0383(99), (Washington, DC, December 1998). [2] NEMS documentation reports are available on the EIA CD-ROM and the EIA Homepage (http://www.eia.gov/bookshelf.html). For ordering information on the CD-ROM, contact STAT-USA's toll free order number: 1-800-STAT-USA or by calling (202) 482-1986. [3] Energy Information Administration, The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998, DOE/EIA-0581(98), (Washington, DC, February 1998). [4] The underlying macroeconomic growth cases use DRI/McGraw-Hill’s August 1998 T250898 and February TO250298 and TP250298. [5] EIA, International Energy Outlook 1998, DOE/EIA-0484(98) (Washington DC, April 1998).

289

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Renewable Fuels  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for projections of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind1. Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was one of the first electric generation technologies, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy.

290

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

commercial.gif (5196 bytes) commercial.gif (5196 bytes) The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings, however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

292

Benchmarking Process Energy Performance From Historical Data: Bringing Sanity into Energy Budgets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reducing energy costs has two components: knowledge of process energy consumption and an energy management process. This concept is summed up in energy management's 2-M rule: to manage energy, energy must be measured. After data on process energy...

Severson, D. S.

293

Bioenergy Production Pathways and Value-Chain Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bioenergy Production Pathways and Value-Chain Components Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy on Life Cycle Analyses of Bioenergy Systems Prepared by Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. #12;Bioenergy Production Pathways

294

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2000, DOE/EIA-M060(2000) January 2000. The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2000, DOE/EIA-M060(2000) January 2000. Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions, and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves addresses the relationship between the minemouth price of coal and corresponding levels of coal production, labor productivity, and the cost of factor inputs (mining equipment, mine labor, and fuel requirements).

295

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Electricity Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2008, DOE/EIA-M068(2008). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

296

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2004, DOE/EIA- M068(2004). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

297

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NEMS overview and brief description of cases NEMS overview and brief description of cases Table E1. Summary of the AEO2013 cases Case name Description Reference Real GDP grows at an average annual rate of 2.5 percent from 2011 to 2040. Crude oil prices rise to about $163 per barrel (2011 dollars) in 2040. Complete projection tables in Appendix A. Low Economic Growth Real GDP grows at an average annual rate of 1.9 percent from 2011 to 2040. Other energy market assumptions are the same as in the Reference case. Partial projection tables in Appendix B. High Economic Growth Real GDP grows at an average annual rate of 2.9 percent from 2011 to 2040. Other energy market assumptions are the same as in the Reference case. Partial projection tables in Appendix B. Low Oil Price Low prices result from a combination of low demand for petroleum and other liquids in the non-OECD nations and higher global supply. Lower demand is measured by lower economic growth relative to the Reference case. On the supply side, OPEC increases its market share to 49 percent, and the costs of other liquids production technologies are lower than in the Reference case.Light, sweet crude oil prices fall to $75 per barrel in 2040. Partial projection tables in Appendix C.

298

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NEMS overview and brief description of cases NEMS overview and brief description of cases Table E1. Summary of the AEO2013 cases Case name Description Reference Real GDP grows at an average annual rate of 2.5 percent from 2011 to 2040. Crude oil prices rise to about $163 per barrel (2011 dollars) in 2040. Complete projection tables in Appendix A. Low Economic Growth Real GDP grows at an average annual rate of 1.9 percent from 2011 to 2040. Other energy market assumptions are the same as in the Reference case. Partial projection tables in Appendix B. High Economic Growth Real GDP grows at an average annual rate of 2.9 percent from 2011 to 2040. Other energy market assumptions are the same as in the Reference case. Partial projection tables in Appendix B. Low Oil Price Low prices result from a combination of low demand for petroleum and other liquids in the non-OECD nations and higher global supply. Lower demand is measured by lower economic growth relative to the Reference case. On the supply side, OPEC increases its market share to 49 percent, and the costs of other liquids production technologies are lower than in the Reference case.Light, sweet crude oil prices fall to $75 per barrel in 2040. Partial projection tables in Appendix C.

299

EIA - AEO2010 - State renewable energy requirements and goals: Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

State renewable energy requirements and goals: Update through 2009 State renewable energy requirements and goals: Update through 2009 Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 State renewable energy requirements and goals: Update through 2009 To the extent possible, AEO2010 incorporates the impacts of State laws requiring the addition of renewable generation or capacity by utilities doing business in the States. Currently, 30 States and the District of Columbia have enforceable RPS or similar laws (Table 2). Under such standards, each State determines its own levels of generation, eligible technologies, and noncompliance penalties. AEO2010 includes the impacts of all laws in effect as of September 2009 (with the exception of Hawaii, because NEMS provides electricity market projections for the continental United States only).

300

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Transportation Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems energy components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

302

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy Outlook Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 This paper presents average national levelized costs for generating technologies that are brought on line in 20161 as represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) as configured for the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 (AEO2011) reference case.2 Levelized cost is often cited as a convenient summary measure of the overall competiveness of different generating technologies. Levelized cost represents the present value of the total cost of building and operating a generating plant over an assumed financial life and duty cycle, converted to equal annual payments and expressed in terms of real dollars to remove the impact of inflation. Levelized cost reflects overnight capital cost,

303

Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 (AEO2006), pre- pared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030. The projections are based on results from EIA's National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an "Overview" summarizing the AEO2006 reference case and comparing it with the AEO2005 reference case. The next section, "Leg- islation and Regulations," discusses evolving legisla- tion and regulatory issues, including recently enacted legislation and regulation, such as the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and some that are proposed. "Issues in Focus" includes a discussion of the basis of EIA's sub- stantial revision of the world oil price trend used in the projections. It also examines the following topics: implications of higher oil price expectations for eco- nomic growth; differences

304

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and

305

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and

306

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight, rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

307

Cleanroom Work Support Component Areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Satisfactory cleanroom operations require adequate support components. The same care in design required for the cleanroom proper must also be used in layout ... and activities that are carried out in the cleanroom

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Tidal Energy Resource Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

dalresourcegtrchaas.ppt More Documents & Publications Ocean current resource assessment Free Flow Energy (TRL 1 2 3 Component) - Design and Development of a Cross-Platform...

309

Energy Incentive Programs, Minnesota | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

CenterPoint Energy offers rebates for efficient natural gas-fired equipment, including heating systems and components (new and retrofit), boiler tune-ups, water heaters, steam...

310

Balance of Plant (BoP) Components Validation for Fuel Cells  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Slides from the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Component and System Qualification Workshop held November 4, 2010 in Livermore, CA.

311

Water Power News | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

12, 2015 Energy Department Announces 8 Million to Develop Advanced Components for Wave, Tidal, and Current Energy Systems The Energy Department today announced 8 million...

312

Education Toolbox Search | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enter terms Search Retain current filters Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Download Geothermal Energy (5 Activities) Geothermal energy is one of the components of the National Energy...

313

Energy-efficient control in injection molding.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As an energy-intensive process, in injection molding, energy cost is one of the major cost components. The energy expenditure during molding can be divided into (more)

Yao, Ke

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Residential energy gateway system in smart grid.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project discusses about the residential energy gateway in the Smart Grid. A residential energy gateway is a critical component in the Home Energy Management (more)

Thirumurthy, Vinod Govindswamy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Physical Components, Coordinate Components, and the Speed of Light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For generalized coordinate systems, the numerical values of vector and tensor components do not generally equal the physical values, i.e., the values one would measure with standard physical instruments. Hence, calculating physical components from coordinate components is important for comparing experiment with theory. Surprisingly, however, this calculational method is not widely known among physicists, and is rarely taught in relativity courses, though it is commonly employed in at least one other field (applied mechanics.) Different derivations of this method, ranging from elementary to advanced level, are presented. The result is then applied to clarify the oftentimes confusing issue of whether or not the speed of light in non-inertial frames is equal to c.

Robert D. Klauber

2001-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

316

NREL: Transportation Research - Energy Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Transportation Research Cutaway image of an automobile showing the location of energy storage components (battery and inverter), as well as electric motor, power...

317

Battery Components, Active Materials for  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A battery consists of one or more electrochemical cells that convert into electrically energy the chemical energy stored in two separated electrodes, the anode and the cathode. Inside a cell, the two electrodes ....

J. B. Goodenough

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Energy Sources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Pilot Program Renewable Energy Pilot Program In June 2010, the Louisiana Public Service Commission (LPSC) unanimously approved a Renewable Energy Pilot Program for the state. The final implementation plan was adopted in November 2010. The goal of the pilot program is to determine whether a renewable portfolio standard is suitable for Louisiana. The pilot program has two major components: the Research Component and the Request for Proposal (RFP) Component. October 16, 2013 Renewable Energy Goal In May 2010, Oklahoma established a renewable energy goal for electric utilities operating in the state. The goal calls for 15% of the total installed generation capacity in Oklahoma to be derived from renewable sources by 2015. There are no interim targets, and the goal does not extend

319

Automated cleaning of electronic components  

SciTech Connect

Environmental and operator safety concerns are leading to the elimination of trichloroethylene and chlorofluorocarbon solvents in cleaning processes that remove rosin flux, organic and inorganic contamination, and particulates from electronic components. Present processes depend heavily on these solvents for manual spray cleaning of small components and subassemblies. Use of alternative solvent systems can lead to longer processing times and reduced quality. Automated spray cleaning can improve the quality of the cleaning process, thus enabling the productive use of environmentally conscious materials, while minimizing personnel exposure to hazardous materials. We describe the development of a prototype robotic system for cleaning electronic components in a spray cleaning workcell. An important feature of the prototype system is the capability to generate the robot paths and motions automatically from the CAD models of the part to be cleaned, and to embed cleaning process knowledge into the automatically programmed operations.

Drotning, W.; Meirans, L.; Wapman, W.; Hwang, Y.; Koenig, L.; Petterson, B.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Three Components Evolution in a Simple Big Bounce Cosmological Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a five-dimensional Ricci flat Bouncing cosmology and assume that the four-dimensional universe is permeated smoothly by three minimally coupled matter components: CDM+baryons $\\rho_{m}$, radiation $\\rho_{r}$ and dark energy $\\rho_{x}$. Evolutions of these three components are studied and it is found that dark energy dominates before the bounce, and pulls the universe contracting. In this process, dark energy decreases while radiation and the matter increase. After the bounce, the radiation and matter dominates alternatively and then decrease with the expansion of the universe. At present, the dark energy dominates again and pushes the universe accelerating. In this model, we also obtain that the equation of state (EOS) of dark energy at present time is $w_{x0}\\approx -1.05$ and the redshift of the transition from decelerated expansion to accelerated expansion is $z_{T}\\approx 0.37$, which are compatible with the current observations.

Lixin Xu; Hongya Liu

2005-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems energy components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Carbon Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

CARBON EMISSIONS CARBON EMISSIONS A part of the integrating module, the carbon emissions submodule (CEM) computes the carbon emissions due to the combustion of energy. The coefficients for carbon emissions are derived from Energy Information Administration, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1996, published in October 1997. The calculations account for the fact that some fossil fuels are used for nonfuel purposes, such as feedstocks, and thus the carbon in the fuel is sequestered in the end product. CEM also allows for several carbon policy evaluation options to be imposed within NEMS. Although none of the policy options are assumed in the Annual Energy Outlook 1998, the options can be used in special analyses to simulate potential market-based approaches to meet national carbon emission

322

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Electricity Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Electricity Market Module figure 6. Electricity Market Model Supply Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2009, DOE/EIA-M068(2009). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules

323

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

available in PDF available in PDF Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Release date: July 12, 2012 This paper presents average levelized costs for generating technologies that are brought on line in 20171 as represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (AEO2012) reference case.2 Levelized cost is often cited as a convenient summary measure of the overall competiveness of different generating technologies. It represents the per-kilowatthour cost (in real dollars) of building and operating a generating plant over an assumed financial life and duty cycle. Key inputs to calculating levelized costs include overnight capital costs, fuel costs, fixed and variable operations and maintenance (O&M) costs, financing costs,

324

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has five submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, landfill gas, solar, and wind; a sixth renewable, conventional hydroelectric power, is represented in the Electricity Market Module (EMM).117 Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration,

325

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Key Assumptions Macroeconomic Sector Inputs

326

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

transportation.gif (5318 bytes) transportation.gif (5318 bytes) The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, mass transit, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

327

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has five submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, landfill gas, solar, and wind; a sixth renewable, conventional hydroelectric power, is represented in the Electricity Market Module (EMM).112 Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration,

328

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Residential Demand Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" by appliance (or UEC-in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new

329

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

330

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 21 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS25 data.

331

Primary Components of Binomial Ideals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for primary components of special binomial ideals. A feature of this work is that our results are independent of the characteristic of the field. First of all, we analyze the primary decomposition of a special class of binomial ideals, lattice ideals...

Eser, Zekiye

2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

332

,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components" ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues",,,," " " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related","All"

333

,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.1;" Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.1;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components" ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues",,,," " " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related","All"

334

EIA - Forecasts and Analysis of Energy Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2025, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and associated carbon dioxide emissions. The International Energy Outlook 2005 (IEO2005) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2025. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2005 are consistent with those published in EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO2005), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Although the IEO typically uses the same reference case as the AEO, IEO2005 has adopted the October futures case from AEO2005 as its reference case for the United States. The October futures case, which has an assumption of higher world oil prices than the AEO2005 reference case, now appears to be a more likely projection. The reference case prices will be reconsidered for the next AEO. Based on information available as of July 2005, the AEO2006 reference case will likely reflect world oil prices higher than those in the IEO2005 reference case.

335

Experiential Component Approval Form Concentration in Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiential Component Approval Form Concentration in Nanotechnology Return completed form to ENG Plan to complete the experiential component as a requirement for the concentration in Nanotechnology to complete the experiential component for the Nanotechnology Concentration by: Research Experience in Lab

Goldberg, Bennett

336

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NATURAL GAS TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION MODULE NATURAL GAS TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Annual Flow Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Capacity Expansion Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Pipeline Tariff Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Distributor Tariff Submodule The natural gas transmission and distribution module (NGTDM) is the component of NEMS that represents the natural gas market. The NGTDM models the natural gas transmission and distribution network in the lower 48 States, which links suppliers (including importers) and consumers of natural gas. The module determines regional market-clearing prices for natural gas supplies (including border prices) and end-use consumption. The NGTDM has four primary submodules: the annual flow submodule, the capacity expansion submodule, the pipeline tariff submodule, and the

337

Processing of Activated Core Components  

SciTech Connect

Used activated components from the core of a NPP like control elements, water channels from a BWR, and others like in-core measurement devices need to be processed into waste forms suitable for interim storage, and for the final waste repository. Processing of the activated materials can be undertaken by underwater cutting and packaging or by cutting and high-pressure compaction in a hot cell. A hot cell is available in Germany as a joint investment between GNS and the Karlsruhe Research Center at the latter's site. Special transport equipment is available to transport the components ''as-is'' to the hot cell. Newly designed underwater processing equipment has been designed, constructed, and operated for the special application of NPP decommissioning. This equipment integrates an underwater cutting device with an 80 ton force underwater in-drum compactor.

Friske, A.; Gestermann, G.; Finkbeiner, R.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

338

Nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint. Small gaps limit horizontal displacement of components during a seismic occurrence and therefore reduce dynamic loadings on the free lower end. The reactor vessel and reactor guard vessel use thicker section roll-forged rings welded between the vessel straight shell sections and the bottom hemispherical head sections. The inside of the reactor guard vessel ring forging contains local vertical dovetail slots and upper ledge pockets to mount and retain field fitted and installed blocks. As an option, the horizontal displacement of the reactor vessel core support cone can be limited by including shop fitted/installed local blocks in opposing alignment with the reactor vessel forged ring. Beams embedded in the wall of the reactor building protrude into apertures in the thermal insulation shell adjacent the reactor guard vessel ring and have motion limit blocks attached thereto to provide to a predetermined clearance between the blocks and reactor guard vessel ring.

Snyder, Glenn J. (Lynchburg, VA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Perceptual-components architecture for digital video  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A perceptual-components architecture for digital video partitions the image stream into signal components in a manner analogous to that used in the human visual system. These...

Watson, Andrew B

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Battery systems performance studies - HIL components testing...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

systems performance studies - HIL components testing Battery systems performance studies - HIL components testing 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems energy components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Model-based software component testing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??[Truncated abstract] Software component testing (SCT) is a proven software engineering approach to evaluating, improving and demonstrating component reliability and quality for producing trusted software (more)

Zheng, Weiqun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

HIGH INTEGRITY MAGNESIUM AUTOMOTIVE COMPONENTS (HIMAC) | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

HIGH INTEGRITY MAGNESIUM AUTOMOTIVE COMPONENTS (HIMAC) HIGH INTEGRITY MAGNESIUM AUTOMOTIVE COMPONENTS (HIMAC) 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual...

343

Fusion-component lifetime analysis  

SciTech Connect

A one-dimensional computer code has been developed to examine the lifetime of first-wall and impurity-control components. The code incorporates the operating and design parameters, the material characteristics, and the appropriate failure criteria for the individual components. The major emphasis of the modeling effort has been to calculate the temperature-stress-strain-radiation effects history of a component so that the synergystic effects between sputtering erosion, swelling, creep, fatigue, and crack growth can be examined. The general forms of the property equations are the same for all materials in order to provide the greatest flexibility for materials selection in the code. The individual coefficients within the equations are different for each material. The code is capable of determining the behavior of a plate, composed of either a single or dual material structure, that is either totally constrained or constrained from bending but not from expansion. The code has been utilized to analyze the first walls for FED/INTOR and DEMO and to analyze the limiter for FED/INTOR.

Mattas, R.F.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Failure Rate Data Analysis for High Technology Components  

SciTech Connect

Understanding component reliability helps designers create more robust future designs and supports efficient and cost-effective operations of existing machines. The accelerator community can leverage the commonality of its high-vacuum and high-power systems with those of the magnetic fusion community to gain access to a larger database of reliability data. Reliability studies performed under the auspices of the International Energy Agency are the result of an international working group, which has generated a component failure rate database for fusion experiment components. The initial database work harvested published data and now analyzes operating experience data. This paper discusses the usefulness of reliability data, describes the failure rate data collection and analysis effort, discusses reliability for components with scarce data, and points out some of the intersections between magnetic fusion experiments and accelerators.

L. C. Cadwallader

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Multi-component Removal in Flue Gas by Aqua Ammonia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

component Removal in Flue Gas by Aqua Ammonia component Removal in Flue Gas by Aqua Ammonia Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,255,842 entitled "Multi-component Removal in Flue Gas by Aqua Ammonia." This patent discloses a method for the removal of potential environmental-impacting compounds from flue gas streams. The method oxidizes some or all of the acid precursors such as sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) and nitric oxides (NO x ) into sulfur trioxide and nitrogen dioxide, respectively. Following this step, the gas stream is then treated with aqua ammonia or ammonium hydroxide to capture the compounds via chemical absorption through acid-base or neutralization reactions where a fertilizer is formed.

346

Durability of ACERT Engine Components  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

heavy duty diesel engine thermal efficiency of 55% by 2018 ACE: Improve commercial vehicle fuel economy at least 20% 3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy...

347

EVALUATION OF COMPONENT MODE SYNTHESIS METHODS FOR THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EVALUATION OF COMPONENT MODE SYNTHESIS METHODS FOR THE DETECTION OF MODAL INTERACTION THROUGH ROTOR 2009 Abstract The study of interactions through direct contact between blade-tips and outer casings where friction is accounted for. This method offers energy momentum conserving which is a critical point

Boyer, Edmond

348

Methods for microwave heat treatment of manufactured components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for heat treating manufactured components using microwave energy and microwave susceptor material. Heat treating medium such as eutectic salts may be employed. A fluidized bed introduces process gases which may include carburizing or nitriding gases. The process may be operated in a batch mode or continuous process mode. A microwave heating probe may be used to restart a frozen eutectic salt bath.

Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN)

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

349

Evaluation of aging degradation of structural components  

SciTech Connect

Irradiation embrittlement of the neutron shield tank (NST) A212 Grade B steel from the Shippingport reactor, as well as thermal embrittlement of CF-8 cast stainless steel components from the Shippingport and KRB reactors, has been characterized. Increases in Charpy transition temperature (CTT), yield stress, and hardness of the NST material in the low-temperature low-flux environment are consistent with the test reactor data for irradiations at < 232{degrees}C. The shift in CTT is not as severe as that observed in surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR): however, it shows very good agreement with the results for HFIR A212-B steel irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The results indicate that fluence rate has not effect on radiation embrittlement at rates as low as 2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s at the low operating temperature of the Shippingport NST, i.e., 55{degrees}C. This suggest that radiation damage in Shippingport NST and HFIR surveillance samples may be different because of the neutron spectra and/or Cu and Ni content of the two materials. Cast stainless steel components show relatively modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength. Correlations for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly conservative values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predict the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot- and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approx}15 y.

Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Evaluation of aging degradation of structural components  

SciTech Connect

Irradiation embrittlement of the neutron shield tank (NST) A212 Grade B steel from the Shippingport reactor, as well as thermal embrittlement of CF-8 cast stainless steel components from the Shippingport and KRB reactors, has been characterized. Increases in Charpy transition temperature (CTT), yield stress, and hardness of the NST material in the low-temperature low-flux environment are consistent with the test reactor data for irradiations at < 232{degrees}C. The shift in CTT is not as severe as that observed in surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR): however, it shows very good agreement with the results for HFIR A212-B steel irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The results indicate that fluence rate has not effect on radiation embrittlement at rates as low as 2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}{center dot}s at the low operating temperature of the Shippingport NST, i.e., 55{degrees}C. This suggest that radiation damage in Shippingport NST and HFIR surveillance samples may be different because of the neutron spectra and/or Cu and Ni content of the two materials. Cast stainless steel components show relatively modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength. Correlations for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly conservative values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predict the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot- and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approx}15 y.

Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Petroleum Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Petroleum Market Module Figure 9. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, bioesters, corn, biomass, and coal), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. refining

352

Predicting Problems Caused by Component Upgrades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to guarantee that the system's behavior is preserved across a component replacement. If automated logical

Liskov, Barbara

353

Correct Execution of Reconfiguration for Stateful Components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In component-based software engineering, reconfiguration describes structural changes to the architecture of a component system. For stateful components, not only structural but also behavioural aspects have to be taken into account in reconfiguration. ... Keywords: Reconfiguration, model checking, stateful components

Moritz Hammer; Alexander Knapp

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

A component-based collaboration infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-through in building reusable sys- tems. The popularity of di?erent component models in industry has demonstrated the attractions and power of CBD. Further more, modern object-oriented languages 18 such as Java and .Net provide direct support on component... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 B. Shared Component Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 1. Modeling Shared Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 2. Java Embodiment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 a. Shared Component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 b...

Yang, Yi

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

355

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

356

Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Energy Efficiency Assessments Lynn Price Staff Scientist China Energy Group Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments - Definition and overview of key components - International experience - Chinese situation and recommendations - US-China collaboration Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments - Analysis of the use of energy and potential for energy efficiency in an industrial facility * Current situation * Recommendations for improving energy efficiency * Cost-benefit analysis of recommended options * An action plan for realizing potential savings Types of Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments - Preliminary or walk-through - Detailed or diagnostic Audit criteria

357

Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of offering NEM for biogas-electric systems and fuel cells.but AB 2228 (2002) allowed biogas-electric facilities up to

McAllister, Joseph Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Pub  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

case tables Appendix B Economic growth cases comparisons tables Appendix C Oil price cases comparisons tables Appendix D Results from side cases tables Appendix E: NEMS...

359

Ghana-GTZ Electrification Component of the Promotion of Private Sector  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electrification Component of the Promotion of Private Sector Electrification Component of the Promotion of Private Sector Programme Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Ghana-GTZ Electrification Component of the Promotion of Private Sector Programme Name Ghana-GTZ Electrification Component of the Promotion of Private Sector Programme Agency/Company /Organization GTZ Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Background analysis Website http://www.gtz.de/en/themen/um Country Ghana Western Africa References Electrification Component of the Promotion of Private Sector Programme in Ghana[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. References ↑ "Electrification Component of the Promotion of Private Sector Programme in Ghana" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Ghana-GTZ_Electrification_Component_of_the_Promotion_of_Private_Sector_Programme&oldid=328714"

360

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - appendix  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The National Energy Modeling System is documented in a series of model documentation reports, available on the EIA Web site at http://www.eia.doe. gov/bookshelf/docs.html or by contacting the National Energy Information Center (202/586-8800). The National Energy Modeling System is documented in a series of model documentation reports, available on the EIA Web site at http://www.eia.doe. gov/bookshelf/docs.html or by contacting the National Energy Information Center (202/586-8800). Energy Information Administration, Integrating Module of the National Energy Modeling System: Model Documentation DOE/EIA-M057(2000) (Washington, DC, December 1999). Energy Information Administration, Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M065(2000) (Washington, DC, December 1999). Energy Information Administration, Documentation of the DRI Model of the U.S. Economy, DOE/EIA- M061 (Washington, DC, December 1993). Energy Information Administration, NEMS International Energy Module: Model Documentation Report, DOE/EIA-M071(99) (Washington, DC, February 1999).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems energy components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2007, DOE/EIA- M068(2007). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

362

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Transportation Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption isthe sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

363

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Figure 15. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Structure. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 16. Natural Gas Transmission and distribution Module Network. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Natural Gas Transmission and distribution Module Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The natural gas transmission and distribution module (NGTDM) of NEMS represents the natural gas market and determines regional market–clearing prices for natural gas supplies and for end–use consumption, given the

364

Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007: Summary of Provisions (released in AEO2008)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 was signed into law on December 19, 2007, and became Public Law 110-140. Provisions in EISA2007 that require funding appropriations to be implemented, whose impact is highly uncertain, or that require further specification by federal agencies or Congress are not included in Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO). For example, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) does not try to anticipate policy responses to the many studies required by EISA2007, nor to predict the impact of research and development (R&D) funding authorizations included in the bill. Moreover, AEO2008 does not include any provision that addresses a level of detail beyond that modeled in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), which was used to develop the AEO2008 projections. AEO2008 addresses only those provisions in EISA2007 that establish specific tax credits, incentives, or standards.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Model documentation report: Residential sector demand module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description for energy analysts, other users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports according to Public Law 93-275, section 57(b)(1). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 The Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006), prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030. The projections are based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an “Overview” summarizing the AEO2006 reference case and comparing it with the AEO2005 reference case. The next section, “Legislation and Regulations,” discusses evolving legislation and regulatory issues, including recently enacted legislation and regulation, such as the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and some that are proposed. “Issues in Focus” includes a discussion of the basis of EIA’s substantial revision of the world oil price trend used in the projections. It also examines the following topics: implications of higher oil price expectations for economic growth; differences among types of crude oil available on world markets; energy technologies on the cusp of being introduced; nonconventional liquids technologies beginning to play a larger role in energy markets; advanced vehicle technologies included in AEO2006; mercury emissions control technologies; and U.S. greenhouse gas intensity. “Issues in Focus” is followed by “Energy Market Trends,” which provides a summary of the AEO2006 projections for energy markets.

367

Geothermal Energy (5 Activities)  

K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

Geothermal energy is one of the components of the National Energy Policy: Reliable, Affordable, and Environmentally Sound Energy for Americas Future. This lesson includes five activities that will give your students information on the principles of heat transfer and the technology of using geothermal energy to generate electricity.

368

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has five submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, landfill gas, solar, and wind; a sixth renewable, conventional hydroelectric power, is represented in the Electricity Market Module (EMM).119 Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was an original source of electricity generation, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon low-cost energy storage.

369

Potential impacts of energy efficiency policies in the U.S. industry: Results from the clean energy futures study  

SciTech Connect

Scenarios for a Clean Energy Future (CEF) studied the role that efficient clean energy technologies can play in meeting the economic and environmental challenges for our future energy supply. The study describes a portfolio of policies that would motivate energy users and businesses to invest in innovative energy efficient technologies. On the basis of the portfolios, two policy scenarios have been developed, i.e. a moderate scenario and an advanced scenario. We focus on the industrial part of the CEF-study. The studied policies include a wide scope of activities, which are organized under the umbrella of voluntary industrial sector agreements. The policies for the policy scenarios have been modeled using the National Energy Modeling System (CEF-NEMS). Under the reference scenario industrial energy use would grow to 41 Quads in 2020, compared to 34.8 Quads in 1997, with an average improvement of the energy intensity by 1.1% per year. In the Moderate scenario the annual improvement is a bout 1.5%/year, leading to primary energy use of 37.8 Quads in 2020, resulting in 10% lower CO2 emissions by 2020 compared to the reference scenario. In the Advanced scenario the annual improvement increases to 1.8% per year, leading to primary energy use of 34.3 Quads in 2020, and 29% lower CO2 emissions. We report on the policies, assumptions and results for industry.

Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn

2001-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

370

Education Toolbox Search | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Search Enter terms Search Retain current filters Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Download Geothermal Energy (5 Activities) Geothermal energy is one of the components of the...

371

Next Generation Materials | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

energy productivity. The goal is to increase service life tenfold, decreasing the energy intensity of the materials and components. Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless...

372

Microsoft Word - Advanced Components_Final_v2_0.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appendix B3: A Systems View of the Modern Grid ADVANCED COMPONENTS Conducted by the National Energy Technology Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability March 2007 Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Page B3-1 Modern Grid Systems View: Appendix B3 v2.0 Advanced Components TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary........................................................................2 Current State.................................................................................4 Power Electronics in Transmission and Distribution Systems .... 4 Superconducting devices .............................................................. 6 Generation and Storage Distributed Energy Resources .............

373

Predicting problems caused by component upgrades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a new, automatic technique to assess whether replacing a component of a software system by a purportedly compatible component may change the behavior of the system. The technique operates before ...

McCamant, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Advanced filters and components for power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis is to improve the high frequency performance of components and filters by better compensating the parasitic effects of practical components. The main application for this improvement is in ...

Neugebauer, Timothy Carl, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Tools to Implement MPDV Component Characteristics  

SciTech Connect

This slide show presents work on photonic Doppler velocimetry multiplexing techniques, particularly as regards measurements on components.

Pena, M; Daykin, E; Emmit, R; Garza, A; Gibo, M; Hutchins, M; Perez, C; Teel, M

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

376

Predicting Problems Caused by Component Upgrades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. If automated logical comparison indicates that the new component does not make all the guarantees that the old

Liskov, Barbara

377

Tensor Principal Component Analysis via Convex Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 11, 2012 ... Keywords: Tensor; Principal Component Analysis; Low Rank; Nuclear Norm; Semidefinite Programming Relaxation. Category 1: Convex and...

Bo Jiang

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

378

Safety implementation of adaptive embedded control components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper deals with dynamic reconfigurations of component-based adaptive embedded control systems to be automatically handled at run-time by intelligent agents. We define a Control Component as a software unit supporting control tasks of the system ... Keywords: adaptive embedded control system, dynamic reconfiguration, intelligent agent, semaphore, software control component

Atef Gharbi; Mohamed Khalgui; Samir Ben Ahmed

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

LIRMM UM II Component based Software Architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 LIRMM UM II Component based Software Architecture of Robot Controllers R. Passama, D. Andreu, C component approaches and robot control architectures. This methodology defines a process that guides architecture, useful for analysis and integration, and a dedicated component-based language, focusing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

380

Table 11.3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010; 3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Renewable Energy (excluding Wood NAICS Total Onsite and Code(a) Subsector and Industry Generation Cogeneration(b) Other Biomass)(c) Other(d) Total United States 311 Food 5,666 5,414 81 171 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 3,494 3,491 Q 2 311221 Wet Corn Milling 3,213 3,211 0 2 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 1,382 1,319 64 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 336 325 Q * 3115 Dairy Products 38 36 1 1 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 19 Q Q 14 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 342 238 Q 7 3121 Beverages 308 204 Q 7 3122 Tobacco 34

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems energy components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components at LBNL |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components at LBNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components at LBNL Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Use of heavy-ion accelerators for testing microelectronic components for

382

Low Cost Components: Advanced High Power & High Energy Battery Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland.

383

Energy Department Announces $8 Million to Develop Advanced Components...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

A power take-off is the MHK sub-system that includes the hardware needed to convert mechanical motion into electrical power. Innovative structures: Selected projects will design,...

384

Analysis of the Clean Energy Standard Act of 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Appendix B: Estimating Price Impacts of the BCES12 Small Retailer Exemption The CES policy proposal analyzed in this paper, as outlined in the letter and draft legislation provided in Appendix D, exempts small electricity retailers. Small electricity retailers are defined as those with sales less than 2,000,000 megawatthours (MWh) in 2015, with the exemption level decreasing linearly to 1,000,000 MWh in 2025 and beyond. EIA is not able to disaggregate the price impacts of exempt small retailers from those of larger covered retailers within the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Given the exemption, there is likely to be a considerable divergence in the price impacts for customers of exempt and non-exempt electricity providers. Using historical data and assuming that small retailer

385

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

coal.gif (4423 bytes) coal.gif (4423 bytes) The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation: Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-MO60. Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions, and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves addresses the relationship between the minemouth price of coal and corresponding levels of coal production, labor productivity, and the cost of factor inputs (mining equipment, mine labor, and fuel requirements).

386

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2001, DOE/EIA-M060(2001) January 2001. Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions, and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves

387

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

California California Colorado Delaware Massachusetts New Jersey New York State renewable energy requirements and goals: Update through 2010 To the extent possible, AEO2011 incorporates the impacts of State laws requiring the addition of renewable generation or capacity by utilities doing business in the States. Currently, 30 States and the District of Columbia have enforceable RPS or similar laws (Table 2). Under such standards, each State determines its own levels of renewable generation, eligible technologies, and noncompliance penalties. AEO2011 includes the impacts of all laws in effect in 2010 (with the exception of Hawaii, because NEMS provides electricity market projections for the continental United States only). In the AEO2011 Reference case, States generally meet their ultimate RPS

388

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Petroleum Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Petroleum Market Module The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, bioesters, corn, biomass, and coal), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. Figure 9. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. The PMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. refining activities in the five Petroleum Area Defense Districts (PADDs) (Figure 9),

389

Employing demand response in energy procurement plans of electricity retailers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper proposes a new framework in which demand response (DR) is incorporated as an energy resource of electricity retailers in addition to the commonly used forward contracts and pool markets. In this way, a stepwise reward-based DR is proposed as a real-time resource of the retailer. In addition, the unpredictable behavior of customers participating in the proposed reward-based DR is modeled through a scenario-based participation factor. The overall problem is formulated as a stochastic optimization approach in which pool prices and customers participation in DR are uncertain variables. The feasibility of the problem is evaluated on a realistic case of the Australian National Electricity Market (NEM) and solved using General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS) software.

Nadali Mahmoudi; Mehdi Eghbal; Tapan K. Saha

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2002, DOE/EIA-M060(2002) (Washington, DC, January 2002). Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves

391

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Expenditures Module Household Expenditures Module The Household Expenditures Module (HEM) constructs household energy expenditure profiles using historical survey data on household income, population and demographic characteristics, and consumption and expenditures for fuels for various end-uses. These data are combined with NEMS forecasts of household disposable income, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures by end-use and household type. The HEM disaggregation algorithm uses these combined results to forecast household fuel consumption and expenditures by income quintile and Census Division. Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2003 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2003 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS).

392

Model documentation report: Transportation sector model of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description of TRAN for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirements of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, 57(b)(1)). Third, it permits continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Table N13.2. Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 1998;" 2. Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,"Renewable Energy",," " " "," ",,,"(excluding Wood",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total Onsite",,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",1,0.8,1.5,0.9

394

Classified Component Disposal at the Nevada National Security Site  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) has added the capability needed for the safe, secure disposal of non-nuclear classified components that have been declared excess to national security requirements. The NNSS has worked with U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration senior leadership to gain formal approval for permanent burial of classified matter at the NNSS in the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex owned by the U.S. Department of Energy. Additionally, by working with state regulators, the NNSS added the capability to dispose non-radioactive hazardous and non-hazardous classified components. The NNSS successfully piloted the new disposal pathway with the receipt of classified materials from the Kansas City Plant in March 2012.

Poling, J. [NSTec; Arnold, P. [NSTec; Saad, M. [SNL; DiSanza, F.; Cabble, K. [NNSA/NSO

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

395

Expandable Metal Liner For Downhole Components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liner for an annular downhole component is comprised of an expandable metal tube having indentations along its surface. The indentations are formed in the wall of the tube either by drawing the tube through a die, by hydroforming, by stamping, or roll forming and may extend axially, radially, or spirally along its wall. The indentations accommodate radial and axial expansion of the tube within the downhole component. The tube is inserted into the annular component and deformed to match an inside surface of the component. The tube may be expanded using a hydroforming process or by drawing a mandrel through the tube. The tube may be expanded in such a manner so as to place it in compression against the inside wall of the component. The tube is useful for improving component hydraulics, shielding components from contamination, inhibiting corrosion, and preventing wear to the downhole component during use. It may also be useful for positioning conduit and insulated conductors within the component. An insulating material may be disposed between the tube and the component in order to prevent galvanic corrosion of the downhole component.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe R. (Provo, UT)

2004-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

396

Phase Chemistry of Tank Sludge Residual Components  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has millions of gallons of high level nuclear waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Washington and Savannah River, South Carolina. These tanks will eventually be emptied and decommissioned. This will leave a residue of sludge adhering to the interior tank surfaces that may contaminate nearby groundwaters with radionuclides and RCRA metals. Performance assessment (PA) calculations must be carried out prior to closing the tanks. This requires developing radionuclide release models from the sludges so that the PA calculations can be based on credible source terms. These efforts continued to be hindered by uncertainties regarding the actual nature of the tank contents and the distribution of radionuclides among the various phases. In particular, it is of vital importance to know what radionuclides are associated with solid sludge components. Experimentation on actual tank sludges can be difficult, dangerous and prohibitively expensive. The research funded under this grant for the past three years was intended to provide a cost-effective method for developing the needed radionuclide release models using non-radioactive artificial sludges. Insights gained from this work will also have more immediate applications in understanding the processes responsible for heel development in the tanks and in developing effective technologies for removing wastes from the tanks.

J.L. Krumhansl

2002-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

397

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Petroleum Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

petroleum market module (PMM) represents domestic refinery operations and the marketing of petroleum products to consumption regions. PMM solves for petroleum product prices, crude oil and product import activity (in conjunction with the international energy module and the oil and gas supply module), and domestic refinery capacity expansion and fuel consumption. The solution is derived, satisfying the demand for petroleum products and incorporating the prices for raw material inputs and imported petroleum products, the costs of investment, and the domestic production of crude oil and natural gas liquids. The relationship of PMM to other NEMS modules is illustrated in Figure 17. petroleum market module (PMM) represents domestic refinery operations and the marketing of petroleum products to consumption regions. PMM solves for petroleum product prices, crude oil and product import activity (in conjunction with the international energy module and the oil and gas supply module), and domestic refinery capacity expansion and fuel consumption. The solution is derived, satisfying the demand for petroleum products and incorporating the prices for raw material inputs and imported petroleum products, the costs of investment, and the domestic production of crude oil and natural gas liquids. The relationship of PMM to other NEMS modules is illustrated in Figure 17. Figure 17. Petroleum Market Module Structure PMM is a regional, linear-programming representation of the U.S. petroleum market. Refining operations are represented by a three-region linear programming formulation of the five Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADDs) (Figure 18). PADDs I and V are each treated as single regions, while PADDs II, III, and IV are aggregated into one region. Each region is considered as a single firm where more than 30 distinct refinery processes are modeled. Refining capacity is allowed to expand in each region, but the model does not distinguish between additions to existing refineries or the building of new facilities. Investment criteria are developed exogenously, although the decision to invest is endogenous.

398

ORIGINAL ARTICLE The Effect of Foot and Ankle Prosthetic Components on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORIGINAL ARTICLE The Effect of Foot and Ankle Prosthetic Components on Braking and Propulsive, Neptune RR, Walden JG, Rogers WE, Bosker GW. The effect of foot and ankle pros- thetic components-9. Objective: To assess the influence of energy storage and return (ESAR) prosthetic feet and multi-axis ankles

399

Summary of Components of the "Best of the Region" Standard for New Non-Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of Components of the "Best of the Region" Standard for New Non-Residential Buildings Specifications for Implementation of Fifth Power Plan Model Conservation Standards for New Commercial Buildings Adapted from: Northwest Energy NWBest Project Summary of Components of the "Best of the Region" Standard

400

Energy Assurance | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assurance Assurance Energy Assurance The Energy Sector consists of thousands of electricity, oil, and natural gas assets that are geographically dispersed and connected by systems and networks. Therefore, interdependency within the sector and across the Nation's critical infrastructure sectors is critical. The energy infrastructure provides fuel to the Nation, and in turn depends on the Nation's transportation, communications, finance, and government infrastructures. The energy systems and networks cross the Nation's borders, making international collaboration a necessary component of the Energy Sector's efforts. Protecting and improving the resiliency of the Energy Sector in the face of both manmade and natural disasters is an ongoing effort that requires continued vigilance, contingency planning, and training. With partnership

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems energy components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Photovoltaic Energy Technology Module | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Photovoltaic Energy Technology Module Photovoltaic Energy Technology Module Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Photovoltaic Energy Technology Module Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar Topics: Technology characterizations Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTENERGY2/EXTRENENERGYTK/0,, References: Photovoltaic Energy Technology Module[1] Resources Portable Solar Photovoltaic Lanterns: Performance and Certification Specification, and Type Approval, ESMAP TECHNICAL PAPER 078 Testing of Storage Batteries used in Stand Alone Photovoltaic Power Systems, Test procedures and examples of test results Technical Specifications for Solar Home Systems (SHS), Rural Electrification and Renewable Energy Development (PV Component) Project

402

Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles - PHEV Modeling - Component Requirement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Requirement Definition for PHEVs Requirement Definition for PHEVs One of the main objectives of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle R&D Plan (2.2Mb pdf) is to "determine component development requirements" through simulation analysis. PSAT has been used to design and evaluate a series of PHEVs to define the requirements of different components, focusing on the energy storage system's power and energy. Several vehicle classes (including midsize car, crossover SUV and midsize SUV) and All Electric Range (AER from 10 to 40 miles) were considered. The preliminary simulations were performed at Argonne using a pre-transmission parallel hybrid configuration with an energy storage system sized to run the Urban Dynanometer Driving Schedule (UDDS) in electric mode. Additional powertrain configurations and sizing algorithm are currently being considered. Trade-off studies are being performed as ways to achieve some level of performance while easing requirements on one area or another. As shown in the figure below, the FreedomCAR Energy Storage Technical Team selected a short term and a long term All Electric Range (AER) goals based on several vehicle simulations.

403

Avi Shultz | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

solar power (CSP) team, focusing on a number of projects with significant chemistry components, including thermochemical energy storage, high-temperature corrosion, and...

404

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5). The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment and their installed costs over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

405

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007), prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030. The projections are based on results from EIA's National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an "Overview" summarizing the AEO2007 reference case. The next section, "Legislation and Regulations," discusses evolving legislation and regulatory issues, including recently enacted legislation and regulation, such as the new Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards for light-duty trucks finalized by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in March 2006. It also provides an update on the handling of key provisions in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT2005) that could not be incorporated in the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006) because of the absence of implementing regulations or funding appropriations. Finally, it provides a summary of how sunset provisions in selected Federal fuel taxes and tax credits are handled in AEO2007.

406

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5). The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment and their installed costs over the projection horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the projection horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

407

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO2005) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2025 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an “Overview” summarizing the AEO2005 reference case. The next section, “Legislation and Regulations,” discusses evolving legislation and regulatory issues, including legislation and regulations that have been enacted and some that are proposed. Next, the “Issues in Focus” section discusses key energy market issues and examines their potential impacts. In particular, it includes a discussion of the world oil price assumptions used in the reference case and four alternative world oil price cases examined in AEO2005. “Issues in Focus” is followed by “Market Trends,” which provides a summary of energy market trends in the AEO2005 forecast.

408

Solid tags for identifying failed reactor components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid tag material which generates stable detectable, identifiable, and measurable isotopic gases on exposure to a neutron flux to be placed in a nuclear reactor component, particularly a fuel element, in order to identify the reactor component in event of its failure. Several tag materials consisting of salts which generate a multiplicity of gaseous isotopes in predetermined ratios are used to identify different reactor components.

Bunch, Wilbur L. (Richland, WA); Schenter, Robert E. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Heartbeat Model for Component Failure in Simulation of Plant Behavior  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Department of Energys Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRSP), tools and methodology for risk-informed characterization of safety margin are being developed for use in supporting decision-making on plant life extension after the first license renewal. Beginning with the traditional discussion of margin in terms of a load (a physical challenge to system or component function) and a capacity (the capability of that system or component to accommodate the challenge), we are developing the capability to characterize realistic probabilistic load and capacity spectra, reflecting both aleatory and epistemic uncertainty in system behavior. This way of thinking about margin comports with work done in the last 10 years. However, current capabilities to model in this way are limited: it is currently possible, but difficult, to validly simulate enough time histories to support quantification in realistic problems, and the treatment of environmental influences on reliability is relatively artificial in many existing applications. The INL is working on a next-generation safety analysis capability (widely referred to as R7) that will enable a much better integration of reliability-related and phenomenology-related aspects of margin. In this paper, we show how to implement cumulative damage (heartbeat) models for component reliability that lend themselves naturally to being included as part of the phenomenology simulation. Implementation of this modeling approach relies on the way in which the phenomenology simulation implements its dynamic time step management. Within this approach, component failures influence the phenomenology, and the phenomenology influences the component failures.

R. W. Youngblood; R. R. Nourgaliev; D. L. Kelly; C. L. Smith; T-N. Dinh

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Toxic components in diesel exhaust fumes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To control diesel-engine toxicity, a computation method is proposed for the concentration of toxic components in diesel exhaust fumes, on the basis of external engine...

A. F. Dorokhov; E. V. Klimova

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Successfully Dismantled March 20, 2007 Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled Oak Ridge, TN Continuing its efforts to reduce the size of the U.S. nuclear weapons...

412

NDE DEVELOPMENT FOR ACERT ENGINE COMPONENTS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Barrier Coating (TBC) 12 PM024 TBCs applied on engine exhaust components reduce heat loss so improve efficiency; they also replace the use of expensive high-temperature...

413

Component and System Qualification Workshop Proceedings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Proceedings from the U.S. DOE Hydrogen Component and System Qualification Workshop, held at Sandia National Laboratory in Livermore, CA, on November 4, 2010.

414

Developing Language Processing Components with GATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developing Language Processing Components with GATE (a User Guide) For GATE version 3 beta 1 (July.3 Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 3.4 [D] Get Started

Maynard, Diana

415

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4, 2010 4, 2010 Clean Energy Works Portland: A Model For Retrofit Projects How a new weatherization organization in Portland, Oregon has already managed to weatherize 250 homes. June 3, 2010 Pierre's Prototype for Wind and Solar - Capitol Lake Plaza Capitol Lake Plaza sits centrally on Pierre, S.D.'s government plaza. Originally built in 1974, the building has been undergoing major energy renovations since being purchased by the state two years ago. Two major components of the renovation are about to appear at the building's highest point: solar panels and wind turbines are being installed on the roof. June 3, 2010 How Do You Save Energy at Work? ENERGY STAR's National Building Competition is a contest to see which of 14 facilities around the country can lower its energy use intensity (EUI) by

416

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply on a regional basis (Figure 7). A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2006), (Washington, DC, 2006). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural

417

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Module. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply on a regional basis (Figure 7). A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2007), (Washington, DC, 2007). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural

418

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Petroleum Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Petroleum Market Module Figure 9. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) forecasts petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, and bioesters), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. refining

419

Hybrid solar lighting systems and components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid solar lighting system and components having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one fiber receiver, at least one hybrid luminaire, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator and each hybrid luminaire. A controller operates each component.

Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN); Beshears, David L. (Knoxville, TN); Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Jordan, John K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lind, Randall F. (Lenoir City, TN)

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

420

Hybrid solar lighting distribution systems and components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid solar lighting distribution system and components having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one fiber receiver, at least one hybrid luminaire, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator and each hybrid luminaire. A controller operates all components.

Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN); Beshears, David L. (Knoxville, TN); Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Jordan, John K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lind, Randall F. (Lenoir City, TN)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems energy components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Status of the Boeing Dish Engine Critical Component project  

SciTech Connect

The Boeing Company's Dish Engine Critical Component (DECC) project started in April of 1998. It is a continuation of a solar energy program started by McDonnel Douglas (now Boeing) and United Stirling of Sweden in the mid 1980s. The overall objectives, schedule, and status of this project are presented in this paper. The hardware test configuration, hardware background, operation, and test plans are also discussed. A summary is given of the test data, which includes the daily power performance, generated energy, working-gas usage, mirror reflectivity, solar insolation, on-sun track time. Generating time, and system availability. The system performance based upon the present test data is compared to test data from the 1984/88 McDonnel Douglas/United Stirling AB/Southern California Edison test program. The test data shows that the present power, energy, and mirror performance is comparable to when the hardware was first manufactured 14 years ago.

Stone, K.W.; Nelving, H.; Braun, H.W.; Clark, T.B.; Diver, R.B.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

GRB 060218: The nature of the optical-UV component  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The optical-UV component in GRB 060218 is assumed to be due to optically thick cyclotron emission. The key aspect of this model is the high temperature of the absorbing electrons. The heat input derives from nuclei accelerated in semi-relativistic internal shocks, like in ordinary gamma-ray bursts. Coulomb collisions transfer part of that energy to electrons. Inverse Compton cooling on the X-ray photons leads to electron temperatures around 100 keV. Such a high brightness temperature for the optical-UV emission implies an emitting area roughly equal to that of the thermal X-ray component. This suggests a model in which the radio, optical-UV and thermal X-ray emission are closely related: Although the optical-UV and thermal X-ray emission are two separate spectral components, it is argued that they both come from the photosphere of a quasi-spherical, continuous outflow, whose interaction with the circumstellar medium gives rise to the radio emission. The properties of GRB 060218, as measured in the co-moving frame, are similar to those of ordinary gamma-ray burst; i.e., the main difference is the much lower value of the bulk Lorentz factor in GRB 060218. The cyclotron absorption implies a magnetic field in rough equipartition with the matter energy density in the outflow. Hence, the magnetic field could have a dynamically important role, possibly with a magnetar as the central engine.

C. -I. Bjrnsson

2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

423

Design of resonant frequencies for piezoelectric actuator with integrated components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Piezoelectric actuators are used in a wide range of electrical devices including piezoelectric speakers buzzers haptics and ultrasonic transducers. For piezoelectric actuator systems used in mobile devices the most important issue is improving the electromechanical conversion efficiency. The power consumed by the actuators must be minimized due to the small size of the batteries used. The frequency response around the mechanical resonance must be carefully designed to enable low power driving. The resonant frequencies of piezoelectric actuators that consist of integrated components such as the metal cones in ultrasonic speakers are determined by the energy dispersion of the total system. Therefore factors such as the size and physical properties of each component must be designed to optimize the resonant frequencies for practical applications. The total energy of the piezoelectric system is described by Lagrange-Maxwell equations. Even though it is not easy to solve the differential equations written in a Lagrangian coordinate system by using exact calculations useful information for designing systems can be derived from approximate calculations. In this paper we will introduce design guidelines that can be used to optimize the resonant frequencies of piezoelectric actuators with integrated components based on analysis using the Lagrangian coordinate system.

Jun Kuroda; Yasuharu Onishi; Motoyoshi Komoda; Yoshio Yamasaki

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

LBNL Windows & Daylighting Software -- THERM Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Components Components THERM has three basic components: Graphic User Interface: a graphic user interface that allows you to draw a cross section of the product or component for which you are performing thermal calculations. Heat Transfer Analysis: a heat-transfer analysis component that includes: an automatic mesh generator to create the elements for the finite-element analysis, a finite-element solver, an optional error estimator and adaptive mesh generator, and an optional view-factor radiation model. Results: a results displayer. Graphic User Interface THERM has standard graphic capabilities associated with the Microsoft Windows™ operating system. For example, THERM allows you to use: Both mouse and cursor operations; Standard editing features, such as Cut, Copy, Paste, Select All, and Delete;

425

Hot gas path component cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling system for a hot gas path component is disclosed. The cooling system may include a component layer and a cover layer. The component layer may include a first inner surface and a second outer surface. The second outer surface may define a plurality of channels. The component layer may further define a plurality of passages extending generally between the first inner surface and the second outer surface. Each of the plurality of channels may be fluidly connected to at least one of the plurality of passages. The cover layer may be situated adjacent the second outer surface of the component layer. The plurality of passages may be configured to flow a cooling medium to the plurality of channels and provide impingement cooling to the cover layer. The plurality of channels may be configured to flow cooling medium therethrough, cooling the cover layer.

Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Bunker, Ronald Scott; Itzel, Gary Michael

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

426

Correct Execution of Reconfiguration for Stateful Components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In component-based software engineering, reconfiguration describes structural changes to the architecture of a component system. For stateful components, not only structural but also behavioural aspects have to be taken into account in reconfiguration. We present a procedure to conduct reconfiguration in systems of concurrent, stateful components that interferes as little as possible with unchanged subsystems. Reconfiguration is described by a plan for adding, deleting and reconnecting components. A plan is executed by a sequence of simple, local steps, which are suitable for implementation in a programming language. We prove that plan execution is indistinguishable from atomic reconfiguration and use this fact for state-space reduction for verifying properties by model checking.

Moritz Hammer; Alexander Knapp

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Footnote  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

[1] Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000), DOE/EIA-0383(2000), (Washington, DC, December 1999). [1] Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000), DOE/EIA-0383(2000), (Washington, DC, December 1999). [2] NEMS documentation reports are available on the EIA CD-ROM and the EIA Homepage (http://www.eia.gov/bookshelf.html). For ordering information on the CD-ROM, contact STAT-USA's toll free order number: 1-800-STAT-USA or by calling (202) 482-1986. [3] Energy Information Administration, The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998, DOE/EIA-0581(98), (Washington, DC, February 1998). [4] The underlying macroeconomic growth cases use Standard and Poor’s DRI August 1999 T250899 and February TO250299 and TP250299. [5] PennWell Publishing Co., International Petroleum Encyclopedia, (Tulsa, OK, 1999). [6] EIA, EIA Model Documentation: World Oil Refining Logistics Demand Model, “WORLD” Reference Manual, DOE/EIA-M058, (Washington, DC, March 1994).

428

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

residential.gif (5487 bytes) residential.gif (5487 bytes) The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

429

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has five submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, landfill gas, solar, and wind; a sixth renewable, conventional hydroelectric power, is represented in the Electricity Market Module (EMM).109 Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was an original source of electricity generation, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon low-cost energy storage.

430

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Renewable Fuels  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for projections of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind1. Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was one of the first electric generation technologies, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon the availability of low-cost energy storage systems.

431

A hazard separation system for dismantlement of nuclear weapon components  

SciTech Connect

Over the next decade, the US Department of Energy (DOE) must retire and dismantle many nuclear weapon systems. In support of this effort, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has developed the Hazard Separation System (HSS). The HSS combines abrasive waterjet cutting technology and real-time radiography. Using the HSS, operators determine the exact location of interior, hazardous sub-components and remove them through precision cutting. The system minimizes waste and maximizes the recovery of recyclable materials. During 1994, the HSS was completed and demonstrated. Weapon components processed during the demonstration period included arming, fusing, and firing units; preflight control units; neutron generator subassemblies; and x-units. Hazards removed included radioactive krytron tubes and gap tubes, thermal batteries, neutron generator tubes, and oil-filled capacitors. Currently, the HSS is being operated at SNL in a research and development mode to facilitate the transfer of the technology to other DOE facilities for support of their dismantlement operations.

Lutz, J.D.; Purvis, S.T.; Hospelhorn, R.L.; Thompson, K.R.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Data:E708e6eb-22a5-4460-b954-099e4aee83a9 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e6eb-22a5-4460-b954-099e4aee83a9 e6eb-22a5-4460-b954-099e4aee83a9 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Columbus Southern Power Co Effective date: 2012/03/09 End date if known: Rate name: General Service - Low Load Factor-Secondary voltage(Breakdown Service Minimum Demand Charge) Sector: Industrial Description: Customers with cogeneration and/or small power production facilities which qualify under Section 210 of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 shall take service under Schedule COGEN/SPP, Schedule NEMS, or by special agreement with the Company. All other customers having sources of electrical energy supply other than the Company shall take service under Schedule SBS or Schedule NEMS.

433

Data:E4e53518-fd5d-4be0-bc81-b8cdc643a67a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

518-fd5d-4be0-bc81-b8cdc643a67a 518-fd5d-4be0-bc81-b8cdc643a67a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Columbus Southern Power Co Effective date: 2012/03/09 End date if known: Rate name: General Service - Low Load Factor- Primary voltage(Breakdown Service Minimum Demand Charge) Sector: Industrial Description: Customers with cogeneration and/or small power production facilities which qualify under Section 210 of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 shall take service under Schedule COGEN/SPP, Schedule NEMS, or by special agreement with the Company. All other customers having sources of electrical energy supply other than the Company shall take service under Schedule SBS or Schedule NEMS.

434

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2012 2, 2012 DOE is investing in projects that will increase energy efficiency in the manufacturing industry. One project will develop a new process for producing titanium components that could reduce the materials needed by ten-fold in aircraft and vehicle manufacturing. | Courtesy of Flickr user markjhandel, Creative Commons license. American Manufacturing Gets a Boost "Invented in America, made in America, and sold around the world." At the Energy Department, this isn't just a catchphrase -- it's a course of action. June 12, 2012 Students practice hooking out -- or removing -- DNA from a strawberry sample at Idaho National Laboratory. | Photo courtesy of INL.

435

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A part of the integrating module, the carbon emissions submodule (CEM), computes the carbon emissions from the combustion of energy. The coefficients for carbon emissions are derived from Energy Information Administration, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998,14 published in October 1999. The coefficients account for the fact that some fossil fuels are used for nonfuel purposes, such as feedstocks, and thus the carbon in the fuel is sequestered in the end product. A part of the integrating module, the carbon emissions submodule (CEM), computes the carbon emissions from the combustion of energy. The coefficients for carbon emissions are derived from Energy Information Administration, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998,14 published in October 1999. The coefficients account for the fact that some fossil fuels are used for nonfuel purposes, such as feedstocks, and thus the carbon in the fuel is sequestered in the end product. CEM also allows for several carbon policy evaluation options to be analyzed within NEMS. Although these policy options are not assumed in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000, the options have been used in special analyses to simulate potential market-based approaches to meet national carbon emission objectives. The policy options implemented in CEM are as follows:

436

ARM - Evaluation Product - Organic Aerosol Component VAP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsOrganic Aerosol Component VAP ProductsOrganic Aerosol Component VAP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Organic Aerosol Component VAP 2011.01.08 - 2012.03.24 Site(s) SGP General Description Organic aerosol (OA, i.e., the organic fraction of particles) accounts for 10-90% of the fine aerosol mass globally and is a key determinant of aerosol radiative forcing. But atmospheric OA is poorly characterized and its life cycle insufficiently represented in models. As a result, current models are unable to simulate OA concentrations and properties. This deficiency represents a large source of uncertainty in the quantification of aerosol direct and indirect effects and the prediction of future climate change. The Organic Aerosol Component (OACOMP) value-added product (VAP) uses

437

Structural Automotive Components from Composite Materials | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. lm08kia.pdf More Documents & Publications Structural Automotive Components from Composite...

438

Knowledge Portals: Components, Functionalities, and Deployment Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowledge Portals: Components, Functionalities, and Deployment Challenges Claudia Loebbecke University of Cologne Kevin Crowston Syracuse University School of Information Studies Abstract Knowledge Portals (KPs) are highly integrative Knowledge Management Systems (KMS) that promise to synthesize widely

Crowston, Kevin

439

Artificial Vision A vital component of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Artificial Vision A vital component of transhumanism #12;Machinehead · Merger of human and machine. · Transhumanism ­ Our design is flawed. · Blind spot · Blinking #12;Beyond the blind spot · Eventually plug

La Rosa, Andres H.

440

Data transmission element for downhole drilling components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A robust data transmission element for transmitting information between downhole components, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The data transmission element components include a generally U-shaped annular housing, a generally U-shaped magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element such as ferrite, and an insulated conductor. Features on the magnetically conducting, electrically insulating element and the annular housing create a pocket when assembled. The data transmission element is filled with a polymer to retain the components within the annular housing by filling the pocket with the polymer. The polymer can bond with the annular housing and the insulated conductor but preferably not the magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element. A data transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT)

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems energy components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Thresholding Multivariate Regression and Generalized Principal Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the high-dimensional data matrices have been extensively researched for uncorrelated and independent situations, they are much less so for the transposable data matrices. A generalization of principal component analysis and the related weighted least...

Sun, Ranye

2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

442

Accurate Energy Attribution and Accounting for Multi-core Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

us- age information. Our system utilizes runtime direct en- ergy measurements that provide accurate per-component energy usage

Ryffel, Sebi; Stathopoulos, Thanos; McIntire, Dustin; Kaiser, William; Thiele, Lothar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Indigestible fiber components as possible internal markers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INDIGESTIBLE FIBER COMPONENTS AS POSSIBLE INZERNAL MARKERS A Thesis by BERNARD FREDERICK JACOBS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AQf University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August... 1975 Major Subject: Animal Nutrition INDIGESTIBLE FIBER COMPONENTS AS POSSIBLE INTERNAL MARKERS A Thesis by BERNARD FREDERICK JACOBS Approved as to style and content by: !, /, (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Depar ent) (Member) (Member...

Jacobs, Bernard Frederick

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Component of variance estimation based on synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Component of Variance Estimation based on. Synthesis. (August lg (2) Jocelyn Anthea Tommerup, B. Sc. , B. Econ. , University of Queenslsnd Directed. by: Dr. H. 0. Hartley Analysis of variance, widely used in the study of statistical variation.... Essentially the problem is to find these coefficients so that, estimstes of the components may be computed. Hartley [1967] hss proposed a method which gives these coef'ficients directly for sry design, balanced of' unbalanced. It is the objective...

Tommerup, Jocelyn Anthea

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

445

RDCDS Meteorologoical Component Quick Installation Guide  

SciTech Connect

This guide provides step-by-step instructions for the deployment of one of the Rapidly Deployable Chemical Defense System (RDCDS) weather stations and central control system. Instructions for the deployment and operation of the Atmospheric Systems Corporation miniSODAR (SOnic Detection and Ranging) can be found in accompanying manuals developed by Atmospheric Systems Corporation. A detailed description of the system and its components can be found in the manual entitled Description of the RDCDS Meteorological Component.

Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.

2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

446

Method and apparatus for monitoring aircraft components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Operability of aircraft mechanical components is monitored by analyzing the voltage output of an electrical generator of the aircraft. Alternative generators, for a turbine-driven rotor aircraft, include the gas producer turbine tachometer generator, the power turbine tachometer generator, and the aircraft systems power producing starter/generator. Changes in the peak amplitudes of the fundamental frequency and its harmonics are correlated to changes in condition of the mechanical components.

Dickens, Larry M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Haynes, Howard D. (Knoxville, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Clinton, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Method and apparatus for monitoring aircraft components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Operability of aircraft mechanical components is monitored by analyzing the voltage output of an electrical generator of the aircraft. Alternative generators, for a turbine-driven rotor aircraft, include the gas producer turbine tachometer generator, the power turbine tachometer generator, and the aircraft systems power producing starter/generator. Changes in the peak amplitudes of the fundamental frequency and its harmonics are correlated to changes in condition of the mechanical components. 14 figs.

Dickens, L.M.; Haynes, H.D.; Ayers, C.W.

1996-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

448

An analysis of multiple component mooring lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AN ANALYSIS OF MULTIPLE COMPONENT MOORING LINES A Thesis by THOMAS ROBERT NALTERS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major...'595 ABSTRACT An Analysis Of Multiple Component Mooring Lines (December 1977) Thomas Robert Walters, B. E. , Vanderbilt University Co-Chai rman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Ts ung- Chow Su Co- Chai rman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Richard Domi nguez...

Walters, Thomas Robert

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

449

Wind Energy Markets, 2. edition  

SciTech Connect

The report provides an overview of the global market for wind energy, including a concise look at wind energy development in key markets including installations, government incentives, and market trends. Topics covered include: an overview of wind energy including the history of wind energy production and the current market for wind energy; key business drivers of the wind energy market; barriers to the growth of wind energy; key wind energy trends and recent developments; the economics of wind energy, including cost, revenue, and government subsidy components; regional and national analyses of major wind energy markets; and, profiles of key wind turbine manufacturers.

NONE

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

Renewable Energy Certificates | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Certificates Renewable Energy Certificates Renewable Energy Certificates October 16, 2013 - 5:15pm Addthis Image of a red balloon reading 'Electricity' plus a green balloon reading 'REC' equals a purple balloon reading 'Renewable Power' Components of a Renewable Energy Certificate Two separate products exist from electricity produced by renewable energy projects that can be sold together or treated separately. One is the actual electrons produced, which can either be transferred through the power grid to provide power to utility customers or used off-grid or at a customer site. Although they are not common in the market, Federal renewable energy policy recognizes renewable energy certificates (RECs) from thermal renewable energy projects. For thermal RECs the energy product is British

451

Energy Data Initiative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Data Initiative Energy Data Initiative Crystal Clear filesystem socket.png Energy Data Jam Crystal Clear filesystem socket.png Energy Datapalooza Training.jpg Resources Partners.jpg Community Energy Data Initiative The U.S. Government, as well as the private sector, is sitting on a vast -- and in many cases, untapped -- supply of energy data. Data are essential components of the President's all-of-the-above energy strategy. To help harness the power of these data through a combination of technology and ingenuity, the Obama Administration has launched the Energy Data Initiative (EDI). The EDI commits the Administration to release data resources in computer-readable form, and calls upon private-sector organizations to voluntarily give consumers secure access to their own energy use data.

452

BetterBuildings Financing Energy Efficiency Retrofits in the...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Financing Energy Efficient Retrofits in the Commercial Sector Webinar (text version) Primer on Clean Energy Lending: The Major Components and Options Financial Vehicles within an...

453

Simple thermodynamics of strongly coupled one-component-plasma in two and three dimensions  

SciTech Connect

Simple analytical approximations for the internal energy of the strongly coupled one-component-plasma in two and three dimensions are discussed. As a result, new practical expressions for the internal energy in the fluid phase are proposed. Their accuracy is checked by evaluating the location of the fluid-solid phase transition from the free energy consideration. Possible applications to other related systems are briefly discussed.

Khrapak, Sergey A., E-mail: Sergey.Khrapak@dlr.de [Forschungsgruppe Komplexe Plasmen, Deutsches Zentrum fr Luft- und Raumfahrt, Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany); Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Khrapak, Alexey G. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

454

Alternative Energy Product Manufacturers Tax Credit | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Product Manufacturers Tax Credit Product Manufacturers Tax Credit Alternative Energy Product Manufacturers Tax Credit < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Maximum Rebate 5% of taxpayer's qualified expenditures Program Info Start Date 7/1/2006 State New Mexico Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Rebate Amount Determined by New Mexico Department of Taxation and Revenue Provider New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department The Alternative Energy Product Manufacturers tax credit may be claimed for manufacturing alternative energy products and components, including renewable energy systems, fuel cell systems, and electric and hybrid-electric vehicles. Alternative energy components include parts,

455

Energy 101: Energy Efficient Data Centers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficient Data Centers Energy Efficient Data Centers Energy 101: Energy Efficient Data Centers Addthis Description Data centers provide mission-critical computing functions vital to the daily operation of top U.S. economic, scientific, and technological organizations. These data centers consume large amounts of energy to run and maintain their computer systems, servers, and associated high-performance components-up to 3% of all U.S. electricity powers data centers. efficiency improvements to data centers can produce significant energy savings and reduce the load on the electric grid. Duration 2:52 Topic Energy Efficiency Commercial Weatherization Consumption Credit Energy Department Video ANNOUNCER: It's hard to imagine going back to a world without computers. They store critical data for our everyday lives.

456

Performance Engineering Technology for Scientific Component Software  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale, complex scientific applications are beginning to benefit from the use of component software design methodology and technology for software development. Integral to the success of component-based applications is the ability to achieve high-performing code solutions through the use of performance engineering tools for both intra-component and inter-component analysis and optimization. Our work on this project aimed to develop performance engineering technology for scientific component software in association with the DOE CCTTSS SciDAC project (active during the contract period) and the broader Common Component Architecture (CCA) community. Our specific implementation objectives were to extend the TAU performance system and Program Database Toolkit (PDT) to support performance instrumentation, measurement, and analysis of CCA components and frameworks, and to develop performance measurement and monitoring infrastructure that could be integrated in CCA applications. These objectives have been met in the completion of all project milestones and in the transfer of the technology into the continuing CCA activities as part of the DOE TASCS SciDAC2 effort. In addition to these achievements, over the past three years, we have been an active member of the CCA Forum, attending all meetings and serving in several working groups, such as the CCA Toolkit working group, the CQoS working group, and the Tutorial working group. We have contributed significantly to CCA tutorials since SC'04, hosted two CCA meetings, participated in the annual ACTS workshops, and were co-authors on the recent CCA journal paper [24]. There are four main areas where our project has delivered results: component performance instrumentation and measurement, component performance modeling and optimization, performance database and data mining, and online performance monitoring. This final report outlines the achievements in these areas for the entire project period. The submitted progress reports for the first two years describe those year's achievements in detail. We discuss progress in the last project period in this document. Deployment of our work in CCA components, frameworks, and applications is an important metric of success. We also summarize the project's accomplishments in this regard at the end of the report. A list of project publications is also given.

Malony, Allen D.

2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

457

Assessment of the Energy Rating of Insulated Wall Assemblies - A Step Towards Building Energy Labeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Considerable efforts are recently focusing on energy labeling of components and systems in buildings. In Canada, the energy rating of windows was established, which provides a protocol to rate different types of windows with respect to their energy...

Elmahdy, H.; Maref, W.; Saber, H.; Swinton, M.; Glazer, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Second Stokes component generation in the SRS of chirped laser pulses  

SciTech Connect

An experimental investigation was made of optical schemes for the generation of the second Stokes component in the SRS of broadband chirped laser pulses in high-pressure gases. Measurements were made of the energy conversion efficiency and the spatial characteristics of the light beam of the second Stokes component for one- and two-fold focusing of the pump radiation into the gas-filled cell as well as in schemes involving a quartz capillary and two gas-filled cells. The highest energy efficiency of conversion to the second Stokes component was attained in the case of cascade generation in the optical scheme with two pressurised-gas cells. In the SRS in hydrogen in this scheme, the Ti:sapphire laser radiation with a wavelength of 0.79 {mu}m was converted to the 2.3-{mu}m second Stokes component with an efficiency of 8.5%. (nonlinear-optics phenomena)

Konyashchenko, Aleksandr V; Losev, Leonid L; Tenyakov, S Yu

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

459

GRB 060218: The nature of the optical-UV component  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The optical-UV component in GRB 060218 is assumed to be due to optically thick cyclotron emission. The key aspect of this model is the high temperature of the absorbing electrons. The heat input derives from nuclei accelerated in semi-relativistic internal shocks, like in ordinary gamma-ray bursts. Coulomb collisions transfer part of that energy to electrons. Inverse Compton cooling on the X-ray photons leads to electron temperatures around 100 keV. Such a high brightness temperature for the optical-UV emission implies an emitting area roughly equal to that of the thermal X-ray component. This suggests a model in which the radio, optical-UV and thermal X-ray emission are closely related: Although the optical-UV and thermal X-ray emission are two separate spectral components, it is argued that they both come from the photosphere of a quasi-spherical, continuous outflow, whose interaction with the circumstellar medium gives rise to the radio emission. The properties of GRB 060218, as measured in the co-moving f...

Bjrnsson, C I

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Retrospective Review Retrospective Review 4 Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review Table 1. Comparison of absolute percent difference between AEO reference case projections and related outcomes Variable All AEOs (AEO82 to AEO2010) NEMS AEOs (AEO94 to AEO2010) Gross Domestic Product Real Gross Domestic Product (Growth Rate)* 0.8 0.9 Petroleum World Oil Prices 49.9 31.4 Total Petroleum Consumption 4.1 4.3 Crude Oil Production 5.8 6.4 Petroleum Net Imports 6.0 7.3 Natural Gas Natural Gas Wellhead Prices 56.6 31.9 Total Natural Gas Consumption 7.3 7.4 Natural Gas Production 6.2 6.9 Natural Gas Net Imports 17.9 17.1 Coal Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants** 43.1 19.5 Total Coal Consumption 4.9 6.0 Coal Production 4.8 4.5 Electricity Average Electricity Prices 19.7 12.0 Total Electricity Sales 3.0 3.8 Total Energy, Carbon and Intensity

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems energy components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

EA-1035: Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los Alamos  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

35: Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los 35: Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico EA-1035: Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to relocate the Weapons Component Testing Facility from Building 450 to Building 207, both within Technical Area 16, at the U.S. Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD February 10, 1995 EA-1035: Finding of No Significant Impact Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico February 10, 1995 EA-1035: Final Environmental Assessment

462

Surveillance Guides - QAS 2.2 Staging/Storage of Components  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STAGING/STORAGE OF COMPONENTS STAGING/STORAGE OF COMPONENTS 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to ensure that before components or consumables are used in maintenance and repair of equipment and systems, or before new components and systems are installed, they are stored in ways that prevent deterioration. The surveillance also examines the contractor's practices in staging materials, and the use of effective quality control to ensure materials and components are stored and staged properly. Finally, the surveillance provides an opportunity for the Facility Representative to verify that the contractor is complying with performance objectives established by the Department of Energy. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5700.6C, Quality Assurance

463

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model Regions. The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas natural gas exploration and development on a regional basis (Figure 7). The OGSM is organized into 4 submodules: Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply submodule, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2010), (Washington, DC, 2010). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural

464

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

renewable.gif (4875 bytes) renewable.gif (4875 bytes) The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) consists of five distinct submodules that represent the major renewable energy technologies. Although it is described here, conventional hydroelectric is included in the Electricity Market Module (EMM) and is not part of the RFM. Similarly, ethanol modeling is included in the Petroleum Market Module (PMM). Some renewables, such as municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not require the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was an original source of electricity generation, to newer power systems using wind, solar, and geothermal energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittence, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon low-cost energy storage.

465

Kainos Energy Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kainos Energy Corporation Kainos Energy Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name Kainos Energy Corporation Place San Jose, California Zip 95134-2125 Product Kainos Energy is dedicated to the utilization of advanced nanomaterials and direct conversion manufacturing methods to enable development and fabrication of high performance, low cost fuel cells, stacks and components. References Kainos Energy Corporation[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Kainos Energy Corporation is a company located in San Jose, California . References ↑ "Kainos Energy Corporation" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Kainos_Energy_Corporation&oldid=347876"

466

Component evaluation testing and analysis algorithms.  

SciTech Connect

The Ground-Based Monitoring R&E Component Evaluation project performs testing on the hardware components that make up Seismic and Infrasound monitoring systems. The majority of the testing is focused on the Digital Waveform Recorder (DWR), Seismic Sensor, and Infrasound Sensor. In order to guarantee consistency, traceability, and visibility into the results of the testing process, it is necessary to document the test and analysis procedures that are in place. Other reports document the testing procedures that are in place (Kromer, 2007). This document serves to provide a comprehensive overview of the analysis and the algorithms that are applied to the Component Evaluation testing. A brief summary of each test is included to provide the context for the analysis that is to be performed.

Hart, Darren M.; Merchant, Bion John

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Component external leakage and rupture frequency estimates  

SciTech Connect

In order to perform detailed internal flooding risk analyses of nuclear power plants, external leakage and rupture frequencies are needed for various types of components - piping, valves, pumps, flanges, and others. However, there appears to be no up-to-date, comprehensive source for such frequency estimates. This report attempts to fill that void. Based on a comprehensive search of Licensee Event Reports (LERs) contained in Nuclear Power Experience (NPE), and estimates of component populations and exposure times, component external leakage and rupture frequencies were generated. The remainder of this report covers the specifies of the NPE search for external leakage and rupture events, analysis of the data, a comparison with frequency estimates from other sources, and a discussion of the results.

Eide, S.A.; Khericha, S.T.; Calley, M.B.; Johnson, D.A.; Marteeny, M.L.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Yerington Paiute Tribe Energy Plan Version 1  

SciTech Connect

The Yerington Paiute Tribe has made energy management and planning a priority. The Tribal Council has recognized that energy is an important component of their goal of self-sufficiency. Recognizing energy development as a component of the Tribes natural resources provides for needed economic development.A number of priorities have been identified for energy development. These range from immediate housing needs such as weatherization and solar to interest in energy as economic development.

Consulting, BB9 [BB9 Consulting; Director, Environmental

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Can we discover dual-component thermal WIMP dark matter?  

SciTech Connect

We address the question of whether the upcoming generation of dark matter search experiments and colliders will be able to discover if the dark matter in the Universe has two components of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). We outline a model-independent approach, and we study the specific cases of (1) direct detection with low-background 1 ton noble-gas detectors and (2) a 0.5 TeV center of mass energy electron-positron linear collider. We also analyze the case of indirect detection via two gamma-ray lines, which would provide a verification of such a discovery, although multiple gamma-ray lines can in principle originate from the annihilation of a single dark matter particle. For each search ''channel'', we outline a few assumptions to relate the very small set of parameters we consider (defining the masses of the two WIMPs and their relative abundance in the overall dark matter density) with the relevant detection rates. We then draw general conclusions on which corners of a generic dual-component dark matter scenario can be explored with current and next generation experiments. We find that in all channels the ideal setup is one where the relative mass splitting between the two WIMP species is of order 1, and where the two dark matter components contribute in a ratio close to 1:1 to the overall dark matter content of the Universe. Interestingly, in the case of direct detection, future experiments might detect multiple states even if only ? 10% of the energy-density of dark matter in the Universe is in the subdominant species.

Profumo, Stefano; Ubaldi, Lorenzo [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz CA 95064 (United States); Sigurdson, Kris, E-mail: profumo@scipp.ucsc.edu, E-mail: krs@physics.ubc.ca, E-mail: ubaldi@physics.ucsc.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

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