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1

Overview of NEMS-H2, Version 1.0  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NEMS-H2, Version 1.0 NEMS-H2, Version 1.0 Frances Wood OnLocation, Inc., Energy Systems Consulting (fwood@onlocationinc.com) January 26, 2006 OnLocation, Inc., Energy Systems Consulting 2 Today's Presentation * Overview of NEMS-H2 Structure * Current Status * New Hydrogen Market Module (HMM) * Transportation Module Modifications * Preliminary Test Runs * Looking Ahead to Next Phase OnLocation, Inc., Energy Systems Consulting 3 NEMS Overview * The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) was developed and is maintained by EIA - Annual Energy Outlook projections - Congressional as well as agency requests * NEMS has also been used extensively outside of EIA - Various National Laboratories studies - National Commission on Energy Policy - Program offices within DOE for R&D benefits estimation * Modular structure allows each sector to be represented by

2

NEMS integrating module documentation report  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer-based, energy-economy modeling system of U.S. energy markets for the midterm period. NEMS projects the production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy, subject to a variety of assumptions. The assumptions encompass macroeconomic and financial factors, world energy markets, resource availability and costs, behavioral and technological choice criteria, technology characteristics, and demographics. NEMS produces a general equilibrium solution for energy supply and demand in the U.S. energy markets on an annual basis through 2015. Baseline forecasts from NEMS are published in the Annual Energy Outlook. Analyses are also prepared in response to requests by the U.S. Congress, the DOE Office of Policy, and others. NEMS was first used for forecasts presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1994.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

EIA Buildings Analysis of Consumer Behavior in NEMS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings Analysis of Consumer Buildings Analysis of Consumer Behavior in NEMS Behavioral Economics Experts Meeting July 17, 2013 | Washington, DC David Peterson Buildings Energy Consumption and Efficiency Analysis Overview Behavioral Economics Experts Meeting, Washington DC, July 17, 2013 2 * NEMS Structure * Housing/floorspace and service demand in Residential Demand Module (RDM) and Commercial Demand Module (CDM) * Market share calculation for equipment in RDM and CDM * Price responses / elasticities * Distributed generation (DG) & combined heat and power (CHP) NEMS Structure Behavioral Economics Experts Meeting, Washington DC, July 17, 2013 3 * Represents energy supply, conversion, and demand in a unified, but modular system * Detailed structural and process models in most energy sectors

4

Integrated NEMS and optoelectronics for sensor applications.  

SciTech Connect

This work utilized advanced engineering in several fields to find solutions to the challenges presented by the integration of MEMS/NEMS with optoelectronics to realize a compact sensor system, comprised of a microfabricated sensor, VCSEL, and photodiode. By utilizing microfabrication techniques in the realization of the MEMS/NEMS component, the VCSEL and the photodiode, the system would be small in size and require less power than a macro-sized component. The work focused on two technologies, accelerometers and microphones, leveraged from other LDRD programs. The first technology was the nano-g accelerometer using a nanophotonic motion detection system (67023). This accelerometer had measured sensitivity of approximately 10 nano-g. The Integrated NEMS and optoelectronics LDRD supported the nano-g accelerometer LDRD by providing advanced designs for the accelerometers, packaging, and a detection scheme to encapsulate the accelerometer, furthering the testing capabilities beyond bench-top tests. A fully packaged and tested die was never realized, but significant packaging issues were addressed and many resolved. The second technology supported by this work was the ultrasensitive directional microphone arrays for military operations in urban terrain and future combat systems (93518). This application utilized a diffraction-based sensing technique with different optical component placement and a different detection scheme from the nano-g accelerometer. The Integrated NEMS LDRD supported the microphone array LDRD by providing custom designs, VCSELs, and measurement techniques to accelerometers that were fabricated from the same operational principles as the microphones, but contain proof masses for acceleration transduction. These devices were packaged at the end of the work.

Czaplewski, David A.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Olsson, Roy H., III; Bogart, Gregory R. (Symphony Acoustics, Rio Rancho, NM); Krishnamoorthy, Uma; Warren, Mial E.; Carr, Dustin Wade (Symphony Acoustics, Rio Rancho, NM); Okandan, Murat; Peterson, Kenneth Allen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer-based, energy-economy modeling system of U.S. through 2030. NEMS projects the production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy, subject to assumptions on macroeconomic and financial factors, world energy markets, resource availability and costs, behavioral and technological choice criteria, cost and performance characteristics of energy technologies, and demographics. NEMS was designed and implemented by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). NEMS can be used to analyze the effects of existing and proposed government laws and regulations related to energy production and use; the potential impact of new and advanced energy production, conversion, and consumption technologies; the impact and cost of greenhouse gas control; the impact of increased use of renewable energy sources; and the potential savings from increased efficiency of energy use; and the impact of regulations on the use of alternative or reformulated fuels. NEMS has also been used for a number of special analyses at the request of the Administration, U.S. Congress, other offices of DOE and other government agencies, who specify the scenarios and assumptions for the analysis. Modules allow analyses to be conducted in energy topic areas such as residential demand, industrial demand, electricity market, oil and gas supply, renewable fuels, etc.

6

NEMS Freight Transportation Module Improvement Study  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and forecast accuracy. Challenges might include new skill development within EIA, contracting for additional commercial services, and possibly altering the manner in which NEMS...

7

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Overview of NEMS  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

OVERVIEW OF NEMS OVERVIEW OF NEMS blueball.gif (205 bytes) Major Assumptions blueball.gif (205 bytes) NEMS Modular Structure blueball.gif (205 bytes) Integrating Module NEMS represents domestic energy markets by explicitly representing the economic decisionmaking involved in the production, conversion, and consumption of energy products. For example, the penetration of a new or advanced technology for electricity generation is projected only if the technology is deemed to be economic when considering the cost-minimizing mix of fuels over the life of the equipment. Since energy costs and availability and energy- consuming characteristics can vary widely across regions, considerable regional detail is included. Other details of production and consumption categories are represented to

8

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Overview of NEMS  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NEMS represents domestic energy markets by explicitly representing the economic decision making involved in the production, conversion, and consumption of energy products. Where possible, NEMS includes explicit representation of energy technologies and their characteristics. NEMS represents domestic energy markets by explicitly representing the economic decision making involved in the production, conversion, and consumption of energy products. Where possible, NEMS includes explicit representation of energy technologies and their characteristics. Since energy costs and availability and energy-consuming characteristics can vary widely across regions, considerable regional detail is included. Other details of production and consumption categories are represented to facilitate policy analysis and ensure the validity of the results. A summary of the detail provided in NEMS is shown below. Summary Table Major Assumptions Each module of NEMS embodies many assumptions and data to characterize the future production, conversion, or consumption of energy in the United States. Two major assumptions concern economic growth in the United States and world oil prices, as determined by world oil supply and demand.

9

Investigation of residential central air conditioning load shapes in NEMS  

SciTech Connect

This memo explains what Berkeley Lab has learned about how the residential central air-conditioning (CAC) end use is represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). NEMS is an energy model maintained by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) that is routinely used in analysis of energy efficiency standards for residential appliances. As part of analyzing utility and environmental impacts related to the federal rulemaking for residential CAC, lower-than-expected peak utility results prompted Berkeley Lab to investigate the input load shapes that characterize the peaky CAC end use and the submodule that treats load demand response. Investigations enabled a through understanding of the methodology by which hourly load profiles are input to the model and how the model is structured to respond to peak demand. Notably, it was discovered that NEMS was using an October-peaking load shape to represent residential space cooling, which suppressed peak effects to levels lower than expected. An apparent scaling down of the annual load within the load-demand submodule was found, another significant suppressor of the peak impacts. EIA promptly responded to Berkeley Lab's discoveries by updating numerous load shapes for the AEO2002 version of NEMS; EIA is still studying the scaling issue. As a result of this work, it was concluded that Berkeley Lab's customary end-use decrement approach was the most defensible way for Berkeley Lab to perform the recent CAC utility impact analysis. This approach was applied in conjunction with the updated AEO2002 load shapes to perform last year's published rulemaking analysis. Berkeley Lab experimented with several alternative approaches, including modifying the CAC efficiency level, but determined that these did not sufficiently improve the robustness of the method or results to warrant their implementation. Work in this area will continue in preparation for upcoming rulemakings for the other peak coincident end uses, commercial air conditioning and distribution transformers.

Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Marnay, Chris; Gumerman, Etan; Chan, Peter; Rosenquist, Greg; Osborn, Julie

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS National Climatic Data Center.with Changing Boundaries." Use of GIS to Understand Socio-Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS Appendix A. Map Results Gallery

Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

NEMS Freight Transportation Module Improvement Study  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) contracted with IHS Global, Inc. (IHS) to analyze the relationship between the value of industrial output, physical output, and freight movement in the United States for use in updating analytic assumptions and modeling structure within the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) freight transportation module, including forecasting methodologies and processes to identify possible alternative approaches that would improve multi-modal freight flow and fuel consumption estimation.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

How to obtain the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) NEMS is used by the modelers at the U. S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) who understand its structure and programming. NEMS has only been used by a few organizations outside of the EIA, because most people that requested NEMS found out that it was too difficult or rigid to use. NEMS is not typically used for state-level analysis and is poorly suited for application to other countries. However, many do obtain the model simply to use the data in its input files or to examine the source code.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Screening tests of representative nuclear power plant components exposed to secondary environments created by fires  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results of screening tests to determine component survivability in secondary environments created by fires, specifically increased temperatures, increased humidity, and the presence of particulates and corrosive vapors. Additionally, chloride concentrations were measured in the exhaust from several of the tests used to provide fire environments. Results show actual failure or some indication of failure for strip chart recorders, electronic counters, an oscilloscope amplifier, and switches and relays. The chart recorder failures resulted from accumulation of particulates on the pen slider mechanisms. The electronic counter experienced leakage current failures on circuit boards after the fire exposure and exposure to high humidity. The oscillosocpe amplifier experienced thermal-related drift as high as 20% before thermal protective circuitry shut the unit down. In some cases, switches and relays experienced high contact resistances with the low voltages levels used for the mesurements. Finally, relays tested to thermal failure experienced various failures, all at temperatures ranging from 150/sup 0/C to above 350/sup 0/C. The chloride measurements show that most of the hydrogen chloride generated in the test fires is combined with particulate by the time it reaches the exhaust duct, indicating that hydrogen chloride condensation may be less likely than small scale data implies. 13 refs., 36 figs.

Jacobus, M.J.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Agency/Company /Organization: Energy Information Administration Sector: Energy Focus Area: Economic Development Phase: Develop Goals Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.eia.gov/oiaf/aeo/overview/index.html OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, National Energy Modeling System, NEMS Language: English References: The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview[1] Project the production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy, subject to assumptions on macroeconomic and financial factors, world energy markets, resource availability and costs, behavioral and

15

Overview of NEMS-H2, Version 1.0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation on Overview of NEMS-H2, Version 1.0 given by Frances Wood of OnLocation during the DOE Hydrogen Transition Analysis Workshop on January 26, 2006.

16

Extrapolating Environmental Benefits from IGCC in NEMS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 2008 (April August 2008 (April 2009 Revision) DOE/NETL-402/080108 Water Requirements for Existing and Emerging Thermoelectric Plant Technologies Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or

17

U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a multi-sector, integrated model of the U.S. energy system put out by the Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration. NEMS is used to produce the annual 20-year forecast of U.S. energy use aggregated to the nine-region census division level. The research objective was to disaggregate this regional energy forecast to the county level for select forecast years, for use in a more detailed and accurate regional analysis of energy usage across the U.S. The process of disaggregation using a geographic information system (GIS) was researched and a model was created utilizing available population forecasts and climate zone data. The model's primary purpose was to generate an energy demand forecast with greater spatial resolution than what is currently produced by NEMS, and to produce a flexible model that can be used repeatedly as an add-on to NEMS in which detailed analysis can be executed exogenously with results fed back into the NEMS data flow. The methods developed were then applied to the study data to obtain residential and commercial electricity demand forecasts. The model was subjected to comparative and statistical testing to assess predictive accuracy. Forecasts using this model were robust and accurate in slow-growing, temperate regions such as the Midwest and Mountain regions. Interestingly, however, the model performed with less accuracy in the Pacific and Northwest regions of the country where population growth was more active. In the future more refined methods will be necessary to improve the accuracy of these forecasts. The disaggregation method was written into a flexible tool within the ArcGIS environment which enables the user to output the results in five year intervals over the period 2000-2025. In addition, the outputs of this tool were used to develop a time-series simulation showing the temporal changes in electricity forecasts in terms of absolute, per capita, and density of demand.

Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

A sensitivity analysis of the treatment of wind energy in the AEO99 version of NEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

other assumptions for wind power to determine which onesused in NEMS regarding wind power to determine their impact

Osborn, Julie G.; Wood, Frances; Richey, Cooper; Sanders, Sandy; Short, Walter; Koomey, Jonathan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Analysis and Representation of Miscellaneous Electric Loads in NEMS -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis and Representation of Miscellaneous Electric Loads in NEMS Analysis and Representation of Miscellaneous Electric Loads in NEMS Release date: January 6, 2014 Miscellaneous Electric Loads (MELs) comprise a growing portion of delivered energy consumption in residential and commercial buildings. Recently, the growth of MELs has offset some of the efficiency gains made through technology improvements and standards in major end uses such as space conditioning, lighting, and water heating. Miscellaneous end uses, including televisions, personal computers, security systems, data center servers, and many other devices, have continued to penetrate into building-related market segments. Part of this proliferation of devices and equipment can be attributed to increased service demand for entertainment, computing, and convenience appliances.

20

All-nanophotonic NEMS biosensor on a chip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated chemical and biological sensors give advantages in cost, size and weight reduction and open new prospects for parallel monitoring and analysis. Biosensors based on nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) are the most attractive candidates for the integrated platform. However, actuation and transduction techniques (e.g. electrostatic, magnetomotive, thermal or piezoelectric) limit their operation to laboratory conditions. All-optical approach gives the possibility to overcome this problem, nevertheless, the existing schemes are either fundamentally macroscopic or excessively complicated and expensive in mass production. Here we propose a novel scheme of extremely compact NEMS biosensor monolithically integrated on a chip with all-nanophotonic transduction and actuation. It consists of the photonic waveguide and the nanobeam cantilever placed above the waveguide, both fabricated in the same CMOS-compatible process. Being in the near field of the strongly confined photonic mode, cantilever is efficiently...

Fedyanin, Dmitry Yu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP results for the base case and scenarios.  

SciTech Connect

The NEMS-MP model generates numerous results for each run of a scenario. (This model is the integrated National Energy Modeling System [NEMS] version used for the Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study [MP].) This appendix examines additional findings beyond the primary results reported in the Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study: Vehicle Characterization and Scenario Analyses (Reference 1). These additional results are provided in order to help further illuminate some of the primary results. Specifically discussed in this appendix are: (1) Energy use results for light vehicles (LVs), including details about the underlying total vehicle miles traveled (VMT), the average vehicle fuel economy, and the volumes of the different fuels used; (2) Resource fuels and their use in the production of ethanol, hydrogen (H{sub 2}), and electricity; (3) Ethanol use in the scenarios (i.e., the ethanol consumption in E85 vs. other blends, the percent of travel by flex fuel vehicles on E85, etc.); (4) Relative availability of E85 and H2 stations; (5) Fuel prices; (6) Vehicle prices; and (7) Consumer savings. These results are discussed as follows: (1) The three scenarios (Mixed, (P)HEV & Ethanol, and H2 Success) when assuming vehicle prices developed through literature review; (2) The three scenarios with vehicle prices that incorporate the achievement of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program vehicle cost goals; (3) The three scenarios with 'literature review' vehicle prices, plus vehicle subsidies; and (4) The three scenarios with 'program goals' vehicle prices, plus vehicle subsidies. The four versions or cases of each scenario are referred to as: Literature Review No Subsidies, Program Goals No Subsidies, Literature Review with Subsidies, and Program Goals with Subsidies. Two additional points must be made here. First, none of the results presented for LVs in this section include Class 2B trucks. Results for this class are included occasionally in Reference 1. They represent a small, though noticeable, segment of the 'LV plus 2B' market (e.g., a little more than 3% of today's energy use in that market). We generally do not include them in this discussion, simply because it requires additional effort to combine the NEMS-MP results for them with the results for the other LVs. (Where there is an exception, we will indicate so.) Second, where reference is made to E85, the ethanol content is actually 74%. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) assumes that, to address cold-starting issues, the percent of ethanol in E85 will vary seasonally. The EIA uses an annual average ethanol content of 74% in its forecasts. That assumption is maintained in the NEMS-MP scenario runs.

Plotkin, S. E.; Singh, M. K.; Energy Systems

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

22

Price Responsiveness in the AEO2003 NEMS Residential and Commercial Buildings Sector Models  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper describes the demand responses to changes in energy prices in the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 versions of the Residential and Commercial Demand Modules of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). It updates a similar paper completed for the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 version of the NEMS.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

063-2011 063-2011 February 2011 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-2006 April 2006 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2011 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1063-2011 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) standard is approved for use by all DOE/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Components. 2. The revision to this DOE standard was developed by a working group consisting of headquarters and field participants. Beneficial comments (recommendations,

24

Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1063-2006 April 2006 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-2000 March 2000 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2006 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program web site at http://www.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-STD-1063-2006 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy standard is approved for use by all DOE Components. 2. The revision to this DOE standard was developed by a working group consisting of headquarters and field participants. Beneficial comments (recommendations, additions, deletions) and any pertinent data that may improve this document should

25

Nano-Electro-Mechanical (NEM) Relay Devices and Technology for Ultra-Low Energy Digital Integrated Circuits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology 3.1 Introduction Nano-electro-mechanical (NEM)improvements, a scaled nano-relay technology with optimizedNano-Electro-Mechanical (NEM) Relay Devices and Technology

Nathanael, Rhesa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Recycling Guide: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Recycling Information Call 301-496-7990 or visit the NEMS Website at http://www.nems.nih.gov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recycling Guide: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Recycling Information ­ Call 301-496-7990 or visit the NEMS in COMMINGLED bin Rinse food/beverage containers before recycling No Pyrex or Styrofoam Printer and Copier Toner Cartridges in TONER CARTRIDGE bin Recycle packaging material in appropriate bin NIH charities

Baker, Chris I.

27

Workshop on Opportunities for Magnetism in MEMS/NEMS, April 16-17, 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities for Magnetism in MEMS/NEMS Opportunities for Magnetism in MEMS/NEMS Argonne National Laboratory - April 16-17, 2010 Sponsored by NSF, NIST and Argonne National Laboratory Friday, April 16 13:00 Welcome and Introduction Chair: John Moreland 13:10 Pritiraj Mohanty Boston University "Study of Spin Dynamics using Nanomechanics" 13:50 T. Mitch Wallis NIST, Boulder "Measurement of the Einstein-de Haas Effect with a Microcantilever" 14:30 Albrecht Jander Oregon State University "Application of Torques to Nanostructures using Ferromagnetic Resonance" 15:10 Coffee Break Chair: Dennis Greywall 15:30 Rassul Karabalin Caltech "Next-Generation NEMS Functionality Enable by Advances in Novel Materials"

28

Comparison of Bottom-Up and Top-Down Forecasts: Vision Industry Energy Forecasts with ITEMS and NEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technologies, EIA extracted energy use infonnation from the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) - 2000 (8) for each of the seven # The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle Memorial Institute...-6, 2000 NEMS The NEMS industrial module is the official forecasting model for EIA and thus the Department of Energy. For this reason, the energy prices and output forecasts used to drive the ITEMS model were taken from EIA's AEO 2000. Understanding...

Roop, J. M.; Dahowski, R. T

29

NEM modication prevents high-anity ATP binding to the rst nucleotide binding fold of the sulphonylurea receptor, SUR1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NEM modi¢cation prevents high-a¤nity ATP binding to the ¢rst nucleotide binding fold, UK Received 7 July 1999; received in revised form 11 August 1999 Abstract Pancreatic LL-cell ATP WWM 8-azido- [KK-32 P]ATP or 8-azido-[QQ-32 P]ATP was inhibited by NEM with Ki of 1.8 WWM and 2.4 WWM

Tucker, Stephen J.

30

Assessment and Suggestions to Improve the Commercial Building Module of EIA-NEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

use from the base case divided by the total change in lighting electricity use from the base case. VI LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Impact of lighting energy reduction on heating and cooling energy use in the large office building Figure 2. Impact...-South-Central) for the Commercial Sector Demand Module of NEMS. Units are in MBtu/sq.ft./year. E = Electricity NG = Natural Gas O = Other LA This was usually done by metering consumption before and after the retrofit and then analyzing the data to account for weather and changes...

O'Neal, D. L.; Reddy, T. A.; Sucher, B.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Department Safety Representatives Department Safety Representative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department Safety Representatives Overview Department Safety Representative Program/Operations Guidance Document The Department Safety Representative (DSR) serves a very important role with implementation of safety, health, and environmental programs on campus. The role of the DSR is to assist

Pawlowski, Wojtek

32

Glossary Balancing Item: Represents  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Balancing Balancing Item: Represents differences between the sum of the components of natural gas supply and the sum of the components of natural gas disposition. These differences may be due to quantities lost or to the effects of data-report- ing problems. Reporting problems include differences due to the net result of conversions of flow data metered at varying temperature and pressure bases and converted to a standard temperature and pressure base; the effect of vari- ations in company accounting and billing practices; differ- ences between billing cycle and calendar period time frames; and imbalances resulting from the merger of data- reporting systems that vary in scope, format, definitions, and type of respondents. Biomass Gas: A medium Btu gas containing methane and carbon dioxide, resulting from the action of microorganisms on organic materials such as a landfill. British Thermal

33

Facility Representative Program: 2000 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Facility Representative Workshop 0 Facility Representative Workshop May 16-18, 2000 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Tuesday, May 16, 2000 Theme for Day 1: Sustaining the Success of the Facility Representative Program 8:00 a.m. - Opening Remarks - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:05 a.m. - Welcome - Kenneth Powers, Deputy Manager Nevada Operations Office 8:15 a.m. - Deputy Secretary Remarks - T. J. Glauthier, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:30 a.m. - Keynote Address - Jerry Lyle, Assistant Manager for Environmental Management, Idaho Operations Office 9:00 a.m. - Facility Representative of the Year Presentation - Mark B. Whitaker, Departmental Representative 9:30 a.m. - Break 9:50 a.m. - Program Results and Goals - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager

34

Facility Representative Program: 2010 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 Facility Representative Workshop 10 Facility Representative Workshop May 12 - 13, 2010 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees | Summary Report Workshop Agenda and Presentations Day 1: Wednesday, May 12, 2010 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks James Heffner, Facility Representative Program Manager Earl Hughes, Safety System Oversight Program Manager Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Assistance Office of Health, Safety and Security 8:15 a.m. Welcome from the Nevada Site Office John Mallin, Deputy Assistant Manager for Site Operations Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Workshop Keynote Address Todd Lapointe Chief of Nuclear Safety Central Technical Authority Staff 9:15 a.m. Facility Representative and Safety System Oversight Award Ceremony James Heffner, Facility Representative Program Manager

35

Facility Representative Program: 2007 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Facility Representative Workshop 7 Facility Representative Workshop May 15 - 17, 2007 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Final Day 1: Tuesday, May 15, 2007 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks Joanne Lorence, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome from the Nevada Site Office Gerald Talbot, Manager, Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary The Honorable Clay Sell, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:45 a.m. Keynote Address - Safety Oversight Perspective and Expectations Glenn Podonsky, Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer, Office of Health, Safety and Security 9:10 a.m. Facility Representative of the Year Presentation Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board,

36

Facility Representative Program: 2003 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Facility Representative Workshop 3 Facility Representative Workshop May 13 - 15, 2003 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Day 1: Tuesday, May 13, 2003 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. John Evans, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome Kathleen Carlson Manager, Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Keynote Address Savannah River Site and Facility Reps - A Shared History and Common Future Jeffrey M. Allison Manager, Savannah River Operations Office 9:00 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary Kyle E. McSlarrow, Deputy Secretary of Energy 9:10 a.m. Facility Representative of the Year Presentation Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

37

Facility Representative Program: 2001 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Facility Representative Workshop 1 Facility Representative Workshop May 15 - 17, 2001 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Day 1: Tuesday, May 15, 2001 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. - Logistics Announcements & Opening Remarks - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. - Welcome - Debbie Monette, Assistant Manager for National Security, Nevada Operations Office 8:30 a.m. - Keynote Address - Ralph Erickson, National Nuclear Security Administration 9:00 a.m.- DOE Facility Representative of the Year Presentation - Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board 9:30 a.m. - Break 9:50 a.m. - Program Summary - Joe Arango 10:10 a.m. - Management Panel/Questions and Answers

38

Facility Representative Program: Facility Representative Program Sponsors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Program Sponsors Facility Representative Program Sponsors There are 29 Facility Representative Program Sponsors Office Name Title E-Mail Phone ASO Larry Pendexter ES&H Div Dir (Argonne) larry.pendexter@ch.doe.gov 630-252-1485 BHSO Bob Desmarais Operations Management Division Director desmarai@bnl.gov 631-344-5434 CBFO Glenn Gamlin Facility Representative Supervisor glenn.gamlin@wipp.ws 575-234-8136 CBFO Casey Gadbury Operations Manager casey.gadbury@wipp.ws 575-234-7372 FSO Mark Bollinger Deputy Manager Mark.Bollinger@ch.doe.gov 630-840-8130 FSO John Scott FR Team Lead john.scott@ch.doe.gov 630-840-2250 HS-30 James O'Brien Director, Office of Nuclear Safety James.O'Brien@hq.doe.gov 301-903-1408 HS-32 Earl Hughes Facility Representative Program Manager Earl.Hughes@hq.doe.gov 202-586-0065

39

Facility Representative Program: 2004 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Facility Representative Workshop 4 Facility Representative Workshop May 18 - 20, 2004 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Final Day 1: Tuesday, May 18, 2004 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks John Evans, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome Kathy Carlson, Nevada Site Office Manager 8:30 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary Kyle E. McSlarrow, Deputy Secretary of Energy Deputy Secretary's Remarks 8:40 a.m. Keynote Address - NNSA Evaluation of Columbia Accident Investigation Board Report Brigadier General Ronald J. Haeckel, Principal Assistant Deputy Administrator for Military Applications, NNSA Other Information: NASA’S Columbia Accident Investigation Board Report

40

Facility Representative Program: 2006 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Facility Representative Workshop 6 Facility Representative Workshop May 16 - 19, 2006 Knoxville, Tennessee Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Final To view Pictures, scroll the mouse over the Picture icon To view Presentations, Picture Slideshows and Video, click on the icon Day 1: Tuesday, May 16, 2006 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks John Evans, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome from Oak Ridge Office Gerald Boyd, Manager, Oak Ridge Office 8:25 a.m. Welcome from Y-12 Site Office Theodore Sherry, Manager, Y-12 Site Office 8:35 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary The Honorable Clay Sell, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:40 a.m. Keynote Address - Safety Oversight at Environmental Management Activities Dr. Inés Triay, Chief Operating Officer, Office of Environmental Management

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study: Vehicle Characterization and Scenario Analyses - Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP Results for the Base Case and Scenarios  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP Results Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP Results for the Base Case and Scenarios Energy Systems Division Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available on paper to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, for a processing fee, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62

42

Facility Representative Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Facility Representative Office of Nuclear Safety Home Facility Representative Home Annual Facility Rep Workshop › 2012 › 2011 › 2010 › 2009 › 2008 › 2007 › 2006 › 2005 › 2004 › 2003 › 2002 › 2001 › 2000 DOE Safety Links › ORPS Info › Operating Experience › DOE Lessons Learned › Accident Investigation Assessment Tools › FR CRADs › Surveillance Guides › Manager's Guide for Safety and Health Subject Matter Links General Program Information › Program Mission Statement › Program Directives and Guidance › FR of the Year Award Program › FR of the Year Award › FR Program Assessment Guide (Appendix B, DOE STD 1063-2011) FR Quarterly Performance Indicators Training & Qualification Information › Qualification Standards › Energy Online Courses

43

On representing chemical environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We review some recently published methods to represent atomic neighborhood environments, and analyze their relative merits in terms of their faithfulness and suitability for fitting potential energy surfaces. The crucial properties that such representations (sometimes called descriptors) must have are differentiability with respect to moving the atoms and invariance to the basic symmetries of physics: rotation, reflection, translation, and permutation of atoms of the same species. We demonstrate that certain widely used descriptors that initially look quite different are specific cases of a general approach, in which a finite set of basis functions with increasing angular wave numbers are used to expand the atomic neighborhood density function. Using the example system of small clusters, we quantitatively show that this expansion needs to be carried to higher and higher wave numbers as the number of neighbors increases in order to obtain a faithful representation, and that variants of the descriptors converge at very different rates. We also propose an altogether different approach, called Smooth Overlap of Atomic Positions, that sidesteps these difficulties by directly defining the similarity between any two neighborhood environments, and show that it is still closely connected to the invariant descriptors. We test the performance of the various representations by fitting models to the potential energy surface of small silicon clusters and the bulk crystal.

Albert P. Bartk; Risi Kondor; Gbor Csnyi

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

44

14 - Graphene nanoelectromechanics (NEMS)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: The use of graphene in the development of nanoscale mechanical structures is reviewed. The recent development of graphene resonators and techniques used to fabricate and characterise them is described. Some applications in sensor technology are highlighted.

Z. Moktadir

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source -Sound Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source - Sound Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency Wave represents pressure Target - Radio Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency

Colorado at Boulder, University of

46

Facility Representative Program: Facility Representative of the Year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative of the Year Award Facility Representative of the Year Award Annual Facility Representative Workshop Facility Representative of the Year Award Process Facility Representative of the Year Award 2012 WINNER: John C. Barnes, Savannah River Operations Office Letter from DNFSB Chairman Peter S. Winokur, Ph.D 2012 Nominees: Peter W. Kelley, Brookhaven Site Office James E. Garza, Idaho Operations Office (EM) William R. Watson, Idaho Operations Office (NE) Darlene S. Rodriguez, Los Alamos Field Office Robert R. Robb, Livermore Field Office Kenneth W. Wethington, Grand Junction Project Office's Moab site Thomas P. Denny, Nevada Field Office Michael J. Childers, NNSA Production Office Pantex Site Catherine T. Schidel, NNSA Production Office Y12 Site Chelsea D. Hubbard, Oak Ridge Operations Office (EM)

47

FAQS Reference Guide Facility Representative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the October 2010 edition of DOE-STD-1151-2010, Facility Representative Functional Area Qualification Standard.

48

Facility Representative Program: Qualification Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training & Qualification Information Training & Qualification Information Qualification Standards DOE Order Self-Study Modules DOE Fundamentals Handbooks Nuclear Safety Basis Self-Study Guide Energy Online Courses Available Link to National Training Center Basic Courses for Facility Representative Qualification Recommended Courses to Expand Facility Representative's Knowledge Base Qualification Standards General Technical Base Qualification Standard, Qualification Card & Reference Guide -- GTB Qualification Standard (DOE-STD-1146-2007), December 2007 [PDF] -- GTB Qualification Card, December 2007 [DOC] -- GTB "Gap" Qualification Card, December 2007 [DOC] -- GTB Qualification Standard Reference Guide, May 2008 [PDF] Facility Representative Qualification Standard, Qualification Card & Reference Guide

49

Facility Representative Program: Basic Courses For Facility Representative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training & Qualification Information Training & Qualification Information Qualification Standards DOE Order Self-Study Modules DOE Fundamentals Handbooks Nuclear Safety Basis Self-Study Guide Energy Online Courses Available Link to National Training Center Basic Courses for Facility Representative Qualification Recommended Courses to Expand Facility Representative's Knowledge Base Basic Courses For Facility Rep Qualification (These courses may be beneficial during the initial qualification of Facility Representatives.) Course Title FR FAQS CN Point of Contact Comments Applied Engineering Fundamentals 13 days * See below Mike Schoener 803-641-8166 E-mail Course description at http://ntc.doe.gov course catalog Asbestos Awareness 2 hours 2.1 Federal employees register through the CHRIS system For course details see

50

Stack Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stack Components Stack Components Nancy L. Garland Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Fuel Cell Team FORS 5G-086 (202) 586-5673 nancy.garland@ee.doe.gov Stack Components F u e l P r o c e s s o r Bipolar Plate Cathode + Anode - Electrolyte H+ H+ HYDROGEN OXYGEN Example shown is for acidic electrolytes Bipolar Plate e - e - O 2 O 2 O 2 e - H+ Bipolar Plate Bipolar Plate Cathode + Anode - Electrolyte H+ H+ H+ H+ HYDROGEN OXYGEN Example shown is for acidic electrolytes Bipolar Plate Bipolar Plate e - e - e - e - O 2 O 2 O 2 O 2 O 2 O 2 e - e - H+ H+ Power Stack Component Barriers $10 Other Bipolar Plates Membranes Electrodes $25 $5 $5 Fuel Cell Power Systems $45/kW BARRIERS * Stack material cost/manufacturing * Durability * Electrode performance * Thermal and water management Stack Component Targets

51

Facility Representative Program: Facility Representative of the Year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Facility Representative Office of Nuclear Safety Home Facility Representative Home Annual Facility Rep Workshop › 2012 › 2011 › 2010 › 2009 › 2008 › 2007 › 2006 › 2005 › 2004 › 2003 › 2002 › 2001 › 2000 DOE Safety Links › ORPS Info › Operating Experience › DOE Lessons Learned › Accident Investigation Assessment Tools › FR CRADs › Surveillance Guides › Manager's Guide for Safety and Health Subject Matter Links General Program Information › Program Mission Statement › Program Directives and Guidance › FR of the Year Award Program › FR of the Year Award › FR Program Assessment Guide (Appendix B, DOE STD 1063-2011) FR Quarterly Performance Indicators Training & Qualification Information › Qualification Standards › Energy Online Courses

52

Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of Project Activity ORD-FY04-012, Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative, was to provide the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) with expertise on past, present, and future climate scenarios and to support the technical elements of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) climate program. The Climate Technical Support Representative was to explain, defend, and interpret the YMP climate program to the various audiences during Site Recommendation and License Application. This technical support representative was to support DOE management in the preparation and review of documents, and to participate in comment response for the Final Environmental Impact Statement, the Site Recommendation Hearings, the NRC Sufficiency Comments, and other forums as designated by DOE management. Because the activity was terminated 12 months early and experience a 27% reduction in budget, it was not possible to complete all components of the tasks as originally envisioned. Activities not completed include the qualification of climate datasets and the production of a qualified technical report. The following final report is an unqualified summary of the activities that were completed given the reduced time and funding.

Sharpe, Saxon E

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

53

PSCAD Modules Representing PV Generator  

SciTech Connect

Photovoltaic power plants (PVPs) have been growing in size, and the installation time is very short. With the cost of photovoltaic (PV) panels dropping in recent years, it can be predicted that in the next 10 years the contribution of PVPs to the total number of renewable energy power plants will grow significantly. In this project, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a dynamic modeling of the modules to be used as building blocks to develop simulation models of single PV arrays, expanded to include Maximum Power Point Tracker (MPPT), expanded to include PV inverter, or expanded to cover an entire PVP. The focus of the investigation and complexity of the simulation determines the components that must be included in the simulation. The development of the PV inverter was covered in detail, including the control diagrams. Both the current-regulated voltage source inverter and the current-regulated current source inverter were developed in PSCAD. Various operations of the PV inverters were simulated under normal and abnormal conditions. Symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults were simulated, presented, and discussed. Both the three-phase analysis and the symmetrical component analysis were included to clarify the understanding of unsymmetrical faults. The dynamic model validation was based on the testing data provided by SCE. Testing was conducted at SCE with the focus on the grid interface behavior of the PV inverter under different faults and disturbances. The dynamic model validation covers both the symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults.

Muljadi, E.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Representing and encoding plant architecture: A review Christophe Godin*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review Representing and encoding plant architecture: A review Christophe Godin* CIRAD, Programme de and topological organisation of these components defines the plant architecture. Before the early 1970's-performance computers have become available for plant growth analysis and simulation, trig- gering the development

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

55

General Engineer / Physical Scientist (Facility Representative)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Facility Representatives (FRs) are line management's on-site technical representative with responsibility for identifying and evaluating environmental, safety and health issues and concerns,...

56

FAQS Job Task Analyses - Facility Representative | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Representative FAQS Job Task Analyses - Facility Representative FAQS Job Task Analyses are performed on the Function Area Qualification Standards. The FAQS Job Task...

57

Facility Representative of the Year Award  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPRESENTATIVE OF THE YEAR AWARD PROGRAM REPRESENTATIVE OF THE YEAR AWARD PROGRAM OBJECTIVE The Facility Representative Award Program is a special award designed to recognize superior or exemplary service by a Facility Representative over a period of one year. This special award program has been established in accordance with the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 331.1C, Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program. FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE OF THE YEAR AWARD The Facility Representative of the Year Award is determined by a panel representing the Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer and managers from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), the Office of Environmental Management (EM), the Office of Science (SC), and the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE). The Facility Representative Program Manager in

58

DOE ORP Contracting Officer Representatives - Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE ORP Contracting Officer Representatives DOE - ORP ContractsProcurements ORP Contracts & Procurements Home DOE-ORP Contract Management Plans DOE-ORP Prime Contracts DOE-ORP...

59

Representativeness models of systems: smart grid example  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Given the great emphasis being placed on energy efficiency in contemporary society, in which the smart grid plays a prominent role, this is an opportune time to explore methodologies for appropriately representing system attributes. We suggest this is ... Keywords: Smart grid, System representativeness

Norman Schneidewind

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program, Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program, 12/17/1998 Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program, 12/17/1998 The Department's Revised Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 93-3 has once again underscored the Department's commitment to maintaining the technical capability necessary to safely manage and operate our defense nuclear facilities. Attracting and retaining highly qualified employees and placing them in our critical technical positions is vital to fi.dfilling this commitment. You have identified 95'% of your Facility Representative positions as critical technical positions. The Office of Field Management has noted a 12'?40annual attrition rate of Facility Representatives from the Facility

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Representing El Nio in Coupled OceanAtmosphere GCMs: The Dominant Role of the Atmospheric Component  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A systematic modular approach to investigate the respective roles of the ocean and atmosphere in setting El Nio characteristics in coupled general circulation models is presented. Several state-of-the-art coupled models sharing either the same ...

E. Guilyardi; S. Gualdi; J. Slingo; A. Navarra; P. Delecluse; J. Cole; G. Madec; M. Roberts; M. Latif; L. Terray

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Advisory Board Seats New Student Representatives | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board (ORSSAB) welcomed two new student representatives at its May meeting. Gracie Hall and Julia Riley will serve...

63

Authorizing Official Designated Representative (AODR) | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the AO Representative role will have a working knowledge of system function, security policies, and technical security safeguards, and serve as technical advisor(s) to the AO. AODR...

64

Facility Representative Program, Criteria & Review Approach Documents  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This page provides Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADS) to assist Facility Representatives. Please submit your CRADS for posting by sending them to the HQ FR Program Manager. Please include the subject, date, and a contact person.

65

A Capital Market Test of Representativeness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. I also provide evidence that rejects a theory based on fixation in favor of representativeness. These results document evidence of overreaction to past sales growth in firms where underreaction to fundamentals does not confound the overreaction due...

Safdar, Mohammad

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

66

FOOD SECURITY FUEL INDEPENDENCE These projects represent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FOOD SECURITY FUEL INDEPENDENCE These projects represent a huge effort to determine and improve pressing challenges. ASH 1% ASH 1% ASH 1% OTHERS 6% OTHERS 6% OTHERS 6% OIL 2% OIL 10% OIL 20% SUCROSE 45% LIPID CANE Produce and store oil in the stem in place of sugar During photosynthesis, sugarcane

Bashir, Rashid

67

An iconic approach to representing climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 An iconic approach to representing climate change Saffron Jessica O'Neill A thesis submitted-experts to be meaningfully engaged with the issue of climate change. This thesis investigates the value of engaging non-experts with climate change at the individual level. Research demonstrates that individuals perceive climate change

Feigon, Brooke

68

Book Reviews NETL: A System for Representing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Book Reviews NETL: A System for Representing and Using Real-World Knowledge Scott E. Fahlman structure which can be con- sidered on its own merits, independently of such tim- ing considerations. NETL in the original]. The central organizing principle of NETL is a prop- erty inheritance hierarchy using nodes

Shapiro, Stuart C.

69

ARM - Evaluation Product - Organic Aerosol Component VAP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsOrganic Aerosol Component VAP ProductsOrganic Aerosol Component VAP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Organic Aerosol Component VAP 2011.01.08 - 2012.03.24 Site(s) SGP General Description Organic aerosol (OA, i.e., the organic fraction of particles) accounts for 10-90% of the fine aerosol mass globally and is a key determinant of aerosol radiative forcing. But atmospheric OA is poorly characterized and its life cycle insufficiently represented in models. As a result, current models are unable to simulate OA concentrations and properties. This deficiency represents a large source of uncertainty in the quantification of aerosol direct and indirect effects and the prediction of future climate change. The Organic Aerosol Component (OACOMP) value-added product (VAP) uses

70

Data structures and apparatuses for representing knowledge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Data structures and apparatuses to represent knowledge are disclosed. The processes can comprise labeling elements in a knowledge signature according to concepts in an ontology and populating the elements with confidence values. The data structures can comprise knowledge signatures stored on computer-readable media. The knowledge signatures comprise a matrix structure having elements labeled according to concepts in an ontology, wherein the value of the element represents a confidence that the concept is present in an information space. The apparatus can comprise a knowledge representation unit having at least one ontology stored on a computer-readable medium, at least one data-receiving device, and a processor configured to generate knowledge signatures by comparing datasets obtained by the data-receiving devices to the ontologies.

Hohimer, Ryan E; Thomson, Judi R; Harvey, William J; Paulson, Patrick R; Whiting, Mark A; Tratz, Stephen C; Chappell, Alan R; Butner, Robert S

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

71

DOE-STD-1063-2000 - Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2000 March 2000 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-97 October 1997 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1063-2000 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy standard is approved for use by all DOE Components. 2. The Revision to this DOE standard was developed by a working group consisting of

72

Hydrates represent gas source, drilling hazard  

SciTech Connect

Gas hydrates look like ordinary ice. However, if a piece of such ice is put into warm water its behavior will be different from the ordinary melting of normal ice. In contrast, gas hydrates cause bubbles in the warm water, which indicates the high content of gas in the hydrate crystals. The presence of four components is required: gas itself, water, high pressure, and low temperature. The paper discusses how hydrates form, hydrates stability, South Caspian hydrates, and hydrates hazards for people, ships, pipelines, and drilling platforms.

Bagirov, E. [Azerbaijan Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan); Lerche, I. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

1997 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees Last Name First Office Location Phone E-Mail Anderson Mike ID CFATAN (208) 526-7418 andersmr@id.doe.gov Bell Bill AL LAAO (505) 665-6324 bbell@doeal.gov Biro Brian RL LABS (509) 376-7660 brian_a_biro@rl.gov Brown Mark RL TANKS (509) 373-9150 mark_c_brown@rl.gov Charboneau Briant RL 324/327 (509) 373-6137 briant_L_charboneau@rl.gov Daniels Rick OR HFIR (423) 574-9143 e29@ornl.gov Dennis Jack AL AAO (806) 477-3176 jdennis@pantex.com Dikeakos Maria CH BHG (516) 344-3950 dikeako@bnl.gov Duey Don AL AAO (806) 477-6987 dduey@pantex.com Earley Larry RL WRAP (509) 373-9388 larry_d_earley@rl.gov Eddy Doug OAK LLNL (925) 422-3379 doug.eddy@oak.doe.gov Edwards Robert SR NMSD (803) 208-2645 robert-e.edwards@srs.gov

74

1998 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees 8 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees Last Name First Office Location Phone Fax E-Mail Alvord Bob OAK LLNL (925) 422-0830 (925) 422-0832 robert.alvord@oak.doe.gov Barnes John SR SRTC (803) 208-2628 (803) 208-1123 johnc.barnes@srs.gov Bell Fred AL LAAO (505) 665-4856 (505) 665-9230 fbell@doeal.gov Bell Bill AL LAAO (505) 665-6324 (505) 665-9230 bbell@doeal.gov Bennett Rick RF DOE (303) 966-8155 (303) 966-7447 rick.bennett@rfets.gov Biro Brian RL LABS (509) 376-7660 (509) 376-9837 brian_a_biro@rl.gov Blanco Jose SR DWPF (803) 208-7022 (803) 557-8223 jose.blanco@srs.gov Charboneau Briant RL 324/327 (509) 373-6137 (509) 373-9839 briant_L_charboneau@rl.gov Christensen Debbie AL OMD (505) 845-5239 dschristensen@doeal.gov Clifton Gary OR ORNL (423) 576-6810 (423) 574-9275 g7y@ornl.gov

75

Laboratory or Facility Representative Email Addresses Phone #  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory or Facility Representative Email Addresses Phone # Ames Laboratory Stacy Joiner joiner@ameslab.gov 515-294-5932 Argonne National Laboratory Connie Cleary ccleary@anl.gov 630-252-8111 Brookhaven National Laboratory Walter Copan wcopan@bnl.gov 631-344-3035 Fermi National Acclerator Laboratory Bruce Chrisman chrisman@fnal.gov 630-840-6657 Idaho National Laboratory Steven McMaster steven.mcmaster@inl.gov 208-526-1340 Kansas City Plant Caron O'Dower codower@kcp.com 816-997-2645 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Viviana Wolinsky viwolinsky@lbl.gov 510-486-6463 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Roger Werne werne1@llnl.gov 925-423-9353 Los Alamos National Laboratory John Mott jmott@lanl.gov 505-665-0883 National Energy Technology Laboratory Jessica Sosenko jessica.sosenko@netl.doe.gov 412-386-7417

76

Facility Representative Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1151-2010 October 2010 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1151-2010 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Office of Health, Safety and Security Approved DOE Technical Standards Web Site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/standard/standard.html DOE-STD-1151-2010 iii APPROVAL The Federal Technical Capability Panel consists of senior U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) managers responsible for overseeing the Federal Technical Capability Program. This Panel is

77

Electronic Component Obsolescence  

SciTech Connect

Electronic component obsolescence occurs when parts are no longer available to support the manufacture and/or repair of equipment still in service. Future instrumentation containing complex components WILL face obsolescence issues as technology advances. This paper describes hardware and software obsolescence as well as factors to consider when designing new instrumentation.

Sohns, Carl William [ORNL; Ward, Christina D [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Department of Defense Representatives Visit Hanford to Benchmark...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Representatives Visit Hanford to Benchmark Safety Department of Defense Representatives Visit Hanford to Benchmark Safety FLUOR News Release RICHLAND, Wash., December 16, 2005,...

79

Building and Connecting Components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While equations are an essential part of model development, it quickly becomes tedious to write out all the equations for the components in a system. In this chapter, we show how to reuse constitutive equation...

Michael Tiller Ph.D.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Integrating Program Component Executables  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrating Integrating Program Component Executables on Distributed Memory Architectures via MPH Chris Ding and Yun He Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA chqding@lbl.gov, yhe@lbl.gov Abstract A growing trend in developing large and complex ap- plications on today's Teraflop computers is to integrate stand-alone and/or semi-independent program components into a comprehensive simulation package. One example is the climate system model which consists of atmosphere, ocean, land-surface and sea-ice. Each component is semi- independent and has been developed at different institu- tions. We study how this multi-component multi-executable application can run effectively on distributed memory archi- tectures. We identify five effective execution modes and de- velop the MPH library to support

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. From 1982 through 1993, the Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS) was used by the EIA for its analyses, and the Gas Analysis Modeling System (GAMS) was used within IFFS to represent natural gas markets. Prior to 1982, the Midterm Energy Forecasting System (MEFS), also referred to as the Project Independence Evaluation System (PIES), was employed. NEMS was developed to enhance and update EIA`s modeling capability by internally incorporating models of energy markets that had previously been analyzed off-line. In addition, greater structural detail in NEMS permits the analysis of a broader range of energy issues. The time horizon of NEMS is the midterm period (i.e., through 2015). In order to represent the regional differences in energy markets, the component models of NEMS function at regional levels appropriate for the markets represented, with subsequent aggregation/disaggregation to the Census Division level for reporting purposes.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

LMFBR fuel component costs  

SciTech Connect

A significant portion of the cost of fabricating LMFBR fuels is in the non-fuel components such as fuel pin cladding, fuel assembly ducts and end fittings. The contribution of these to fuel fabrication costs, based on FFTF experience and extrapolated to large LMFBR fuel loadings, is discussed. The extrapolation considers the expected effects of LMFBR development programs in progress on non-fuel component costs.

Epperson, E.M.; Borisch, R.R.; Rice, L.H.

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

83

NEMS Buildings Sector Working Group Meeting  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

20 * Photovoltaic system cost path - Updated 2010 system costs based on Tracking the Sun IV (LBNL, 2011) * No change from AEO2012 for residential, 7% lower for commercial -...

84

1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January through March 2012. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standarf 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for January-March 2012 More Documents & Publications 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

85

3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period July through September 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy's (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for July - September 2011 More Documents & Publications 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

86

Facility Representative Program ID Selects FR of the Year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Program ID Selects Facility Representative Program ID Selects FR of the Year John Martin DOE-ID Facility Representative John Martin DOE-ID Facility Representative of the Year. John Martin was selected as DOE-ID's Facility Representative of the Year and the office's nominee for the 2007 DOE Facility Representative of the Year Award. John was selected from an exceptional field of candidates to represent DOE-ID at the Facility Representative Annual Workshop in Las Vegas this May. Each year the Department of Energy recognizes the Facility Representative whose achievements during the calendar year are most exemplary. A panel of senior personnel representing the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Environmental Management (EM), Science (SC), Nuclear Energy (NE) and at least five

87

3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from July to September 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. 3Q CY2003, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

88

FAQS Qualification Card - Facility Representative | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Representative Representative FAQS Qualification Card - Facility Representative A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-FacilityRepresentative.docx Description Facility Representative Qualification Card More Documents & Publications FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card - Facility Representative

89

2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from April to June 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. A total of 13 Facility Representatives transferred to other positions during the quarter. Five of these accepted Facility Representative positions at other sites. Of the 8 that left the Program. 1 recieved a promotion and 7 accepted lateral positions. All of

90

2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. 2Q CY2006, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

91

4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. As of December 31,2003, 93% of all Facility Representatives were fully qualified, exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Currently, 23 of 27 sites meet the goal of 80%. Currently, 23 of 27 sites meet the goal for Facility Representative

92

1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE CONFERENCE June 21 25, 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy will host the Facility Representative Annual Meeting on June 21-25, 1999 at the Alexis Park Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada. The meeting will give Facility Representatives and...

93

Clostridium ljungdahlii represents a microbial production platform based on syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...represents a microbial production platform based on syngas 10.1073/pnas...novel biotechnological production platform based on syngas and CO 2 /H 2 . Results and Discussion...represents a microbial production platform based on syngas. | Clostridium...

Michael Kpke; Claudia Held; Sandra Hujer; Heiko Liesegang; Arnim Wiezer; Antje Wollherr; Armin Ehrenreich; Wolfgang Liebl; Gerhard Gottschalk; Peter Drre

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

BNL CRCR LEAF Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A detailed description of the LEAF facility is given in Rev. Sci. Inst. 75, A detailed description of the LEAF facility is given in Rev. Sci. Inst. 75, 4359-4366 (2004), which can be found by following this link. Accelerator System Components The LEAF facility layout indicates the locations of the laser system, the RF components, the electron gun and the beam lines. RF System The modulator cabinet and S-band (2.856 GHz) klystron are located in the laser room. A copper waveguide carries the 15 MW RF pulse from the klystron to the electron gun in the accelerator vault. (A klystron is a high-power RF amplifier. You can visit the ALS MicroWorlds site for more information on klystrons and the principles of RF particle acceleration.) Electron Gun Accelerator and Beam Line 5 psec beam line The electron gun (link to picture) is located in the southwest corner of

95

Injection molded component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An intermediate component includes a first wall member, a leachable material layer, and a precursor wall member. The first wall member has an outer surface and first connecting structure. The leachable material layer is provided on the first wall member outer surface. The precursor wall member is formed adjacent to the leachable material layer from a metal powder mixed with a binder material, and includes second connecting structure.

James, Allister W; Arrell, Douglas J

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. A summary of this quarters data concluded: 76% fully qualified 41% staffing level

97

2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to impove the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 74% Fully Qualified 94% Staffing Level ( last quarter was

98

4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. A summary of this quarters data concluded: 72% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was

99

2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2008. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 87% Fully Qualifed ( last quarter was 85%) 86% Staffing Level ( last quarter was 88%)

100

1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March2010. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report are presented below." 1Q CY2010, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period of July through September 2010. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representative and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for July - September 2010 More Documents & Publications 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

102

1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from January 2000 to March 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, DOE-STD-1 063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definitions of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data." 1Q CY2000, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

103

4Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (Pis) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. The format of the report is changed from past reports. Information will now be provided according to the major offices having field or site office Facility Representative programs: National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSSA), the Office of

104

3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE-STD-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. A summary of this quarter 's data concluded: 3Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

105

1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from January to March 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. The percentage of Facility Representatives who are fully qualified reached 91% across DOE. In EM the percenage of 97%, in Sc the percentage is 95% and in NNSA the percentage is 78%. The DOE goal is 75%. Staffing levels for the three organizations continue to be below

106

Student Committee Representatives Guidelines Congratulations on being selected as a student representative to a GSLIS committee! We are  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Student Committee Representatives Guidelines Congratulations on being selected as a student to your resume or CV. Your job is to represent students to committees and committees to students. You represent the student body to the committee. Your job is to advocate for your fellow students by bringing

Gilbert, Matthew

107

Student Assembly Offices Student Assembly Representatives: There are four representatives per class to the Student Assembly. Their duties are to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Student Assembly Offices Student Assembly Representatives: There are four representatives per class to the Student Assembly. Their duties are to: Represent the student body of the Medical College of Wisconsin-section of the student body. Fairly administer and distribute all funds including those designated as Student Activity

108

Facility Representative of the Year Award | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Representative of the Year Award Facility Representative of the Year Award Facility Representative of the Year Award Departmental Award Program administered by the Office of Chief Information Officer The Facility Representative Award Program is a special award designed to recognize superior or exemplary service by a Facility Representative over a period of one year. This special award program has been established in accordance with the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 331.1C, Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program. Facility Representative of the Year Award Responsible Contacts Lorrenda Buckner HUMAN RESOURCES SPECIALIST (PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT) E-mail lorrenda.buckner@hq.doe.gov Phone 202-586-8451 More Documents & Publications Safety System Oversight Annual Award

109

1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE CONFERENCE June 21 - 25, 1999 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE CONFERENCE June 21 - 25, 1999 1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE CONFERENCE June 21 - 25, 1999 1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE CONFERENCE June 21 - 25, 1999 The Department of Energy will host the Facility Representative Annual Meeting on June 21-25, 1999 at the Alexis Park Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada. The meeting will give Facility Representatives and line management the opportunity to share lessons learned, and to discuss upcoming program improvements. There is no cost for the meeting, however, rooms reserved at the government rate are limited so if you are planning on attending, please make reservations as soon as possible. The hotel phone number is 1-800-453-8000. For more information, please contact Joe Hassenfeldt, Facility Representative Program Manager, FM-10, at 202-586-1643." Microsoft Word - Document1

110

2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from April to June 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standards , DOE-STD-1063-2000, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definition of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. Overall, the percentage of fully qualified Facility Representatives increased to 80% last quarter, from 78% the previous quarter , and

111

1Q CY2000, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May May 9,2000 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: .yc,..,%$'! L.W.T oseph Arango, Facl ity Representative Program Manager (S-3.1) SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from January 2000 to March 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, DOE-STD-1 063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definitions of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. You will note that the indicators show the attrition of five Facility Representatives from the program during this reporting period. Of those five, two were promoted

112

4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from October to December 2001. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standards , DOE-STD-1063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definition of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data 4Q CY2001, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications

113

2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. As of June 30,2005, 97% of all FRs were fully qualified, down from 88% the previous quarter, but exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Eighteen of 27 reporting sites meet the goal of FR qualifications. 2Q CY2005, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

114

Facility Representative of the Year Award | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Representative of the Year Award Facility Representative of the Year Award Facility Representative of the Year Award Departmental Award Program administered by the Office of Chief Information Officer The Facility Representative Award Program is a special award designed to recognize superior or exemplary service by a Facility Representative over a period of one year. This special award program has been established in accordance with the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 331.1C, Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program. Facility Representative of the Year Award Responsible Contacts Lorrenda Buckner HUMAN RESOURCES SPECIALIST (PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT) E-mail lorrenda.buckner@hq.doe.gov Phone 202-586-8451 More Documents & Publications Safety System Oversight Annual Award

115

1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period January through March 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy's (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. This report reflects changes in DOE STD 1063-2011 that deleted one indicator and changed the way two others are calculated. The changes are discussed below. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for January - March

116

3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from July to September 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standards , DOE-STD-1063-2000, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definition of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. The percentage of fully qualified Facility Representatives in the DOE complex

117

October 2010, Facility Representative Qualification Standard Reference Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Facility Representative Qualification Standard Reference Guide OCTOBER 2010 Table of Contents i LIST OF FIGURES ..................................................................................................................... iii LIST OF TABLES ........................................................................................................................ v ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................................ vi PURPOSE ...................................................................................................................................... 1 SCOPE ........................................................................................................................................... 1

118

General Engineer/Physical Scientist (Senior Facility Representative)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A successful candidate in this position will serve as the Site Managers Senior Facility Representative, and responsible for program management, technical monitoring, advising and evaluating all...

119

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Minneapolis, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6A Minneapolis, Minnesota In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly...

120

Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order established procedures governing the selection, appointment and termination of Department of Energy contracting officers and contracting officer representatives. Cancels DOE O 541.1A.

2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Component failure data handbook  

SciTech Connect

This report presents generic component failure rates that are used in reliability and risk studies of commercial nuclear power plants. The rates are computed using plant-specific data from published probabilistic risk assessments supplemented by selected other sources. Each data source is described. For rates with four or more separate estimates among the sources, plots show the data that are combined. The method for combining data from different sources is presented. The resulting aggregated rates are listed with upper bounds that reflect the variability observed in each rate across the nuclear power plant industry. Thus, the rates are generic. Both per hour and per demand rates are included. They may be used for screening in risk assessments or for forming distributions to be updated with plant-specific data.

Gentillon, C.D.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Sprayed skin turbine component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fabricating a turbine component (50) by casting a core structure (30), forming an array of pits (24) in an outer surface (32) of the core structure, depositing a transient liquid phase (TLP) material (40) on the outer surface of the core structure, the TLP containing a melting-point depressant, depositing a skin (42) on the outer surface of the core structure over the TLP material, and heating the assembly, thus forming both a diffusion bond and a mechanical interlock between the skin and the core structure. The heating diffuses the melting-point depressant away from the interface. Subsurface cooling channels (35) may be formed by forming grooves (34) in the outer surface of the core structure, filling the grooves with a fugitive filler (36), depositing and bonding the skin (42), then removing the fugitive material.

Allen, David B

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

123

Precision Cleaning Titanium Components  

SciTech Connect

Clean bond surfaces are critical to the operation of diffusion bonded titanium engine components. These components can be contaminated with machining coolant, shop dirt, and fingerprints during normal processing and handling. These contaminants must be removed to achieve acceptable bond quality. As environmental concerns become more important in manufacturing, elimination of the use of hazardous materials is desired. For this reason, another process (not using nitric-hydrofluoric acid solution) to clean titanium parts before bonding was sought. Initial cleaning trials were conducted at Honeywell to screen potential cleaning techniques and chemistries. During the initial cleaning process screening phase, Pratt and Whitney provided Honeywell with machined 3 inch x 3 inch x 1 inch titanium test blocks. These test blocks were machined with a water-based machining coolant and exposed to a normal shop environment and handling. (Honeywell sectioned one of these blocks into smaller samples to be used for additional cleanliness verification analyses.) The sample test blocks were ultrasonically cleaned in alkaline solutions and AUGER analysis was used by Honeywell FM and T to validate their cleanliness. This information enabled selection of final cleaning techniques and solutions to be used for the bonding trials. To validate Honeywell's AUGER data and to verify the cleaning processes in actual situations, additional sample blocks were cleaned (using the chosen processes) and then bonded. The bond quality of the test blocks was analyzed according to Pratt and Whitney's requirements. The Charpy impact testing was performed according to ASTM procedure {number_sign}E-23. Bond quality was determined by examining metallographic samples of the bonded test blocks for porosity along the bondline.

Hand, T.E.; Bohnert, G.W.

2000-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

124

Truth-telling A Representative Johannes Abeler1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Truth-telling ­ A Representative Assessment Johannes Abeler1 Anke Becker2 Armin Falk3 University people do report the payoff-maximizing outcome, some report their private informa- tion truthfully or at least do not lie maximally. We measure truth-telling outside the laboratory by calling a representative

Huber, Bernhard A.

125

4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October through December 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard 1063-2011 , Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report include: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data: * DOE was staffed at 179 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTE), which is 92 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent). Four FRs left due to transfer,

126

4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 83% Fully Qualified (last Quarter was 82%) 85% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 93%) 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is >40%) 73% Time Spent in Oversight Activities (DOE Goal is> 65%)"

127

1Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 6 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. As of March 31,2006 81% of all FRs were fully qualified,up from 78% the previous quarter, and just above the DOE goal of 80%. To assist site offices in continuing to meet the qualification goal, there will be two focused training sessions for FR candidates in the coming months. These

128

2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period April through June 20 1 1. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-20 1 1, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight data DOE was staffed at 180 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTEs), which is 9 1 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent).

129

2Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the highlight of, and announces the availablity on-line of, the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. This memorandum also announces that Mr. James Heffner has turned over FR Program Manager duties to Mr. Earl Huges. Mr. Heffner is assuming expanded team leader duties over several additional programs within the

130

4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. As of December 31, 2005 78% of all FRs were fully qualified , down from the 84% the previous quarter, and below the DOE goal of 80%. Site offices hired 11 new FRs in the quarter and several sites moved FRs to new facilities, thus requiring new qualifications.

131

1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 78% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was 76%) 90% Staffing Level ( last Quarter was 89%) 47% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is>40%) 74% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is>65%)"

132

Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Clay and granitic geologic rock units are potential host media for future repositories for used nuclear fuel and high level waste. This report addresses the representation of flow in these two media within numerical process models. Discrete fracture network (DFNs) models are an approach to representing flow in fractured granite that explicitly represents the geometry and flow properties of individual fractures. New DFN generation and computational grid generation methods have been developed and tested. Mesh generation and the generation of flow streamlines within the DFN are also included. Traditional form of Darcy's law is not adequate

133

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_8a_usa_ak_fairbanks_post1980_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_8a_usa_ak_fairbanks_post1980_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3A Atlanta, Georgia Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena, Montana Reference Buildings by Building Type: Secondary school

134

2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April through June 2012. Data for these indicators were gathered by field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report include: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data * DOE was staffed at 176 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTE), which is 95 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent). This staff reflects a

135

1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives. and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR Program. As of March 31st, 2005, 88% of all FRs were fully qualified, up from 86% the previous quarter, and exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Several of the new FRs hired recently completed qualifications. Eighteen of 27 reporting sites meet the goal of FR qualifications

136

4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR program. As of December 31, 2004, 86% of all FRs were fully qualified,down from 89% the previous quarter, and exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Several sites added new FRs or switched FRs from their exisiting facilities to new facilities, reducing the overall qualification rate.

137

2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from April to June 2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR program. As of June 30, 2004, 89% of all FRs were fully qualified , exceeding the DOE goal of 80%, but down slightly from the previous quarter. Twenty of 28 reporting sites meet the goal for FR qualifications. Overall FR staffing is at 85% of the levels needed per the staffing

138

3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. As of September 30,2005, 84% of all FRs were fully qualified , down from 87% the previous quarter, but exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Several sites shifted fully-qualifed FRs to new facilities, thus requiring new qualifications. Although the overall percentage of fully qualified FRS

139

3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from July to September 2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR program. As of September 30, 2004, 89% of all FRs were fully qualified, the same as last quarter, and exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Twenty of 28 reporting sites meet the goal for FR qualifications. Overall FR stadding is at 85% of the levels needed per the staffing analysis methodology in

140

2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 77% Fully Qualified (last quarter was 78%) 90% Staffing Level ( last Quarter was 90%); 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is>40%); and 73% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is > 65%)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

4Q CY2000, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 February 26,2001 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: seph Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager (S-3.1) SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from October to December 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, 063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definitions of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. I intend to continue to provide this summary information to you quarterly. These provide

142

4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period October through December 2010. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report are presented below: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data * DOE was staffed at 184 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTEs) which is 92

143

4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2008. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 76% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was 80%) 89% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 89%) 44% Time Spent in the Field ( Department of Energy)(DOE) goal is > 40%) 73% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is> 65%)"

144

Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for October - December 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOR DISTRIBUTION FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: ANDREW C. LAWRENCE DIRECTOR OFFICE OF NUCLEAR SAFETY, QUALITY ASSURANCE AND ENVIRONMENT OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, October-December (Fourth Quarter Calendar Year 2010) This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period October through December 2010. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report are presented below:

145

Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media The report presents information related to the development of a fundamental understanding of disposal-system performance in a range of environments for potential wastes that could arise from future nuclear fuel cycle alternatives. It addresses selected aspects of the development of computational modeling capability for the performance of storage and disposal options. Topics include radionuclide interaction with geomedia, colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport (Pu colloids), interaction between iodide (accumulate in the interlayer regions of clay minerals) and a suite of clay minerals, adsorption of uranium onto granite and bentonite,

146

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 7 Duluth,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Duluth, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 7 Duluth, Minnesota In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_7a_usa_mn_duluth_pre1980_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_7a_usa_mn_duluth_pre1980_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3B Los Angeles, California Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3C San Francisco, California Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois

147

WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory Board WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory Board March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Rose Scott, a governmental affairs specialist with URS Washington TRU Solutions LLC, the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant management and operating contractor, was selected for the National Environmental Justice Advisory Board. Rose Scott, a governmental affairs specialist with URS Washington TRU Solutions LLC, the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant management and operating contractor, was selected for the National Environmental Justice Advisory Board. CARLSBAD, N.M. - Organizers say no similar opportunity or conference exists in America. In April, representatives from federal and state

148

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6A  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A A Minneapolis, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6A Minneapolis, Minnesota In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_6a_usa_mn_minneapolis_post1980_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_6a_usa_mn_minneapolis_post1980_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 7 Duluth, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5B Boulder,

149

WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory Board WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory Board March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Rose Scott, a governmental affairs specialist with URS Washington TRU Solutions LLC, the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant management and operating contractor, was selected for the National Environmental Justice Advisory Board. Rose Scott, a governmental affairs specialist with URS Washington TRU Solutions LLC, the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant management and operating contractor, was selected for the National Environmental Justice Advisory Board. CARLSBAD, N.M. - Organizers say no similar opportunity or conference exists in America. In April, representatives from federal and state

150

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions June 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Secretary Chu presents the Secretary of Energy's Appreciation Award to Judy A. McLemore. Secretary Chu presents the Secretary of Energy's Appreciation Award to Judy A. McLemore. WASHINGTON, D.C. - A representative of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, N.M., on Tuesday received the Secretary of Energy's Appreciation Award for her efforts to improve sustainability and reduce travel costs and the number of fleet vehicles. Judy A. McLemore, who works for URS Regulatory and Environmental Services, based in Carlsbad, was honored for helping advance DOE's management and

151

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1A Miami, Florida Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 1A Miami, Florida In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

152

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B Boulder, Colorado Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5B Boulder, Colorado In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

153

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Chicago, Illinois Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

154

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B Phoenix, Arizona Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2B Phoenix, Arizona In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

155

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 Duluth, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 7 Duluth, Minnesota In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

156

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Baltimore, Maryland Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4A Baltimore, Maryland In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view...

157

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view...

158

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Atlanta, Georgia Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3A Atlanta, Georgia In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

159

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Fairbanks, Alaska Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

160

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B Las Vegas, Nevada Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3B Las Vegas, Nevada In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Houston, Texas Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2A Houston, Texas In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

162

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B Helena, Montana Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena, Montana In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

163

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

C San Francisco, California Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3C San Francisco, California In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can...

164

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B Los Angeles, California Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3B Los Angeles, California In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can...

165

DOE/Advisory Board Recognize Service of Student Representatives...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Board Recognize Service of Student Representatives April 16, 2014 - 12:58pm Addthis The Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board (ORSSAB) and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE)...

166

August 20, 2014 meeting with DOE representatives regarding the...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

August 20, 2014 meeting with DOE representatives regarding the remand of the DOE Direct Final Rule as it relates to efficiency standards for non-weatherized gas furnaces August 20,...

167

*Official Academic Senate Representative Dean of UC Davis Extension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*Official Academic Senate Representative Dean of UC Davis Extension Recruitment Advisory Committee, Health Sciences, Public Policy & Business Programs, UC Davis Extension Chloe Fox Undergraduate Student, International Agricultural Development; Outreach Coordinator, Program for International Energy Technologies

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

168

Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish procedures governing the selection, appointment, and termination of contracting officers and for the appointment of contracting officer representatives. Cancels DOE Order 4200.4A. Canceled by DOE O 541.1A.

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

W&M Student Elected to Represent American Physical Society's...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

W&M Student Elected to Represent American Physical Society's Graduate Student Forum V Gray Valerie Gray, a graduate student at The College of William and Mary and a researcher at...

170

A representative individual from Arrovian aggregation of parametric individual utilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A representative individual from Arrovian aggregation of parametric individual utilities social choice theory Assumptions Assumption on decisive coalitions Assumptions on individual utility functions Assumptions on the social welfare function Results The socially acceptable utility function

171

2Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0,2007 0,2007 M E M 0 R A N D ; p s ' X Z FROM: M RK B. WHI DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVE TO THE DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, April - June (2nd Quarter CY2007) Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 74% Fully Qualified (last Quarter was 72%) 94% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 9 1 %)

172

Maintenance Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MAINTENANCE MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: An effective facilities maintenance program should optimize the material condition of components and equipment to support safe and effective operations and ensure the peak performance and reliability of those systems and equipment important to operations. Criteria: The program, facility or operation has a Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP), or equivalent document, which defines and documents the approach to conduct of maintenance. The maintenance organization structure is well defined and understood. Responsibilities, organizational interfaces, and administrative activities are adequately defined and implemented to provide timely availability of

173

Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus Title Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4420E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Hopkins, Asa S., Alexander B. Lekov, James D. Lutz, and Gregory J. Rosenquist Subsidiary Authors Energy Analysis Department Pagination 55 Date Published March 1 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley ISBN Number LBNL-4420E Abstract This report presents a new simulation tool under development at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This tool uses EnergyPlus to simulate each single-family home in the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), and generates a calibrated, nationally representative set of simulated homes whose energy use is statistically indistinguishable from the energy use of the single-family homes in the RECS sample. This research builds upon earlier work by Ritchard et al. for the Gas Research Institute and Huang et al. for LBNL. A representative national sample allows us to evaluate the variance in energy use between individual homes, regions, or other subsamples; using this tool, we can also evaluate how that variance affects the impacts of potential policies.

174

Durability of ACERT Engine Components  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

strength data from with FE model "load factors" and stress field to estimate fast fracture strength and fatigue resistance of design component Determination of FE model "load...

175

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions June 29, 2012 - 12:19pm Addthis Judy McLemore from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant led efforts to reduce the DOE’s vehicle fleet by 20 percent, improving sustainability and saving money. Under her leadership, greenhouse gas emissions associated with business travel were reduced by 63 percent and travel costs were reduced by greater than 60 percent. Judy McLemore from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant led efforts to reduce the DOE's vehicle fleet by 20 percent, improving sustainability and saving money. Under her leadership, greenhouse gas emissions associated with business travel were reduced by 63 percent and travel costs were

176

DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE STD 1063, Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

63-2011 63-2011 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES DOE-STD-1063-2011 Familiar Level August 2011 1 DOE-STD-1063-2011 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES FAMILIAR LEVEL OBJECTIVES Given the familiar level of this module and the resources listed below, you will be able to answer the following questions: 1. What are the purpose and scope of DOE-STD-1063-2011? 2. What are the definitions of the terms listed in section 3 of DOE-STD-1063-2011? 3. What are the duties, responsibilities, and authorities of facility representatives (FRs) and other key personnel? 4. What are the requirements of the FR program? 5. What are the Department of Energy (DOE)-wide FR performance indicators (PIs)? 6. How are DOE-wide FR PIs calculated? 7. What are the FR program objectives that should be measured by an FR program

177

SUBJECT: Guidance on Retention of Facility Representative Technical  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SUBJECT: Guidance on Retention of Facility Representative Technical SUBJECT: Guidance on Retention of Facility Representative Technical Competence during Reductions in Force, 4/21/1998 SUBJECT: Guidance on Retention of Facility Representative Technical Competence during Reductions in Force, 4/21/1998 The Department's Revised Implementation Plan (IP) for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 93-3 renews the Department's commitment to maintaining the technical capability necessary to safely manage and operate defense nuclear facilities. Retaining highly qualified employees in critical technical skills areas is vital to the maintenance of these technical capabilities. The Department has therefore committed in the revised R? to the development of a model that offices can use to proactively manage and preserve critical technical capabilities. During the

178

Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for October-December 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2012 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: JAMES B. O'BRIEN DIRECTOR ~ OFFICE OF :-IDC~AR AFETY OFFICE OF HEAL 'l;H, AFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, October- December 20 ll This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October through December 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard 1063-2011 , Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report include: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data * DOE was staffed at 179 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTE), which is 92 percent of the full

179

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions June 29, 2012 - 12:19pm Addthis Judy McLemore from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant led efforts to reduce the DOE’s vehicle fleet by 20 percent, improving sustainability and saving money. Under her leadership, greenhouse gas emissions associated with business travel were reduced by 63 percent and travel costs were reduced by greater than 60 percent. Judy McLemore from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant led efforts to reduce the DOE's vehicle fleet by 20 percent, improving sustainability and saving money. Under her leadership, greenhouse gas emissions associated with business travel were reduced by 63 percent and travel costs were

180

Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for April - June 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 , 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: JAMES B. O'BRIEN SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, April - June 20 1 I This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period April through June 20 1 1. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-20 1 1, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report: FR Staffin~/Qualification/Oversi~ht Data DOE was staffed at 180 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTEs), which is 9 1 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent).

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181

4Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2008 6, 2008 MEMORANDUM FROM: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATNE TO THE DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, October - December (4th Quarter CY2007) Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 83% Fully Qualified (last Quarter was 82%) 85% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 93%) 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is >40%)

182

Landscape Characterization and Representativeness Analysis for Understanding Sampling Network Coverage  

SciTech Connect

Sampling networks rarely conform to spatial and temporal ideals, often comprised of network sampling points which are unevenly distributed and located in less than ideal locations due to access constraints, budget limitations, or political conflict. Quantifying the global, regional, and temporal representativeness of these networks by quantifying the coverage of network infrastructure highlights the capabilities and limitations of the data collected, facilitates upscaling and downscaling for modeling purposes, and improves the planning efforts for future infrastructure investment under current conditions and future modeled scenarios. The work presented here utilizes multivariate spatiotemporal clustering analysis and representativeness analysis for quantitative landscape characterization and assessment of the Fluxnet, RAINFOR, and ForestGEO networks. Results include ecoregions that highlight patterns of bioclimatic, topographic, and edaphic variables and quantitative representativeness maps of individual and combined networks.

Maddalena, Damian; Hoffman, Forrest; Kumar, Jitendra; Hargrove, William

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Landscape Characterization and Representativeness Analysis for Understanding Sampling Network Coverage  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Sampling networks rarely conform to spatial and temporal ideals, often comprised of network sampling points which are unevenly distributed and located in less than ideal locations due to access constraints, budget limitations, or political conflict. Quantifying the global, regional, and temporal representativeness of these networks by quantifying the coverage of network infrastructure highlights the capabilities and limitations of the data collected, facilitates upscaling and downscaling for modeling purposes, and improves the planning efforts for future infrastructure investment under current conditions and future modeled scenarios. The work presented here utilizes multivariate spatiotemporal clustering analysis and representativeness analysis for quantitative landscape characterization and assessment of the Fluxnet, RAINFOR, and ForestGEO networks. Results include ecoregions that highlight patterns of bioclimatic, topographic, and edaphic variables and quantitative representativeness maps of individual and combined networks.

Maddalena, Damian; Hoffman, Forrest; Kumar, Jitendra; Hargrove, William

184

June 21, 1999 Memo, Facility Representative Program Status  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June June 21, 1999 MEMORANDUM FOR: Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Director, Office of Science Director, Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology FROM: John Wilcynski, Director, Office of Field Integration SUBJECT: FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS Since September, 1993, the Office of Field Management has served as the Department's corporate advocate for the Facility Representative Program. The Facility Representative (FR) is a critical technical position serving as line management's "eyes and ears" for operational safety in our contractor-operated facilities. I recognize the importance of the FR Program, and commit the Office of Field Integration (FI) to its continued crosscutting support. The FI staff continues to work with your staff members and with the Defense Nuclear Facilities

185

Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative, 12/03 Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative, 12/03 An assessment of the Electrical Safety (ES) program at XXXX was conducted during the week of December XX-XX, 2003. The assessment team evaluated the program using the programmatic areas and specific Lines of Inquiry (LOI) contained in the approved Assessment plan provided. The team consisted of the Facility Representative from National Nuclear Security Administration, as well as ES, Subject Matter Expert support. The assessment plan identified 5 areas of review for Electrical Safety. An integrated process has been established to ensure electrical safety hazards are identified and that adequate controls are defined and

186

Wave Energy Resources Representative Sites Around the Hawaiian Islands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wave Energy Resources for Representative Sites Around the Hawaiian Islands Prepared by: Luis A Foreword This report provides wave energy resource information required to select coastal segments for specific wave-energy-conversion (WEC) technology and to initiate engineering design incorporating

187

A Mathematical Programming Model for Scheduling Pharmaceutical Sales Representatives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% to nearly 80,000 from 50,000, and that visits by sales representatives to doctors' offices increased ten. In the next section, we present some background material relevant to this research. Then, in Section 3, we instances in Section 4. We present concluding remarks in Section 5. 2. Background For multi

Gautam, Natarajan

188

Representing SN1 Reaction Mechanism Using the Qualitative Process Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nucleophilic substitution) and the SN2 (bimolecular nucleophilic substitution). Our intention is not to trainRepresenting SN1 Reaction Mechanism Using the Qualitative Process Theory Alicia Tang Y domain remains widely open. The application of Qualitative Process Theory (QPT) in organic reaction

Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

189

Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer's Representatives  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish procedures governing the selection, appointment, and termination of contracting officers and for the appointment of contracting officer's representatives. To ensure that only trained and qualified procurement and financial assistance professionals, within the scope of this Order, serve as contracting officers. Cancels DOE O 541.1. Canceled by DOE O 541.1B.

2000-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

190

Anthropogenic Biomes ver. 1 Anthropogenic biomes represent heterogeneous  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

defined by population density and vegetation cover. The 21 biomes are grouped into six major categoriesAnthropogenic Biomes ver. 1 Africa Anthropogenic biomes represent heterogeneous landscape mosaics: Populated irrigated cropland 34: Populated rainfed cropland 35: Remote croplands 41: Residential rangelands

Columbia University

191

Livermore Site Office Facility Representative Program Self-Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARPT-LSO-2011-001 ARPT-LSO-2011-001 Site: Livermore Site Office Subject: Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Activity Report for the Livermore Site Office Facility Representative Program Self-Assessment Dates of Activity 01/24/2011 - 01/28/2011 Report Preparer Robert Freeman Activity Description/Purpose: This activity report documents the results of the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) review of and participation in the Livermore Site Office Self-Assessment of the Facility Representative (FR) Program. This self-assessment was led by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Livermore Site Office (LSO) and conducted by LSO staff, HSS staff, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety (CDNS) staff, a peer from Los Alamos Site

192

Processes, data structures, and apparatuses for representing knowledge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Processes, data structures, and apparatuses to represent knowledge are disclosed. The processes can comprise labeling elements in a knowledge signature according to concepts in an ontology and populating the elements with confidence values. The data structures can comprise knowledge signatures stored on computer-readable media. The knowledge signatures comprise a matrix structure having elements labeled according to concepts in an ontology, wherein the value of the element represents a confidence that the concept is present in an information space. The apparatus can comprise a knowledge representation unit having at least one ontology stored on a computer-readable medium, at least one data-receiving device, and a processor configured to generate knowledge signatures by comparing datasets obtained by the data-receiving devices to the ontologies.

Hohimer, Ryan E. (West Richland, WA); Thomson, Judi R. (Guelph, CA); Harvey, William J. (Richland, WA); Paulson, Patrick R. (Pasco, WA); Whiting, Mark A. (Richland, WA); Tratz, Stephen C. (Richland, WA); Chappell, Alan R. (Seattle, WA); Butner, R. Scott (Richland, WA)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

193

DOE | Office of Health, Safety and Security | 2012 Facility Representative,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Facility Representative Office of Nuclear Safety Home Facility Representative Home Annual Facility Rep Workshop › 2012 › 2011 › 2010 › 2009 › 2008 › 2007 › 2006 › 2005 › 2004 › 2003 › 2002 › 2001 › 2000 DOE Safety Links › ORPS Info › Operating Experience › DOE Lessons Learned › Accident Investigation Assessment Tools › FR CRADs › Surveillance Guides › Manager's Guide for Safety and Health Subject Matter Links General Program Information › Program Mission Statement › Program Directives and Guidance › FR of the Year Award Program › FR of the Year Award › FR Program Assessment Guide (Appendix B, DOE STD 1063-2011) FR Quarterly Performance Indicators Training & Qualification Information › Qualification Standards › Energy Online Courses

194

Domain assignments for FSSP representative set using DomainParser  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Domain assignments for the FSSP representative set Domain assignments for the FSSP representative set The following are the domain assignments for the FSSP representative set (released on January 31, 2000, 1987 chains in total) using DomainParser. Each line shows a PDB entry (with a chain identifier if any), total number of residues, number of domains, and domain assignments. The result is obtained fully automatically without manual editing. 12asa 327 2 (33-86; 271-288) (4-32; 87-270; 289-330) 153l 185 1 16pk 415 2 (5-205; 409-419) (206-408) 16vpa 311 2 (47-130; 164-233; 324-349) (131-163; 234-323; 395-402) 1914 171 1 19hca 292 2 (45-107) (1-44; 108-292) 1a02f 53 1 1a02j 52 1 1a02n 280 2 (399-569) (570-678) 1a04a 205 2 (5-126) (127-216) 1a0aa 63 1 1a0ca 437 1 1a0fa 201 2 (1-81) (82-201) 1a0ha 159 1 1a0i 332 2 (2-239) (240-349)

195

Cleanroom Work Support Component Areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Satisfactory cleanroom operations require adequate support components. The same care in design required for the cleanroom proper must also be used in layout ... and activities that are carried out in the cleanroom

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

NREL's Building Component Library for Use with Energy Models  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Building Component Library (BCL) is the U.S. Department of Energys comprehensive online searchable library of energy modeling building blocks and descriptive metadata. Novice users and seasoned practitioners can use the freely available and uniquely identifiable components to create energy models and cite the sources of input data, which will increase the credibility and reproducibility of their simulations. The BCL contains components which are the building blocks of an energy model. They can represent physical characteristics of the building such as roofs, walls, and windows, or can refer to related operational information such as occupancy and equipment schedules and weather information. Each component is identified through a set of attributes that are specific to its type, as well as other metadata such as provenance information and associated files. The BCL also contains energy conservation measures (ECM), referred to as measures, which describe a change to a building and its associated model. For the BCL, this description attempts to define a measure for reproducible application, either to compare it to a baseline model, to estimate potential energy savings, or to examine the effects of a particular implementation. The BCL currently contains more than 30,000 components and measures. A faceted search mechanism has been implemented on the BCL that allows users to filter through the search results using various facets. Facet categories include component and measure types, data source, and energy modeling software type. All attributes of a component or measure can also be used to filter the results.

197

MODELING OF DAMAGE AND LIFETIME ANALYSIS OF PLASMA FACING COMPONENTS DURING PLASMA INSTABILITIES IN TOKAMAKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MODELING OF DAMAGE AND LIFETIME ANALYSIS OF PLASMA FACING COMPONENTS DURING PLASMA INSTABILITIES reliability and characterize the performance of this key component. A novel particle-in-cell (PIC) technique) as consequence of plasma instabilities in tokamak reactors still represents the biggest obstacle

Harilal, S. S.

198

Physical Components, Coordinate Components, and the Speed of Light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For generalized coordinate systems, the numerical values of vector and tensor components do not generally equal the physical values, i.e., the values one would measure with standard physical instruments. Hence, calculating physical components from coordinate components is important for comparing experiment with theory. Surprisingly, however, this calculational method is not widely known among physicists, and is rarely taught in relativity courses, though it is commonly employed in at least one other field (applied mechanics.) Different derivations of this method, ranging from elementary to advanced level, are presented. The result is then applied to clarify the oftentimes confusing issue of whether or not the speed of light in non-inertial frames is equal to c.

Robert D. Klauber

2001-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

199

Defining And Characterizing Sample Representativeness For DWPF Melter Feed Samples  

SciTech Connect

Representative sampling is important throughout the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) process, and the demonstrated success of the DWPF process to achieve glass product quality over the past two decades is a direct result of the quality of information obtained from the process. The objective of this report was to present sampling methods that the Savannah River Site (SRS) used to qualify waste being dispositioned at the DWPF. The goal was to emphasize the methodology, not a list of outcomes from those studies. This methodology includes proven methods for taking representative samples, the use of controlled analytical methods, and data interpretation and reporting that considers the uncertainty of all error sources. Numerous sampling studies were conducted during the development of the DWPF process and still continue to be performed in order to evaluate options for process improvement. Study designs were based on use of statistical tools applicable to the determination of uncertainties associated with the data needs. Successful designs are apt to be repeated, so this report chose only to include prototypic case studies that typify the characteristics of frequently used designs. Case studies have been presented for studying in-tank homogeneity, evaluating the suitability of sampler systems, determining factors that affect mixing and sampling, comparing the final waste glass product chemical composition and durability to that of the glass pour stream sample and other samples from process vessels, and assessing the uniformity of the chemical composition in the waste glass product. Many of these studies efficiently addressed more than one of these areas of concern associated with demonstrating sample representativeness and provide examples of statistical tools in use for DWPF. The time when many of these designs were implemented was in an age when the sampling ideas of Pierre Gy were not as widespread as they are today. Nonetheless, the engineers and statisticians used carefully thought out designs that systematically and economically provided plans for data collection from the DWPF process. Key shared features of the sampling designs used at DWPF and the Gy sampling methodology were the specification of a standard for sample representativeness, an investigation that produced data from the process to study the sampling function, and a decision framework used to assess whether the specification was met based on the data. Without going into detail with regard to the seven errors identified by Pierre Gy, as excellent summaries are readily available such as Pitard [1989] and Smith [2001], SRS engineers understood, for example, that samplers can be biased (Gy?s extraction error), and developed plans to mitigate those biases. Experiments that compared installed samplers with more representative samples obtained directly from the tank may not have resulted in systematically partitioning sampling errors into the now well-known error categories of Gy, but did provide overall information on the suitability of sampling systems. Most of the designs in this report are related to the DWPF vessels, not the large SRS Tank Farm tanks. Samples from the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), which contains the feed to the DWPF melter, are characterized using standardized analytical methods with known uncertainty. The analytical error is combined with the established error from sampling and processing in DWPF to determine the melter feed composition. This composition is used with the known uncertainty of the models in the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) to ensure that the wasteform that is produced is comfortably within the acceptable processing and product performance region. Having the advantage of many years of processing that meets the waste glass product acceptance criteria, the DWPF process has provided a considerable amount of data about itself in addition to the data from many special studies. Demonstrating representative sampling directly from the large Tank Farm tanks is a difficult, if not unsolvable enterprise due to li

Shine, E. P.; Poirier, M. R.

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

200

Facility Representative Program: Criteria Review and Approach Document  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment Tools Assessment Tools Surveillance Guides Manager's Guide for Safety and Health Walkthroughs Criteria Review and Approach Document This page provides Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADS) to assist Facility Representatives. Please submit your CRADS for posting by sending them to the HQ FR Program Manager. Please include the subject, date, and a contact person. Communications NASA Benchmarks Communications Assessment Plan Configuration Management Configuration Management Assessment Plan Confined Space Confined Spaces Assessment Plan Conduct of Operations Conduct of Operations Assessment Plan Electrical Assessment Electrical Safety Assessment Plan Facility Procedures Verification and Validation of Facility Procedures Assessment Plan Hoisting and Rigging

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

4Q CY2008, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITES Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (4QCY2008) Field or Ops Office Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 1 3 1 100 1 100 100 70 86 ID (EM) 13 12 11 85 0 82 82 43 84 OR (EM) 19 18 18 95 0 72 72 44 66 ORP 15 15 14 93 0 79 64 43 72 PPPO 6 5 5 83 0 80 80 44 70 RL 19 18 18 95 1 84 84 45 70 SPRU 1 1 1 100 0 100 0 30 80 SR 32 24 24 75 2 71 67 45 74 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 50 50 42 70 EM Totals 108 98 94 87 4 77 72 44 72 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * % Field Time is defined as the number of hours spent in the plant/field divided by the number of available work hours in the quarter. The number of available work hours is the actual number of hours a Facility Representative works in a calendar quarter, including overtime hours. It does not include

202

Automated cleaning of electronic components  

SciTech Connect

Environmental and operator safety concerns are leading to the elimination of trichloroethylene and chlorofluorocarbon solvents in cleaning processes that remove rosin flux, organic and inorganic contamination, and particulates from electronic components. Present processes depend heavily on these solvents for manual spray cleaning of small components and subassemblies. Use of alternative solvent systems can lead to longer processing times and reduced quality. Automated spray cleaning can improve the quality of the cleaning process, thus enabling the productive use of environmentally conscious materials, while minimizing personnel exposure to hazardous materials. We describe the development of a prototype robotic system for cleaning electronic components in a spray cleaning workcell. An important feature of the prototype system is the capability to generate the robot paths and motions automatically from the CAD models of the part to be cleaned, and to embed cleaning process knowledge into the automatically programmed operations.

Drotning, W.; Meirans, L.; Wapman, W.; Hwang, Y.; Koenig, L.; Petterson, B.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

On the Robustness of Cool Disc Components in Bright ULXs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this letter, we comment on the robustness of putative cool (kT ~ 0.2 keV) accretion disc components in the X-ray spectra of the most luminous (L ~ 10^40 erg/s) ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs) in nearby normal galaxies. When compared to stellar-mass black holes, the low disc temperatures observed in some ULXs may imply intermediate-mass black hole primaries. Recent work has claimed that such soft excesses are unlikely to be actual disc components, based on the lack of variability in these components, and in the overall source flux. Other work has proposed that alternative phenomenological models, and complex Comptonisation models, rule-out cool disc components in ULX spectra. An inspection of the literature on Galactic stellar-mass black holes and black hole candidates demonstrates that the flux behaviours seen in specific ULXs are consistent with phenomena observed in well-known Galactic X-ray binaries. Applying Comptonisation models to simulated disc blackbody plus power-law spectra shows that at the sensitivity achieved in even the best ULX spectra, Comptonisation fits are highly model-dependent, and do not yield meaningful constraints on the accretion flow. In contrast, the need for a soft, thermal component does not appear to be model-dependent. As we have previously noted, soft thermal components in ULX spectra may not represent accretion discs, but present alternatives to this interpretation are not robust.

J. M. Miller; A. C. Fabian; M. C. Miller

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

204

3Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITES ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITES Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (3QCY2007) Field or Ops Office Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 1 2 2 200 0 100 50 66 86 ID (ICP) 13 12 11 85 1 100 100 40 65 OR (EM) 19 17 16 84 0 94 88 47 71 ORP 14 14 14 100 0 100 93 46 74 PPPO 4 4 4 100 0 100 100 42 75 RL 19 19 19 100 0 100 95 73 69 SR 31 31 25 81 2 88 80 40 79 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 100 100 43 65 EM Totals 103 101 93 90 3 96 89 50 73 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * % Field Time is defined as the number of hours spent in the plant/field divided by the number of available work hours in the quarter. The number of

205

Facility Representative Program Assessment Criteria, Review, and Approach Document (CRAD)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STD-1063-2011 STD-1063-2011 Appendix B B-1 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM ASSESSMENT GUIDE The DOE has implemented its FR Program, and is looking to continuously improve the program's effectiveness DOE-wide. An effective FR Program has many elements, as described in this Standard. These elements are intended to yield a program that provides DOE facilities with well-trained FRs who spend appropriate amounts of time in their facilities and can work effectively with their contractor management counterparts. The program, to be effective, needs the functional support of management. To maintain the continued support of DOE management, the FR program needs to demonstrate its continued performance and effectiveness, which is to be assessed periodically using

206

2Q CY2004, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment Attachment Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report September 20, 2004 Distribution: Kyle McSlarrow, S-2 Bruce Carnes, S-2 Les Novitsky, S-2 David Garman, S-3 Linton Brooks, NA-1 Tyler Przybylek, NA-1 Everet Beckner, NA-10 James Mangeno, NA-3.6 Glenn Podonsky, SP-1 Mike Kilpatrick, OA-1 Patricia Worthington, OA-40 Paul Golan, EM-1 Inés Triay, EM-3 Patty Bubar, EM-3.2 Raymond Orbach, SC-1 Milt Johnson, SC-3 William Magwood, NE-1 Manager, Ames Site Office Manager, Argonne Site Office Manager, Brookhaven Site Office Manager, Carlsbad Field Office Manager, Fermi Site Office Manager, Idaho Operations Office Manager, Livermore Site Office Manager, Los Alamos Site Office Manager, Nevada Site Office Manager, Oak Ridge Operations Office Manager, Office of River Protection

207

1Q CY2010, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Http: Http: OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (EM) Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (1QCY2010) Field or Ops Office Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 3 3 3 100 0 100 33 50 78 ID (EM) 13 13 12 92 0 100 100 50 91 OR (EM) 18 17 18 100 0 100 81 45 67 ORP 15 15 14 93 1 93 80 51 81 PPPO 6 6 6 100 0 100 100 43 68 RL 19 19 19 100 0 95 95 43 69 SPRU 1 1 1 100 0 100 0 50 75 SR 32 29 29 91 1 69 69 43 76 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 50 50 37 60 EM Totals 109 105 104 95 2 89 81 45 75 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * Field or Ops Office Key:

208

Use of S-. alpha. diagram for representing tokamak equilibrium  

SciTech Connect

A use of the S-{alpha} diagram is proposed as a tool for representing the plasma equilibrium with a qualitative characterization of its stability through pattern recognition. The diagram is an effective tool for visually presenting the relationship between the shear and dimensionless pressure gradient of an equilibrium. In the PBX-M tokamak, an H-mode operating regime with high poloidal {beta} and L-mode regime with high toroidal {beta}, obtained using different profile modification techniques, are found to have distinct S-{alpha} trajectory patterns. Pellet injection into a plasma in the H-mode regime with high toroidal {beta}, obtained using different profile modification techniques, are found to have distinct S-{alpha} trajectory patterns. Pellet injection into a plasma in the H-mode regime results in favorable qualities of both regimes. The {beta} collapse process and ELM event also manifest themselves as characteristic changes in the S-{alpha} pattern.

Takahashi, H.; Chance, M.; Kessel, C.; LeBlanc, B.; Manickam, J.; Okabayashi, M.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

SIGNATURE O F AGENCY REPRESENTATIVE NATIONAL ENERGY STRATEGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MINOR SUBDIVISION MINOR SUBDIVISION Jeff Martus 01-903-3481 SIGNATURE O F AGENCY REPRESENTATIVE NATIONAL ENERGY STRATEGY See attached. National Energy Strategy The Department of Energy (DOE) was directed by President Bush on July 26, 1989 to begin the development of a comprehensive National Energy Strategy (NES). Published in February 1991, the NES provides the foundation for a more efficient, less vulnerable, and environmentally sustainable energy future. The NES defines international, commercial, regulatory, and technological policy tools that diversify U.S. resources of energy supplies and offers more flexibility and efficiency in the way energy is transformed and used. This proposed schedule provides for the disposition of records that have been created or received by DOE in connection with the

210

Primary Components of Binomial Ideals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for primary components of special binomial ideals. A feature of this work is that our results are independent of the characteristic of the field. First of all, we analyze the primary decomposition of a special class of binomial ideals, lattice ideals...

Eser, Zekiye

2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

211

,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components" ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues",,,," " " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related","All"

212

,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.1;" Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.1;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components" ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues",,,," " " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related","All"

213

Experiential Component Approval Form Concentration in Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiential Component Approval Form Concentration in Nanotechnology Return completed form to ENG Plan to complete the experiential component as a requirement for the concentration in Nanotechnology to complete the experiential component for the Nanotechnology Concentration by: Research Experience in Lab

Goldberg, Bennett

214

Laser ultrasonic multi-component imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Techniques for ultrasonic determination of the interfacial relationship of multi-component systems are discussed. In implementations, a laser energy source may be used to excite a multi-component system including a first component and a second component at least in partial contact with the first component. Vibrations resulting from the excitation may be detected for correlation with a resonance pattern indicating if discontinuity exists at the interface of the first and second components.

Williams, Thomas K. (Federal Way, WA); Telschow, Kenneth (Des Moines, WA)

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

215

Processing of Activated Core Components  

SciTech Connect

Used activated components from the core of a NPP like control elements, water channels from a BWR, and others like in-core measurement devices need to be processed into waste forms suitable for interim storage, and for the final waste repository. Processing of the activated materials can be undertaken by underwater cutting and packaging or by cutting and high-pressure compaction in a hot cell. A hot cell is available in Germany as a joint investment between GNS and the Karlsruhe Research Center at the latter's site. Special transport equipment is available to transport the components ''as-is'' to the hot cell. Newly designed underwater processing equipment has been designed, constructed, and operated for the special application of NPP decommissioning. This equipment integrates an underwater cutting device with an 80 ton force underwater in-drum compactor.

Friske, A.; Gestermann, G.; Finkbeiner, R.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

216

Nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint. Small gaps limit horizontal displacement of components during a seismic occurrence and therefore reduce dynamic loadings on the free lower end. The reactor vessel and reactor guard vessel use thicker section roll-forged rings welded between the vessel straight shell sections and the bottom hemispherical head sections. The inside of the reactor guard vessel ring forging contains local vertical dovetail slots and upper ledge pockets to mount and retain field fitted and installed blocks. As an option, the horizontal displacement of the reactor vessel core support cone can be limited by including shop fitted/installed local blocks in opposing alignment with the reactor vessel forged ring. Beams embedded in the wall of the reactor building protrude into apertures in the thermal insulation shell adjacent the reactor guard vessel ring and have motion limit blocks attached thereto to provide to a predetermined clearance between the blocks and reactor guard vessel ring.

Snyder, Glenn J. (Lynchburg, VA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

2Q CY2009, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (2QCY2009) Field or Ops Office * Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time ** % Oversight Time *** CBFO 3 3 2 67 0 50 50 46 76 ID 13 13 11 85 0 100 100 49 90 OR 19 18 17 89 1 71 71 42 57 ORP 15 15 15 100 0 73 73 53 77 PPPO 6 6 6 100 0 67 67 42 70 RL 19 19 19 100 0 84 84 45 69 SR 32 28 28 88 0 64 64 47 73 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 50 50 37 70 EM Totals 109 104 100 92 1 74 74 46 72 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * Field or Ops Office Key CBFO = Carlsbad Field Office; ID = Idaho Operations Office; OR = Oak Ridge Office; ORP = Office of River Protection; PPPO = Portsmouth/Paducah

218

Greening the U.S. House of Representatives  

SciTech Connect

The Greening the Capitol initiative was launched in March, 2007 with the threefold goals of making the U.S. House of Representatives: 1) carbon neutral within 18 months, 2) reducing energy use by 50percent in ten years, and 3) becoming a model of sustainable operations. We report on the recommendations to meet these goals, looking at the targets of opportunity at the Capitol Power Plant, the existing buildings, and the overall operations of the complex. Our findings have shown that these goals are achievable, and that through an integrated approach the savings in carbon and energy can be met. Specific examples include the lighting retrofits in the House offices, parking areas, and the Capitol dome; the retrofits to the HVAC systems and controls, including duct sealing, improving the efficiency of the energy and water use in the food service areas; and improved operations of the steam and chilled water distribution system. A key aspect has been better tracking and feedback to the building operators of the actual energy consumption. We report on the technical opportunities presented by these historic and symbolic buildings in becoming models of sustainability.

Diamond, Rick; Diamond, Rick; Payne, Christopher

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Perceptual-components architecture for digital video  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A perceptual-components architecture for digital video partitions the image stream into signal components in a manner analogous to that used in the human visual system. These...

Watson, Andrew B

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Battery systems performance studies - HIL components testing...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

systems performance studies - HIL components testing Battery systems performance studies - HIL components testing 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Model-based software component testing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??[Truncated abstract] Software component testing (SCT) is a proven software engineering approach to evaluating, improving and demonstrating component reliability and quality for producing trusted software (more)

Zheng, Weiqun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

HIGH INTEGRITY MAGNESIUM AUTOMOTIVE COMPONENTS (HIMAC) | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

HIGH INTEGRITY MAGNESIUM AUTOMOTIVE COMPONENTS (HIMAC) HIGH INTEGRITY MAGNESIUM AUTOMOTIVE COMPONENTS (HIMAC) 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual...

223

Fusion-component lifetime analysis  

SciTech Connect

A one-dimensional computer code has been developed to examine the lifetime of first-wall and impurity-control components. The code incorporates the operating and design parameters, the material characteristics, and the appropriate failure criteria for the individual components. The major emphasis of the modeling effort has been to calculate the temperature-stress-strain-radiation effects history of a component so that the synergystic effects between sputtering erosion, swelling, creep, fatigue, and crack growth can be examined. The general forms of the property equations are the same for all materials in order to provide the greatest flexibility for materials selection in the code. The individual coefficients within the equations are different for each material. The code is capable of determining the behavior of a plate, composed of either a single or dual material structure, that is either totally constrained or constrained from bending but not from expansion. The code has been utilized to analyze the first walls for FED/INTOR and DEMO and to analyze the limiter for FED/INTOR.

Mattas, R.F.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

8 2168-6831/13/$31.002013IEEE ieee Geoscience and remote sensinG maGazine December 2013 Abstract--Earth observing satellites represent some  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and remote sensinG maGazine communities, and industry sectors including mining, fisheries, and transportation--Earth observing satellites represent some of the most valued components of the international Global Ocean of the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS), required to carry out advanced coastal and ocean research

225

Representing Cloud Processing of Aerosol in Numerical Models  

SciTech Connect

The satellite imagery in Figure 1 provides dramatic examples of how aerosol influences the cloud field. Aerosol from ship exhaust can serve as nucleation centers in otherwise cloud-free regions, forming ship tracks (top image), or can enhance the reflectance/albedo in already cloudy regions. This image is a demonstration of the first indirect effect, in which changes in aerosol modulate cloud droplet radius and concentration, which influences albedo. It is thought that, through the effects it has on precipitation (drizzle), aerosol can also affect the structure and persistence of planetary boundary layer (PBL) clouds. Regions of cellular convection, or open pockets of cloudiness (bottom image) are thought to be remnants of strongly drizzling PBL clouds. Pockets of Open Cloudiness (POCs) (Stevens et al. 2005) or Albrecht's ''rifts'' are low cloud fraction regions characterized by anomalously low aerosol concentrations, implying they result from precipitation. These features may in fact be a demonstration of the second indirect effect. To accurately represent these clouds in numerical models, we have to treat the coupled cloud-aerosol system. We present the following series of mesoscale and large eddy simulation (LES) experiments to evaluate the important aspects of treating the coupled cloud-aerosol problem. 1. Drizzling and nondrizzling simulations demonstrate the effect of drizzle on a mesoscale forecast off the California coast. 2. LES experiments with explicit (bin) microphysics gauge the relative importance of the shape of the aerosol spectrum on the 3D dynamics and cloud structure. 3. Idealized mesoscale model simulations evaluate the relative roles of various processes, sources, and sinks.

Mechem, D.B.; Kogan, Y.L.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

226

Predicting Problems Caused by Component Upgrades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to guarantee that the system's behavior is preserved across a component replacement. If automated logical

Liskov, Barbara

227

Correct Execution of Reconfiguration for Stateful Components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In component-based software engineering, reconfiguration describes structural changes to the architecture of a component system. For stateful components, not only structural but also behavioural aspects have to be taken into account in reconfiguration. ... Keywords: Reconfiguration, model checking, stateful components

Moritz Hammer; Alexander Knapp

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

A component-based collaboration infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-through in building reusable sys- tems. The popularity of di?erent component models in industry has demonstrated the attractions and power of CBD. Further more, modern object-oriented languages 18 such as Java and .Net provide direct support on component... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 B. Shared Component Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 1. Modeling Shared Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 2. Java Embodiment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 a. Shared Component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 b...

Yang, Yi

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

229

A Subbasin-based framework to represent land surface processes in an Earth System Model  

SciTech Connect

Realistically representing spatial heterogeneity and lateral land surface processes within and between modeling units in earth system models is important because of their implications to surface energy and water exchange. The traditional approach of using regular grids as computational units in land surface models and earth system models may lead to inadequate representation of lateral movements of water, energy and carbon fluxes, especially when the grid resolution increases. Here a new subbasin-based framework is introduced in the Community Land Model (CLM), which is the land component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Local processes are represented assuming each subbasin as a grid cell on a pseudo grid matrix with no significant modifications to the existing CLM modeling structure. Lateral routing of water within and between subbasins is simulated with the subbasin version of a recently-developed physically based routing model, Model for Scale Adaptive River Routing (MOSART). As an illustration, this new framework is implemented in the topographically diverse region of the U.S. Pacific Northwest. The modeling units (subbasins) are delineated from high-resolution Digital Elevation Model while atmospheric forcing and surface parameters are remapped from the corresponding high resolution datasets. The impacts of this representation on simulating hydrologic processes are explored by comparing it with the default (grid-based) CLM representation. In addition, the effects of DEM resolution on parameterizing topography and the subsequent effects on runoff processes are investigated. Limited model evaluation and comparison showed that small difference between the averaged forcing can lead to more significant difference in the simulated runoff and streamflow because of nonlinear horizontal processes. Topographic indices derived from high resolution DEM may not improve the overall water balance, but affect the partitioning between surface and subsurface runoff. More systematic analyses are needed to determine the relative merits of the subbasin representation compared to the commonly used grid-based representation, especially when land surface models are approaching higher resolutions.

Tesfa, Teklu K.; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Ke, Yinghai; Sun, Yu; Liu, Ying

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

230

Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples  

SciTech Connect

Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing laboratory samples is important so that the properties of these materials may be measured, while controlling the composition and other variables. Natural samples are rare, and have often experienced pressure and temperature changes that may affect the property to be measured [Waite et al., 2008]. Forming methane hydrate samples in the laboratory has been done a number of ways, each having advantages and disadvantages. The ice-to-hydrate method [Stern et al., 1996], contacts melting ice with methane at the appropriate pressure to form hydrate. The hydrate can then be crushed and mixed with mineral grains under controlled conditions, and then compacted to create laboratory samples of methane hydrate in a mineral medium. The hydrate in these samples will be part of the load-bearing frame of the medium. In the excess gas method [Handa and Stupin, 1992], water is distributed throughout a mineral medium (e.g. packed moist sand, drained sand, moistened silica gel, other porous media) and the mixture is brought to hydrate-stable conditions (chilled and pressurized with gas), allowing hydrate to form. This method typically produces grain-cementing hydrate from pendular water in sand [Waite et al., 2004]. In the dissolved gas method [Tohidi et al., 2002], water with sufficient dissolved guest molecules is brought to hydrate-stable conditions where hydrate forms. In the laboratory, this is can be done by pre-dissolving the gas of interest in water and then introducing it to the sample under the appropriate conditions. With this method, it is easier to form hydrate from more soluble gases such as carbon dioxide. It is thought that this method more closely simulates the way most natural gas hydrate has formed. Laboratory implementation, however, is difficult, and sample formation is prohibitively time consuming [Minagawa et al., 2005; Spangenberg and Kulenkampff, 2005]. In another version of this technique, a specified quantity of gas is placed in a sample, then the sample is flooded with water and cooled [Priest et al., 2009]. We have performed a number of tests in which hydrate was formed and the uniformity of the hydrate formation was examined. These tests have primarily used a variety of modifications of the excess gas method to make the hydrate, although we have also used a version of the excess water technique. Early on, we found difficulties in creating uniform samples with a particular sand/ initial water saturation combination (F-110 Sand, {approx} 35% initial water saturation). In many of our tests we selected this combination intentionally to determine whether we could use a method to make the samples uniform. The following methods were examined: Excess gas, Freeze/thaw/form, Freeze/pressurize/thaw, Excess gas followed by water saturation, Excess water, Sand and kaolinite, Use of a nucleation enhancer (SnoMax), and Use of salt in the water. Below, each method, the underlying hypothesis, and our results are briefly presented, followed by a brief conclusion. Many of the hypotheses investigated are not our own, but were presented to us. Much of the data presented is from x-ray CT scanning our samples. The x-ray CT scanner provides a three-dimensional density map of our samples. From this map and the physics that is occurring in our samples, we are able to gain an understanding of the spatial nature of the processes that occur, and attribute them to the locations where they occur.

Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.; Nakagawa, S.; Kwon, T.-H.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

SunShot Initiative: Component R&D for CSP Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Component R&D for CSP Systems to Component R&D for CSP Systems to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Component R&D for CSP Systems on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Component R&D for CSP Systems on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Component R&D for CSP Systems on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Component R&D for CSP Systems on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Component R&D for CSP Systems on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Component R&D for CSP Systems on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Collectors Receivers Power Block Thermal Storage Systems Analysis Competitive Awards Staff Photovoltaics Systems Integration Balance of Systems Component R&D for CSP Systems Graphic showing five color blocks in a circular formation that represent the technical goals and cost targets for each component in the CSP system.

232

Building Component Library | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Component Library Building Component Library Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Building Component Library Agency/Company /Organization: NREL Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings Phase: Create a Vision, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan Topics: Resource assessment, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Dataset Website: bcl.nrel.gov Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): buildings, nrel, data, component Language: English Building Component Library Screenshot References: Buildings Component Library[1] The Building Component Library is a repository of building data used to create building energy models. The Building Component Library is a repository of building data used to create building energy models. The data are broken down into separate

233

Predicting problems caused by component upgrades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a new, automatic technique to assess whether replacing a component of a software system by a purportedly compatible component may change the behavior of the system. The technique operates before ...

McCamant, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

IEA Task 27 BUILDING ENVELOPE COMPONENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IEA Task 27 BUILDING ENVELOPE COMPONENTS Performance, durability and sustainability of advanced windows and solar components for building envelopes Energy Performance Assessment Methodology Starting................................................................................................................................................. 3 2 Concepts of Energy Performance Assessment of Building Envelopes

235

Advanced filters and components for power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis is to improve the high frequency performance of components and filters by better compensating the parasitic effects of practical components. The main application for this improvement is in ...

Neugebauer, Timothy Carl, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Tools to Implement MPDV Component Characteristics  

SciTech Connect

This slide show presents work on photonic Doppler velocimetry multiplexing techniques, particularly as regards measurements on components.

Pena, M; Daykin, E; Emmit, R; Garza, A; Gibo, M; Hutchins, M; Perez, C; Teel, M

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

237

Predicting Problems Caused by Component Upgrades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. If automated logical comparison indicates that the new component does not make all the guarantees that the old

Liskov, Barbara

238

Tensor Principal Component Analysis via Convex Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 11, 2012 ... Keywords: Tensor; Principal Component Analysis; Low Rank; Nuclear Norm; Semidefinite Programming Relaxation. Category 1: Convex and...

Bo Jiang

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

239

Molecular Components of Catalytic Selectivity  

SciTech Connect

Selectivity, that is, to produce one molecule out of many other thermodynamically feasible product molecules, is the key concept to develop 'clean manufacturing' processes that do not produce byproducts (green chemistry). Small differences in potential energy barriers for elementary reaction steps control which reaction channel is more likely to yield the desired product molecule (selectivity), instead of the overall activation energy for the reaction that controls turnover rates (activity). Recent studies have demonstrated the atomic- or molecular-level tailoring of parameters such as the surface structures of active sites that give rise to nanoparticle size and shape dependence of turnover rates and reaction selectivities. Here, we highlight seven molecular components that influence reaction selectivities. These include: surface structure, adsorbate-induced restructuring, adsorbate mobility, reaction intermediates, surface composition, charge transport, and oxidation states for model metal single crystal and colloid nanoparticle catalysts. We show examples of their functioning and describe in-situ instruments that permit us to investigate their roles in surface reactions.

Somorjai, Gabor A.; Park, Jeong Y.

2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

240

Safety implementation of adaptive embedded control components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper deals with dynamic reconfigurations of component-based adaptive embedded control systems to be automatically handled at run-time by intelligent agents. We define a Control Component as a software unit supporting control tasks of the system ... Keywords: adaptive embedded control system, dynamic reconfiguration, intelligent agent, semaphore, software control component

Atef Gharbi; Mohamed Khalgui; Samir Ben Ahmed

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

LIRMM UM II Component based Software Architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 LIRMM UM II Component based Software Architecture of Robot Controllers R. Passama, D. Andreu, C component approaches and robot control architectures. This methodology defines a process that guides architecture, useful for analysis and integration, and a dedicated component-based language, focusing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

242

Expandable Metal Liner For Downhole Components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liner for an annular downhole component is comprised of an expandable metal tube having indentations along its surface. The indentations are formed in the wall of the tube either by drawing the tube through a die, by hydroforming, by stamping, or roll forming and may extend axially, radially, or spirally along its wall. The indentations accommodate radial and axial expansion of the tube within the downhole component. The tube is inserted into the annular component and deformed to match an inside surface of the component. The tube may be expanded using a hydroforming process or by drawing a mandrel through the tube. The tube may be expanded in such a manner so as to place it in compression against the inside wall of the component. The tube is useful for improving component hydraulics, shielding components from contamination, inhibiting corrosion, and preventing wear to the downhole component during use. It may also be useful for positioning conduit and insulated conductors within the component. An insulating material may be disposed between the tube and the component in order to prevent galvanic corrosion of the downhole component.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe R. (Provo, UT)

2004-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

243

Correction for Kpke et al., Clostridium ljungdahlii represents a microbial production platform based on syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Clostridium ljungdahlii represents a microbial production platform based on syngas 10.1073/pnas.1010816107 MICROBIOLOGY...Clostridium ljungdahlii represents a microbial production platform based on syngas, by Michael Kopke, Claudia Held...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Are Pixel Graphs Are Better at Representing Information than Pie Graphs?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigates whether pixel graphs more accurately represent percentage based data than pie graphs or bar graphs. Participants were asked ... representing large quantities of percentage based data than

Jolie Bell; Jim Davies

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Surveillance Guides - QAS 2.2 Staging/Storage of Components  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STAGING/STORAGE OF COMPONENTS STAGING/STORAGE OF COMPONENTS 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to ensure that before components or consumables are used in maintenance and repair of equipment and systems, or before new components and systems are installed, they are stored in ways that prevent deterioration. The surveillance also examines the contractor's practices in staging materials, and the use of effective quality control to ensure materials and components are stored and staged properly. Finally, the surveillance provides an opportunity for the Facility Representative to verify that the contractor is complying with performance objectives established by the Department of Energy. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5700.6C, Quality Assurance

246

SunShot Initiative: Component R&D for CSP Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Component R&D for CSP Systems Component R&D for CSP Systems Graphic showing five color blocks in a circular formation that represent the technical goals and cost targets for each component in the CSP system. Enlarge image The SunShot Initiative goal is to reduce the levelized cost of electricity generated by concentrating solar power (CSP) to $0.06 per kilowatt hour (kWh) or less, without any subsidy, by the year 2020. Concentrating solar power systems have different system configurations, such as trough, tower, linear Fresnel or dish, but they all share similar components. The SunShot CSP program funds research and development within the industry, national laboratories and universities to achieve the technical and economic targets for the following CSP component technologies:

247

Energy Department Announces $8 Million to Develop Advanced Components for Wave, Tidal, and Current Energy Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Energy Department today announced $8 million in available funding to spur innovation in next-generation marine and hydrokinetic control and component technologies. In the United States, waves, tides, and ocean currents represent a largely untapped renewable energy resource that could provide clean, affordable energy to homes and businesses across the country's coastal regions.

248

An accurate PVT model for geothermal fluids as represented by H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2}-NaCl mixtures  

SciTech Connect

Estimates for the pressure decline in high TDS geothermal fluids containing dissolved gases are extremely sensitive to the PVT representation of the reservoir fluid. Significant errors in predicted pressures will occur if the geothermal fluid is represented by one or two pseudo components with modified water properties. As a result, we have developed a PVT model to predict the thermodynamic properties of a prototype geothermal fluid as represented by three-component H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2}-NaCl mixtures. The range of applicability of the model is: Temperatures from 75 to 700+ F, pressures from 14.7 to 5000 psi, carbon dioxide content from 0-5 wt%, and salt concentrations to 30 wt%. The model has been implemented into Unocal's version of a commercially available reservoir simulator and is currently being used to study one of Unocal's high salinity reservoirs located in the Imperial Valley of California.

Andersen, G.; Probst, A.; Murray, L.; Butler, S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Dynamic characterization of satellite components through non-invasive methods  

SciTech Connect

The rapid deployment of satellites is hindered by the need to flight-qualify their components and the resulting mechanical assembly. Conventional methods for qualification testing of satellite components are costly and time consuming. Furthermore, full-scale vehicles must be subjected to launch loads during testing. The harsh testing environment increases the risk of component damage during qualification. The focus of this research effort was to assess the performance of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) techniques as replacement for traditional vibration testing. SHM techniques were applied on a small-scale structure representative of a responsive satellite. The test structure consisted of an extruded aluminum space-frame covered with aluminum shear plates, which was assembled using bolted joints. Multiple piezoelectric patches were bonded to the test structure and acted as combined actuators and sensors. Various methods of SHM were explored including impedance-based health monitoring, wave propagation, and conventional frequency response functions. Using these methods in conjunction with finite element modeling, the dynamic properties of the test structure were established and areas of potential damage were identified and localized. The adequacy of the results from each SHM method was validated by comparison to results from conventional vibration testing.

Mullens, Joshua G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiest, Heather K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mascarenas, David D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

250

What every designated representative should know about Title IV and Title V enforcement provisions  

SciTech Connect

Title IV of the Clean Air Act not only created a regulatory program unlike any other under the Clean Air Act, but also established a unique position--the designated representative--as an integral part of the program. The designated representative is required to meet certain basic obligations under Title IV, and a panoply of enforcement mechanisms are available to EPA in the event of noncompliance with these obligations. Also, because a designated representative may take on responsibilities under the permit provisions of Title V of the Clean Air Act, the designated representative can also be subject to an enforcement action for failure to comply with certain Title V permit requirements. This paper considers the basic definition of the designated representative under EPA`s Title IV and Title V regulations, identifies the responsibilities assigned to the designated representative, and then analyzes the enforcement mechanisms that may be applied to the designated representative if a regulatory responsibility has not been satisfied.

Bischoff, C.A. [Gallagher and Kennedy, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Dayal, P. [Tucson Electric Power Co., Tucson, AZ (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

251

Solid tags for identifying failed reactor components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid tag material which generates stable detectable, identifiable, and measurable isotopic gases on exposure to a neutron flux to be placed in a nuclear reactor component, particularly a fuel element, in order to identify the reactor component in event of its failure. Several tag materials consisting of salts which generate a multiplicity of gaseous isotopes in predetermined ratios are used to identify different reactor components.

Bunch, Wilbur L. (Richland, WA); Schenter, Robert E. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Toxic components in diesel exhaust fumes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To control diesel-engine toxicity, a computation method is proposed for the concentration of toxic components in diesel exhaust fumes, on the basis of external engine...

A. F. Dorokhov; E. V. Klimova

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Successfully Dismantled March 20, 2007 Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled Oak Ridge, TN Continuing its efforts to reduce the size of the U.S. nuclear weapons...

254

NDE DEVELOPMENT FOR ACERT ENGINE COMPONENTS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Barrier Coating (TBC) 12 PM024 TBCs applied on engine exhaust components reduce heat loss so improve efficiency; they also replace the use of expensive high-temperature...

255

Component and System Qualification Workshop Proceedings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Proceedings from the U.S. DOE Hydrogen Component and System Qualification Workshop, held at Sandia National Laboratory in Livermore, CA, on November 4, 2010.

256

Developing Language Processing Components with GATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developing Language Processing Components with GATE (a User Guide) For GATE version 3 beta 1 (July.3 Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 3.4 [D] Get Started

Maynard, Diana

257

DOE-STD-1063-97; DOE Standard Establishing and Maintaining a Facility Representative Program at DOE Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-97 3-97 October 1997 Supersedes DOE-STD-1063-93 DOE STANDARD ESTABLISHING AND MAINTAINING A FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM AT DOE FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA FACR Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (423) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. Order No. DE98001286 DOE-STD-1063-97 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy standard is approved for use by all DOE Components.

258

Chemical kinetic modeling of component mixtures relevant to gasoline  

SciTech Connect

Detailed kinetic models of pyrolysis and combustion of hydrocarbon fuels are nowadays widely used in the design of internal combustion engines and these models are effectively applied to help meet the increasingly stringent environmental and energetic standards. In previous studies by the combustion community, such models not only contributed to the understanding of pure component combustion, but also provided a deeper insight into the combustion behavior of complex mixtures. One of the major challenges in this field is now the definition and the development of appropriate surrogate models able to mimic the actual features of real fuels. Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. Their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. Aside the most commonly used surrogates containing iso-octane and n-heptane only, the so called Primary Reference Fuels (PRF), new mixtures have recently been suggested to extend the reference components in surrogate mixtures to also include alkenes and aromatics. It is generally agreed that, including representative species for all the main classes of hydrocarbons which can be found in real fuels, it is possible to reproduce very effectively in a wide range of operating conditions not just the auto-ignition propensity of gasoline or Diesel fuels, but also their physical properties and their combustion residuals [1]. In this work, the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation is computationally examined. The attention is focused on the autoignition of iso-octane, hexene and their mixtures. Some important issues relevant to the experimental and modeling investigation of such fuels are discussed with the help of rapid compression machine data and calculations. Following the model validation, the behavior of mixtures is discussed on the basis of computational results.

Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Dooley, S; Westbrook, C K

2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

259

Hybrid solar lighting systems and components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid solar lighting system and components having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one fiber receiver, at least one hybrid luminaire, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator and each hybrid luminaire. A controller operates each component.

Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN); Beshears, David L. (Knoxville, TN); Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Jordan, John K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lind, Randall F. (Lenoir City, TN)

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

260

Hybrid solar lighting distribution systems and components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid solar lighting distribution system and components having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one fiber receiver, at least one hybrid luminaire, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator and each hybrid luminaire. A controller operates all components.

Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN); Beshears, David L. (Knoxville, TN); Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Jordan, John K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lind, Randall F. (Lenoir City, TN)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

LBNL Windows & Daylighting Software -- THERM Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Components Components THERM has three basic components: Graphic User Interface: a graphic user interface that allows you to draw a cross section of the product or component for which you are performing thermal calculations. Heat Transfer Analysis: a heat-transfer analysis component that includes: an automatic mesh generator to create the elements for the finite-element analysis, a finite-element solver, an optional error estimator and adaptive mesh generator, and an optional view-factor radiation model. Results: a results displayer. Graphic User Interface THERM has standard graphic capabilities associated with the Microsoft Windows™ operating system. For example, THERM allows you to use: Both mouse and cursor operations; Standard editing features, such as Cut, Copy, Paste, Select All, and Delete;

262

Hot gas path component cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling system for a hot gas path component is disclosed. The cooling system may include a component layer and a cover layer. The component layer may include a first inner surface and a second outer surface. The second outer surface may define a plurality of channels. The component layer may further define a plurality of passages extending generally between the first inner surface and the second outer surface. Each of the plurality of channels may be fluidly connected to at least one of the plurality of passages. The cover layer may be situated adjacent the second outer surface of the component layer. The plurality of passages may be configured to flow a cooling medium to the plurality of channels and provide impingement cooling to the cover layer. The plurality of channels may be configured to flow cooling medium therethrough, cooling the cover layer.

Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Bunker, Ronald Scott; Itzel, Gary Michael

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

263

Correct Execution of Reconfiguration for Stateful Components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In component-based software engineering, reconfiguration describes structural changes to the architecture of a component system. For stateful components, not only structural but also behavioural aspects have to be taken into account in reconfiguration. We present a procedure to conduct reconfiguration in systems of concurrent, stateful components that interferes as little as possible with unchanged subsystems. Reconfiguration is described by a plan for adding, deleting and reconnecting components. A plan is executed by a sequence of simple, local steps, which are suitable for implementation in a programming language. We prove that plan execution is indistinguishable from atomic reconfiguration and use this fact for state-space reduction for verifying properties by model checking.

Moritz Hammer; Alexander Knapp

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_5a_usa_il_chicago-ohare_post1980_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_5a_usa_il_chicago-ohare_post1980_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5B Boulder, Colorado Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6A Minneapolis, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena,

265

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_4c_usa_wa_seattle_new2004_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_4c_usa_wa_seattle_new2004_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2B Phoenix,

266

1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from January 2000 to March 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the...

267

4Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from October to December 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field...

268

2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

269

4Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (Pis) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

270

3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period July through September 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered...

271

1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from January to March 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

272

4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October through December 2011. Data for these indicators were...

273

3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2008. Data for these indicators aregathered by Field...

274

1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January through March 2012. Data for these indicators were...

275

E-Print Network 3.0 - archaeal orphans representing Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and archaeal groups was carried out using the neighbor... -Flexibacter- Bacteroides (CFB), Cyanobacteria, and Alpha-Proteobacteria were dominantly represented. Crenarcheota...

276

3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period of July through September 2010. Data for these...

277

High Schools Served by Regional Admissions Representatives (by County) Lisa Overstreet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Schools Served by Regional Admissions Representatives (by County) Region 1 Lisa Overstreet San Joaquin El Dorado San Mateo Fresno Sierra Kings Solano Lake Sonoma Madera Stanislaus Mariposa

Belanger, David P.

278

Establishing and maintaining a facility representative program at DOE nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this DOE standard, (Establishing and Maintaining a Facility Representative Program at DOE Nuclear Facilities), is to help ensure that DOE Facility Representatives are selected based on consistently high standards and from the best qualified candidates available, that they receive the training required for them to function effectively, and that their expected duties, responsibilities, and authorities are well understood and accurately documented. To this end, this guidance provides the following practical information: (1) An approach for use in determining the required facility coverage; (2) The duties, responsibilities and authorities expected of a Facility Representative; and (3) The training and qualification expected of a Facility Representative.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Report on D&D of Large Components with Valuable EM Contributions is  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report on D&D of Large Components with Valuable EM Contributions is Report on D&D of Large Components with Valuable EM Contributions is Available on Powerpedia Report on D&D of Large Components with Valuable EM Contributions is Available on Powerpedia November 26, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM's Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning/Facility Engineering (D&D/FE), representing DOE on the Nuclear Energy Agency's (NEA) Working Party on Decommissioning and Dismantling (WPDD) of the Radioactive Waste Management Committee, provided significant contributions to the recently published report titled, "The Management of Large Components from Decommissioning to Storage and Disposal." Read the report on Powerpedia here. The WPDD focuses on the analysis of decommissioning policy, strategy and

280

Environmental Evaluation of New Generation Vehicles and Vehicle Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-266 1-266 Environmental Evaluation of New Generation Vehicles and Vehicle Components December 2001 Prepared by Susan M. Schexnayder 1 Sujit Das 2 Rajive Dhingra 1 Jonathan G. Overly 1 Bruce E. Tonn 2 Jean H. Peretz 1 Greg Waidley 1 Gary A. Davis 1 1 University of Tennessee-Knoxville 2 Oak Ridge National Laboratory This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Purification of polymorphic components of complex genomes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for processing related subject and reference macromolecule composed of complementary strand into their respective subject and reference populations of representative fragments and effectuating purification of unique polymorphic subject fragments. 1 fig.

Stodolsky, M.

1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

282

Property:Component Integration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Component Integration Component Integration Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. The allowed values for this property are: Customer Assembled Factory Integrated Pages using the property "Component Integration" Showing 22 pages using this property. D Distributed Generation Study/10 West 66th Street Corp + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/615 kW Waukesha Packaged System + Factory Integrated + Distributed Generation Study/Aisin Seiki G60 at Hooligans Bar and Grille + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/Arrow Linen + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/Dakota Station (Minnegasco) + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/Elgin Community College + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/Emerling Farm + Factory Integrated +

283

Effectiveness of marine reserve networks in representing biodiversity and minimizing impact to fishermen: a comparison  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LETTER Effectiveness of marine reserve networks in representing biodiversity and minimizing impact of California's Marine Life Protection Act Initiative at represent- ing biodiversity and minimizing estimated to design marine reserve networks that meet biodiversity targets efficiently (Kirkpatrick 1983; Leslie et al

Queensland, University of

284

A generalized 3D inverted pendulum model to represent human normal walking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A generalized 3D inverted pendulum model to represent human normal walking Sophie Sakka IRCCy,lacouture}@univ-poitiers.fr Abstract-- This paper compares different inverted pendulum models to represent the stance phase of human adapted to pathological walking as the walking symmetry hypothesis -needed to build classical inverted

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

285

Applying Engineering and Fleet Detail to Represent Passenger Vehicle Transport in a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applying Engineering and Fleet Detail to Represent Passenger Vehicle Transport in a Computable. It seeks to provide leadership in understanding scientific, economic, and ecological aspects://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 Applying Engineering and Fleet Detail to Represent Passenger Vehicle

286

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Representatives of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations February 26, 2003 Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Testify on the Office of Inspector General's recent inquiry concerning Los Alamos National Laboratory. STATEMENT OF GREGORY H. FRIEDMAN INSPECTOR GENERAL U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BEFORE THE U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND COMMERCE SUBCOMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND INVESTIGATIONS, February 26, 2003

287

3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2008. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 80% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was 87%) 89% Staffing Level ( last Quarter was 86%) 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is > 40%) 76% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is >

288

FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999 Since September, 1993, the Office of Field Management has served as the Department's corporate advocate for the Facility Representative Program. The Facility Representative (FR) is a critical technical position serving as line management's "eyes and ears" for operational safety in our contractor-operated facilities. I recognize the importance of the FR Program, and commit the Office of Field Integration (FI) to its continued crosscutting support. The FI staff continues to work with your staff members and with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) staff on FR Program issues, including staffing, training and qualification, recruitment, and retention. The Board is clearly interested in the

289

Structural Automotive Components from Composite Materials | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. lm08kia.pdf More Documents & Publications Structural Automotive Components from Composite...

290

Knowledge Portals: Components, Functionalities, and Deployment Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowledge Portals: Components, Functionalities, and Deployment Challenges Claudia Loebbecke University of Cologne Kevin Crowston Syracuse University School of Information Studies Abstract Knowledge Portals (KPs) are highly integrative Knowledge Management Systems (KMS) that promise to synthesize widely

Crowston, Kevin

291

Artificial Vision A vital component of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Artificial Vision A vital component of transhumanism #12;Machinehead · Merger of human and machine. · Transhumanism ­ Our design is flawed. · Blind spot · Blinking #12;Beyond the blind spot · Eventually plug

La Rosa, Andres H.

292

Data transmission element for downhole drilling components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A robust data transmission element for transmitting information between downhole components, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The data transmission element components include a generally U-shaped annular housing, a generally U-shaped magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element such as ferrite, and an insulated conductor. Features on the magnetically conducting, electrically insulating element and the annular housing create a pocket when assembled. The data transmission element is filled with a polymer to retain the components within the annular housing by filling the pocket with the polymer. The polymer can bond with the annular housing and the insulated conductor but preferably not the magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element. A data transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT)

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

293

Thresholding Multivariate Regression and Generalized Principal Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the high-dimensional data matrices have been extensively researched for uncorrelated and independent situations, they are much less so for the transposable data matrices. A generalization of principal component analysis and the related weighted least...

Sun, Ranye

2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

294

Indigestible fiber components as possible internal markers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INDIGESTIBLE FIBER COMPONENTS AS POSSIBLE INZERNAL MARKERS A Thesis by BERNARD FREDERICK JACOBS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AQf University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August... 1975 Major Subject: Animal Nutrition INDIGESTIBLE FIBER COMPONENTS AS POSSIBLE INTERNAL MARKERS A Thesis by BERNARD FREDERICK JACOBS Approved as to style and content by: !, /, (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Depar ent) (Member) (Member...

Jacobs, Bernard Frederick

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Component of variance estimation based on synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Component of Variance Estimation based on. Synthesis. (August lg (2) Jocelyn Anthea Tommerup, B. Sc. , B. Econ. , University of Queenslsnd Directed. by: Dr. H. 0. Hartley Analysis of variance, widely used in the study of statistical variation.... Essentially the problem is to find these coefficients so that, estimstes of the components may be computed. Hartley [1967] hss proposed a method which gives these coef'ficients directly for sry design, balanced of' unbalanced. It is the objective...

Tommerup, Jocelyn Anthea

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

296

RDCDS Meteorologoical Component Quick Installation Guide  

SciTech Connect

This guide provides step-by-step instructions for the deployment of one of the Rapidly Deployable Chemical Defense System (RDCDS) weather stations and central control system. Instructions for the deployment and operation of the Atmospheric Systems Corporation miniSODAR (SOnic Detection and Ranging) can be found in accompanying manuals developed by Atmospheric Systems Corporation. A detailed description of the system and its components can be found in the manual entitled Description of the RDCDS Meteorological Component.

Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.

2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

297

Method and apparatus for monitoring aircraft components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Operability of aircraft mechanical components is monitored by analyzing the voltage output of an electrical generator of the aircraft. Alternative generators, for a turbine-driven rotor aircraft, include the gas producer turbine tachometer generator, the power turbine tachometer generator, and the aircraft systems power producing starter/generator. Changes in the peak amplitudes of the fundamental frequency and its harmonics are correlated to changes in condition of the mechanical components.

Dickens, Larry M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Haynes, Howard D. (Knoxville, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Clinton, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Method and apparatus for monitoring aircraft components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Operability of aircraft mechanical components is monitored by analyzing the voltage output of an electrical generator of the aircraft. Alternative generators, for a turbine-driven rotor aircraft, include the gas producer turbine tachometer generator, the power turbine tachometer generator, and the aircraft systems power producing starter/generator. Changes in the peak amplitudes of the fundamental frequency and its harmonics are correlated to changes in condition of the mechanical components. 14 figs.

Dickens, L.M.; Haynes, H.D.; Ayers, C.W.

1996-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

299

An analysis of multiple component mooring lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AN ANALYSIS OF MULTIPLE COMPONENT MOORING LINES A Thesis by THOMAS ROBERT NALTERS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major...'595 ABSTRACT An Analysis Of Multiple Component Mooring Lines (December 1977) Thomas Robert Walters, B. E. , Vanderbilt University Co-Chai rman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Ts ung- Chow Su Co- Chai rman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Richard Domi nguez...

Walters, Thomas Robert

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

300

Evaluating fugacity models for trace components in landfill gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A fugacity approach was evaluated to reconcile loadings of vinyl chloride (chloroethene), benzene, 1,3-butadiene and trichloroethylene in waste with concentrations observed in landfill gas monitoring studies. An evaluative environment derived from fictitious but realistic properties such as volume, composition, and temperature, constructed with data from the Brogborough landfill (UK) test cells was used to test a fugacity approach to generating the source term for use in landfill gas risk assessment models (e.g. GasSim). SOILVE, a dynamic Level II model adapted here for landfills, showed greatest utility for benzene and 1,3-butadiene, modelled under anaerobic conditions over a 10year simulation. Modelled concentrations of these components (95?300?gm?3; 43?gm?3) fell within measured ranges observed in gas from landfills (24?300180?000?gm?3; 2070?gm?3). This study highlights the need (i) for representative and time-referenced biotransformation data; (ii) to evaluate the partitioning characteristics of organic matter within waste systems and (iii) for a better understanding of the role that gas extraction rate (flux) plays in producing trace component concentrations in landfill gas.

Sophie Shafi; Andrew Sweetman; Rupert L. Hough; Richard Smith; Alan Rosevear; Simon J.T. Pollard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Bayesian Modeling of Time Trends in Component Reliability Data via Markov Chain Monte Carlo Simulation  

SciTech Connect

Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques represent an extremely flexible and powerful approach to Bayesian modeling. This work illustrates the application of such techniques to time-dependent reliability of components with repair. The WinBUGS package is used to illustrate, via examples, how Bayesian techniques can be used for parametric statistical modeling of time-dependent component reliability. Additionally, the crucial, but often overlooked subject of model validation is discussed, and summary statistics for judging the models ability to replicate the observed data are developed, based on the posterior predictive distribution for the parameters of interest.

D. L. Kelly

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Performance Engineering Technology for Scientific Component Software  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale, complex scientific applications are beginning to benefit from the use of component software design methodology and technology for software development. Integral to the success of component-based applications is the ability to achieve high-performing code solutions through the use of performance engineering tools for both intra-component and inter-component analysis and optimization. Our work on this project aimed to develop performance engineering technology for scientific component software in association with the DOE CCTTSS SciDAC project (active during the contract period) and the broader Common Component Architecture (CCA) community. Our specific implementation objectives were to extend the TAU performance system and Program Database Toolkit (PDT) to support performance instrumentation, measurement, and analysis of CCA components and frameworks, and to develop performance measurement and monitoring infrastructure that could be integrated in CCA applications. These objectives have been met in the completion of all project milestones and in the transfer of the technology into the continuing CCA activities as part of the DOE TASCS SciDAC2 effort. In addition to these achievements, over the past three years, we have been an active member of the CCA Forum, attending all meetings and serving in several working groups, such as the CCA Toolkit working group, the CQoS working group, and the Tutorial working group. We have contributed significantly to CCA tutorials since SC'04, hosted two CCA meetings, participated in the annual ACTS workshops, and were co-authors on the recent CCA journal paper [24]. There are four main areas where our project has delivered results: component performance instrumentation and measurement, component performance modeling and optimization, performance database and data mining, and online performance monitoring. This final report outlines the achievements in these areas for the entire project period. The submitted progress reports for the first two years describe those year's achievements in detail. We discuss progress in the last project period in this document. Deployment of our work in CCA components, frameworks, and applications is an important metric of success. We also summarize the project's accomplishments in this regard at the end of the report. A list of project publications is also given.

Malony, Allen D.

2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

303

Tensor analysis applied to symmetrical components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

+ In the next ohap- ter all our oaloulations will be based along sequenoe axes instead, sinoe it is easier and oleareri Fig, 5 a b o represents a generator, dw f a short transmission line, g h g a load, n ground impedanoe of generator, n ground impedanoe...+ In the next ohap- ter all our oaloulations will be based along sequenoe axes instead, sinoe it is easier and oleareri Fig, 5 a b o represents a generator, dw f a short transmission line, g h g a load, n ground impedanoe of generator, n ground impedanoe...

Iriarte, Modesto

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

304

Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The U.S. House of Representatives The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization April 5 2005 Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Testify regarding recent allegations of misconduct involving documents associated with the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Disposal of the Nation's high-level nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel is one of the most sensitive and complex challenges facing the U.S.

305

Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations March 4, 2004 Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Herbert Richardson, Principal Deputy Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Testify regarding physical security at the Department of Energy's facilities. The Department's activities range from nuclear nonproliferation, to cutting edge research and development, to weapons programs. The sensitive and critical nature of the Department's work

306

U.S. Representative Cleaver congratulates KCP employees for safety record  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Representative Cleaver congratulates KCP employees for safety record Representative Cleaver congratulates KCP employees for safety record during big move | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > U.S. Representative Cleaver congratulates KCP employees for ... U.S. Representative Cleaver congratulates KCP employees for safety record

307

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Of Representatives Of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations May 1, 2003 Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Request to testify on the Office of Inspector General's (OIG) reviews of management practices at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory). In February of this year, I testified before this Subcommittee regarding our Special Inquiry report on Operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory (DOE/IG-0584, January 2003). That report noted a series of actions taken by

308

Order Module--DOE-STD-1063-2011, FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1063-2011, FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES DOE-STD-1063-2011, FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES Order Module--DOE-STD-1063-2011, FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES The familiar level of this module is divided into three sections. The first section addresses the purpose and scope of DOE-STD-1063-2011, the purpose of the FR program, and the duties, responsibilities, and authorities of FRs and other key personnel. In the second section, the requirements of the FR program are discussed. The third section covers the three appendices of this standard: FR performance indicators, an FR program assessment guide, and the process to determine FR staffing. We have provided examples and a practice to help familiarize you with the material. The practice will also help prepare you for the criterion test. DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE STD 1063, Facility Representatives

309

Design of a Fragment Library that maximally represents available chemical space  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cheminformatics protocols have been developed and assessed that identify a small set of fragments which can represent the compounds in a chemical library for use in fragment-based ligand discovery. Six differe...

M. N. Schulz; J. Landstrm; K. Bright

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Extracting and Representing Qualitative Behaviors of Complex Systems in Phase Spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a qualitative method for understanding and representing phase space structures of complex systems and demonstrate the method with a program, MAPS --- Modeler and Analyzer for Phase Spaces, using deep domain ...

Zhao, Feng

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Representing Knowledge of LargeScale Space 1 Benjamin Jack Kuipers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Representing Knowledge of Large­Scale Space 1 Benjamin Jack Kuipers July 1977 1 B. J. Kuipers. 1977, and Mark Jeffery. Continuing discussions with Al Stevens have been pleasurable and helpful. My wife Laura

Kuipers, Benjamin

312

How faithfully will the geostrophic currents represent the existing ocean currents?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is widely recognized that the geostrophic flows computed by the dynamic method of Bjerknes and collaborators represent the actual currents pretty faithfully. However, what would be the reason that a geostrophi...

Koji Hidaka

1972-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION The Student Government Association, or "SGA", has the greatest student representative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

_____________________________________________________________________________ STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION The Student Government Association, or "SGA", has the greatest student representative authority on campus. The Student Government Association receives a $4.50 per student per quarter student-assessed fee

Selmic, Sandra

314

Lessons Learned in Optimizing Workers' and Worker Representatives' Input to Work Planning and Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Slide Presentation by Tom McQuiston, Dr. P.H., United Steelworkers - Tony Mazzocchi Center for Health, Safety and Environmental Education. Lessons Learned in Optimizing Workers and Worker Representatives Input in Work Planning and Control.

315

John C. Barnes of Savannah River Operations named 2012 Facility Representative of the Year  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

About 200 Department of Energy (DOE) federal employees are Facility Representatives (FR) who provide day-to-day oversight of contractor operations at DOE facilities. Each year the Department...

316

Secretary Chu to Join Representatives Lofgren and Honda at the SLAC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Representatives Lofgren and Honda at the SLAC Representatives Lofgren and Honda at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Secretary Chu to Join Representatives Lofgren and Honda at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory August 13, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - On Monday, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will visit the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in Menlo Park, California. Secretary Chu will join Representatives Zoe Lofgren and Mike Honda and Stanford University President John Hennessy at a dedication ceremony for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The Recovery Act-funded LCLS produces x-ray pulses millions of times brighter than the world's most powerful synchrotron sources, capable of capturing images of atoms and molecules in motion. The LCLS is led by SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC). Operated by

317

U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford February 3, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Tomorrow, Friday, February 4, U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu will travel to East Hartford, Conn. to visit United Technologies Research Center, which has received funding from the Department for several transformational clean energy research projects. The Secretary is visiting UTC to highlight the importance of investing in innovation and clean energy to put people back to work, grow the economy, and win the future. He will be joined by U.S. Representatives John Larson and Joe Courtney for a tour

318

Secretary Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New "Sputnik  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New "Sputnik Moment" for America Secretary Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New "Sputnik Moment" for America November 29, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - In a speech at the National Press Club, U.S Energy Secretary Steven Chu said that the success of China and other countries in clean energy industries represents a new "Sputnik Moment" for the United States, and requires a similar mobilization of America's innovation machine so that we can compete in the global race for the jobs of the future. Secretary Chu outlined efforts underway at the Department to give America's entrepreneurs and manufacturers an edge through investments in clean energy innovation.

319

NREL: Learning - Advanced Vehicle Systems and Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Vehicle Systems and Components Advanced Vehicle Systems and Components Photo of a man checking out an advanced battery using testing equipment that includes a long metal tube on a table top. NREL's researchers test new batteries developed for hybrid electric vehicles. Credit: Warren Gretz Researchers and engineers at the NREL work closely with those in the automotive industry to develop new technologies, such as advanced batteries, for storing energy in cars, trucks, and buses. They also help to develop and test new technologies for using that energy more efficiently. And they work on finding new, energy-efficient ways to reduce the amount of fuel needed to heat and cool the interiors, or cabins, of vehicles. To help develop these new technologies, NREL's researchers are improving the efficiency of vehicle systems and components like these:

320

Component evaluation testing and analysis algorithms.  

SciTech Connect

The Ground-Based Monitoring R&E Component Evaluation project performs testing on the hardware components that make up Seismic and Infrasound monitoring systems. The majority of the testing is focused on the Digital Waveform Recorder (DWR), Seismic Sensor, and Infrasound Sensor. In order to guarantee consistency, traceability, and visibility into the results of the testing process, it is necessary to document the test and analysis procedures that are in place. Other reports document the testing procedures that are in place (Kromer, 2007). This document serves to provide a comprehensive overview of the analysis and the algorithms that are applied to the Component Evaluation testing. A brief summary of each test is included to provide the context for the analysis that is to be performed.

Hart, Darren M.; Merchant, Bion John

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Component external leakage and rupture frequency estimates  

SciTech Connect

In order to perform detailed internal flooding risk analyses of nuclear power plants, external leakage and rupture frequencies are needed for various types of components - piping, valves, pumps, flanges, and others. However, there appears to be no up-to-date, comprehensive source for such frequency estimates. This report attempts to fill that void. Based on a comprehensive search of Licensee Event Reports (LERs) contained in Nuclear Power Experience (NPE), and estimates of component populations and exposure times, component external leakage and rupture frequencies were generated. The remainder of this report covers the specifies of the NPE search for external leakage and rupture events, analysis of the data, a comparison with frequency estimates from other sources, and a discussion of the results.

Eide, S.A.; Khericha, S.T.; Calley, M.B.; Johnson, D.A.; Marteeny, M.L.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

MSTC - Microsystems Science, Technology, and Components - Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Contacts Microsystems Home Custom Microsystems Solutions Microsystems R&D Services Capabilities and Technologies Facilities Trusted Microsystems General Info About Us Awards Contacts Doing Business with Us Fact Sheets MESA News CONTACT US card file image ASIC Custom Solutions email: ASIC Custom Solutions Biological Microsensor Technologies Biosensors and Nanomaterials email: Biosensors and Nanomaterials Chemical Microsensors and Sensor Microsystems Chemical sensors and integrated sensor-based microsystems email: Chemical Microsensors and Sensor Microsystems Custom Components COTS, Capacitors, Magnetics, Cables and Interconnects email: Custom Components Failure Analysis Root Cause and Failure Analysis email: Failure Analysis Integrated Photonics Photonic Crystals, Nano Photonics, Micro Optics

323

Five-quark components in baryons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence has been accumulating for the existence of significant intrinsic non-perturbative five-quark components in various baryons. The inclusion of the five-quark components gives a natural explanation of the excess of $\\bar d$ over $\\bar u$, significant quark orbital angular momentum in the proton, the problematic mass and decay pattern of the lowest $1/2^-$ baryon nonet, etc.. A breathing mode of $qqq\\leftrightarrow qqqq\\bar q$ is suggested for the lowest $1/2^-$ baryon octet. Evidence of a predicted member of the new scheme, $\\Sigma^*(1/2^-)$ around 1380 MeV, is introduced.

B. S. Zou

2010-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

324

Technique for Measuring Hybrid Electronic Component Reliability  

SciTech Connect

Materials compatibility studies of aged, engineered materials and hardware are critical to understanding and predicting component reliability, particularly for systems with extended stockpile life requirements. Nondestructive testing capabilities for component reliability would significantly enhance lifetime predictions. For example, if the detection of crack propagation through a solder joint can be demonstrated, this technique could be used to develop baseline information to statistically determine solder joint lifelengths. This report will investigate high frequency signal response techniques for nondestructively evaluating the electrical behavior of thick film hybrid transmission lines.

Green, C.C.; Hernandez, C.L.; Hosking, F.M.; Robinson, D.; Rutherford, B.; Uribe, F.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Loaded Transducer Fpr Downhole Drilling Component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. To close gaps present between transmission elements, transmission elements may be biased with a "spring force," urging them closer together.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

326

Non-Reactor Micro-Component Development  

SciTech Connect

This book chapter will appear in a book being published by Wiley VCH, titled "Micro-Instrumentation for High Throughput Experimentation and Process Intensification." It represents a summary of microchannel-based research in all areas of non-reactive process development, such as heat exchange, mixing, emulsification, phase separation, distillation, mass-transfer, and biological applications.

Palo, Daniel R.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.; Holladay, Jamie D.; Humble, Paul H.; Dagle, Robert A.; Brooks, Kriston P.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Vaporization modeling of petroleum-biofuel drops using a hybrid multi-component approach  

SciTech Connect

Numerical modeling of the vaporization characteristics of multi-component fuel mixtures is performed in this study. The fuel mixtures studied include those of binary components, biodiesel, diesel-biodiesel, and gasoline-ethanol. The use of biofuels has become increasingly important for reasons of environmental sustainability. Biofuels are often blended with petroleum fuels, and the detailed understanding of the vaporization process is essential to designing a clean and efficient combustion system. In this study, a hybrid vaporization model is developed that uses continuous thermodynamics to describe petroleum fuels and discrete components to represent biofuels. The model is validated using the experimental data of n-heptane, n-heptane-n-decane mixture, and biodiesel. Since biodiesel properties are not universal due to the variation in feedstock, methods for predicting biodiesel properties based on the five dominant fatty acid components are introduced. Good levels of agreement in the predicted and measured drop size histories are obtained. Furthermore, in modeling the diesel-biodiesel drop, results show that the drop lifetime increases with the biodiesel concentration in the blend. During vaporization, only the lighter components of diesel fuel vaporize at the beginning. Biodiesel components do not vaporize until some time during the vaporization process. On the other hand, results of gasoline-ethanol drops indicate that both fuels start to vaporize once the process begins. At the beginning, the lighter components of gasoline have a slightly higher vaporization rate than ethanol. After a certain time, ethanol vaporizes faster than the remaining gasoline components. At the end, the drop reduces to a regular gasoline drop with heavier components. Overall, the drop lifetime increases as the concentration of ethanol increases in the drop due to the higher latent heat. (author)

Zhang, Lei; Kong, Song-Charng [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, 2025 Black Engineering Building, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Robust volume calculations for Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) components in Monte Carlo transport calculations  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we consider a new generalized algorithm for the efficient calculation of component object volumes given their equivalent constructive solid geometry (CSG) definition. The new method relies on domain decomposition to recursively subdivide the original component into smaller pieces with volumes that can be computed analytically or stochastically, if needed. Unlike simpler brute-force approaches, the proposed decomposition scheme is guaranteed to be robust and accurate to within a user-defined tolerance. The new algorithm is also fully general and can handle any valid CSG component definition, without the need for additional input from the user. The new technique has been specifically optimized to calculate volumes of component definitions commonly found in models used for Monte Carlo particle transport simulations for criticality safety and reactor analysis applications. However, the algorithm can be easily extended to any application which uses CSG representations for component objects. The paper provides a complete description of the novel volume calculation algorithm, along with a discussion of the conjectured error bounds on volumes calculated within the method. In addition, numerical results comparing the new algorithm with a standard stochastic volume calculation algorithm are presented for a series of problems spanning a range of representative component sizes and complexities. (authors)

Millman, D. L. [Dept. of Computer Science, Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (United States); Griesheimer, D. P.; Nease, B. R. [Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corporation, Bertis Atomic Power Laboratory (United States); Snoeyink, J. [Dept. of Computer Science, Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Evaluation of SWAT streamflow components for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

passes: forward, backward, forward, with a decreasing baseflow rate at each pass [Arnold et al. (1995 from physically based equations) A reliable simulation of streamflow components is an important step any reference to the underlying physical processes #12;Application of two separation techniques

330

Software reuse strategies and component markets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Black-box reuse with component markets could be the silver bullet solution that makes software reuse a reality, and advances software development to a robust industrial process---but only if market makers address the growing pains plaguing this immature ...

T. Ravichandran; Marcus A. Rothenberger

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

SCADA architecture with mobile remote components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the advent of new technologies, the demand of connecting IT systems to the Internet is increasing. This is also the case for Control systems specifically SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) systems. Traditional SCADA systems are connected ... Keywords: SCADA, control systems, mobility, remote components

Tai-Hoon Kim

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Architecture for SCADA with mobile remote components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the advent of new technologies, the demand of connecting IT systems to the Internet is increasing. This is also the case for Control systems specifically SCADA (Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition) systems. Traditional SCADA systems are connected ... Keywords: SCADA, control systems, mobility, remote components

Rosslin John Robles; Tai-Hoon Kim

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Non-Negative Risk Components Jeremy Staum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Depending on the purpose of risk attribution, it may or may not be acceptable to get negative riskNon-Negative Risk Components Jeremy Staum j-staum@northwestern.edu Department of Industrial the risk of a portfolio or system to its compo- nents, when it is required to produce non-negative risk

Staum, Jeremy

334

Artificial Neural Network Investigation of the Structural Group Contribution Method for Predicting Pure Components Auto Ignition Temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Artificial Neural Network Investigation of the Structural Group Contribution Method for Predicting Pure Components Auto Ignition Temperature ... Artificial neural networks were used to investigate several structural group contribution (SGC) methods available in the literature. ... The hidden layer is a single layer with six neurons, and the output layer consists of one neuron representing the predicted AIT property. ...

Tareq A. Albahri; Reena S. George

2003-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

335

Beamline standard component designs for the Advanced Photon Source  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Photon Source (APS) has initiated a design standardization and modularization activity for the APS synchrotron radiation beamline components. These standard components are included in components library, sub-components library and experimental station library. This paper briefly describes these standard components using both technical specifications and side view drawings.

Shu, D.; Barraza, J.; Brite, C.; Chang, J.; Sanchez, T.; Tcheskidov, V.; Kuzay, T.M.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Enabling Technologies for Ceramic Hot Section Components  

SciTech Connect

Silicon-based ceramics are attractive materials for use in gas turbine engine hot sections due to their high temperature mechanical and physical properties as well as lower density than metals. The advantages of utilizing ceramic hot section components include weight reduction, and improved efficiency as well as enhanced power output and lower emissions as a result of reducing or eliminating cooling. Potential gas turbine ceramic components for industrial, commercial and/or military high temperature turbine applications include combustor liners, vanes, rotors, and shrouds. These components require materials that can withstand high temperatures and pressures for long duration under steam-rich environments. For Navy applications, ceramic hot section components have the potential to increase the operation range. The amount of weight reduced by utilizing a lighter gas turbine can be used to increase fuel storage capacity while a more efficient gas turbine consumes less fuel. Both improvements enable a longer operation range for Navy ships and aircraft. Ceramic hot section components will also be beneficial to the Navy's Growth Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and VAATE (Versatile Affordable Advanced Turbine Engines) initiatives in terms of reduced weight, cooling air savings, and capability/cost index (CCI). For DOE applications, ceramic hot section components provide an avenue to achieve low emissions while improving efficiency. Combustors made of ceramic material can withstand higher wall temperatures and require less cooling air. Ability of the ceramics to withstand high temperatures enables novel combustor designs that have reduced NO{sub x}, smoke and CO levels. In the turbine section, ceramic vanes and blades do not require sophisticated cooling schemes currently used for metal components. The saved cooling air could be used to further improve efficiency and power output. The objectives of this contract were to develop technologies critical for ceramic hot section components for gas turbine engines. Significant technical progress has been made towards maturation of the EBC and CMC technologies for incorporation into gas turbine engine hot-section. Promising EBC candidates for longer life and/or higher temperature applications relative to current state of the art BSAS-based EBCs have been identified. These next generation coating systems have been scaled-up from coupons to components and are currently being field tested in Solar Centaur 50S engine. CMC combustor liners were designed, fabricated and tested in a FT8 sector rig to demonstrate the benefits of a high temperature material system. Pretest predictions made through the use of perfectly stirred reactor models showed a 2-3x benefit in CO emissions for CMC versus metallic liners. The sector-rig test validated the pretest predictions with >2x benefit in CO at the same NOx levels at various load conditions. The CMC liners also survived several trip shut downs thereby validating the CMC design methodology. Significant technical progress has been made towards incorporation of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and environmental barrier coatings (EBC) technologies into gas turbine engine hot-section. The second phase of the program focused on the demonstration of a reverse flow annular CMC combustor. This has included overcoming the challenges of design and fabrication of CMCs into 'complex' shapes; developing processing to apply EBCs to 'engine hardware'; testing of an advanced combustor enabled by CMCs in a PW206 rig; and the validation of performance benefits against a metal baseline. The rig test validated many of the pretest predictions with a 40-50% reduction in pattern factor compared to the baseline and reductions in NOx levels at maximum power conditions. The next steps are to develop an understanding of the life limiting mechanisms in EBC and CMC materials, developing a design system for EBC coated CMCs and durability testing in an engine environment.

Venkat Vedula; Tania Bhatia

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

337

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations April 5, 2005 Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Request to testify on the results of our work at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, one of the Department of Energy's most prominent facilities. STATEMENT OF GREGORY H. FRIEDMAN INSPECTOR GENERAL U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BEFORE THE U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND COMMERCE SUBCOMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND INVESTIGATIONS, May 5, 2005

338

WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO YOU AND THE PEOPLE YOU REPRESENT. | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPRESENT. REPRESENT. WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO YOU AND THE PEOPLE YOU REPRESENT. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is charged under the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007) with modernizing the nation's electricity grid to improve its reliability and efficiency. As part of this effort, DOE is also responsible for increasing awareness of our nation's Smart Grid. Building upon The Smart Grid: An Introduction, a DOE-sponsored publication released in 2008 and available online at www.smartgrid.gov, this publication is one in a series of books designed to better acquaint discrete stakeholder groups with the promise and possibilities of the Smart Grid. Stakeholder groups include Utilities, Regulators, Policymakers, Technology Providers, Consumer Advocates and Environmental Groups.

339

On April 25, 2013, several representatives of energy efficiency advocacy organiz  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 25, 2013, several representatives of energy efficiency advocacy organizations met with staff April 25, 2013, several representatives of energy efficiency advocacy organizations met with staff and members of the Compressed Air and Gas Institute (CAGI) along with some compressed air experts at the offices of the Alliance to Save Energy to explore and discuss a consensus approach to advancing energy efficiency of compressed air systems within the context of the DOE's potential rulemaking on compressors. The group discussed the need to assemble the relevant data and technical content that will be valuable in identifying possible pathways to achieve a meaningful and appropriate compressor standard that maximizes energy savings potential without creating an undue burden on the market. Representing the energy efficiency advocacy organizations were Tracy Kohler of the Compressed Air

340

December 17, 1998 Memo, Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

mE mE F 1325.8 (a89) EFG (U7-W) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: December 17, 1998 REPLY TO ATTN OF: FM- 10(J. Hassenfeldt, 202 586-1643) SUBJECT Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program TO:Distribution The Department's Revised Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 93-3 has once again underscored the Department's commitment to maintaining the technical capability necessary to safely manage and operate our defense nuclear facilities. Attracting and retaining highly qualified employees and placing them in our critical technical positions is vital to fi.dfilling this commitment. You have identified 95'% of your Facility Representative positions as critical technical positions. The Office of Field Management has noted a 12'?40 annual attrition rate of Facility Representatives

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

How Representative are the Cloud Regimes at the TWP Sites? … An ISCCP Perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Representative are the Cloud Regimes at the How Representative are the Cloud Regimes at the TWP Sites? - An ISCCP Perspective C. Jakob Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre Melbourne, Australia G. Tselioudis National Aeronautic and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies Columbia University New York Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has established comprehensive cloud and radiation observatories in various locations across the globe with the aim of collecting measurements and developing models to better understand the processes that control solar and thermal infrared radiative transfer in clouds and at the surface. The locales of the individual ARM sites were chosen because they represent typical cloud regimes occurring in various climate regimes (Stokes and Schwartz

342

CRAD, Nuclear Safety Component - June 29, 2011 | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

CRAD, Nuclear Safety Component - June 29, 2011 CRAD, Nuclear Safety Component - June 29, 2011 June 29, 2011 Nuclear Safety Component and Services Procurement (HSS CRAD 45-12, Rev....

343

From Multi-Component Gas Streams Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Separation of CO Separation of CO 2 From Multi-Component Gas Streams Opportunity Research is active on the patent-pending technology, titled "Apparatus and Process for the Separation of Gases Using Supersonic Expansion and Oblique Shock Wave Compression." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview The separation of a gaseous mixture into constituent gases has proven to be useful for a variety of industrial and commercial applications. Currently CO 2 can be separated from multi- component gas streams using compression and refrigeration techniques in order to condense the CO 2 out of a vapor phase so that it can be mechanically separated from the stream.

344

Coatings for hot section gas turbine components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Components in the hot section of gas turbines are protected from the environment by oxidation-resistant coatings while thermal barrier coatings are applied to reduce the metal operating temperature of blades and vanes. The integrity of these protective coatings is an issue of major concern in current gas turbine designs. Premature cracking of the protective layer in oxidation-resistant coatings and of the interface in thermal barrier coating systems has become one of the life limiting factors of coated components in gas turbines. Following a brief overview of the state-of-the-art of coated material systems with respect to coating types and their status of application, the fracture mechanisms and mechanics of coated systems are presented and discussed.

J. Bressers; S. Peteves; M. Steen

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

System for inspecting large size structural components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a system for inspecting large scale structural components such as concrete walls or the like. The system includes a mobile gamma radiation source and a mobile gamma radiation detector. The source and detector are constructed and arranged for simultaneous movement along parallel paths in alignment with one another on opposite sides of a structural component being inspected. A control system provides signals which coordinate the movements of the source and detector and receives and records the radiation level data developed by the detector as a function of source and detector positions. The radiation level data is then analyzed to identify areas containing defects corresponding to unexpected variations in the radiation levels detected.

Birks, Albert S. (Columbus, OH); Skorpik, James R. (Kennewick, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Columbia River Component Data Evaluation Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Columbia River Component Data Compilation and Evaluation task was to compile, review, and evaluate existing information for constituents that may have been released to the Columbia River due to Hanford Site operations. Through this effort an extensive compilation of information pertaining to Hanford Site-related contaminants released to the Columbia River has been completed for almost 965 km of the river.

C.S. Cearlock

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

347

Advanced Materials for Lightweight Valve Train Components | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for Lightweight Valve Train Components Advanced Materials for Lightweight Valve Train Components Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review...

348

Durability of ACERT Engine Components | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Washington D.C. pmp11lin.pdf More Documents & Publications Durability of ACERT Engine Components Durability of ACERT Engine Components Materials for Advanced Engine Valve Train...

349

Miracle Wind Power Components Manufacture Co Ltd | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Miracle Wind Power Components Manufacture Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Miracle Wind Power Components Manufacture Co Ltd Place: Wuxi, Jiangsu Province, China Sector:...

350

New Design Methods and Algorithms for Multi-component Distillation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

New Design Methods and Algorithms for Multi-component Distillation Processes New Design Methods and Algorithms for Multi-component Distillation Processes multicomponent.pdf More...

351

AVTA Vehicle Component Cost Model | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Vehicle Component Cost Model AVTA Vehicle Component Cost Model 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010...

352

Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM...

353

DOE Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells DOE Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells This document describes test protocols...

354

Friction Modeling for Lubricated Engine and Drivetrain Components...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Modeling for Lubricated Engine and Drivetrain Components Friction Modeling for Lubricated Engine and Drivetrain Components 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs...

355

Magnesium Replacement of Aluminum Cast Components in a Production...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Magnesium Replacement of Aluminum Cast Components in a Production V6 Engine to Effect Cost-Effective Mass Reduction Magnesium Replacement of Aluminum Cast Components in a...

356

Table 11.4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components; Unit:...

357

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Hydrogen System Component...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

other hydrogen system components. Reliable components are needed to ensure the success of hydrogen fueling stations and support the commercial deployment of fuel cell electric...

358

Fuel Cell Subsystems and Components | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Cell Subsystems and Components Fuel Cell Subsystems and Components As recommended by the 2004 National Research Council report, the program continues to increase its support...

359

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. Subsequent chapters of this report provide: an overview of NGTDM; a description of the interface between the NEMS and NGTDM; an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM; the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module; the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module; the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module; the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module; and a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Data Transmission System For A Downhole Component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a system for transmitting data through a string of downhole components. In accordance with one aspect of the invention, the system includes a plurality of downhole components, such as sections of pipe in a drill string. Each component has a first and second end, with a first communication element located at the first end and a second communication element located at the second end. Each communication element includes a first contact and a second contact. The system also includes a coaxial cable running between the first and second communication elements, the coaxial cable having a conductive tube and a conductive core within it. The system also includes a first and second connector for connecting the first and second communication elements respectively to the coaxial cable. Each connector includes a conductive sleeve, lying concentrically within the conductive tube, which fits around and makes electrical contact with the conductive core. The conductive sleeve is electrically isolated from the conductive tube. The conductive sleeve of the first connector is in electrical contact with the first contact of the first communication element, the conductive sleeve of the second connector is in electrical contact with the first contact of the second communication element, and the conductive tube is in electrical contact with both the second contact of the first communication element and the second contact of the second communication element.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT)

2005-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

1.2 - Chondrites and Their Components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Chondrites are extraordinary mixtures of materials with diverse origins that formed around other stars, in the solar nebula, and in their parent asteroids. Most chondrites were so severely altered by aqueous fluids, thermal metamorphism, and impacts that the original characteristics of their components have been largely erased. But a few pristine chondrites have preserved an exquisite mineralogical, chemical, isotopic, and chronological record of the first few million years of solar system history. The properties of diverse types of carbonaceous, ordinary, and enstatite chondrites focusing on the most pristine samples are reviewed to establish the chemical, isotopic, and mineralogical properties and origins of their components and to elucidate the asteroidal processes that modified them. Refractory inclusions amoeboid olivine aggregates and CaAl-rich inclusions were the first solids to form in the solar nebula near to the protosun. Chondrules and associated metallic FeNi grains were still forming several million years later when the earliest planetesimals, which melted due to heat from 26Al decay, were colliding. In the least-altered chondrites, matrix material, which coats chondrules and other components, is largely composed of micrometer-sized silicates and amorphous materials, which formed at high temperatures, plus small amounts (up to 200ppm) of presolar oxides and silicates.

E.R.D. Scott; A.N. Krot

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Review of the Facility Representative Program at the Idaho Site, March 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the Facility Representative Program at the Idaho Site March 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose.................................................................................................................................................. ! 2.0 Scope ..................................................................................................................................................... ! 3.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Results ..................................................................................................................................................

363

Laser Safety Web Resources The web links below represent varied resources for laser safety information and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laser Safety Web Resources The web links below represent varied resources for laser safety endorsement by Georgia Tech. Please contact the Laser Safety Officer if you know of any helpful resources of Laser Physics and Technology, http://www.rp- photonics.com/encyclopedia.html Kentek, http

Houston, Paul L.

364

Literature List Arabatzis, T. 2006. Representing Electrons: A Biographical Approach to Theoretical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Springer), pp. 13-28. Hacking, I. 1983. Representing and Intervening (Cambridge University Press), pp. 149-185, 210-232. Hacking, I. 1999. The Social Construction of What? (Harvard University Press), pp. 1-34, 63-99. Hacking, I. 2000. "How Inevitable Are the Results of Successful Science?" Philosophy of Science 67

365

curve represents degradation where all the cell wall is accessible to enzymes and the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

curve represents degradation where all the cell wall is accessible to enzymes and the 'Within, van Gelder AH, Driehuis F (1997) Anim. Feed Sci Technol 66, 31-45 A role for plant enzymes- ystwyth, Ceredigion, SY23 3EB, UK) Proteolytic enzymes in plants are inti- mately involved in controlled

Boyer, Edmond

366

Results on CP Violation from Belle T.E. Browder representing the Belle Collaboration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results on CP Violation from Belle T.E. Browder representing the Belle Collaboration Department of Physics, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii Abstract. I describe the recent measurement of the CP In 1973, Kobayashi and Maskawa (KM) first proposed a model where CP violation is incorporated

Browder, Tom

367

Representing Energy Price Variability in Long-and Medium-term Hydropower Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 2002). The output of each hydropower plant is usually small relative to the overall energy market1 Representing Energy Price Variability in Long- and Medium- term Hydropower Optimization Marcelo A Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Davis, USA Journal of Water

Pasternack, Gregory B.

368

On the Possibility of Using Complex Values in Fuzzy Logic For Representing Inconsistencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

applications in mind, including the idea of applying fuzzy logic to control. In surprising contrast to Zadeh's initial predictions, fuzzy control has become the most successful area of applications of fuzzy logic (seeOn the Possibility of Using Complex Values in Fuzzy Logic For Representing Inconsistencies Hung T

Kreinovich, Vladik

369

University Safety Partners Mission Statement The University Safety Partners (USP) is a group of appointed representatives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the work environment at Stanford. The role of University Safety Partners is to: · Advise the UniversityUniversity Safety Partners Mission Statement The University Safety Partners (USP) is a group of appointed representatives who are responsible for the administration of the University's health and safety

370

XPS Investigations of Ruthenium Deposited onto Representative Inner Surfaces of Nuclear Reactor Containment Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

XPS Investigations of Ruthenium Deposited onto Representative Inner Surfaces of Nuclear Reactor in a nuclear power plant, interactions of gaseous RuO4 with reactor containment building surfaces (stainless, during nuclear reactor operation, the fission-product ruthenium will accumulate in the fuel. The quantity

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

371

Synthesizing Representative I/O Workloads Using Iterative Distillation Zachary Kurmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synthesizing Representative I/O Workloads Using Iterative Distillation Zachary Kurmas College proper- ties are "key" for a given workload and storage system. We have developed a tool, the Distiller, that automati- cally identifies the key properties ("attribute-values") of the workload. The Distiller then uses

Kurmas, Zachary

372

Patterns for Representing FMEA in Formal Specification of Control Systems Ilya Lopatkin, Alexei Iliasov,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Patterns for Representing FMEA in Formal Specification of Control Systems Ilya Lopatkin, Alexei, Finland {Yuliya.Prokhorova, Elena.Troubitsyna}@abo.fi Abstract -- Failure Modes and Effects analysis (FMEA) is a widely used technique for inductive safety analysis. FMEA provides engineers with valuable information

Southampton, University of

373

When is it Biased? Assessing the Representativeness of Twitter's Streaming API  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When is it Biased? Assessing the Representativeness of Twitter's Streaming API Fred Morstatter tweets through the "Streaming API". Recently, research has pointed to evidence of bias in this source in the Streaming API data. We tackle the problem of finding sample bias without costly and restrictive Firehose

Liu, Huan

374

Signs and Sight in Southern Uganda Representing Perception in Ordinary Conversation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

124 Signs and Sight in Southern Uganda Representing Perception in Ordinary Conversation Ben Orlove-spoken language in the East African nation of Uganda, frequently include discussions and evaluations of signs, drawn from field work that we have conducted in Uganda, centers on a set of beliefs that certain sensory

Orlove, Benjamin S.

375

Mechanism-based Representative Volume Elements (RVEs) for Predicting Property Degradations in Multiphase Materials  

SciTech Connect

Quantitative understanding of the evolving thermal-mechanical properties of a multi-phase material hinges upon the availability of quantitative statistically representative microstructure descriptions. Questions then arise as to whether a two-dimensional (2D) or a three-dimensional (3D) representative volume element (RVE) should be considered as the statistically representative microstructure. Although 3D models are more representative than 2D models in general, they are usually computationally expensive and difficult to be reconstructed. In this paper, we evaluate the accuracy of a 2D RVE in predicting the property degradations induced by different degradation mechanisms with the multiphase solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode material as an example. Both 2D and 3D microstructure RVEs of the anodes are adopted to quantify the effects of two different degradation mechanisms: humidity-induced electrochemical degradation and phosphorus poisoning induced structural degradation. The predictions of the 2D model are then compared with the available experimental measurements and the results from the 3D model. It is found that the 2D model, limited by its inability of reproducing the realistic electrical percolation, is unable to accurately predict the degradation of thermo-electrical properties. On the other hand, for the phosphorus poisoning induced structural degradation, both 2D and 3D microstructures yield similar results, indicating that the 2D model is capable of providing computationally efficient yet accurate results for studying the structural degradation within the anodes.

Xu, Wei; Sun, Xin; Li, Dongsheng; Ryu, Seun; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Nuclear talks in Austria International representatives will meet in Vienna on Saturday to discuss a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear talks in Austria International representatives will meet in Vienna on Saturday to discuss a controversial nuclear fusion plan. The technical meeting of experts is intended to pave the way of nuclear fusion say it provides an attractive long-term energy option, because the basic materials needed

377

Review of the Facility Representative Program at the Idaho Site, March 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Facility Representative Program at the Idaho Site March 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose.................................................................................................................................................. ! 2.0 Scope ..................................................................................................................................................... ! 3.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Results ..................................................................................................................................................

378

Diagnosing Abortion Problems Abortions can represent a significant loss of (potential)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diagnosing Abortion Problems Abortions can represent a significant loss of (potential) income in the investi- gation of an abortion problem. Breeding dates, parity, production information and health events and Preventing Abortion Problems Ernest Hovingh, Extension Veterinarian, Virginia-Maryland Regional College

Liskiewicz, Maciej

379

Advanced Life Assessment Methods for Gas Turbine Engine Components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In combustion systems for aircraft applications, liners represent an interesting challenge from the engineering point of view regarding the state of stress, including high temperatures (up to 1500C) varying over time, high thermal gradients, creep related phenomena, mechanical fatigue and vibrations. As a matter of fact, under the imposed thermo-mechanical loading conditions, some sections of the liner can creep; the consequent residual stresses at low temperatures can cause plastic deformations. For these reasons, during engine operations, the material behaviour can be hardly non-linear and the simulation results to be time expensive. Aim of this paper is to select and implement some advanced material life assessment methods to gas turbine engine components such as combustor liners. Uniaxial damage models for Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF), based on Coffin-Manson, Neu-Sehitoglu and Chaboche works, have been implemented in Matlab. In particular, experimental LCF and TMF results for full size specimens are compared to calibrate these models and to assess TMF life of specimens. Results obtained in different testing conditions have been used for validation. In particular, each model needs specific parameter calibrations to characterize the investigated materials; these parameters and their relation with temperature variation have been experimentally obtained by testing standard specimens.

Vincenzo Cuffaro; Francesca Cur; Raffaella Sesana

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Automated Assessment of Polyethylene Wear in Cemented Acetabular Components using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automated Assessment of Polyethylene Wear in Cemented Acetabular Components using Anteroposterior, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, DD1 9SY, UK Abstract Polyethylene wear in the acetabular components of hip to the polyethylene acetabular component of a prosthesis so that both it and the metal femoral head component can

St Andrews, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Comparison of component frameworks for real-time embedded systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of components significantly helps in development of real-time embedded systems. There have been a number of component frameworks developed for this purpose, and some of them have already became well established in this area. Even though these ... Keywords: Component frameworks, Component-based development, Real-time and embedded systems

Tom Pop, Petr Hn?tynka, Petr Hoek, Michal Malohlava, Tom Bure

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

MSTC - Microsystems Science, Technology, and Components - Trusted  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trusted Microsystems Trusted Microsystems Microsystems Home Custom Microsystems Solutions Microsystems R&D Services Capabilities and Technologies Facilities Trusted Microsystems General Info About Us Awards Contacts Doing Business with Us Fact Sheets MESA News Trusted Microsystems for National Security Customers Trusted R&D Trusted Design Trusted Fabrication Trusted BEOL Trusted Custom Electronic Components Trusted Microsystems "Trusted Microsystems" encompasses the entire product development cycle. Sandia's Microsystems Center affords access to trusted people and facilities for research and development, design, layout, fabrication, characterization, packaging, and test. Trusted Design Secure design facility with disciplined and trusted design flow and methodologies Trusted Structured ASIC

383

RECLAMATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING COMPONENTS  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive material packages are withdrawn from use for various reasons; loss of mission, decertification, damage, replacement, etc. While the packages themselves may be decertified, various components may still be able to perform to their required standards and find useful service. The Packaging Technology and Pressurized Systems group of the Savannah River National Laboratory has been reducing the cost of producing new Type B Packagings by reclaiming, refurbishing, and returning to service the containment vessels from older decertified packagings. The program and its benefits are presented.

Abramczyk, G.; Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.; Bellamy, S.

2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

384

Thermal Study of Inverter Components: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Thermal histories of inverter components were collected from operating inverters from several manufacturers and three locations. The data were analyzed to determine thermal profiles, the dependence on local conditions, and to assess the effect on inverter reliability. Inverter temperatures were shown to increase with the power dissipation of the inverters, follow diurnal and annual cycles, and have a dependence on wind speed. An accumulated damage model was applied to the temperature profiles and an example of using these data to predict reliability was explored.

Sorensen, N. R.; Thomas, E. V.; Quintana, M. A.; Barkaszi, S.; Rosenthal, A.; Zhang, Z.; Kurtz, S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Installation of Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

386

Atmospheric Oxidation of Coal at Moderate Temperatures. Effect of Oxidation on the Carbonizing Properties of Representative Coking Coals.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric Oxidation of Coal at Moderate Temperatures. ... Effect of Oxidation on the Carbonizing Properties of Representative Coking Coals. ...

L Schmidt; J Elder; J Davis

1940-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Registering for DAU Online Course CLC 222, Contracting Officer's Representative Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Registering for DAU Online Course CLC 222, Contracting Officer's Representative Training Registering for DAU Online Course CLC 222, Contracting Officer's Representative Training To register for this, and any other DAU online course, you must first register in the Federal Acquisition Institute's Training Application System (FAITAS). Steps to register in FAITAS and to register for the course are below. Please note, you are required to provide your Social Security Number (SSN) to complete registration. This is the only time the SSN is required; this information is restricted and not available to unauthorized personnel. Please contact Linda Ott (linda.ott@hq.doe.gov, 202-287-5310) if you have any questions or concerns. If you encounter problems with

388

Facility Representative Performance Indicator Report for for Jan-Mar 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Performance Indicators January-March 2013 Facility Representative Performance Indicators January-March 2013 Staffing, Qualification, and Utilization Data OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (EM) Location Analysis FTE Approved FTE Actual Staff % Staff * Gains / Losses % Core Qualified * % Fully Qualified * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 3 3 4 100 0 100 100 63 ID (EM) 1 7 7 6 86 0 71 71 90 OR (EM) 14 14 13 93 0 86 86 75 ORP 13 13 13 100 0 100 100 90 PPPO 2 6 6 6 100 ±1 100 100 74 RL 17 15 15 88 0 88 82 70 SPRU 3 2 2 2 100 0 100 0 90 SR 4 31 31 27 87 -1 87 87 86 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 100 100 75 EM Totals 95 93 88 93 +1, -2 89 86 79 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >65 Location Key: CBFO = Carlsbad Field Office ORP = Office of River Protection SPRU = Separations Process Research Unit

389

2012 Facility Representative/Safety System Oversight/Fire Safety Workshop - Registrants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative / Safety System Oversight Workshop Facility Representative / Safety System Oversight Workshop DOE Fire Safety Workshop Federal Technical Capability Panel (FTCP) Meeting May 14 - 18, 2012, at the Alexis park Resort Hotel, Las Vegas, NV Registrants As of 5/15/2012 Total Number: 218 First Name Last Name Government /Contractor Agency Secretarial Office Site Position Training Course FTCP FS 5/15 FS 5/16 FR/SSO Plenary FR Track SSO Track Fire Safety Training Tour Ron Alderson Government Employee DOE NNSA Nevada SSO SAF-271 No No No Yes No Yes No No Josh Allen Government Employee DOE EM Richland FR No No No No Yes Yes No No No Mark Alsdorf Government Employee DOE HSS Headquarters NTC Safety Training Manager SAF-271 Yes No No Yes No No No No Xavier Aponte Government Employee

390

WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO YOU AND THE PEOPLE YOU REPRESENT.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPRESENT. REPRESENT. regulators consumer advocates environmental groups technology providers policymakers ONE of SIX SMART GRID STAKEHOLDER BOOKS A smarter grid can work harder and more efficiently to respond to the needs of all consumers, contain costs and enable clean-energy solutions at scale. regulators utilities 2 DISCLAIMER PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor Litos Strategic Communication, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information apparatus, product,

391

On October 20, 2011, representatives of Howe Corporation, Gade Environmental, an  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 20, 2011, representatives of Howe Corporation, Gade Environmental, and Beecon ProfServe October 20, 2011, representatives of Howe Corporation, Gade Environmental, and Beecon ProfServe met with DOE to discuss the proposed rules EERE-2010 BT-TP-0036 RIN 1904-AC38 Energy Efficiency Program for Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Test Procedures for Commercial Ice Makers. The meeting was held at the request of Howe Corporation at the DOE offices in Washington DC. In attendance: Ari Altman, DOE Ashley Armstrong, DOE Robert Bittner, Beecon ProfServe John Cymbalsky, DOE Mary Gade, Gade Environmental Group Mary Howe, Howe Corporation Charles Llenza, DOE Jeff Mackowiak, Howe Corporation Mark O'Malley, Gade Environmental Group Howe Corporation introduced and discussed the following concerns regarding the NOPR. For reference,

392

Defining food literacy and its components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Food literacy has emerged as a term to describe the everyday practicalities associated with healthy eating. The term is increasingly used in policy, practice, research and by the public; however, there is no shared understanding of its meaning. The purpose of this research was to develop a definition of food literacy which was informed by the identification of its components. This was considered from two perspectives: that of food experts which aimed to reflect the intention of existing policy and investment, and that of individuals, who could be considered experts in the everyday practicalities of food provisioning and consumption. Given that food literacy is likely to be highly contextual, this second study focused on disadvantaged young people living in an urban area who were responsible for feeding themselves. The Expert Study used a Delphi methodology (round one n=43). The Young Peoples Study used semi-structured, life-course interviews (n=37). Constructivist Grounded Theory was used to analyse results. This included constant comparison of data within and between studies. From this, eleven components of food literacy were identified which fell into the domains of: planning and management; selection; preparation; and eating. These were used to develop a definition for the term food literacy.

Helen Anna Vidgen; Danielle Gallegos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Anodizing of High Electrically Stressed Components  

SciTech Connect

Anodizing creates an aluminum oxide coating that penetrates into the surface as well as builds above the surface of aluminum creating a very hard ceramic-type coating with good dielectric properties. Over time and use, the electrical carrying components (or spools in this case) experience electrical breakdown, yielding undesirable x-ray dosages or failure. The spool is located in the high vacuum region of a rod pinch diode section of an x-ray producing machine. Machine operators have recorded decreases in x-ray dosages over numerous shots using the reusable spool component, and re-anodizing the interior surface of the spool does not provide the expected improvement. A machine operation subject matter expert coated the anodized surface with diffusion pump oil to eliminate electrical breakdown as a temporary fix. It is known that an anodized surface is very porous, and it is because of this porosity that the surface may trap air that becomes a catalyst for electrical breakdown. In this paper we present a solution of mitigating electrical breakdown by oiling. We will also present results of surface anodizing improvements achieved by surface finish preparation and surface sealing. We conclude that oiling the anodized surface and using anodized hot dip sealing processes will have similar results.

Flores, P. [NSTec; Henderson, D. J. [NSTec; Good, D. E. [NSTec; Hogge, K. [NSTec; Mitton, C. V. [NSTec; Molina, I. [NSTec; Naffziger, C. [NSTec; Codova, S. R. [SNL; Ormond, E. U. [SNL

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Finite element plate formulation including transverse shear effects for representing composite shell structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For Representing Composite Shell Structures. (May 1987) Jsmil M. Hamdallah, B. S. , University of Toledo Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. John J. Engblom A finite element formulation for the analysis of thin to moderately thick lam- inated composite shell... in an analysis if delamination is to be avoided. The results obtained in this research confirm the potential use of the element presented as an accurate and eflicient tool in the analysis of thin to moderately thick laminated shell structures. To my parents...

Hamdallah, Jamil M.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

395

Solubility and freezing effects of Fe2+ solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

determined the total equilibrium metal solubility ([Fe2+ ]T and [Mg2+ ]T) in 20­90 wt % sulfuric acidSolubility and freezing effects of Fe2+ and Mg2+ in H2SO4 solutions representative of upper solutions over the temperature range 200­300 K. We have measured solubilities using samples of MgSO4, FeSO4Á

396

Uniprocessor Performance Analysis of a Representative Workload of Sandia National Laboratories' Scientific Applications.  

SciTech Connect

UNIPROCESSOR PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF A REPRESENTATIVE WORKLOAD OF SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES' SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS Master of Science in Electrical Engineering New Mexico State University Las Cruces, New Mexico, 2005 Dr. Jeanine Cook, Chair Throughout the last decade computer performance analysis has become absolutely necessary to maximum performance of some workloads. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) located in Albuquerque, New Mexico is no different in that to achieve maximum performance of large scientific, parallel workloads performance analysis is needed at the uni-processor level. A representative workload has been chosen as the basis of a computer performance study to determine optimal processor characteristics in order to better specify the next generation of supercomputers. Cube3, a finite element test problem developed at SNL is a representative workload of their scientific workloads. This workload has been studied at the uni-processor level to understand characteristics in the microarchitecture that will lead to the overall performance improvement at the multi-processor level. The goal of studying vthis workload at the uni-processor level is to build a performance prediction model that will be integrated into a multi-processor performance model which is currently being developed at SNL. Through the use of performance counters on the Itanium 2 microarchitecture, performance statistics are studied to determine bottlenecks in the microarchitecture and/or changes in the application code that will maximize performance. From source code analysis a performance degrading loop kernel was identified and through the use of compiler optimizations a performance gain of around 20% was achieved.

Charles Laverty

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Evaluation of Sialon internal combustion engine components and fabrication of several ceramic components for automotive applications  

SciTech Connect

Fabrication development work was carried out on a push-rod tip having a stepped OD design and a 90{degree} shoulder in the transition area. Spray-dried Sialon premix was used in dry press tooling, and components were densified to about 98% of theoretical density using pressureless sintering conditions. Upon evaluation of the sintered components, it was found that afl components showed defects in the transition area. Modifications of the pressing parameters, incorporation of a 45{degree} angle in the shoulder area, and the use of tailored premix did not lead to the fabrication of defect-free parts. From these observations, it was concluded that the original part design could not easily be adapted to high-volume ceramic manufacturing methods. Subsequently, a modification to the desip was implemented. An SiC material with improved toughness (Hexoloy SX) was used for fabricating several test components with a closely machined, straight OD design. Pressureless-sintered and post-hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) Hexoloy SX components were supplied to The American Ceramic Engine Company (ACE) for assembly and testing. Fuel pump push-rod assemblies with Hemoloy SX tips were prepared by ACE, but no testing has been carried out to date.

McMurtry, C.H.; Ten Eyck, M.O.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Evaluation of Sialon internal combustion engine components and fabrication of several ceramic components for automotive applications  

SciTech Connect

Fabrication development work was carried out on a push-rod tip having a stepped OD design and a 90[degree] shoulder in the transition area. Spray-dried Sialon premix was used in dry press tooling, and components were densified to about 98% of theoretical density using pressureless sintering conditions. Upon evaluation of the sintered components, it was found that afl components showed defects in the transition area. Modifications of the pressing parameters, incorporation of a 45[degree] angle in the shoulder area, and the use of tailored premix did not lead to the fabrication of defect-free parts. From these observations, it was concluded that the original part design could not easily be adapted to high-volume ceramic manufacturing methods. Subsequently, a modification to the desip was implemented. An SiC material with improved toughness (Hexoloy SX) was used for fabricating several test components with a closely machined, straight OD design. Pressureless-sintered and post-hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) Hexoloy SX components were supplied to The American Ceramic Engine Company (ACE) for assembly and testing. Fuel pump push-rod assemblies with Hemoloy SX tips were prepared by ACE, but no testing has been carried out to date.

McMurtry, C.H.; Ten Eyck, M.O.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Automotive Component Measurements forAutomotive Component Measurements for Determining VehicleDetermining Vehicle--Level RadiatedLevel Radiated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Automotive Component Measurements forAutomotive Component Measurements for Determining VehicleDetermining Vehicle--Level RadiatedLevel Radiated Automotive Component Measurements forAutomotive ComponentEmissionsEmissionsEmissions Todd Hubing Mi h li P f f V hi l El t iMichelin Professor of Vehicular Electronics Clemson University

Stuart, Steven J.

400

Non-destructive component separation using infrared radiant energy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for separating a first component and a second component from one another at an adhesive bond interface between the first component and second component. Typically the method involves irradiating the first component with infrared radiation from a source that radiates substantially only short wavelengths until the adhesive bond is destabilized, and then separating the first component and the second component from one another. In some embodiments an assembly of components to be debonded is placed inside an enclosure and the assembly is illuminated from an IR source that is external to the enclosure. In some embodiments an assembly of components to be debonded is simultaneously irradiated by a multi-planar array of IR sources. Often the IR radiation is unidirectional. In some embodiments the IR radiation is narrow-band short wavelength infrared radiation.

Simandl, Ronald F. (Knoxville, TN); Russell, Steven W. (Knoxville, TN); Holt, Jerrid S. (Knoxville, TN); Brown, John D. (Harriman, TN)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

MSTC - Microsystems Science, Technology, and Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microsystems Microsystems Microsystems Home Custom Microsystems Solutions Microsystems R&D Services Capabilities and Technologies Facilities Trusted Microsystems General Info About Us Awards Contacts Doing Business with Us Fact Sheets MESA News MICROSYSTEMS SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY & COMPONENTS Clear Latest MSTC News Ed Cole appointed Fellow by ASM International Researching new detectors for chemical, biological threats MESA fab streaming video MESAFab streaming video Get Adobe Flash player The concept of integrating more than one transistor on a single chip has had a profound and lasting impact on our society. From the first use in the Minuteman missile to the proliferation of consumer products today, microelectronic circuits have dramatically improved performance, functionality, and reliability, while reducing cost

402

Component failure data handbook. Technical evaluation report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents generic component failure rates that are used in reliability and risk studies of commercial nuclear power plants. The rates are computed using plant-specific data from published probabilistic risk assessments supplemented by selected other sources. Each data source is described. For rates with four or more separate estimates among the sources, plots show the data that are combined. The method for combining data from different sources is presented. The resulting aggregated rates are listed with upper bounds that reflect the variability observed in each rate across the nuclear power plant industry. Thus, the rates are generic. Both per hour and per demand rates are included. They may be used for screening in risk assessments or for forming distributions to be updated with plant-specific data.

Gentillon, C.D.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Thermal barrier coatings for turbine components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine component, such as a turbine blade having a metal substrate (22) is coated with a metal MCrAlY alloy layer (24) and then a thermal barrier layer (20) selected from LaAlO.sub.3, NdAlO.sub.3, La.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7, Dy.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12, HO.sub.3 Al.sub.3 O.sub.12, ErAlO.sub.3, GdAlO.sub.3, Yb.sub.2 Ti.sub.2 O.sub.7, LaYbO.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7 or Y.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12.

Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Bethesda, MD); Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Modeling the Phillips curve with unobserved components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are imposed on the underlying level (core in?ation), since #25;t = (1#0; #11;L)#0;1#22;t + (1#0; #11;L)#0;1"t; t = 1; :::; T 5 1960 1980 2000 0.05 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 INFLATION Level 1960 1980 2000 0.01 0.00 0.01 INFLATIONSeasonal 1960 1980 2000 0.05 0... .8 9.0 9.2 log_GDP Level 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 0.025 0.000 0.025 0.050 0.0 75 INFLATION Level+Cycle 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 0.02 0.01 0.00 0.01 0.02 0.0 3 log_GDPCycle Figure 5: Smoothed components from a bivariate model for GDP and in?a- tion A...

Harvey, Andrew C

405

Compound cooling flow turbulator for turbine component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Multi-scale turbulation features, including first turbulators (46, 48) on a cooling surface (44), and smaller turbulators (52, 54, 58, 62) on the first turbulators. The first turbulators may be formed between larger turbulators (50). The first turbulators may be alternating ridges (46) and valleys (48). The smaller turbulators may be concave surface features such as dimples (62) and grooves (54), and/or convex surface features such as bumps (58) and smaller ridges (52). An embodiment with convex turbulators (52, 58) in the valleys (48) and concave turbulators (54, 62) on the ridges (46) increases the cooling surface area, reduces boundary layer separation, avoids coolant shadowing and stagnation, and reduces component mass.

Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Marra, John J; Rudolph, Ronald J

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

406

Tritium Removal from Carbon Plasma Facing Components  

SciTech Connect

Tritium removal is a major unsolved development task for next-step devices with carbon plasma-facing components. The 2-3 order of magnitude increase in duty cycle and associated tritium accumulation rate in a next-step tokamak will place unprecedented demands on tritium removal technology. The associated technical risk can be mitigated only if suitable removal techniques are demonstrated on tokamaks before the construction of a next-step device. This article reviews the history of codeposition, the tritium experience of TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) and JET (Joint European Torus) and the tritium removal rate required to support ITER's planned operational schedule. The merits and shortcomings of various tritium removal techniques are discussed with particular emphasis on oxidation and laser surface heating.

C.H. Skinner; J.P. Coad; G. Federici

2003-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

407

Evaluation of aging degradation of structural components  

SciTech Connect

Irradiation embrittlement of the neutron shield tank (NST) A212 Grade B steel from the Shippingport reactor, as well as thermal embrittlement of CF-8 cast stainless steel components from the Shippingport and KRB reactors, has been characterized. Increases in Charpy transition temperature (CTT), yield stress, and hardness of the NST material in the low-temperature low-flux environment are consistent with the test reactor data for irradiations at < 232{degrees}C. The shift in CTT is not as severe as that observed in surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR): however, it shows very good agreement with the results for HFIR A212-B steel irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The results indicate that fluence rate has not effect on radiation embrittlement at rates as low as 2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s at the low operating temperature of the Shippingport NST, i.e., 55{degrees}C. This suggest that radiation damage in Shippingport NST and HFIR surveillance samples may be different because of the neutron spectra and/or Cu and Ni content of the two materials. Cast stainless steel components show relatively modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength. Correlations for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly conservative values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predict the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot- and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approx}15 y.

Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Evaluation of aging degradation of structural components  

SciTech Connect

Irradiation embrittlement of the neutron shield tank (NST) A212 Grade B steel from the Shippingport reactor, as well as thermal embrittlement of CF-8 cast stainless steel components from the Shippingport and KRB reactors, has been characterized. Increases in Charpy transition temperature (CTT), yield stress, and hardness of the NST material in the low-temperature low-flux environment are consistent with the test reactor data for irradiations at < 232{degrees}C. The shift in CTT is not as severe as that observed in surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR): however, it shows very good agreement with the results for HFIR A212-B steel irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The results indicate that fluence rate has not effect on radiation embrittlement at rates as low as 2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}{center dot}s at the low operating temperature of the Shippingport NST, i.e., 55{degrees}C. This suggest that radiation damage in Shippingport NST and HFIR surveillance samples may be different because of the neutron spectra and/or Cu and Ni content of the two materials. Cast stainless steel components show relatively modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength. Correlations for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly conservative values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predict the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot- and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approx}15 y.

Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Method and apparatus for component separation using microwave energy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for separating and recovering components includes the steps of providing at least a first component bonded to a second component by a microwave absorbent adhesive bonding material at a bonding area to form an assembly, the bonding material disposed between the components. Microwave energy is directly and selectively applied to the assembly so that substantially only the bonding material absorbs the microwave energy until the bonding material is at a debonding state. A separation force is applied while the bonding material is at the debonding state to permit disengaging and recovering the components. In addition, an apparatus for practicing the method includes holders for the components.

Morrow, Marvin S. (Kingston, TN); Schechter, Donald E. (Ten Mile, TN); Calhoun, Jr., Clyde L. (Knoxville, TN)

2001-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

410

Bonneville Purchasing Instructions. Appendix 14A, Contracting Officer`s Technical Representatives` Guide for Services Contracts.  

SciTech Connect

This guide outlines the duties of BPA personnel designated as Contracting Officers Technical Representatives (COTRs). The BPA Administrator gives contracting officers (COs) in BPA responsibility and authority for awarding and administering contracts. COs are authorized to designate other BPA employees to act as their representatives for purposes of contract administration, from the time of contract award until final receipt and acceptance of the contracted services. COTRs are the individuals primarily relied upon to perform technical contract administration functions. Similar functions for supply and construction contracts are performed by engineering representatives, construction inspectors, and inspectors. Although this Guide is written primarily with the COTR in mind, the concept and operation of teamwork is essential throughout the entire process of contract administration. The CO administers the contract during performance, but rarely has expertise in all of the relevant technical areas. Therefore, CO decisions rely on input from a team. The COTR is an indispensable member of that team. The instructions in this Guide are designed to facilitate this essential CO-COTR cooperation. COTR duties are usually additional to those required of the COTR in his or her assigned line organization. The COTR is still accountable to the line supervisor for performance of regularly-assigned duties. These duties are to be reflected appropriately in performance appraisals and job descriptions. For contract administration duties, however, the COTR reports directly to, and is accountable only to, the CO. The COTR`s supervisor must allow sufficient time to ensure that the COTR can adequately monitor the contract for technical compliance. This Guide is designed for COTRs who are performing service contract (including intergovernmental contract) administration functions as an adjunct to their normal technical duties.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Equipment and Piping Labeling Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EQUIPMENT AND PIPING LABELING EQUIPMENT AND PIPING LABELING Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: To verify that facility equipment and piping are labeled in a manner such that facility personnel are able to positively identify equipment they operate. To ensure that an effective labeling program is in effect to reduce operator and maintenance errors from incorrect identification of equipment, to increase training effectiveness by tracing the actual facility system as opposed to tracing its schematic, and to reduce personnel exposure to radiation and hazardous materials. This assessment provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's program for labeling equipment and piping and for establishing compliance

412

Sampling device for withdrawing a representative sample from single and multi-phase flows  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluid stream sampling device has been developed for the purpose of obtaining a representative sample from a single or multi-phase fluid flow. This objective is carried out by means of a probe which may be inserted into the fluid stream. Individual samples are withdrawn from the fluid flow by sampling ports with particular spacings, and the sampling parts are coupled to various analytical systems for characterization of the physical, thermal, and chemical properties of the fluid flow as a whole and also individually.

Apley, Walter J. (Pasco, WA); Cliff, William C. (Richland, WA); Creer, James M. (Richland, WA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Process management using component thermal-hydraulic function classes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process management expert system where following malfunctioning of a component, such as a pump, for determining system realignment procedures such as for by-passing the malfunctioning component with on-line speeds to maintain operation of the process at full or partial capacity or to provide safe shut down of the system while isolating the malfunctioning component. The expert system uses thermal-hydraulic function classes at the component level for analyzing unanticipated as well as anticipated component malfunctions to provide recommended sequences of operator actions. Each component is classified according to its thermal-hydraulic function, and the generic and component-specific characteristics for that function. Using the diagnosis of the malfunctioning component and its thermal hydraulic class, the expert system analysis is carried out using generic thermal-hydraulic first principles. One aspect of the invention employs a qualitative physics-based forward search directed primarily downstream from the malfunctioning component in combination with a subsequent backward search directed primarily upstream from the serviced component. Generic classes of components are defined in the knowledge base according to the three thermal-hydraulic functions of mass, momentum and energy transfer and are used to determine possible realignment of component configurations in response to thermal-hydraulic function imbalance caused by the malfunctioning component. Each realignment to a new configuration produces the accompanying sequence of recommended operator actions. All possible new configurations are examined and a prioritized list of acceptable solutions is produced. 5 figs.

Morman, J.A.; Wei, T.Y.C.; Reifman, J.

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

414

Process management using component thermal-hydraulic function classes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process management expert system where following malfunctioning of a component, such as a pump, for determining system realignment procedures such as for by-passing the malfunctioning component with on-line speeds to maintain operation of the process at full or partial capacity or to provide safe shut down of the system while isolating the malfunctioning component. The expert system uses thermal-hydraulic function classes at the component level for analyzing unanticipated as well as anticipated component malfunctions to provide recommended sequences of operator actions. Each component is classified according to its thermal-hydraulic function, and the generic and component-specific characteristics for that function. Using the diagnosis of the malfunctioning component and its thermal hydraulic class, the expert system analysis is carried out using generic thermal-hydraulic first principles. One aspect of the invention employs a qualitative physics-based forward search directed primarily downstream from the malfunctioning component in combination with a subsequent backward search directed primarily upstream from the serviced component. Generic classes of components are defined in the knowledge base according to the three thermal-hydraulic functions of mass, momentum and energy transfer and are used to determine possible realignment of component configurations in response to thermal-hydraulic function imbalance caused by the malfunctioning component. Each realignment to a new configuration produces the accompanying sequence of recommended operator actions. All possible new configurations are examined and a prioritized list of acceptable solutions is produced.

Morman, James A. (Woodridge, IL); Wei, Thomas Y. C. (Downers Grove, IL); Reifman, Jaques (Western Springs, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

2012 Facility Representative/Safety System Oversight/Fire Safety Workshop Agenda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative  Safety System Oversight  Fire Safety Facility Representative  Safety System Oversight  Fire Safety Overall Workshop Agenda May 14-18, 2012  Alexis Park Hotel  Las Vegas, Nevada Monday, May 14, 2012 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SAF-271, SSO Assessments (Day 1) Zeus B Quality Assurance Overview for FR/SSO Personnel Zeus A 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. Workshop Registration Zeus Foyer Tuesday, May 15, 2012 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Fire Safety Workshop Track Begins (see track agenda) Parthenon 4 SAF-271, SSO Assessments (Day 2) Zeus B . Safety Culture Workshop Zeus A Federal Technical Capability Panel Parthenon 2 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. Workshop Registration Zeus Foyer Wednesday, May 16, 2012 6:30 a.m. - 7:45 a.m. Workshop Registration Zeus Foyer 8:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. FR/SSO Tracks Begin; Plenary session with Fire Safety Track Parthenon 2 & 4

416

Temporal and Spatial Deployment of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies across the Representative Concentration Pathways  

SciTech Connect

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Changes (IPCC) Fifth Assessment (to be published in 2013-2014) will to a significant degree be built around four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) that are intended to represent four scenarios of future development of greenhouse gas emissions, land use, and concentrations that span the widest range of potential future atmospheric radiative forcing. Under the very stringent climate policy implied by the 2.6 W/m2 overshoot scenario, all electricity is eventually generated from low carbon sources. However, carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies never comprise more than 50% of total electricity generation in that very stringent scenario or in any of the other cases examined here. There are significant differences among the cases studied here in terms of how CCS technologies are used, with the most prominent being is the significant expansion of biomass+CCS as the stringency of the implied climate policy increases. Cumulative CO2 storage across the three cases that imply binding greenhouse gas constraints ranges by nearly an order of magnitude from 170GtCO2 (radiative forcing of 6.0W/m2 in 2100) to 1600GtCO2 (2.6W/m2 in 2100) over the course of this century. This potential demand for deep geologic CO2 storage is well within published estimates of total global CO2 storage capacity.

Dooley, James J.; Calvin, Katherine V.

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

417

A Model-Driven Engineering Framework for Component Models Interoperability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A multitude of component models exist today, characterized by slightly different conceptual architectural elements, focusing on a specific operational domain, covering different phases of component life-cycle, or supporting analysis of different quality ...

Ivica Crnkovi?; Ivano Malavolta; Henry Muccini

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Development of three-dimensional passive components for power electronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As component and power densities have increased, printed circuit boards (PCBs) have taken on additional functionality including heatsinking and forming constituent parts of electrical components. PCBs are not well suited ...

Cantillon-Murphy, Pdraig J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Feeding of Small Components Using the Surface Tension of Fluids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The feeding of components smaller than 1mm2 is a high challenge in an automated manufacturing line. The surface forces affecting these micro components are getting more important and cause problems when handled. ...

Matthias Burgard; Nabih Othman; Uwe Mai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

AMD 601 High Integrity -Magnesium Automotive Components (HI-MAC...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AMD 601 High Integrity -Magnesium Automotive Components (HI-MAC) AMD 601 High Integrity -Magnesium Automotive Components (HI-MAC) Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Authorization basis status report (miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components)  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a systematic evaluation conducted to identify miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components with potential needed authorization basis upgrades. It provides the Authorization Basis upgrade plan for those miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components identified.

Stickney, R.G.

1998-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

422

Multi component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency and Durability in Engines ITP Nanomanufacturing:...

423

Impact of Biodiesel on Fuel System Component Durability  

SciTech Connect

A study of the effects of biodiesel blends on fuel system components and the physical characteristics of elastomer materials.

Terry, B.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Improving the Design Reliability of Petroleum Pipeline Components on Repair  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Developments are considered that may appreciably improve the design reliability in the repair of petroleum pipeline components.

I. N. Karelin

425

DOSE RATES FROM NEUTRON ACTIVATION OF FUSION REACTOR COMPONENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NEUTRON ACTIVATION OF FUSION REACTOR C01WONENTS LawrenceNeutron Activation of Fusion Reactor Components Lawrence

Ruby, Lawrence

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Rancho Seco-Planning for Large Components  

SciTech Connect

The Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station ceased operation in June of 1989 and entered an extended period of Safestor to allow funds to accumulate for dismantlement. Incremental dismantlement was begun in 1997 of steam systems and based on the successful work to date, the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) board of directors approved full decommissioning in July 1999. A schedule has been developed for completion of decommissioning by 2008, allowing decommissioning funds to accumulate until they are needed. Systems removal began in the Auxiliary Building in October of 1999 and in the Reactor Building in January of 2000. Systems dismantlement continues in the Reactor Building and the Auxiliary Building and should be completed by mid 2003. The Spent Fuel is currently being moved to dry storage in an onsite ISFSI, with completion scheduled for late 2002. The personnel resources on site are currently assigned to support both the dry fuel project and the dismantlement of the facility. Once fuel movement is complete more resources will be provided for dismantlement. Characterization of major components other than the vessel is complete and planning for their removal is in progress with various cut-up and/or shipping options being evaluated. Planning for the vessel and internals removal is being performed. The relatively slow pace of the work allows careful evaluation of cost-effective options as they become available in the industry.

Gardiner, D. E.; Newey, J. M; Snyder, M. W.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

427

Phase Chemistry of Tank Sludge Residual Components  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has millions of gallons of high level nuclear waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Washington and Savannah River, South Carolina. These tanks will eventually be emptied and decommissioned. This will leave a residue of sludge adhering to the interior tank surfaces that may contaminate nearby groundwaters with radionuclides and RCRA metals. Performance assessment (PA) calculations must be carried out prior to closing the tanks. This requires developing radionuclide release models from the sludges so that the PA calculations can be based on credible source terms. These efforts continued to be hindered by uncertainties regarding the actual nature of the tank contents and the distribution of radionuclides among the various phases. In particular, it is of vital importance to know what radionuclides are associated with solid sludge components. Experimentation on actual tank sludges can be difficult, dangerous and prohibitively expensive. The research funded under this grant for the past three years was intended to provide a cost-effective method for developing the needed radionuclide release models using non-radioactive artificial sludges. Insights gained from this work will also have more immediate applications in understanding the processes responsible for heel development in the tanks and in developing effective technologies for removing wastes from the tanks.

J.L. Krumhansl

2002-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

428

Two component-three dimensional catalysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to catalytic reactor membranes having a gas-impermeable membrane for transport of oxygen anions. The membrane has an oxidation surface and a reduction surface. The membrane is coated on its oxidation surface with an adherent catalyst layer and is optionally coated on its reduction surface with a catalyst that promotes reduction of an oxygen-containing species (e.g., O.sub.2, NO.sub.2, SO.sub.2, etc.) to generate oxygen anions on the membrane. The reactor has an oxidation zone and a reduction zone separated by the membrane. A component of an oxygen containing gas in the reduction zone is reduced at the membrane and a reduced species in a reactant gas in the oxidation zone of the reactor is oxidized. The reactor optionally contains a three-dimensional catalyst in the oxidation zone. The adherent catalyst layer and the three-dimensional catalyst are selected to promote a desired oxidation reaction, particularly a partial oxidation of a hydrocarbon.

Schwartz, Michael (Boulder, CO); White, James H. (Boulder, CO); Sammells, Anthony F. (Boulder, CO)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998;" 1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,,,," " " "," ",,,,"Sales and","Net Demand","RSE" "NAICS"," ",,,"Total Onsite","Transfers","for","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","Transfers In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

430

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2002;" 1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,,,," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand","RSE" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases"," In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

431

SoSAA: a framework for integrating components & agents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modern computing systems require powerful software frameworks to ease their development and manage their complexity. These issues are addressed within both Component-Based Software Engineering and Agent-Oriented Software Engineering, although few integrated ... Keywords: agent oriented software engineering, agent programming toolkit, component based software engineering, component framework

Mauro Dragone; David Lillis; Rem Collier; G. M. P. O'Hare

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Standardization of Components, Products and Processes with Data Mining  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Standardization of Components, Products and Processes with Data Mining Bruno AGARD Département de databases. This paper discusses applications of data mining in standardization of components, products, and processes. Standardization of components is accomplished using association rules derived from customers

Kusiak, Andrew

433

A Component Framework for Telecare and Home Automation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Component Framework for Telecare and Home Automation Claire Maternaghan and Kenneth J. Turner-the-shelf and novel components. Keywords ­ Component Framework, Home Automation, Service-Oriented Architecture required. Home automation allows users to interact with their home as a whole, and to have flexible control

Hammerton, James

434

A case study: demands on component-based development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Building software systems with reusable components brings many advantages. The development becomes more efficient, the realibility of the products is enhanced, and the maintenance requirement is significantly reduced. Designing, developing and maintaining ... Keywords: architecture, component-based development, development environment, reuse, standard components

Ivica Crnkovic; Magnus Larsson

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

DOE-STD-1151-2002; Facility Representative Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1151-2002 1151-2002 April 2002 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1151-2002 iii APPROVAL The Federal Technical Capability Panel consists of senior Department of Energy managers

436

NASA Benchmarks Communications Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMMUNICATIONS COMMUNICATIONS Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Lines of authority are clearly defined with clear and open communications existing between all departments and all levels. Criteria: Dialogue exists between personnel involved in engineering/design, operations, maintenance, safety issues, and remedial actions. Personnel within the departments are promptly informed on issues as they occur on a need-to-know basis. Lessons Learned and feedback is encouraged inter-departmentally regarding safety, adequate resources, and processes to enable prompt and effective corrective actions and resolutions for mission accomplishment. Management has an effective and specified chain of communication in both directions between corporate and facility management. (DOE/EH-0135)

437

NASA Benchmarks Lessons Learned Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LESSONS LEARNED LESSONS LEARNED Assessment Plan Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Management should have an established Lessons Learned Program with an effective system to continuously distribute information of improvement in safe operations to all affected personnel. Criteria: Timely and effective action is taken to track and correct identified deficiencies and to prevent their recurrence by addressing their basic causes and related generic problems. (DOE/EH-0135) Management installs an effective corrective action program (caWeb) for safety-related issues, wherein records are updated and actions are tracked through completion. (DOE/EH-0135) Management uses the corrective action program (caWeb) as the database to analyze safety issues, implement corrective actions, and define

438

Facility Representatives, DOE-STD-1063-2011, Change Notice 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STD-1063-2011 STD-1063-2011 February 2011 Change Notice 1 March 2012 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1063-2011 ii Change Notice No. 1 March 2012 Table of Changes Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ Page/Section Change Foreword Update contact information and internet address. Page 20/ Section 5.4.8 Edited the discussion of Interim Qualification to match the language in the Definition section and deleted a redundant word. Page 20/ Section 5.4.10 Clarified qualification requirements for

439

Electrical Safety Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 2003 December 2003 An assessment of the Electrical Safety (ES) program at XXXX was conducted during the week of December XX-XX, 2003. The assessment team evaluated the program using the programmatic areas and specific Lines of Inquiry (LOI) contained in the approved Assessment plan provided. The team consisted of the Facility Representative from National Nuclear Security Administration, as well as ES, Subject Matter Expert support. The assessment plan identified 5 areas of review for Electrical Safety. An integrated process has been established to ensure electrical safety hazards are identified and that adequate controls are defined and implemented. The M&O contractor and other NTS Users management actively participate in the ES program. An implemented Work Control process is in place that ensures

440

Confined Spaces Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONFINED SPACES CONFINED SPACES Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: This assessment provides a basis for evaluating the safety effectiveness of the contractor's confined or enclosed spaces procedure, and for establishing compliance with DOE and OSHA requirements. Specifically, this assessment is to verify the information and findings of the BN Management Self Assessment Report on "Confined Space", ES&H-MSA-03-13, dated December 31, 2003. Criteria: Practices and procedures are in place to protect employees in general industry from the hazards of entry into permit-required confined spaces. 29 CFR 1910.146 (a) Each employee is instructed in the recognition and avoidance of unsafe conditions and the regulations applicable to his work environment to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

NASA Benchmarks Safety Functions Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SAFETY FUNCTIONS SAFETY FUNCTIONS Assessment Plan Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Management should be proactive in addressing safety-related issues. Management should have an established system to provide a ranking of safety considerations founded upon risk-based priorities. Criteria: A system is in place to provide a ranking of safety considerations founded upon risk-based priorities. (DOE/EH-0135) Procedures clearly define management's responsibility for safety- related decisions and provide for the escalation of matters in an appropriate time frame. (DOE/EH-0135) Management promotes safety programs and the organization's safety culture through sponsoring and attending safety meetings. (DOE/EH- 0135) Management encourages and supports effective programs for reporting

442

Representing BornOppenheimer breakdown radial correction functions for diatomic molecules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The empirical determination of BornOppenheimer breakdown (BOB) correction functions from the analysis of high resolution diatomic molecule spectra is becoming increasingly common. However, in virtually all applications to date, the analytic expressions used to represent those functions have unphysical limiting behaviour which makes the resulting overall potential energy functions unusable at long-range. This paper delineates the limiting physical constraints, which should be imposed on the form of such BOB correction functions, and presents flexible new expressions incorporating those constraints. The utility of these new forms is illustrated by a re-analysis of recent high resolution IR data for the ground electronic state of AgH, which yields an updated potential energy function and more meaningful adiabatic (potential) and non-adiabatic (centrifugal) BOB correction functions for this system. Further examination of this AgH system also illustrates the problem of model dependence associated with efforts to determine physically unique potential energy and centrifugal BOB correction functions.

Robert J. Le Roy; Yiye Huang

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Big Questions for Social Media Big Data: Representativeness, Validity and Other Methodological Pitfalls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large-scale databases of human activity in social media have captured scientific and policy attention, producing a flood of research and discussion. This paper considers methodological and conceptual challenges for this emergent field, with special attention to the validity and representativeness of social media big data analyses. Persistent issues include the over-emphasis of a single platform, Twitter, sampling biases arising from selection by hashtags, and vague and unrepresentative sampling frames. The socio-cultural complexity of user behavior aimed at algorithmic invisibility (such as subtweeting, mock-retweeting, use of "screen captures" for text, etc.) further complicate interpretation of big data social media. Other challenges include accounting for field effects, i.e. broadly consequential events that do not diffuse only through the network under study but affect the whole society. The application of network methods from other fields to the study of human social activity may not always be appropriat...

Tufekci, Zeynep

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

System and method for representing and manipulating three-dimensional objects on massively parallel architectures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A parallel computing system is described that comprises a plurality of uniquely labeled, parallel processors, each processor capable of modelling a three-dimensional object that includes a plurality of vertices, faces and edges. The system comprises a front-end processor for issuing a modelling command to the parallel processors, relating to a three-dimensional object. Each parallel processor, in response to the command and through the use of its own unique label, creates a directed-edge (d-edge) data structure that uniquely relates an edge of the three-dimensional object to one face of the object. Each d-edge data structure at least includes vertex descriptions of the edge and a description of the one face. As a result, each processor, in response to the modelling command, operates upon a small component of the model and generates results, in parallel with all other processors, without the need for processor-to-processor intercommunication.

Karasick, Michael S. (Ridgefield, CT); Strip, David R. (Albuquerque, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Data Collection for Current U.S. Wind Energy Projects: Component Costs, Financing, Operations, and Maintenance; January 2011 - September 2011  

SciTech Connect

DNV Renewables (USA) Inc. (DNV) used an Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Cost Model to evaluate ten distinct cost scenarios encountered under variations in wind turbine component failure rates. The analysis considers: (1) a Reference Scenario using the default part failure rates within the O&M Cost Model, (2) High Failure Rate Scenarios that increase the failure rates of three major components (blades, gearboxes, and generators) individually, (3) 100% Replacement Scenarios that model full replacement of these components over a 20 year operating life, and (4) Serial Failure Scenarios that model full replacement of blades, gearboxes, and generators in years 4 to 6 of the wind project. DNV selected these scenarios to represent a broad range of possible operational experiences. Also in this report, DNV summarizes the predominant financing arrangements used to develop wind energy projects over the past several years and provides summary data on various financial metrics describing those arrangements.

Martin-Tretton, M.; Reha, M.; Drunsic, M.; Keim, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may differ.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Note: This syllabus may represent a past offering of this course and future course offerings may to unpack the popular "crowdsourcing" term--revealing its roots in open source principles and outsourcing argumentation around the concept of crowdsourcing/crowd work. #12;Note: This syllabus may represent a past

447

Spatial Data Structures Spatial data structures describe the rules that are used to represent geographic data in geographic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spatial Data Structures Spatial data structures describe the rules that are used to represent depending on those beneath it: · Conceptual spatial data models describe how geographic objects (for example, rivers) or phenomena are represented in GIS. · Logical spatial data models describe how geographic data

Stock, Kristin

448

Using Peer-Led Team Learning to Increase Participation and Success of Under-represented Groups in Introductory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using Peer-Led Team Learning to Increase Participation and Success of Under-represented Groups the implementation and evaluation of a program that uses active recruiting and peer-led team learn- ing to try Keywords women in computer science, under-represented groups, peer- led team learning, PLTL, ESP, inclusion

Rodger, Susan H.

449

Abstract--A study determined people's perceptions of many types of managed and unmanaged landscapes as represented on slides.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

landscapes as represented on slides. In scenes of arid lands in the western United States, most respon- dents of respondentswereshown sets of color slides that illustrated various landscape com- ponents, structures, and management actions throughout the western United States. Slide sets represented objects photographed from fixed

450

Farm-level economic impacts of the House of Representatives Farm Bill Proposal, H.R. 2646, and the Senate Farm Bill Proposal, S. 1731, for representative rice farms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual Nei Cash Vann Income, 2002-2010, Under H. R. 2646 and S. 1731 for the 3, 774-acre Texas Representative Rice Farm, TXR3774 . 55 CDF of Average Annual Net Cash Farm Income, 2002-2010, Under H. R. 2646 and S. 1731 for the 1, 650-acre Texas... Missouri Representative Rice Farm, MOER4000. 67 17 CDF of Average Annual Net Cash Farm Income, 2002-2010, Under H. R. 2646 and S. 1731 for the 4, 735-acre Mississippi Representative Rice Farm, MSR4735. 68 18 Certainty Equivalents of Average Annual Nei...

Houston, Christy Michelle

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Recommended isolated-line profile for representing high-resolution spectroscopic transitions (IUPAC Technical Report)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The report of an IUPAC Task Group, formed in 2011 on "Intensities and line shapes in high-resolution spectra of water isotopologues from experiment and theory" (Project No. 2011-022-2-100), on line profiles of isolated high-resolution rotational-vibrational transitions perturbed by neutral gas-phase molecules is presented. The well-documented inadequacies of the Voigt profile (VP), used almost universally by databases and radiative-transfer codes, to represent pressure effects and Doppler broadening in isolated vibrational-rotational and pure rotational transitions of the water molecule have resulted in the development of a variety of alternative line-profile models. These models capture more of the physics of the influence of pressure on line shapes but, in general, at the price of greater complexity. The Task Group recommends that the partially Correlated quadratic-Speed-Dependent Hard-Collision profile should be adopted as the appropriate model for high-resolution spectroscopy. For simplicity this should b...

Tennyson, Jonathan; Campargue, Alain; Csaszar, Attila G; Daumont, Ludovic; Gamache, Robert R; Hodges, Joseph T; Lisak, Daniel; Naumenko, Olga V; Rothman, Laurence S; Tran, Ha; Zobov, Nikolai F; Buldyreva, Jeanna; Boone, Chris D; De Vizia, Maria Domenica; Gianfrani, Livio; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; McPheat, Robert; Murray, Jonathan; Ngo, Ngoc Hoa; Polyansky, Oleg L; Weidmann, Damien

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Status report: Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of BWR core shrouds and other internal components  

SciTech Connect

On July 25, 1994, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued Generic Letter (GL) 94-03 to obtain information needed to assess compliance with regulatory requirements regarding the structural integrity of core shrouds in domestic boiling water reactors (BWRs). This report begins with a brief description of the safety significance of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) as it relates to the design and function of BWR core shrouds and other internal components. It then presents a brief history of shroud cracking events both in the US and abroad, followed by an indepth summary of the industry actions to address the issue of IGSCC in BWR core shrouds and other internal components. This report summarizes the staff`s basis for issuing GL 94-03, as well as the staff`s assessment of plant-specific responses to GL 94-03. The staff is continually evaluating the licensee inspection programs and the results from examinations of BWR core shrouds and other internal components. This report is representative of submittals to and evaluations by the staff as of September 30, 1995. An update of this report will be issued at a later date.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Mobile-component housing and solar energy: the possibilities  

SciTech Connect

The possibilities for acceptance of PV among different modes of housing construction are considered. The focus is on that form of housing production defined as mobile-component housing, a type of housing built in a factory to a single national construction standard. The first section describes the structure of the manufactured housing industry. It provides definitions and terminology necessary to a discussion of mobile-component housing. It then reviews the production activity and approach, distribution, consumer and financing for this mode of housing. The second section presents the product characteristics of mobile-component housing. The third section reviews solar technologies, and discusses their relation to mobile-component housing. The fourth section focuses specifically on factors influencing receptivity to solar by the mobile-component housing industry. The conclusion summarizes the analysis as it relates to the possibilities for photovoltaics in mobile-component housing.

Nutt-Powell, T.E.; Furlong, M.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Table 11.3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002;" 3 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,"Renewable Energy",," " " "," ",,,"(excluding Wood",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total Onsite",,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.9,0.8,1.1,1.3

455

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;" 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",75652,21,5666,347,80993

456

Table 11.4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002;" 4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Onsite-Generation Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " ",,,"Renewable Energy" ,,,"(excluding Wood",,"RSE" "Economic","Total Onsite",,"and",,"Row" "Characteristic(a)","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.8,0.8,1.1,1.4 "Value of Shipments and Receipts"

457

Magnetic component of gluon plasma and its viscosity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the role of the magnetic degrees of freedom of the gluon plasma in its viscosity. The main assumption is that motions of the magnetic component and of the rest of the plasma can be considered as independent. The magnetic component in the deconfined phase is described by a three-dimensional (Euclidean) field theory. The parameters of the theory can be estimated phenomenologically, from the lattice data. It is not ruled out that the magnetic component is superfluid.

M. N. Chernodub; H. Verschelde; V. I. Zakharov

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

458

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006;" 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," " " "," ",,,"Total ","Sales and","Net Demand" "NAICS"," ",,"Transfers ","Onsite","Transfers","for" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",73242,309,4563,111,78003

459

Systems and Components Development Expertise [Nuclear Waste Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systems and Components Systems and Components Development Expertise Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technologies Overview Modeling and analysis Unit Process Modeling Mass Tracking System Software Waste Form Performance Modeling Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations Development, Design, Operation Overview Systems and Components Development Expertise System Engineering Design Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Waste Management using Electrometallurgical Technology Systems and Components Development Expertise Bookmark and Share Electrorefiner The electrorefiner: an apparatus used for electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel to facilitate storage and ultimate disposal. Click on

460

Microsoft Word - NGNP_Metallic Component Risk Report-043008-FINAL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TI-RISK May 2008 Revision 0 Metallic Component Schedule Risk and Cost Uncertainty Assessment APPROVALS Function Printed Name and Signature Date Author Name: Philip L. Rittenhouse...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Interaction of low-metamorphic coal components in coking batch  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The interaction of low-metamorphic coal components in coking batch during pyrolysis is studied. The characteristics of the resulting coke are presented, and the partial hydrogenation is...

E. I. Malyi; A. S. Koverya; M. A. Starovoit

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

New Austenitic Stainless Steels for Exhaust Components (Agreement...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications CF8C PLus: A New Cast Stainless Steel for High-Temperature Diesel Exhaust Components Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Materials for...

463

H2A Delivery Components Model and Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydrogen Delivery Components Model Matt Ringer National Renewable Energy Laboratory February 8, 2005 Other Team Members: Mark Paster: DOE Marianne Mintz, Jerry Gillette, Jay Burke:...

464

A Component Evaluation Tool from the Vehicle System Perspective  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Testbed) is a Modular Hybrid Test Environment for Component Evaluation Emulated electric traction system: *Battery pack simulated *Motor-inverter emulated *Physical motor...

465

Peridigm summary report : lessons learned in development with agile components.  

SciTech Connect

This report details efforts to deploy Agile Components for rapid development of a peridynamics code, Peridigm. The goal of Agile Components is to enable the efficient development of production-quality software by providing a well-defined, unifying interface to a powerful set of component-based software. Specifically, Agile Components facilitate interoperability among packages within the Trilinos Project, including data management, time integration, uncertainty quantification, and optimization. Development of the Peridigm code served as a testbed for Agile Components and resulted in a number of recommendations for future development. Agile Components successfully enabled rapid integration of Trilinos packages into Peridigm. A cost of this approach, however, was a set of restrictions on Peridigm's architecture which impacted the ability to track history-dependent material data, dynamically modify the model discretization, and interject user-defined routines into the time integration algorithm. These restrictions resulted in modifications to the Agile Components approach, as implemented in Peridigm, and in a set of recommendations for future Agile Components development. Specific recommendations include improved handling of material states, a more flexible flow control model, and improved documentation. A demonstration mini-application, SimpleODE, was developed at the onset of this project and is offered as a potential supplement to Agile Components documentation.

Salinger, Andrew Gerhard; Mitchell, John Anthony; Littlewood, David John; Parks, Michael L.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Electric Drive and Advanced Battery and Components Testbed (EDAB...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Peer Evaluation Meeting vss033carlson2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Electric Drive and Advanced Battery and Components Testbed (EDAB) Vehicle Technologies Office...

467

Electric Drive and Advanced Battery and Components Testbed (EDAB...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Review and Peer Evaluation vss033carlson2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Electric Drive and Advanced Battery and Components Testbed (EDAB) Electric Drive and Advanced...

468

Nuclear Safety Component and Services Procurement, June 29, 2011...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Office of Enforcement and Oversight Criteria Review and Approach Document Subject: Nuclear Safety Component and Services Procurement Inspection Criteria, Inspection Activities, and...

469

US Synthetic Corp (TRL 4 Component) - The Development of Open...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings for use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines US Synthetic Corp (TRL 4 Component) - The Development of Open, Water Lubricated...

470

Macroencapsulation Equivalency Guidance for Classified Weapon Components and NNSSWAC Compliance  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex has a surplus of classified legacy weapon components generated over the years with no direct path for disposal. The majority of the components have been held for uncertainty of future use or no identified method of sanitization or disposal. As more weapons are retired, there is an increasing need to reduce the amount of components currently in storage or on hold. A process is currently underway to disposition and dispose of the legacy/retired weapons components across the DOE complex.

Poling, J.

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

471

DOE Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CELL COMPONENT ACCELERATED STRESS TEST PROTOCOLS FOR PEM FUEL CELLS (Electrocatalysts, Supports, Membranes, and Membrane Electrode Assemblies) March 2007 Fuel cells, especially for...

472

Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

USCAR FUEL CELL TECH TEAM CELL COMPONENT ACCELERATED STRESS TEST PROTOCOLS FOR PEM FUEL CELLS (Electrocatalysts, Supports, Membranes, and Membrane Electrode Assemblies) Revised May...

473

Components Responsible for the Health Effects of Inhaled Engine...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Responsible for the Health Effects of Inhaled Engine Emissions Components Responsible for the Health Effects of Inhaled Engine Emissions Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel...

474

Friction and Wear Enhancement of Titanium Alloy Engine Components...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Merit Review and Peer Evaluation pm007blau2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Friction and Wear Enhancement of Titanium Alloy Engine Components Vehicle Technologies Office...

475

NREL: Energy Systems Integration Facility - Prototype and Component...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DC systems such as commercial microgrids Long-duration reliability and safety tests of battery and energy storage system components Thermal energy storage materials testing...

476

AMD 405: Improved Automotive Suspension Components Cast with...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Maryland. merit08mccarty5.pdf More Documents & Publications AMD 601 High Integrity -Magnesium Automotive Components (HI-MAC) Low Cost PM Technology for Particle Reinforced...

477

Powder Metal Performance Modeling of Automotive Components ?AMD...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Automotive Components: Manufacturing Process Feasibility StudyAMD 310 Structural Cast Magnesium Development (SCMD) AMD 111 Magnesium Front End Design And Development (AMD603)...

478

Scientific Solutions (TRL 5 6 Component) - Underwater Active...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Scientific Solutions (TRL 5 6 Component) - Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Network for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy 40aamssistein.ppt More Documents &...

479

Physics of Reliability: Evaluating Design Insights for Component...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for Component Technologies in Solar (PREDICTS) program is taking a physics- and chemistry-based approach to identifying failure modes for solar products. Launched in October...

480

NDE DEVELOPMENT FOR ACERT ENGINE COMPONENTS | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation pm024sun2011p.pdf More Documents & Publications NDE Development for ACERT Engine Components...

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481

Method for the continuous processing of hermetic fiber optic components and the resultant fiber optic-to-metal components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hermetic fiber optic-to-metal components and method for making hermetic fiber optic-to-metal components by assembling and fixturing elements comprising a metal shell, a glass preform, and a metal-coated fiber optic into desired relative positions and then sealing said fixtured elements preferably using a continuous heating process. The resultant hermetic fiber optic-to-metal components exhibit high hermeticity and durability despite the large differences in thermal coefficients of expansion among the various elements.

Kramer, Daniel P. (Centerville, OH)

1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

482

Development of a Future Representative Concentration Pathway for Use in the IPCC 5th Assessment Earth System Model Simulations  

SciTech Connect

The representative concentration pathway to be delivered is a scenario of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and other radiatively important atmospheric species, along with land-use changes, derived from the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). The particular representative concentration pathway (RCP) that the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) has been responsible for is a not-to-exceed pathway that stabilizes at a radiative forcing of 4.5Wm-2 in the year 2100.

None

2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

483

The impact of alternative farm policy proposals for the 1990 Farm Bill on representative beef cattle ranches in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE IMPACT OF ALTERNATIVE FARM POLICY PROPOSALS FOR THE 1990 FARM BILL ON REPRESENTATIVE BEEF CATTLE RANCHES IN TEXAS A Thesis by DAVID ALLEN HARTMAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfdlrnent... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE AUGUST 1990 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics THE IMPACT OF ALTERNATIVE FARM POLICY PROPOSALS FOR THE 1990 FARM BILL ON REPRESENTATIVE BEEF CATTLE RANCHES IN TEXAS A Thesis by DAVID ALLEN HARTMAN...

Hartman, David Allen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

484

Parallel components for PDEs and optimization: some issues and experiences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-performance simulations in computational science often involve the combined software contributions of multidisciplinary teams of scientists, engineers, mathematicians, and computer scientists. One goal of component-based software engineering in ... Keywords: component-based software, interface specification, parallel computing, scientific computing

Boyana Norris; Satish Balay; Steven Benson; Lori Freitag; Paul Hovland; Lois McInnes; Barry Smith

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Integrable Hierarchy of Multi-Component Kaup -Boussinesq Equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By using the Lax approach we find the integrable hierarchy of the two and three field Kaup-Boussinesq equations. We then give a multi-component Kaup-Boussinesq equations and their recursion operators. Finally we show that all multi-component Kaup-Boussinesq equations are the degenerate Svinolupov KdV systems.

Metin Gurses

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

486

Local dynamic update for component-based distributed systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dynamic evolution is a key aspect of the design, development, and maintenance of complex and distributed software systems built by integrating components. Evolution, traditionally obtained by producing software upgrades, may derive from changes in the ... Keywords: component-based distributed system, dynamic reconfiguration, dynamic software update, software evolution

Valerio Panzica La Manna

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Dynamic software update for component-based distributed systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dynamic evolution is a key aspect of the design, development, and maintenance of complex and distributed software systems built by integrating components. Evolution, tradi- tionally obtained by producing software upgrades, may de- rive from changes in ... Keywords: component-based distributed system, dynamic reconfiguration, dynamic software update, software evolution

Valerio Panzica La Manna

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Original article Comparison of biomass component equations for four  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Original article Comparison of biomass component equations for four species of northern coniferous compare equations predicting the biomass components (foliage, branches, stem, roots, total aboveground the adjusted R2 for total, aboveground, branch and foliage biomass equations by 2.5 %. Adding tree height

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

489

Describing bond graph models of hydraulic components in Modelica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss an object oriented description of bond graph models of hydraulic components by means of the unified modeling language Modelica. A library which is still under development is briefly described and models of some standard hydraulic components are given for illustration. In particular we address the modeling of hydraulic orifices.

W. Borutzky; B. Barnard; J.U. Thoma

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Reconfigurable Run-Time Support for Distributed Service Component Architectures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.lastname@inria.fr ABSTRACT SCA (Service Component Architecture) is an OASIS stan- dard for describing service-oriented to SCA and en- ables both introspecting and reconfiguring service-oriented architectures at run-Based Software Engineering (CBSE), Middle- ware, Service Component Architecture (SCA), Service-Oriented

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

491

SCCMulti: an improved parallel strongly connected components algorithm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tarjan's famous linear time, sequential algorithm for finding the strongly connected components (SCCs) of a graph relies on depth first search, which is inherently sequential. Deterministic parallel algorithms solve this problem in logarithmic time using ... Keywords: parallel graph algorithms, randomized algorithms, strongly connected components

Daniel Tomkins; Timmie Smith; Nancy M. Amato; Lawrence Rauchwerger

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Safety-Oriented Design of Component Assemblies using Safety Interfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FACS 2006 Safety-Oriented Design of Component Assemblies using Safety Interfaces Jonas Elmqvist¨oping, Sweden Abstract This paper promotes compositional reasoning in the context of safety-critical systems, and demonstrates a safety-oriented component model using an application from the automotive industry: an Adaptive

493

Formal Modeling and Analysis of the HLA Component Integration Standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of domain-speci c integration standards in areas as diverse as programming environments, robotics control 20Formal Modeling and Analysis of the HLA Component Integration Standard Robert J. Allen IBM, Dept An increasingly important trend in the engineering of com- plex systems is the design of component integration

van der Hoek, André

494

Component-based General-purpose Operating System Martin Decky  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Component-based General-purpose Operating System Martin Deck´y Charles University, Faculty to apply this programming and design paradigm in the domain of general-purpose operating systems. This paper analyzes several nice properties of component systems which might be beneficial in operating

495

System diagnostics using qualitative analysis and component functional classification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for detecting and identifying faulty component candidates during off-normal operations of nuclear power plants involves the qualitative analysis of macroscopic imbalances in the conservation equations of mass, energy and momentum in thermal-hydraulic control volumes associated with one or more plant components and the functional classification of components. The qualitative analysis of mass and energy is performed through the associated equations of state, while imbalances in momentum are obtained by tracking mass flow rates which are incorporated into a first knowledge base. The plant components are functionally classified, according to their type, as sources or sinks of mass, energy and momentum, depending upon which of the three balance equations is most strongly affected by a faulty component which is incorporated into a second knowledge base. Information describing the connections among the components of the system forms a third knowledge base. The method is particularly adapted for use in a diagnostic expert system to detect and identify faulty component candidates in the presence of component failures and is not limited to use in a nuclear power plant, but may be used with virtually any type of thermal-hydraulic operating system.

Reifman, Jaques (Lisle, IL); Wei, Thomas Y. C. (Downers Grove, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

System diagnostics using qualitative analysis and component functional classification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for detecting and identifying faulty component candidates during off-normal operations of nuclear power plants involves the qualitative analysis of macroscopic imbalances in the conservation equations of mass, energy and momentum in thermal-hydraulic control volumes associated with one or more plant components and the functional classification of components. The qualitative analysis of mass and energy is performed through the associated equations of state, while imbalances in momentum are obtained by tracking mass flow rates which are incorporated into a first knowledge base. The plant components are functionally classified, according to their type, as sources or sinks of mass, energy and momentum, depending upon which of the three balance equations is most strongly affected by a faulty component which is incorporated into a second knowledge base. Information describing the connections among the components of the system forms a third knowledge base. The method is particularly adapted for use in a diagnostic expert system to detect and identify faulty component candidates in the presence of component failures and is not limited to use in a nuclear power plant, but may be used with virtually any type of thermal-hydraulic operating system. 5 figures.

Reifman, J.; Wei, T.Y.C.

1993-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

497

Nested User Interface Components Ken Perlin, Jon Meyer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nested User Interface Components Ken Perlin, Jon Meyer NYU Media Research Lab Department,meyer}@cs.nyu.edu ABSTRACT Nested User Interface Components combine the concepts of Zooming User Interfaces (ZUIs) with recursive nesting of active graphical user interface widgets. The resulting system of recursively nesting

498

Fuel and fuel blending components from biomass derived pyrolysis oil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the conversion of biomass derived pyrolysis oil to liquid fuel components is presented. The process includes the production of diesel, aviation, and naphtha boiling point range fuels or fuel blending components by two-stage deoxygenation of the pyrolysis oil and separation of the products.

McCall, Michael J.; Brandvold, Timothy A.; Elliott, Douglas C.

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

499

Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles - PHEV Modeling - Component Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Impact on Fuel Efficiency Technologies Impact on Fuel Efficiency One of the main objectives of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) R&D Plan (2.2Mb pdf) is to "determine component development requirements" through simulation analysis. Overall fuel efficiency is affected by component technologies from a component sizing and efficiency aspect. To properly define component requirements, several technologies for each of the main components (energy storage, engine and electric machines) are being compared at Argonne using PSAT. Per the R&D plan, several Li-ion battery materials are being modeled to evaluate their impacts on fuel efficiency and vehicle mass. Different Power to Energy ratios are being considered to understand the relative impact of power and energy.

500

Fast-Tracking Drivetrain Electrification - Component Technology Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The four main components used in drivetrain electrification The four main components used in drivetrain electrification are energy storage systems, power electronics, electric machines/gearboxes, and control systems. Argonne is actively pursuing increased performance and efficiency of these components along with reducing manufacturing costs. Cost reduction is addressed by reducing materials cost/ quantity, reducing labor/processing steps, increasing performance for the same components, and optimizing efficiency for the same materials cost. Energy Storage System Components Argonne has partnered with Maxwell Technologies to investigate the benefits of actively combining high power density ultracapacitors via power electronics with high energy density Li-Ion (or other future chemistry) batteries. This combination potentially reduces the net ESS cost and provides full acceleration and braking power at low