Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

NEMS industrial module documentation report  

SciTech Connect

The NEMS Industrial Demand Model is a dynamic accounting model, bringing together the disparate industries and uses of energy in those industries, and putting them together in an understandable and cohesive framework. The Industrial Model generates mid-term (up to the year 2010) forecasts of industrial sector energy demand as a component of the NEMS integrated forecasting system. From the NEMS system, the Industrial Model receives fuel prices, employment data, and the value of output of industrial activity. Based on the values of these variables, the Industrial Model passes back to the NEMS system estimates of consumption by fuel types.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

NEMS integrating module documentation report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer modeling system that produces a general equilibrium solution for energy supply and demand in the US energy markets. The model achieves a supply and demand balance in the end-use demand regions, defined as the nine Census Divisions, by solving for the prices of each energy type such that the quantities producers are willing to supply equal the quantities consumers wish to consume. The system reflects market economics, industry structure, and energy policies and regulations that influence market behavior. The NEMS Integrating Module is the central integrating component of a complex modeling system. As such, a thorough understanding of its role in the modeling process can only be achieved by placing it in the proper context with respect to the other modules. To that end, this document provides an overview of the complete NEMS model, and includes brief descriptions of the modules with which the Integrating Module interacts. The emphasis and focus, however, is on the structure and function of the Integrating Module of NEMS.

Not Available

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

3

Overview of NEMS-H2, Version 1.0  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NEMS-H2, Version 1.0 NEMS-H2, Version 1.0 Frances Wood OnLocation, Inc., Energy Systems Consulting (fwood@onlocationinc.com) January 26, 2006 OnLocation, Inc., Energy Systems Consulting 2 Today's Presentation * Overview of NEMS-H2 Structure * Current Status * New Hydrogen Market Module (HMM) * Transportation Module Modifications * Preliminary Test Runs * Looking Ahead to Next Phase OnLocation, Inc., Energy Systems Consulting 3 NEMS Overview * The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) was developed and is maintained by EIA - Annual Energy Outlook projections - Congressional as well as agency requests * NEMS has also been used extensively outside of EIA - Various National Laboratories studies - National Commission on Energy Policy - Program offices within DOE for R&D benefits estimation * Modular structure allows each sector to be represented by

4

NEMS integrating module documentation report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer-based, energy-economy modeling system of U.S. energy markets for the midterm period. NEMS projects the production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy, subject to a variety of assumptions. The assumptions encompass macroeconomic and financial factors, world energy markets, resource availability and costs, behavioral and technological choice criteria, technology characteristics, and demographics. NEMS produces a general equilibrium solution for energy supply and demand in the U.S. energy markets on an annual basis through 2015. Baseline forecasts from NEMS are published in the Annual Energy Outlook. Analyses are also prepared in response to requests by the U.S. Congress, the DOE Office of Policy, and others. NEMS was first used for forecasts presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1994.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

EIA Buildings Analysis of Consumer Behavior in NEMS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings Analysis of Consumer Buildings Analysis of Consumer Behavior in NEMS Behavioral Economics Experts Meeting July 17, 2013 | Washington, DC David Peterson Buildings Energy Consumption and Efficiency Analysis Overview Behavioral Economics Experts Meeting, Washington DC, July 17, 2013 2 * NEMS Structure * Housing/floorspace and service demand in Residential Demand Module (RDM) and Commercial Demand Module (CDM) * Market share calculation for equipment in RDM and CDM * Price responses / elasticities * Distributed generation (DG) & combined heat and power (CHP) NEMS Structure Behavioral Economics Experts Meeting, Washington DC, July 17, 2013 3 * Represents energy supply, conversion, and demand in a unified, but modular system * Detailed structural and process models in most energy sectors

6

An architecture for component-based design of representative-based clustering algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose an architecture for the design of representative-based clustering algorithms based on reusable components. These components were derived from K-means-like algorithms and their extensions. With the suggested clustering design architecture, ... Keywords: Architecture, Generic algorithm, K-means, Representative-based clustering algorithms, Reusable component

Boris Delibaši?; Milan Vuki?evi?; Miloš Jovanovi?; Kathrin Kirchner; Johannes Ruhland; Milija Suknovi?

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer-based, energy-economy modeling system of U.S. through 2030. NEMS projects the production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy, subject to assumptions on macroeconomic and financial factors, world energy markets, resource availability and costs, behavioral and technological choice criteria, cost and performance characteristics of energy technologies, and demographics. NEMS was designed and implemented by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). NEMS can be used to analyze the effects of existing and proposed government laws and regulations related to energy production and use; the potential impact of new and advanced energy production, conversion, and consumption technologies; the impact and cost of greenhouse gas control; the impact of increased use of renewable energy sources; and the potential savings from increased efficiency of energy use; and the impact of regulations on the use of alternative or reformulated fuels. NEMS has also been used for a number of special analyses at the request of the Administration, U.S. Congress, other offices of DOE and other government agencies, who specify the scenarios and assumptions for the analysis. Modules allow analyses to be conducted in energy topic areas such as residential demand, industrial demand, electricity market, oil and gas supply, renewable fuels, etc.

8

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Overview of NEMS  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

OVERVIEW OF NEMS OVERVIEW OF NEMS blueball.gif (205 bytes) Major Assumptions blueball.gif (205 bytes) NEMS Modular Structure blueball.gif (205 bytes) Integrating Module NEMS represents domestic energy markets by explicitly representing the economic decisionmaking involved in the production, conversion, and consumption of energy products. For example, the penetration of a new or advanced technology for electricity generation is projected only if the technology is deemed to be economic when considering the cost-minimizing mix of fuels over the life of the equipment. Since energy costs and availability and energy- consuming characteristics can vary widely across regions, considerable regional detail is included. Other details of production and consumption categories are represented to

9

Availability of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Archive.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Availability of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Archive. NEMS has been developed primarily for use by the modelers at Energy Information

10

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Overview of NEMS  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NEMS represents domestic energy markets by explicitly representing the economic decision making involved in the production, conversion, and consumption of energy products. Where possible, NEMS includes explicit representation of energy technologies and their characteristics. NEMS represents domestic energy markets by explicitly representing the economic decision making involved in the production, conversion, and consumption of energy products. Where possible, NEMS includes explicit representation of energy technologies and their characteristics. Since energy costs and availability and energy-consuming characteristics can vary widely across regions, considerable regional detail is included. Other details of production and consumption categories are represented to facilitate policy analysis and ensure the validity of the results. A summary of the detail provided in NEMS is shown below. Summary Table Major Assumptions Each module of NEMS embodies many assumptions and data to characterize the future production, conversion, or consumption of energy in the United States. Two major assumptions concern economic growth in the United States and world oil prices, as determined by world oil supply and demand.

11

Investigation of residential central air conditioning load shapes in NEMS  

SciTech Connect

This memo explains what Berkeley Lab has learned about how the residential central air-conditioning (CAC) end use is represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). NEMS is an energy model maintained by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) that is routinely used in analysis of energy efficiency standards for residential appliances. As part of analyzing utility and environmental impacts related to the federal rulemaking for residential CAC, lower-than-expected peak utility results prompted Berkeley Lab to investigate the input load shapes that characterize the peaky CAC end use and the submodule that treats load demand response. Investigations enabled a through understanding of the methodology by which hourly load profiles are input to the model and how the model is structured to respond to peak demand. Notably, it was discovered that NEMS was using an October-peaking load shape to represent residential space cooling, which suppressed peak effects to levels lower than expected. An apparent scaling down of the annual load within the load-demand submodule was found, another significant suppressor of the peak impacts. EIA promptly responded to Berkeley Lab's discoveries by updating numerous load shapes for the AEO2002 version of NEMS; EIA is still studying the scaling issue. As a result of this work, it was concluded that Berkeley Lab's customary end-use decrement approach was the most defensible way for Berkeley Lab to perform the recent CAC utility impact analysis. This approach was applied in conjunction with the updated AEO2002 load shapes to perform last year's published rulemaking analysis. Berkeley Lab experimented with several alternative approaches, including modifying the CAC efficiency level, but determined that these did not sufficiently improve the robustness of the method or results to warrant their implementation. Work in this area will continue in preparation for upcoming rulemakings for the other peak coincident end uses, commercial air conditioning and distribution transformers.

Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Marnay, Chris; Gumerman, Etan; Chan, Peter; Rosenquist, Greg; Osborn, Julie

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Nanotribology and nanomechanics of MEMS/NEMS and BioMEMS/BioNEMS materials and devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The micro/nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS) need to be designed to perform expected functions typically in millisecond to picosecond range. Expected life of the devices for high speed contacts can vary from few hundred thousand to many billions ... Keywords: MEMS, NEMS, Nanomaterials characterization, Nanomechanics, Nanotechnology

Bharat Bhushan

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS National Climatic Data Center.with Changing Boundaries." Use of GIS to Understand Socio-Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS Appendix A. Map Results Gallery

Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

NEMS may be addressed to the following analysts:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/aeo/overview/index.html This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. PREFACE The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview provides a summary description of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), which was used to generate the forecasts of energy production, demand, imports, and prices through the year 2020 for the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000), (DOE/EIA-0383(2000)), released in November 1999. AEO2000 presents national forecasts of energy markets for five cases—a reference case and four additional cases that assume higher and lower economic growth and higher and lower world oil prices than in the reference case. The Overview presents a brief description of the methodology and scope of each of the component modules of NEMS. The model documentation reports listed in the appendix of this document

An Overview; Aeo Susan H. Holte

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Investigation of residential central air conditioning load shapes in NEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Residential Central Air Conditioning Load Shapes in NEMSof Residential Central Air Conditioning Load Shapes in NEMSof Residential Central Air Conditioning Load Shapes in NEMS

Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Marnay, Chris; Gumerman, Etan; Chan, Peter; Rosenquist, Greg; Osborn, Julie

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Appendix C: Map of NEMS Electricity Market Module Regions  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Analysis of Impacts of a Clean Energy Standard as requested by Chairman Bingaman Appendix C: Map of NEMS Electricity Market Module Regions...

17

Appendix C. Map of NEMS Electricity Market Module Regions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Analysis of Impacts of a Clean Energy Standard as requested by Chairman Hall Appendix C. Map of NEMS Electricity Market Module Regions...

18

National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Agency/Company /Organization: Energy Information Administration Sector: Energy Focus Area: Economic Development Phase: Develop Goals Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.eia.gov/oiaf/aeo/overview/index.html OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, National Energy Modeling System, NEMS Language: English References: The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview[1] Project the production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy, subject to assumptions on macroeconomic and financial factors, world energy markets, resource availability and costs, behavioral and

19

Industrial Demand Module 1999, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. Crawford Honeycutt

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Industrial Demand Module 2005, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. C. Honeycutt

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Industrial Demand Module 2006, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. C. Honeycutt

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Industrial Demand Module 2009, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. C. Honeycutt

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

23

Industrial Demand Module 2003, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. Crawford Honeycutt

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Industrial Demand Module 2007, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. C. Honeycutt

2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

25

Industrial Demand Module 2002, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. Crawford Honeycutt

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Industrial Demand Module 2001, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. Crawford Honeycutt

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Industrial Demand Module 2008, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. C. Honeycutt

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Industrial Demand Module 2000, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. Crawford Honeycutt

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Industrial Demand Module 2004, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. Crawford Honeycutt

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Extrapolating Environmental Benefits from IGCC in NEMS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 2008 (April August 2008 (April 2009 Revision) DOE/NETL-402/080108 Water Requirements for Existing and Emerging Thermoelectric Plant Technologies Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or

31

U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a multi-sector, integrated model of the U.S. energy system put out by the Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration. NEMS is used to produce the annual 20-year forecast of U.S. energy use aggregated to the nine-region census division level. The research objective was to disaggregate this regional energy forecast to the county level for select forecast years, for use in a more detailed and accurate regional analysis of energy usage across the U.S. The process of disaggregation using a geographic information system (GIS) was researched and a model was created utilizing available population forecasts and climate zone data. The model's primary purpose was to generate an energy demand forecast with greater spatial resolution than what is currently produced by NEMS, and to produce a flexible model that can be used repeatedly as an add-on to NEMS in which detailed analysis can be executed exogenously with results fed back into the NEMS data flow. The methods developed were then applied to the study data to obtain residential and commercial electricity demand forecasts. The model was subjected to comparative and statistical testing to assess predictive accuracy. Forecasts using this model were robust and accurate in slow-growing, temperate regions such as the Midwest and Mountain regions. Interestingly, however, the model performed with less accuracy in the Pacific and Northwest regions of the country where population growth was more active. In the future more refined methods will be necessary to improve the accuracy of these forecasts. The disaggregation method was written into a flexible tool within the ArcGIS environment which enables the user to output the results in five year intervals over the period 2000-2025. In addition, the outputs of this tool were used to develop a time-series simulation showing the temporal changes in electricity forecasts in terms of absolute, per capita, and density of demand.

Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Analysis and Representation of Miscellaneous Electric Loads in NEMS -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis and Representation of Miscellaneous Electric Loads in NEMS Analysis and Representation of Miscellaneous Electric Loads in NEMS Release date: January 6, 2014 Miscellaneous Electric Loads (MELs) comprise a growing portion of delivered energy consumption in residential and commercial buildings. Recently, the growth of MELs has offset some of the efficiency gains made through technology improvements and standards in major end uses such as space conditioning, lighting, and water heating. Miscellaneous end uses, including televisions, personal computers, security systems, data center servers, and many other devices, have continued to penetrate into building-related market segments. Part of this proliferation of devices and equipment can be attributed to increased service demand for entertainment, computing, and convenience appliances.

33

Industrial Demand Module 1998, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description ofthe NEMS Industrial Model for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in supportof its models (Public Law 94-385, section 57.b2). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects.

T. Crawford Honeycutt

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: NEMS-H2 (National Energy Modeling...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

economic aspects of hydrogen production, delivery, and consumption. Keywords: Energy prices; emissions; production; imports; energy consumption; economic Purpose NEMS projects...

35

U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a multi-sector, integrated model of the U.S. energy system put out by the Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration. NEMS is used to produce the annual 20-year forecast of U.S. energy use aggregated to the nine-region census division level. The research objective was to disaggregate this regional energy forecast to the county level for select forecast years, for use in a more detailed and accurate regional analysis of energy usage across the U.S. The process of disaggregation using a geographic information system (GIS) was researched and a model was created utilizing available population forecasts and climate zone data. The model's primary purpose was to generate an energy demand forecast with greater spatial resolution than what is currently produced by NEMS, and to produce a flexible model that can be used repeatedly as an add-on to NEMS in which detailed analysis can be executed exogenously with results fed back into the NEMS data flow. The methods developed were then applied to the study data to obtain residential and commercial electricity demand forecasts. The model was subjected to comparative and statistical testing to assess predictive accuracy. Forecasts using this model were robust and accurate in slow-growing, temperate regions such as the Midwest and Mountain regions. Interestingly, however, the model performed with less accuracy in the Pacific and Northwest regions of the country where population growth was more active. In the future more refined methods will be necessary to improve the accuracy of these forecasts. The disaggregation method was written into a flexible tool within the ArcGIS environment which enables the user to output the results in five year intervals over the period 2000-2025. In addition, the outputs of this tool were used to develop a time-series simulation showing the temporal changes in electricity forecasts in terms of absolute, per capita, and density of demand.

Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP results for the base case and scenarios.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NEMS-MP model generates numerous results for each run of a scenario. (This model is the integrated National Energy Modeling System [NEMS] version used for the Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study [MP].) This appendix examines additional findings beyond the primary results reported in the Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study: Vehicle Characterization and Scenario Analyses (Reference 1). These additional results are provided in order to help further illuminate some of the primary results. Specifically discussed in this appendix are: (1) Energy use results for light vehicles (LVs), including details about the underlying total vehicle miles traveled (VMT), the average vehicle fuel economy, and the volumes of the different fuels used; (2) Resource fuels and their use in the production of ethanol, hydrogen (H{sub 2}), and electricity; (3) Ethanol use in the scenarios (i.e., the ethanol consumption in E85 vs. other blends, the percent of travel by flex fuel vehicles on E85, etc.); (4) Relative availability of E85 and H2 stations; (5) Fuel prices; (6) Vehicle prices; and (7) Consumer savings. These results are discussed as follows: (1) The three scenarios (Mixed, (P)HEV & Ethanol, and H2 Success) when assuming vehicle prices developed through literature review; (2) The three scenarios with vehicle prices that incorporate the achievement of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program vehicle cost goals; (3) The three scenarios with 'literature review' vehicle prices, plus vehicle subsidies; and (4) The three scenarios with 'program goals' vehicle prices, plus vehicle subsidies. The four versions or cases of each scenario are referred to as: Literature Review No Subsidies, Program Goals No Subsidies, Literature Review with Subsidies, and Program Goals with Subsidies. Two additional points must be made here. First, none of the results presented for LVs in this section include Class 2B trucks. Results for this class are included occasionally in Reference 1. They represent a small, though noticeable, segment of the 'LV plus 2B' market (e.g., a little more than 3% of today's energy use in that market). We generally do not include them in this discussion, simply because it requires additional effort to combine the NEMS-MP results for them with the results for the other LVs. (Where there is an exception, we will indicate so.) Second, where reference is made to E85, the ethanol content is actually 74%. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) assumes that, to address cold-starting issues, the percent of ethanol in E85 will vary seasonally. The EIA uses an annual average ethanol content of 74% in its forecasts. That assumption is maintained in the NEMS-MP scenario runs.

Plotkin, S. E.; Singh, M. K.; Energy Systems

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

37

A sensitivity analysis of the treatment of wind energy in the AEO99 version of NEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Each year, the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA) publishes a forecast of the domestic energy economy in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). During the forecast period of the AEO (currently through 2020), renewable energy technologies have typically not achieved significant growth. The contribution of renewable technologies as electric generators becomes more important, however, in scenarios analyzing greenhouse gas emissions reductions or significant technological advancements. We examined the economic assumptions about wind power used for producing forecasts with the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) to determine their influence on the projected capacity expansion of this technology. This analysis should help illustrate to policymakers what types of issues may affect wind development, and improve the general understanding of the NEMS model itself. Figure 1 illustrates the model structure and factors relevant to wind deployment. We found that NEMS uses various cost multipliers and constraints to represent potential physical and economic limitations to growth in wind capacity, such as resource depletion, costs associated with rapid manufacturing expansion, and grid stability with high levels of capacity from intermittent resources. The model's flexibility allows the user to make alternative assumptions about the magnitude of these factors. While these assumptions have little effect on the Reference Case forecast for the 1999 edition of the AEO, they can make a dramatic difference when wind is more attractive, such as under a carbon permit trading system. With $100/ton carbon permits, the wind capacity projection for 2020 ranges from 15 GW in the unaltered model (AEO99 Reference Case) to 168 GW in the extreme case when all the multipliers and constraints examined in this study are removed. Furthermore, if modifications are made to the model allowing inter-regional transmission of electricity, wind capacity is forecast to reach 214 GW when all limitations are removed. The figures in the upper end of these ranges are not intended to be viewed as reasonable projections, but their magnitude illustrates the importance of the parameters governing the growth of wind capacity and resource availability in forecasts using NEMS. In addition, many uncertainties exist regarding these assumptions that potentially affect the growth of wind power. We suggest several areas in which to focus future research in order to better model the potential development of this resource. Because many of the assumptions related to wind in the model are also used for other renewable technologies, these suggestions could be applied to other renewable resources as well.

Osborn, Julie G; Wood, Frances; Richey, Cooper; Sanders, Sandy; Short, Walter; Koomey, Jonathan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

A sensitivity analysis of the treatment of wind energy in the AEO99 version of NEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and maintenance (O&M) costs, renewable energy productionrenewable energy technologies are modeled becomes critical. The structure of NEMS makes cost

Osborn, Julie G.; Wood, Frances; Richey, Cooper; Sanders, Sandy; Short, Walter; Koomey, Jonathan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1063-2006 April 2006 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-2000 March 2000 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2006 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program web site at http://www.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-STD-1063-2006 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy standard is approved for use by all DOE Components. 2. The revision to this DOE standard was developed by a working group consisting of headquarters and field participants. Beneficial comments (recommendations, additions, deletions) and any pertinent data that may improve this document should

40

Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

063-2011 063-2011 February 2011 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-2006 April 2006 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2011 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1063-2011 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) standard is approved for use by all DOE/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Components. 2. The revision to this DOE standard was developed by a working group consisting of headquarters and field participants. Beneficial comments (recommendations,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Nanoelectromechanical (NEM) relays integrated with CMOS SRAM for improved stability and low leakage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a hybrid nanoelectromechanical (NEM)/CMOS static random access memory (SRAM) cell, in which the two pull-down transistors of a conventional CMOS six transistor (6T) SRAM cell are replaced with NEM relays. This SRAM cell utilizes the infinite ...

Soogine Chong; Kerem Akarvardar; Roozbeh Parsa; Jun-Bo Yoon; Roger T. Howe; Subhasish Mitra; H.-S. Philip Wong

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

U.S. Regional Energy Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-57955 U.S. Regional Energy Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS Jesse A. Cohen, Jennifer L Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Planning, Budget, and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy-57955 U.S. Regional Energy Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS Prepared for the Office of Planning

43

Nano-Electro-Mechanical (NEM) Relay Devices and Technology for Ultra-Low Energy Digital Integrated Circuits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology 3.1 Introduction Nano-electro-mechanical (NEM)improvements, a scaled nano-relay technology with optimizedNano-Electro-Mechanical (NEM) Relay Devices and Technology

Nathanael, Rhesa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Boron injection/dilution capabilities in TRACB/NEM coupled code  

SciTech Connect

The coupled code TRAC-BF1/NEM is a thermal-hydraulic-neutronic code which allows transient simulations considering neutronic 3D and thermal-hydraulic process in multiple channels with one-dimensional geometry. TRAC-BF1 and NEM can be executed either in stand-alone mode, i.e. without coupling, as well as coupled. In stand-alone calculations NEM code is used without coupling and the thermal-hydraulic conditions (fuel temperature, moderator density and boron concentration) and xenon concentration for each node are taken from the SIMULATE3 output files. The NEM's source code has been modified to be able to read these conditions from external files when it is executed without being coupled. The coupling between TRAC-BF1 and NEM follows an integration scheme in which the thermal-hydraulic solution of TRAC-BF1 is sent to NEM to incorporate the feedback effects through the cross sections. TRAC-BF1 solves heat conduction equations inside of the heat structures using the 3D power distribution from NEM. The coupling is carried out through the communication protocol functions of PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine). The present article presents a study which constitutes an advance in the simulation of injection, transport and mix of boron in the reactor, increasing the capabilities of TRAC-BF1/NEM coupled code. This article shows the modifications introduced in the TRAC-BF1/NEM's source code to allow a more realistic simulation of boron injection transients. The qualification of these improvements in both codes is performed simulating a steady state of a generic BWR at nominal power. The results have been compared with SIMULATE3 which is used as a reference to obtain the cross sections through the SIMTAB methodology. (authors)

Jambrina, A.; Barrachina, T.; Miro, R.; Verdu, G. [Inst. for the Industrial, Radiophysical and Environmental Safety ISIRYM, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia UPV (Spain)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

CNT-based MEMS/NEMS gas ionizers for portable mass spectrometry applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the fabrication and experimental characterization of a carbon nanotube (CNT)-based MEMS/NEMS electron impact gas ionizer with an integrated extractor gate for portable mass spectrometry. The ionizer achieves ...

Velasquez-Heller, Luis Fernand

46

Workshop on Opportunities for Magnetism in MEMS/NEMS, April 16-17, 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities for Magnetism in MEMS/NEMS Opportunities for Magnetism in MEMS/NEMS Argonne National Laboratory - April 16-17, 2010 Sponsored by NSF, NIST and Argonne National Laboratory Friday, April 16 13:00 Welcome and Introduction Chair: John Moreland 13:10 Pritiraj Mohanty Boston University "Study of Spin Dynamics using Nanomechanics" 13:50 T. Mitch Wallis NIST, Boulder "Measurement of the Einstein-de Haas Effect with a Microcantilever" 14:30 Albrecht Jander Oregon State University "Application of Torques to Nanostructures using Ferromagnetic Resonance" 15:10 Coffee Break Chair: Dennis Greywall 15:30 Rassul Karabalin Caltech "Next-Generation NEMS Functionality Enable by Advances in Novel Materials"

47

Assessment and Suggestions to Improve the Commercial Building Module of EIA-NEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a comprehensive, computer-based, energy-economy modeling system developed and maintained by the Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA). NEMS forecasts the national production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy out to 2015, subject to macroeconomic assumptions, world energy markets, resource availability and costs, technological developments, and behavioral and technological choice criteria. NEMS has nine program modules of which the Commercial Sector Demand (CSD) module is one. Currently the CSD module uses a matrix of Energy Use Intensities (EUls) gleaned from the 1989 CBECS database to model service demand per major fuel type for eight different geographic census divisions and eleven different building types.

O'Neal, D. L.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Learning and cost reductions for generating technologies in the national energy modeling system (NEMS)  

SciTech Connect

This report describes how Learning-by-Doing (LBD) is implemented endogenously in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for generating plants. LBD is experiential learning that correlates to a generating technology's capacity growth. The annual amount of Learning-by-Doing affects the annual overnight cost reduction. Currently, there is no straightforward way to integrate and make sense of all the diffuse information related to the endogenous learning calculation in NEMS. This paper organizes the relevant information from the NEMS documentation, source code, input files, and output files, in order to make the model's logic more accessible. The end results are shown in three ways: in a simple spreadsheet containing all the parameters related to endogenous learning; by an algorithm that traces how the parameters lead to cost reductions; and by examples showing how AEO 2004 forecasts the reduction of overnight costs for generating technologies over time.

Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

49

Glossary Balancing Item: Represents  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Balancing Balancing Item: Represents differences between the sum of the components of natural gas supply and the sum of the components of natural gas disposition. These differences may be due to quantities lost or to the effects of data-report- ing problems. Reporting problems include differences due to the net result of conversions of flow data metered at varying temperature and pressure bases and converted to a standard temperature and pressure base; the effect of vari- ations in company accounting and billing practices; differ- ences between billing cycle and calendar period time frames; and imbalances resulting from the merger of data- reporting systems that vary in scope, format, definitions, and type of respondents. Biomass Gas: A medium Btu gas containing methane and carbon dioxide, resulting from the action of microorganisms on organic materials such as a landfill. British Thermal

50

Comparison of Bottom-Up and Top-Down Forecasts: Vision Industry Energy Forecasts with ITEMS and NEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparisons are made of energy forecasts using results from the Industrial module of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and an industrial economic-engineering model called the Industrial Technology and Energy Modeling System (ITEMS), a model developed for industrial energy analysis at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Although the results are mixed, generally ITEMS show greater penetration of energy efficient technologies and thus lower energy use, even though the business as usual forecasts for ITEMS uses a higher discount rate than NEMS uses.

Roop, J. M.; Dahowski, R. T

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Facility Representative Program: 2000 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Facility Representative Workshop 0 Facility Representative Workshop May 16-18, 2000 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Tuesday, May 16, 2000 Theme for Day 1: Sustaining the Success of the Facility Representative Program 8:00 a.m. - Opening Remarks - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:05 a.m. - Welcome - Kenneth Powers, Deputy Manager Nevada Operations Office 8:15 a.m. - Deputy Secretary Remarks - T. J. Glauthier, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:30 a.m. - Keynote Address - Jerry Lyle, Assistant Manager for Environmental Management, Idaho Operations Office 9:00 a.m. - Facility Representative of the Year Presentation - Mark B. Whitaker, Departmental Representative 9:30 a.m. - Break 9:50 a.m. - Program Results and Goals - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager

52

Facility Representative Program: 2012 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

18, 2012 Las Vegas, NV Agenda | Presentations | SSO Annual Award | Pictures | Summary Report 2011 Facility Representative of the Year Award 2011 WINNER: Congratulations to Bradley...

53

Science and technology of piezoelectric/diamond heterostructures for monolithically integrated high performance MEMS/NEMS/CMOS devices.  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the fundamental and applied science performed to integrate piezoelectric PbZr{sub x}Ti{sub 1-x}O{sub 3} and AlN films with a novel mechanically robust ultrananocrystalline diamond layer to enable a new generation of low voltage/high-performance piezoactuated hybrid piezoelectric/diamond MEMS/NEMS devices.

Auciello, O.; Sumant, A. V.; Hiller, J.; Kabius, B.; Ma, Z.; Srinivasan, S. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( MSD); (Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison); (INTEL)

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Facility Representative Program: 2001 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Facility Representative Workshop 1 Facility Representative Workshop May 15 - 17, 2001 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Day 1: Tuesday, May 15, 2001 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. - Logistics Announcements & Opening Remarks - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. - Welcome - Debbie Monette, Assistant Manager for National Security, Nevada Operations Office 8:30 a.m. - Keynote Address - Ralph Erickson, National Nuclear Security Administration 9:00 a.m.- DOE Facility Representative of the Year Presentation - Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board 9:30 a.m. - Break 9:50 a.m. - Program Summary - Joe Arango 10:10 a.m. - Management Panel/Questions and Answers

55

Facility Representative Program: Facility Representative Program Sponsors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Program Sponsors Facility Representative Program Sponsors There are 29 Facility Representative Program Sponsors Office Name Title E-Mail Phone ASO Larry Pendexter ES&H Div Dir (Argonne) larry.pendexter@ch.doe.gov 630-252-1485 BHSO Bob Desmarais Operations Management Division Director desmarai@bnl.gov 631-344-5434 CBFO Glenn Gamlin Facility Representative Supervisor glenn.gamlin@wipp.ws 575-234-8136 CBFO Casey Gadbury Operations Manager casey.gadbury@wipp.ws 575-234-7372 FSO Mark Bollinger Deputy Manager Mark.Bollinger@ch.doe.gov 630-840-8130 FSO John Scott FR Team Lead john.scott@ch.doe.gov 630-840-2250 HS-30 James O'Brien Director, Office of Nuclear Safety James.O'Brien@hq.doe.gov 301-903-1408 HS-32 Earl Hughes Facility Representative Program Manager Earl.Hughes@hq.doe.gov 202-586-0065

56

Facility Representative Program: 2010 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 Facility Representative Workshop 10 Facility Representative Workshop May 12 - 13, 2010 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees | Summary Report Workshop Agenda and Presentations Day 1: Wednesday, May 12, 2010 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks James Heffner, Facility Representative Program Manager Earl Hughes, Safety System Oversight Program Manager Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Assistance Office of Health, Safety and Security 8:15 a.m. Welcome from the Nevada Site Office John Mallin, Deputy Assistant Manager for Site Operations Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Workshop Keynote Address Todd Lapointe Chief of Nuclear Safety Central Technical Authority Staff 9:15 a.m. Facility Representative and Safety System Oversight Award Ceremony James Heffner, Facility Representative Program Manager

57

Facility Representative Program: 2007 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Facility Representative Workshop 7 Facility Representative Workshop May 15 - 17, 2007 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Final Day 1: Tuesday, May 15, 2007 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks Joanne Lorence, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome from the Nevada Site Office Gerald Talbot, Manager, Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary The Honorable Clay Sell, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:45 a.m. Keynote Address - Safety Oversight Perspective and Expectations Glenn Podonsky, Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer, Office of Health, Safety and Security 9:10 a.m. Facility Representative of the Year Presentation Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board,

58

Facility Representative Program: 2003 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Facility Representative Workshop 3 Facility Representative Workshop May 13 - 15, 2003 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Day 1: Tuesday, May 13, 2003 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. John Evans, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome Kathleen Carlson Manager, Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Keynote Address Savannah River Site and Facility Reps - A Shared History and Common Future Jeffrey M. Allison Manager, Savannah River Operations Office 9:00 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary Kyle E. McSlarrow, Deputy Secretary of Energy 9:10 a.m. Facility Representative of the Year Presentation Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

59

Estimating the environmental and economic effects of widespread residential PV adoption using GIS and NEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a study of the national effects of widespread adoption of grid-connected residential rooftop photovoltaic (PV) systems. A Geographic Information System (GIS) model is used to estimate potential PV system adoption and PV electricity generation and the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is used to estimate the national effects of PV electricity generation. Adoption is assumed to occur if levelized PV system cost is less than the local average retail electricity rate at the country level. An estimate of the current {open_quotes}best{close_quotes} scenario (defined by a 6.5% real interest rate, 30-year loan life, $6{sub 1994}/W system cost, and $4{sub 1994}/month voluntary premium) results in no adoption. Several scenarios designed to stimulate PV adoption are modeled. As an example, if PV system costs are instead assumed to be $3{sub 1994}/W, rooftop systems are found to be cost effective in 16% of detached single-family households in the U.S. by 2015 (assuming full adoption of 4-kW systems), this results in 82.1 TWh of annual PV electricity generation, 170 TWh of avoided electricity transmission, distribution, and generation losses, 6 Mt/a of avoided carbon emissions, 50 kt/a of avoided NOx emissions, and 27.3 GW of avoided electricity generating capacity in place.

Marnay, C.; Richey, R.C.; Mahler, S.A. [and others

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Facility Representative Program: 2000 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Break 10:00 a.m. - Making Your Observations CountLeading Indicators - Mike Weis, Rocky Flats Field Office 10:45 a.m. - Facility Representative PanelQuestions and Answers (Ben...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Facility Representative Program: 2004 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Facility Representative Workshop 4 Facility Representative Workshop May 18 - 20, 2004 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Final Day 1: Tuesday, May 18, 2004 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks John Evans, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome Kathy Carlson, Nevada Site Office Manager 8:30 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary Kyle E. McSlarrow, Deputy Secretary of Energy Deputy Secretary's Remarks 8:40 a.m. Keynote Address - NNSA Evaluation of Columbia Accident Investigation Board Report Brigadier General Ronald J. Haeckel, Principal Assistant Deputy Administrator for Military Applications, NNSA Other Information: NASAÂ’S Columbia Accident Investigation Board Report

62

Facility Representative Program: 2006 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Facility Representative Workshop 6 Facility Representative Workshop May 16 - 19, 2006 Knoxville, Tennessee Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Final To view Pictures, scroll the mouse over the Picture icon To view Presentations, Picture Slideshows and Video, click on the icon Day 1: Tuesday, May 16, 2006 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks John Evans, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome from Oak Ridge Office Gerald Boyd, Manager, Oak Ridge Office 8:25 a.m. Welcome from Y-12 Site Office Theodore Sherry, Manager, Y-12 Site Office 8:35 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary The Honorable Clay Sell, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:40 a.m. Keynote Address - Safety Oversight at Environmental Management Activities Dr. Inés Triay, Chief Operating Officer, Office of Environmental Management

63

Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study: Vehicle Characterization and Scenario Analyses - Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP Results for the Base Case and Scenarios  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP Results Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP Results for the Base Case and Scenarios Energy Systems Division Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available on paper to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, for a processing fee, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62

64

Property Representatives Lists- HQ  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These are the current lists of Headquarters Property Representatives.  If you have any questions please contact:Ellen Hall, Office of Logistics Operations, (301) 903-2613.

65

Overview of NEMS-H2, Version 1.0 Frances Wood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Energy: Gas Oil Electricity Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Petroleum Refining Coal (grid-based electricity) · Each is represented by capital cost, non-fuel O&M costs, and energy sector to be represented by methodology and data that fit it best ­ Optimization techniques used

66

Industry Representatives Acknowledgements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

computer science: Manitoba curriculum framework of outcomes. — Draft Includes bibliographical references. ISBN 0-7711-3122-4 1. Computer science—Curricula. 2. Computer science—Study and teaching (Secondary)—Manitoba. 3. Electronic data processing—Curricula. 4. Electronic data processing—Study and teaching (Secondary)— Manitoba. I. Manitoba. Manitoba Education and Youth. Copyright © 2003, the Crown in Right of Manitoba as represented by the Minister of Education and

Draft September Senior (s; Senior (s; Normand Châtel; Collège Béliveau; Louis Riel; School Division; Geoff Bresch; Scott Greenlay; Bruce Popham; David Tetlock

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Facility Representative Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Facility Representative Office of Nuclear Safety Home Facility Representative Home Annual Facility Rep Workshop › 2012 › 2011 › 2010 › 2009 › 2008 › 2007 › 2006 › 2005 › 2004 › 2003 › 2002 › 2001 › 2000 DOE Safety Links › ORPS Info › Operating Experience › DOE Lessons Learned › Accident Investigation Assessment Tools › FR CRADs › Surveillance Guides › Manager's Guide for Safety and Health Subject Matter Links General Program Information › Program Mission Statement › Program Directives and Guidance › FR of the Year Award Program › FR of the Year Award › FR Program Assessment Guide (Appendix B, DOE STD 1063-2011) FR Quarterly Performance Indicators Training & Qualification Information › Qualification Standards › Energy Online Courses

68

Federal Interagency Chemistry Representatives (FICR) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Federal Interagency Chemistry Representatives (FICR) Meeting 2013 - A Federal Green Chemistry Forum. ...

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

NEMS Measurement Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... approximately one third of all nanotechnology R&D [1] and ... will focus on the measurement science needed for ... this work, all of these results will be ...

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

70

Large-area low-temperature ultrananocrystaline diamond (UNCD) films and integration with CMOS devices for monolithically integrated diamond MEMD/NEMS-CMOS systems.  

SciTech Connect

Because of exceptional mechanical, chemical, and tribological properties, diamond has a great potential to be used as a material for the development of high-performance MEMS and NEMS such as resonators and switches compatible with harsh environments, which involve mechanical motion and intermittent contact. Integration of such MEMS/NEMS devices with complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) microelectronics will provide a unique platform for CMOS-driven commercial MEMS/NEMS. The main hurdle to achieve diamond-CMOS integration is the relatively high substrate temperatures (600-800 C) required for depositing conventional diamond thin films, which are well above the CMOS operating thermal budget (400 C). Additionally, a materials integration strategy has to be developed to enable diamond-CMOS integration. Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD), a novel material developed in thin film form at Argonne, is currently the only microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) grown diamond film that can be grown at 400 C, and still retain exceptional mechanical, chemical, and tribological properties comparable to that of single crystal diamond. We have developed a process based on MPCVD to synthesize UNCD films on up to 200 mm in diameter CMOS wafers, which will open new avenues for the fabrication of monolithically integrated CMOS-driven MEMS/NEMS based on UNCD. UNCD films were grown successfully on individual Si-based CMOS chips and on 200 mm CMOS wafers at 400 C in a MPCVD system, using Ar-rich/CH4 gas mixture. The CMOS devices on the wafers were characterized before and after UNCD deposition. All devices were performing to specifications with very small degradation after UNCD deposition and processing. A threshold voltage degradation in the range of 0.08-0.44V and transconductance degradation in the range of 1.5-9% were observed.

Sumant, A.V.; Auciello, O.; Yuan, H.-C; Ma, Z.; Carpick, R. W.; Mancini, D. C.; Univ. of Wisconsin; Univ. of Pennsylvania

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Facility Representative Program: Facility Representative of the Year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative of the Year Award Facility Representative of the Year Award Annual Facility Representative Workshop Facility Representative of the Year Award Process Facility Representative of the Year Award 2012 WINNER: John C. Barnes, Savannah River Operations Office Letter from DNFSB Chairman Peter S. Winokur, Ph.D 2012 Nominees: Peter W. Kelley, Brookhaven Site Office James E. Garza, Idaho Operations Office (EM) William R. Watson, Idaho Operations Office (NE) Darlene S. Rodriguez, Los Alamos Field Office Robert R. Robb, Livermore Field Office Kenneth W. Wethington, Grand Junction Project Office's Moab site Thomas P. Denny, Nevada Field Office Michael J. Childers, NNSA Production Office Pantex Site Catherine T. Schidel, NNSA Production Office Y12 Site Chelsea D. Hubbard, Oak Ridge Operations Office (EM)

72

FAQS Reference Guide – Facility Representative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the October 2010 edition of DOE-STD-1151-2010, Facility Representative Functional Area Qualification Standard.

73

Component Reliability Extensions for Fractal component model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the model is an abstraction and, therefore, it may represent behavior not possible in the original program. Consequently, a model checker may then find errors that are not present in the program (i.e., false negatives, a component cannot be checked in isolation because it does not form a complete program (with the main method

74

Finding minimum representative pattern sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Frequent pattern mining often produces an enormous number of frequent patterns, which imposes a great challenge on understanding and further analysis of the generated patterns. This calls for finding a small number of representative patterns to best ... Keywords: frequent pattern summarization, representative patterns

Guimei Liu; Haojun Zhang; Limsoon Wong

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Facility Representative Program: Qualification Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training & Qualification Information Training & Qualification Information Qualification Standards DOE Order Self-Study Modules DOE Fundamentals Handbooks Nuclear Safety Basis Self-Study Guide Energy Online Courses Available Link to National Training Center Basic Courses for Facility Representative Qualification Recommended Courses to Expand Facility Representative's Knowledge Base Qualification Standards General Technical Base Qualification Standard, Qualification Card & Reference Guide -- GTB Qualification Standard (DOE-STD-1146-2007), December 2007 [PDF] -- GTB Qualification Card, December 2007 [DOC] -- GTB "Gap" Qualification Card, December 2007 [DOC] -- GTB Qualification Standard Reference Guide, May 2008 [PDF] Facility Representative Qualification Standard, Qualification Card & Reference Guide

76

Facility Representative Program: Basic Courses For Facility Representative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training & Qualification Information Training & Qualification Information Qualification Standards DOE Order Self-Study Modules DOE Fundamentals Handbooks Nuclear Safety Basis Self-Study Guide Energy Online Courses Available Link to National Training Center Basic Courses for Facility Representative Qualification Recommended Courses to Expand Facility Representative's Knowledge Base Basic Courses For Facility Rep Qualification (These courses may be beneficial during the initial qualification of Facility Representatives.) Course Title FR FAQS CN Point of Contact Comments Applied Engineering Fundamentals 13 days * See below Mike Schoener 803-641-8166 E-mail Course description at http://ntc.doe.gov course catalog Asbestos Awareness 2 hours 2.1 Federal employees register through the CHRIS system For course details see

77

Regret-minimizing representative databases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose the k-representative regret minimization query (k-regret) as an operation to support multi-criteria decision making. Like top-k, the k-regret query assumes that users have some utility or scoring functions; however, ...

Danupon Nanongkai; Atish Das Sarma; Ashwin Lall; Richard J. Lipton; Jun Xu

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Data Visualization Perceiving and Representing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Visualization Perceiving and Representing Structured Information using Objects #12;Data #12;Data Visualization Image Based vs Structure Theories s Template theories based on 2D image processing s In structural theories we extract the structure of a scene in terms of 3D primitives #12;Data

Chi, Ed Huai-hsin

79

Facility Representative Program: Facility Representative of the Year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Facility Representative Office of Nuclear Safety Home Facility Representative Home Annual Facility Rep Workshop › 2012 › 2011 › 2010 › 2009 › 2008 › 2007 › 2006 › 2005 › 2004 › 2003 › 2002 › 2001 › 2000 DOE Safety Links › ORPS Info › Operating Experience › DOE Lessons Learned › Accident Investigation Assessment Tools › FR CRADs › Surveillance Guides › Manager's Guide for Safety and Health Subject Matter Links General Program Information › Program Mission Statement › Program Directives and Guidance › FR of the Year Award Program › FR of the Year Award › FR Program Assessment Guide (Appendix B, DOE STD 1063-2011) FR Quarterly Performance Indicators Training & Qualification Information › Qualification Standards › Energy Online Courses

80

ESD Toxicology Laboratory Representative References  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

., et al. 1984. Comparative acute toxicity of components of coal-derived synthetic products to aquatic:709-724. Mesocosm Testing Giddings, J. M., et al. 1984. Effects of chronic exposure to coal-derived oil of chronic exposure to coal-derived oil on freshwater ecosystems. II. Experimental ponds. Environ. Toxicol

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of Project Activity ORD-FY04-012, “Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative,” was to provide the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) with expertise on past, present, and future climate scenarios and to support the technical elements of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) climate program. The Climate Technical Support Representative was to explain, defend, and interpret the YMP climate program to the various audiences during Site Recommendation and License Application. This technical support representative was to support DOE management in the preparation and review of documents, and to participate in comment response for the Final Environmental Impact Statement, the Site Recommendation Hearings, the NRC Sufficiency Comments, and other forums as designated by DOE management. Because the activity was terminated 12 months early and experience a 27% reduction in budget, it was not possible to complete all components of the tasks as originally envisioned. Activities not completed include the qualification of climate datasets and the production of a qualified technical report. The following final report is an unqualified summary of the activities that were completed given the reduced time and funding.

Sharpe, Saxon E

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

82

Stack Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stack Components Stack Components Nancy L. Garland Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Fuel Cell Team FORS 5G-086 (202) 586-5673 nancy.garland@ee.doe.gov Stack Components F u e l P r o c e s s o r Bipolar Plate Cathode + Anode - Electrolyte H+ H+ HYDROGEN OXYGEN Example shown is for acidic electrolytes Bipolar Plate e - e - O 2 O 2 O 2 e - H+ Bipolar Plate Bipolar Plate Cathode + Anode - Electrolyte H+ H+ H+ H+ HYDROGEN OXYGEN Example shown is for acidic electrolytes Bipolar Plate Bipolar Plate e - e - e - e - O 2 O 2 O 2 O 2 O 2 O 2 e - e - H+ H+ Power Stack Component Barriers $10 Other Bipolar Plates Membranes Electrodes $25 $5 $5 Fuel Cell Power Systems $45/kW BARRIERS * Stack material cost/manufacturing * Durability * Electrode performance * Thermal and water management Stack Component Targets

83

PSCAD Modules Representing PV Generator  

SciTech Connect

Photovoltaic power plants (PVPs) have been growing in size, and the installation time is very short. With the cost of photovoltaic (PV) panels dropping in recent years, it can be predicted that in the next 10 years the contribution of PVPs to the total number of renewable energy power plants will grow significantly. In this project, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a dynamic modeling of the modules to be used as building blocks to develop simulation models of single PV arrays, expanded to include Maximum Power Point Tracker (MPPT), expanded to include PV inverter, or expanded to cover an entire PVP. The focus of the investigation and complexity of the simulation determines the components that must be included in the simulation. The development of the PV inverter was covered in detail, including the control diagrams. Both the current-regulated voltage source inverter and the current-regulated current source inverter were developed in PSCAD. Various operations of the PV inverters were simulated under normal and abnormal conditions. Symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults were simulated, presented, and discussed. Both the three-phase analysis and the symmetrical component analysis were included to clarify the understanding of unsymmetrical faults. The dynamic model validation was based on the testing data provided by SCE. Testing was conducted at SCE with the focus on the grid interface behavior of the PV inverter under different faults and disturbances. The dynamic model validation covers both the symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults.

Muljadi, E.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Facility Representative Program: Program Mission Statement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Program Information Program Mission Statement Program Directives and Guidance Facility Representative of the Year Award Program Facility Representative of the Year Award FR...

85

Facility Representative of the Year Award  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPRESENTATIVE OF THE YEAR AWARD PROGRAM REPRESENTATIVE OF THE YEAR AWARD PROGRAM OBJECTIVE The Facility Representative Award Program is a special award designed to recognize superior or exemplary service by a Facility Representative over a period of one year. This special award program has been established in accordance with the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 331.1C, Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program. FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE OF THE YEAR AWARD The Facility Representative of the Year Award is determined by a panel representing the Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer and managers from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), the Office of Environmental Management (EM), the Office of Science (SC), and the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE). The Facility Representative Program Manager in

86

Facility Representative Program: Program Performance Indicators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Performance Indicators DOE Corporate Reporting Data (ORPS, CAIRS, Others) Facility Representative Performance Indicator Guidance -- Appendix A in DOE-STD-1063-2011,...

87

Custom Components - Microsystems Science, Technology, and Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Connectors area will help you optimize your choice of connectors for your requirements Passive RF Components Our Passive RF Components area will work with you to identify, specify...

88

Representativeness models of systems: smart grid example  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the great emphasis being placed on energy efficiency in contemporary society, in which the smart grid plays a prominent role, this is an opportune time to explore methodologies for appropriately representing system attributes. We suggest this is ... Keywords: Smart grid, System representativeness

Norman Schneidewind

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program, Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program, 12/17/1998 Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program, 12/17/1998 The Department's Revised Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 93-3 has once again underscored the Department's commitment to maintaining the technical capability necessary to safely manage and operate our defense nuclear facilities. Attracting and retaining highly qualified employees and placing them in our critical technical positions is vital to fi.dfilling this commitment. You have identified 95'% of your Facility Representative positions as critical technical positions. The Office of Field Management has noted a 12'?40annual attrition rate of Facility Representatives from the Facility

90

Representativeness of Wind Observations at Airports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind information for use at airports can be called representative if it provides an optimal estimate of wind variations to be expected over the runway. It is shown that a single anemometer at a nonideal but reasonable location will usually ...

J. Wieringa

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

A Practical Pyrgeometer Using the Representative Angle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple directional pyrgeometer is tested and compared with a conventional standard pyrgeometer. The system presented in this article has a narrow directional response and points to the representative zenith angle of 52.5°. Because of its ...

Satoshi Sakai; Aya Ito; Kazuhiro Umetani; Isao Iizawa; Masanori Onishi

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Finding representative workloads for computer system design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work explores how improved workload characterization can be used for a better selection of representative workloads within the computer system and processor design process. We find that metrics easily available in modern computer systems provide ...

Jan Lodewijk Bonebakker

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Facility Representative Program: Program Directives and Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative of the Year Award FR Program Assessment Guide (Appendix B, DOE STD 1063-2011) Program Directives and Guidance FR Program Standard, DOE STD 1063-2011,...

94

Representing aggregate works in the digital library  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the challenge of representing aggregate works such as encyclopedias, collected poems and journals in heterogenous digital library collections. Reflecting on the materials used by humanities academics, we demonstrate the varied range ... Keywords: aggregate documents, architecture, digital libraries

George Buchanan; Jeremy Gow; Ann Blandford; Jon Rimmer; Claire Warwick

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Facility Representative Program Outstanding at ID  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

protects not only the workers, but the public and the environment as well. Specifically, DOE orders say: "The purpose of the DOE Facility Representative Program is to ensure that...

96

Software Component Integration Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a combination of off-the-shelf components, with new components integrated to satisfy ... oriented, that is, it consists of objects with state and behavior. ...

2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

97

1997 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees Last Name First Office Location Phone E-Mail Anderson Mike ID CFATAN (208) 526-7418 andersmr@id.doe.gov Bell Bill AL LAAO (505) 665-6324 bbell@doeal.gov Biro Brian RL LABS (509) 376-7660 brian_a_biro@rl.gov Brown Mark RL TANKS (509) 373-9150 mark_c_brown@rl.gov Charboneau Briant RL 324/327 (509) 373-6137 briant_L_charboneau@rl.gov Daniels Rick OR HFIR (423) 574-9143 e29@ornl.gov Dennis Jack AL AAO (806) 477-3176 jdennis@pantex.com Dikeakos Maria CH BHG (516) 344-3950 dikeako@bnl.gov Duey Don AL AAO (806) 477-6987 dduey@pantex.com Earley Larry RL WRAP (509) 373-9388 larry_d_earley@rl.gov Eddy Doug OAK LLNL (925) 422-3379 doug.eddy@oak.doe.gov Edwards Robert SR NMSD (803) 208-2645 robert-e.edwards@srs.gov

98

1998 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees 8 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees Last Name First Office Location Phone Fax E-Mail Alvord Bob OAK LLNL (925) 422-0830 (925) 422-0832 robert.alvord@oak.doe.gov Barnes John SR SRTC (803) 208-2628 (803) 208-1123 johnc.barnes@srs.gov Bell Fred AL LAAO (505) 665-4856 (505) 665-9230 fbell@doeal.gov Bell Bill AL LAAO (505) 665-6324 (505) 665-9230 bbell@doeal.gov Bennett Rick RF DOE (303) 966-8155 (303) 966-7447 rick.bennett@rfets.gov Biro Brian RL LABS (509) 376-7660 (509) 376-9837 brian_a_biro@rl.gov Blanco Jose SR DWPF (803) 208-7022 (803) 557-8223 jose.blanco@srs.gov Charboneau Briant RL 324/327 (509) 373-6137 (509) 373-9839 briant_L_charboneau@rl.gov Christensen Debbie AL OMD (505) 845-5239 dschristensen@doeal.gov Clifton Gary OR ORNL (423) 576-6810 (423) 574-9275 g7y@ornl.gov

99

Laboratory or Facility Representative Email Addresses Phone #  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory or Facility Representative Email Addresses Phone # Ames Laboratory Stacy Joiner joiner@ameslab.gov 515-294-5932 Argonne National Laboratory Connie Cleary ccleary@anl.gov 630-252-8111 Brookhaven National Laboratory Walter Copan wcopan@bnl.gov 631-344-3035 Fermi National Acclerator Laboratory Bruce Chrisman chrisman@fnal.gov 630-840-6657 Idaho National Laboratory Steven McMaster steven.mcmaster@inl.gov 208-526-1340 Kansas City Plant Caron O'Dower codower@kcp.com 816-997-2645 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Viviana Wolinsky viwolinsky@lbl.gov 510-486-6463 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Roger Werne werne1@llnl.gov 925-423-9353 Los Alamos National Laboratory John Mott jmott@lanl.gov 505-665-0883 National Energy Technology Laboratory Jessica Sosenko jessica.sosenko@netl.doe.gov 412-386-7417

100

Facility Representative Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1151-2010 October 2010 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1151-2010 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Office of Health, Safety and Security Approved DOE Technical Standards Web Site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/standard/standard.html DOE-STD-1151-2010 iii APPROVAL The Federal Technical Capability Panel consists of senior U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) managers responsible for overseeing the Federal Technical Capability Program. This Panel is

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

DOE-STD-1063-2000 - Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2000 March 2000 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-97 October 1997 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1063-2000 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy standard is approved for use by all DOE Components. 2. The Revision to this DOE standard was developed by a working group consisting of

102

A BRIEF REVIEW OF MODELS REPRESENTING CREEP OF ALLOY 617  

SciTech Connect

Alloy 617 is being considered for the construction of components to operate in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). Service temperatures will range from 650 to 1000 C. To meet the needs of the conceptual designers of this plant, a materials handbook is being developed that will provide information on alloy 617, as well as other materials of interest. The database for alloy 617 to be incorporated into the handbook was produced in the 1970s and 1980s, while creep and damage models were developed from the database for use in the design of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. In the work reported here, the US database and creep models are briefly reviewed. The work reported represents progress toward a useful model of the behavior of this material in the temperature range of 650 to 1000 C.

Swindeman, Robert W [ORNL; Swindeman, Michael [University of Dayton Research Institute; Ren, Weiju [ORNL

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

The underground electromagnetic pulse: Four representative models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I describe four phenomenological models by which an underground nuclear explosion may generate electromagnetic pulses: Compton current asymmetry (or ''Compton dipole''); Uphole conductor currents (or ''casing currents''); Diamagnetic cavity plasma (or ''magnetic bubble''); and Large-scale ground motion (or ''magneto-acoustic wave''). I outline the corresponding analytic exercises and summarize the principal results of the computations. I used a 10-kt contained explosion as the fiducial case. Each analytic sequence developed an equivalent source dipole and calculated signal waveforms at representative ground-surface locations. As a comparative summary, the Compton dipole generates a peak source current moment of about 12,000 A/center dot/m in the submicrosecond time domain. The casing-current source model obtains an equivalent peak moment of about 2 /times/ 10/sup 5/ A/center dot/m in the 10- to 30-/mu/s domain. The magnetic bubble produces a magnetic dipole moment of about 7 /times/ 10/sup 6/ A/center dot/m/sup 2/, characterized by a 30-ms time structure. Finally, the magneto-acoustic wave corresponds to a magnetic dipole moment of about 600 A/center dot/m/sup 2/, with a waveform showing 0.5-s periodicities. 8 refs., 35 figs., 7 tabs.

Wouters, L.F.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Beyond Generic Component Parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For flexible use in application contexts, software components should be parameterized, but also extended appropriately. Until now, there is no language mechanism to solve both problems uniformly. This paper presents a new concept, component hooks. Hooks ...

Uwe Aßmann

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

ARM - Evaluation Product - Organic Aerosol Component VAP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsOrganic Aerosol Component VAP ProductsOrganic Aerosol Component VAP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Organic Aerosol Component VAP 2011.01.08 - 2012.03.24 Site(s) SGP General Description Organic aerosol (OA, i.e., the organic fraction of particles) accounts for 10-90% of the fine aerosol mass globally and is a key determinant of aerosol radiative forcing. But atmospheric OA is poorly characterized and its life cycle insufficiently represented in models. As a result, current models are unable to simulate OA concentrations and properties. This deficiency represents a large source of uncertainty in the quantification of aerosol direct and indirect effects and the prediction of future climate change. The Organic Aerosol Component (OACOMP) value-added product (VAP) uses

106

Reactor component automatic grapple  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A grapple for handling nuclear reactor components in a medium such as liquid sodium which, upon proper seating and alignment of the grapple with the component as sensed by a mechanical logic integral to the grapple, automatically seizes the component. The mechanical logic system also precludes seizure in the absence of proper seating and alignment.

Greenaway, Paul R. (Bethel Park, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Heavy metals hazardous components of Eaf dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric arc furnace (EAF) dust is a waste generated in the EAF during the steel production process. Among different wastes, EAF dust represents one of the most hazardous, since it contains heavy metals such as Zn, Fe, Cr, Cd and Pb. The goal of the ... Keywords: electric arc furnace (EAF), furnace additives, hazard components, heavy metals, scrap composition, x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

Cristiana-Zizi Rizescu; Zorica Bacinschi; Elena Valentina Stoian; Aurora Poinescu; Dan Nicolae Ungureanu

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Component reliability testing  

SciTech Connect

Component and system reliability of active solare energy systems continues to be a major concern of designers, manufacturers, installers, and consumers. Six test loops were constructed at the Solar Energy Research Institute in Golden, Colorado, to thermally cycle active solar energy system components. Drain valves, check valves, air vents, vacuum breakers, tempering valves, and polybutylene pipe were included in the testing. Test results show poor reliabiity of some of the components and limited performance from others. The results lead to a better understanding of certain failures in the field and present designers with realistic expectations for these components.

Farrington, R.B.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period July through September 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy's (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for July - September 2011 More Documents & Publications 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

110

1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January through March 2012. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standarf 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for January-March 2012 More Documents & Publications 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

111

Facility Representative Program ID Selects FR of the Year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Program ID Selects Facility Representative Program ID Selects FR of the Year John Martin DOE-ID Facility Representative John Martin DOE-ID Facility Representative of the Year. John Martin was selected as DOE-ID's Facility Representative of the Year and the office's nominee for the 2007 DOE Facility Representative of the Year Award. John was selected from an exceptional field of candidates to represent DOE-ID at the Facility Representative Annual Workshop in Las Vegas this May. Each year the Department of Energy recognizes the Facility Representative whose achievements during the calendar year are most exemplary. A panel of senior personnel representing the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Environmental Management (EM), Science (SC), Nuclear Energy (NE) and at least five

112

LLNL's NeMS: Network Mapping System  

High Performance Computing Innovation Center (Building 6475)located in LLNL's Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) Seating is limited, Pre-registration ...

113

3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from July to September 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. 3Q CY2003, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

114

FAQS Qualification Card - Facility Representative | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Representative Representative FAQS Qualification Card - Facility Representative A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-FacilityRepresentative.docx Description Facility Representative Qualification Card More Documents & Publications FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card - Facility Representative

115

Integrating Program Component Executables  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrating Integrating Program Component Executables on Distributed Memory Architectures via MPH Chris Ding and Yun He Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA chqding@lbl.gov, yhe@lbl.gov Abstract A growing trend in developing large and complex ap- plications on today's Teraflop computers is to integrate stand-alone and/or semi-independent program components into a comprehensive simulation package. One example is the climate system model which consists of atmosphere, ocean, land-surface and sea-ice. Each component is semi- independent and has been developed at different institu- tions. We study how this multi-component multi-executable application can run effectively on distributed memory archi- tectures. We identify five effective execution modes and de- velop the MPH library to support

116

4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. As of December 31,2003, 93% of all Facility Representatives were fully qualified, exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Currently, 23 of 27 sites meet the goal of 80%. Currently, 23 of 27 sites meet the goal for Facility Representative

117

2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from April to June 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. A total of 13 Facility Representatives transferred to other positions during the quarter. Five of these accepted Facility Representative positions at other sites. Of the 8 that left the Program. 1 recieved a promotion and 7 accepted lateral positions. All of

118

2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. 2Q CY2006, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

119

Greening the U.S. House of Representatives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greening the U.S. House of Representatives Title Greening the U.S. House of Representatives Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-322E Year of Publication 2008 Authors...

120

Case Study 11 - A Collection of Homes Representing US ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A Collection of Homes Representing US Housing Stock. [Persily AK, Musser A., Leber D. (2006)]. In order to allow nationwide ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2008. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 87% Fully Qualifed ( last quarter was 85%) 86% Staffing Level ( last quarter was 88%)

122

3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. A summary of this quarters data concluded: 76% fully qualified 41% staffing level

123

2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to impove the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 74% Fully Qualified 94% Staffing Level ( last quarter was

124

4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. A summary of this quarters data concluded: 72% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was

125

1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from January to March 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. The percentage of Facility Representatives who are fully qualified reached 91% across DOE. In EM the percenage of 97%, in Sc the percentage is 95% and in NNSA the percentage is 78%. The DOE goal is 75%. Staffing levels for the three organizations continue to be below

126

1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March2010. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report are presented below." 1Q CY2010, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

127

3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period of July through September 2010. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representative and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for July - September 2010 More Documents & Publications 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

128

1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from January 2000 to March 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, DOE-STD-1 063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definitions of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data." 1Q CY2000, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

129

4Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (Pis) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. The format of the report is changed from past reports. Information will now be provided according to the major offices having field or site office Facility Representative programs: National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSSA), the Office of

130

3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE-STD-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. A summary of this quarter 's data concluded: 3Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

131

Ceramic component for electrodes  

SciTech Connect

A ceramic component suitable for preparing MHD generator electrodes having the compositional formula: Y.sub.x (Mg.sub.y Cr.sub.z).sub.w Al.sub.(1-w) O.sub.3 where x=0.9 to 1.05, y=0.02 to 0.2, z=0.8 to 1.05 and w=1.0 to 0.5. The component is resistant to the formation of hydration products in an MHD environment, has good electrical conductivity and exhibits a lower electrochemical corrosion rate than do comparable compositions of lanthanum chromite.

Marchant, David D. (Richland, WA); Bates, J. Lambert (Richland, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Components in the Pipeline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scientists commonly describe their data processing systems metaphorically as software pipelines. These pipelines input one or more data sources and apply a sequence of processing steps to transform the data and create useful results. While conceptually simple, pipelines often adopt complex topologies and must meet stringent quality of service requirements that place stress on the software infrastructure used to construct the pipeline. In this paper we describe the MeDICi Integration Framework, which is a component-based framework for constructing complex software pipelines. The framework supports composing pipelines from distributed heterogeneous software components and provides mechanisms for controlling qualities of service to meet demanding performance, reliability and communication requirements.

Gorton, Ian; Wynne, Adam S.; Liu, Yan (Jenny); Yin, Jian

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

133

Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. From 1982 through 1993, the Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS) was used by the EIA for its analyses, and the Gas Analysis Modeling System (GAMS) was used within IFFS to represent natural gas markets. Prior to 1982, the Midterm Energy Forecasting System (MEFS), also referred to as the Project Independence Evaluation System (PIES), was employed. NEMS was developed to enhance and update EIA`s modeling capability by internally incorporating models of energy markets that had previously been analyzed off-line. In addition, greater structural detail in NEMS permits the analysis of a broader range of energy issues. The time horizon of NEMS is the midterm period (i.e., through 2015). In order to represent the regional differences in energy markets, the component models of NEMS function at regional levels appropriate for the markets represented, with subsequent aggregation/disaggregation to the Census Division level for reporting purposes.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Facility Representative of the Year Award | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Representative of the Year Award Facility Representative of the Year Award Facility Representative of the Year Award Departmental Award Program administered by the Office of Chief Information Officer The Facility Representative Award Program is a special award designed to recognize superior or exemplary service by a Facility Representative over a period of one year. This special award program has been established in accordance with the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 331.1C, Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program. Facility Representative of the Year Award Responsible Contacts Lorrenda Buckner HUMAN RESOURCES SPECIALIST (PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT) E-mail lorrenda.buckner@hq.doe.gov Phone 202-586-8451 More Documents & Publications Safety System Oversight Annual Award

135

1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period January through March 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy's (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. This report reflects changes in DOE STD 1063-2011 that deleted one indicator and changed the way two others are calculated. The changes are discussed below. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for January - March

136

3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from July to September 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standards , DOE-STD-1063-2000, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definition of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. The percentage of fully qualified Facility Representatives in the DOE complex

137

Facility Representative of the Year Award | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Representative of the Year Award Facility Representative of the Year Award Facility Representative of the Year Award Departmental Award Program administered by the Office of Chief Information Officer The Facility Representative Award Program is a special award designed to recognize superior or exemplary service by a Facility Representative over a period of one year. This special award program has been established in accordance with the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 331.1C, Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program. Facility Representative of the Year Award Responsible Contacts Lorrenda Buckner HUMAN RESOURCES SPECIALIST (PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT) E-mail lorrenda.buckner@hq.doe.gov Phone 202-586-8451 More Documents & Publications Safety System Oversight Annual Award

138

1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE CONFERENCE June 21 - 25, 1999 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE CONFERENCE June 21 - 25, 1999 1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE CONFERENCE June 21 - 25, 1999 1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE CONFERENCE June 21 - 25, 1999 The Department of Energy will host the Facility Representative Annual Meeting on June 21-25, 1999 at the Alexis Park Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada. The meeting will give Facility Representatives and line management the opportunity to share lessons learned, and to discuss upcoming program improvements. There is no cost for the meeting, however, rooms reserved at the government rate are limited so if you are planning on attending, please make reservations as soon as possible. The hotel phone number is 1-800-453-8000. For more information, please contact Joe Hassenfeldt, Facility Representative Program Manager, FM-10, at 202-586-1643." Microsoft Word - Document1

139

2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from April to June 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standards , DOE-STD-1063-2000, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definition of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. Overall, the percentage of fully qualified Facility Representatives increased to 80% last quarter, from 78% the previous quarter , and

140

1Q CY2000, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May May 9,2000 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: .yc,..,%$'! L.W.T oseph Arango, Facl ity Representative Program Manager (S-3.1) SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from January 2000 to March 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, DOE-STD-1 063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definitions of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. You will note that the indicators show the attrition of five Facility Representatives from the program during this reporting period. Of those five, two were promoted

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from October to December 2001. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standards , DOE-STD-1063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definition of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data 4Q CY2001, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications

142

2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. As of June 30,2005, 97% of all FRs were fully qualified, down from 88% the previous quarter, but exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Eighteen of 27 reporting sites meet the goal of FR qualifications. 2Q CY2005, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

143

October 2010, Facility Representative Qualification Standard Reference Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Facility Representative Qualification Standard Reference Guide OCTOBER 2010 Table of Contents i LIST OF FIGURES ..................................................................................................................... iii LIST OF TABLES ........................................................................................................................ v ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................................ vi PURPOSE ...................................................................................................................................... 1 SCOPE ........................................................................................................................................... 1

144

Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of...

145

Statement of Patricia Hoffman Before the US House of Representatives...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on Energy and Power (May 9, 2012) Statement of Patricia Hoffman Before the US House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power (May 9, 2012)...

146

Statement of Patricia Hoffman Before the US House of Representatives...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Water Development (March 27, 2012) Statement of Patricia Hoffman Before the US House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development (March...

147

Microsoft Word - 2.24 Safety Advisory Committee Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The SAC Representative is expected to: * Possess an understanding of Integrated Safety Management. * Communicate regularly with senior division management and other division...

148

Economic Analysis of a Representative Deep-Water Gas Production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Natural Gas 1998: Issues and Trends 181 Appendix C Economic Analysis of a Representative Deep-Water Gas Production Project

149

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2A Houston, Texas Reference Buildings by Building Type: Small Hotel Reference Buildings by Climate Zone...

150

BNL CRCR LEAF Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A detailed description of the LEAF facility is given in Rev. Sci. Inst. 75, A detailed description of the LEAF facility is given in Rev. Sci. Inst. 75, 4359-4366 (2004), which can be found by following this link. Accelerator System Components The LEAF facility layout indicates the locations of the laser system, the RF components, the electron gun and the beam lines. RF System The modulator cabinet and S-band (2.856 GHz) klystron are located in the laser room. A copper waveguide carries the 15 MW RF pulse from the klystron to the electron gun in the accelerator vault. (A klystron is a high-power RF amplifier. You can visit the ALS MicroWorlds site for more information on klystrons and the principles of RF particle acceleration.) Electron Gun Accelerator and Beam Line 5 psec beam line The electron gun (link to picture) is located in the southwest corner of

151

Component for thermoelectric generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a thermoelectric generator, a component comprises a ceramic insulator, having over limited areas thereof, each area corresponding to a terminal end of thermoelectric wires, a coating of a first metal which adheres to the insulator, and an electrical thermoelectric junction including a second metal which wets said first metal and adheres to said terminal ends but does not wet said insulator, and a cloth composed of electrically insulating threads interlaced with thermoelectric wires.

Purdy, David L. (Indiana, PA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Representative well models for eight geothermal-resource areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Representative well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal-resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. The models were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. The nature, construction, and validation of the models are presented.

Carson, C.C.; Lin, Y.T.; Livesay, B.J.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Representing a robotic domain using temporal description logics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A temporal logic for representing and reasoning on a robotic domain is presented. Actions are represented by describing what is true while the action itself is occurring, and plans are constructed by temporally relating actions and world states. The ... Keywords: Action Representation, Description Logic, Robotics, Temporal Logic

Alessandro Artale; Enrico Franconi

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives. and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR Program. As of March 31st, 2005, 88% of all FRs were fully qualified, up from 86% the previous quarter, and exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Several of the new FRs hired recently completed qualifications. Eighteen of 27 reporting sites meet the goal of FR qualifications

155

4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR program. As of December 31, 2004, 86% of all FRs were fully qualified,down from 89% the previous quarter, and exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Several sites added new FRs or switched FRs from their exisiting facilities to new facilities, reducing the overall qualification rate.

156

2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from April to June 2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR program. As of June 30, 2004, 89% of all FRs were fully qualified , exceeding the DOE goal of 80%, but down slightly from the previous quarter. Twenty of 28 reporting sites meet the goal for FR qualifications. Overall FR staffing is at 85% of the levels needed per the staffing

157

3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. As of September 30,2005, 84% of all FRs were fully qualified , down from 87% the previous quarter, but exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Several sites shifted fully-qualifed FRs to new facilities, thus requiring new qualifications. Although the overall percentage of fully qualified FRS

158

3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from July to September 2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR program. As of September 30, 2004, 89% of all FRs were fully qualified, the same as last quarter, and exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Twenty of 28 reporting sites meet the goal for FR qualifications. Overall FR stadding is at 85% of the levels needed per the staffing analysis methodology in

159

2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 77% Fully Qualified (last quarter was 78%) 90% Staffing Level ( last Quarter was 90%); 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is>40%); and 73% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is > 65%)"

160

4Q CY2000, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 February 26,2001 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: seph Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager (S-3.1) SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from October to December 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, 063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definitions of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. I intend to continue to provide this summary information to you quarterly. These provide

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period October through December 2010. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report are presented below: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data * DOE was staffed at 184 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTEs) which is 92

162

4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2008. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 76% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was 80%) 89% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 89%) 44% Time Spent in the Field ( Department of Energy)(DOE) goal is > 40%) 73% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is> 65%)"

163

4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October through December 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard 1063-2011 , Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report include: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data: * DOE was staffed at 179 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTE), which is 92 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent). Four FRs left due to transfer,

164

4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 83% Fully Qualified (last Quarter was 82%) 85% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 93%) 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is >40%) 73% Time Spent in Oversight Activities (DOE Goal is> 65%)"

165

1Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 6 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. As of March 31,2006 81% of all FRs were fully qualified,up from 78% the previous quarter, and just above the DOE goal of 80%. To assist site offices in continuing to meet the qualification goal, there will be two focused training sessions for FR candidates in the coming months. These

166

2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period April through June 20 1 1. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-20 1 1, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight data DOE was staffed at 180 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTEs), which is 9 1 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent).

167

2Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the highlight of, and announces the availablity on-line of, the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. This memorandum also announces that Mr. James Heffner has turned over FR Program Manager duties to Mr. Earl Huges. Mr. Heffner is assuming expanded team leader duties over several additional programs within the

168

4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. As of December 31, 2005 78% of all FRs were fully qualified , down from the 84% the previous quarter, and below the DOE goal of 80%. Site offices hired 11 new FRs in the quarter and several sites moved FRs to new facilities, thus requiring new qualifications.

169

1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 78% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was 76%) 90% Staffing Level ( last Quarter was 89%) 47% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is>40%) 74% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is>65%)"

170

Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Clay and granitic geologic rock units are potential host media for future repositories for used nuclear fuel and high level waste. This report addresses the representation of flow in these two media within numerical process models. Discrete fracture network (DFNs) models are an approach to representing flow in fractured granite that explicitly represents the geometry and flow properties of individual fractures. New DFN generation and computational grid generation methods have been developed and tested. Mesh generation and the generation of flow streamlines within the DFN are also included. Traditional form of Darcy's law is not adequate

171

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_8a_usa_ak_fairbanks_post1980_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_8a_usa_ak_fairbanks_post1980_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3A Atlanta, Georgia Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena, Montana Reference Buildings by Building Type: Secondary school

172

2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April through June 2012. Data for these indicators were gathered by field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report include: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data * DOE was staffed at 176 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTE), which is 95 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent). This staff reflects a

173

Efficient independent component analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Independent component analysis (ICA) has been widely used for blind source separation in many fields such as brain imaging analysis, signal processing and telecommunication. Many statistical techniques based on M-estimates have been proposed for estimating the mixing matrix. Recently several nonparametric methods have been developed but in-depth analysis on asymptotic efficiency has not been available. We analyze ICA using semiparametric theories and propose a straightforward estimate based on the efficient score function by using B-spline approximations. The estimate is asymptotically efficient under moderate conditions and exhibits better performance than standard ICA methods in a variety of simulations.

Chen, Aiyou

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Adaptive kernel principal component analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An adaptive kernel principal component analysis (AKPCA) method, which has the flexibility to accurately track the kernel principal components (KPC), is presented. The contribution of this paper may be divided into two parts. First, KPC are recursively ... Keywords: Adaptive method, Kernel principal component, Kernel principal component analysis, Non-stationary data, Recursive algorithm

Mingtao Ding; Zheng Tian; Haixia Xu

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for October - December 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOR DISTRIBUTION FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: ANDREW C. LAWRENCE DIRECTOR OFFICE OF NUCLEAR SAFETY, QUALITY ASSURANCE AND ENVIRONMENT OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, October-December (Fourth Quarter Calendar Year 2010) This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period October through December 2010. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report are presented below:

176

Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media The report presents information related to the development of a fundamental understanding of disposal-system performance in a range of environments for potential wastes that could arise from future nuclear fuel cycle alternatives. It addresses selected aspects of the development of computational modeling capability for the performance of storage and disposal options. Topics include radionuclide interaction with geomedia, colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport (Pu colloids), interaction between iodide (accumulate in the interlayer regions of clay minerals) and a suite of clay minerals, adsorption of uranium onto granite and bentonite,

177

WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory Board WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory Board March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Rose Scott, a governmental affairs specialist with URS Washington TRU Solutions LLC, the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant management and operating contractor, was selected for the National Environmental Justice Advisory Board. Rose Scott, a governmental affairs specialist with URS Washington TRU Solutions LLC, the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant management and operating contractor, was selected for the National Environmental Justice Advisory Board. CARLSBAD, N.M. - Organizers say no similar opportunity or conference exists in America. In April, representatives from federal and state

178

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions June 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Secretary Chu presents the Secretary of Energy's Appreciation Award to Judy A. McLemore. Secretary Chu presents the Secretary of Energy's Appreciation Award to Judy A. McLemore. WASHINGTON, D.C. - A representative of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, N.M., on Tuesday received the Secretary of Energy's Appreciation Award for her efforts to improve sustainability and reduce travel costs and the number of fleet vehicles. Judy A. McLemore, who works for URS Regulatory and Environmental Services, based in Carlsbad, was honored for helping advance DOE's management and

179

2Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0,2007 0,2007 M E M 0 R A N D ; p s ' X Z FROM: M RK B. WHI DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVE TO THE DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, April - June (2nd Quarter CY2007) Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 74% Fully Qualified (last Quarter was 72%) 94% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 9 1 %)

180

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 7 Duluth,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Duluth, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 7 Duluth, Minnesota In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_7a_usa_mn_duluth_pre1980_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_7a_usa_mn_duluth_pre1980_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3B Los Angeles, California Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3C San Francisco, California Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory Board WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory Board March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Rose Scott, a governmental affairs specialist with URS Washington TRU Solutions LLC, the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant management and operating contractor, was selected for the National Environmental Justice Advisory Board. Rose Scott, a governmental affairs specialist with URS Washington TRU Solutions LLC, the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant management and operating contractor, was selected for the National Environmental Justice Advisory Board. CARLSBAD, N.M. - Organizers say no similar opportunity or conference exists in America. In April, representatives from federal and state

182

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6A  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A A Minneapolis, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6A Minneapolis, Minnesota In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_6a_usa_mn_minneapolis_post1980_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_6a_usa_mn_minneapolis_post1980_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 7 Duluth, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5B Boulder,

183

Representing Drag on Unresolved Terrain as a Distributed Momentum Sink  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In numerical weather prediction models, drag on unresolved terrain is usually represented by augmenting the boundary drag on the model atmosphere, in terms of an effective surface roughness length. But as is shown here, if a terrain-following ...

John D. Wilson

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Houston, Texas Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2A Houston, Texas In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

185

Secretary Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

at the National Press Club, U.S Energy Secretary Steven Chu said that the success of China and other countries in clean energy industries represents a new "Sputnik Moment" for...

186

Quantum states representing perfectly secure bits are always distillable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is proven that recently introduced states with perfectly secure bits of cryptographic key (private states representing secure bit) [K. Horodecki et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 160502 (2005)] as well as its multipartite and higher dimension generalizations always represent distillable entanglement. The corresponding lower bounds on distillable entanglement are provided. We also present a simple alternative proof that for any bipartite quantum state entanglement cost is an upper bound on distillable cryptographic key in bipartite scenario.

Pawel Horodecki; Remigiusz Augusiak

2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

187

Solar bowl component efficiencies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory has published two volumes on the economic evaluation of various proposed configurations and plant sizes for the four solar thermal technologies. These are the latest in a series of publications sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) on plant and operational costs and are more complete in that they include calculations of electrical output. These latest Battelle volumes use the 1976 solar data from Barstow, Calif., and by calculating or estimating the energy conversion efficiency of each element in the process from sun to electricity predict the output and cost of electricity from different plant sizes for each of the four technologies. In this paper a comparison is presented of the component efficiencies developed by Battelle and those of the solar bowl at Crosbyton, Tex.

O'Hair, E.A.; Green, B.L. (College of Engineering, Texas Tech. Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus Title Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4420E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Hopkins, Asa S., Alexander B. Lekov, James D. Lutz, and Gregory J. Rosenquist Subsidiary Authors Energy Analysis Department Pagination 55 Date Published March 1 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley ISBN Number LBNL-4420E Abstract This report presents a new simulation tool under development at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This tool uses EnergyPlus to simulate each single-family home in the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), and generates a calibrated, nationally representative set of simulated homes whose energy use is statistically indistinguishable from the energy use of the single-family homes in the RECS sample. This research builds upon earlier work by Ritchard et al. for the Gas Research Institute and Huang et al. for LBNL. A representative national sample allows us to evaluate the variance in energy use between individual homes, regions, or other subsamples; using this tool, we can also evaluate how that variance affects the impacts of potential policies.

189

Consistent Interaction Of Software Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Constructing complex software systems by integrating different software components is a promising and challenging approach. With the functionality of software components given by models it is possible to ensure consistency of such models before implementation ...

Gregor Engels; Jochen M. Küuster; Luuk Groenwegen

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Maintenance Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MAINTENANCE MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: An effective facilities maintenance program should optimize the material condition of components and equipment to support safe and effective operations and ensure the peak performance and reliability of those systems and equipment important to operations. Criteria: The program, facility or operation has a Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP), or equivalent document, which defines and documents the approach to conduct of maintenance. The maintenance organization structure is well defined and understood. Responsibilities, organizational interfaces, and administrative activities are adequately defined and implemented to provide timely availability of

191

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions June 29, 2012 - 12:19pm Addthis Judy McLemore from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant led efforts to reduce the DOE’s vehicle fleet by 20 percent, improving sustainability and saving money. Under her leadership, greenhouse gas emissions associated with business travel were reduced by 63 percent and travel costs were reduced by greater than 60 percent. Judy McLemore from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant led efforts to reduce the DOE's vehicle fleet by 20 percent, improving sustainability and saving money. Under her leadership, greenhouse gas emissions associated with business travel were reduced by 63 percent and travel costs were

192

Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for April - June 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 , 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: JAMES B. O'BRIEN SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, April - June 20 1 I This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period April through June 20 1 1. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-20 1 1, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report: FR Staffin~/Qualification/Oversi~ht Data DOE was staffed at 180 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTEs), which is 9 1 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent).

193

4Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2008 6, 2008 MEMORANDUM FROM: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATNE TO THE DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, October - December (4th Quarter CY2007) Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 83% Fully Qualified (last Quarter was 82%) 85% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 93%) 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is >40%)

194

June 21, 1999 Memo, Facility Representative Program Status  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June June 21, 1999 MEMORANDUM FOR: Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Director, Office of Science Director, Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology FROM: John Wilcynski, Director, Office of Field Integration SUBJECT: FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS Since September, 1993, the Office of Field Management has served as the Department's corporate advocate for the Facility Representative Program. The Facility Representative (FR) is a critical technical position serving as line management's "eyes and ears" for operational safety in our contractor-operated facilities. I recognize the importance of the FR Program, and commit the Office of Field Integration (FI) to its continued crosscutting support. The FI staff continues to work with your staff members and with the Defense Nuclear Facilities

195

Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative, 12/03 Electrical Safety Assessment Plan--NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative, 12/03 An assessment of the Electrical Safety (ES) program at XXXX was conducted during the week of December XX-XX, 2003. The assessment team evaluated the program using the programmatic areas and specific Lines of Inquiry (LOI) contained in the approved Assessment plan provided. The team consisted of the Facility Representative from National Nuclear Security Administration, as well as ES, Subject Matter Expert support. The assessment plan identified 5 areas of review for Electrical Safety. An integrated process has been established to ensure electrical safety hazards are identified and that adequate controls are defined and

196

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions June 29, 2012 - 12:19pm Addthis Judy McLemore from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant led efforts to reduce the DOE’s vehicle fleet by 20 percent, improving sustainability and saving money. Under her leadership, greenhouse gas emissions associated with business travel were reduced by 63 percent and travel costs were reduced by greater than 60 percent. Judy McLemore from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant led efforts to reduce the DOE's vehicle fleet by 20 percent, improving sustainability and saving money. Under her leadership, greenhouse gas emissions associated with business travel were reduced by 63 percent and travel costs were

197

DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE STD 1063, Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

63-2011 63-2011 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES DOE-STD-1063-2011 Familiar Level August 2011 1 DOE-STD-1063-2011 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES FAMILIAR LEVEL OBJECTIVES Given the familiar level of this module and the resources listed below, you will be able to answer the following questions: 1. What are the purpose and scope of DOE-STD-1063-2011? 2. What are the definitions of the terms listed in section 3 of DOE-STD-1063-2011? 3. What are the duties, responsibilities, and authorities of facility representatives (FRs) and other key personnel? 4. What are the requirements of the FR program? 5. What are the Department of Energy (DOE)-wide FR performance indicators (PIs)? 6. How are DOE-wide FR PIs calculated? 7. What are the FR program objectives that should be measured by an FR program

198

SUBJECT: Guidance on Retention of Facility Representative Technical  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SUBJECT: Guidance on Retention of Facility Representative Technical SUBJECT: Guidance on Retention of Facility Representative Technical Competence during Reductions in Force, 4/21/1998 SUBJECT: Guidance on Retention of Facility Representative Technical Competence during Reductions in Force, 4/21/1998 The Department's Revised Implementation Plan (IP) for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 93-3 renews the Department's commitment to maintaining the technical capability necessary to safely manage and operate defense nuclear facilities. Retaining highly qualified employees in critical technical skills areas is vital to the maintenance of these technical capabilities. The Department has therefore committed in the revised R? to the development of a model that offices can use to proactively manage and preserve critical technical capabilities. During the

199

Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for October-December 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2012 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: JAMES B. O'BRIEN DIRECTOR ~ OFFICE OF :-IDC~AR AFETY OFFICE OF HEAL 'l;H, AFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, October- December 20 ll This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October through December 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard 1063-2011 , Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report include: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data * DOE was staffed at 179 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTE), which is 92 percent of the full

200

Argonne TDC: Superconductive Components, Inc.  

Unlocking the Potential of High-Temperature Superconductors . Superconductive Components, Inc. Columbus, Ohio. For bulk applications of high-temperature ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Argonne TDC: Superconductive Components, Inc.  

High-Performance Tailored Materials for Levitation Permanent Magnet Technologies Making materials to help advance flywheel energy storage. Superconductive Components ...

202

Security Components and Mechanisms Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Security Components and Mechanisms Group. Welcome. ... A security checklist is a document that contains instructions for securely configuring … ...

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

203

Fuel options from microalgae with representative chemical compositions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Representative species of microalgae are examined with respect to their reported chemical compositions. Each species is analyzed under a variety of culture conditions, with the objective being to characterize an optimum mixture of fuel products (e.g., methane, ethanol, methylester) which should be produced by the particular species. Historically the emphasis has been on the entire algal cell mass. Using the reported chemical composition for the representative species under specific sets of growth conditions, some conclusions can be drawn about the preferred fuel product conversion routes that could be employed. 10 references, 7 figures, 12 tables.

Feinberg, D. A.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Specifying and checking component usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of today's challenges is producing reliable software in the face of an increasing number of interacting components. Our system CHET lets developers define specifications describing how a component should be used and checks these specifications in ... Keywords: automata, components, finite-state, flow analysis, specifications, verification

Steven P. Reiss

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

On the construction of generalized Grassmann representatives of state vectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generalized $Z_k$-graded Grassmann variables are used to label coherent states related to the nilpotent representation of the q-oscillator of Biedenharn and Macfarlane when the deformation parameter is a root of unity. These states are then used to construct generalized Grassmann representatives of state vectors.

M. El Baz; Y. Hassouni

2004-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

206

Can Regional Climate Models Represent the Indian Monsoon?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of four regional climate models (RCMs) to represent the Indian monsoon was verified in a consistent framework for the period 1981–2000 using the 45-yr European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Re-Analysis (ERA-40) as ...

Philippe Lucas-Picher; Jens H. Christensen; Fahad Saeed; Pankaj Kumar; Shakeel Asharaf; Bodo Ahrens; Andrew J. Wiltshire; Daniela Jacob; Stefan Hagemann

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Identifying and representing elements of local contexts in namibia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an attempt to represent local context in a 3D visualisation for rural elders in Namibia we have found major differences in the conceptualization of this context between external and local partners in the co-creation process. Through the evaluation ... Keywords: context, context-aware, indigenous knowledge, participatory design, re-contextualization

Kasper Rodil, Kasper Løvborg Jensen, Matthias Rehm, Heike Winschiers-Theophilus

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Representing digital assets usingMPEG-21 Digital Item Declaration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various XML-based approaches aimed at representing compound digital assets have emerged over the last several years. Approaches that are of specific relevance to the digital library community include the Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS), ... Keywords: Digital Item, Digital asset, MPEG-21 DID, OAI-PMH, OpenURL

Jeroen Bekaert; Emiel De Kooning; Herbert de Sompel

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Responses to Questions from the Texas House of Representatives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Texas. However, several specific factors place the future of transportation in the state at risk. Given1 Responses to Questions from the Texas House of Representatives Select Committee on Transportation Funding Prepared for The Honorable Eddie Rodriguez Vice Chair Select Committee on Transportation Funding

210

Livermore Site Office Facility Representative Program Self-Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARPT-LSO-2011-001 ARPT-LSO-2011-001 Site: Livermore Site Office Subject: Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Activity Report for the Livermore Site Office Facility Representative Program Self-Assessment Dates of Activity 01/24/2011 - 01/28/2011 Report Preparer Robert Freeman Activity Description/Purpose: This activity report documents the results of the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) review of and participation in the Livermore Site Office Self-Assessment of the Facility Representative (FR) Program. This self-assessment was led by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Livermore Site Office (LSO) and conducted by LSO staff, HSS staff, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety (CDNS) staff, a peer from Los Alamos Site

211

Processes, data structures, and apparatuses for representing knowledge  

SciTech Connect

Processes, data structures, and apparatuses to represent knowledge are disclosed. The processes can comprise labeling elements in a knowledge signature according to concepts in an ontology and populating the elements with confidence values. The data structures can comprise knowledge signatures stored on computer-readable media. The knowledge signatures comprise a matrix structure having elements labeled according to concepts in an ontology, wherein the value of the element represents a confidence that the concept is present in an information space. The apparatus can comprise a knowledge representation unit having at least one ontology stored on a computer-readable medium, at least one data-receiving device, and a processor configured to generate knowledge signatures by comparing datasets obtained by the data-receiving devices to the ontologies.

Hohimer, Ryan E. (West Richland, WA); Thomson, Judi R. (Guelph, CA); Harvey, William J. (Richland, WA); Paulson, Patrick R. (Pasco, WA); Whiting, Mark A. (Richland, WA); Tratz, Stephen C. (Richland, WA); Chappell, Alan R. (Seattle, WA); Butner, R. Scott (Richland, WA)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

212

DOE | Office of Health, Safety and Security | 2012 Facility Representative,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Facility Representative Office of Nuclear Safety Home Facility Representative Home Annual Facility Rep Workshop › 2012 › 2011 › 2010 › 2009 › 2008 › 2007 › 2006 › 2005 › 2004 › 2003 › 2002 › 2001 › 2000 DOE Safety Links › ORPS Info › Operating Experience › DOE Lessons Learned › Accident Investigation Assessment Tools › FR CRADs › Surveillance Guides › Manager's Guide for Safety and Health Subject Matter Links General Program Information › Program Mission Statement › Program Directives and Guidance › FR of the Year Award Program › FR of the Year Award › FR Program Assessment Guide (Appendix B, DOE STD 1063-2011) FR Quarterly Performance Indicators Training & Qualification Information › Qualification Standards › Energy Online Courses

213

Domain assignments for FSSP representative set using DomainParser  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Domain assignments for the FSSP representative set Domain assignments for the FSSP representative set The following are the domain assignments for the FSSP representative set (released on January 31, 2000, 1987 chains in total) using DomainParser. Each line shows a PDB entry (with a chain identifier if any), total number of residues, number of domains, and domain assignments. The result is obtained fully automatically without manual editing. 12asa 327 2 (33-86; 271-288) (4-32; 87-270; 289-330) 153l 185 1 16pk 415 2 (5-205; 409-419) (206-408) 16vpa 311 2 (47-130; 164-233; 324-349) (131-163; 234-323; 395-402) 1914 171 1 19hca 292 2 (45-107) (1-44; 108-292) 1a02f 53 1 1a02j 52 1 1a02n 280 2 (399-569) (570-678) 1a04a 205 2 (5-126) (127-216) 1a0aa 63 1 1a0ca 437 1 1a0fa 201 2 (1-81) (82-201) 1a0ha 159 1 1a0i 332 2 (2-239) (240-349)

214

Representative element modeling of fracture systems based on stochastic analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An important task associated with reservoir simulation is the development of a technique to model a large number of fractures with a single description. Representative elements must be developed before reservoir scale simulations can adequately address the effects of intersecting fracture systems on fluid migration. An effective element model will sharply reduce the cost and complexity of large scale simulations to bring these to manageable levels. Stochastic analysis is a powerful tool which can determine the hydraulic and transport characteristics of intersecting sets of statistically defined fractures. Hydraulic and transport characteristics are required to develop representative elements. Given an assumption of fully developed laminar flow, the net fracture conductivities and hence flow velocities can be determined from descriptive statistics of fracture spacing, orientation, aperture, and extent. The distribution of physical characteristics about their mean leads to a distribution of the associated conductivities. The variance of hydraulic conductivity induces dispersion into the transport process. The simplest of fracture systems, a single set of parallel fractures, is treated to demonstrate the usefulness of stochastic analysis. Explicit equations for conductivity of an element are developed and the dispersion characteristics are shown. The analysis reveals the dependence of the representative element properties on the various parameters used to describe the fracture system. 10 refs., 3 figs.

Clemo, T.M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Ceramic Component Development Process Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The development of ceramic components and coatings is critical to the demonstration of advanced fossil energy systems. Ceramic components and coating will play critical role in hot-gas filtration, high- temperature heat exchangers, thermal barrier coatings, and the hot- section of turbines. Continuous-fiber composites (CFCC) are expected to play an increasing role in these applications. This program encompassed five technical areas related to ceramic component development for fossil energy systems.

Boss, D.; Sambasivan, S.; Kuehmann, C. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Basic Industrial Research Lab.; Faber, K. [Northwestern University, MEAS Materials Science & Engineering, Evanston, IL (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

System, Stack and Component Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 17, 2011 ... Energy Conversion/Fuel Cells: System, Stack and Component Design ... In fuel cell mode it produces electricity and heat from hydrogen, and in ...

217

APS beamline standard components handbook  

SciTech Connect

It is clear that most Advanced Photon Source (APS) Collaborative Access Team (CAT) members would like to concentrate on designing specialized equipment related to their scientific programs rather than on routine or standard beamline components. Thus, an effort is in progress at the APS to identify standard and modular components of APS beamlines. Identifying standard components is a nontrivial task because these components should support diverse beamline objectives. To assist with this effort, the APS has obtained advice and help from a Beamline Standardization and Modularization Committee consisting of experts in beamline design, construction, and operation. The staff of the Experimental Facilities Division identified various components thought to be standard items for beamlines, regardless of the specific scientific objective of a particular beamline. A generic beamline layout formed the basis for this identification. This layout is based on a double-crystal monochromator as the first optical element, with the possibility of other elements to follow. Pre-engineering designs were then made of the identified standard components. The Beamline Standardization and Modularization Committee has reviewed these designs and provided very useful input regarding the specifications of these components. We realize that there will be other configurations that may require special or modified components. This Handbook in its current version (1.1) contains descriptions, specifications, and pre-engineering design drawings of these standard components. In the future, the APS plans to add engineering drawings of identified standard beamline components. Use of standard components should result in major cost reductions for CATs in the areas of beamline design and construction.

Kuzay, T.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Supervised probabilistic principal component analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Principal component analysis (PCA) has been extensively applied in data mining, pattern recognition and information retrieval for unsupervised dimensionality reduction. When labels of data are available, e.g., in a classification or regression task, ... Keywords: dimensionality reduction, principal component analysis, semi-supervised projection, supervised projection

Shipeng Yu; Kai Yu; Volker Tresp; Hans-Peter Kriegel; Mingrui Wu

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Performance of Solar Facade Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of these products by developing and applying appropriate methods for assessment of durability, reliability materials · Daylighting products · Solar protection devices (e.g., blinds) · PV windows · Solar collector components are investigated. Physical models are further developed that allow component performance

220

Heat treating of manufactured components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for heat treating manufactured components using microwave energy and microwave susceptor material is disclosed. The system typically includes an insulating vessel placed within a microwave applicator chamber. A moderating material is positioned inside the insulating vessel so that a substantial portion of the exterior surface of each component for heat treating is in contact with the moderating material.

Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN)

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Facility Representative Program: Criteria Review and Approach Document  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment Tools Assessment Tools Surveillance Guides Manager's Guide for Safety and Health Walkthroughs Criteria Review and Approach Document This page provides Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADS) to assist Facility Representatives. Please submit your CRADS for posting by sending them to the HQ FR Program Manager. Please include the subject, date, and a contact person. Communications NASA Benchmarks Communications Assessment Plan Configuration Management Configuration Management Assessment Plan Confined Space Confined Spaces Assessment Plan Conduct of Operations Conduct of Operations Assessment Plan Electrical Assessment Electrical Safety Assessment Plan Facility Procedures Verification and Validation of Facility Procedures Assessment Plan Hoisting and Rigging

222

Consumption Externalities: A Representative Consumer Model when Agents are Heterogeneous *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: We examine a growth model with consumption externalities where agents differ in their initial capital endowment and their reference group. We show under which conditions the aggregate equilibrium with heterogeneous agents replicates that obtained with a representative consumer, despite the fact that different individuals have different consumption levels. Next we consider the implications of the presence of consumption externalities for the long-run distributions of income and wealth. We find that, in a growing economy, “keeping up with the Joneses ” results in less inequality than would prevail in an economy with no consumption externalities.

Cecilia García-peñalosa; Stephen J. Turnovsky

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

M.: An Ontology-Based Framework for Representing Organizational Knowledge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: This paper describes an ontology-based organizational knowledge representation framework focused on the specification of a two kinds of ontologies: the top level ontology containing concepts characterizing the typical organizational background and COKE ontologies representing so called core organizational knowledge entities. The framework constitutes an abstract representation of organizational knowledge providing a semantic support for designing knowledge management infrastructure able to interoperate with systems already existing in an organization. Moreover, the annotation of COKE w.r.t. the top level ontology allowed by the framework facilitates their semi-automatic handling, retrieval and evolution monitoring.

Andrea Gualtieri; Massimo Ruffolo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Representative Consumer's Risk Aversion and Efficient Risk-Sharing Rules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

consumer as the sum of two components. The first one is a weighted sum of the derivatives of the individual consumers’ absolute cautiousness, and the second is a positive multiple of the weighted vari- 1We refer to some of these contributions in the rest... , and complete. Denote its strict part by Âi and symmetric part by ?i, then ?i Âi ?i for every ?i ? Z?i and every ?i 6? Z?i , and ?i ?i ?i for every ?i 6? Z?i and every ?i 6? Z?i . Thus the random variables ?i for which ui (?i) is not integrable are the least...

Hara, Chiaki; Kuzmics, Christoph

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

225

4Q CY2008, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITES Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (4QCY2008) Field or Ops Office Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 1 3 1 100 1 100 100 70 86 ID (EM) 13 12 11 85 0 82 82 43 84 OR (EM) 19 18 18 95 0 72 72 44 66 ORP 15 15 14 93 0 79 64 43 72 PPPO 6 5 5 83 0 80 80 44 70 RL 19 18 18 95 1 84 84 45 70 SPRU 1 1 1 100 0 100 0 30 80 SR 32 24 24 75 2 71 67 45 74 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 50 50 42 70 EM Totals 108 98 94 87 4 77 72 44 72 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * % Field Time is defined as the number of hours spent in the plant/field divided by the number of available work hours in the quarter. The number of available work hours is the actual number of hours a Facility Representative works in a calendar quarter, including overtime hours. It does not include

226

2Q CY2004, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment Attachment Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report September 20, 2004 Distribution: Kyle McSlarrow, S-2 Bruce Carnes, S-2 Les Novitsky, S-2 David Garman, S-3 Linton Brooks, NA-1 Tyler Przybylek, NA-1 Everet Beckner, NA-10 James Mangeno, NA-3.6 Glenn Podonsky, SP-1 Mike Kilpatrick, OA-1 Patricia Worthington, OA-40 Paul Golan, EM-1 Inés Triay, EM-3 Patty Bubar, EM-3.2 Raymond Orbach, SC-1 Milt Johnson, SC-3 William Magwood, NE-1 Manager, Ames Site Office Manager, Argonne Site Office Manager, Brookhaven Site Office Manager, Carlsbad Field Office Manager, Fermi Site Office Manager, Idaho Operations Office Manager, Livermore Site Office Manager, Los Alamos Site Office Manager, Nevada Site Office Manager, Oak Ridge Operations Office Manager, Office of River Protection

227

1Q CY2010, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Http: Http: OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (EM) Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (1QCY2010) Field or Ops Office Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 3 3 3 100 0 100 33 50 78 ID (EM) 13 13 12 92 0 100 100 50 91 OR (EM) 18 17 18 100 0 100 81 45 67 ORP 15 15 14 93 1 93 80 51 81 PPPO 6 6 6 100 0 100 100 43 68 RL 19 19 19 100 0 95 95 43 69 SPRU 1 1 1 100 0 100 0 50 75 SR 32 29 29 91 1 69 69 43 76 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 50 50 37 60 EM Totals 109 105 104 95 2 89 81 45 75 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * Field or Ops Office Key:

228

SIGNATURE O F AGENCY REPRESENTATIVE NATIONAL ENERGY STRATEGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MINOR SUBDIVISION MINOR SUBDIVISION Jeff Martus 01-903-3481 SIGNATURE O F AGENCY REPRESENTATIVE NATIONAL ENERGY STRATEGY See attached. National Energy Strategy The Department of Energy (DOE) was directed by President Bush on July 26, 1989 to begin the development of a comprehensive National Energy Strategy (NES). Published in February 1991, the NES provides the foundation for a more efficient, less vulnerable, and environmentally sustainable energy future. The NES defines international, commercial, regulatory, and technological policy tools that diversify U.S. resources of energy supplies and offers more flexibility and efficiency in the way energy is transformed and used. This proposed schedule provides for the disposition of records that have been created or received by DOE in connection with the

229

3Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITES ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITES Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (3QCY2007) Field or Ops Office Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 1 2 2 200 0 100 50 66 86 ID (ICP) 13 12 11 85 1 100 100 40 65 OR (EM) 19 17 16 84 0 94 88 47 71 ORP 14 14 14 100 0 100 93 46 74 PPPO 4 4 4 100 0 100 100 42 75 RL 19 19 19 100 0 100 95 73 69 SR 31 31 25 81 2 88 80 40 79 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 100 100 43 65 EM Totals 103 101 93 90 3 96 89 50 73 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * % Field Time is defined as the number of hours spent in the plant/field divided by the number of available work hours in the quarter. The number of

230

Facility Representative Program Assessment Criteria, Review, and Approach Document (CRAD)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STD-1063-2011 STD-1063-2011 Appendix B B-1 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM ASSESSMENT GUIDE The DOE has implemented its FR Program, and is looking to continuously improve the program's effectiveness DOE-wide. An effective FR Program has many elements, as described in this Standard. These elements are intended to yield a program that provides DOE facilities with well-trained FRs who spend appropriate amounts of time in their facilities and can work effectively with their contractor management counterparts. The program, to be effective, needs the functional support of management. To maintain the continued support of DOE management, the FR program needs to demonstrate its continued performance and effectiveness, which is to be assessed periodically using

231

Inherently Reliable Boiler Component Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the lessons learned during the last decade in efforts to improve the reliability and availability of boilers used in the production of electricity. The information in this report can assist in component modifications and new boiler designs.

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

232

Binder Formulations Utilizing Furanic Components  

This technology describes the use of furanic components derived from agricultural waste streams, such as hydroxylmethylfurfural (HMF).  When used in combination with a phenolic urethane resin and cured with a gaseous amine catalyst, the resulting ...

233

Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a new simulation tool under development at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This tool uses EnergyPlus to simulate each single-family home in the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), and generates a calibrated, nationally representative set of simulated homes whose energy use is statistically indistinguishable from the energy use of the single-family homes in the RECS sample. This research builds upon earlier work by Ritchard et al. for the Gas Research Institute and Huang et al. for LBNL. A representative national sample allows us to evaluate the variance in energy use between individual homes, regions, or other subsamples; using this tool, we can also evaluate how that variance affects the impacts of potential policies. The RECS contains information regarding the construction and location of each sampled home, as well as its appliances and other energy-using equipment. We combined this data with the home simulation prototypes developed by Huang et al. to simulate homes that match the RECS sample wherever possible. Where data was not available, we used distributions, calibrated using the RECS energy use data. Each home was assigned a best-fit location for the purposes of weather and some construction characteristics. RECS provides some detail on the type and age of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment in each home; we developed EnergyPlus models capable of reproducing the variety of technologies and efficiencies represented in the national sample. This includes electric, gas, and oil furnaces, central and window air conditioners, central heat pumps, and baseboard heaters. We also developed a model of duct system performance, based on in-home measurements, and integrated this with fan performance to capture the energy use of single- and variable-speed furnace fans, as well as the interaction of duct and fan performance with the efficiency of heating and cooling equipment. Comparison with RECS revealed that EnergyPlus did not capture the heating-side behavior of heat pumps particularly accurately, and that our simple oil furnace and boiler models needed significant recalibration to fit with RECS. Simulating the full RECS sample on a single computer would take many hours, so we used the 'cloud computing' services provided by Amazon.com to simulate dozens of homes at once. This enabled us to simulate the full RECS sample, including multiple versions of each home to evaluate the impact of marginal changes, in less than 3 hours. Once the tool was calibrated, we were able to address several policy questions. We made a simple measurement of the heat replacement effect and showed that the net effect of heat replacement on primary energy use is likely to be less than 5%, relative to appliance-only measures of energy savings. Fuel switching could be significant, however. We also evaluated the national and regional impacts of a variety of 'overnight' changes in building characteristics or occupant behavior, including lighting, home insulation and sealing, HVAC system efficiency, and thermostat settings. For example, our model shows that the combination of increased home insulation and better sealed building shells could reduce residential natural gas use by 34.5% and electricity use by 6.5%, and a 1 degree rise in summer thermostat settings could save 2.1% of home electricity use. These results vary by region, and we present results for each U.S. Census division. We conclude by offering proposals for future work to improve the tool. Some proposed future work includes: comparing the simulated energy use data with the monthly RECS bill data; better capturing the variation in behavior between households, especially as it relates to occupancy and schedules; improving the characterization of recent construction and its regional variation; and extending the general framework of this simulation tool to capture multifamily housing units, such as apartment buildings.

Hopkins, Asa S.; Lekov, Alex; Lutz, James; Rosenquist, Gregory; Gu, Lixing

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

234

2Q CY2009, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (2QCY2009) Field or Ops Office * Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time ** % Oversight Time *** CBFO 3 3 2 67 0 50 50 46 76 ID 13 13 11 85 0 100 100 49 90 OR 19 18 17 89 1 71 71 42 57 ORP 15 15 15 100 0 73 73 53 77 PPPO 6 6 6 100 0 67 67 42 70 RL 19 19 19 100 0 84 84 45 69 SR 32 28 28 88 0 64 64 47 73 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 50 50 37 70 EM Totals 109 104 100 92 1 74 74 46 72 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * Field or Ops Office Key CBFO = Carlsbad Field Office; ID = Idaho Operations Office; OR = Oak Ridge Office; ORP = Office of River Protection; PPPO = Portsmouth/Paducah

235

Greening the U.S. House of Representatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Greening the Capitol initiative was launched in March, 2007 with the threefold goals of making the U.S. House of Representatives: 1) carbon neutral within 18 months, 2) reducing energy use by 50percent in ten years, and 3) becoming a model of sustainable operations. We report on the recommendations to meet these goals, looking at the targets of opportunity at the Capitol Power Plant, the existing buildings, and the overall operations of the complex. Our findings have shown that these goals are achievable, and that through an integrated approach the savings in carbon and energy can be met. Specific examples include the lighting retrofits in the House offices, parking areas, and the Capitol dome; the retrofits to the HVAC systems and controls, including duct sealing, improving the efficiency of the energy and water use in the food service areas; and improved operations of the steam and chilled water distribution system. A key aspect has been better tracking and feedback to the building operators of the actual energy consumption. We report on the technical opportunities presented by these historic and symbolic buildings in becoming models of sustainability.

Diamond, Rick; Diamond, Rick; Payne, Christopher

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Exclusivity structures and graph representatives of local complementation orbits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a construction that maps any connected graph G on three or more vertices into a larger graph, H(G), whose independence number is strictly smaller than its Lov\\'asz number which is equal to its fractional packing number. The vertices of H(G) represent all possible events consistent with the stabilizer group of the graph state associated with G, and exclusive events are adjacent. Mathematically, the graph H(G) corresponds to the orbit of G under local complementation. Physically, the construction translates into graph-theoretic terms the connection between a graph state and a Bell inequality maximally violated by quantum mechanics. In the context of zero-error information theory, the construction suggests a protocol achieving the maximum rate of entanglement-assisted capacity, a quantum mechanical analogue of the Shannon capacity, for each H(G). The violation of the Bell inequality is expressed by the one-shot version of this capacity being strictly larger than the independence number. Finally, given the correspondence between graphs and exclusivity structures, we are able to compute the independence number for certain infinite families of graphs with the use of quantum non-locality, therefore highlighting an application of quantum theory in the proof of a purely combinatorial statement.

Adan Cabello; Matthew G. Parker; Giannicola Scarpa; Simone Severini

2012-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

237

Evidence of aging effects on certain safety-related components  

SciTech Connect

In response to interest shown by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), Principal Working Group I (PWG- 1) of the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) conducted a generic study on the effects of aging of active components in nuclear power plants. (This focus on active components is consistent with PWG-l`s mandate; passive components are primarily within the mandate of PWG-3.) Representatives from France, Sweden, Finland, Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom participated in the study by submitting reports documenting aging studies performed in their countries. This report consists of summaries of those reports, along with a comparison of the various statistical analysis methods used in the studies. The studies indicate that with some exceptions, active components generally do not present a significant aging problem in nuclear power plants. Design criteria and effective preventative maintenance programs, including timely replacement of components, are effective in mitigating potential aging problems. However, aging studies (such as qualitative and statistical analyses of failure modes and maintenance data) are an important part of efforts to identify and solve potential aging problems. Solving these problems typically includes such strategies as replacing suspect components with improved components, and implementing improved maintenance programs.

Magleby, H.L.; Atwood, C.L.; MacDonald, P.E.; Edson, J.L.; Bramwell, D.L. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

NREL's Building Component Library for Use with Energy Models  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Building Component Library (BCL) is the U.S. Department of Energy’s comprehensive online searchable library of energy modeling building blocks and descriptive metadata. Novice users and seasoned practitioners can use the freely available and uniquely identifiable components to create energy models and cite the sources of input data, which will increase the credibility and reproducibility of their simulations. The BCL contains components which are the building blocks of an energy model. They can represent physical characteristics of the building such as roofs, walls, and windows, or can refer to related operational information such as occupancy and equipment schedules and weather information. Each component is identified through a set of attributes that are specific to its type, as well as other metadata such as provenance information and associated files. The BCL also contains energy conservation measures (ECM), referred to as measures, which describe a change to a building and its associated model. For the BCL, this description attempts to define a measure for reproducible application, either to compare it to a baseline model, to estimate potential energy savings, or to examine the effects of a particular implementation. The BCL currently contains more than 30,000 components and measures. A faceted search mechanism has been implemented on the BCL that allows users to filter through the search results using various facets. Facet categories include component and measure types, data source, and energy modeling software type. All attributes of a component or measure can also be used to filter the results.

239

Automated cleaning of electronic components  

SciTech Connect

Environmental and operator safety concerns are leading to the elimination of trichloroethylene and chlorofluorocarbon solvents in cleaning processes that remove rosin flux, organic and inorganic contamination, and particulates from electronic components. Present processes depend heavily on these solvents for manual spray cleaning of small components and subassemblies. Use of alternative solvent systems can lead to longer processing times and reduced quality. Automated spray cleaning can improve the quality of the cleaning process, thus enabling the productive use of environmentally conscious materials, while minimizing personnel exposure to hazardous materials. We describe the development of a prototype robotic system for cleaning electronic components in a spray cleaning workcell. An important feature of the prototype system is the capability to generate the robot paths and motions automatically from the CAD models of the part to be cleaned, and to embed cleaning process knowledge into the automatically programmed operations.

Drotning, W.; Meirans, L.; Wapman, W.; Hwang, Y.; Koenig, L.; Petterson, B.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Towards reusable components with aspects: an empirical study on modularity and obliviousness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential of aspect-oriented programming to represent cross-cutting concerns as reusable components has yet to be fully realized. Indeed, authors have detailed significant challenges in creating reusable aspect component libraries. Proposed solutions ... Keywords: aspect-oriented programming, case study, modularity

Kevin Hoffman; Patrick Eugster

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The CCSM4 Ocean Component  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ocean component of the Community Climate System Model version 4 (CCSM4) is described, and its solutions from the twentieth-century (20C) simulations are documented in comparison with observations and those of CCSM3. The improvements to the ...

Gokhan Danabasoglu; Susan C. Bates; Bruce P. Briegleb; Steven R. Jayne; Markus Jochum; William G. Large; Synte Peacock; Steve G. Yeager

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimization In an Integrated Concurrent Engineering Framework by Massimo Usan M. S. Aeronautical Engineering of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science in Engineering and Management at the Massachusetts Institute Engineering Systems Division #12;Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement Through Multi

243

Large Component Removal/Disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the removal and disposal of the large components from Maine Yankee Atomic Power Plant. The large components discussed include the three steam generators, pressurizer, and reactor pressure vessel. Two separate Exemption Requests, which included radiological characterizations, shielding evaluations, structural evaluations and transportation plans, were prepared and issued to the DOT for approval to ship these components; the first was for the three steam generators and one pressurizer, the second was for the reactor pressure vessel. Both Exemption Requests were submitted to the DOT in November 1999. The DOT approved the Exemption Requests in May and July of 2000, respectively. The steam generators and pressurizer have been removed from Maine Yankee and shipped to the processing facility. They were removed from Maine Yankee's Containment Building, loaded onto specially designed skid assemblies, transported onto two separate barges, tied down to the barges, th en shipped 2750 miles to Memphis, Tennessee for processing. The Reactor Pressure Vessel Removal Project is currently under way and scheduled to be completed by Fall of 2002. The planning, preparation and removal of these large components has required extensive efforts in planning and implementation on the part of all parties involved.

Wheeler, D. M.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

244

Component-based LR parsing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A language implementation with proper compositionality enables a compiler developer to divide-and-conquer the complexity of building a large language by constructing a set of smaller languages. Ideally, these small language implementations should be ... Keywords: Component-based software development, LR parsing, Parser generator

Xiaoqing Wu; Barrett R. Bryant; Jeff Gray; Marjan Mernik

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

MCFC component development at ANL.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory is developing advanced cathode and electrolyte components for the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). Working in support of the MCFC developers, the goal of this effort is to extend the life of the MCFC cell and to improve its performance.

Bloom, I.

1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing laboratory samples is important so that the properties of these materials may be measured, while controlling the composition and other variables. Natural samples are rare, and have often experienced pressure and temperature changes that may affect the property to be measured [Waite et al., 2008]. Forming methane hydrate samples in the laboratory has been done a number of ways, each having advantages and disadvantages. The ice-to-hydrate method [Stern et al., 1996], contacts melting ice with methane at the appropriate pressure to form hydrate. The hydrate can then be crushed and mixed with mineral grains under controlled conditions, and then compacted to create laboratory samples of methane hydrate in a mineral medium. The hydrate in these samples will be part of the load-bearing frame of the medium. In the excess gas method [Handa and Stupin, 1992], water is distributed throughout a mineral medium (e.g. packed moist sand, drained sand, moistened silica gel, other porous media) and the mixture is brought to hydrate-stable conditions (chilled and pressurized with gas), allowing hydrate to form. This method typically produces grain-cementing hydrate from pendular water in sand [Waite et al., 2004]. In the dissolved gas method [Tohidi et al., 2002], water with sufficient dissolved guest molecules is brought to hydrate-stable conditions where hydrate forms. In the laboratory, this is can be done by pre-dissolving the gas of interest in water and then introducing it to the sample under the appropriate conditions. With this method, it is easier to form hydrate from more soluble gases such as carbon dioxide. It is thought that this method more closely simulates the way most natural gas hydrate has formed. Laboratory implementation, however, is difficult, and sample formation is prohibitively time consuming [Minagawa et al., 2005; Spangenberg and Kulenkampff, 2005]. In another version of this technique, a specified quantity of gas is placed in a sample, then the sample is flooded with water and cooled [Priest et al., 2009]. We have performed a number of tests in which hydrate was formed and the uniformity of the hydrate formation was examined. These tests have primarily used a variety of modifications of the excess gas method to make the hydrate, although we have also used a version of the excess water technique. Early on, we found difficulties in creating uniform samples with a particular sand/ initial water saturation combination (F-110 Sand, {approx} 35% initial water saturation). In many of our tests we selected this combination intentionally to determine whether we could use a method to make the samples uniform. The following methods were examined: Excess gas, Freeze/thaw/form, Freeze/pressurize/thaw, Excess gas followed by water saturation, Excess water, Sand and kaolinite, Use of a nucleation enhancer (SnoMax), and Use of salt in the water. Below, each method, the underlying hypothesis, and our results are briefly presented, followed by a brief conclusion. Many of the hypotheses investigated are not our own, but were presented to us. Much of the data presented is from x-ray CT scanning our samples. The x-ray CT scanner provides a three-dimensional density map of our samples. From this map and the physics that is occurring in our samples, we are able to gain an understanding of the spatial nature of the processes that occur, and attribute them to the locations where they occur.

Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.; Nakagawa, S.; Kwon, T.-H.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components" ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues",,,," " " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related","All"

248

,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.1;" Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.1;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components" ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues",,,," " " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related","All"

249

On the Robustness of Cool Disc Components in Bright ULXs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this letter, we comment on the robustness of putative cool (kT ~ 0.2 keV) accretion disc components in the X-ray spectra of the most luminous (L ~ 10^40 erg/s) ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs) in nearby normal galaxies. When compared to stellar-mass black holes, the low disc temperatures observed in some ULXs may imply intermediate-mass black hole primaries. Recent work has claimed that such soft excesses are unlikely to be actual disc components, based on the lack of variability in these components, and in the overall source flux. Other work has proposed that alternative phenomenological models, and complex Comptonisation models, rule-out cool disc components in ULX spectra. An inspection of the literature on Galactic stellar-mass black holes and black hole candidates demonstrates that the flux behaviours seen in specific ULXs are consistent with phenomena observed in well-known Galactic X-ray binaries. Applying Comptonisation models to simulated disc blackbody plus power-law spectra shows that at the sensitivity achieved in even the best ULX spectra, Comptonisation fits are highly model-dependent, and do not yield meaningful constraints on the accretion flow. In contrast, the need for a soft, thermal component does not appear to be model-dependent. As we have previously noted, soft thermal components in ULX spectra may not represent accretion discs, but present alternatives to this interpretation are not robust.

J. M. Miller; A. C. Fabian; M. C. Miller

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

250

Nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint. Small gaps limit horizontal displacement of components during a seismic occurrence and therefore reduce dynamic loadings on the free lower end. The reactor vessel and reactor guard vessel use thicker section roll-forged rings welded between the vessel straight shell sections and the bottom hemispherical head sections. The inside of the reactor guard vessel ring forging contains local vertical dovetail slots and upper ledge pockets to mount and retain field fitted and installed blocks. As an option, the horizontal displacement of the reactor vessel core support cone can be limited by including shop fitted/installed local blocks in opposing alignment with the reactor vessel forged ring. Beams embedded in the wall of the reactor building protrude into apertures in the thermal insulation shell adjacent the reactor guard vessel ring and have motion limit blocks attached thereto to provide to a predetermined clearance between the blocks and reactor guard vessel ring.

Snyder, Glenn J. (Lynchburg, VA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Application Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Application Components to someone by E-mail Share EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Application Components on Facebook Tweet about EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Application...

252

Detecting and analyzing insecure component usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Software is commonly built from reusable components that provide desired functionalities. Although component reuse significantly improves software productivity, insecure component usage can lead to security vulnerabilities in client applications. ... Keywords: differential testing, insecure component usage, testing and analysis of real-world software

Taeho Kwon; Zhendong Su

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Chemical Exergy of Canola Biomass Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... LS Karpushenkova Chemical Faculty, Belarusian State University, Minsk, Belarus Thermodynamic properties of canola biomass components: seeds ...

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

254

U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Administration. 2004c. "Energy Glossary Website."http://www.eia.doe.gov/glossary/. Energy InformationGIS Appendix G. Glossary AEO : The Annual Energy Outlook,

Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Self-biased 215MHz Magnetoelectric NEMS Resonator for Ultra ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lighting Enhancement of GaN LEDs by Applying p-Type Ni(P):SnO2 TCO on p- GaN Epitaxial Layer · Localized Temperature Stability in Multilayer LTCC.

256

U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

h. Pacific i. MidAtlantic 4. Climate Zone shapefile a.must have a field with climate zone ID’s as an integer in apopulation forecasts and climate zone data. The model’s

Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Modeling Distributed Electricity Generation in the NEMS Buildings ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Gas Turbine . 900 29 . 900 29 . 900 29 . 900 ... Gas Microturbine . 800 27 . 700 27 . 700 27 . 700 ...

258

U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 29: Residential electricity growth rate (percentage)Over Time The residential electricity growth rate indicatesFigure 29: Residential electricity growth rate (percentage)

Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energyor consumption of energy in the U.S. Figure 2: The 13California Energy Commission 2002) U.S. Regional Energy

Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Microsoft Word - NEMS CO2 MARKET MODEL FINAL REPORT - APPENDICES...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2CCCST(MNUMNR,MJUMPYR) 87metric ton CO2 co2mminc Regional CO2 capture and compression costs EORRESMAX(MNUMNR) Million bbls oil co2mminc Regional Gross EOR reserve limit based...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential and commercial electricity demand forecasts. The23 Electricity Demandand commercial electricity demand per census division from

Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Investigation of residential central air conditioning load shapes in NEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

like refrigerators, whose baseload shape is flat, a higherload, yielding a flatter (baseload) profile. However, for a

Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Marnay, Chris; Gumerman, Etan; Chan, Peter; Rosenquist, Greg; Osborn, Julie

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Modeling Distributed Electricity Generation in the NEMS Buildings Models  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper presents the modeling methodology, projected market penetration, and impact of distributed generation with respect to offsetting future electricity needs and carbon dioxide emissions in the residential and commercial buildings sector in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) reference case.

Erin Boedecker

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

264

Available Technologies: Ultra High Performance MEMS/NEMS ...  

These new inventions offer opportunites for quantum advancements in wireless communication, MEMS capabilities, and mass sensing.

265

Engineering Color using Nanostructures Yanhui Zhao@BioNEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, such as projects using satellite technology for healthcare delivery in West Africa and solar dish Stirling engines guidance and direction for the project. Washington State University College of Engineering and Architecture Junior Ballroom (CUB 210) Washington State University Pullman campus #12;College of Engineering

Yener, Aylin

266

Facility Representatives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Industry Documents ... 3 2.1.1 DOE Directives (Polices, Orders, Manuals, Guides) ... 3 2.1.2 DOE...

267

Heavy Water Components Test Reactor Decommissioning - Major Component Removal  

SciTech Connect

The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility (Figure 1) was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR facility is on high, well-drained ground, about 30 meters above the water table. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. It was not a defense-related facility like the materials production reactors at SRS. The reactor was moderated with heavy water and was rated at 50 megawatts thermal power. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In 1965, fuel assemblies were removed, systems that contained heavy water were drained, fluid piping systems were drained, deenergized and disconnected and the spent fuel basin was drained and dried. The doors of the reactor facility were shut and it wasn't until 10 years later that decommissioning plans were considered and ultimately postponed due to budget constraints. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR again. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. The $1.6 billion allocation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to SRS for site clean up at SRS has opened the doors to the HWCTR again - this time for final decommissioning. During the lifetime of HWCTR, 36 different fuel assemblies were tested in the facility. Ten of these experienced cladding failures as operational capabilities of the different designs were being established. In addition, numerous spills of heavy water occurred within the facility. Currently, radiation and radioactive contamination levels are low within HWCTR with most of the radioactivity contained within the reactor vessel. There are no known insults to the environment, however with the increasing deterioration of the facility, the possibility exists that contamination could spread outside the facility if it is not decommissioned. An interior panoramic view of the ground floor elevation taken in August 2009 is shown in Figure 2. The foreground shows the transfer coffin followed by the reactor vessel and control rod drive platform in the center. Behind the reactor vessel is the fuel pool. Above the ground level are the polar crane and the emergency deluge tank at the top of the dome. Note the considerable rust and degradation of the components and the interior of the containment building. Alternative studies have concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning is to remove the reactor vessel, steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. Characterization studies along with transport models have concluded that the remaining below grade equipment that is left in place including the transfer coffin will not contribute any significant contamination to the environment in the future. The below grade space will be grouted in place. A concrete cover will be placed over the remaining footprint and the groundwater will be monitored for an indefinite period to ensure compliance with environmental regulations. The schedule for completion of decommissioning is late FY2011. This paper describes the concepts planned in order to remove the major components including the dome, the reactor vessel (RV), the two steam generators (SG), and relocating the transfer coffin (TC).

Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

268

Heavy Water Components Test Reactor Decommissioning - Major Component Removal  

SciTech Connect

The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility (Figure 1) was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR facility is on high, well-drained ground, about 30 meters above the water table. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. It was not a defense-related facility like the materials production reactors at SRS. The reactor was moderated with heavy water and was rated at 50 megawatts thermal power. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In 1965, fuel assemblies were removed, systems that contained heavy water were drained, fluid piping systems were drained, deenergized and disconnected and the spent fuel basin was drained and dried. The doors of the reactor facility were shut and it wasn't until 10 years later that decommissioning plans were considered and ultimately postponed due to budget constraints. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR again. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. The $1.6 billion allocation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to SRS for site clean up at SRS has opened the doors to the HWCTR again - this time for final decommissioning. During the lifetime of HWCTR, 36 different fuel assemblies were tested in the facility. Ten of these experienced cladding failures as operational capabilities of the different designs were being established. In addition, numerous spills of heavy water occurred within the facility. Currently, radiation and radioactive contamination levels are low within HWCTR with most of the radioactivity contained within the reactor vessel. There are no known insults to the environment, however with the increasing deterioration of the facility, the possibility exists that contamination could spread outside the facility if it is not decommissioned. An interior panoramic view of the ground floor elevation taken in August 2009 is shown in Figure 2. The foreground shows the transfer coffin followed by the reactor vessel and control rod drive platform in the center. Behind the reactor vessel is the fuel pool. Above the ground level are the polar crane and the emergency deluge tank at the top of the dome. Note the considerable rust and degradation of the components and the interior of the containment building. Alternative studies have concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning is to remove the reactor vessel, steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. Characterization studies along with transport models have concluded that the remaining below grade equipment that is left in place including the transfer coffin will not contribute any significant contamination to the environment in the future. The below grade space will be grouted in place. A concrete cover will be placed over the remaining footprint and the groundwater will be monitored for an indefinite period to ensure compliance with environmental regulations. The schedule for completion of decommissioning is late FY2011. This paper describes the concepts planned in order to remove the major components including the dome, the reactor vessel (RV), the two steam generators (SG), and relocating the transfer coffin (TC).

Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

269

Independent Components Of Odour Signals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If two independent observations or processes are measured with the same apparatus, the inherent nature of the measuring device will in many cases introduce a dependency between the two recorded processes object to inspection. In this paper a suggestion of how Independent Component Analysis (ICA) can be used to identify such device dependencies and in turn give an estimated reconstruction of the observations without the correlation between signals introduced by the apparatus. The procedure is illustrated with the use of an "electronic nose" used to sample odours from mixtures of alcohol solutions. It is shown that ICA as a novel tool in the analysis of odour signals can extract the independent odour sources and give acceptable estimates of the ratio with which the alcohol solutions were mixed with two different approaches.

Martin Kermit Oliver; Oliver Tomic T

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform March 20, 2003 Before the...

271

U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit...

272

SunShot Initiative: Component R&D for CSP Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Component R&D for CSP Systems to Component R&D for CSP Systems to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Component R&D for CSP Systems on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Component R&D for CSP Systems on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Component R&D for CSP Systems on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Component R&D for CSP Systems on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Component R&D for CSP Systems on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Component R&D for CSP Systems on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Collectors Receivers Power Block Thermal Storage Systems Analysis Competitive Awards Staff Photovoltaics Systems Integration Balance of Systems Component R&D for CSP Systems Graphic showing five color blocks in a circular formation that represent the technical goals and cost targets for each component in the CSP system.

273

Nondestructive evaluation of ceramic matrix composite combustor components.  

SciTech Connect

Combustor liners fabricated from a SiC/SiC composite were nondestructively interrogated before and after combustion rig testing. The combustor liners were inspected by X-ray, ultrasonic and thermographic techniques. In addition, mechanical test results were obtained from witness coupons, representing the as-manufactured liners, and from coupons machined from the components after combustion exposure. Thermography indications were found to correlate with reduced material properties obtained after rig testing. Microstructural examination of the SiC/SiC liners revealed the thermography indications to be delaminations and damaged fiber tows.

Sun, J. G.; Verrilli, M. J.; Stephan, R.; Barnett, T. R.; Ojard, G.

2002-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

274

Building Component Library | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Component Library Building Component Library Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Building Component Library Agency/Company /Organization: NREL Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings Phase: Create a Vision, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan Topics: Resource assessment, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Dataset Website: bcl.nrel.gov Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): buildings, nrel, data, component Language: English Building Component Library Screenshot References: Buildings Component Library[1] The Building Component Library is a repository of building data used to create building energy models. The Building Component Library is a repository of building data used to create building energy models. The data are broken down into separate

275

Clustering and disjoint principal component analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A constrained principal component analysis, which aims at a simultaneous clustering of objects and a partitioning of variables, is proposed. The new methodology allows us to identify components with maximum variance, each one a linear combination of ...

Maurizio Vichi; Gilbert Saporta

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Component Certification - What is the Value?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Component-based software is becoming increasingly popular as a means to create value through improved integration across multiple parts of a plant or business. However, sometimes components that are supposed to be integrated cannot be integrated in the ...

Lars Bratthall; Johan Hasselberg; Brad Hoffman; Zbigniew Korendo; Bruno Schilli; Lars Gundersen

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Advanced filters and components for power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis is to improve the high frequency performance of components and filters by better compensating the parasitic effects of practical components. The main application for this improvement is in ...

Neugebauer, Timothy Carl, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Battery components employing a silicate binder  

SciTech Connect

A battery component structure employing inorganic-silicate binders. In some embodiments, casting or coating of components may be performed using aqueous slurries of silicates and electrode materials or separator materials.

Delnick, Frank M. (Albuquerque, NM); Reinhardt, Frederick W. (Albuquerque, NM); Odinek, Judy G. (Rio Rancho, NM)

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

279

Equatorial Velocity Profiles. Part I: Meridional Component  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A time series or vertical profiles of horizontal velocity was collected in the western equatorial Indian Ocean during late spring of 1976. The meridional velocity component is examined here, the zonal component in Part II of this paper. The ...

Kathleen O'Neill

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

TEST PLAN CHARACTERIZATION OF JET FORCES UPON WASTE TANK COMPONENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Westinghouse Hanford Company plans to install mixer pumps in double-shell waste tanks to mobilize and suspend settled sludge to allow eventual retrieval for treatment and permanent storage. The mixer pumps produce high momentum, horizontally directed jets that impact and mobilize the sludge and mix it into slurry for removal. There is concern that the force of the jet may damage tank internal components in its path. This test plan describes scaled experiments designed to characterize the velocity profiles of a near floor jet and to quantify the impact farces and drag coefficients of three tank components: radiation dry well, airlift circulator, and steam coil. The experiments will be conducted in water, at approximately 1/6-scale, using one stationary nozzle to simulate the jet. To measure and confirm the velocity profile of the free, submerged jet, the horizontal and vertical velocity profiles will be measured at several distances from the nozzle. The profile will also be measured after the jet impinges upon the tank floor to determine the·extent of the change in the profile caused by impingement. The jet forces upon the test articles will be measured at a maximum of four velocities and a variety of test article orientations. Each orientation will represent a unique position of the test article relative to the jet and the tank floor. In addition, the steam coil will be tested in three rotational orientations because it is not symmetric. The highest jet velocity will be selected so that the Reynolds number of the test article in the model will match that of the prototype when operating at design conditions. The forces measured upon the model components will be used to calculate the force on the prototype components using geometric scaling factors. In addition, the model force measurements will be used to calculate the component's drag coefficient as a function of the component Reynolds number.

Bamberger, J. A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Microstructure Components and Mechanical Properties of an ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of Microstructural and Mechanical Length Scales on Fatigue Crack ... Components and Mechanical Properties of an Acicular Ferrite Pipeline Steel.

282

Tools to Implement MPDV Component Characteristics  

SciTech Connect

This slide show presents work on photonic Doppler velocimetry multiplexing techniques, particularly as regards measurements on components.

Pena, M; Daykin, E; Emmit, R; Garza, A; Gibo, M; Hutchins, M; Perez, C; Teel, M

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

283

Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled | National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

284

Tensor Principal Component Analysis via Convex Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 11, 2012 ... Keywords: Tensor; Principal Component Analysis; Low Rank; Nuclear Norm; Semidefinite Programming Relaxation. Category 1: Convex and ...

285

Manufacturing complex silica aerogel target components  

SciTech Connect

Aerogel is a material used in numerous components in High Energy Density Physics targets. In the past these components were molded into the proper shapes. Artifacts left in the parts from the molding process, such as contour irregularities from shrinkage and density gradients caused by the skin, have caused LANL to pursue machining as a way to make the components.

Defriend Obrey, Kimberly Ann [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Day, Robert D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Espinoza, Brent F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hatch, Doug [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patterson, Brian M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Feng, Shihai [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Learning from the future of component repositories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important aspect of the quality assurance of large component repositories is the logical coherence of component metadata. We argue that it is possible to identify certain classes of such problems by checking relevant properties of the possible future ... Keywords: component repository, quality assurance, speculative analysis

Pietro Abate; Roberto Di Cosmo; Ralf Treinen; Stefano Zacchiroli

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Method of using infrared radiation for assembling a first component with a second component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of assembling a first component for assembly with a second component involves a heating device which includes an enclosure having a cavity for inserting a first component. An array of infrared energy generators is disposed within the enclosure. At least a portion of the first component is inserted into the cavity, exposed to infrared energy and thereby heated to a temperature wherein the portion of the first component is sufficiently softened and/or expanded for assembly with a second component.

Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Whitson, Barry G. (Corryton, TN); Blue, Craig A. (Knoxville, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Data-oriented research for bioresource utilization: A case study to investigate water uptake in cellulose using Principal Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bioresource utilization represents an important interdisciplinary research that integrates academic and industrial expertise across diverse scientific domains, including physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. The present paper describes a cyber-infrastructure ... Keywords: Principal component analysis,Laboratories,Loading,Correlation,Data visualization,Materials,Databases,bioethanol,Principal Component Analysis,Scientific workflow,lignocellulose

Roberto M. Cesar, Liu Yi Ling, Carlos Driemeier

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Clean Diesel Component Improvement Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research conducted in this program significantly increased the knowledge and understanding in the fields of plasma physics and chemistry in diesel exhaust, the performance and characteristics of multifunctional catalysts in diesel exhaust, and the complexities of controlling a combination of such systems to remove NOx. Initially this program was designed to use an in-line plasma system (know as a plasma assisted catalyst system or PAC) to convert NO {yields} NO{sub 2}, a more catalytically active form of nitrogen oxides, and to crack hydrocarbons (diesel fuel in particular) into active species. The NO{sub 2} and the cracked hydrocarbons were then flowed over an in-line ceramic NOx catalyst that removed NO{sub 2} from the diesel exhaust. Even though the PAC system performed well technically and was able to remove over 95% of NOx from diesel exhaust the plasma component proved not to be practical or commercially feasible. The lack of practical and commercial viability was due to high unit costs and lack of robustness. The plasma system and its function was replaced in the NOx removal process by a cracking reforming catalyst that converted diesel fuel to a highly active reductant for NOx over a downstream ceramic NOx catalyst. This system was designated the ceramic catalyst system (CCS). It was also determined that NO conversion to NO{sub 2} was not required to achieve high levels of NOx reduction over ceramic NOx catalyst if that catalyst was properly formulated and the cracking reforming produced a reductant optimized for that NOx catalyst formulation. This system has demonstrated 92% NOx reduction in a diesel exhaust slipstream and 65% NOx reduction from the full exhaust of a 165 hp diesel engine using the FTP cycle. Although this system needs additional development to be commercial, it is simple, cost effective (does not use precious metals), sulfur tolerant, operates at high space velocities, does not require a second fluid be supplied as a reductant, has low parasitic loss of 2-3% and achieves high levels of NOx reduction. This project benefits the public by providing a simple low-cost technology to remove NOx pollutants from the exhaust of almost any combustion source. The reduction of NOx emissions emitted into the troposphere provides well documented improvement in health for the majority of United States citizens. The emissions reduction produced by this technology helps remove the environmental constraints to economic growth.

None

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

290

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_4c_usa_wa_seattle_new2004_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_4c_usa_wa_seattle_new2004_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2B Phoenix,

291

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_5a_usa_il_chicago-ohare_post1980_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_5a_usa_il_chicago-ohare_post1980_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5B Boulder, Colorado Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6A Minneapolis, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena,

292

Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)  

SciTech Connect

The UO portion of the larger TASCS project was focused on the usability subproject identified in the original project proposal. The key usability issue that we tacked was that of supporting legacy code developers in migrating to a component-oriented design pattern and development model with minimal manual labor. It was observed during the lifetime of the TASCS (and previous CCA efforts) that more often than not, users would arrive with existing code that was developed previous to their exposure to component design methods. As such, they were faced with the task of both learning the CCA toolchain and at the same time, manually deconstructing and reassembling their existing code to fit the design constraints imposed by components. This was a common complaint (and occasional reason for a user to abandon components altogether), so our task was to remove this manual labor as much as possible to lessen the burden placed on the end-user when adopting components for existing codes. To accomplish this, we created a source-based static analysis tool that used code annotations to drive code generation and transformation operations. The use of code annotations is due to one of the key technical challenges facing this work | programming languages are limited in the degree to which application-specific semantics can be represented in code. For example, data types are often ambiguous. The C pointer is the most common example cited in practice. Given a pointer to a location in memory, should it be interpreted as a singleton or an array. If it is to be interpreted as an array, how many dimensions does the array have? What are their extents? The annotation language that we designed and implemented addresses this ambiguity issue by allowing users to decorate their code in places where ambiguity exists in order to guide tools to interpret what the programmer really intends.

Dr. Mathew Sottile

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

293

DOE-STD-1063-97; DOE Standard Establishing and Maintaining a Facility Representative Program at DOE Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-97 3-97 October 1997 Supersedes DOE-STD-1063-93 DOE STANDARD ESTABLISHING AND MAINTAINING A FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM AT DOE FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA FACR Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (423) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. Order No. DE98001286 DOE-STD-1063-97 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy standard is approved for use by all DOE Components.

294

Selection of a representative set of parameters for robust ordinal regression outranking methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce the concept of a representative set of parameters for multiple criteria outranking methods: ELECTRE^G^K^M^S and PROMETHEE^G^K^S which apply the principle of robust ordinal regression. We exploit the necessary and the possible results provided ... Keywords: ELECTRE-like method, Outranking relation, PROMETHEE-like method, Representative preference model, Representative set of parameters, Robust ordinal regression

Mi?osz Kadzi?ski; Salvatore Greco; Roman S?owi?ski

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and...

296

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and...

297

4Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from October to December 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field...

298

Surveillance Guides - QAS 2.2 Staging/Storage of Components  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STAGING/STORAGE OF COMPONENTS STAGING/STORAGE OF COMPONENTS 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to ensure that before components or consumables are used in maintenance and repair of equipment and systems, or before new components and systems are installed, they are stored in ways that prevent deterioration. The surveillance also examines the contractor's practices in staging materials, and the use of effective quality control to ensure materials and components are stored and staged properly. Finally, the surveillance provides an opportunity for the Facility Representative to verify that the contractor is complying with performance objectives established by the Department of Energy. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5700.6C, Quality Assurance

299

SunShot Initiative: Component R&D for CSP Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Component R&D for CSP Systems Component R&D for CSP Systems Graphic showing five color blocks in a circular formation that represent the technical goals and cost targets for each component in the CSP system. Enlarge image The SunShot Initiative goal is to reduce the levelized cost of electricity generated by concentrating solar power (CSP) to $0.06 per kilowatt hour (kWh) or less, without any subsidy, by the year 2020. Concentrating solar power systems have different system configurations, such as trough, tower, linear Fresnel or dish, but they all share similar components. The SunShot CSP program funds research and development within the industry, national laboratories and universities to achieve the technical and economic targets for the following CSP component technologies:

300

Solid tags for identifying failed reactor components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid tag material which generates stable detectable, identifiable, and measurable isotopic gases on exposure to a neutron flux to be placed in a nuclear reactor component, particularly a fuel element, in order to identify the reactor component in event of its failure. Several tag materials consisting of salts which generate a multiplicity of gaseous isotopes in predetermined ratios are used to identify different reactor components.

Bunch, Wilbur L. (Richland, WA); Schenter, Robert E. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Cold worked ferritic alloys and components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to liquid metal fast breeder reactor and steam generator precipitation hardening fully ferritic alloy components which have a microstructure substantially free of the primary precipitation hardening phase while having cells or arrays of dislocations of varying population densities. It also relates to the process by which these components are produced, which entails solution treating the alloy followed by a final cold working step. In this condition, the first significant precipitation hardening of the component occurs during high temperature use.

Korenko, Michael K. (Wexford, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

REQUEST BY HONEYWELL INTERNATIONAL, INC., CERAMIC COMPONENTS...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

has invested significantly in preparation for the development and commercialization of ceramic components as set forth in Honeywell's waiver petition. Honeywell has agreed to...

303

Room-Scale Smoke Component Yields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Figure 4 is a visualization of the FDS ... The symmetric stretch is not observed because ... The hardware consists of National Instruments components. ...

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

304

Tensor Principal Component Analysis via Convex Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 9, 2012 ... tensor, known as the tensor principal component analysis (PCA) ...... of RAM, and all the default settings of CVX were used for all the tests.

305

Reformulated Gasoline Blending Components Imports from Turkey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

306

Motor Gasoline Blending Components Imports from Syria  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

307

Motor Gasoline Blending Components Imports from Kyrgyzstan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

308

Vehicle Component Heat Dissipation Improvements - Energy ...  

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and ... to cool electronics or other power components usually involve a set of thermally conductive fins ...

309

Passive RF Components - Microsystems Science, Technology, and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Passive RF Components Microsystems Home Custom Microsystems Solutions Microsystems R&D Services Capabilities and Technologies Facilities Trusted Microsystems General Info About Us...

310

Component design for LMFBR's  

SciTech Connect

Just as FFTF has prototype components to confirm their design, FFTF is serving as a prototype for the design of the commercial LMFBR's. Design and manufacture of critical components for the FFTF system have been accomplished primarily using vendors with little or no previous experience in supplying components for high temperature sodium systems. The exposure of these suppliers, and through them a multitude of subcontractors, to the requirements of this program has been a necessary and significant step in preparing American industry for the task of supplying the large mechanical components required for commercial LMFBR's. (auth)

Fillnow, R.H.; France, L.L.; Zerinvary, M.C.; Fox, R.O.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Uranium Weapons Components Successfully...

312

Dynamic characterization of satellite components through non-invasive methods  

SciTech Connect

The rapid deployment of satellites is hindered by the need to flight-qualify their components and the resulting mechanical assembly. Conventional methods for qualification testing of satellite components are costly and time consuming. Furthermore, full-scale vehicles must be subjected to launch loads during testing. The harsh testing environment increases the risk of component damage during qualification. The focus of this research effort was to assess the performance of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) techniques as replacement for traditional vibration testing. SHM techniques were applied on a small-scale structure representative of a responsive satellite. The test structure consisted of an extruded aluminum space-frame covered with aluminum shear plates, which was assembled using bolted joints. Multiple piezoelectric patches were bonded to the test structure and acted as combined actuators and sensors. Various methods of SHM were explored including impedance-based health monitoring, wave propagation, and conventional frequency response functions. Using these methods in conjunction with finite element modeling, the dynamic properties of the test structure were established and areas of potential damage were identified and localized. The adequacy of the results from each SHM method was validated by comparison to results from conventional vibration testing.

Mullens, Joshua G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiest, Heather K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mascarenas, David D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

313

3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2008. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 80% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was 87%) 89% Staffing Level ( last Quarter was 86%) 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is > 40%) 76% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is >

314

FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999 Since September, 1993, the Office of Field Management has served as the Department's corporate advocate for the Facility Representative Program. The Facility Representative (FR) is a critical technical position serving as line management's "eyes and ears" for operational safety in our contractor-operated facilities. I recognize the importance of the FR Program, and commit the Office of Field Integration (FI) to its continued crosscutting support. The FI staff continues to work with your staff members and with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) staff on FR Program issues, including staffing, training and qualification, recruitment, and retention. The Board is clearly interested in the

315

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Representatives of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations February 26, 2003 Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Testify on the Office of Inspector General's recent inquiry concerning Los Alamos National Laboratory. STATEMENT OF GREGORY H. FRIEDMAN INSPECTOR GENERAL U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BEFORE THE U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND COMMERCE SUBCOMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND INVESTIGATIONS, February 26, 2003

316

Multiple mass-market applications as components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Truly successful models for component-based software development continue to prove elusive. One of the few is the use of operating system, database and similar programs in many systems. We address three related problems in this paper. First, we lack ... Keywords: component-based software, package-oriented programming

David Coppit; Kevin J. Sullivan

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Hybrid solar lighting distribution systems and components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hybrid solar lighting distribution system and components having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one fiber receiver, at least one hybrid luminaire, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator and each hybrid luminaire. A controller operates all components.

Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN); Beshears, David L. (Knoxville, TN); Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Jordan, John K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lind, Randall F. (Lenoir City, TN)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

318

Hybrid solar lighting systems and components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid solar lighting system and components having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one fiber receiver, at least one hybrid luminaire, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator and each hybrid luminaire. A controller operates each component.

Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN); Beshears, David L. (Knoxville, TN); Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Jordan, John K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lind, Randall F. (Lenoir City, TN)

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

319

Reliability and Lifetime Prediction for Ceramic Components  

SciTech Connect

Ceramic materials are used extensively in non-nuclear components in the weapons stockpile including neutron tubes, stronglinks, weaklinks, batteries, and current/voltage stacks. Ceramics also perform critical functions in electronics, passively as insulators and actively as resistors and capacitors, Glass and ceramic seals also provide hermetic electrical feedthrus in connectors for many weapons components.

Vedula, V.R.; Glass, S.J.; Monroe, S.L.; Neilsen, M.K.; Newton, C.

1999-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

320

Component connectors with QoS guarantees  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Connectors have emerged as a powerful concept for composition and coordination of concurrent activities encapsulated as components and services. Compositional coordination models and languages serve as a means to formally specify and implement component ... Keywords: Reo, composition, coordination, quality of service, quantitative constraint automata

Farhad Arbab; Tom Chothia; Sun Meng; Young-Joo Moon

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

On software component co-installability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern software systems are built by composing components drawn from large repositories, whose size and complexity is increasing at a very fast pace. A fundamental challenge for the maintainability and the scalability of such software systems is the ... Keywords: co-installability, component, conflicts, dependencies, open source, package management

Roberto Di Cosmo; Jérôme Vouillon

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

LBNL Windows & Daylighting Software -- THERM Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Components Components THERM has three basic components: Graphic User Interface: a graphic user interface that allows you to draw a cross section of the product or component for which you are performing thermal calculations. Heat Transfer Analysis: a heat-transfer analysis component that includes: an automatic mesh generator to create the elements for the finite-element analysis, a finite-element solver, an optional error estimator and adaptive mesh generator, and an optional view-factor radiation model. Results: a results displayer. Graphic User Interface THERM has standard graphic capabilities associated with the Microsoft Windows™ operating system. For example, THERM allows you to use: Both mouse and cursor operations; Standard editing features, such as Cut, Copy, Paste, Select All, and Delete;

323

Failure testing of active solar energy components  

SciTech Connect

Component and system reliability of active solar energy systems continue to be a major concern of designers, manufacturers, installers, and consumers. Six test loops were constructed and the Solar Energy Research Institute, in Golden, Colorado, to thermally cycle active solar energy system components. Drain valves, check valves, air vents, vacuum breakers, tempering valves, and polybutylene pipe were included in the testing. The test methods and results are discussed in this report. Test results show poor reliability of some of the components and limited performance from others. The results lead to a better understanding of certain failures in the field and present designers with realistic expectations for these components. Recommendations are given to improve component reliability and for further testing.

Farrington, R.B.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Property:Component Integration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Component Integration Component Integration Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. The allowed values for this property are: Customer Assembled Factory Integrated Pages using the property "Component Integration" Showing 22 pages using this property. D Distributed Generation Study/10 West 66th Street Corp + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/615 kW Waukesha Packaged System + Factory Integrated + Distributed Generation Study/Aisin Seiki G60 at Hooligans Bar and Grille + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/Arrow Linen + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/Dakota Station (Minnegasco) + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/Elgin Community College + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/Emerling Farm + Factory Integrated +

325

NHI Component Technical Readiness Evaluation System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A decision process for evaluating the technical readiness or maturity of components (i.e., heat exchangers, chemical reactors, valves, etc.) for use by the U.S. DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative is described. This system is used by the DOE NHI to assess individual components in relation to their readiness for pilot-scale and larger-scale deployment and to drive the research and development work needed to attain technical maturity. A description of the evaluation system is provided, and examples are given to illustrate how it is used to assist in component R&D decisions.

Steven R. Sherman; Dane F. Wilson; Steven J. Pawel

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Automatic Mediation between Incompatible Component Interaction Styles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Incompatibility of component interaction styles is identified as a major obstacle to interoperability when using off-the-shelf components or dealing with legacy software in compositional development. It is argued that a language for defining abstract interfaces -- AID -- can serve as a basis for accommodating heterogeneous interaction styles. AID is independent of any concrete style, such as invocation, pipe-and-filter, event-based or others. An AID text just specifies elementary input and output events which happen at the boundary of a component.

Klaus-Peter Löhr

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

SRAT/SME components: Wear evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Material water of internal components in the Slurry Receipt Adjustment Tank/Slurry Mix Evaporator (SRAT/SME) has been documented. This study consisted of a special wear test of approximately 1,950 hours of simulated run time. Basic dimensions were obtained for components before the test, and they were compared with measurements taken after the exposure. Wear of tank components, the estimated life of design materials of construction, and guidance for design configuration were obtained. The test program is continuing with no basic changes in design.

Jenkins, C.F.

1987-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

328

Purification of polymorphic components of complex genomes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for processing related subject and reference macromolecule populations composed of complementary strands into their respective subject and reference populations of representative fragments and effectuating purification of unique polymorphic subject fragments. 1 figure.

Stodolsky, M.

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

329

Non-fuel assembly components: 10 CFR 61.55 classification for waste disposal  

SciTech Connect

This document reports the results of laboratory radionuclide measurements on a representative group of non-fuel assembly (NFA) components for the purposes of waste classification. This document also provides a methodology to estimate the radionuclide inventory of NFA components, including those located outside the fueled region of a nuclear reactor. These radionuclide estimates can then be used to determine the waste classification of NFA components for which there are no physical measurements. Previously, few radionuclide inventory measurements had been performed on NFA components. For this project, recommended scaling factors were selected for the ORIGEN2 computer code that result in conservative estimates of radionuclide concentrations in NFA components. These scaling factors were based upon experimental data obtained from the following NFA components: (1) a pressurized water reactor (PWR) burnable poison rod assembly, (2) a PVM rod cluster control assembly, and (3) a boiling water reactor cruciform control rod blade. As a whole, these components were found to be within Class C limits. Laboratory radionuclide measurements for these components are provided in detail.

Migliore, R.J.; Reid, B.D.; Fadeff, S.K.; Pauley, K.A.; Jenquin, U.P.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Time-independent and time-dependent contributions to the unavailability of standby safety system components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The unavailability of standby safety system components due to failures in nuclear power plants is considered to involve a time independent and a time dependent part. The former relates to the component`s unavailability from demand stresses due to usage, and the latter represents the component`s unavailability due to standby time stresses related to the environment. In this paper, data from the nuclear plant reliability data system (NPRDS) were used to partition the component`s unavailability into the contributions from standby time stress (i.e., due to environmental factors) and demand stress (i.e., due to usage). Analyses are presented of motor operated valves (MOVs), motor driven pumps (MDPs), and turbine driven pumps (FDPs). MOVs fail predominantly (approx. 78%) from environmental factors (standby time stress failures). MDPs fail slightly more frequently from demand stresses (approx. 63%) than standby time stresses, while TDPs fail predominantly from standby time stresses (approx. 78%). Such partitions of component unavailability have many uses in risk informed and performance based regulation relating to modifications to Technical Specification, in-service testing, precise determination of dominant accident sequences, and implementation of maintenance rules.

Lofgren, E.V. [Science Applications International Corp., Fairfax Station, VA (United States); Uryasev, S.; Samanta, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

U.S. Representative Cleaver congratulates KCP employees for safety record  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Representative Cleaver congratulates KCP employees for safety record Representative Cleaver congratulates KCP employees for safety record during big move | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > U.S. Representative Cleaver congratulates KCP employees for ... U.S. Representative Cleaver congratulates KCP employees for safety record

332

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Of Representatives Of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations May 1, 2003 Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Request to testify on the Office of Inspector General's (OIG) reviews of management practices at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory). In February of this year, I testified before this Subcommittee regarding our Special Inquiry report on Operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory (DOE/IG-0584, January 2003). That report noted a series of actions taken by

333

Order Module--DOE-STD-1063-2011, FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1063-2011, FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES DOE-STD-1063-2011, FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES Order Module--DOE-STD-1063-2011, FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES The familiar level of this module is divided into three sections. The first section addresses the purpose and scope of DOE-STD-1063-2011, the purpose of the FR program, and the duties, responsibilities, and authorities of FRs and other key personnel. In the second section, the requirements of the FR program are discussed. The third section covers the three appendices of this standard: FR performance indicators, an FR program assessment guide, and the process to determine FR staffing. We have provided examples and a practice to help familiarize you with the material. The practice will also help prepare you for the criterion test. DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE STD 1063, Facility Representatives

334

Selecting Representative Days for More Efficient Dynamical Climate Downscaling: Application to Wind Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a new computationally efficient and statistically robust sampling method for generating dynamically downscaled climatologies. It is based on a Monte Carlo method coupled with stratified sampling. A small yet representative set ...

Daran L. Rife; Emilie Vanvyve; James O. Pinto; Andrew J. Monaghan; Christopher A. Davis; Gregory S. Poulos

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Secretary Chu to Join Representatives Lofgren and Honda at the SLAC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Representatives Lofgren and Honda at the SLAC Representatives Lofgren and Honda at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Secretary Chu to Join Representatives Lofgren and Honda at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory August 13, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - On Monday, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will visit the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in Menlo Park, California. Secretary Chu will join Representatives Zoe Lofgren and Mike Honda and Stanford University President John Hennessy at a dedication ceremony for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The Recovery Act-funded LCLS produces x-ray pulses millions of times brighter than the world's most powerful synchrotron sources, capable of capturing images of atoms and molecules in motion. The LCLS is led by SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC). Operated by

336

U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford February 3, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Tomorrow, Friday, February 4, U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu will travel to East Hartford, Conn. to visit United Technologies Research Center, which has received funding from the Department for several transformational clean energy research projects. The Secretary is visiting UTC to highlight the importance of investing in innovation and clean energy to put people back to work, grow the economy, and win the future. He will be joined by U.S. Representatives John Larson and Joe Courtney for a tour

337

Secretary Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New "Sputnik  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New "Sputnik Moment" for America Secretary Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New "Sputnik Moment" for America November 29, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - In a speech at the National Press Club, U.S Energy Secretary Steven Chu said that the success of China and other countries in clean energy industries represents a new "Sputnik Moment" for the United States, and requires a similar mobilization of America's innovation machine so that we can compete in the global race for the jobs of the future. Secretary Chu outlined efforts underway at the Department to give America's entrepreneurs and manufacturers an edge through investments in clean energy innovation.

338

Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The U.S. House of Representatives The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization April 5 2005 Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Testify regarding recent allegations of misconduct involving documents associated with the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Disposal of the Nation's high-level nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel is one of the most sensitive and complex challenges facing the U.S.

339

Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations March 4, 2004 Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Herbert Richardson, Principal Deputy Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Testify regarding physical security at the Department of Energy's facilities. The Department's activities range from nuclear nonproliferation, to cutting edge research and development, to weapons programs. The sensitive and critical nature of the Department's work

340

On the Use of Multi-dimensional Dynamic Logic Programming to Represent Societal Agents' Viewpoints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the applicability of the new paradigm of Multi-dimensional Dynamic Logic Programming to represent an agent's view of the combination of societal knowledge dynamics. The representation of a dynamic society of agents is the core of ...

João Alexandre Leite; José Júlio Alferes; Luís Moniz Pereira

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of Representatives...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of...

342

Weather pattern classification to represent the urban heat island in present and future climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A classification of weather patterns (WP) is derived that is tailored to best represent situations relevant for the urban heat island (UHI). Three different types of k-means-based cluster methods are conducted. The explained cluster variance is ...

Peter Hoffmann; K. Heinke Schlünzen

343

Can Satellite Sampling of Offshore Wind Speeds Realistically Represent Wind Speed Distributions?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind speeds over the oceans are required for a range of applications but are difficult to obtain through in situ methods. Hence, remote sensing tools, which also offer the possibility of describing spatial variability, represent an attractive ...

R. J. Barthelmie; S. C. Pryor

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

An abstract schema for representing semantic roles and modelling the syntax-semantics interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel approach to semantic role annotation implementing an entailment-based view of the concept of semantic role. I propose to represent arguments of predicates with grammatically relevant primitive properties entailed by the semantics ...

Voula Gotsoulia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Oil Bodies and Oleosins in Physcomitrella Possess Characteristics Representative of Early Trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil Bodies and Oleosins in Physcomitrella Possess Characteristics Representative of Early Trends oleosin genes. Microscopy examination of Physcomitrella revealed that oil bodies (OBs) were abundant in the photosynthetic vegetative gametophyte and the reproductive spore. Chromatography illustrated the neutral lipids

Gent, Universiteit

346

Environmental Evaluation of New Generation Vehicles and Vehicle Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-266 1-266 Environmental Evaluation of New Generation Vehicles and Vehicle Components December 2001 Prepared by Susan M. Schexnayder 1 Sujit Das 2 Rajive Dhingra 1 Jonathan G. Overly 1 Bruce E. Tonn 2 Jean H. Peretz 1 Greg Waidley 1 Gary A. Davis 1 1 University of Tennessee-Knoxville 2 Oak Ridge National Laboratory This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

347

Principal Component Analysis of Wind Profiler Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to wind profiler observations to study the vertical profile of the wind field and its temporal evolution. The rationale for decomposing time–height wind profiler data using PCA is twofold. The ...

Christopher R. Williams

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Decontamination of large components-test case  

SciTech Connect

The rising per-cubic-foot burial costs, together with the trend toward standardized above-ground burial sites, provides the basis for seeking an alternative to direct burial of large components. Large contaminated components such as steam generators can be safely dismantled and decontaminated for free release, metals recycle, and volume reduction. This grand-scale disposal technology will prove to be an economical and ecological alternative to direct burial or interim storage. Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) in Bolton, operators and decommissioners of the Yankee Nuclear Power Station in Rowe, Massachusetts, has teamed with Frank W Hake Associates in Memphis, TN, to decontaminate a large component as a test case. The large component is YAEC`s reactor pressure vessel head (RPVH). The 79 100 lb RPVH is surface contaminated with 0.7 Ci (1500 mR/h contact) resulting from 32 yr of operating in a 2000 psi, 530{degrees}F pressurized water reactor environment.

Mancini, A. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States); Bosco, B. [Frank W. Hake Associates, Memphis, TN (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

349

Complex Principal Component Analysis: Theory and Examples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Complex principal component (CPC) analysis is shown to be a useful method for identifying traveling and standing waves in geophysical data sets. Combinations of simple progressive and standing oscillations are used to examine the properties of ...

J. D. Horel

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

SloanSpace- DSpace file transfer component  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis demonstrates how to use Web services to integrate course management systems with digital repositories. We present a component that provides interoperation between SloanSpace, a course management system, and ...

Cuevas, Genevieve T

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Thermochemical nanolithography components, systems, and methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved nanolithography components, systems, and methods are described herein. The systems and methods generally employ a resistively heated atomic force microscope tip to thermally induce a chemical change in a surface. In addition, certain polymeric compositions are also disclosed.

Riedo, Elisa; Marder, Seth R.; de Heer, Walt A.; Szoskiewicz, Robert J.; Kodali, Vamsi K.; Jones, Simon C.; Okada, Takashi; Wang, Debin; Curtis, Jennifer E.; Henderson, Clifford L.; Hua, Yueming

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

352

Big data : evolution, components, challenges and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work reviews the evolution and current state of the "Big Data" industry, and to understand the key components, challenges and opportunities of Big Data and analytics face in today business environment, this is analyzed ...

Zarate Santovena, Alejandro

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Stationary turbine component with laminated skin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stationary turbine engine component, such as a turbine vane, includes a internal spar and an external skin. The internal spar is made of a plurality of spar laminates, and the external skin is made of a plurality of skin laminates. The plurality of skin laminates interlockingly engage the plurality of spar laminates such that the external skin is located and held in place. This arrangement allows alternative high temperature materials to be used on turbine engine components in areas where their properties are needed without having to make the entire component out of such material. Thus, the manufacturing difficulties associated with making an entire component of such a material and the attendant high costs are avoided. The skin laminates can be made of advanced generation single crystal superalloys, intermetallics and refractory alloys.

James, Allister W. (Orlando, FL)

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

354

Data transmission element for downhole drilling components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A robust data transmission element for transmitting information between downhole components, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The data transmission element components include a generally U-shaped annular housing, a generally U-shaped magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element such as ferrite, and an insulated conductor. Features on the magnetically conducting, electrically insulating element and the annular housing create a pocket when assembled. The data transmission element is filled with a polymer to retain the components within the annular housing by filling the pocket with the polymer. The polymer can bond with the annular housing and the insulated conductor but preferably not the magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element. A data transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT)

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

355

Impedance Measurements of Components for the ALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impedance Measurements on the ALS Curved Sector Tank", R.A.of the Higher Order Modes of the ALS 500 MHz Acceleratingof Components for the ALS J.N. Corlett and R.A. Rimmer May

Corlett, J.N.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Materials Reliability Program: Functionality Analysis for Babcock & Wilcox Representative PWR Internals (MRP-229-Rev. 3)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the functionality assessment of degradation for Babcock Wilcox (BW) designed reactor internals. The components analyzed include the core barrel assembly and selected Alloy X-750 and Alloy A-286 structural bolts.

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

357

Methodology for Establishing Remaining Life of Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When a plant's maintenance personnel develop component assessment procedures, a common step is to establish a methodology that considers the type of component, the materials of construction, the operating regimes, the degradation and failure mechanisms, failure history, lead times for repair, and the costs of refurbishment. A unifying view of condition assessment identifies active and potentially active damage mechanisms and is based on three kinds of information: the degree of damage currently in the co...

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

358

Gas Turbine Hot Section Component Life Tracking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Damage tracking software—backed by comprehensive analysis techniques—provides a means for owners/operators to independently track and predict life consumption for critical gas turbine hot section components. Results can be compared with equipment supplier formulated intervals. This report updates the development status of damage tracking software for managing life-cycle costs by improving owner/operator understanding of component life and life consumption as a function of turbine ...

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

359

Method and apparatus for monitoring aircraft components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Operability of aircraft mechanical components is monitored by analyzing the voltage output of an electrical generator of the aircraft. Alternative generators, for a turbine-driven rotor aircraft, include the gas producer turbine tachometer generator, the power turbine tachometer generator, and the aircraft systems power producing starter/generator. Changes in the peak amplitudes of the fundamental frequency and its harmonics are correlated to changes in condition of the mechanical components. 14 figs.

Dickens, L.M.; Haynes, H.D.; Ayers, C.W.

1996-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

360

Method and apparatus for monitoring aircraft components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Operability of aircraft mechanical components is monitored by analyzing the voltage output of an electrical generator of the aircraft. Alternative generators, for a turbine-driven rotor aircraft, include the gas producer turbine tachometer generator, the power turbine tachometer generator, and the aircraft systems power producing starter/generator. Changes in the peak amplitudes of the fundamental frequency and its harmonics are correlated to changes in condition of the mechanical components.

Dickens, Larry M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Haynes, Howard D. (Knoxville, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Clinton, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

A New Approach to Component Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carefully tested electric/electronic components are a requirement for effective hardware-in-the-loop tests and vehicle tests in automotive industry. A new method for definition and execution of component tests is described. The most important advantage of this method is independance from the test stand. It therefore offers the oppportunity to build up knowledge over a long period of time and the ability to share this knowledge with different partners.

Brinkmeyer, Horst

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

RDCDS Meteorologoical Component Quick Installation Guide  

SciTech Connect

This guide provides step-by-step instructions for the deployment of one of the Rapidly Deployable Chemical Defense System (RDCDS) weather stations and central control system. Instructions for the deployment and operation of the Atmospheric Systems Corporation miniSODAR™ (SOnic Detection and Ranging) can be found in accompanying manuals developed by Atmospheric Systems Corporation. A detailed description of the system and its components can be found in the manual entitled Description of the RDCDS Meteorological Component.

Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.

2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

363

Report on D&D of Large Components with Valuable EM Contributions is  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report on D&D of Large Components with Valuable EM Contributions is Report on D&D of Large Components with Valuable EM Contributions is Available on Powerpedia Report on D&D of Large Components with Valuable EM Contributions is Available on Powerpedia November 26, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM's Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning/Facility Engineering (D&D/FE), representing DOE on the Nuclear Energy Agency's (NEA) Working Party on Decommissioning and Dismantling (WPDD) of the Radioactive Waste Management Committee, provided significant contributions to the recently published report titled, "The Management of Large Components from Decommissioning to Storage and Disposal." Read the report on Powerpedia here. The WPDD focuses on the analysis of decommissioning policy, strategy and

364

Embrittlement of Forging Brass Components Due to Microstructural ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Metallurgical failure analysis was performed on multiple forging brass components. The components mainly fractured during the installation ...

365

WASTE CHARACTERIZATION OF POLYMERIC COMPONENTS EXPOSED TO TRITIUM GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent independent review led to uncertainty about the technical basis for characterizing the residual amount of tritium in polymer components used in the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities that are sent for waste disposal. A review of a paper published in the open literature firmly establishes the basis of the currently used characterization, 10 Ci/cc. Information provided in that paper about exposure experiments performed at the DOE Mound Laboratory allows the calculation of the currently used characterization. These experiments involved exposure of high density polyethylene (HD-PE) to initially 1 atm tritium gas. In addition, a review of recent research at the Savannah River Site not only further substantiates this characterization, but also establishes its use for ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, a trade name is Teflon{reg_sign}), and Vespel{reg_sign} polyimide. 10 Ci/cc tritium is a representative characterization for any type of polymer components exposed at ambient temperature and at approximately 1 atm. tritium gas.

Clark, E

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

An apparatus for remotely handling components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The inventive apparatus for remotely handling barlike components which define a longitudinal direction includes a gripper mechanism for gripping the component including first and second gripper members longitudinally fixedly spaced from each other and oriented parallel to each other in planes transverse to the longitudinal direction. Each gripper member includes a jaw having at least one V-groove with opposing surfaces intersecting at a base and extending radially relative to the longitudinal direction for receiving the component in an open end between the opposing surfaces. The V-grooves on the jaw plate of t he first and second gripper members are aligned in the longitudinal direction to support the component in the first and second gripper members. A jaw is rotatably mounted on and a part of each of the first and second gripper members for selectively assuming a retracted mode in which the open end of the V-groove is unobstructed and active mode in which the jaw spans the open end of the V-groove in the first and second gripper members. The jaw has a locking surface for contacting the component in the active mode to secure the component between the locking surface of the jaw and the opposing surfaces of the V-groove. The locking surface has a plurality of stepped portions, each defining a progressively decreasing radial distance between the base of the V-groove and the stepped portion opposing the base to accommodate varying sizes of components. In a preferred embodiment, the apparatus also includes a control mechanism for remotely controlling movement of the jaw in the locking mode to assume one of a plurality of locking positions corresponding to positioning one of the stepped portions opposite the base.

Szkrybalo, G.A.; Griffin, D.L.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

367

Automatic Detection of Unsafe Component Loadings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic loading of software components (e.g., libraries or modules) is a widely used mechanism for improved system modularity and flexibility. Correct component resolution is critical for reliable and secure software execution, however, programming mistakes may lead to unintended or even malicious components to be resolved and loaded. In particular, dynamic loading can be hijacked by placing an arbitrary file with the specified name in a directory searched before resolving the target component. Although this issue has been known for quite some time, it was not considered serious because exploiting it requires access to the local file system on the vulnerable host. Recently such vulnerabilities started to receive considerable attention as their remote exploitation became realistic; it is now important to detect and fix these vulnerabilities. In this paper, we present the first automated technique to detect vulnerable and unsafe dynamic component loadings. Our analysis has two phases: 1) apply dynamic binary instrumentation to collect runtime information on component loading (online phase); and 2) analyze the collected information to detect vulnerable component loadings (offline phase). For evaluation, we implemented our technique to detect vulnerable and unsafe DLL loadings in popular Microsoft Windows software. Our results show that unsafe DLL loading is prevalent and can lead to serious security threats. Our tool detected more than 1,700 unsafe DLL loadings in 28 widely used software and discovered serious attack vectors for remote code execution. Microsoft has opened a Microsoft Security Response Center (MSRC) case on our reported issues and is working with us and other affected software vendors to develop necessary patches.

Taeho Kwon; Zhendong Su

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

An overview of component qualification using Bayesian statistics and energy methods.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The below overview is designed to give the reader a limited understanding of Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood (MLE) estimation; a basic understanding of some of the mathematical tools to evaluate the quality of an estimation; an introduction to energy methods and a limited discussion of damage potential. This discussion then goes on to presented a limited presentation as to how energy methods and Bayesian estimation are used together to qualify components. Example problems with solutions have been supplied as a learning aid. Bold letters are used to represent random variables. Un-bolded letter represent deterministic values. A concluding section presents a discussion of attributes and concerns.

Dohner, Jeffrey Lynn

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Spectral Components Analysis of Diffuse Emission Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop a novel method to separate the components of a diffuse emission process based on an association with the energy spectra. Most of the existing methods use some information about the spatial distribution of components, e.g., closeness to an external template, independence of components etc., in order to separate them. In this paper we propose a method where one puts conditions on the spectra only. The advantages of our method are: 1) it is internal: the maps of the components are constructed as combinations of data in different energy bins, 2) the components may be correlated among each other, 3) the method is semi-blind: in many cases, it is sufficient to assume a functional form of the spectra and determine the parameters from a maximization of a likelihood function. As an example, we derive the CMB map and the foreground maps for seven yeas of WMAP data. In an Appendix, we present a generalization of the method, where one can also add a number of external templates.

Malyshev, Dmitry; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

370

Progress in photovoltaic system and component improvements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project is a partnership between the US government (through the US Department of Energy [DOE]) and the PV industry. Part of its purpose is to conduct manufacturing technology research and development to address the issues and opportunities identified by industry to advance photovoltaic (PV) systems and components. The project was initiated in 1990 and has been conducted in several phases to support the evolution of PV industrial manufacturing technology. Early phases of the project stressed PV module manufacturing. Starting with Phase 4A and continuing in Phase 5A, the goals were broadened to include improvement of component efficiency, energy storage and manufacturing and system or component integration to bring together all elements for a PV product. This paper summarizes PV manufacturers` accomplishments in components, system integration, and alternative manufacturing methods. Their approaches have resulted in improved hardware and PV system performance, better system compatibility, and new system capabilities. Results include new products such as Underwriters Laboratories (UL)-listed AC PV modules, modular inverters, and advanced inverter designs that use readily available and standard components. Work planned in Phase 5A1 includes integrated residential and commercial roof-top systems, PV systems with energy storage, and 300-Wac to 4-kWac inverters.

Thomas, H.P.; Kroposki, B.; McNutt, P.; Witt, C.E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Bower, W.; Bonn, R.; Hund, T.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Progress in photovoltaic system and component improvements  

SciTech Connect

The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project is a partnership between the US government (through the US Department of Energy [DOE]) and the PV industry. Part of its purpose is to conduct manufacturing technology research and development to address the issues and opportunities identified by industry to advance photovoltaic (PV) systems and components. The project was initiated in 1990 and has been conducted in several phases to support the evolution of PV industrial manufacturing technology. Early phases of the project stressed PV module manufacturing. Starting with Phase 4A and continuing in Phase 5A, the goals were broadened to include improvement of component efficiency, energy storage and manufacturing and system or component integration to bring together all elements for a PV product. This paper summarizes PV manufacturers` accomplishments in components, system integration, and alternative manufacturing methods. Their approaches have resulted in improved hardware and PV system performance, better system compatibility, and new system capabilities. Results include new products such as Underwriters Laboratories (UL)-listed AC PV modules, modular inverters, and advanced inverter designs that use readily available and standard components. Work planned in Phase 5A1 includes integrated residential and commercial roof-top systems, PV systems with energy storage, and 300-Wac to 4-kWac inverters.

Thomas, H.P.; Kroposki, B.; McNutt, P.; Witt, C.E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Bower, W.; Bonn, R.; Hund, T.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations April 5, 2005 Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Request to testify on the results of our work at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, one of the Department of Energy's most prominent facilities. STATEMENT OF GREGORY H. FRIEDMAN INSPECTOR GENERAL U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BEFORE THE U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND COMMERCE SUBCOMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND INVESTIGATIONS, May 5, 2005

373

WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO YOU AND THE PEOPLE YOU REPRESENT. | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPRESENT. REPRESENT. WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO YOU AND THE PEOPLE YOU REPRESENT. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is charged under the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007) with modernizing the nation's electricity grid to improve its reliability and efficiency. As part of this effort, DOE is also responsible for increasing awareness of our nation's Smart Grid. Building upon The Smart Grid: An Introduction, a DOE-sponsored publication released in 2008 and available online at www.smartgrid.gov, this publication is one in a series of books designed to better acquaint discrete stakeholder groups with the promise and possibilities of the Smart Grid. Stakeholder groups include Utilities, Regulators, Policymakers, Technology Providers, Consumer Advocates and Environmental Groups.

374

On April 25, 2013, several representatives of energy efficiency advocacy organiz  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 25, 2013, several representatives of energy efficiency advocacy organizations met with staff April 25, 2013, several representatives of energy efficiency advocacy organizations met with staff and members of the Compressed Air and Gas Institute (CAGI) along with some compressed air experts at the offices of the Alliance to Save Energy to explore and discuss a consensus approach to advancing energy efficiency of compressed air systems within the context of the DOE's potential rulemaking on compressors. The group discussed the need to assemble the relevant data and technical content that will be valuable in identifying possible pathways to achieve a meaningful and appropriate compressor standard that maximizes energy savings potential without creating an undue burden on the market. Representing the energy efficiency advocacy organizations were Tracy Kohler of the Compressed Air

375

December 17, 1998 Memo, Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

mE mE F 1325.8 (a89) EFG (U7-W) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: December 17, 1998 REPLY TO ATTN OF: FM- 10(J. Hassenfeldt, 202 586-1643) SUBJECT Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program TO:Distribution The Department's Revised Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 93-3 has once again underscored the Department's commitment to maintaining the technical capability necessary to safely manage and operate our defense nuclear facilities. Attracting and retaining highly qualified employees and placing them in our critical technical positions is vital to fi.dfilling this commitment. You have identified 95'% of your Facility Representative positions as critical technical positions. The Office of Field Management has noted a 12'?40 annual attrition rate of Facility Representatives

376

How Representative are the Cloud Regimes at the TWP Sites? Â… An ISCCP Perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Representative are the Cloud Regimes at the How Representative are the Cloud Regimes at the TWP Sites? - An ISCCP Perspective C. Jakob Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre Melbourne, Australia G. Tselioudis National Aeronautic and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies Columbia University New York Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has established comprehensive cloud and radiation observatories in various locations across the globe with the aim of collecting measurements and developing models to better understand the processes that control solar and thermal infrared radiative transfer in clouds and at the surface. The locales of the individual ARM sites were chosen because they represent typical cloud regimes occurring in various climate regimes (Stokes and Schwartz

377

NREL: Learning - Advanced Vehicle Systems and Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Vehicle Systems and Components Advanced Vehicle Systems and Components Photo of a man checking out an advanced battery using testing equipment that includes a long metal tube on a table top. NREL's researchers test new batteries developed for hybrid electric vehicles. Credit: Warren Gretz Researchers and engineers at the NREL work closely with those in the automotive industry to develop new technologies, such as advanced batteries, for storing energy in cars, trucks, and buses. They also help to develop and test new technologies for using that energy more efficiently. And they work on finding new, energy-efficient ways to reduce the amount of fuel needed to heat and cool the interiors, or cabins, of vehicles. To help develop these new technologies, NREL's researchers are improving the efficiency of vehicle systems and components like these:

378

Protection of lithographic components from particle contamination  

SciTech Connect

A system that employs thermophoresis to protect lithographic surfaces from particle deposition and operates in an environment where the pressure is substantially constant and can be sub-atmospheric. The system (thermophoretic pellicle) comprises an enclosure that surrounds a lithographic component whose surface is being protected from particle deposition. The enclosure is provided with means for introducing a flow of gas into the chamber and at least one aperture that provides for access to the lithographic surface for the entry and exit of a beam of radiation, for example, and further controls gas flow into a surrounding low pressure environment such that a higher pressure is maintained within the enclosure and over the surface being protected. The lithographic component can be heated or, alternatively the walls of the enclosure can be cooled to establish a temperature gradient between the surface of the lithographic component and the walls of the enclosure, thereby enabling the thermophoretic force that resists particle deposition.

Klebanoff, Leonard E. (San Ramon, CA); Rader, Daniel J. (Lafayette, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Loaded transducer for downhole drilling components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for transmitting information between downhole components has a first downhole component with a first mating surface and a second downhole component having a second mating surface configured to substantially mate with the first mating surface. The system also has a first transmission element with a first communicating surface and is mounted within a recess in the first mating surface. The first transmission element also has an angled surface. The recess has a side with multiple slopes for interacting with the angled surface, each slope exerting a different spring force on the first transmission element. A second transmission element has a second communicating surface mounted proximate the second mating surface and adapted to communicate with the first communicating surface.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Daly, Jeffery E. (Cypress, TX)

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

380

Component technology for Stirling power converters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NASA Lewis Research Center has organized a component technology program as part of the efforts to develop Stirling converter technology for space power applications. The Stirling space power program is part of the NASA High Capacity Power Project of the Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). NASA Lewis is also providing technical management for a DOE/Sandia program to develop Stirling converters for solar terrestrial power producing electricity for the utility grid. The primary contractors for the space power and solar terrestrial programs develop component technologies directly related to their program goals. This Lewis component technology effort, while coordinated with the main programs, aims at longer term issues, advanced technologies, and independent assessments. This paper will present an overview of work on linear alternators, engine/alternator/load interactions and controls, heat exchangers, materials, life and reliability, and bearings.

Thieme, L.G.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

MSTC - Microsystems Science, Technology, and Components - Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Contacts Microsystems Home Custom Microsystems Solutions Microsystems R&D Services Capabilities and Technologies Facilities Trusted Microsystems General Info About Us Awards Contacts Doing Business with Us Fact Sheets MESA News CONTACT US card file image ASIC Custom Solutions email: ASIC Custom Solutions Biological Microsensor Technologies Biosensors and Nanomaterials email: Biosensors and Nanomaterials Chemical Microsensors and Sensor Microsystems Chemical sensors and integrated sensor-based microsystems email: Chemical Microsensors and Sensor Microsystems Custom Components COTS, Capacitors, Magnetics, Cables and Interconnects email: Custom Components Failure Analysis Root Cause and Failure Analysis email: Failure Analysis Integrated Photonics Photonic Crystals, Nano Photonics, Micro Optics

382

Investigations into High Temperature Components and Packaging  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the work that was performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in support of the development of high temperature power electronics and components with monies remaining from the Semikron High Temperature Inverter Project managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). High temperature electronic components are needed to allow inverters to operate in more extreme operating conditions as required in advanced traction drive applications. The trend to try to eliminate secondary cooling loops and utilize the internal combustion (IC) cooling system, which operates with approximately 105 C water/ethylene glycol coolant at the output of the radiator, is necessary to further reduce vehicle costs and weight. The activity documented in this report includes development and testing of high temperature components, activities in support of high temperature testing, an assessment of several component packaging methods, and how elevated operating temperatures would impact their reliability. This report is organized with testing of new high temperature capacitors in Section 2 and testing of new 150 C junction temperature trench insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBTs) in Section 3. Section 4 addresses some operational OPAL-GT information, which was necessary for developing module level tests. Section 5 summarizes calibration of equipment needed for the high temperature testing. Section 6 details some additional work that was funded on silicon carbide (SiC) device testing for high temperature use, and Section 7 is the complete text of a report funded from this effort summarizing packaging methods and their reliability issues for use in high temperature power electronics. Components were tested to evaluate the performance characteristics of the component at different operating temperatures. The temperature of the component is determined by the ambient temperature (i.e., temperature surrounding the device) plus the temperature increase inside the device due the internal heat that is generated due to conduction and switching losses. Capacitors and high current switches that are reliable and meet performance specifications over an increased temperature range are necessary to realize electronics needed for hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs), fuel cell (FC) and plug-in HEVs (PHEVs). In addition to individual component level testing, it is necessary to evaluate and perform long term module level testing to ascertain the effects of high temperature operation on power electronics.

Marlino, L.D.; Seiber, L.E.; Scudiere, M.B.; M.S. Chinthavali, M.S.; McCluskey, F.P.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Innovative Approaches to Large Component Packaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioactive waste disposal often times requires creative approaches in packaging design, especially for large components. Innovative design techniques are required to meet the needs for handling, transporting, and disposing of these large packages. Large components (i.e., Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) heads and even RPVs themselves) require special packaging for shielding and contamination control, as well as for transport and disposal. WMG Inc designed and used standard packaging for RPV heads without control rod drive mechanisms (CRDMs) attached for five RPV heads and has also more recently met an even bigger challenge and developed the innovative Intact Vessel Head Transport System (IVHTS) for RPV heads with CRDMs intact. This packaging system has been given a manufacturer's exemption by the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT) for packaging RPV heads. The IVHTS packaging has now been successfully used at two commercial nuclear power plants. Another example of innovative packaging is the large component packaging that WMG designed, fabricated, and utilized at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). In 2002, West Valley's high-level waste vitrification process was shut down in preparation for D and D of the West Valley Vitrification Facility. Three of the major components of concern within the Vitrification Facility were the Melter, the Concentrate Feed Makeup Tank (CFMT), and the Melter Feed Holdup Tank (MFHT). The removal, packaging, and disposition of these three components presented significant radiological and handling challenges for the project. WMG designed, fabricated, and installed special packaging for the transport and disposal of each of these three components, which eliminated an otherwise time intensive and costly segmentation process that WVDP was considering. Finally, WMG has also designed and fabricated special packaging for both the Connecticut Yankee (CY) and San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) RPVs. This paper presents the approach that has been successfully used for planning, implementing, and preparing for the disposition of large components such as those mentioned previously. It addresses the major regulatory and design requirements for packaging, transporting, and disposing of these components. The specific topics that are covered include radiological characterization, shielding, packaging design, on-site handling and movement, off-site transportation options, a brief discussion on disposition, and lessons learned. (authors)

Freitag, A.; Hooper, M.; Posivak, E.; Sullivan, J. [WMG, Inc., Peekskill, NY 10566 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Loaded Transducer Fpr Downhole Drilling Component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. To close gaps present between transmission elements, transmission elements may be biased with a "spring force," urging them closer together.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

385

Two-component Bose gases under rotation  

SciTech Connect

We examine the formation of vortices in a one- and two-component gas of bosonic atoms in a harmonic trap that is set rotating. Both the mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii approach, and the numerical diagonalization method are employed. For a two-component Bose gas, we show that beside the well-known coreless vortices of single quantization, the interatomic interactions between the two species may lead to coreless vortices of multiple quantization. We furthermore comment on the geometries of the interlaced vortex patterns. In the limit of weak interactions, we finally demonstrate a number of exact results.

Bargi, S.; Kaerkkaeinen, K.; Christensson, J.; Reimann, S. M. [Mathematical Physics, LTH, Lund University, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Kavoulakis, G. M. [Department of Sciences, TEI of Crete, P.O. Box 1939 Heraklion, 71004 Greece (Greece); Manninen, M. [NanoScience Center, Department of Physics, FIN-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

2008-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

386

Nuclear talks in Austria International representatives will meet in Vienna on Saturday to discuss a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear talks in Austria International representatives will meet in Vienna on Saturday to discuss a controversial nuclear fusion plan. The technical meeting of experts is intended to pave the way of nuclear fusion say it provides an attractive long-term energy option, because the basic materials needed

387

Texas A&M University System Chancellor's Diversity Council Representatives from Texas AgriLife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas A&M University System Chancellor's Diversity Council Representatives from Texas AgriLife Facilitator Joni E. Baker, Ph.D. Director of Equal Opportunity and Diversity The Texas A&M University System 200 Technology Way, Suite 1281 College Station, Texas 77845-3424 979-458-6203 979-458-6206 (fax

388

Review of the Facility Representative Program at the Idaho Site, March 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Facility Representative Program at the Idaho Site March 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose.................................................................................................................................................. ! 2.0 Scope ..................................................................................................................................................... ! 3.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Results ..................................................................................................................................................

389

Review of the Facility Representative Program at the Idaho Site, March 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the Facility Representative Program at the Idaho Site March 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose.................................................................................................................................................. ! 2.0 Scope ..................................................................................................................................................... ! 3.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Results ..................................................................................................................................................

390

Texas Revolution Introduction: In this lesson, students will play a game to represent the Texas Revolution.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Revolution Introduction: In this lesson, students will play a game to represent the Texas to use in conjunction with teaching the battles of the Texas Revolution. A large area is needed the students into two teams: the Mexican Army and the Texas Army. Line each team up, shoulder to shoulder

Wilkins, Neal

391

Representative Air Temperature of Thermally Heterogeneous Urban Areas Using the Measured Pressure Gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method to measure an area-averaged ground air temperature based on the hydrostatic equation is shown. The method was devised to overcome the problem of finding the most representative surface air temperature over a wide region, a problem that ...

Hirofumi Sugawara; Ken-ichi Narita; Takehiko Mikami

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

SphereAvatar: a situated display to represent a remote collaborator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An emerging form of telecollaboration utilizes situated or mobile displays at a physical destination to virtually represent remote visitors. An example is a personal telepresence robot, which acts as a physical proxy for a remote visitor, and uses cameras ... Keywords: avatars, mixed reality, remote collaboration, spherical displays, telepresence, telerobotics

Oyewole Oyekoya; William Steptoe; Anthony Steed

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Independent component analysis for document restoration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a novel approach to restoring digital document images, with the aim of improving text legibility and OCR performance. These are often compromised by the presence of artifacts in the background, derived from many kinds of degradations, such ... Keywords: Blind source separation, Degraded documents, Independent component analysis, Palimpsest restoration- Bleed-through cancellation

Anna Tonazzini; Luigi Bedini; Emanuele Salerno

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

SCADA architecture with mobile remote components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the advent of new technologies, the demand of connecting IT systems to the Internet is increasing. This is also the case for Control systems specifically SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) systems. Traditional SCADA systems are connected ... Keywords: SCADA, control systems, mobility, remote components

Tai-Hoon Kim

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Hydro Life Extension Modernization Guide Volume 6 - Civil and Other Plant Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydroelectric power generation is a proven vital source of electricity in the United States and worldwide. This guideline represents the last in a series of seven to help hydroelectric utilities access the needs and benefits of life extension and modernization. This volume focuses on alternatives for civil and other plant components to assist in evaluating the cost and economic justification for various alternatives and to implement the selected plan. It also provides a screening procedure and criteria t...

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Passive Component Maintenance Guide for Nuclear Power Plant Personnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The information contained in this report represents a significant collection of technical and human performance information, including techniques and good practices, related to the design, maintenance, and operation of passive components common at most domestic nuclear power plants. Assemblage of this information provides a single point of reference for plant engineering and maintenance personnel, both in the present and in the future. Through the use of this guideline, in close conjunction with the indu...

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

397

Vaporization modeling of petroleum-biofuel drops using a hybrid multi-component approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical modeling of the vaporization characteristics of multi-component fuel mixtures is performed in this study. The fuel mixtures studied include those of binary components, biodiesel, diesel-biodiesel, and gasoline-ethanol. The use of biofuels has become increasingly important for reasons of environmental sustainability. Biofuels are often blended with petroleum fuels, and the detailed understanding of the vaporization process is essential to designing a clean and efficient combustion system. In this study, a hybrid vaporization model is developed that uses continuous thermodynamics to describe petroleum fuels and discrete components to represent biofuels. The model is validated using the experimental data of n-heptane, n-heptane-n-decane mixture, and biodiesel. Since biodiesel properties are not universal due to the variation in feedstock, methods for predicting biodiesel properties based on the five dominant fatty acid components are introduced. Good levels of agreement in the predicted and measured drop size histories are obtained. Furthermore, in modeling the diesel-biodiesel drop, results show that the drop lifetime increases with the biodiesel concentration in the blend. During vaporization, only the lighter components of diesel fuel vaporize at the beginning. Biodiesel components do not vaporize until some time during the vaporization process. On the other hand, results of gasoline-ethanol drops indicate that both fuels start to vaporize once the process begins. At the beginning, the lighter components of gasoline have a slightly higher vaporization rate than ethanol. After a certain time, ethanol vaporizes faster than the remaining gasoline components. At the end, the drop reduces to a regular gasoline drop with heavier components. Overall, the drop lifetime increases as the concentration of ethanol increases in the drop due to the higher latent heat. (author)

Zhang, Lei; Kong, Song-Charng [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, 2025 Black Engineering Building, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Correlated Component Analysis for diffuse component separation with error estimation on simulated Planck polarization data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a data analysis pipeline for CMB polarization experiments, running from multi-frequency maps to the power spectra. We focus mainly on component separation and, for the first time, we work out the covariance matrix accounting for errors associated to the separation itself. This allows us to propagate such errors and evaluate their contributions to the uncertainties on the final products.The pipeline is optimized for intermediate and small scales, but could be easily extended to lower multipoles. We exploit realistic simulations of the sky, tailored for the Planck mission. The component separation is achieved by exploiting the Correlated Component Analysis in the harmonic domain, that we demonstrate to be superior to the real-space application (Bonaldi et al. 2006). We present two techniques to estimate the uncertainties on the spectral parameters of the separated components. The component separation errors are then propagated by means of Monte Carlo simulations to obtain the corresponding contributi...

Ricciardi, S; Natoli, P; Polenta, G; Baccigalupi, C; Salerno, E; Kayabol, K; Bedini, L; De Zotti, G; 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2010.16819.x

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Only the Best Can Make It: Optimal Component Selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Component-based Software Engineering (CBSE), the construction of cost-optimal component systems is a nontrivial task. It requires not only to optimally select components and their adaptors but also to take their interplay into account. In this paper, ... Keywords: adaptor code generation, component selection, component-based software engineering, cost functions, term rewriting

Lars Gesellensetter; Sabine Glesner

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Beamline standard component designs for the Advanced Photon Source  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Photon Source (APS) has initiated a design standardization and modularization activity for the APS synchrotron radiation beamline components. These standard components are included in components library, sub-components library and experimental station library. This paper briefly describes these standard components using both technical specifications and side view drawings.

Shu, D.; Barraza, J.; Brite, C.; Chang, J.; Sanchez, T.; Tcheskidov, V.; Kuzay, T.M.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Enabling Technologies for Ceramic Hot Section Components  

SciTech Connect

Silicon-based ceramics are attractive materials for use in gas turbine engine hot sections due to their high temperature mechanical and physical properties as well as lower density than metals. The advantages of utilizing ceramic hot section components include weight reduction, and improved efficiency as well as enhanced power output and lower emissions as a result of reducing or eliminating cooling. Potential gas turbine ceramic components for industrial, commercial and/or military high temperature turbine applications include combustor liners, vanes, rotors, and shrouds. These components require materials that can withstand high temperatures and pressures for long duration under steam-rich environments. For Navy applications, ceramic hot section components have the potential to increase the operation range. The amount of weight reduced by utilizing a lighter gas turbine can be used to increase fuel storage capacity while a more efficient gas turbine consumes less fuel. Both improvements enable a longer operation range for Navy ships and aircraft. Ceramic hot section components will also be beneficial to the Navy's Growth Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and VAATE (Versatile Affordable Advanced Turbine Engines) initiatives in terms of reduced weight, cooling air savings, and capability/cost index (CCI). For DOE applications, ceramic hot section components provide an avenue to achieve low emissions while improving efficiency. Combustors made of ceramic material can withstand higher wall temperatures and require less cooling air. Ability of the ceramics to withstand high temperatures enables novel combustor designs that have reduced NO{sub x}, smoke and CO levels. In the turbine section, ceramic vanes and blades do not require sophisticated cooling schemes currently used for metal components. The saved cooling air could be used to further improve efficiency and power output. The objectives of this contract were to develop technologies critical for ceramic hot section components for gas turbine engines. Significant technical progress has been made towards maturation of the EBC and CMC technologies for incorporation into gas turbine engine hot-section. Promising EBC candidates for longer life and/or higher temperature applications relative to current state of the art BSAS-based EBCs have been identified. These next generation coating systems have been scaled-up from coupons to components and are currently being field tested in Solar Centaur 50S engine. CMC combustor liners were designed, fabricated and tested in a FT8 sector rig to demonstrate the benefits of a high temperature material system. Pretest predictions made through the use of perfectly stirred reactor models showed a 2-3x benefit in CO emissions for CMC versus metallic liners. The sector-rig test validated the pretest predictions with >2x benefit in CO at the same NOx levels at various load conditions. The CMC liners also survived several trip shut downs thereby validating the CMC design methodology. Significant technical progress has been made towards incorporation of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and environmental barrier coatings (EBC) technologies into gas turbine engine hot-section. The second phase of the program focused on the demonstration of a reverse flow annular CMC combustor. This has included overcoming the challenges of design and fabrication of CMCs into 'complex' shapes; developing processing to apply EBCs to 'engine hardware'; testing of an advanced combustor enabled by CMCs in a PW206 rig; and the validation of performance benefits against a metal baseline. The rig test validated many of the pretest predictions with a 40-50% reduction in pattern factor compared to the baseline and reductions in NOx levels at maximum power conditions. The next steps are to develop an understanding of the life limiting mechanisms in EBC and CMC materials, developing a design system for EBC coated CMCs and durability testing in an engine environment.

Venkat Vedula; Tania Bhatia

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

402

Enabling Technologies for Ceramic Hot Section Components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Silicon-based ceramics are attractive materials for use in gas turbine engine hot sections due to their high temperature mechanical and physical properties as well as lower density than metals. The advantages of utilizing ceramic hot section components include weight reduction, and improved efficiency as well as enhanced power output and lower emissions as a result of reducing or eliminating cooling. Potential gas turbine ceramic components for industrial, commercial and/or military high temperature turbine applications include combustor liners, vanes, rotors, and shrouds. These components require materials that can withstand high temperatures and pressures for long duration under steam-rich environments. For Navy applications, ceramic hot section components have the potential to increase the operation range. The amount of weight reduced by utilizing a lighter gas turbine can be used to increase fuel storage capacity while a more efficient gas turbine consumes less fuel. Both improvements enable a longer operation range for Navy ships and aircraft. Ceramic hot section components will also be beneficial to the Navy's Growth Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and VAATE (Versatile Affordable Advanced Turbine Engines) initiatives in terms of reduced weight, cooling air savings, and capability/cost index (CCI). For DOE applications, ceramic hot section components provide an avenue to achieve low emissions while improving efficiency. Combustors made of ceramic material can withstand higher wall temperatures and require less cooling air. Ability of the ceramics to withstand high temperatures enables novel combustor designs that have reduced NO{sub x}, smoke and CO levels. In the turbine section, ceramic vanes and blades do not require sophisticated cooling schemes currently used for metal components. The saved cooling air could be used to further improve efficiency and power output. The objectives of this contract were to develop technologies critical for ceramic hot section components for gas turbine engines. Significant technical progress has been made towards maturation of the EBC and CMC technologies for incorporation into gas turbine engine hot-section. Promising EBC candidates for longer life and/or higher temperature applications relative to current state of the art BSAS-based EBCs have been identified. These next generation coating systems have been scaled-up from coupons to components and are currently being field tested in Solar Centaur 50S engine. CMC combustor liners were designed, fabricated and tested in a FT8 sector rig to demonstrate the benefits of a high temperature material system. Pretest predictions made through the use of perfectly stirred reactor models showed a 2-3x benefit in CO emissions for CMC versus metallic liners. The sector-rig test validated the pretest predictions with >2x benefit in CO at the same NOx levels at various load conditions. The CMC liners also survived several trip shut downs thereby validating the CMC design methodology. Significant technical progress has been made towards incorporation of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and environmental barrier coatings (EBC) technologies into gas turbine engine hot-section. The second phase of the program focused on the demonstration of a reverse flow annular CMC combustor. This has included overcoming the challenges of design and fabrication of CMCs into 'complex' shapes; developing processing to apply EBCs to 'engine hardware'; testing of an advanced combustor enabled by CMCs in a PW206 rig; and the validation of performance benefits against a metal baseline. The rig test validated many of the pretest predictions with a 40-50% reduction in pattern factor compared to the baseline and reductions in NOx levels at maximum power conditions. The next steps are to develop an understanding of the life limiting mechanisms in EBC and CMC materials, developing a design system for EBC coated CMCs and durability testing in an engine environment.

Venkat Vedula; Tania Bhatia

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

403

On October 20, 2011, representatives of Howe Corporation, Gade Environmental, an  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 20, 2011, representatives of Howe Corporation, Gade Environmental, and Beecon ProfServe October 20, 2011, representatives of Howe Corporation, Gade Environmental, and Beecon ProfServe met with DOE to discuss the proposed rules EERE-2010 BT-TP-0036 RIN 1904-AC38 Energy Efficiency Program for Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Test Procedures for Commercial Ice Makers. The meeting was held at the request of Howe Corporation at the DOE offices in Washington DC. In attendance: Ari Altman, DOE Ashley Armstrong, DOE Robert Bittner, Beecon ProfServe John Cymbalsky, DOE Mary Gade, Gade Environmental Group Mary Howe, Howe Corporation Charles Llenza, DOE Jeff Mackowiak, Howe Corporation Mark O'Malley, Gade Environmental Group Howe Corporation introduced and discussed the following concerns regarding the NOPR. For reference,

404

Registering for DAU Online Course CLC 222, Contracting Officer's Representative Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Registering for DAU Online Course CLC 222, Contracting Officer's Representative Training Registering for DAU Online Course CLC 222, Contracting Officer's Representative Training To register for this, and any other DAU online course, you must first register in the Federal Acquisition Institute's Training Application System (FAITAS). Steps to register in FAITAS and to register for the course are below. Please note, you are required to provide your Social Security Number (SSN) to complete registration. This is the only time the SSN is required; this information is restricted and not available to unauthorized personnel. Please contact Linda Ott (linda.ott@hq.doe.gov, 202-287-5310) if you have any questions or concerns. If you encounter problems with

405

Facility Representative Performance Indicator Report for for Jan-Mar 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Performance Indicators January-March 2013 Facility Representative Performance Indicators January-March 2013 Staffing, Qualification, and Utilization Data OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (EM) Location Analysis FTE Approved FTE Actual Staff % Staff * Gains / Losses % Core Qualified * % Fully Qualified * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 3 3 4 100 0 100 100 63 ID (EM) 1 7 7 6 86 0 71 71 90 OR (EM) 14 14 13 93 0 86 86 75 ORP 13 13 13 100 0 100 100 90 PPPO 2 6 6 6 100 ±1 100 100 74 RL 17 15 15 88 0 88 82 70 SPRU 3 2 2 2 100 0 100 0 90 SR 4 31 31 27 87 -1 87 87 86 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 100 100 75 EM Totals 95 93 88 93 +1, -2 89 86 79 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >65 Location Key: CBFO = Carlsbad Field Office ORP = Office of River Protection SPRU = Separations Process Research Unit

406

2012 Facility Representative/Safety System Oversight/Fire Safety Workshop - Registrants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative / Safety System Oversight Workshop Facility Representative / Safety System Oversight Workshop DOE Fire Safety Workshop Federal Technical Capability Panel (FTCP) Meeting May 14 - 18, 2012, at the Alexis park Resort Hotel, Las Vegas, NV Registrants As of 5/15/2012 Total Number: 218 First Name Last Name Government /Contractor Agency Secretarial Office Site Position Training Course FTCP FS 5/15 FS 5/16 FR/SSO Plenary FR Track SSO Track Fire Safety Training Tour Ron Alderson Government Employee DOE NNSA Nevada SSO SAF-271 No No No Yes No Yes No No Josh Allen Government Employee DOE EM Richland FR No No No No Yes Yes No No No Mark Alsdorf Government Employee DOE HSS Headquarters NTC Safety Training Manager SAF-271 Yes No No Yes No No No No Xavier Aponte Government Employee

407

WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO YOU AND THE PEOPLE YOU REPRESENT.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPRESENT. REPRESENT. regulators consumer advocates environmental groups technology providers policymakers ONE of SIX SMART GRID STAKEHOLDER BOOKS A smarter grid can work harder and more efficiently to respond to the needs of all consumers, contain costs and enable clean-energy solutions at scale. regulators utilities 2 DISCLAIMER PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor Litos Strategic Communication, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information apparatus, product,

408

Representing natural and manmade drainage systems in an earth system modeling framework  

SciTech Connect

Drainage systems can be categorized into natural or geomorphological drainage systems, agricultural drainage systems and urban drainage systems. They interact closely among themselves and with climate and human society, particularly under extreme climate and hydrological events such as floods. This editorial articulates the need to holistically understand and model drainage systems in the context of climate change and human influence, and discusses the requirements and examples of feasible approaches to representing natural and manmade drainage systems in an earth system modeling framework.

Li, Hongyi; Wu, Huan; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

409

Fatigue of Composite Material Beam Elements Representative of Wind Turbine Blade Substructure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The database and analysis methods used to predict wind turbine blade structural performance for stiffness, static strength, dynamic response,and fatigue lifetime are validated through the design, fabrication, and testing of substructural elements. We chose a test specimen representative of wind turbine blade primary substructure to represent the spar area of a typical wind turbine blade. We then designed an I-beam with flanges and web to represent blade structure, using materials typical of many U.S.-manufactured blades. Our study included the fabrication and fatigue testing of 52 beams and many coupons of beam material. Fatigue lifetimes were consistent with predictions based on the coupon database. The final beam specimen proved to be a very useful tool for validating strength and lifetime predictions for a variety of flange and web materials, and is serving as a test bed to ongoing studies of structural details and the interaction between manufacturing and structural performance. Th e beam test results provide a significant validation of the coupon database and the methodologies for predicting fatigue of composite material beam elements.

Mandell, J. F.; Samborsky, D. D.; Combs, D. W.; Scott, M. E.; Cairns, D. S. (Department of Chemical Engineering, Montana State University)

1998-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

410

The Distributive Impact Assessment Model (DIAM): Technology share component  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The models described in this report are used to allocate total energy consumption in an energy end-use service area by fuel type (including electricity) within the Distributive Impact Assessment Model (DIAM) framework. The primary objective of the DIAM is to provide energy consumption and expenditure forecasts for different population categories that are consistent with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration`s (EIA`s) National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) forecast, which is produced annually in the Annual Energy Outlook and periodically in support of DOE policy formulation and analysis. The models are multinominal logit models that have been estimated using EIA`s 1990 Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Three models were estimated: space heating share, water heating share, and cooking share. These models are used to allocate total end-use service consumption over different technologies defined by fuel type characteristics. For each of the end-use service categories, consumption shares are estimated for a subset of six fuel types: natural gas, electricity, liquid petroleum gas, fuel oil/kerosene, wood, and other fuel.

Poyer, D.A.; Earl, E.; Bonner, B.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

From Multi-Component Gas Streams Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Separation of CO Separation of CO 2 From Multi-Component Gas Streams Opportunity Research is active on the patent-pending technology, titled "Apparatus and Process for the Separation of Gases Using Supersonic Expansion and Oblique Shock Wave Compression." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview The separation of a gaseous mixture into constituent gases has proven to be useful for a variety of industrial and commercial applications. Currently CO 2 can be separated from multi- component gas streams using compression and refrigeration techniques in order to condense the CO 2 out of a vapor phase so that it can be mechanically separated from the stream.

412

System for inspecting large size structural components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a system for inspecting large scale structural components such as concrete walls or the like. The system includes a mobile gamma radiation source and a mobile gamma radiation detector. The source and detector are constructed and arranged for simultaneous movement along parallel paths in alignment with one another on opposite sides of a structural component being inspected. A control system provides signals which coordinate the movements of the source and detector and receives and records the radiation level data developed by the detector as a function of source and detector positions. The radiation level data is then analyzed to identify areas containing defects corresponding to unexpected variations in the radiation levels detected.

Birks, Albert S. (Columbus, OH); Skorpik, James R. (Kennewick, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

FILTER COMPONENT ASSESSMENT--CERAMIC CANDLES--  

SciTech Connect

Efforts at Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) have been focused on development of hot gas filter systems as an enabling technology for advanced coal and biomass-based gas turbine power generation applications. SWPC has been actively involved in the development of advanced filter materials and component configuration, has participated in numerous surveillance programs characterizing the material properties and microstructure of field tested filter elements, and has undertaken extended, accelerated filter life testing programs. This report summarizes the results of SWPC's filter component assessment efforts, identifying the performance and stability of porous monolithic, fiber reinforced, and filament wound ceramic hot gas candle filters, potentially for {ge}3 years of viable pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) service operating life.

M.A. Alvin

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

414

Mechanical Cutting of Irradiated Reactor Internal Components  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the use of mechanical cutting methods to volume reduce and package irradiated reactor internal components. The recent completion of the removal of the Reactor Vessel Internals (RVI) from within the Sacramento Municipal Utility District's (SMUD) Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Plant demonstrates that unlike previous methods used for similar projects, mechanical cutting minimizes exposure to workers, costly water cleanup, and excessive secondary waste generation. (authors)

Anderson, M.G.; Fennema, J.A. [MOTA Corporation, West Columbia, SC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Columbia River Component Data Evaluation Summary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Columbia River Component Data Compilation and Evaluation task was to compile, review, and evaluate existing information for constituents that may have been released to the Columbia River due to Hanford Site operations. Through this effort an extensive compilation of information pertaining to Hanford Site-related contaminants released to the Columbia River has been completed for almost 965 km of the river.

C.S. Cearlock

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

416

Thermal spray applications for power plant components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power plants usually are located near water and many are in salt water environments. Corrosion occurring in these environments is a problem often solved with thermal spray coatings. The use of thermal spray aluminum and zinc in three power plants for various components is reviewed. Special emphasis is on the cooling tower at the Seabrook, New Hampshire plant. A guide to selection of the coating and process also is given.

Sampson, E.R.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Gas Turbine Component Repair Shop Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aftermarket repair services for gas turbine OM has been undergoing continual transformation beginning with the emergence of independent shops in the 1980s. The original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in the late 1990s began to aggressively pursue repair services. Gas turbine hot section component repair/replacement coupled with inspection/overhaul technical support has come to be offered as long-term service agreements (LTSAs). These agreements often extend from 6 to 18 years. The repair business continu...

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

418

Probability Density Functions to Represent Magnetic Fields at the Solar Surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical simulations of magneto-convection and analysis of solar magnetogram data provide empirical probability density functions (PDFs) for the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field. In this paper, we theoretically explore effects of several types of PDFs on polarized Zeeman line formation. We also propose composite PDFs to account for randomness in both field strength and orientation. Such PDFs can possibly mimic random fields at the solar surface.

Sampoorna, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Mechanical cutting of irradiated reactor internal components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mechanical cutting methods to volume reduce and package reactor internal components are now a viable solution for stakeholders challenged with the retirement of first generation nuclear facilities. The recent completion of the removal of the Reactor Vessel Internals (RVI) from within the Sacramento Municipal Utility District's (SMUD) Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Plant demonstrates that unlike previous methods, inclusive of plasma arc and abrasive water-jet cutting, mechanical cutting minimizes exposure to workers, costly water cleanup, and excessive secondary waste generation. Reactor internal components were segmented, packaged, and removed from the reactor building for shipment or storage, allowing the reactor cavity to be drained and follow-on reactor segmentation activities to proceed in the dry state. Area exposure rates at the work positions during the segmentation process were generally 1 mR per hr. Radiological exposure documented for the underwater segmentation processes totaled 13 person rem. The reactor internals weighing 343,000 pounds were segmented into over 200 pieces for maximum shipping package efficiency and produced 5,600 lb of stainless steel chips and shavings which were packaged in void spaces of existing disposal containers, therefore creating no additional disposal volume. Because no secondary waste was driven into suspension in the reactor cavity water, the water was free released after one pass through a charcoal bed and ion exchange filter system. Mechanical cutting techniques are capable of underwater segmentation of highly radioactive components on a large scale. This method minimized radiological exposure and costly water cleanup while creating no secondary waste.

Anderson, Michael G. [MOTA Corporation: 3410 Sunset Boulevard, West Columbia, SC, 29169 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Data Transmission System For A Downhole Component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a system for transmitting data through a string of downhole components. In accordance with one aspect of the invention, the system includes a plurality of downhole components, such as sections of pipe in a drill string. Each component has a first and second end, with a first communication element located at the first end and a second communication element located at the second end. Each communication element includes a first contact and a second contact. The system also includes a coaxial cable running between the first and second communication elements, the coaxial cable having a conductive tube and a conductive core within it. The system also includes a first and second connector for connecting the first and second communication elements respectively to the coaxial cable. Each connector includes a conductive sleeve, lying concentrically within the conductive tube, which fits around and makes electrical contact with the conductive core. The conductive sleeve is electrically isolated from the conductive tube. The conductive sleeve of the first connector is in electrical contact with the first contact of the first communication element, the conductive sleeve of the second connector is in electrical contact with the first contact of the second communication element, and the conductive tube is in electrical contact with both the second contact of the first communication element and the second contact of the second communication element.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT)

2005-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Superplastic forming of stainless steel automotive components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exhaust emission standards are governmentally controlled standards, which are increasingly stringent, forcing alternate strategies to meet these standards. One approach to improve the efficiency of the exhaust emission equipment is to decrease the time required to get the catalytic converter to optimum operating temperature. To accomplish this, automotive manufacturers are using double wall stainless steel exhaust manifolds to reduce heat loss of the exhaust gases to the converter. The current method to manufacture double wall stainless steel exhaust components is to use a low-cost alloy with good forming properties and extensively form, cut, assemble, and weld the pieces. Superplastic forming (SPF) technology along with alloy improvements has potential at making this process more cost effective. Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and USCAR Low Emission Partnership (LEP) worked under a Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) to evaluate material properties, SPF behavior, and welding behavior of duplex stainless steel alloy for automotive component manufacturing. Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has a separate CRADA with the LEP to use SPF technology to manufacture a double wall stainless steel exhaust component. As a team these CRADAs developed and demonstrated a technical plan to accomplish making double wall stainless steel exhaust manifolds.

Bridges, B. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Elmer, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Carol, L. [AC Delco Systems World Headquarters, Flint, MI (United States). USCAR Low Emissions Technology Research and Development Partnership

1997-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

422

Free-Energy Component Analysis of 40 ProteinDNA Complexes: A Consensus View on the Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free-Energy Component Analysis of 40 Protein­DNA Complexes: A Consensus View on the Thermodynamics. Computation of absolute binding free energies for systems of this complexity transiting from structural a computational first atlas of the free energy contributors to binding in 40 protein­DNA complexes representing

Jayaram, Bhyravabotla

423

Gregory H. Friedman: Provided for The Committee on Oversight and Government Reform U.S. House of Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Gregory H. Friedman: Provided for The Committee on Oversight and Government Reform U.S. House of Representatives

424

HVAC component data modeling using industry foundation classes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HVAC Component Data Modeling Using Industry Foundationof a major extension of the HVAC part of the IFC data model.generic approach for handling HVAC components. This includes

Bazjanac, Vladimir; Forester, James; Haves, Philip; Sucic, Darko; Xu, Peng

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

DAVID Fuel Cell Components SL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DAVID Fuel Cell Components SL Jump to: navigation, search Name DAVID Fuel Cell Components SL Place Madrid, Spain Zip 28010 Product DAVIDFCC is devoted to the research, manufacture...

426

H2A Delivery Components Model and Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Replacement capital includes for some components H2A Delivery Component Economic Analysis * The economic results presented assume specific scenario - Scenario refers to...

427

All-sky astrophysical component separation with Fast Independent Component Analysis (FastICA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new, fast, algorithm for the separation of astrophysical components superposed in maps of the sky, based on the fast Independent Component Analysis technique (FastICA). It allows to recover both the spatial pattern and the frequency scalings of the emissions from statistically independent astrophysical processes, present along the line-of-sight, from multi-frequency observations. We apply FastICA to simulated observations of the microwave sky with angular resolution and instrumental noise at the mean nominal levels for the Planck satellite, containing the most important known diffuse signals: the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), Galactic synchrotron, dust and free-free emissions. A method for calibrating the reconstructed maps of each component at each frequency has been devised. The spatial pattern of all the components have been recovered on all scales probed by the instrument. In particular, the CMB angular power spectra is recovered at the percent level up to $\\ell_{max}\\simeq 2000$. Freque...

Maino, D; Baccigalupi, C; Perrotta, F; Banday, A J; Bedini, L; Burigana, C; Zotti, G D; Górski, K M; Salerno, E

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Equipment and Piping Labeling Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EQUIPMENT AND PIPING LABELING EQUIPMENT AND PIPING LABELING Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: To verify that facility equipment and piping are labeled in a manner such that facility personnel are able to positively identify equipment they operate. To ensure that an effective labeling program is in effect to reduce operator and maintenance errors from incorrect identification of equipment, to increase training effectiveness by tracing the actual facility system as opposed to tracing its schematic, and to reduce personnel exposure to radiation and hazardous materials. This assessment provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's program for labeling equipment and piping and for establishing compliance

429

Statistical description of heavy truck accidents on representative segments of interstate highway  

SciTech Connect

Any quantitative analysis of the risk of transportation accidents requires the use of many different statistical distributions. Included among these are the types of accidents which occur and the severity of these when they do occur. Several previous studies have derived this type of information for truck traffic over U. S. highways in general; these data are not necessarily applicable for the anticipated LMFBR spent fuel cask routes. This report presents data for highway segments representative of the specific LMFBR cask routes which are anticipated. These data are based upon a detailed record-by-record review of filed reports for accidents which occurred along the specified route segments.

Hartman, W.F.; Davidson, C.A.; Foley, J.T.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Model documentation: Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The methodology employed allows the analysis of impacts of regional capacity constraints in the interstate natural gas pipeline network and the identification of pipeline capacity expansion requirements. There is an explicit representation of core and noncore markets for natural gas transmission and distribution services, and the key components of pipeline tariffs are represented in a pricing algorithm. Natural gas pricing and flow patterns are derived by obtaining a market equilibrium across the three main elements of the natural gas market: the supply element, the demand element, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. The NGTDM consists of four modules: the Annual Flow Module, the Capacity F-expansion Module, the Pipeline Tariff Module, and the Distributor Tariff Module. A model abstract is provided in Appendix A.

NONE

1995-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

431

MSTC - Microsystems Science, Technology, and Components - Trusted  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trusted Microsystems Trusted Microsystems Microsystems Home Custom Microsystems Solutions Microsystems R&D Services Capabilities and Technologies Facilities Trusted Microsystems General Info About Us Awards Contacts Doing Business with Us Fact Sheets MESA News Trusted Microsystems for National Security Customers Trusted R&D Trusted Design Trusted Fabrication Trusted BEOL Trusted Custom Electronic Components Trusted Microsystems "Trusted Microsystems" encompasses the entire product development cycle. Sandia's Microsystems Center affords access to trusted people and facilities for research and development, design, layout, fabrication, characterization, packaging, and test. Trusted Design Secure design facility with disciplined and trusted design flow and methodologies Trusted Structured ASIC

432

Thermal Study of Inverter Components: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal histories of inverter components were collected from operating inverters from several manufacturers and three locations. The data were analyzed to determine thermal profiles, the dependence on local conditions, and to assess the effect on inverter reliability. Inverter temperatures were shown to increase with the power dissipation of the inverters, follow diurnal and annual cycles, and have a dependence on wind speed. An accumulated damage model was applied to the temperature profiles and an example of using these data to predict reliability was explored.

Sorensen, N. R.; Thomas, E. V.; Quintana, M. A.; Barkaszi, S.; Rosenthal, A.; Zhang, Z.; Kurtz, S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Surface modification of tribological components in transportation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reviews a number of programs funded through the Engineered Tribological Interfaces (ETI) Task area of the Tribology Program that utilize energetic beams of atoms to enhance the mechanical and microstructural properties of near-surface regions to improve the tribological performance of critical components. The processes used in these programs include techniques based on chemical vapor deposition, physical vapor deposition, and ion implantation. A common feature of these techniques is their ability to produce dense and adherent modified surfaces without need for subsequent grinding/polishing treatments. Another feature of these techniques is their ability to introduce a wide range of elements into near-surface regions.

Fenske, G.R.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

RECLAMATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING COMPONENTS  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive material packages are withdrawn from use for various reasons; loss of mission, decertification, damage, replacement, etc. While the packages themselves may be decertified, various components may still be able to perform to their required standards and find useful service. The Packaging Technology and Pressurized Systems group of the Savannah River National Laboratory has been reducing the cost of producing new Type B Packagings by reclaiming, refurbishing, and returning to service the containment vessels from older decertified packagings. The program and its benefits are presented.

Abramczyk, G.; Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.; Bellamy, S.

2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

435

FUNDAMENTAL COMPONENTS OF THE "PACE" ANALOG COMPUTER  

SciTech Connect

The analog computer used in this installation was manufactured by Electronics Asscciates, Inc. The installation consists of two consoles and a test rack. Each console is made up of 56 operational amplifiers, 5 electronic multipliers, 5 diode function generators, 1 noise generator, 8 pot padders, 80 attenuators, and the recording equipment. It is possible to "slave" one console to the other for problems that require more equipment than is available on the one console. The test rack is provided for the purpose of checking the components without causing any loss of operating time on the consoles. (W.D.M.)

Scott, W.E.

1959-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Turbine engine component with cooling passages  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A component for use in a turbine engine including a first member and a second member associated with the first member. The second member includes a plurality of connecting elements extending therefrom. The connecting elements include securing portions at ends thereof that are received in corresponding cavities formed in the first member to attach the second member to the first member. The connecting elements are constructed to space apart a first surface of the second member from a first surface of the first member such that at least one cooling passage is formed between adjacent connecting elements and the first surface of the second member and the first surface of the first member.

Arrell, Douglas J. (Oviedo, FL); James, Allister W. (Orlando, FL)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

437

Osadciw, “Fusion for Component based Face Recognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — This paper proposes a practical way to realize the diversity in face recognition system for performance improvement by fusing the classification results from the components (characteristic regions such as eyes, nose and mouth) and from the whole face image, instead of concatenating the face feature and the modular features for a single classifier. The extracted sub-images are not totally independent from the face image, but the experiments show that the fused result is improved from the recognition result based on the face or components alone. The fusion is implemented and compared at both score level and decision level. Communication resources are preserved between the sensor and fusion point in decision level fusion at the expense of performance, and the selection of which fusion scheme to use depends on the system resources and performance requirement. In the same way that the face images are used to construct the Eigenface [1] or DFLDA [2] feature space for recognition, the componentsare used to construct the feature spaces for each part on their own. Four components are considered in the simulation: eyes, nose, moth and forehead to derive similarity scores for four classifiers. Score level fusion sums the scores from each classifier to make the final decision as shown in Figure 1. The summation could be weighted according to the relative accuracy and importance of each individual classifier [3], [4]. Score level fusion needs to transmit the real number scores from the classifiers to the fusion center. This takes more transmission recourses than the categorical ranking decisions from the classifiers, but the score provides more information. Decision level fusion utilizes majority voting to fuse the results from each classifier as shown in Figure 2. Decision level fusion greatly reduces bandwidth needs on transmission. However, once the decision is made at each classifier based on the scores, the information on their relative degrees of similarity is lost preventing its use in the final decision. As shown in Table I, the classifiers based on the components are weaker than the classifier based on the face. Variations based on different weighting of the five classifiers are tried.

Yanjun Yan; Lisa Ann Osadciw

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Strain rate, temperature and representative length scale influence on plasticity and yield stress in copper  

SciTech Connect

Shock compression of materials constitutes a complex process involving high strain rates, elevated temperatures and compression of the lattice. Materials properties are greatly affected by temperature, the representative length scale and the strain rate of the deformation. Experimentally, it is difficult to study the dynamic microscopic mechanisms that affect materials properties following high intensity shock loading, but they can be investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Moreover, MD allows a better control over some parameters. We are using MD simulations to study the effect of the strain rate, representative length scale and temperature on the properties of metals during compression. A half-million-atom Cu sample is subjected to strain rates ranging from 10{sup 7} s{sup -1} to 10{sup 12} s{sup -1} at different temperatures ranging from 50K to 1500K. Single crystals as well as polycrystals are investigated. Plasticity mechanisms as well as the evolution of the micro- and macro-yield stress are observed. Our results show that the yield stress increases with increasing strain rate and decreasing temperature. We also show that the strain rate at which the transition between constant and increasing yield stress as a function of the temperature occurs increases with increasing temperature. Calculations at different grain sizes will give an insight into the grain size effect on the plasticity mechanisms and the yield stress.

Dupont, Virginie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

439

2012 Facility Representative/Safety System Oversight/Fire Safety Workshop Agenda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative ï‚· Safety System Oversight ï‚· Fire Safety Facility Representative ï‚· Safety System Oversight ï‚· Fire Safety Overall Workshop Agenda May 14-18, 2012 ï‚· Alexis Park Hotel ï‚· Las Vegas, Nevada Monday, May 14, 2012 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SAF-271, SSO Assessments (Day 1) Zeus B Quality Assurance Overview for FR/SSO Personnel Zeus A 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. Workshop Registration Zeus Foyer Tuesday, May 15, 2012 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Fire Safety Workshop Track Begins (see track agenda) Parthenon 4 SAF-271, SSO Assessments (Day 2) Zeus B . Safety Culture Workshop Zeus A Federal Technical Capability Panel Parthenon 2 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. Workshop Registration Zeus Foyer Wednesday, May 16, 2012 6:30 a.m. - 7:45 a.m. Workshop Registration Zeus Foyer 8:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. FR/SSO Tracks Begin; Plenary session with Fire Safety Track Parthenon 2 & 4

440

Census Bureau. Field Experiences 2 Field Representative Experiences with the Current Population Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In September 2007, U.S. Census Bureau researchers completed a third pilot study on factors that contribute to gaining cooperation and successfully completing survey interviews. This pilot study was part of a larger effort to systematically study interview dynamics and how they affect respondent cooperation with Census Bureau surveys. The results of this study will add to extant data on two previous pilot studies on gaining cooperation behavior (Beck, Wright, & Petkunas, 2007). In 2006, we collected data from Program Coordinators, Program Supervisors, and Senior Field Representatives (SFRs) working on (Beck, Wright, & Petkunas, 2007). The current pilot study involved collecting information from a sample of Census Bureau survey interviewers, called Field Representatives (FRs), throughout the United States. Like these other “field ” employees, FRs work from one of the twelve Census Bureau Regional Offices, which are responsible for the management of field data collection. The FRs filled out a brief questionnaire asking them to list practices, techniques, and recommendations they felt were either successful or unsuccessful at gaining respondent cooperation with Current Population Survey (CPS) interviews. The CPS is a panel survey involving eight monthly interviews with each sampled household. Respondents complete four consecutive monthly interviews, rotate out

Jennifer Beck; Jennifer Beck

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Temporal and Spatial Deployment of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies across the Representative Concentration Pathways  

SciTech Connect

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) Fifth Assessment (to be published in 2013-2014) will to a significant degree be built around four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) that are intended to represent four scenarios of future development of greenhouse gas emissions, land use, and concentrations that span the widest range of potential future atmospheric radiative forcing. Under the very stringent climate policy implied by the 2.6 W/m2 overshoot scenario, all electricity is eventually generated from low carbon sources. However, carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies never comprise more than 50% of total electricity generation in that very stringent scenario or in any of the other cases examined here. There are significant differences among the cases studied here in terms of how CCS technologies are used, with the most prominent being is the significant expansion of biomass+CCS as the stringency of the implied climate policy increases. Cumulative CO2 storage across the three cases that imply binding greenhouse gas constraints ranges by nearly an order of magnitude from 170GtCO2 (radiative forcing of 6.0W/m2 in 2100) to 1600GtCO2 (2.6W/m2 in 2100) over the course of this century. This potential demand for deep geologic CO2 storage is well within published estimates of total global CO2 storage capacity.

Dooley, James J.; Calvin, Katherine V.

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

442

A theoretical framework of component-based software development phases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Component-Based Software Development (CBSD) is considered by many as the next revolution in systems development. Its focus is on the integration of pre-fabricated software components to build systems that increase portability and flexibility. CBSD purports ... Keywords: component-based software development, component-based software development life cycle, design science, systems development approach

Jason H. Sharp; Sherry D. Ryan

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Independent Component Analysis for Document Restoration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a novel approach to restoring digital document images, with the aim of improving text legibility and OCR performance. These are often compromised by the presence of artifacts in the background, derived from many kinds of degradations, such as spots, underwritings, and show-through or bleed-through e#ects. So far, background removal techniques have been based on local, adaptive filters and morphological--structural operators to cope with frequent low-contrast situations. For the specific problem of bleed-through/show-through, most work has been based on the comparison between the front and back pages. This, however, requires a preliminary registration of the two images. Our approach is based on viewing the problem as one of separating overlapped texts and then reformulating it as a blind source separation problem, approached through independent component analysis techniques. These methods have the advantage that no models are required for the background. In addition, we use the spectral components of the image at di#erent bands, so that there is no need for registration. Examples of bleed-through cancellation and recovery of underwriting from palimpsests are provided.

Anna Tonazzini; Luigi Bedini; Emanuele Salerno

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

TANGENTIAL COMPONENT OF THE YORP EFFECT  

SciTech Connect

This Letter discusses how re-emission of absorbed solar light by centimeter- to decimeter-sized structures on the surface of an asteroid can create a component of the recoil force that is parallel to the surface. Under certain conditions, the western sides of stones appears to be on average slightly warmer than their eastern sides, thus experiencing stronger recoil force and increasing the rotation rate of the asteroid. We study this effect, called the tangential YORP effect, in a toy model, replacing stones with walls and simulating heat conductivity in them. We discuss general trends of the effect, estimate its magnitude, and find it to be comparable to the normal YORP effect determined by gross-scale asymmetry of the asteroid. The existence of this effect would modify the predictions of the YORP acceleration of asteroids. In some cases, equilibrium between tangential and normal components of YORP is possible, resulting in a large number of asteroids expected to have no net YORP acceleration, which can be the case for Itokawa.

Golubov, Oleksiy [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, ZAH, University of Heidelberg, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Krugly, Yurij N., E-mail: golubov@ari.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute of Astronomy of Kharkiv National University, Sumska Street 35, Kharkiv 61022 (Ukraine)

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

445

Progress in photovoltaic components and systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Research and Development project is a government/industry partnership between the U.S. Department of Energy and members of the U.S. photovoltaic (PV) industry. The purpose of the project is to work with industry to improve manufacturing processes, reduce manufacturing costs, and improve the performance of PV products. This project is conducted through phased solicitations with industry participants selected through a competitive evaluation process. Starting in 1995, the two most recent solicitations include manufacturing improvements for balance-of-system (BOS) components, energy storage, and PV system design improvements. This paper surveys the work accomplished since that time, as well as BOS work currently in progress in the PV Manufacturing R&D project to identify areas of continued interest and product trends. Industry participants continue to work to improve inverters and to expand the features and capabilities of this key component. The industry also continues to advance fully integrated systems that meet standards for performance and safety. All participants included manufacturing improvements to reduce costs and improve reliability. Accomplishments of the project's participants are summarized to illustrate the product and manufacturing trends.

Thomas, H.; Kroposki, B.; Witt, C.; Bower, W.

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

446

Progress in Photovoltaic Components and Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Research and Development project is a government/industry partnership between the US Department of Energy and members of the US photovoltaic (TV) industry. The purpose of the project is to work with industry to improve manufacturing processes, reduce manufacturing costs, and improve the performance of PV products. This project is conducted through phased solicitations with industry participants selected through a competitive evaluation process. Starting in 1995, the two most recent solicitations include manufacturing improvements for balance-of-system (BOS) components, energy storage, and PV system design improvements. This paper surveys the work accomplished since that time, as well as BOS work currently in progress in the PV Manufacturing R and D project to identify areas of continued interest and product trends. Industry participants continue to work to improve inverters and to expand the features and capabilities of this key component. The industry also continues to advance fully integrated systems that meet standards for performance and safety. All participants included manufacturing improvements to reduce costs and improve reliability. Accomplishments of the project's participants are summarized to illustrate the product and manufacturing trends.

THOMAS,H.; KROPOSKI,B.; WITT,C.; BOWER,WARD I.

2000-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Installation of Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

448

Evaluation of Sialon internal combustion engine components and fabrication of several ceramic components for automotive applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fabrication development work was carried out on a push-rod tip having a stepped OD design and a 90[degree] shoulder in the transition area. Spray-dried Sialon premix was used in dry press tooling, and components were densified to about 98% of theoretical density using pressureless sintering conditions. Upon evaluation of the sintered components, it was found that afl components showed defects in the transition area. Modifications of the pressing parameters, incorporation of a 45[degree] angle in the shoulder area, and the use of tailored premix did not lead to the fabrication of defect-free parts. From these observations, it was concluded that the original part design could not easily be adapted to high-volume ceramic manufacturing methods. Subsequently, a modification to the desip was implemented. An SiC material with improved toughness (Hexoloy SX) was used for fabricating several test components with a closely machined, straight OD design. Pressureless-sintered and post-hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) Hexoloy SX components were supplied to The American Ceramic Engine Company (ACE) for assembly and testing. Fuel pump push-rod assemblies with Hemoloy SX tips were prepared by ACE, but no testing has been carried out to date.

McMurtry, C.H.; Ten Eyck, M.O.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Evaluation of Sialon internal combustion engine components and fabrication of several ceramic components for automotive applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fabrication development work was carried out on a push-rod tip having a stepped OD design and a 90{degree} shoulder in the transition area. Spray-dried Sialon premix was used in dry press tooling, and components were densified to about 98% of theoretical density using pressureless sintering conditions. Upon evaluation of the sintered components, it was found that afl components showed defects in the transition area. Modifications of the pressing parameters, incorporation of a 45{degree} angle in the shoulder area, and the use of tailored premix did not lead to the fabrication of defect-free parts. From these observations, it was concluded that the original part design could not easily be adapted to high-volume ceramic manufacturing methods. Subsequently, a modification to the desip was implemented. An SiC material with improved toughness (Hexoloy SX) was used for fabricating several test components with a closely machined, straight OD design. Pressureless-sintered and post-hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) Hexoloy SX components were supplied to The American Ceramic Engine Company (ACE) for assembly and testing. Fuel pump push-rod assemblies with Hemoloy SX tips were prepared by ACE, but no testing has been carried out to date.

McMurtry, C.H.; Ten Eyck, M.O.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Electricity Market Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the Electricity Market Module as it was used for the Annual Energy Outlook 2013. The Electricity Market Module (EMM) is the electricity supply component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The EMM represents the generation, transmission, and pricing of electricity. It consists of four submodules: the Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP) Submodule, the Electricity Fuel Dispatch (EFD) Submodule, the Electricity Finance and Pricing (EFP) Submodule, and the Electricity Load and Demand (ELD) Submodule.

Jeff Jones

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

451

Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. Subsequent chapters of this report provide: an overview of NGTDM; a description of the interface between the NEMS and NGTDM; an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM; the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module; the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module; the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module; the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module; and a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Electrical Safety Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/NSO IOD Facility Representative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 2003 December 2003 An assessment of the Electrical Safety (ES) program at XXXX was conducted during the week of December XX-XX, 2003. The assessment team evaluated the program using the programmatic areas and specific Lines of Inquiry (LOI) contained in the approved Assessment plan provided. The team consisted of the Facility Representative from National Nuclear Security Administration, as well as ES, Subject Matter Expert support. The assessment plan identified 5 areas of review for Electrical Safety. An integrated process has been established to ensure electrical safety hazards are identified and that adequate controls are defined and implemented. The M&O contractor and other NTS Users management actively participate in the ES program. An implemented Work Control process is in place that ensures

453

Confined Spaces Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONFINED SPACES CONFINED SPACES Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: This assessment provides a basis for evaluating the safety effectiveness of the contractor's confined or enclosed spaces procedure, and for establishing compliance with DOE and OSHA requirements. Specifically, this assessment is to verify the information and findings of the BN Management Self Assessment Report on "Confined Space", ES&H-MSA-03-13, dated December 31, 2003. Criteria: Practices and procedures are in place to protect employees in general industry from the hazards of entry into permit-required confined spaces. 29 CFR 1910.146 (a) Each employee is instructed in the recognition and avoidance of unsafe conditions and the regulations applicable to his work environment to

454

NASA Benchmarks Safety Functions Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SAFETY FUNCTIONS SAFETY FUNCTIONS Assessment Plan Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Management should be proactive in addressing safety-related issues. Management should have an established system to provide a ranking of safety considerations founded upon risk-based priorities. Criteria: A system is in place to provide a ranking of safety considerations founded upon risk-based priorities. (DOE/EH-0135) Procedures clearly define management's responsibility for safety- related decisions and provide for the escalation of matters in an appropriate time frame. (DOE/EH-0135) Management promotes safety programs and the organization's safety culture through sponsoring and attending safety meetings. (DOE/EH- 0135) Management encourages and supports effective programs for reporting

455

DOE-STD-1151-2002; Facility Representative Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1151-2002 1151-2002 April 2002 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1151-2002 iii APPROVAL The Federal Technical Capability Panel consists of senior Department of Energy managers

456

NASA Benchmarks Communications Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMMUNICATIONS COMMUNICATIONS Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Lines of authority are clearly defined with clear and open communications existing between all departments and all levels. Criteria: Dialogue exists between personnel involved in engineering/design, operations, maintenance, safety issues, and remedial actions. Personnel within the departments are promptly informed on issues as they occur on a need-to-know basis. Lessons Learned and feedback is encouraged inter-departmentally regarding safety, adequate resources, and processes to enable prompt and effective corrective actions and resolutions for mission accomplishment. Management has an effective and specified chain of communication in both directions between corporate and facility management. (DOE/EH-0135)

457

NASA Benchmarks Lessons Learned Assessment Plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LESSONS LEARNED LESSONS LEARNED Assessment Plan Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Management should have an established Lessons Learned Program with an effective system to continuously distribute information of improvement in safe operations to all affected personnel. Criteria: Timely and effective action is taken to track and correct identified deficiencies and to prevent their recurrence by addressing their basic causes and related generic problems. (DOE/EH-0135) Management installs an effective corrective action program (caWeb) for safety-related issues, wherein records are updated and actions are tracked through completion. (DOE/EH-0135) Management uses the corrective action program (caWeb) as the database to analyze safety issues, implement corrective actions, and define

458

Facility Representatives, DOE-STD-1063-2011, Change Notice 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STD-1063-2011 STD-1063-2011 February 2011 Change Notice 1 March 2012 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1063-2011 ii Change Notice No. 1 March 2012 Table of Changes Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ Page/Section Change Foreword Update contact information and internet address. Page 20/ Section 5.4.8 Edited the discussion of Interim Qualification to match the language in the Definition section and deleted a redundant word. Page 20/ Section 5.4.10 Clarified qualification requirements for

459

Selection of respirator test panels representative of U.S. adult facial sizes  

SciTech Connect

As requested by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Respirator Research and Development Section, Industrial Hygiene Group, has prepared anthropometric specifications for subjects to test the fit of half-mask, quarter-mask, and full- facepiece respirators. A facial survey of 200 males was conducted, with results similar to those of a recent survey of some 4000 U. S. airmen. Subjects were selected on the basis of face length and face width to wear full-face masks in tests. For testing halfand quarter-masks, face length and lip length were used. Test panels containing 25 male-and-female subjects were used to represent a majority of the working population. A sequential sampling scheme was developed to reduce the amount of testing required to determine if a mask provides adequate protection for diffurent facial sizes. Examples of man test results are given. (auth)

Hack, A.; Hyatt, E.C.; Held, B.J.; Moore, T.O.; Richards, C.P.; McConville, J.T.

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

MSTC - Microsystems Science, Technology, and Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microsystems Microsystems Microsystems Home Custom Microsystems Solutions Microsystems R&D Services Capabilities and Technologies Facilities Trusted Microsystems General Info About Us Awards Contacts Doing Business with Us Fact Sheets MESA News MICROSYSTEMS SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY & COMPONENTS Clear Latest MSTC News Ed Cole appointed Fellow by ASM International Researching new detectors for chemical, biological threats MESA fab streaming video MESAFab streaming video Get Adobe Flash player The concept of integrating more than one transistor on a single chip has had a profound and lasting impact on our society. From the first use in the Minuteman missile to the proliferation of consumer products today, microelectronic circuits have dramatically improved performance, functionality, and reliability, while reducing cost

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems component represents" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Fatigue reliability of wind turbine components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fatigue life estimates for wind turbine components can be extremely variable due to both inherently random and uncertain parameters. A structural reliability analysis is used to qualify the probability that the fatigue life will fall short of a selected target. Reliability analysis also produces measures of the relative importance of the various sources of uncertainty and the sensitivity of the reliability to each input parameter. The process of obtaining reliability estimates is briefly outlined. An example fatigue reliability calculation for a blade joint is formulated; reliability estimates, importance factors, and sensitivities are produced. Guidance in selecting distribution functions for the random variables used to model the random and uncertain parameters is also provided. 5 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Veers, P.S.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Directed light fabrication of rhenium components  

SciTech Connect

Directed Light Fabrication (DLF) is a direct metal deposition process that fuses powder, delivered by gas into the focal zone of a high powered laser beam to form fully dense near-net shaped components. This is accomplished in one step without the use of molds, dies, forming, pressing, sintering or forging equipment. DLF is performed in a high purity inert environment free from the contaminants associated with conventional processing such as oxide and carbon pickup, lubricants, binding agents, cooling or cleaning agents. Applications using rhenium have historically been limited in part by its workability and cost. This study demonstrates the ability to fuse rhenium metal powder, using a DLF machine, into free standing rods and describes the associated parameter study. Microstructural comparisons between DLF deposited rhenium and commercial rhenium sheet product is performed. This research combined with existing DLF technology demonstrates the feasibility of forming complex rhenium, metal shapes directly from powder.

Milewski, J.O.; Thoma, D.J.; Lewis, G.K.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Futuristic concepts in engines and components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This publication includes papers on two-stroke engines and components, Brayton Stirling and Otto Cycles, alternative cycles, advanced combustion, and other related topics. Contents include: Paving the way to controlled combustion engines (CCE); A new class of stratified-charge internal combustion engine; Internal combustion (IC) engine with minimum number of moving parts; New type of heat engine -- externally heated air engine; A porous media burner for reforming methanol for fuel cell powered electric vehicles; Using a Stirling engine simulation program as a regenerator design aid; In-cylinder regenerated engines; High speed electronic fuel injection for direct injected rotary engine; and The characteristics of fuel consumption and exhaust emissions of the side exhaust port rotary engine.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

464

Thermal barrier coatings for turbine components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine component, such as a turbine blade having a metal substrate (22) is coated with a metal MCrAlY alloy layer (24) and then a thermal barrier layer (20) selected from LaAlO.sub.3, NdAlO.sub.3, La.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7, Dy.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12, HO.sub.3 Al.sub.3 O.sub.12, ErAlO.sub.3, GdAlO.sub.3, Yb.sub.2 Ti.sub.2 O.sub.7, LaYbO.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7 or Y.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12.

Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Bethesda, MD); Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Two Component Signal Transduction in Desulfovibrio Species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The environmentally relevant Desulfovibrio species are sulfate-reducing bacteria that are of interest in the bioremediation of heavy metal contaminated water. Among these, the genome of D. vulgaris Hildenborough encodes a large number of two component systems consisting of 72 putative response regulators (RR) and 64 putative histidinekinases (HK), the majority of which are uncharacterized. We classified the D. vulgaris Hildenborough RRs based on their output domains and compared the distribution of RRs in other sequenced Desulfovibrio species. We have successfully purified most RRs and several HKs as His-tagged proteins. We performed phospho-transfer experiments to verify relationships between cognate pairs of HK and RR, and we have also mapped a few non-cognate HK-RR pairs. Presented here are our discoveries from the Desulfovibrio RR categorization and results from the in vitro studies using purified His tagged D. vulgaris HKs and RRs.

Luning, Eric; Rajeev, Lara; Ray, Jayashree; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

466

Statement of Patricia Hoffman Before the US House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development (March 27, 2012)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Statement of Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman Before the US House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development to discuss the President's FY13 budget for the...

467

All-sky astrophysical component separation with Fast Independent Component Analysis (FastICA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new, fast, algorithm for the separation of astrophysical components superposed in maps of the sky. The algorithm, based on the Independent Component Analysis (ICA) technique, is aimed at recovering both the spatial pattern and the frequency scalings of the emissions from statistically independent astrophysical processes, present along the line-of-sight, from multi-frequency observations, without any a priori assumption on properties of the components to be separated, except that all of them, but at most one, must have non-Gaussian distributions. The analysis starts from very simple toy-models of the sky emission in order to assess the quality of the reconstruction when inputs are well known and controlled. In particular we study the dependence of the results of separation conducted on and off the Galactic plane independently, showing that optimal separation is achieved for sky regions where components are smoothly distributed. Then we move to more realistic applications on simulated observations of the microwave sky with angular resolution and instrumental noise at the mean nominal

D. Maino; A. Farusi; C. Baccigalupi; F. Perrotta; L. Bedini

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) Components and Enterprise Component Information System (eCIS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the project was to develop the processes for using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) parts for WR production and to put in place a system for implementing the data management tools required to disseminate, store, track procurement, and qualify vendors. Much of the effort was devoted to determining if the use of COTS parts was possible. A basic question: How does the Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) begin to use COTS in the weapon Stockpile Life Extension Programs with high reliability, affordability, while managing risk at acceptable levels? In FY00, it was determined that a certain weapon refurbishment program could not be accomplished without the use of COTS components. The elements driving the use of COTS components included decreased cost, greater availability, and shorter delivery time. Key factors that required implementation included identifying the best suppliers and components, defining life cycles and predictions of obsolescence, testing the feasibility of using COTS components with a test contractor to ensure capability, as well as quality and reliability, and implementing the data management tools required to disseminate, store, track procurement, and qualify vendors. The primary effort of this project then was to concentrate on the risks involved in the use of COTS and address the issues of part and vendor selection, procurement and acceptance processes, and qualification of the parts via part and sample testing. The Enterprise Component Information System (eCIS) was used to manage the information generated by the COTS process. eCIS is a common interface for both the design and production of NWC components and systems integrating information between SNL National Laboratory (SNL) and the Kansas City Plant (KCP). The implementation of COTS components utilizes eCIS from part selection through qualification release. All part related data is linked across an unclassified network for access by both SNL and KCP personnel. The system includes not only NWC part information but also includes technical reference data for over 25 Million electronic and electromechanical commercial and military parts via a data subscription. With the capabilities added to the system through this project, eCIS provides decision support, parts list/BOM analysis, editing, tracking, workflows, reporting, and history/legacy information integrating manufacturer reference, company technical, company business, and design data.

John Minihan; Ed Schmidt; Greg Enserro; Melissa Thompson

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

469

Waste Package Component Design Methodology Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Executive Summary provides an overview of the methodology being used by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) to design waste packages and ancillary components. This summary information is intended for readers with general interest, but also provides technical readers a general framework surrounding a variety of technical details provided in the main body of the report. The purpose of this report is to document and ensure appropriate design methods are used in the design of waste packages and ancillary components (the drip shields and emplacement pallets). The methodology includes identification of necessary design inputs, justification of design assumptions, and use of appropriate analysis methods, and computational tools. This design work is subject to ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description''. The document is primarily intended for internal use and technical guidance for a variety of design activities. It is recognized that a wide audience including project management, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and others are interested to various levels of detail in the design methods and therefore covers a wide range of topics at varying levels of detail. Due to the preliminary nature of the design, readers can expect to encounter varied levels of detail in the body of the report. It is expected that technical information used as input to design documents will be verified and taken from the latest versions of reference sources given herein. This revision of the methodology report has evolved with changes in the waste package, drip shield, and emplacement pallet designs over many years and may be further revised as the design is finalized. Different components and analyses are at different stages of development. Some parts of the report are detailed, while other less detailed parts are likely to undergo further refinement. The design methodology is intended to provide designs that satisfy the safety and operational requirements of the YMP. Four waste package configurations have been selected to illustrate the application of the methodology during the licensing process. These four configurations are the 21-pressurized water reactor absorber plate waste package (21-PWRAP), the 44-boiling water reactor waste package (44-BWR), the 5 defense high-level radioactive waste (HLW) DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF) codisposal short waste package (5-DHLWDOE SNF Short), and the naval canistered SNF long waste package (Naval SNF Long). Design work for the other six waste packages will be completed at a later date using the same design methodology. These include the 24-boiling water reactor waste package (24-BWR), the 21-pressurized water reactor control rod waste package (21-PWRCR), the 12-pressurized water reactor waste package (12-PWR), the 5 defense HLW DOE SNF codisposal long waste package (5-DHLWDOE SNF Long), the 2 defense HLW DOE SNF codisposal waste package (2-MC012-DHLW), and the naval canistered SNF short waste package (Naval SNF Short). This report is only part of the complete design description. Other reports related to the design include the design reports, the waste package system description documents, manufacturing specifications, and numerous documents for the many detailed calculations. The relationships between this report and other design documents are shown in Figure 1.

D.C. Mecham

2004-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

470

All-sky astrophysical component separation with Fast Independent Component Analysis (FastICA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new, fast, algorithm for the separation of astrophysical components superposed in maps of the sky, based on the fast Independent Component Analysis technique (FastICA). It allows to recover both the spatial pattern and the frequency scalings of the emissions from statistically independent astrophysical processes, present along the line-of-sight, from multi-frequency observations. We apply FastICA to simulated observations of the microwave sky with angular resolution and instrumental noise at the mean nominal levels for the Planck satellite, containing the most important known diffuse signals: the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), Galactic synchrotron, dust and free-free emissions. A method for calibrating the reconstructed maps of each component at each frequency has been devised. The spatial pattern of all the components have been recovered on all scales probed by the instrument. In particular, the CMB angular power spectra is recovered at the percent level up to $\\ell_{max}\\simeq 2000$. Frequency scalings and normalization have been recovered with better than percent precision for all the components at frequencies and in sky regions where their signal-to-noise ratio exceeds 1.5; the error increases at ten percent level for signal-to-noise ratios about 1. Runs have been performed on a Pentium III 600 MHz computer; FastICA typically took a time of the order of 10 minutes for all-sky simulations with 3.5 arcminutes pixel size. We conclude that FastICA is an extremly promising technique for analyzing the maps that will be obtained by the forthcoming high resolution CMB experiments.

D. Maino; A. Farusi; C. Baccigalupi; F. Perrotta; A. J. Banday; L. Bedini; C. Burigana; G. De Zotti; K. M. Gorski; E. Salerno

2001-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

471

NGA Industry Critique of the Exploration Component  

SciTech Connect

The author critiques the Exploration component of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Program Review X. The comments focus principally on the hydrothermal portion of the DOE program, but he also makes some commentary on the Long Valley Exploratory Well and Geopressured-Geothermal components of the program, as well as some general comments. Before I do that, I would like to review the current state of geothermal exploration in the United States. According to Koenig (1989, 1990) who critiqued the DOE Geothermal Program in those years, geothermal exploration in the western U.S. has been conducted in virtually all of the apparent geothermal resource areas. Many of these areas which were under exploration in the 1960s and 1970s, and were explored in part under the U.S. DOE Industry Coupled Program have progressed to commercial status in the 80s. The DOE March (1992) Draft Multi-Year Program Plan for FY 1993-1997 states that 8 out of the 14 geothermal resource areas explored under this Industry Coupled Program in the late 1970s are currently under production. I do not think we will find anyone in this room, in the geothermal industry, or in the United States that will argue with the clear and outstanding success of that government program. When the prices of oil dropped in the 1980s, many geothermal operators left the industry, and with the dramatic decrease in activity, many of the service companies went by the wayside also. By and large, the domestic geothermal industry today is emaciated. As a result of the capital intensive nature of geothermal development, the historical long lead times to go from exploration to production, the highly entrepreneurial nature of the industry, and the lack of an economic market, virtually no new exploration has been conducted in the U.S. in about 10 years. The consequence of this lack of activity is an almost nonexistent geothermal reserve base, outside of known producing fields and their immediate surrounds. The U.S. DOE Deep Thermal Gradient Drilling Program in the Cascade Range is a notable exception to this stagnant condition. Like it's predecessor, the industry coupled program, the Thermal Gradient Drilling Program identified at least, one potentially viable geothermal resource: Newberry Volcano.

Iovanetti, J.L.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

472

Process management using component thermal-hydraulic function classes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process management expert system where following malfunctioning of a component, such as a pump, for determining system realignment procedures such as for by-passing the malfunctioning component with on-line speeds to maintain operation of the process at full or partial capacity or to provide safe shut down of the system while isolating the malfunctioning component. The expert system uses thermal-hydraulic function classes at the component level for analyzing unanticipated as well as anticipated component malfunctions to provide recommended sequences of operator actions. Each component is classified according to its thermal-hydraulic function, and the generic and component-specific characteristics for that function. Using the diagnosis of the malfunctioning component and its thermal hydraulic class, the expert system analysis is carried out using generic thermal-hydraulic first principles. One aspect of the invention employs a qualitative physics-based forward search directed primarily downstream from the malfunctioning component in combination with a subsequent backward search directed primarily upstream from the serviced component. Generic classes of components are defined in the knowledge base according to the three thermal-hydraulic functions of mass, momentum and energy transfer and are used to determine possible realignment of component configurations in response to thermal-hydraulic function imbalance caused by the malfunctioning component. Each realignment to a new configuration produces the accompanying sequence of recommended operator actions. All possible new configurations are examined and a prioritized list of acceptable solutions is produced.

Morman, James A. (Woodridge, IL); Wei, Thomas Y. C. (Downers Grove, IL); Reifman, Jaques (Western Springs, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Process management using component thermal-hydraulic function classes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process management expert system where following malfunctioning of a component, such as a pump, for determining system realignment procedures such as for by-passing the malfunctioning component with on-line speeds to maintain operation of the process at full or partial capacity or to provide safe shut down of the system while isolating the malfunctioning component. The expert system uses thermal-hydraulic function classes at the component level for analyzing unanticipated as well as anticipated component malfunctions to provide recommended sequences of operator actions. Each component is classified according to its thermal-hydraulic function, and the generic and component-specific characteristics for that function. Using the diagnosis of the malfunctioning component and its thermal hydraulic class, the expert system analysis is carried out using generic thermal-hydraulic first principles. One aspect of the invention employs a qualitative physics-based forward search directed primarily downstream from the malfunctioning component in combination with a subsequent backward search directed primarily upstream from the serviced component. Generic classes of components are defined in the knowledge base according to the three thermal-hydraulic functions of mass, momentum and energy transfer and are used to determine possible realignment of component configurations in response to thermal-hydraulic function imbalance caused by the malfunctioning component. Each realignment to a new configuration produces the accompanying sequence of recommended operator actions. All possible new configurations are examined and a prioritized list of acceptable solutions is produced. 5 figs.

Morman, J.A.; Wei, T.Y.C.; Reifman, J.

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

474

A multi-component partitioning model to predict organic leaching from stabilized/solidified oily wastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stabilization/Solidification (S/S) is an established remediation process in hazardous waste management. Recently this process has been applied to hazardous organic wastes with mixed results. These results have prompted further studies to examine the effectiveness of this process in containing organic contaminants. The primary goal of S/S is to contain the contaminants in a solidified form, removing them from the environment. This is accomplished by decreasing the contaminant surface area and chemically converting the waste by reducing the contaminant solubility. The most common S/S processes utilize the chemical reactions achieved in cement-based and pozzolanic mixes. The effectiveness of this process is determined by the degree to which contaminants will leach from the waste end-product. Leach models, therefore, are an effective way to predict the leaching of contaminants and to describe the immobilization and binding mechanisms that take place. The multi-component nature of oily wastes requires that a multi-component approach be taken to describe the partitioning between the aqueous and non-aqueous phases. The heterogeneous nature of these wastes precludes analysis of partitioning of all chemical species. Thus a pseudo-component model has been developed that describes the partitioning of TOC as caused by the partitioning of a small number of pseudo-components. A pseudo-component is used to represent a group of chemical species that have similar tendencies to partition between the aqueous and non-aqueous phases. A linear partitioning relationship is used to develop the partitioning model, with the values of the partitioning coefficients chosen to represent strongly sorbed, moderately sorbed, and weakly sorbed components. The partitioning characteristics of the waste were determined in a series of sequential experiments in which different amounts of water were added. After each addition, the system was allowed to equilibrate, the added water removed by centrifugation and its TOC measured. The model predicts that the measured concentrations of TOC are due to the sum of all pseudo-components in the aqueous or mobile phase.

O'Cleirigh, Declan Ronan

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z