Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems commercial sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Commercial Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Kevin Jarzomski

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

Commercial Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Kevin Jarzomski

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

3

Assessment and Suggestions to Improve the Commercial Building Module of EIA-NEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a comprehensive, computer-based, energy-economy modeling system developed and maintained by the Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA). NEMS forecasts the national production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy out to 2015, subject to macroeconomic assumptions, world energy markets, resource availability and costs, technological developments, and behavioral and technological choice criteria. NEMS has nine program modules of which the Commercial Sector Demand (CSD) module is one. Currently the CSD module uses a matrix of Energy Use Intensities (EUls) gleaned from the 1989 CBECS database to model service demand per major fuel type for eight different geographic census divisions and eleven different building types.

O'Neal, D. L.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Model documentation report: Commercial Sector Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components. The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module is a simulation tool based upon economic and engineering relationships that models commercial sector energy demands at the nine Census Division level of detail for eleven distinct categories of commercial buildings. Commercial equipment selections are performed for the major fuels of electricity, natural gas, and distillate fuel, for the major services of space heating, space cooling, water heating, ventilation, cooking, refrigeration, and lighting. The algorithm also models demand for the minor fuels of residual oil, liquefied petroleum gas, steam coal, motor gasoline, and kerosene, the renewable fuel sources of wood and municipal solid waste, and the minor services of office equipment. Section 2 of this report discusses the purpose of the model, detailing its objectives, primary input and output quantities, and the relationship of the Commercial Module to the other modules of the NEMS system. Section 3 of the report describes the rationale behind the model design, providing insights into further assumptions utilized in the model development process to this point. Section 3 also reviews alternative commercial sector modeling methodologies drawn from existing literature, providing a comparison to the chosen approach. Section 4 details the model structure, using graphics and text to illustrate model flows and key computations.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Pennsylvania Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Sectors ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pennsylvania Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Sectors by Marketers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

6

Michigan Natural Gas Percent Sold to The Commercial Sectors by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Natural Gas Percent Sold to The Commercial Sectors by Local Distribution Companies (Percent)

7

EIA Buildings Analysis of Consumer Behavior in NEMS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings Analysis of Consumer Buildings Analysis of Consumer Behavior in NEMS Behavioral Economics Experts Meeting July 17, 2013 | Washington, DC David Peterson Buildings Energy Consumption and Efficiency Analysis Overview Behavioral Economics Experts Meeting, Washington DC, July 17, 2013 2 * NEMS Structure * Housing/floorspace and service demand in Residential Demand Module (RDM) and Commercial Demand Module (CDM) * Market share calculation for equipment in RDM and CDM * Price responses / elasticities * Distributed generation (DG) & combined heat and power (CHP) NEMS Structure Behavioral Economics Experts Meeting, Washington DC, July 17, 2013 3 * Represents energy supply, conversion, and demand in a unified, but modular system * Detailed structural and process models in most energy sectors

8

EIA Energy Efficiency-Commercial Buildings Sector Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

These tables provide estimates of commercial sector energy consumption and energy intensities for 1992, 1995, 1999 and 2003 based on the Commercial ...

9

NEMS industrial module documentation report  

SciTech Connect

The NEMS Industrial Demand Model is a dynamic accounting model, bringing together the disparate industries and uses of energy in those industries, and putting them together in an understandable and cohesive framework. The Industrial Model generates mid-term (up to the year 2010) forecasts of industrial sector energy demand as a component of the NEMS integrated forecasting system. From the NEMS system, the Industrial Model receives fuel prices, employment data, and the value of output of industrial activity. Based on the values of these variables, the Industrial Model passes back to the NEMS system estimates of consumption by fuel types.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Pennsylvania Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Sectors ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pennsylvania Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Sectors by Local Distributor Companies (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

11

Michigan Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Sectors by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Sectors by Local Distributor Companies (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

12

Commercial Buildings Sector Agent-Based Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Buildings Sector Agent-Based Model Commercial Buildings Sector Agent-Based Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Commercial Buildings Sector Agent-Based Model Agency/Company /Organization: Argonne National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings - Commercial Phase: Evaluate Options Topics: Implementation Resource Type: Technical report User Interface: Website Website: web.anl.gov/renewables/research/building_agent_based_model.html OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, Commercial Buildings Sector Agent-Based Model Language: English References: Building Efficiency: Development of an Agent-based Model of the US Commercial Buildings Sector[1] Model the market-participants, dynamics, and constraints-help decide whether to adopt energy-efficient technologies to meet commercial building

13

Commercial Sector Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Business Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The estimated market potential for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) in the commercial sector could be about 4 billion MWh from 2001 through 2015. This market, however, is highly sensitive to impacts deregulation will have on commercial retail rates.

1996-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

14

EA-0513: Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial Sector  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

13: Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial 13: Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial Sector Buildings, Bonneville Power Administration EA-0513: Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial Sector Buildings, Bonneville Power Administration SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for DOE's Bonneville Power Administration to use several diverse approaches to purchase or acquire energy savings from commercial sector buildings region wide. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 25, 1991 EA-0513: Final Environmental Assessment Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial Sector Buildings, Bonneville Power Administration September 25, 1991 EA-0513: Finding of No Significant Impact Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial Sector Buildings,

15

Distributed Generation Potential of the U.S. Commercial Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Representation Technology Type Gas Turbine Microturbine GasSystem (NEMS), gas turbine, gas engine, microturbine,System (NEMS): small (gas turbines, gas engines, and

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA

17

EIA Energy Efficiency-Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities: 1992- 2003 Released Date: December 2004 Page Last Revised: August 2009 These tables provide estimates of commercial sector energy consumption and energy intensities for 1992, 1995, 1999 and 2003 based on the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). They also provide estimates of energy consumption and intensities adjusted for the effect of weather on heating, cooling, and ventilation energy use. Total Site Energy Consumption (U.S. and Census Region) Html Excel PDF bullet By Principal Building Activity (Table 1a) html Table 1a excel table 1a. pdf table 1a. Weather-Adjusted by Principal Building Activity (Table 1b) html table 1b excel table 1b pdf table 1b.

18

Fuel choice and aggregate energy demand in the commercial sector  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a fuel choice and aggregate-demand model of energy use in the commercial sector of the United States. The model structure is dynamic with short-run fuel-price responses estimated to be close to those of the residential sector. Of the three fuels analyzed, electricity consumption exhibits a greater response to its own price than either natural gas or fuel oil. In addition, electricity price increases have the largest effect on end-use energy conservation in the commercial sector. An improved commercial energy-use data base is developed which removes the residential portion of electricity and natural gas use that traditional energy-consumption data sources assign to the commercial sector. In addition, household and commercial petroleum use is differentiated on a state-by-state basis.

Cohn, S.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Sampling Methodologies for the Commercial Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designing a survey sample that accurately mirrors the target population is a key step toward a much-needed understanding of the factors affecting commercial electricity use. This thorough exploration of new and familiar methodologies is based on experience with five recent, large-scale utility surveys of commercial customers.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Model documentation report: Commercial Sector Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components. This report serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, section 57(b)(1)). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems commercial sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Distributed Generation Potential of the U.S. Commercial Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003). Oil and Gas Supply Module Natural Gas Transmissionelectricity and natural gas prices from the NEMS supply-side

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Methodology for Modeling Building Energy Performance across the Commercial Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report uses EnergyPlus simulations of each building in the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to document and demonstrate bottom-up methods of modeling the entire U.S. commercial buildings sector (EIA 2006). The ability to use a whole-building simulation tool to model the entire sector is of interest because the energy models enable us to answer subsequent 'what-if' questions that involve technologies and practices related to energy. This report documents how the whole-building models were generated from the building characteristics in 2003 CBECS and compares the simulation results to the survey data for energy use.

Griffith, B.; Long, N.; Torcellini, P.; Judkoff, R.; Crawley, D.; Ryan, J.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Distributed Generation Potential of the U.S. Commercial Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have waste heat driven absorption cooling capabilities. Thewith the greatest absorption cooling potential and thewaste heat driven absorption cooling capabilities into NEMS

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

sector Renewable Energy Non renewable Energy Biomass Buildings Commercial  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

user interface valueType text user interface valueType text sector valueType text abstract valueType text website valueType text openei tool keyword valueType text openei tool uri valueType text items label Calculator user interface Spreadsheet Website sector Renewable Energy Non renewable Energy Biomass Buildings Commercial Buildings Residential Economic Development Gateway Geothermal Greenhouse Gas Multi model Integration Multi sector Impact Evaluation Gateway Solar Wind energy website https www gov uk pathways analysis openei tool keyword calculator greenhouse gas emissions GHG low carbon energy planning energy data emissions data openei tool uri http calculator tool decc gov uk pathways primary energy chart uri http en openei org w index php title Calculator type Tools label AGI

25

Distributed Generation Potential of the U.S. Commercial Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

versions of NEMS. Natural gas prices are higher in AEO2004.forecasted wellhead natural gas price from both versions ofhighly unstable natural gas prices, and the AEO2004 natural

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 Commercial Building Median Lifetimes (Years) Building Type Median (1) 66% Survival (2) 33% Survival (2) Assembly 55 40 75 Education 62 45 86 Food Sales 55 41 74 Food Service 50 35 71 Health Care 55 42 73 Large Office 65 46 92 Mercantile & Service 50 36 69 Small Office 58 41 82 Warehouse 58 41 82 Lodging 53 38 74 Other 60 44 81 Note(s): Source(s): 1) PNNL estimates the median lifetime of commercial buildings is 70-75 years. 2) Number of years after which the building survives. For example, a third of the large office buildings constructed today will survive 92 years later. EIA, Assumptions for the Annual Energy Outlook 2011, July 2011, Table 5.2, p. 40; EIA, Model Documentation Report: Commercial Sector 'Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System, May 2010, p. 30-35; and PNNL, Memorandum: New Construction in the Annual Energy Outlook 2003, Apr. 24,

27

Bonneville Power Administration`s Commercial Sector Conservation Market.  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville has, as part of its resource plan, accepted targets for commercial conservation which are quite ambitious. To meet these targets, Bonneville will need to acquire as much cost-effective conservation as possible over the next twelve years. With this in mind, this document explores the relative importance of different commercial market segments and the types of assistance each market needs to install as many cost-effective conservation measures in as many buildings as possible. This document reviews Bonneville`s marketing environment and position, and suggests goals for commercial sector conservation marketing at Bonneville. Then it presents a broad market segmentation and series of additional demographic analyses. These analyses assess what groups of consumers Bonneville must reach to achieve most of the commercial conservation potential and what is needed to reach them. A final section reviews the success of Bonneville programs at reaching various markets. The market segmentation identifies different types of consumers and opportunities which would require distinct program approaches. Four large market segments are identified that have distinct program needs. Then four ``building life-cycle events`` are identified which provide important conservation opportunities and also require distinct program services. This creates a matrix of 16 cells which delineate distinct needs for program marketing. Each of the four key market segments manages at least 20% of the Region`s commercial floorspace.

Gordan, Frederick M. [Pacific Energy Associates, Inc. (United States)

1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

28

U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a multi-sector, integrated model of the U.S. energy system put out by the Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration. NEMS is used to produce the annual 20-year forecast of U.S. energy use aggregated to the nine-region census division level. The research objective was to disaggregate this regional energy forecast to the county level for select forecast years, for use in a more detailed and accurate regional analysis of energy usage across the U.S. The process of disaggregation using a geographic information system (GIS) was researched and a model was created utilizing available population forecasts and climate zone data. The model's primary purpose was to generate an energy demand forecast with greater spatial resolution than what is currently produced by NEMS, and to produce a flexible model that can be used repeatedly as an add-on to NEMS in which detailed analysis can be executed exogenously with results fed back into the NEMS data flow. The methods developed were then applied to the study data to obtain residential and commercial electricity demand forecasts. The model was subjected to comparative and statistical testing to assess predictive accuracy. Forecasts using this model were robust and accurate in slow-growing, temperate regions such as the Midwest and Mountain regions. Interestingly, however, the model performed with less accuracy in the Pacific and Northwest regions of the country where population growth was more active. In the future more refined methods will be necessary to improve the accuracy of these forecasts. The disaggregation method was written into a flexible tool within the ArcGIS environment which enables the user to output the results in five year intervals over the period 2000-2025. In addition, the outputs of this tool were used to develop a time-series simulation showing the temporal changes in electricity forecasts in terms of absolute, per capita, and density of demand.

Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Solid-State Lighting: LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Lighting in the Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification on Delicious

30

Distributed Generation Potential of the U.S. Commercial Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Module Petroleum Market Module Conversion Oil and Gas Supply Module Natural Gas Transmission limits. The submodule receives electricity and natural gas prices from the NEMS supply-side modules are reciprocating engines fueled by natural gas. Microturbines are small (30-200 kW) turbine engines, also usually

31

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures March 2012 3.3.3 Commercial Buildings Aggregate Energy Expenditures, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (2) Total 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 148.6 37.0 17.0 202.6 148.9 37.2 17.1 203.2 145.9 36.2 16.7 198.9 147.5 36.8 16.9 201.2 143.8 35.1 16.4 195.2 145.0 35.5 16.6 197.0 141.1 34.0 16.0 191.1 142.5 34.6 16.2 193.3 136.9 32.1 15.7 184.8 139.1 33.0 15.9 188.0 133.5 31.0 15.4 179.9 135.0 31.6 15.6 182.2 131.0 29.7 15.1 175.8 131.9 30.3 15.3 177.5 128.1 28.7 14.5 171.3 130.0 29.3 15.0 174.4 129.4 29.7 15.4 174.5 127.7 29.2 13.8 170.7 134.8 29.9 14.5 179.2 134.5 28.5 16.9 180.0 141.1

32

Major models and data sources for residential and commercial sector energy conservation analysis. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Major models and data sources are reviewed that can be used for energy-conservation analysis in the residential and commercial sectors to provide an introduction to the information that can or is available to DOE in order to further its efforts in analyzing and quantifying their policy and program requirements. Models and data sources examined in the residential sector are: ORNL Residential Energy Model; BECOM; NEPOOL; MATH/CHRDS; NIECS; Energy Consumption Data Base: Household Sector; Patterns of Energy Use by Electrical Appliances Data Base; Annual Housing Survey; 1970 Census of Housing; AIA Research Corporation Data Base; RECS; Solar Market Development Model; and ORNL Buildings Energy Use Data Book. Models and data sources examined in the commercial sector are: ORNL Commercial Sector Model of Energy Demand; BECOM; NEPOOL; Energy Consumption Data Base: Commercial Sector; F.W. Dodge Data Base; NFIB Energy Report for Small Businesses; ADL Commercial Sector Energy Use Data Base; AIA Research Corporation Data Base; Nonresidential Buildings Surveys of Energy Consumption; General Electric Co: Commercial Sector Data Base; The BOMA Commercial Sector Data Base; The Tishman-Syska and Hennessy Data Base; The NEMA Commercial Sector Data Base; ORNL Buildings Energy Use Data Book; and Solar Market Development Model. Purpose; basis for model structure; policy variables and parameters; level of regional, sectoral, and fuels detail; outputs; input requirements; sources of data; computer accessibility and requirements; and a bibliography are provided for each model and data source.

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Overview of NEMS-H2, Version 1.0  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NEMS-H2, Version 1.0 NEMS-H2, Version 1.0 Frances Wood OnLocation, Inc., Energy Systems Consulting (fwood@onlocationinc.com) January 26, 2006 OnLocation, Inc., Energy Systems Consulting 2 Today's Presentation * Overview of NEMS-H2 Structure * Current Status * New Hydrogen Market Module (HMM) * Transportation Module Modifications * Preliminary Test Runs * Looking Ahead to Next Phase OnLocation, Inc., Energy Systems Consulting 3 NEMS Overview * The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) was developed and is maintained by EIA - Annual Energy Outlook projections - Congressional as well as agency requests * NEMS has also been used extensively outside of EIA - Various National Laboratories studies - National Commission on Energy Policy - Program offices within DOE for R&D benefits estimation * Modular structure allows each sector to be represented by

34

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 39 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial.

35

Energy Efficiency Report-Chapter 4: Commercial Buildings Sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) The CBECS ... water heating, refrigeration, powering office equipment, and other uses.

36

Distributed Generation Potential of the U.S. CommercialSector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small-scale (100 kW-5 MW) on-site distributed generation (DG) economically driven by combined heat and power (CHP) applications and, in some cases, reliability concerns will likely emerge as a common feature of commercial building energy systems in developed countries over the next two decades. In the U.S., private and public expectations for this technology are heavily influenced by forecasts published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), most notably the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). EIA's forecasts are typically made using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), which has a forecasting module that predicts the penetration of several possible commercial building DG technologies over the period 2005-2025. Annual penetration is forecast by estimating the payback period for each technology, for each of a limited number of representative building types, for each of nine regions. This process results in an AEO2004 forecast deployment of about a total 3 GW of DG electrical generating capacity by 2025, which is only 0.25 percent of total forecast U.S. capacity. Analyses conducted using both the AEO2003 and AEO2004 versions of NEMS changes the baseline costs and performance characteristics of DG to reflect a world without U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research into several thermal DG technologies, which is then compared to a case with enhanced technology representative of the successful achievement of DOE research goals. The net difference in 2025 DG penetration is dramatic using the AEO2003 version of NEMS, but much smaller in the AEO2004 version. The significance and validity of these contradictory results are discussed, and possibilities for improving estimates of commercial U.S. DG potential are explored.

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Gumerman,Etan; Marnay, Chris

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a multi-sector, integrated model of the U.S. energy system put out by the Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration. NEMS is used to produce the annual 20-year forecast of U.S. energy use aggregated to the nine-region census division level. The research objective was to disaggregate this regional energy forecast to the county level for select forecast years, for use in a more detailed and accurate regional analysis of energy usage across the U.S. The process of disaggregation using a geographic information system (GIS) was researched and a model was created utilizing available population forecasts and climate zone data. The model's primary purpose was to generate an energy demand forecast with greater spatial resolution than what is currently produced by NEMS, and to produce a flexible model that can be used repeatedly as an add-on to NEMS in which detailed analysis can be executed exogenously with results fed back into the NEMS data flow. The methods developed were then applied to the study data to obtain residential and commercial electricity demand forecasts. The model was subjected to comparative and statistical testing to assess predictive accuracy. Forecasts using this model were robust and accurate in slow-growing, temperate regions such as the Midwest and Mountain regions. Interestingly, however, the model performed with less accuracy in the Pacific and Northwest regions of the country where population growth was more active. In the future more refined methods will be necessary to improve the accuracy of these forecasts. The disaggregation method was written into a flexible tool within the ArcGIS environment which enables the user to output the results in five year intervals over the period 2000-2025. In addition, the outputs of this tool were used to develop a time-series simulation showing the temporal changes in electricity forecasts in terms of absolute, per capita, and density of demand.

Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

to Nine 16% Unoccupied 3% Ten or More 8% Government Owned 24% Total 100% Federal 3% State 5% Local 15% Total 100% Source(s): EIA, Commercial Building Characteristics 2003, June...

39

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6% 25% South 5% 18% 14% 37% West 3% 9% 5% 18% 100% Source(s): EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Building Characteristics Tables, Oct. 2006, Table A2, p. 3-4...

40

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

that are larger than 100,000 square feet. EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Building Characteristics Tables, Oct. 2006, Table A1, p. 1-2. 2,586 948 810...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems commercial sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

to 2003 9% Total 100% Source(s): Percent of Total Floorspace EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Building Characteristics Tables, Oct. 2006, Table A1, p. 1-...

42

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

43

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services [1].

44

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

45

NEMS integrating module documentation report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer-based, energy-economy modeling system of U.S. energy markets for the midterm period. NEMS projects the production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy, subject to a variety of assumptions. The assumptions encompass macroeconomic and financial factors, world energy markets, resource availability and costs, behavioral and technological choice criteria, technology characteristics, and demographics. NEMS produces a general equilibrium solution for energy supply and demand in the U.S. energy markets on an annual basis through 2015. Baseline forecasts from NEMS are published in the Annual Energy Outlook. Analyses are also prepared in response to requests by the U.S. Congress, the DOE Office of Policy, and others. NEMS was first used for forecasts presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1994.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Principal Commercial Building Types, as of 2003 (Percent of Total Floorspace) (1) Office 17% 17% 19% Mercantile 16% 14% 18% Retail 6% 9% 5% Enclosed & Strip Malls 10% 4% 13% Education 14% 8% 11% Warehouse and Storage 14% 12% 7% Lodging 7% 3% 7% Service 6% 13% 4% Public Assembly 5% 6% 5% Religious Worship 5% 8% 2% Health Care 4% 3% 8% Inpatient 3% 0% 6% Outpatient 2% 2% 2% Food Sales 2% 5% 5% Food Service 2% 6% 6% Public Order and Safety 2% 1% 2% Other 2% 2% 4% Vacant 4% 4% 1% Total 100% 100% 100% Note(s): Source(s): Total Floorspace Total Buildings Primary Energy Consumption 1) For primary energy intensities by building type, see Table 3.1.13. Total CBECS 2003 commercial building floorspace is 71.7 billion SF. EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and Expenditures Tables, Oct. 2006, Table C1A

47

BetterBuildings Financing Energy Efficiency Retrofits in the Commercial Sector - Part 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Commercial Energy Efficiency Finance Programs Small Commercial Energy Efficiency Finance Programs Sponsored by State Governments SURVEY OF SURVEY OF SMALL COMMERCIAL ENERGY EFFICIENCY FINANCE PROGRAMS SPONSORED BY PROGRAMS SPONSORED BY STATE GOVERNMENTS May 3, 2011 Background of Small Commercial Finance Program Survey  Includes 20 States ( (mostly y identified from database of state incentives for renewable energy, DSIRE)  Sponsoring programs for:  small commercial (generally defined as 30,000 square feet or less and/or 150 kW or less) or   both small and large commercial sectors both small and large commercial sectors  Discussions with program managers   Creation of a table of program elements Creation of a table of program elements

48

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

commercial.gif (5196 bytes) commercial.gif (5196 bytes) The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings, however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

49

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Total Commercial Floorspace and Number of Buildings, by Year 1980 50.9 (1) N.A. 3.1 (3) 1990 64.3 N.A. 4.5 (3) 2000 (4) 68.5 N.A. 4.7 (5) 2008 78.8 15% N.A. 2010 81.1 26% N.A. 2015 84.1 34% N.A. 2020 89.2 43% N.A. 2025 93.9 52% N.A. 2030 98.2 60% N.A. 2035 103.0 68% N.A. Note(s): Source(s): EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 1994, Jan. 1994, Table A5, p. 62 for 1990 floorspace; EIA, AEO 2003, Jan. 2003, Table A5, p. 127-128 for 2000 floorspace; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Summary Reference Case Tables, Table A5, p. 11-12 for 2008-2035 floorspace; EIA Commercial Building Characteristics 1989, June 1991, Table A4, p. 17 for 1990 number of buildings; EIA, Commercial Building Characteristics 1999, Aug. 2002, Table 3 for 1999 number of buildings and floorspace; and EIA, Buildings and Energy in the 1980s, June 1995, Table 2.1, p. 23 for number of buildings in 1980.

50

Development of an improved commercial sector energy model for national policy analysis  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory provided support to the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy (CE), under the Office of Planning and Assessment, to develop improved energy and environmental analysis tools. Commercial building sector energy models from the past decade were analyzed in order to provoke comment and stimulate discussion between potential model users and developers as to the appropriate structure and capability of a commercial sector energy model supported by CE. Three specific areas were examined during this review. These areas provide (1) a look at recent suggestions and guidance as to what constitutes a minimal set of requirements and capabilities for a commercial buildings energy model for CE, (2) a review of several existing models in terms of their general structure and how they match up with the requirements listed previously, and (3) an overview of a proposed improved commercial sector energy model.

Belzer, D.B.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

9 9 2003 Energy Expenditures per Square Foot of Commercial Floorspace and per Building, by Building Type ($2010) ($2010) Food Service 4.88 27.2 Mercantile 2.23 38.1 Food Sales 4.68 26.0 Education 1.43 36.6 Health Care 2.76 68.0 Service 1.39 9.1 Public Order and Safety 2.07 32.0 Warehouse and Storage 0.80 13.5 Office 2.01 29.8 Religious Worship 0.76 7.8 Public Assembly 1.73 24.6 Vacant 0.34 4.8 Lodging 1.72 61.5 Other 2.99 65.5 Note(s): Source(s): Mall buildings are no longer included in most CBECs tables; therefore, some data is not directly comparable to past CBECs. EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures: Consumption and Expenditures Tables, Oct. 2006, Table 4; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price deflators. Per Square Foot Per Building

52

National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Agency/Company /Organization: Energy Information Administration Sector: Energy Focus Area: Economic Development Phase: Develop Goals Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.eia.gov/oiaf/aeo/overview/index.html OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, National Energy Modeling System, NEMS Language: English References: The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview[1] Project the production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy, subject to assumptions on macroeconomic and financial factors, world energy markets, resource availability and costs, behavioral and

53

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

8 8 2003 Average Commercial Building Floorspace, by Principal Building Type and Vintage Building Type 1959 or Prior 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Education 27.5 26.9 21.7 25.6 Food Sales N.A. N.A. N.A. 5.6 Food Service 6.4 4.4 5.0 5.6 Health Care 18.5 37.1 N.A. 24.5 Inpatient N.A. 243.6 N.A. 238.1 Outpatient N.A. 11.3 11.6 10.4 Lodging 9.9 36.1 36.0 35.9 Retail (Other Than Mall) 6.2 9.3 17.5 9.7 Office 12.4 16.4 14.2 14.8 Public Assembly 13.0 13.8 17.3 14.2 Public Order and Safety N.A. N.A. N.A. 15.4 Religious Worship 8.7 9.6 15.6 10.1 Service 6.1 6.5 6.8 6.5 Warehouse and Storage 19.7 17.2 15.4 16.9 Other N.A. N.A. N.A. 22.0 Vacant N.A. N.A. N.A. 14.1 Source(s): Average Floorspace/Building (thousand SF) EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Building Characteristics Tables, June 2006, Table B8, p. 63-69, and Table B9, p. 70-76

54

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Energy Service Company (ESCO) Industry Activity ($Million Nominal) (1) Low High 1990 143 342 Market Segment Share 1991 218 425 MUSH (2) 69% 1992 331 544 Federal 15% 1993 505 703 Commercial & Industrial 7% 1994 722 890 Residential 6% 1995 1,105 1,159 Public Housing 3% 1996 1,294 1,396 1997 1,394 1,506 1998 1,551 1,667 2008 Revenues by Project/Technology Type 1999 1,764 1,925 2000 1,876 2,186 Market Segment Share 2001 - - Energy Efficiency 75% 2002 - - Onsite Renewables 14% 2003 - - Engine/Turbine Generators 6% 2004 2,447 2,507 Consulting/Master Planning 3% 2005 2,949 3,004 Other 2% 2006 3,579 3,627 2007 - - 2008 4,087 4,171 Note(s): Source(s): Estimated Revenue ($Million Nominal) (1) 2008 Revenue Sources 1) Estimates based on surveys of major ESCOs and input from industry experts. 2) Includes municipal and state governments, universities

55

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 2015 Commercial Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal (3) Electricity Total Percent Lighting 28.4 28.4 16.3% Space Heating 14.6 2.9 1.3 0.1 4.3 0.1 4.7 23.7 13.6% Ventilation 15.1 15.1 8.6% Space Cooling 0.3 14.2 14.5 8.3% Refrigeration 9.9 9.9 5.7% Electronics 8.8 8.8 5.1% Water Heating 4.1 0.7 0.7 2.5 7.3 4.2% Computers 5.3 5.3 3.0% Cooking 1.7 0.6 2.3 1.3% Other (4) 2.9 0.3 3.7 1.4 5.4 22.8 31.1 17.8% Adjust to SEDS (5) 5.8 4.5 4.5 17.7 28.1 16.1% Total 29.3 8.4 1.3 3.7 1.5 14.9 0.1 130.0 174.5 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.1 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.4 billion). 3) Coal average price is from AEO 2012 Early Release, all users price. 4) Includes service station equipment, ATMs, medical equipment,

56

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

8 8 Average Annual Energy Expenditures per Square Foot of Commercial Floorspace, by Year ($2010) Year $/SF 1980 (1) 2.12 1981 2.22 (2) 1982 2.24 1983 2.21 1984 2.25 1985 2.20 1986 2.06 1987 2.00 1988 1.99 1989 2.01 1990 1.98 1991 1.92 1992 1.86 1993 1.96 1994 2.05 1995 2.12 1996 2.10 1997 2.08 1998 1.97 1999 1.88 2000 2.06 2001 2.20 2002 2.04 2003 2.13 2004 2.16 2005 2.30 2006 2.36 2007 2.35 2008 1.71 2009 2.43 2010 2.44 2011 2.44 2012 2.35 2013 2.28 2014 2.27 2015 2.29 2016 2.29 2017 2.28 2018 2.29 2019 2.29 2020 2.29 2021 2.31 2022 2.32 2023 2.32 2024 2.32 2025 2.32 2026 2.32 2027 2.33 2028 2.32 2029 2.31 2030 2.31 2031 2.32 2032 2.35 2033 2.37 2034 2.39 2035 2.42 Note(s): Source(s): EIA, State Energy Data Prices and Expenditures Database, June 2011 for 1980-2009; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Summary Reference Case Tables, Table A2, p. 3-5 and Table A5, p. 11-12 for consumption, Table A3, p. 6-8 for prices for 2008-2035; EIA, Annual Energy Review

57

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 2010 Commercial Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal (3) Electricity Total Percent Lighting 35.4 35.4 19.7% Space Heating 15.0 2.9 0.9 0.1 3.9 0.1 8.5 27.5 15.3% Space Cooling 0.4 25.0 25.3 14.1% Ventilation 15.9 15.9 8.9% Refrigeration 11.6 11.6 6.5% Water Heating 4.0 0.6 0.6 2.7 7.3 4.1% Electronics 7.8 7.8 4.3% Computers 6.3 6.3 3.5% Cooking 1.6 0.7 2.3 1.3% Other (4) 2.7 0.3 3.3 1.2 4.8 20.4 28.0 15.6% Adjust to SEDS (5) 6.2 5.2 5.2 0.6 12.0 6.7% Total 29.9 9.0 0.9 3.3 1.3 14.5 0.1 134.8 179.4 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.1 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.2 billion). 3) Coal average price is from AEO 2012 Early Release, all users price. 4) Includes service station equipment, ATMs, medical equipment,

58

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 2025 Commercial Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal (3) Electricity Total Percent Lighting 30.1 30.1 15.2% Space Heating 17.1 2.8 1.5 0.1 4.4 0.2 4.5 26.1 13.3% Electronics 11.2 11.2 5.7% Space Cooling 0.3 14.3 14.6 7.4% Water Heating 5.2 0.8 0.8 2.5 8.5 4.3% Computers 5.5 5.5 2.8% Refrigeration 9.4 9.4 4.8% Ventilation 16.6 16.6 8.4% Cooking 2.1 0.6 2.7 1.4% Other (4) 4.8 0.3 4.3 1.7 6.3 31.2 42.3 21.5% Adjust to SEDS (5) 5.9 4.9 4.9 19.2 30.0 15.2% Total 35.5 8.9 1.5 4.3 1.9 16.5 0.2 145.0 197.1 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.1 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.7 billion). 3) Coal average price is from AEO 2011 Early Release, all users price. 4) Includes service station equipment, ATMs, medical equipment,

59

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 2035 Commercial Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal (3) Electricity Total Percent Lighting 32.3 32.3 14.4% Space Heating 19.0 2.7 1.6 0.2 4.5 0.2 4.6 28.2 12.5% Water Heating 6.3 1.0 1.0 18.1 25.4 11.3% Space Cooling 0.4 15.1 15.5 6.9% Electronics 13.0 13.0 5.8% Refrigeration 10.0 10.0 4.4% Computers 6.0 6.0 2.7% Cooking 2.6 0.6 3.2 1.4% Ventilation 2.4 2.4 1.1% Other (4) 9.3 0.4 4.9 2.0 7.2 40.9 57.5 25.5% Adjust to SEDS (5) 4.6 5.3 5.3 21.7 31.6 14.0% Total 42.2 9.4 1.6 4.9 2.2 18.0 0.2 164.8 225.1 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.2 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($2.0 billion). 3) Coal average price is from AEO 2012 Early Release, all users price. 4) Includes service station equipment, ATMs, medical equipment,

60

Electricity-use Feedback in the Commercial Sector: Examining the Potential for Building Occupant Behavior Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feedback technologies to encourage behavior change have been explored in the residential sector for the past three decades, but the savings potential of using feedback strategies in the commercial sector, which represents over one quarter of US electricity sales, has yet to be adequately explored. Although a number of building load control technologies that include some form of feedback provision have existed for some years, they generally target technical staff. The focus of this report is to understand...

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems commercial sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Commercial Energy Prices, by Year and Fuel Type ($2010) Electricity Natural Gas Distillate Oil Residual Oil ($/gal) ($/gal) 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 9.39 104.50 2.79 3.78 9.35 104.74 2.81 3.81 9.47 101.25 2.73 3.69 9.40 103.22 2.76 3.75 9.54 99.28 2.67 3.60 9.51 100.49 2.70 3.64 9.52 94.53 2.66 3.52 9.55 97.45 2.64 3.55 9.46 90.92 2.61 3.46 9.48 92.13 2.63 3.49 9.49 87.65 2.54 3.41 9.47 89.48 2.58 3.42 9.58 85.91 2.41 3.28 9.54 86.36 2.49 3.34 9.57 87.02 2.07 2.97 9.52 84.58 2.26 3.14 10.09 86.14 2.34 3.55 9.76 87.22 2.37 3.57 10.27 97.87 1.49 2.03 10.14 90.95 1.66 2.86 10.04 114.33 1.51 2.47 10.56 121.16 2.01 3.34 9.59 121.45 1.24 2.07 10.13 124.31 1.39 2.32 9.44 94.94 0.93 1.23

62

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Commercial Energy Prices, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 per Million Btu) Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Average 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 (2) 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 27.39 10.47 27.48 21.15 27.10 10.45 27.73 21.01 27.56 10.32 27.04 21.10 27.52 10.45 27.28 21.18 27.86 10.05 26.41 21.06 27.74 10.12 26.73 21.07 28.00 9.75 25.85 20.90 27.96 9.93 26.16 21.01 27.78 9.21 25.46 20.46 27.90 9.45 25.69 20.67 27.76 8.95 24.95 20.23 27.72 9.09 25.24 20.32 27.96 8.64 24.34 20.11 27.81 8.77 24.80 20.14 27.91 8.46 23.15 19.90 28.07 8.59 24.07 20.11 28.61 8.72 23.94 20.36 28.05 8.70 22.00 19.99 29.73 9.10 20.28 20.99 29.57 8.61 24.24 21.03 30.95 12.12 23.75 23.21 30.09 9.79 15.83 21.13 29.70

63

National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer-based, energy-economy modeling system of U.S. through 2030. NEMS projects the production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy, subject to assumptions on macroeconomic and financial factors, world energy markets, resource availability and costs, behavioral and technological choice criteria, cost and performance characteristics of energy technologies, and demographics. NEMS was designed and implemented by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). NEMS can be used to analyze the effects of existing and proposed government laws and regulations related to energy production and use; the potential impact of new and advanced energy production, conversion, and consumption technologies; the impact and cost of greenhouse gas control; the impact of increased use of renewable energy sources; and the potential savings from increased efficiency of energy use; and the impact of regulations on the use of alternative or reformulated fuels. NEMS has also been used for a number of special analyses at the request of the Administration, U.S. Congress, other offices of DOE and other government agencies, who specify the scenarios and assumptions for the analysis. Modules allow analyses to be conducted in energy topic areas such as residential demand, industrial demand, electricity market, oil and gas supply, renewable fuels, etc.

64

Assessment of the Technical Potential for Achieving Net Zero-Energy Buildings in the Commercial Sector  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the findings from research conducted at NREL to assess the technical potential for zero-energy building technologies and practices to reduce the impact of commercial buildings on the U.S. energy system. Commercial buildings currently account for 18% of annual U.S. energy consumption, and energy use is growing along with overall floor area. Reducing the energy use of this sector will require aggressive research goals and rapid implementation of the research results.

Griffith, B.; Long, N.; Torcellini, P.; Judkoff, R.; Crawley, D.; Ryan, J.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for

66

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for

67

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

68

Directory of energy efficiency information services for the residential and commercial sectors  

SciTech Connect

This directory is a compilation of organizations which disseminate a wide range of information on the efficient use of energy in the residential and commercial sectors. Each organization's services are defined by the informations' targeted audience, types of services offered, topics and sectors addressed and access terms required. The organizations included in this directory are based on the Guide to Energy Efficiency Information Services for the Residential and Commercial Sectors, June 1987. The information is presented in two formats in this directory, each focusing on different manners of data retrieval. Section One provides a matrix illustrating the information available by the type of energy-efficiency services offered and Section Two presents information on available services in an alphabetized list by the organization name.

Not Available

1988-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

69

NEMS integrating module documentation report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer modeling system that produces a general equilibrium solution for energy supply and demand in the US energy markets. The model achieves a supply and demand balance in the end-use demand regions, defined as the nine Census Divisions, by solving for the prices of each energy type such that the quantities producers are willing to supply equal the quantities consumers wish to consume. The system reflects market economics, industry structure, and energy policies and regulations that influence market behavior. The NEMS Integrating Module is the central integrating component of a complex modeling system. As such, a thorough understanding of its role in the modeling process can only be achieved by placing it in the proper context with respect to the other modules. To that end, this document provides an overview of the complete NEMS model, and includes brief descriptions of the modules with which the Integrating Module interacts. The emphasis and focus, however, is on the structure and function of the Integrating Module of NEMS.

Not Available

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

70

Comparative analysis of energy data bases for the industrial and commercial sectors  

SciTech Connect

Energy data bases for the industrial and commercial sectors were analyzed to determine how valuable this data might be for policy analysis. The approach is the same for both end-use sectors: first a descrption or overview of relevant data bases identifies the available data; the coverage and methods used to generate the data are then explained; the data are then characterized and examples are provided for the major data sets under consideration. A final step assesses the data bases under consideration and draws conclusions. There are a variety of data bases considered for each of the end-use sectors included in this report. Data bases for the industrial sector include the National Energy Accounts, process-derived data bases such as the Drexel data base and data obtained from industry trade associations. For the commercial sector, three types of data bases are analyzed: the Nonresidential Building Energy Consumption Surveys, Dodge Construction Data and the Building Owners and Manager's Association Experience Exchange Report.

Roop, J.M.; Belzer, D.B.; Bohn, A.A.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Impact of post-event avoidance behavior on commercial facilities sector venues-literature review.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 (9/11), focused a great deal of interest and concern on how individual and social perceptions of risk change behavior and subsequently affect commercial sector venues. Argonne conducted a review of the literature to identify studies that quantify the direct and indirect economic consequences of avoidance behaviors that result from terrorist attacks. Despite a growing amount of literature addressing terrorism impacts, relatively little is known about the causal relationships between risk perception, human avoidance behaviors, and the economic effects on commercial venues. Nevertheless, the technical and academic literature does provide some evidence, both directly and by inference, of the level and duration of post-event avoidance behaviors on commercial venues. Key findings are summarized in this Executive Summary. Also included as an appendix is a more detailed summary table of literature findings reproduced from the full report.

Samsa, M. E.; Baldwin, T. E.; Berry, M. S.; Guzowski, L. B.; Martinez-Moyano, I.; Nieves, A. L.; Ramarasad, A. (Decision and Information Sciences)

2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

72

Toward a National Plan for the Accelerated Commercialization of Solar Energy: residential/commercial buildings market sector workbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This workbook contains preliminary data and assumptions used during the preparation of inputs to a National Plan for the Accelerated Commercialization of Solar Energy (NPAC). The workbook indicates the market potential, competitive position, market penetration, and technological characteristics of solar technologies for this market sector over the next twenty years. The workbook also presents projections of the mix of solar technologies by US Census Regions. In some cases, data have been aggregated to the national level. Emphasis of the workbook is on a mid-price fuel scenario, Option II, that meets about a 20% solar goal by the year 2000. The energy demand for the mid-price scenario is projected at 115 quads in the year 2000. The workbook, prepared in April 1979, represents government policies and programs anticipated at that time.

Taul, Jr., J. W.; de Jong, D. L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

ENERGY STAR Snapshot: Measuring Progress in the Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Spring 2008.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring Progress in the Commercial and Industrial Sectors Spring 2008 Introduction Through 2007, commercial and industrial (C&I) leaders have made unprecedented progress in their efforts to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions across their buildings and facilities. This includes: y Hundreds of organizations and individuals stepping forward to take the ENERGY STAR Challenge to improve the energy efficiency of America's buildings by 10 percent or more y Measuring the energy performance in tens of thousands of buildings y Achieving energy savings across millions of square feet y Designating more than 4,000 efficient buildings and facilities with the ENERGY STAR label ENERGY STAR partners are building tremendous momentum for energy efficiency and seeing important

74

Encyclopedia of Energy, Volume 1, pp 605616. Elsevier. 2004. Author nonexclusive, royalty-free copyright 1 Commercial Sector and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Encyclopedia of Energy, Volume 1, pp 605­616. Elsevier. 2004. Author nonexclusive, royalty-free copyright 1 Commercial Sector and Energy Use J. MICHAEL MACDONALD Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge of Commercial Energy Use 3. Measuring Energy Performance 4. Performance Rating Systems 5. Energy Efficiency

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

75

Where did the money go? The cost and performance of the largest commercial sector DSM program  

SciTech Connect

We calculate the total resource cost (TRC) of energy savings for 40 of the largest 1992 commercial sector DSM programs. The calculation includes the participating customer`s cost contribution to energy saving measures and all utility costs, including incentives received by customers, program administrative and overhead costs, measurement and evaluation costs, and shareholder incentives paid to the utility. All savings are based on post-program savings evaluations. We find that, on a savings-weighted basis, the programs have saved energy at a cost of 3.2 {cents}/kWh. Taken as a whole, the programs have been highly cost effective when compared to the avoided costs faced by the utilities when the programs were developed. We investigate reasons for differences in program costs and examine uncertainties in current utility practices for reporting costs and evaluating savings.

Eto, J.; Kito, S.; Shown, L.; Sonnenblick, R.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Analysis and Representation of Miscellaneous Electric Loads in NEMS -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis and Representation of Miscellaneous Electric Loads in NEMS Analysis and Representation of Miscellaneous Electric Loads in NEMS Release date: January 6, 2014 Miscellaneous Electric Loads (MELs) comprise a growing portion of delivered energy consumption in residential and commercial buildings. Recently, the growth of MELs has offset some of the efficiency gains made through technology improvements and standards in major end uses such as space conditioning, lighting, and water heating. Miscellaneous end uses, including televisions, personal computers, security systems, data center servers, and many other devices, have continued to penetrate into building-related market segments. Part of this proliferation of devices and equipment can be attributed to increased service demand for entertainment, computing, and convenience appliances.

77

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

78

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

79

Availability of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Archive.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Availability of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Archive. NEMS has been developed primarily for use by the modelers at Energy Information

80

A new approach to estimate commercial sector end-use load shapes and energy use intensities  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the application of an end-use load shape estimation technique to develop annual energy use intensities (EUIs) and hourly end-use load shapes (LSs) for commercial buildings in the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) service territory. Results will update inputs for the commercial sector energy and peak demand forecasting models used by PG&E and the California Energy Commission (CEC). EUIs were estimated for 11 building types, up to 10 end uses, 3 fuel types, 2 building vintages, and up to 5 climate regions. The integrated methodology consists of two major parts. The first part is the reconciliation of initial end-use load-shape estimates with measured whole-building load data to produce intermediate EUIs and load shapes, using LBL`s End-use Disaggregation Algorithm, EDA. EDA is a deterministic hourly algorithm that relies on the observed characteristics of the measured hourly whole-building electricity use and disaggregates it into major end-use components. The end-use EUIs developed through the EDA procedure represent a snap-shot of electricity use by building type and end-use for two regions of the PG&E service territory, for the year that disaggregation is performed. In the second part of the methodology, we adjust the EUIs for direct application to forecasting models based on factors such as climatic impacts on space-conditioning EUIs, fuel saturation effects, building and equipment vintage, and price impacts. Core data for the project are detailed on-site surveys for about 800 buildings, mail surveys ({approximately}6000), load research data for over 1000 accounts, and hourly weather data for five climate regions.

Akbari, H.; Eto, J.; Konopacki, S.; Afzal, A.; Heinemeier, K.; Rainer, L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems commercial sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Conservation screening curves to compare efficiency investments topower plants: Applications to commercial sector conservationprograms  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a simplified methodology to compare supply and demand-side resources. The screening curve approach supplements with load shape information the data contained in a supply curve of conserved energy. In addition, a screening curve contains information on competing supply technologies, such as annualized capital costs, variable costs, and cost per delivered kWh. The information in the screening curve allows policymakers to promptly and conveniently compare the relevant parameters affecting supply and demand-side investment decisions. While many sophisticated computer models have evolved to account for the load shape impacts of energy efficiency investments, this sophistication has, by and large, not trickled down to spreadsheet-level or 'back-of-the-envelope' analyses. Our methodology allows a simple summary of load shape characteristics based on the output of the more complicated models. It offers many advantages, principal of which is clarity in analyzing supply and demand-side investment choices. This paper first describes how supply-side screening curves have been used in the past, and develops the conceptual tools needed to apply integrated supply/demand screening curves in the least-cost utility planning process. It then presents examples of supply-side technologies and commercial sector demand-side management programs, and plots them on representative screening curves.

Koomey, Jonathan; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Conservation screening curves to compare efficiency investments to power plants: Applications to commercial sector conservation programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Analysis 3 LILCO--Commercial Energy Audit 4Large Commercial Audit 7 SCE--Energy Management SurveysUtilities--Energy Check 5 SMUD--Small Commercial Audit 6

Koomey, Jonathan; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Investigation of residential central air conditioning load shapes in NEMS  

SciTech Connect

This memo explains what Berkeley Lab has learned about how the residential central air-conditioning (CAC) end use is represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). NEMS is an energy model maintained by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) that is routinely used in analysis of energy efficiency standards for residential appliances. As part of analyzing utility and environmental impacts related to the federal rulemaking for residential CAC, lower-than-expected peak utility results prompted Berkeley Lab to investigate the input load shapes that characterize the peaky CAC end use and the submodule that treats load demand response. Investigations enabled a through understanding of the methodology by which hourly load profiles are input to the model and how the model is structured to respond to peak demand. Notably, it was discovered that NEMS was using an October-peaking load shape to represent residential space cooling, which suppressed peak effects to levels lower than expected. An apparent scaling down of the annual load within the load-demand submodule was found, another significant suppressor of the peak impacts. EIA promptly responded to Berkeley Lab's discoveries by updating numerous load shapes for the AEO2002 version of NEMS; EIA is still studying the scaling issue. As a result of this work, it was concluded that Berkeley Lab's customary end-use decrement approach was the most defensible way for Berkeley Lab to perform the recent CAC utility impact analysis. This approach was applied in conjunction with the updated AEO2002 load shapes to perform last year's published rulemaking analysis. Berkeley Lab experimented with several alternative approaches, including modifying the CAC efficiency level, but determined that these did not sufficiently improve the robustness of the method or results to warrant their implementation. Work in this area will continue in preparation for upcoming rulemakings for the other peak coincident end uses, commercial air conditioning and distribution transformers.

Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Marnay, Chris; Gumerman, Etan; Chan, Peter; Rosenquist, Greg; Osborn, Julie

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Nanotribology and nanomechanics of MEMS/NEMS and BioMEMS/BioNEMS materials and devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The micro/nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS) need to be designed to perform expected functions typically in millisecond to picosecond range. Expected life of the devices for high speed contacts can vary from few hundred thousand to many billions ... Keywords: MEMS, NEMS, Nanomaterials characterization, Nanomechanics, Nanotechnology

Bharat Bhushan

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Energy audits reveal significant energy savings potential in India`s commercial air-conditioned building sector  

SciTech Connect

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) began its Energy Management Consultation and Training (EMCAT) project in India. The EMCAT project began in 1991 as a six-year (1991--1997) project to improve India`s technological and management capabilities for both the supply of energy and its efficient end use. The end-use component of EMCAT aims for efficient energy utilization by industries and other sectors such as the commercial sector. A specific task under the end-use component was to conduct energy surveys/audits in high energy-use sectors, such as air-conditioned (AC) buildings in the commercial sector, and to identify investment opportunities that could improve energy utilization. This article presents results of pre-investment surveys that were conducted at four commercial air-conditioned facilities in 1995. The four facilities included two luxury hotels in New Delhi, and one luxury hotel and a private hospital in Bombay. Energy conservation opportunities (ECOs) were explored in three major energy-using systems in these buildings: air-conditioning, lighting, and steam and domestic hot water systems.

Singh, G.; Presny, D.; Fafard, C. [Resource Management Associates of Madison, Inc., WI (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

Distributed Resources in the Commercial Sector: Customer Needs and Adoption Experiences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the last five years, an increasing number of commercial customers have installed distributed resources (DR) solutions at their facilities. This study sheds light on the DR adoption experience of commercial customers, enabling EPRI members to better target attractive commercial segments and assist in customer implementation of DR solutions.

2001-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

87

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

0 2003 Commercial Primary Energy Consumption Intensities, by Principal Building Type Consumption Percent of Total | Consumption Percent of Total Building Type (thousand BtuSF)...

88

A Model of U.S. Commercial Distributed Generation Adoption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small-scale (100 kW-5 MW) on-site distributed generation (DG) economically driven by combined heat and power (CHP) applications and, in some cases, reliability concerns will likely emerge as a common feature of commercial building energy systems over the next two decades. Forecasts of DG adoption published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) are made using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), which has a forecasting module that predicts the penetration of several possible commercial building DG technologies over the period 2005-2025. NEMS is also used for estimating the future benefits of Department of Energy research and development used in support of budget requests and management decisionmaking. The NEMS approach to modeling DG has some limitations, including constraints on the amount of DG allowed for retrofits to existing buildings and a small number of possible sizes for each DG technology. An alternative approach called Commercial Sector Model (ComSeM) is developed to improve the way in which DG adoption is modeled. The approach incorporates load shapes for specific end uses in specific building types in specific regions, e.g., cooling in hospitals in Atlanta or space heating in Chicago offices. The Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) uses these load profiles together with input cost and performance DG technology assumptions to model the potential DG adoption for four selected cities and two sizes of five building types in selected forecast years to 2022. The Distributed Energy Resources Market Diffusion Model (DER-MaDiM) is then used to then tailor the DER-CAM results to adoption projections for the entire U.S. commercial sector for all forecast years from 2007-2025. This process is conducted such that the structure of results are consistent with the structure of NEMS, and can be re-injected into NEMS that can then be used to integrate adoption results into a full forecast.

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Ryan Firestone; Zhou, Nan; Maribu,Karl; Marnay, Chris

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

89

U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS National Climatic Data Center.with Changing Boundaries." Use of GIS to Understand Socio-Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS Appendix A. Map Results Gallery

Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

The energy-savings potential of electrochromic windows in the US commercial buildings sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of EC window and daylighting systems on US primary energyof EC windows and daylighting systems is 97.3 TBtu (1 TBtu =windows and daylighting systems in a prototypical commercial

Lee, Eleanor; Yazdanian, Mehry; Selkowitz, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 2003 Commercial Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Ownership of Unit (1) Ownership Nongovernment Owned 85.1 72% Owner-Occupied 87.3 35% Nonowner-Occupied 88.4 36%...

92

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

8 Commercial Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Vintage Consumption per Year Constructed Square Foot (thousand BtuSF) Prior to 1960 84.4 23% 1960 to 1969 91.5 12% 1970...

93

The economics of photovoltaics in the commercial, institutional and industrical sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the application of a model which computes system break-even capital costs, array break-even capital costs and profits from photovoltaic investments in the industrial, commercial and institutional ...

Cox, Alan J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Energy Use in the U.S. Commercial Sector - Energy Information Administration Data, Information and Analyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. As such, EIA has a wealth of energy data and analyses available for public use, including information about energy use in the buildings sectors. This paper discusses the types of EIA energy information available, how the information can be accessed, and how it may be valuable in the quest to improve existing building energy usage.

Boedecker, E.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Countries Launch Initiative to Drive Energy Efficiency in the Commercial and Industrial Sectors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 20, 2010 July 20, 2010 1 FACT SHEET: THE GLOBAL SUPERIOR ENERGY PERFORMANCE PARTNERSHIP At the Clean Energy Ministerial in Washington, D.C. on July 19 th and 20 th , ministers launched a new public- private partnership to accelerate energy efficiency improvements in commercial buildings and industrial facilities, which together account for almost 60 percent of global energy use. The Global Superior Energy Performance (GSEP) Partnership will cut energy use, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and pollution, save money, and create

96

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 Commercial Buildings Share of U.S. Petroleum Consumption (Percent) Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Commercial Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Commercial Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 4% 28% 8% 56% | 6% 31% 56% 34.2 1981 4% 26% 7% 59% | 5% 29% 59% 31.9 1982 3% 26% 5% 61% | 5% 28% 61% 30.2 1983 4% 25% 5% 62% | 5% 27% 62% 30.1 1984 4% 26% 4% 61% | 5% 27% 61% 31.1 1985 3% 25% 4% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 30.9 1986 4% 24% 5% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 32.2 1987 3% 25% 4% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 32.9 1988 3% 24% 5% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 34.2 1989 3% 24% 5% 63% | 5% 25% 63% 34.2 1990 3% 25% 4% 64% | 4% 26% 64% 33.6 1991 3% 24% 4% 65% | 4% 26% 65% 32.8 1992 3% 26% 3% 65% | 4% 27% 65% 33.5 1993 2% 25% 3% 65% | 3% 26% 65% 33.8 1994 2% 25% 3% 65% | 3% 26% 65% 34.7 1995 2% 25% 2% 67% | 3% 26% 67% 34.6 1996 2% 25% 2% 66% | 3% 26% 66% 35.8 1997 2% 26% 3% 66% | 3% 26% 66% 36.3 1998 2% 25% 4% 66% | 3% 26% 66% 36.9 1999 2% 25% 3% 66% | 3% 26% 66% 38.0 2000 2% 24% 3% 67% | 3% 25%

97

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Commercial Buildings Share of U.S. Natural Gas Consumption (Percent) Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Commercial Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Commercial Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 13% 41% 19% 3% | 18% 49% 3% 20.22 1981 13% 42% 19% 3% | 18% 49% 3% 19.74 1982 14% 39% 18% 3% | 20% 45% 3% 18.36 1983 14% 39% 17% 3% | 19% 46% 3% 17.20 1984 14% 40% 17% 3% | 19% 47% 3% 18.38 1985 14% 40% 18% 3% | 19% 46% 3% 17.70 1986 14% 40% 16% 3% | 19% 46% 3% 16.59 1987 14% 41% 17% 3% | 19% 47% 3% 17.63 1988 15% 42% 15% 3% | 19% 47% 3% 18.44 1989 14% 41% 16% 3% | 19% 47% 3% 19.56 1990 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 49% 4% 19.57 1991 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 49% 3% 20.03 1992 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 49% 3% 20.71 1993 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 48% 3% 21.24 1994 14% 42% 18% 3% | 19% 48% 3% 21.75 1995 14% 42% 19% 3% | 20% 49% 3% 22.71 1996 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 49% 3% 23.14 1997 14% 43% 18% 3% | 20% 49% 3% 23.34 1998 13% 43% 20% 3% | 20% 50% 3% 22.86 1999 14%

98

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Commercial Water Use by Source (Million Gallons per Day) Year 1980 - - - 1985 5,710 1,230 1990 5,900 2,390 1995 6,690 2,890 2000 (3) 7,202 3,111 2005 (3) 7,102 3,068 Note(s): Source(s): 10,314 10,171 1) Public supply water use: water withdrawn by public and private water suppliers that furnish water to at least 25 people or have a minimum of 15 connections. 2) Self-supply water use: Water withdrawn from a groundwater or surface-water source by a user rather than being obtained from a public supply. 3) USGS did not estimate commercial water use in this year. Estimates are based on available data and percentage breakdown of commercial use in the 1995 survey. U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of Water in the U.S. in 1985, U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1004, 1988; U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of

99

Market potential for solar thermal energy supply systems in the United States industrial and commercial sectors: 1990--2030. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report revises and extends previous work sponsored by the US DOE on the potential industrial market in the United States for solar thermal energy systems and presents a new analysis of the commercial sector market potential. Current and future industrial process heat demand and commercial water heating, space heating and space cooling end-use demands are estimated. The PC Industrial Model (PCIM) and the commercial modules of the Building Energy End-Use Model (BEEM) used by the DOE`s Energy Information Administration (EIA) to support the recent National Energy Strategy (NES) analysis are used to forecast industrial and commercial end-use energy demand respectively. Energy demand is disaggregated by US Census region to account for geographic variation in solar insolation and regional variation in cost of alternative natural gas-fired energy sources. The industrial sector analysis also disaggregates demand by heat medium and temperature range to facilitate process end-use matching with appropriate solar thermal energy supply technologies. The commercial sector analysis disaggregates energy demand by three end uses: water heating, space heating, and space cooling. Generic conceptual designs are created for both industrial and commercial applications. Levelized energy costs (LEC) are calculated for industrial sector applications employing low temperature flat plate collectors for process water preheat; parabolic troughs for intermediate temperature process steam and direct heat industrial application; and parabolic dish technologies for high temperature, direct heat industrial applications. LEC are calculated for commercial sector applications employing parabolic trough technologies for low temperature water and space heating. Cost comparisons are made with natural gas-fired sources for both the industrial market and the commercial market assuming fuel price escalation consistent with NES reference case scenarios for industrial and commercial sector gas markets.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Countries Launch Initiative to Drive Energy Efficiency in the Commercial and Industrial Sectors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Updated on July 23, 2010 Updated on July 23, 2010 1 FACT SHEET: THE GLOBAL SUPERIOR ENERGY PERFORMANCE PARTNERSHIP At the Clean Energy Ministerial in Washington, D.C. on July 19 th and 20 th , ministers launched a new public- private partnership to accelerate energy efficiency improvements in commercial buildings and industrial facilities, which together account for almost 60 percent of global energy use. The Global Superior Energy Performance (GSEP) Partnership will cut energy use, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and pollution, save money, and create

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems commercial sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Assessment of the Energy Impacts of Outside Air in the Commercial Sector  

SciTech Connect

The enormous quantity of energy consumed by U.S. commercial buildings places a significant burden on the energy supply and is a potential source of economic strain. To address this, the DOE Building Technologies Program has established the goal of developing market-viable zero energy buildings by 2025. This study focuses on the effects of outside air, and considers various outside air sources, types of building construction, building subsectors, and climates. Based on the information about energy consumption attributed to outside air, it identifies topics for further research that have the greatest potential to achieve energy savings.

Benne, K.; Griffith, B.; Long, N.; Torcellini, P.; Crawley, D.; Logee, T.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 2003 Commercial Buildings Delivered Energy End-Use Intensities, by Building Activity (Thousand Btu per SF) (1) Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other Total Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other Total Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other Total Note(s): Source(s): 43.5 45.2 164.4 20.9 1) Due to rounding, end-uses do not sum to total. EIA, 2003 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey, Energy End-Uses, Oct. 2008, Table E.2A. 0.3 0.6 3.0 N.A. 4.9 4.8 18.9 3.1 1.7 3.5 6.0 N.A. 0.1 0.2 N.A. N.A. 4.4 13.1 34.1 1.7 0.8 N.A. N.A. N.A. 1.4 2.0 6.1 0.4 0.8 0.6 2.1 0.1 26.2 19.3 79.4 14.4 2.9 1.3 10.5 0.6 Religious

103

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Aggregate Commercial Building Component Loads as of 1998 (1) Load (quads) and Percent of Total Load Component Heating Cooling Roof -0.103 12% 0.014 1% Walls (2) -0.174 21% -0.008 - Foundation -0.093 11% -0.058 - Infiltration -0.152 18% -0.041 - Ventilation -0.129 15% -0.045 - Windows (conduction) -0.188 22% -0.085 - Windows (solar gain) 0.114 - 0.386 32% Internal Gains Lights 0.196 - 0.505 42% Equipment (electrical) 0.048 - 0.207 17% Equip. (non-electrical) 0.001 - 0.006 1% People 0.038 - 0.082 7% NET Load -0.442 100% 0.963 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Loads represent the thermal energy losses/gains that, when combined, will be offset by a building's heating/cooling system to maintain a set interior temperature (which equals site energy). 2) Includes common interior walls between buildings. LBNL, Commercial Heating and Cooling Loads Component Analysis, June 1998, Table 24, p. 45 and Figure 3, p. 61

104

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Normalized Annual End Uses of Water in Select Restaurants in Western United States (1) Fixture/End Use (2) Faucets Dishwashing Toilets/Urinals Ice Making Total Indoor Use (3) (4) (4) Building Size (SF) Seats: Meals: Benchmarking Values for Restaurants (6) N Gal./SF/year 90 Gal./meal 90 Gal./seat/day 90 Gal./employee/day 90 Note(s): Source(s): American Water Works Association Research Foundation, Commercial and Institutional End Uses of Water, 2000. 25th Percentile of Users 130 - 331 6 - 9 20 - 31 86 - 122 Familiy-style dine-in establishments. Four restaurants in southern California, one in Phoenix, AZ. 1) Water use data for the buildings was collected over a few days. Estimates of annual use were created by accounting for seasonal use and other variables, billing data, and

105

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 Normalized Annual End Uses of Water in Two California High Schools Fixture/End Use Toilet Urinal Faucet Shower Kitchen Misc. uses (2) Cooling Leaks Swimming Pool Total Use Benchmarking Values for Schools (3) N Indoor Use, Gal./sq. ft./year 142 Indoor Use, Gal./school day/student 141 Cooling Use, Gal./sq. ft./year 35 Note(s): Source(s): 8 - 20 1) Water use data for the buildings was collected over a few days. Estimates of annual use were created by accounting for seasonal use and other variables, billing data, and interviews with building managers. 2) One high school. 3) The study derived efficiency benchmarks by analyzing measured data and audit data. The benchmark was set at the lower 25th percentile of users. American Water Works Association Research Foundation, Commercial and Institutional End Uses of Water, 2000.

106

Scale Matters: An Action Plan for Realizing Sector-Wide"Zero-Energy" Performance Goals in Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

It is widely accepted that if the United States is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions it must aggressively address energy end use in the building sector. While there have been some notable but modest successes with mandatory and voluntary programs, there have also been puzzling failures to achieve expected savings. Collectively, these programs have not yet reached the majority of the building stock, nor have they yet routinely produced very large savings in individual buildings. Several trends that have the potential to change this are noteworthy: (1) the growing market interest in 'green buildings' and 'sustainable design', (2) the major professional societies (e.g. AIA, ASHRAE) have more aggressively adopted significant improvements in energy efficiency as strategic goals, e.g. targeting 'zero energy', carbon-neutral buildings by 2030. While this vision is widely accepted as desirable, unless there are significant changes to the way buildings are routinely designed, delivered and operated, zero energy buildings will remain a niche phenomenon rather than a sector-wide reality. Toward that end, a public/private coalition including the Alliance to Save Energy, LBNL, AIA, ASHRAE, USGBC and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) are developing an 'action plan' for moving the U.S. commercial building sector towards zero energy performance. It addresses regional action in a national framework; integrated deployment, demonstration and R&D threads; and would focus on measurable, visible performance indicators. This paper outlines this action plan, focusing on the challenge, the key themes, and the strategies and actions leading to substantial reductions in GHG emissions by 2030.

Selkowitz, Stephen; Selkowitz, Stephen; Granderson, Jessica; Haves, Philip; Mathew, Paul; Harris, Jeff

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

107

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Average Water Use of Commercial and Institutional Establishments (Gallons per Establishment per Day) Average Variation % Total % of CI % Seasonal Daily Use In Use (1) CI Use Customers Use (2) Hotels and Motels 7,113 5.41 5.8% 1.9% 23.1% Laundries/Laundromats 3,290 8.85 4.0% 1.4% 13.4% Car Washes 3,031 3.12 0.8% 0.4% 14.2% Urban Irrigation 2,596 8.73 28.5% 30.2% 86.9% Schools and Colleges 2,117 12.13 8.8% 4.8% 58.0% Hospitals/Medical Offices 1,236 78.5 3.9% 4.2% 23.2% Office Buildings 1,204 6.29 10.2% 11.7% 29.0% Restaurants 906 7.69 8.8% 11.2% 16.1% Food Stores 729 16.29 2.9% 5.2% 19.4% Auto Shops (3) 687 7.96 2.0% 6.7% 27.2% Membership Organizations (4) 629 6.42 2.0% 5.6% 46.2% Total 77.6% 83.3% Note(s): Source(s): 23,538 Estimated from 24 months of water utility billing data in five Western locations: four locations in Southern California and one in Arizona. 1)

108

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

9 9 2003 Commercial Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Principal Building Type and Vintage (1) | Building Type Pre-1959 1960-1989 1990-2003 | Building Type Pre-1959 1960-1989 1990-2003 Health Care 178.1 216.0 135.7 | Education 77.7 88.3 80.6 Inpatient 230.3 255.3 253.8 | Service 62.4 86.0 74.8 Outpatient 91.6 110.4 84.4 | Food Service 145.2 290.1 361.2 Food Sales 205.8 197.6 198.3 | Religious Worship 46.6 39.9 43.3 Lodging 88.2 111.5 88.1 | Public Order & Safety N.A. 101.3 110.6 Office 93.6 94.4 88.0 | Warehouse & Storage N.A. 38.9 33.3 Mercantile 80.4 91.8 94.4 | Public Assembly 61.9 107.6 119.7 Retail (Non-Malls) 74.1 63.7 86.4 | Vacant 21.4 23.1 N.A. Retail (Malls) N.A. 103.9 99.5 | Other 161.3 204.9 125.3 Note(s): Source(s): Consumption (kBtu/SF) Consumption (kBtu/SF) 1) See Table 3.1.3 for primary versus delivered energy consumption.

109

Investigation of residential central air conditioning load shapes in NEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Residential Central Air Conditioning Load Shapes in NEMSof Residential Central Air Conditioning Load Shapes in NEMSof Residential Central Air Conditioning Load Shapes in NEMS

Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Marnay, Chris; Gumerman, Etan; Chan, Peter; Rosenquist, Greg; Osborn, Julie

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Appendix C: Map of NEMS Electricity Market Module Regions  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Analysis of Impacts of a Clean Energy Standard as requested by Chairman Bingaman Appendix C: Map of NEMS Electricity Market Module Regions...

111

Appendix C. Map of NEMS Electricity Market Module Regions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Analysis of Impacts of a Clean Energy Standard as requested by Chairman Hall Appendix C. Map of NEMS Electricity Market Module Regions...

112

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Commercial Delivered and Primary Energy Consumption Intensities, by Year Percent Delivered Energy Consumption Primary Energy Consumption Floorspace Post-2000 Total Consumption per Total Consumption per (million SF) Floorspace (1) (10^15 Btu) SF (thousand Btu/SF) (10^15 Btu) SF (thousand Btu/SF) 1980 50.9 N.A. 5.99 117.7 10.57 207.7 1990 64.3 N.A. 6.74 104.8 13.30 207.0 2000 (2) 68.5 N.A. 8.20 119.7 17.15 250.3 2010 81.1 26% 8.74 107.7 18.22 224.6 2015 84.1 34% 8.88 105.5 18.19 216.2 2020 89.1 43% 9.02 101.2 19.15 214.9 2025 93.9 52% 9.56 101.8 20.06 213.6 2030 98.2 60% 9.96 101.5 20.92 213.1 2035 103.0 68% 10.38 100.8 21.78 211.4 Note(s): Source(s): EIA, State Energy Consumption Database, June 2011 for 1980-2009; DOE for 1980 floorspace; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 1994, Jan. 1994, Table A5, p. 62 for 1990 floorspace; EIA, AEO 2003, Jan. 2003, Table A5, p. 127 for 2000 floorspace; and EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012,

113

From comfort to kilowatts: An integrated assessment of electricity conservation in Thailand's commercial sector  

SciTech Connect

Thailand serves as a case study of the potential to conserve electricity in the fast-growing commercial sectors of the tropical developing world. We performed a field study of over 1100 Thai office workers in which a questionnaire survey and simultaneous physical measurements were taken. Both air-conditioned and non-air-conditioned buildings were included. We analyzed Thai subjective responses on the ASHRAE, McIntyre and other rating scales, relating them to Effective Temperature, demographics, and to rational indices of warmth such as PMV and TSENS. These results suggest that without sacrificing comfort, significant energy conservation opportunities exist through the relaxation of upper space temperature limits. To investigate the potential for conserving energy in a cost-effective manner, we performed a series of parametric simulations using the DOE-2.1D computer program on three commercial building prototypes based on actual buildings in Bangkok; an office, a hotel, and a shopping center. We investigated a wide range of energy conservation measures appropriate for each building type, from architectural measures to HVAC equipment and control solutions. The best measures applied in combination into high efficiency cases can generate energy savings in excess of 50%. Economic analyses performed for the high efficiency cases, resulted in costs of conserved energy of less than and internal rates of return in excess of 40%. Thermal cool storage, cogeneration, and gas cooling technology showed promise as cost-effective electric load management strategies.

Busch, J.F. Jr.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

From comfort to kilowatts: An integrated assessment of electricity conservation in Thailand's commercial sector  

SciTech Connect

Thailand serves as a case study of the potential to conserve electricity in the fast-growing commercial sectors of the tropical developing world. A field study of over 1,100 Thai office workers was performed in which a questionnaire survey and simultaneous physical measurements were taken. Both air-conditioned and non-air-conditioned buildings were included. Thai subjective responses were analyzed on the ASHRAE, McIntyre, and other rating scales, relating them to Effective Temperature, demographics, and to rational indices of warmth such as PMV and TSENSA. These results suggest that without sacrificing comfort, significant energy conservation opportunities exist through the relaxation of upper space temperature limits. To investigate the potential for conserving energy in a cost-effective manner, a series of parametric simulations were performed using the DOE-2.1D computer program for three commercial building prototypes in Bangkok: an office, a hotel, and a shopping center. A wide range of energy conservation measures appropriate for each building type was studied. Drawing on the building energy-simulation results, impacts on the Thai electric utility were evaluated under various conservation scenarios.

Busch, J.F. Jr.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Charting a Path to Net Zero Energy: Public-Private Sector Perspectives of the Commercial Buildings Consortium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transforming the commercial buildings market to become "net-zero-energy-capable" will require dramatically lower levels of energy use sector wide. A comprehensive and concerted industry effort, partnering with utilities and government, must be sufficient in scale to influence the more than 600 billion dollar per year spent on commercial new construction, renovation, and energy bills by fundamentally reinventing today's standard "design- build-operate" building delivery process as an integrated system throughout a building's life cycle. In response to this need, in 2007 Congress called for creation of a Commercial Buildings Consortium (CBC) as a joint effort by the US Department of Energy (DOE), building owners and developers, states, utilities, and other stakeholders to develop and implement a multi-year agenda to transform the market through coordinated technology development, demonstration, and deployment. Since 2009, the CBC has attracted over 500 members, many of whom contributed actively, through 12 working groups, in developing two major reports released in early 2011. Next Generation Technologies Barriers and Industry Recommendations and an Analysis of Cost and Non-cost Barriers and Policy Solutions. This paper reviews the concept of net-zero energy (NZE) buildings and where we stand today. We discuss some of the near-term actions and longer- term strategies needed to accelerate technology innovation; make today's best practices tomorrow's business-as-usual; and deliver dramatically lower levels of energy use along with high-quality, healthy, and pleasant indoor environments that are resilient, adaptable, durable, and grid-responsive - while achieving market-accepted economics.

Harris, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 2015 Commercial Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Lighting 1.01 1.01 11.4% | 3.05 3.05 16.7% Space Heating 1.69 0.20 0.06 0.11 0.17 2.23 25.2% | 0.50 2.57 14.1% Space Cooling 0.04 0.51 0.54 6.1% | 1.52 1.56 8.6% Ventilation 0.54 0.54 6.1% | 1.62 1.62 8.9% Refrigeration 0.35 0.35 4.0% | 1.06 1.06 5.8% Electronics 0.32 0.32 3.6% | 0.95 0.95 5.2% Water Heating 0.48 0.03 0.03 0.09 0.63 7.1% | 0.27 0.81 4.5% Computers 0.19 0.19 2.1% | 0.57 0.57 3.1% Cooking 0.19 0.02 0.21 2.4% | 0.07 0.26 1.4% Other (5) 0.33 0.01 0.14 0.05 0.01 0.81 1.35 15.2% | 2.45 2.99 16.4% Adjust to SEDS (6) 0.68 0.19 0.63 1.50 16.9% | 1.90 2.77 15.2% Total 3.33 0.43 0.14 0.11 0.15 4.63 8.88 100% | 13.99 18.23 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes (0.35 quad) distillate fuel oil and (0.08 quad) residual fuel oil. 2) Kerosene (less than 0.01 quad) and coal (0.06 quad) are

117

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 2025 Commercial Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Lighting 1.08 1.08 11.3% | 3.27 3.27 16.3% Space Heating 1.68 0.18 0.06 0.11 0.16 2.20 23.1% | 0.49 2.53 12.6% Ventilation 0.60 0.60 6.2% | 1.80 1.80 9.0% Space Cooling 0.03 0.52 0.55 5.7% | 1.56 1.59 7.9% Electronics 0.40 0.40 4.2% | 1.22 1.22 6.1% Refrigeration 0.34 0.34 3.6% | 1.02 1.02 5.1% Water Heating 0.52 0.03 0.03 0.09 0.67 7.0% | 0.27 0.85 4.2% Computers 0.20 0.20 2.1% | 0.60 0.60 3.0% Cooking 0.21 0.02 0.23 2.4% | 0.07 0.27 1.4% Other (5) 0.48 0.01 0.15 0.05 0.01 1.12 1.82 19.1% | 3.39 4.09 20.3% Adjust to SEDS (6) 0.58 0.18 0.69 1.46 15.3% | 2.09 2.85 14.2% Total 3.50 0.41 0.15 0.12 0.15 5.23 9.56 100% | 15.77 20.10 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes (0.33 quad) distillate fuel oil and (0.08 quad) residual fuel oil. 2) Kerosene (less than 0.01 quad) and coal (0.06 quad) are

118

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Commercial Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total) Electricity Growth Rate Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Coal Renewable(2) Sales Losses Total Total(3) 2010-Year 1980 2.63 24.9% 1.31 12.4% 0.12 1.1% 0.02 0.2% 1.91 4.58 6.49 61.4% 1981 2.54 23.9% 1.12 10.5% 0.14 1.3% 0.02 0.2% 2.03 4.76 6.80 64.1% 1982 2.64 24.3% 1.03 9.5% 0.16 1.4% 0.02 0.2% 2.08 4.91 6.99 64.5% 1983 2.48 22.7% 1.16 10.7% 0.16 1.5% 0.02 0.2% 2.12 4.98 7.09 65.0% 1984 2.57 22.5% 1.22 10.7% 0.17 1.5% 0.02 0.2% 2.26 5.17 7.43 65.1% 1985 2.47 21.6% 1.08 9.4% 0.14 1.2% 0.02 0.2% 2.35 5.39 7.74 67.6% 1986 2.35 20.3% 1.16 10.0% 0.14 1.2% 0.03 0.2% 2.44 5.47 7.91 68.3% 1987 2.47 20.8% 1.13 9.5% 0.13 1.1% 0.03 0.2% 2.54 5.62 8.16 68.5% 1988 2.72 21.6% 1.09 8.7% 0.13 1.0% 0.03 0.3% 2.68 5.92 8.60 68.4% 1989 2.77 21.0% 1.04 7.9% 0.12 0.9% 0.10 0.8% 2.77 6.39 9.16 69.5% 1990 2.67 20.1%

119

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 2035 Commercial Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Lighting 1.15 1.15 11.1% | 3.40 3.40 15.6% Space Heating 1.65 0.18 0.06 0.11 0.16 2.16 20.8% | 0.48 2.48 11.3% Ventilation 0.65 0.65 6.2% | 1.91 1.91 8.7% Space Cooling 0.03 0.54 0.57 5.5% | 1.59 1.62 7.4% Electronics 0.46 0.46 4.5% | 1.37 1.37 6.3% Refrigeration 0.36 0.36 3.4% | 1.05 1.05 4.8% Water Heating 0.54 0.03 0.04 0.09 0.70 6.8% | 0.25 0.87 4.0% Computers 0.22 0.22 2.1% | 0.64 0.64 2.9% Cooking 0.22 0.02 0.25 2.4% | 0.06 0.29 1.3% Other (5) 0.81 0.01 0.16 0.06 0.01 1.46 2.51 24.2% | 4.30 5.35 24.5% Adjust to SEDS (6) 0.40 0.18 0.77 1.36 13.1% | 2.28 2.86 13.1% Total 3.65 0.40 0.16 0.12 0.16 5.89 10.38 100% | 17.33 21.83 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes (0.32 quad) distillate fuel oil and (0.08 quad) residual fuel oil. 2) Kerosene (0.01 quad) and coal (0.06 quad) are assumed

120

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 2010 Commercial Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Lighting 1.19 1.19 13.6% | 3.69 3.69 20.2% Space Heating 1.65 0.22 0.06 0.11 0.28 2.33 26.6% | 0.88 2.93 16.0% Space Cooling 0.04 0.84 0.88 10.1% | 2.60 2.64 14.5% Ventilation 0.54 0.54 6.1% | 1.66 1.66 9.1% Refrigeration 0.39 0.39 4.5% | 1.21 1.21 6.6% Water Heating 0.44 0.03 0.03 0.09 0.58 6.7% | 0.28 0.78 4.3% Electronics 0.26 0.26 3.0% | 0.81 0.81 4.4% Computers 0.21 0.21 2.4% | 0.66 0.66 3.6% Cooking 0.18 0.02 0.20 2.3% | 0.07 0.25 1.4% Other (5) 0.30 0.01 0.14 0.05 0.01 0.69 1.20 13.7% | 2.13 2.64 14.5% Adjust to SEDS (6) 0.68 0.25 0.02 0.95 10.9% | 0.06 0.99 5.4% Total 3.29 0.52 0.14 0.12 0.14 4.54 8.74 100% | 14.05 18.26 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes (0.43 quad) distillate fuel oil and (0.08 quad) residual fuel oil. 2) Kerosene (0.01 quad) and coal (0.06 quad) are assumed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems commercial sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Commercial Site Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) (1) Growth Rate Wood (2) Solar Thermal (3) Solar PV (3) GHP Total 2010-Year 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 0.110 0.035 0.010 N.A. 0.155 0.4% 0.110 0.035 0.009 N.A. 0.154 0.4% 0.110 0.035 0.009 N.A. 0.153 0.4% 0.110 0.034 0.009 N.A. 0.153 0.4% 0.110 0.034 0.009 N.A. 0.152 0.4% 0.110 0.034 0.008 N.A. 0.152 0.4% 0.110 0.034 0.008 N.A. 0.151 0.4% 0.110 0.033 0.008 N.A. 0.151 0.4% 0.110 0.033 0.008 N.A. 0.150 0.4% 0.110 0.033 0.007 N.A. 0.150 0.4% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.149 0.4% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.149 0.4% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.149 0.5% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.149 0.5% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.148 0.6%

122

Modeling Distributed Electricity Generation in the NEMS Buildings Models  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper presents the modeling methodology, projected market penetration, and impact of distributed generation with respect to offsetting future electricity needs and carbon dioxide emissions in the residential and commercial buildings sector in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) reference case.

Erin Boedecker

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

123

Residential Sector Demand Module 2000, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Residential Sector Demand Module 2004, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Residential Sector Demand Module 2001, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Residential Sector Demand Module 2002, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Residential Sector Demand Module 2005, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Residential Sector Demand Module 2003, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Residential Sector Demand Module 2008, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

130

Residential Sector Demand Module 2006, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Residential Sector Demand Module 2009, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Residential Sector Demand Module 1999, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This is the fifth edition of the Model Documentation Report: Residential Sector DemandModule of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). It reflects changes made to themodule over the past year for the Annual Energy Outlook 1999.

John H. Cymbalsky

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Residential Sector Demand Module 2007, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

John H. Cymbalsky

2007-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

134

Industrial Demand Module 1999, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. Crawford Honeycutt

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Industrial Demand Module 2005, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. C. Honeycutt

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Industrial Demand Module 2006, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. C. Honeycutt

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Industrial Demand Module 2009, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. C. Honeycutt

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

138

Industrial Demand Module 2003, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. Crawford Honeycutt

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Industrial Demand Module 2007, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. C. Honeycutt

2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

140

Industrial Demand Module 2002, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. Crawford Honeycutt

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems commercial sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Industrial Demand Module 2001, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. Crawford Honeycutt

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Industrial Demand Module 2008, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. C. Honeycutt

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Industrial Demand Module 2000, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. Crawford Honeycutt

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Industrial Demand Module 2004, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. Crawford Honeycutt

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Integrated estimation of commercial sector end-use load shapes and energy use intensities in the PG&E service area  

SciTech Connect

This project represents a unique research effort to address the commercial sector end-use energy forecasting data needs of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) and the California Energy Commission (CEC). The object of the project was to develop an updated set of commercial sector end-use energy use intensity (EUI) data that has been fully reconciled with measured data. The research was conducted in two stages. First, we developed reconciled electricity end-use EUIs and load shapes for each of the 11 building types in the inland and coastal regions of the PG&E service territory using information collected in 1986. Second, we developed procedures to translate these results into a consistent set of commercial sector forecasting model inputs recognizing the separate modeling conventions used by PG&E and CEC. EUIs have been developed for: II commercial building types; up to 10 end uses; up to 3 fuel types; 2 and 5 subservice territory forecasting regions (as specified by the PG&E and CEC forecasting models, respectively); and up to 2 distinct vintages corresponding to the period prior to and immediately following the adoption of the first generation of California building and equipment standards. For the electricity end uses, 36 sets of daily load shapes have been developed representing average weekday, average weekend, and peak weekday electricity use for each month of the year by building type for both the inland and coastal climate zones.

Akbari, H.; Eto, J.; Konopacki, S.; Afzal, A.; Heinemeier, K.; Rainer, L.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Methodology for Analyzing the Technical Potential for Energy Performance in the U.S. Commercial Buildings Sector with Detailed Energy Modeling: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes a methodology for developing quantitative answers to the question, ''How low can energy use go within the commercial buildings sector''? The basic process is to take each building in the 1999 CBECS public use data files and create a baseline building energy model for it as if it were being built new in 2005 with code-minimum energy performance.

Griffith, B.; Crawley, D.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Scale Matters: An Action Plan for Realizing Sector-Wide "Zero-Energy" Performance Goals in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 with Projections to 2030. Washington, DC: US Departmentcarbon-neutral buildings by 2030. While this vision isin GHG emissions by 2030. Energy Use in Commercial

Selkowitz, Stephen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Sector-specific issues and reporting methodologies supporting the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Volume 1: Part 1, Electricity supply sector; Part 2, Residential and commercial buildings sector; Part 3, Industrial sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE encourages you to report your achievements in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and sequestering carbon under this program. Global climate change is increasingly being recognized as a threat that individuals and organizations can take action against. If you are among those taking action, reporting your projects may lead to recognition for you, motivation for others, and synergistic learning for the global community. This report discusses the reporting process for the voluntary detailed guidance in the sectoral supporting documents for electricity supply, residential and commercial buildings, industry, transportation, forestry, and agriculture. You may have reportable projects in several sectors; you may report them separately or capture and report the total effects on an entity-wide report.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Extrapolating Environmental Benefits from IGCC in NEMS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 2008 (April August 2008 (April 2009 Revision) DOE/NETL-402/080108 Water Requirements for Existing and Emerging Thermoelectric Plant Technologies Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or

150

Residential Sector Demand Module 1998, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This is the fourth edition of the Model Documentation Report: Residential Sector DemandModule of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). It reflects changes made to themodule over the past year for the Annual Energy Outlook 1998. Since last year, severalnew end-use services were added to the module, including: Clothes washers,dishwashers, furnace fans, color televisions, and personal computers. Also, as with allNEMS modules, the forecast horizon has been extended to the year 2020.

John H. Cymbalsky

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Barriers to the increased utilization of coal combustion/desulfurization by-products by government & commercial sectors - update 1998,7/99,3268845  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BARRIERS TO THE INCREASED UTILIZATION BARRIERS TO THE INCREASED UTILIZATION OF COAL COMBUSTION/DESULFURIZATION BY-PRODUCTS BY GOVERNMENT AND COMMERCIAL SECTORS - UPDATE 1998 EERC Topical Report DE-FC21-93MC-30097--79 Submitted by: Debra F. Pflughoeft-Hassett Everett A. Sondreal Edward N. Steadman Kurt E. Eylands Bruce A. Dockter Energy & Environmental Research Center PO Box 9018 Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018 99-EERC-07-08 July 1999 i TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv LIST OF TABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v ACKNOWLEDGMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii TERMINOLOGY AND DEFINITIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

152

Industrial Demand Module 1998, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description ofthe NEMS Industrial Model for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in supportof its models (Public Law 94-385, section 57.b2). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects.

T. Crawford Honeycutt

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Preliminary energy sector assessments of Jamaica. Volume III: renewable energy. Part I: solar energy - commercial and industrial  

SciTech Connect

This study concerns commercial and industrial solar applications, specifically solar water heating and solar air cooling. The study finds that solar domestic water heating and boiler make-up water preheating are technically feasible and, depending on the displaced energy source (electrical or various fuel types), economically justified; and that solar hot water installations could displace the equivalent of 189,842 barrels of fuel oil per year. However, solar cooling requires high performance collectors not currently manufactured in Jamaica, and feasibility studies indicate that solar cooling in the near term is not economically justified.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: NEMS-H2 (National Energy Modeling...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

economic aspects of hydrogen production, delivery, and consumption. Keywords: Energy prices; emissions; production; imports; energy consumption; economic Purpose NEMS projects...

155

Estimating market penetration of steam, hot water and chilled water in commercial sector using a new econometric model  

SciTech Connect

For the first time in the public domain, we have estimated the energy consumption and expenditures of district steam, hot water, and chilled water. Specifically, the combined energy consumption and expenditures of steam, hot water, and chilled water in 1989 were approximately 800 trillion Btu and 7 billion dollars, respectively. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for estimating market penetration of steam, hot water, and chilled water systems in commercial buildings over the next 20 years. This research sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) used the 1989 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Surveys (CBECS) to provide information on energy consumption and expenditures and related factors in about 6000 buildings. A general linear model to estimated parameters for each of the three equations for steam, hot water, and chilled water demand in the buildings. A logarithmic transformation was made for the dependent variable and most of the explanatory variables. The model provides estimates of building steam, hot water, and chilled water consumption and expenditures between now and the year 2010. This model should be of interest to policymakers, researchers, and market participants involved with planning and implementing community-based energy-conserving and environmentally beneficial energy systems.

Teotia, A.P.S.; Karvelas, D.E.; Daniels, E.J.; Anderson, J.L.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential and commercial electricity demand forecasts. The23 Electricity Demandand commercial electricity demand per census division from

Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

NEMS may be addressed to the following analysts:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/aeo/overview/index.html This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. PREFACE The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview provides a summary description of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), which was used to generate the forecasts of energy production, demand, imports, and prices through the year 2020 for the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000), (DOE/EIA-0383(2000)), released in November 1999. AEO2000 presents national forecasts of energy markets for five casesa reference case and four additional cases that assume higher and lower economic growth and higher and lower world oil prices than in the reference case. The Overview presents a brief description of the methodology and scope of each of the component modules of NEMS. The model documentation reports listed in the appendix of this document

An Overview; Aeo Susan H. Holte

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Residential and Commercial Buildings Sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Also assume that the fan, both before and after project implementa-tion, was rated at 3 thousand cubic feet per minute (MCFM). The estimation was completed as follows:

159

A sensitivity analysis of the treatment of wind energy in the AEO99 version of NEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and maintenance (O&M) costs, renewable energy productionrenewable energy technologies are modeled becomes critical. The structure of NEMS makes cost

Osborn, Julie G.; Wood, Frances; Richey, Cooper; Sanders, Sandy; Short, Walter; Koomey, Jonathan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

U.S. Propane Demand Sectors (1996)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The residential and commercial sector and the chemical sector are the largest end users of propane in the U.S., accounting for 34% and 41% ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems commercial sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Nanoelectromechanical (NEM) relays integrated with CMOS SRAM for improved stability and low leakage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a hybrid nanoelectromechanical (NEM)/CMOS static random access memory (SRAM) cell, in which the two pull-down transistors of a conventional CMOS six transistor (6T) SRAM cell are replaced with NEM relays. This SRAM cell utilizes the infinite ...

Soogine Chong; Kerem Akarvardar; Roozbeh Parsa; Jun-Bo Yoon; Roger T. Howe; Subhasish Mitra; H.-S. Philip Wong

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

U.S. Regional Energy Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-57955 U.S. Regional Energy Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS Jesse A. Cohen, Jennifer L Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Planning, Budget, and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy-57955 U.S. Regional Energy Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS Prepared for the Office of Planning

163

Table 6.8 Natural Gas Prices by Sector, 1967-2011 (Dollars per ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Commercial sector, including commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. 7 The percentage of the sector's consumption in Table ...

164

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 The commercial module forecasts consumption by fuel 15 at the Census division level using prices from the NEMS energy supply modules, and macroeconomic variables from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM), as well as external data sources (technology characterizations, for example). Energy demands are forecast for ten end-use services 16 for eleven building categories 17 in each of the nine Census divisions (see Figure 5). The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division combinations. Next, the ten end-use service demands required for the projected floorspace are developed. The electricity generation and water and space heating supplied by distributed generation and combined heat and power technologies are projected. Technologies are then

165

Nano-Electro-Mechanical (NEM) Relay Devices and Technology for Ultra-Low Energy Digital Integrated Circuits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology 3.1 Introduction Nano-electro-mechanical (NEM)improvements, a scaled nano-relay technology with optimizedNano-Electro-Mechanical (NEM) Relay Devices and Technology

Nathanael, Rhesa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Boron injection/dilution capabilities in TRACB/NEM coupled code  

SciTech Connect

The coupled code TRAC-BF1/NEM is a thermal-hydraulic-neutronic code which allows transient simulations considering neutronic 3D and thermal-hydraulic process in multiple channels with one-dimensional geometry. TRAC-BF1 and NEM can be executed either in stand-alone mode, i.e. without coupling, as well as coupled. In stand-alone calculations NEM code is used without coupling and the thermal-hydraulic conditions (fuel temperature, moderator density and boron concentration) and xenon concentration for each node are taken from the SIMULATE3 output files. The NEM's source code has been modified to be able to read these conditions from external files when it is executed without being coupled. The coupling between TRAC-BF1 and NEM follows an integration scheme in which the thermal-hydraulic solution of TRAC-BF1 is sent to NEM to incorporate the feedback effects through the cross sections. TRAC-BF1 solves heat conduction equations inside of the heat structures using the 3D power distribution from NEM. The coupling is carried out through the communication protocol functions of PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine). The present article presents a study which constitutes an advance in the simulation of injection, transport and mix of boron in the reactor, increasing the capabilities of TRAC-BF1/NEM coupled code. This article shows the modifications introduced in the TRAC-BF1/NEM's source code to allow a more realistic simulation of boron injection transients. The qualification of these improvements in both codes is performed simulating a steady state of a generic BWR at nominal power. The results have been compared with SIMULATE3 which is used as a reference to obtain the cross sections through the SIMTAB methodology. (authors)

Jambrina, A.; Barrachina, T.; Miro, R.; Verdu, G. [Inst. for the Industrial, Radiophysical and Environmental Safety ISIRYM, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia UPV (Spain)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Energy efficiency standards for residential and commercial equipment: Additional opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Savings in the Residential and Commercial Sectors with High Efficiency Electric Motors. Savings in the Residential and Commercial Sectors with High Efficiency Electric Motors. Savings in the Residential and Commercial Sectors with High Efficiency Electric Motors.

Rosenquist, Greg; McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, Jim

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

CNT-based MEMS/NEMS gas ionizers for portable mass spectrometry applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the fabrication and experimental characterization of a carbon nanotube (CNT)-based MEMS/NEMS electron impact gas ionizer with an integrated extractor gate for portable mass spectrometry. The ionizer achieves ...

Velasquez-Heller, Luis Fernand

169

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Overview of NEMS  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

OVERVIEW OF NEMS OVERVIEW OF NEMS blueball.gif (205 bytes) Major Assumptions blueball.gif (205 bytes) NEMS Modular Structure blueball.gif (205 bytes) Integrating Module NEMS represents domestic energy markets by explicitly representing the economic decisionmaking involved in the production, conversion, and consumption of energy products. For example, the penetration of a new or advanced technology for electricity generation is projected only if the technology is deemed to be economic when considering the cost-minimizing mix of fuels over the life of the equipment. Since energy costs and availability and energy- consuming characteristics can vary widely across regions, considerable regional detail is included. Other details of production and consumption categories are represented to

170

EA-0513: Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0513: Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial Sector Buildings, Bonneville Power Administration EA-0513: Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial Sector...

171

District of Columbia Natural Gas Percent Sold to The Commercial...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent Sold to The Commercial Sectors by Local Distribution Companies (Percent) District of Columbia Natural Gas Percent Sold to The Commercial Sectors by Local Distribution...

172

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Overview of NEMS  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NEMS represents domestic energy markets by explicitly representing the economic decision making involved in the production, conversion, and consumption of energy products. Where possible, NEMS includes explicit representation of energy technologies and their characteristics. NEMS represents domestic energy markets by explicitly representing the economic decision making involved in the production, conversion, and consumption of energy products. Where possible, NEMS includes explicit representation of energy technologies and their characteristics. Since energy costs and availability and energy-consuming characteristics can vary widely across regions, considerable regional detail is included. Other details of production and consumption categories are represented to facilitate policy analysis and ensure the validity of the results. A summary of the detail provided in NEMS is shown below. Summary Table Major Assumptions Each module of NEMS embodies many assumptions and data to characterize the future production, conversion, or consumption of energy in the United States. Two major assumptions concern economic growth in the United States and world oil prices, as determined by world oil supply and demand.

173

Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial Building Sector to Support Policy and Innovation Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of implementation. References Architecture 2030 (2007)6.7 GtCO 2 eq/yr globally by 2030 (IPCC 2007). As advocates,commercial buildings by 2030 in the stated goals of the

Coffey, Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Energy Efficiency...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Applicable Sector Commercial Eligible Technologies Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, LED Lighting Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category Energy...

175

Large-area low-temperature ultrananocrystaline diamond (UNCD) films and integration with CMOS devices for monolithically integrated diamond MEMD/NEMS-CMOS systems.  

SciTech Connect

Because of exceptional mechanical, chemical, and tribological properties, diamond has a great potential to be used as a material for the development of high-performance MEMS and NEMS such as resonators and switches compatible with harsh environments, which involve mechanical motion and intermittent contact. Integration of such MEMS/NEMS devices with complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) microelectronics will provide a unique platform for CMOS-driven commercial MEMS/NEMS. The main hurdle to achieve diamond-CMOS integration is the relatively high substrate temperatures (600-800 C) required for depositing conventional diamond thin films, which are well above the CMOS operating thermal budget (400 C). Additionally, a materials integration strategy has to be developed to enable diamond-CMOS integration. Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD), a novel material developed in thin film form at Argonne, is currently the only microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) grown diamond film that can be grown at 400 C, and still retain exceptional mechanical, chemical, and tribological properties comparable to that of single crystal diamond. We have developed a process based on MPCVD to synthesize UNCD films on up to 200 mm in diameter CMOS wafers, which will open new avenues for the fabrication of monolithically integrated CMOS-driven MEMS/NEMS based on UNCD. UNCD films were grown successfully on individual Si-based CMOS chips and on 200 mm CMOS wafers at 400 C in a MPCVD system, using Ar-rich/CH4 gas mixture. The CMOS devices on the wafers were characterized before and after UNCD deposition. All devices were performing to specifications with very small degradation after UNCD deposition and processing. A threshold voltage degradation in the range of 0.08-0.44V and transconductance degradation in the range of 1.5-9% were observed.

Sumant, A.V.; Auciello, O.; Yuan, H.-C; Ma, Z.; Carpick, R. W.; Mancini, D. C.; Univ. of Wisconsin; Univ. of Pennsylvania

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Transportation Sector Module 1995 - Model Developer's Report, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

As the description in Section 4 and Appendix B shows, the NEMS Transportation Model is made up of seven semi-independent submodules which address different vehicular modes of the transportation sector. Each submodule also contains methods to deal with the impacts of policyinitiatives and legislative mandates which affect individual modes of travel. The transportation sector energy consumption is the sum of the energy consumption forecasts generated through the separate submodules.

John Maples

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Workshop on Opportunities for Magnetism in MEMS/NEMS, April 16-17, 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities for Magnetism in MEMS/NEMS Opportunities for Magnetism in MEMS/NEMS Argonne National Laboratory - April 16-17, 2010 Sponsored by NSF, NIST and Argonne National Laboratory Friday, April 16 13:00 Welcome and Introduction Chair: John Moreland 13:10 Pritiraj Mohanty Boston University "Study of Spin Dynamics using Nanomechanics" 13:50 T. Mitch Wallis NIST, Boulder "Measurement of the Einstein-de Haas Effect with a Microcantilever" 14:30 Albrecht Jander Oregon State University "Application of Torques to Nanostructures using Ferromagnetic Resonance" 15:10 Coffee Break Chair: Dennis Greywall 15:30 Rassul Karabalin Caltech "Next-Generation NEMS Functionality Enable by Advances in Novel Materials"

178

Learning and cost reductions for generating technologies in the national energy modeling system (NEMS)  

SciTech Connect

This report describes how Learning-by-Doing (LBD) is implemented endogenously in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for generating plants. LBD is experiential learning that correlates to a generating technology's capacity growth. The annual amount of Learning-by-Doing affects the annual overnight cost reduction. Currently, there is no straightforward way to integrate and make sense of all the diffuse information related to the endogenous learning calculation in NEMS. This paper organizes the relevant information from the NEMS documentation, source code, input files, and output files, in order to make the model's logic more accessible. The end results are shown in three ways: in a simple spreadsheet containing all the parameters related to endogenous learning; by an algorithm that traces how the parameters lead to cost reductions; and by examples showing how AEO 2004 forecasts the reduction of overnight costs for generating technologies over time.

Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

179

Commercialization Support for Business Program (Manitoba, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Commercialization Support for Business Program supports product and process commercialization and business development in all sectors and all regions of the province.

180

Louisville Private Sector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Private Sector Attendees Private Sector Attendees ENERGY STAR Kick-off Meeting December 2007 5/3rd Bank Al J Schneider Company (The Galt House East) Baptist Hospital East Brown - Forman Building Owner and Managers Association (BOMA) Louisville CB Richard Ellis Commercial Real Estate Women (CREW) Louisville Cushman Wakefield General Electric Company Golden Foods Greater Louisville Chapter of International Facility Management Association (IFMA) Hines Humana, Inc Institute of Real Estate Management (IREM) Kentucky Chapter Jewish Hospital & St Mary's Healthcare Kentucky Chapter, Certified Commercial Investment Managers (CCIM) Kentucky Governor's Office of Energy Policy Kentucky Society of Health Care Engineers Kindred Health Care Louisville Air Pollution Control Board

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems commercial sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Making Buildings Part of the Climate Solution by Enforcing Aggressive Commercial Building Codes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the impact of an aggressive commercial building codes policy in the United States. The policy would require both new construction and existing buildings that undergo major modifications to comply with higher building shell efficiency and more stringent equipment standards similar to the latest versions of the ASHRAE 90.1 Standard. Using the Georgia Tech version of the National Energy Modeling System (GT-NEMS), we estimate that the building codes policy could reduce the energy consumption of commercial buildings by 0.94 Quads in 2035, equal to 4 % of the projected energy consumption of commercial buildings in that year. In the four targeted end-uses space heating and cooling, water heating and lighting estimated energy consumption would be 17%, 15%, 20 % and 5 % less than the Reference case forecast in 2035, respectively. The reduction of electricity and natural gas prices along with the consumption decline could save commercial consumers $12.8 billion in energy bills in 2035 and a cumulative $110 billion of bill savings between 2012 and 2035. The environmental benefits of the policy could also be significant. In 2035, 47 MMT of CO2 emissions could be avoided, generating cumulative benefits of $17 billion by 2035. The estimated benefit-cost ratio of this policy within the commercial sector is 1.4, with a resulting net benefit of $59 billion. The positive spillover effect of this policy would lead to an even higher economy-wide benefit-cost ratio. *Corresponding author:

Xiaojing Sun; Marilyn A. Brown; Roderick Jackson; Matt Cox; Dr. Marilyn; A. Brown; D. M. Smith Building

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial Building Sector to Support Policy and Innovation Planning  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the origin, structure and continuing development of a model of time varying energy consumption in the US commercial building stock. The model is based on a flexible structure that disaggregates the stock into various categories (e.g. by building type, climate, vintage and life-cycle stage) and assigns attributes to each of these (e.g. floor area and energy use intensity by fuel type and end use), based on historical data and user-defined scenarios for future projections. In addition to supporting the interactive exploration of building stock dynamics, the model has been used to study the likely outcomes of specific policy and innovation scenarios targeting very low future energy consumption in the building stock. Model use has highlighted the scale of the challenge of meeting targets stated by various government and professional bodies, and the importance of considering both new construction and existing buildings.

Coffey, Brian; Borgeson, Sam; Selkowitz, Stephen; Apte, Josh; Mathew, Paul; Haves, Philip

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Commercialization | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercialization Commercialization Commercialization See an example of these steps in the commercialization process of Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries. See an example of these steps in the commercialization process of Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries. Commercialization is the process by which technologies and innovations developed in the lab make their way to market. By licensing patents or using Energy Department facilities, researchers from the private sector and academia are able to take advantage of federal investments into basic science research, while researchers are able to ensure that their discoveries have a life beyond the lab. The Energy Department also helps entrepreneurs, small business owners and

184

Commercial Buildings Communications protocols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many automation and control protocols in use in commercial building and residential sectors today. For both commercial building and residential sectors there are several thousand manufacturers throughout the world that supply end-use electrical appliances and other building fixtures that communicate using these automation and control protocols. Some of these protocols are based on open standards (for example, BACnet, DALI) while others are semi-proprietary (for example, Zigbee, LonWorks, Modbus...

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Sector 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications A Reminder for Sector 7 PIs and Users: Please report your new publications to the Sector Manager and the CAT Director. The APS requires PIs to submit new publications to its Publication Database, a link which can be found on the Publication section of the APS web site. Publication information for work done at 7ID Proper acknowledgement sentences to include in papers. Sector 7 Call for APS User Activity Reports. APS User Activity Reports by MHATT-CATers. Recent articles Recent theses Sector 7 Reports Sector 7 Recent research highlights (New) Design documents in ICMS on Sector 7 construction and operation Sector 7 related ICMS documents Library Resources available on the WWW The ANL Library system ANL electronic journal list AIM Find it! Citation Ranking by ISI (see Journal citation report)

186

Energy Perspectives: Industrial and transportation sectors ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Since 2008, energy use in the transportation, residential, and commercial sectors stayed relatively constant or fell slightly. Industrial consumption grew in 2010 and ...

187

sector | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

sector sector Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 5, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption sector South Atlantic Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - South Atlantic- Reference Case (xls, 297.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

188

Commercial Buildings Characteristics, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 presents statistics about the number, type, and size of commercial buildings in the United States as well as their energy-related characteristics. These data are collected in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national survey of buildings in the commercial sector. The 1992 CBECS is the fifth in a series conducted since 1979 by the Energy Information Administration. Approximately 6,600 commercial buildings were surveyed, representing the characteristics and energy consumption of 4.8 million commercial buildings and 67.9 billion square feet of commercial floorspace nationwide. Overall, the amount of commercial floorspace in the United States increased an average of 2.4 percent annually between 1989 and 1992, while the number of commercial buildings increased an average of 2.0 percent annually.

Not Available

1994-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

189

Realized and Projected Impacts of U.S. Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Commercial Appliances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thus, the industrial electricity sector prices applied to 6%commercial/industrial sector electricity price for use inassumed that industrial sector electricity prices applied to

Meyers, Stephen P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Commercial Buildings Consortium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Consortium Commercial Buildings Consortium Sandy Fazeli National Association of State Energy Officials sfazeli@naseo.org; 703-299-8800 ext. 17 April 2, 2013 Supporting Consortium for the U.S. Department of Energy Net-Zero Energy Commercial Buildings Initiative 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * Many energy savings opportunities in commercial buildings remain untapped, underserved by the conventional "invest-design-build- operate" approach * The commercial buildings sector is siloed, with limited coordination

191

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Trends in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace The addition of commercial buildings and floorspace from 1995 to 1999 continued the general trends noted since 1979 (Figures 1 and 2). The size of the commercial buildings has grown steadily over the twenty years of CBECS. Each year more buildings are added to the sector (new construction or conversion of pre-existing buildings to commercial activity) than are removed (demolition or conversion to non-commercial activity). The definition for the commercial buildings population was changed for the 1995 CBECS which resulted in a slightly smaller buildings population and accounts for the data break in both Figures 1 and 2 (see report "Trends in the Commercial Buildings Sector" for complete details). Figure 1. Total Commercial Buildings, 1979 to 1999

192

Sector 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sector 7 : Time Resolved Research Group Sector 7 is operated by the Time Resolved Research Group, which is part of the X-ray Science Division (XSD) of the Advanced Photon Source. Our research focus is the study of Ultrafast fs-laser excitation of matter, using x-ray scattering and spectroscopy techniques. The sector developped two hard x-ray beamlines (7ID and 7BM) focused on time-resolved science. The 7BM beamline has been dedicated for time-resolved radiography of fuel sprays. Sector 7 Links: What's New Beamlines Overview User information: Getting Beamtime Current Research Programs Links to our partners, and collaborators (New) Publications Contact information Operational data (w/ current 7ID schedule) ES&H information (ESAF, EOR, TMS training, User Training)

193

Transportation Sector Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model.

John Maples

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

Transportation Sector Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model.

John Maples

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

195

Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP results for the base case and scenarios.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NEMS-MP model generates numerous results for each run of a scenario. (This model is the integrated National Energy Modeling System [NEMS] version used for the Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study [MP].) This appendix examines additional findings beyond the primary results reported in the Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study: Vehicle Characterization and Scenario Analyses (Reference 1). These additional results are provided in order to help further illuminate some of the primary results. Specifically discussed in this appendix are: (1) Energy use results for light vehicles (LVs), including details about the underlying total vehicle miles traveled (VMT), the average vehicle fuel economy, and the volumes of the different fuels used; (2) Resource fuels and their use in the production of ethanol, hydrogen (H{sub 2}), and electricity; (3) Ethanol use in the scenarios (i.e., the ethanol consumption in E85 vs. other blends, the percent of travel by flex fuel vehicles on E85, etc.); (4) Relative availability of E85 and H2 stations; (5) Fuel prices; (6) Vehicle prices; and (7) Consumer savings. These results are discussed as follows: (1) The three scenarios (Mixed, (P)HEV & Ethanol, and H2 Success) when assuming vehicle prices developed through literature review; (2) The three scenarios with vehicle prices that incorporate the achievement of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program vehicle cost goals; (3) The three scenarios with 'literature review' vehicle prices, plus vehicle subsidies; and (4) The three scenarios with 'program goals' vehicle prices, plus vehicle subsidies. The four versions or cases of each scenario are referred to as: Literature Review No Subsidies, Program Goals No Subsidies, Literature Review with Subsidies, and Program Goals with Subsidies. Two additional points must be made here. First, none of the results presented for LVs in this section include Class 2B trucks. Results for this class are included occasionally in Reference 1. They represent a small, though noticeable, segment of the 'LV plus 2B' market (e.g., a little more than 3% of today's energy use in that market). We generally do not include them in this discussion, simply because it requires additional effort to combine the NEMS-MP results for them with the results for the other LVs. (Where there is an exception, we will indicate so.) Second, where reference is made to E85, the ethanol content is actually 74%. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) assumes that, to address cold-starting issues, the percent of ethanol in E85 will vary seasonally. The EIA uses an annual average ethanol content of 74% in its forecasts. That assumption is maintained in the NEMS-MP scenario runs.

Plotkin, S. E.; Singh, M. K.; Energy Systems

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

196

A sensitivity analysis of the treatment of wind energy in the AEO99 version of NEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Each year, the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA) publishes a forecast of the domestic energy economy in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). During the forecast period of the AEO (currently through 2020), renewable energy technologies have typically not achieved significant growth. The contribution of renewable technologies as electric generators becomes more important, however, in scenarios analyzing greenhouse gas emissions reductions or significant technological advancements. We examined the economic assumptions about wind power used for producing forecasts with the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) to determine their influence on the projected capacity expansion of this technology. This analysis should help illustrate to policymakers what types of issues may affect wind development, and improve the general understanding of the NEMS model itself. Figure 1 illustrates the model structure and factors relevant to wind deployment. We found that NEMS uses various cost multipliers and constraints to represent potential physical and economic limitations to growth in wind capacity, such as resource depletion, costs associated with rapid manufacturing expansion, and grid stability with high levels of capacity from intermittent resources. The model's flexibility allows the user to make alternative assumptions about the magnitude of these factors. While these assumptions have little effect on the Reference Case forecast for the 1999 edition of the AEO, they can make a dramatic difference when wind is more attractive, such as under a carbon permit trading system. With $100/ton carbon permits, the wind capacity projection for 2020 ranges from 15 GW in the unaltered model (AEO99 Reference Case) to 168 GW in the extreme case when all the multipliers and constraints examined in this study are removed. Furthermore, if modifications are made to the model allowing inter-regional transmission of electricity, wind capacity is forecast to reach 214 GW when all limitations are removed. The figures in the upper end of these ranges are not intended to be viewed as reasonable projections, but their magnitude illustrates the importance of the parameters governing the growth of wind capacity and resource availability in forecasts using NEMS. In addition, many uncertainties exist regarding these assumptions that potentially affect the growth of wind power. We suggest several areas in which to focus future research in order to better model the potential development of this resource. Because many of the assumptions related to wind in the model are also used for other renewable technologies, these suggestions could be applied to other renewable resources as well.

Osborn, Julie G; Wood, Frances; Richey, Cooper; Sanders, Sandy; Short, Walter; Koomey, Jonathan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

THE CO2 ABATEMENT POTENTIAL OF CALIFORNIA'S MID-SIZED COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity Prices ..Electricity Prices ..Commercial Sector Electricity Prices, Electric Peak Load <

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Sector 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Link to Sector 7 Users and Collaborators Link to Sector 7 Users and Collaborators This is an incomplete list of Partners from Universities and National Labs who use the facilities at Sector 7. If you wish to add a link to your institutional page, do no hesitate to contact Eric Dufresne at the APS. The APS XSD Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics group Center for Molecular Movies at Copenhagen University Roy Clarke Group at the University of Michigan Rob Crowell Group at BNL Chris Elles's group at Kansas University Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center Fuel Injection and Spray Research Group Paul Evans's group web page at the University of Wisconsin Alexei Grigoriev's group at Univ. of Tulsa Eric Landahl's web page at DePaul University The SLAC Pulse Institute Ultrafast Materials Science group (D. Reis and A. Lindenberg)

199

Sector X  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X X If there is an emergency at ETTP requiring evacuation, Sector X reports to the shelter at: Oak Ridge High School 127 Providence Road Oak Ridge, TN 37830 Take most direct route to northbound Bethel Valley Road toward Oak Ridge. Turn left onto Illinois Avenue (Highway 62). Turn right onto Oak Ridge Turnpike and turn left to Oak Ridge High School. If there is an emergency at ORNL requiring evacuation, Sector X reports to the shelter at: Karns High School 2710 Byington Solway Road Knoxville, TN 37931 Take most direct route to northbound Bethel Valley Road toward Knoxville. Then take a left at Highway 62 (Oak Ridge Highway) eastbound to Knoxville. Take a right onto State Route 131 (Byington Beaver Ridge) to Karns High School. If there is an emergency at Y-12 requiring evacuation, Sector X reports to the shelter at:

200

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Introduction  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Commercial > Commercial Buildings Home > Special Home > Commercial > Commercial Buildings Home > Special Reports > Trends in Commercial Buildings Trends: Buildings and Floorspace Energy Consumption and Energy Sources Overview: The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) Trends in the Commercial Buildings Sector Since 1978, the Energy Information Administration has collected basic statistical information from three of the major end-use sectors— residential, and industrial— periodic energy consumption surveys. Each survey is a snapshot of how energy is used in the year of the survey; the series of surveys in each sector reveals the trends in energy use for the sector. Introduction The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects data from a sample of buildings representative of the commercial buildings

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems commercial sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

AEP Appalachian Power - Commercial and Industrial Rebate Programs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Programmable Thermostats, Commercial Refrigeration Equipment, Geothermal Heat Pumps, LED Lighting Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category Energy...

202

Sector 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: News : News Sector 7 calendar of events. APS News APS Monthly meeting slides What's new at the APS Sector 7? 2013 news 2012 news 2011 news 2010 news 2009 news 2008 news 2007 news 2006 news 2005 news 2004 news 2003 news 2002 news 2001 news 2013 News from APS Sector 7 May 2013: Ruben Reininger et al. recently published an article on the optical design of the SPX Imaging and Microscopy beamline (SPXIM). The details can be found on the RSI web site here. A new web page is now available to guide 7-BM users. See the official 7-BM web page for more details. 2012 News from APS Sector 7 August 2012: Jin Wang gave a talk on August 29, 2012 entitled "The APS 7-BM is Open for Business, Officially!" at the August APS Monthly Operation Meeting. On August 1, Alan Kastengren joined the X-ray Science Division to operate the 7-BM beamline. Alan has been involved in the construction

203

Citizens Gas - Commercial Efficiency Rebates (Indiana) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector Commercial Eligible Technologies Boilers, CustomOthers pending approval, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Furnaces, Programmable Thermostats, Steam-system...

204

Nicor Gas - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebates (Illinois) ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector Commercial Eligible Technologies Boilers, CustomOthers pending approval, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Furnaces, Steam-system upgrades, Water Heaters,...

205

Saving Electrical Energy in Commercial Buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With the commercial and institutional building sectors using approximately 29% and 34% of all electrical energy consumption in Canada and the United States, respectively, saving (more)

Case, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

The Commercial Energy Consumer: About Whom Are We Speaking?  

SciTech Connect

Who are commercial sector customers, and how do they make decisions about energy consumption and energy efficiency investment? The energy policy field has not done a thorough job of describing energy consumption in the commercial sector. First, the discussion of the commercial sector itself is dominated by discussion of large businesses/buildings. Second, discussion of this portion of the commercial sectors consumption behavior is driven primarily by theory, with very little field data collected on the way commercial sector decision-makers describe their own options, choices, and reasons for taking action. These limitations artificially constrain energy policy options. This paper reviews the extant literature on commercial sector energy consumption behavior and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, it argues that the primary energy policy model of commercial sector energy consumption is a top-down model that uses macro-level investment data to make conclusions about commercial behavior. Missing from the discussion is a model of consumption behavior that builds up to a theoretical framework informed by the micro-level data provided by commercial decision-makers themselves. Such a bottom-up model could enhance the effectiveness of commercial sector energy policy. In particular, translation of some behavioral models from the residential sector to the commercial sector may offer new opportunities for policies to change commercial energy consumption behavior. Utility bill consumption feedback is considered as one example of a policy option that may be applicable to both the residential and small commercial sector.

Payne, Christopher

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

207

Analysis of ultimate energy consumption by sector in Islamic republic of Iran  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Total ultimate energy consumption in Iran was 1033.32 MBOE in 2006, and increased at an average annual rate of 6% in 1996-2006. Household and commercial sector has been the main consumer sector (418.47 MBOE) and the fastest-growing sector (7.2%) that ... Keywords: Iran, agricultural sector, energy audits, energy consumption, industrial sector, residential and commercial sector, transportation sector

B. Farahmandpour; I. Nasseri; H. Houri Jafari

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Model documentation report: Residential sector demand module of the national energy modeling system  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code. This reference document provides a detailed description for energy analysts, other users, and the public. The NEMS Residential Sector Demand Module is currently used for mid-term forecasting purposes and energy policy analysis over the forecast horizon of 1993 through 2020. The model generates forecasts of energy demand for the residential sector by service, fuel, and Census Division. Policy impacts resulting from new technologies, market incentives, and regulatory changes can be estimated using the module. 26 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Comparison of Bottom-Up and Top-Down Forecasts: Vision Industry Energy Forecasts with ITEMS and NEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparisons are made of energy forecasts using results from the Industrial module of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and an industrial economic-engineering model called the Industrial Technology and Energy Modeling System (ITEMS), a model developed for industrial energy analysis at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Although the results are mixed, generally ITEMS show greater penetration of energy efficient technologies and thus lower energy use, even though the business as usual forecasts for ITEMS uses a higher discount rate than NEMS uses.

Roop, J. M.; Dahowski, R. T

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Commercial | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Commercial Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report . Market Trends The AEO2011 Reference case shows minimal change in commercial energy use per capita between 2009 and 2035 (Figure 62). While growth in commercial floorspace (1.2 percent per year) is faster than growth in population (0.9 percent per year), energy use per capita remains relatively steady due to efficiency improvements in equipment and building shells. Efficiency standards and the addition of more efficient technologies account for a large share of the improvement in the efficiency of end-use services, notably in space cooling, refrigeration, and lighting.[1] Issues in Focus In 2009, the residential and commercial buildings sectors used 19.6

211

Sector 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Programs Research Programs Sector 7's research program exploits the brilliance of the APS undulator radiation to perform material research studies with high spatial and temporal resolution. Microbeam studies are made using x-ray beam sizes on the submicron-scale, and time-resolved diffraction measurements are carried out with picosecond resolution. Sector 7's undulator line has experimental enclosures dedicated to both time-resolved and microbeam research. In one of these enclosures (7ID-D), a femtosecond laser facility is set up for ultrafast diffraction and spectroscopy studies in a pump-probe geometry. The 7ID-B hutch is a white beam capable station used for time-resolved phase-contrast imaging and beamline optics development. A third enclosure (7ID-C) is instrumented for high-resolution diffraction studies with a Huber 6-circle diffractometer. The instrument is ideal for thin-film and interface studies, including the recently developed Coherent Bragg Rod Analysis (COBRA) technique. The fs-laser has recently been delivered to 7ID-C so time-resolved laser pump-x-ray probe can be performed in 7ID-C since March 2007. An x-ray streak camera is also being commissioned in 7ID-C. 7ID-C is equipped for microdiffraction studies with a small Huber 4-cicle diffractometer used with zone-plate optics.

212

Science and technology of piezoelectric/diamond heterostructures for monolithically integrated high performance MEMS/NEMS/CMOS devices.  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the fundamental and applied science performed to integrate piezoelectric PbZr{sub x}Ti{sub 1-x}O{sub 3} and AlN films with a novel mechanically robust ultrananocrystalline diamond layer to enable a new generation of low voltage/high-performance piezoactuated hybrid piezoelectric/diamond MEMS/NEMS devices.

Auciello, O.; Sumant, A. V.; Hiller, J.; Kabius, B.; Ma, Z.; Srinivasan, S. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( MSD); (Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison); (INTEL)

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior glass windows of office tower Commercial Buildings Commercial building systems research explores different ways to integrate the efforts of research in windows, lighting,...

214

Commercial Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Performance Objectives: To review the market potential for improvements in commercial building glazings, quantify the energy savings potentials, explore potential design...

215

Estimating the environmental and economic effects of widespread residential PV adoption using GIS and NEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a study of the national effects of widespread adoption of grid-connected residential rooftop photovoltaic (PV) systems. A Geographic Information System (GIS) model is used to estimate potential PV system adoption and PV electricity generation and the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is used to estimate the national effects of PV electricity generation. Adoption is assumed to occur if levelized PV system cost is less than the local average retail electricity rate at the country level. An estimate of the current {open_quotes}best{close_quotes} scenario (defined by a 6.5% real interest rate, 30-year loan life, $6{sub 1994}/W system cost, and $4{sub 1994}/month voluntary premium) results in no adoption. Several scenarios designed to stimulate PV adoption are modeled. As an example, if PV system costs are instead assumed to be $3{sub 1994}/W, rooftop systems are found to be cost effective in 16% of detached single-family households in the U.S. by 2015 (assuming full adoption of 4-kW systems), this results in 82.1 TWh of annual PV electricity generation, 170 TWh of avoided electricity transmission, distribution, and generation losses, 6 Mt/a of avoided carbon emissions, 50 kt/a of avoided NOx emissions, and 27.3 GW of avoided electricity generating capacity in place.

Marnay, C.; Richey, R.C.; Mahler, S.A. [and others

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Sector 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Information & Getting Beamtime User Information & Getting Beamtime There are three ways to request beamtime to perform an experiment on APS-7ID. One can request beam time as an APS General User, as an APS Partner User, or one can contact a staff member of Sector 7 to work collaboratively with them using a small amount of staff time to gather preliminary data. 80% of the available beamtime on 7ID is given to General and Partner Users, while 20% is reserved for staff use. Beam time is allocated and announced by email shortly before the start of an experimental run. In October 2002, beamline 7ID welcomed its first APS General Users (GU). To gain access to 7ID, General or Partner Users are required to submit a proposal to the APS GU Website by the specified deadline. Sucessful proposals will be scheduled for the next cycle following the proposal deadline. There are three proposal cycles per year with deadlines about two months before the start of a run. The deadlines and General User forms are available on the web through the APS General User Web site. Specific instructions for new General Users are available on the site. These instructions can be helpful also for new APS Users in general.

217

Sector 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview and History Overview and History Sector 7 consists of two APS beamlines: 7-ID: an insertion device beamline based on an APS Type-A Undulator 7-BM: a bend magnet beam line for time-resolved radiography (currently being commissioned) Overview of 7-ID 7-ID comprises four large experimental enclosures designated A, B, C, and D. In 2004, a laser enclosure was also added (7ID-E). Enclosure 7-ID-A is the first optics enclosure and houses a polished Be window, an empty x-ray filter unit, a pair of white beam slits, a water-cooled double crystal diamond monochromator (Kohzu HLD4), and a P4 mode shutter. The beamline vertical offset is 35 mm. Enclosure 7-ID-B is a white-, or monochromatic-beam experimental enclosure. It is equipped with two precision motorized table for alignment and positioning of experimental equipment. This station is used for white-beam imaging or microdiffraction experiments.

218

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trends in Commercial Buildings Sector-1979 to 2003 Trends in Commercial Buildings Sector-1979 to 2003 Since the first CBECS in 1979, the commercial buildings sector has increased in size. From 1979 to 2003: The number of commercial buildings increased from 3.8 million to 4.9 million (Figure 3). The amount of commercial floorspace increased from 51 billion to 72 billion square feet (Figure 4). Total energy consumed increased from less than 5,900 trillion to more than 6,500 trillion Btu (Figure 5). Electricity and natural gas consumption, nearly equal in 1979, diverged; electricity increased to more than 3,500 trillion Btu by 2003 while natural gas declined to 2,100 trillion Btu. Figure 3. The number of commercial buildings increased from 1979 to 2003. Figure 3. The number of commercial buildings increased from 1979 to 2003.

219

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Commercial Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Survey Methodology Sampling Error, Standard Errors, and Relative Standard Errors The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The commercial sector consists of business establishments and other organizations that provide services. The sector includes service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as a wide range of buildings that would not be considered “commercial” in a traditional economic sense, such as public schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Excluded from the sector are the goods-producing industries: manufacturing, agriculture, mining, forestry and fisheries, and construction.

220

Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Full report (4.1 mb) Full report (4.1 mb) Heating, cooling, & water heating equipment Appendix A - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case (1.9 mb) Appendix B - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Advanced Case (1.3 mb) Lighting and commercial ventilation & refrigeration equipment Appendix C - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case (1.1 mb) Appendix D - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Advanced Case (1.1 mb) Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency Release date: August 7, 2013 Energy used in the residential and commercial sectors provides a wide range

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems commercial sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Energy End-Use Flow Maps for the Buildings Sector  

SciTech Connect

Graphical presentations of energy flows are widely used within the industrial sector to depict energy production and use. PNNL developed two energy flow maps, one each for the residential and commercial buildings sectors, in response to a need for a clear, concise, graphical depiction of the flows of energy from source to end-use in the building sector.

Belzer, David B.

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

222

Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Commercial Building Ventilation and Indoor Environmental Quality Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy...

223

Overview of NEMS-H2, Version 1.0 Frances Wood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Energy: Gas Oil Electricity Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Petroleum Refining Coal (grid-based electricity) · Each is represented by capital cost, non-fuel O&M costs, and energy sector to be represented by methodology and data that fit it best ­ Optimization techniques used

224

Sector 30 - useful links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Useful Links Sector 30 Sector Orientation Form HERIX experiment header for lab book MERIX experiment header for lab book Printing from your laptop at the beamline Other IXS sectors...

225

Flathead Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Flathead Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program Flathead Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Maximum Rebate 70% of project cost Program Info State Montana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Retrofit Lighting: $3 - $400 per unit New Construction Lighting: $10 - $50 per unit Provider Flathead Electric Cooperative Flathead Electric Cooperative, in conjunction with Bonneville Power Administration, encourages energy efficiency in the commercial sector by providing a commercial lighting retro-fit rebate program and a new

226

Electricity Supply Sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electricity Supply Sector Part 1 of 6 Supporting Documents Sector-Specific Issues and Reporting Methodologies Supporting the General Guidelines for the Voluntary

227

ERC commercialization activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ERC family of companies is anticipating market entry of their first commercial product, a 2.8-MR power plant, in the second quarter of 1999. The present Cooperative Agreement provides for: (1) Commercialization planning and organizational development, (2) Completion of the pre-commercial DFC technology development, (3) Systems and plant design, (4) Manufacturing processes` scale-up to full- sized stack components and assemblies, (5) Upgrades to ERC`s test facility for full-sized stack testing, and (6) Sub-scale testing of a DFC Stack and BOP fueled with landfill gas. This paper discusses the first item, that of preparing for commercialization. ERC`s formal commercialization program began in 1990 with the selection of the 2-MR Direct Fuel Cell power plant by the American Public Power Association (APPA) for promotion to the over 2000 municipal utilities comprising APPA`s segment of the utility sector. Since that beginning, the APPA core group expanded to become the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group (FCCG) which includes representation from all markets - utilities and other power generation equipment buyers.

Maru, H.C.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Development of a commercial-sector data base and forecasting model for electricity usage and demand. Volume I. Preliminary model specification. [Description of subprograms BEHAV, DEMAND, ECON, ENER, and INGEN  

SciTech Connect

This is the first of twelve major technical reports under the Commission's contract with Hittman Associates. The contract will lead to the development of a data base on commercial space, and the development of a model to forecast electricity usage and demand. This report presents a preliminary specification of the model to be developed. The model being developed combines econometric and engineering approaches, and consists of five subprograms and an overall executing program. The first subprogram forecasts the stock of commercial space, based on employment data and other economic inputs. It also distinguishes among various types of commercial space, and breaks the commercial space into segments according to fuels for various end uses, such as heating, cooling, etc. The second subprogram uses detailed building-survey data to specify a typical, or characteristic building for each unique type of floorspace considered in the study. The third subprogram calculates monthly electricity usage for the typical buildings specified, using standard engineering techniques, and then scales up the electricity use for each building type according to the amount of space, of that type, in the entire building stock. The fourth subprogram performs a similar function, but produces hourly electricity demands, rather than monthly electricity usage. The fifth, and final subprogram adjusts the energy usage and demand values calculated to simulate the impact of certain economic conditions or policy measures. The report presents a flow chart for each subprogram, and a table of inputs and outputs required for each. The logic, structure, flow, and information transfer of each is described.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study: Vehicle Characterization and Scenario Analyses - Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP Results for the Base Case and Scenarios  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP Results Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP Results for the Base Case and Scenarios Energy Systems Division Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available on paper to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, for a processing fee, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62

230

Southwest Gas Corporation - Large Commercial Energy-Efficiency...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Type Utility Rebate Program Applicable Sector Commercial Eligible Technologies Boilers, Steam Traps, Modular Burner Controls, Boiler Tune-Up, Trim Control Pad Active Incentive No...

231

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Commercial...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

consumption by Census division for eight marketed energy sources plus solar and geothermal energy. For the three major commercial sector fuels, electricity, natural gas and...

232

CenterPoint Energy (Gas) - Commercial Efficiency Rebates (Oklahoma...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rebate Program Applicable Sector Commercial, Industrial Eligible Technologies Boilers, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Furnaces, Water Heaters, Food Service Equipment,...

233

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Commercial...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

demand module (CDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for eight marketed energy sources plus solar and geothermal energy. For the three major commercial sector...

234

Midstate Electric Cooperative- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Midstate Electric Cooperative (MEC) encourages energy efficiency in the commercial and industrial sectors by giving customers a choice of several different financial incentive programs. First, ...

235

District of Columbia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Local Distributor Companies (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Sectors by Local Distributor Companies (Dollars per...

236

Civilian applications and policy implications of commercial unmanned aerial vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As UAV capabilities continue to improve the technology will spill out of the military sector and into commercial and civil applications. Already, UAVs have demonstrated commercial marketability in such diverse areas as ...

Sprague, Kara Lynn, 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Public Sector New Construction and Retrofit Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public Sector New Construction and Retrofit Program Public Sector New Construction and Retrofit Program Public Sector New Construction and Retrofit Program < Back Eligibility Fed. Government Institutional Local Government Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Insulation Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Bonus maximum: $100,000 All incentives: $2.50/sq. ft. (base plus bonus), $300,000, 75% of project costs, and 100% of incremental costs Program Info Funding Source Illinois Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (EEPS) surcharge for Ameren,

238

Energy Efficiency Financing for Public Sector Projects (California) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Financing for Public Sector Projects (California) Energy Efficiency Financing for Public Sector Projects (California) Energy Efficiency Financing for Public Sector Projects (California) < Back Eligibility Institutional Local Government Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Energy Sources Solar Wind Maximum Rebate $3 million Program Info State California Program Type State Loan Program Provider California Energy Commission Cities, counties, public care institutions, public hospitals, public schools and colleges, and special districts in California can apply for low-interest loans from the California Energy Commission for energy

239

Residential Sector Demand Module 1995, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This updated version of the NEMS Residential Module Documentation includes changesmade to the residential module for the production of the Annual Energy Outlook 1995.

John H. Cymbalsky

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Commercial Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Performance Commercial Performance Objectives: To review the market potential for improvements in commercial building glazings, quantify the energy savings potentials, explore potential design solutions, and develop guidelines and tools for building designers so that systems are specified and used in an optimal manner. A special emphasis is placed on the daylighting performance of glazings in commercial buildings since lighting is the single largest energy end use and daylighting can improve both visual performance and the quality of the indoor space as well as saving energy. Technical Approach: This project has two major complementary elements. The first is the exploration and assessment of glazing performance in commercial buildings leading to development of design strategies that reduce unnecessary energy use. The final step is creating design guides and tools that make this design knowledge accessible to practitioners, typically carried out in partnership with others. Although the emphasis is energy impacts, e.g. annual energy use, the performance issues addressed in the guides and tools include all that impact the final glazing selection process, e.g. appearance, glare. The second element is an exploration of daylighting strategies for commercial buildings since lighting energy use is the major energy end use in most buildings. This work develops and evaluates new daylighting devices and designs, assesses performance in commercial buildings, and demonstrates system performance using test cells, test rooms and case study buildings. All energy-related aspects of the design solutions, as well as other critical performance issues, are addressed in this work. Results of this work are integrated into the guides and tools described above. Much of this work has been co-supported by utilities and has been carried on in conjunction with participants in an International Energy Agency Daylighting Task.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems commercial sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

K-12 Education Sector Desk Reference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nationwide, educational institutions make up a large portion of the commercial energy market. To support utility marketing and service efforts in this important sector, this compilation collects the best information available about the electric energy needs and issues of kindergarten through 12th grade (K-12) schools.

2000-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

242

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Major Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Major Characteristics of All Commercial Buildings in 2003 Major Characteristics of All Commercial Buildings in 2003 CBECS data are used to answer basic questions about the commercial buildings sector, such as: What types are there? How large are they? How old are they? and Where are they? Results from the 2003 CBECS show that: The commercial buildings sector is not dominated by a single building type. Office buildings, the most common type of commercial building, account for 17 percent of buildings, floorspace, and energy consumed. Commercial buildings range widely in size and smaller buildings are much more numerous than larger buildings. The smallest buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet) account for 53 percent of buildings, but consume only 11 percent of total energy. The largest buildings (those larger than 500,000 square feet)

243

Agricultural and Industrial Process-Heat-Market Sector workbook  

SciTech Connect

This workbook summarizes the preliminary data and assumptions of the Agricultural and Industrial Process Heat Market Sector prepared in conjunction with the development of inputs for a National Plan for the Accelerated Commercialization of Solar Energy.

Shulman, M. J.; Kannan, N. P.; deJong, D. L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial sector energy demand Commercial sector energy demand For commercial buildings, pace of decline in energy intensity depends on technology figure data Average delivered energy consumption per square foot of commercial floorspace declines at an annual rate of 0.4 percent from 2011 to 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 59), while commercial floorspace grows by 1.0 percent per year. Natural gas consumption increases at about one-half the rate of delivered electricity consumption, which grows by 0.8 percent per year in the Reference case. With ongoing improvements in equipment efficiency and building shells, the growth of energy consumption declines more rapidly than commercial floorspace increases, and the average energy intensity of commercial buildings is reduced. Three alternative technology cases show the effects of efficiency

245

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial sector energy demand Commercial sector energy demand For commercial buildings, pace of decline in energy intensity depends on technology figure data Average delivered energy consumption per square foot of commercial floorspace declines at an annual rate of 0.4 percent from 2011 to 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 59), while commercial floorspace grows by 1.0 percent per year. Natural gas consumption increases at about one-half the rate of delivered electricity consumption, which grows by 0.8 percent per year in the Reference case. With ongoing improvements in equipment efficiency and building shells, the growth of energy consumption declines more rapidly than commercial floorspace increases, and the average energy intensity of commercial buildings is reduced. Three alternative technology cases show the effects of efficiency

246

BUILDINGS SECTOR DEMAND-SIDE EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY SUMMARIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Small Commercial, Residential Author: Haider Taha VII. Solar Domestic Water Heaters........................................................................... 59 End-Use: Water Heating Sector: Residential Author: Jim Lutz VIII. Heat Pump Water Heaters ................................................................................. 63 End-Use: Water Heating Sector: Residential Author: Jim Lutz IX. Energy-Efficient Motors

247

Sector 1 welcome  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome to Sector 1 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) located at Argonne Welcome to Sector 1 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) located at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The Sector 1 beamlines are operated by the Materials Physics & Engineering Group (MPE) of the APS X-ray Science Division (XSD). Sector 1 consists of the 1-ID and 1-BM beamlines, and 80% of the available beamtime is accessible to outside users through the General User program. The main programs pursued at Sector 1 are described below. 1-ID is dedicated to providing and using brilliant, high-energy x-ray beams (50-150 keV) for the following activities: Coupled high-energy small- and wide-angle scattering (HE-SAXS/WAXS) High-energy diffraction microscopy (HEDM) Sector 1 General Layout Stress/strain/texture studies Pair-distribution function (PDF) measurements

248

Propane Demand by Sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

We will be watching the agricultural sector, since the Agriculture Economic Research Service has predicted a record corn crop this year. ...

249

Public Sector Electric Efficiency Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public Sector Electric Efficiency Programs Public Sector Electric Efficiency Programs Public Sector Electric Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Fed. Government Institutional Local Government Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Other Construction Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Maximum Rebate $300,000 per location Total incentive may not exceed 75% of project cost (equipment + labor) or 100% of incremental measure cost Program Info Funding Source Illinois Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (EEPS) surcharge for ComEd, Ameren subsidiary customers Start Date 06/01/2008 State Illinois Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Standard Incentive Program: Varies by technology

250

Award Recipients by Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... profile (PDF) Westinghouse Electric Corporation Commercial Nuclear Fuel Division ... for more information on their best management practices. *. ...

251

Distributed Generation Potential of the U.S. Commercial Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C. Marnay. 2003. Distributed Generation Capabilities of theImpact on the Deployment of Distributed Generation. PolicyIntegration of Distributed Generation and the Development of

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Distributed Generation Potential of the U.S. Commercial Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. European Distributed Energy Projects, EUR 21239,Energy Sources and Distributed Energy Resources. Brussels,International Journal of Distributed Energy Resources, 1 (

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Table 2.1c Commercial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

R=Revised. P=Preliminary. NA=Not available. - =No data reported. (s)=Less than 0.5 trillion Btu. 6 Conventional hydroelectricity net generation (converted to Btu ...

254

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures: Consumption and Expenditures Tables, Table C4; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Aug. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price deflators...

255

Table 2.3 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

e Conventional hydroelectric power. f Electricity retail sales to ultimate customers reported by electric utilities and, beginning in 1996, other energy service ...

256

Alliance for Chinese Electric Vehicle Development and Commercialization |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development and Commercialization Development and Commercialization Jump to: navigation, search Name Alliance for Chinese Electric Vehicle Development and Commercialization Place China Sector Vehicles Product China-based alliance announced in January 2010 for speeding up the commercialization and achieving mass adoption of Pure Electronic Vehicles (Pure EVs) in China. References Alliance for Chinese Electric Vehicle Development and Commercialization[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Alliance for Chinese Electric Vehicle Development and Commercialization is a company located in China . References ↑ "Alliance for Chinese Electric Vehicle Development and Commercialization"

257

Public Sector Energy Efficiency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capitol dome Capitol dome Public Sector Energy Efficiency Research on sustainable federal operations supports the implementation of sustainable policies and practices in the public sector. This work serves as a bridge between the technology development of Department of Energy's National Laboratories and the operational needs of public sector. Research activities involve many aspects of integrating sustainability into buildings and government practices, including technical assistance for sustainable building design, operations, and maintenance; project financing for sustainable facilities; institutional change in support of sustainability policy goals; and procurement of sustainable products. All of those activities are supported by our work on program and project evaluation, which analyzes overall program effectiveness while ensuring

258

Commercial Building Asset Rating Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 eere.energy.gov 1 eere.energy.gov Commercial Building Asset Rating Program August 23, 2011 12 p.m. ET, 9 a.m. PT Presenter: Cody Taylor PRE-DECISIONAL Information included in this document is for discussion purposes and does not constitute the final program design. FOR INFORMATION ONLY 2 eere.energy.gov Outline * Goals * Scope & schedule * Guiding principles * Program design issues - Metrics - Rating method - Rating scale - Opportunities for efficiency improvement - Quality assurance Please submit clarifying questions during today's webinar via the Q&A function of Live Meeting. 3 eere.energy.gov National Building Rating Program Goals * Facilitate cost-effective investment in energy efficiency and reduce energy use in the commercial building sector * Establish a national standard for voluntary commercial building asset rating

259

Sector 6 Research Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MM-Group Home MM-Group Home MMG Advisory Committees Beamlines 4-ID-C Soft Spectroscopy 4-ID-D Hard Spectroscopy 6-ID-B,C Mag. Scattering 6-ID-D HighE Scattering 29-ID IEX - ARPES,RSXS Getting Beamtime Sector Orientation Sector 4 Orientation Sector 6 Orientation Publications (4-ID) Publications (6-ID) Contact Us APS Ring Status Current APS Schedule Highlights of research on Sector 6 Teasing Out the Nature of Structural Instabilities in Ceramic Compounds Teasing Out the Nature of Structural Instabilities in Ceramic Compounds March 12, 2013 Researchers have used beamlines 6-ID-B at the APS and XmAS at the ESRF to probe the structure of the rare-earth magnetic material europium titanate. In a magnetic field, the optical properties of this system change quite dramatically, presenting hope of a strong magneto-electric material for potential use in new memory, processing, and sensor devices.

260

Buildings Sector Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A joint NREL, ORNL, and PNNL team conducted market analysis to help inform DOE/EERE's Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program planning and management decisions. This chapter presents the results of the market analysis for the Buildings sector.

Hostick, Donna J.; Nicholls, Andrew K.; McDonald, Sean C.; Hollomon, Jonathan B.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems commercial sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Buildings Sector Analysis  

SciTech Connect

A joint NREL, ORNL, and PNNL team conducted market analysis to help inform DOE/EERE's Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program planning and management decisions. This chapter presents the results of the market analysis for the Buildings sector.

Hostick, Donna J.; Nicholls, Andrew K.; McDonald, Sean C.; Hollomon, Jonathan B.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Miscellaneous Electricity Services in the Buildings Sector (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Residential and commercial electricity consumption for miscellaneous services has grown significantly in recent years and currently accounts for more electricity use than any single major end-use service in either sector (including space heating, space cooling, water heating, and lighting). In the residential sector, a proliferation of consumer electronics and information technology equipment has driven much of the growth. In the commercial sector, telecommunications and network equipment and new advances in medical imaging have contributed to recent growth in miscellaneous electricity use

Information Center

2007-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

263

NEMS Measurement Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... approximately one third of all nanotechnology R&D [1] and ... will focus on the measurement science needed for ... this work, all of these results will be ...

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

264

Transportation Sector Module 2003, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model.

John Maples

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Transportation Sector Module 2009, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model.

John Maples

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

266

Transportation Sector Module 2006, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model.

John Maples

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Transportation Sector Module 2007, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model.

John Maples

2007-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

268

Transportation Sector Module 2002, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model.

John Maples

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Transportation Sector Module 2001, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model.

John Maples

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Transportation Sector Module 2004, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model.

John Maples

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Transportation Sector Module 2005, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model.

John Maples

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Transportation Sector Module 2008, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model.

John Maples

2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

273

Technology Commercialization & Partnerships | BNL  

Brookhaven National Laboratory's Office of Technology Commercialization and Partnerships manages and advances the commercialization of cutting-edge discoveries ...

274

Entity State Code Class of Ownership Residential Commercial...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Code Class of Ownership Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors DTE Energy Services AL Non-Utility - - 458,868 - 458,868 Riceland Foods Inc. AR Non-Utility -...

275

List of Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Incentives | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Refrigeration Equipment Incentives Refrigeration Equipment Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 103 Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 103) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active AEP Appalachian Power - Commercial and Industrial Rebate Programs (West Virginia) Utility Rebate Program West Virginia Commercial Industrial Central Air conditioners Chillers Custom/Others pending approval Heat pumps Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Motor VFDs Programmable Thermostats Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Ground Source Heat Pumps Yes AEP Ohio - Commercial New Construction Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Ohio) Utility Rebate Program Ohio Commercial Industrial Local Government Municipal Utility

276

Improving the Energy Efficiency of Commercial Buildings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Commercial Buildings Improving the Energy Efficiency of Commercial Buildings Engaging Industry Leaders to Deploy Energy Saving Tools, Technologies and Best Practices Learn More Engaging Industry Leaders to Deploy Energy Saving Tools, Technologies and Best Practices Learn More The Building Technologies Office (BTO) works with the commercial building industry to accelerate the uptake of energy efficiency technologies and techniques in both existing and new commercial buildings. By developing, demonstrating, and deploying cost-effective solutions, BTO strives to reduce energy consumption across the commercial building sector by at least 1,600 TBtu. Key Tools and Resources Use the guides, case studies, and other tools developed by the DOE

277

Proceedings: Electric Alternatives to Commercial Cogeneration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings provide the latest technical, marketing, and financial information on the application of high-efficiency and load-managed electrical equipment and on cogeneration in the commercial sector. Utilities can use this information to provide a menu of end-use options to their customers and to encourage equipment installations that benefit both customers and the utility.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Making Africa's Power Sector Sustainable: An Analysis of Power Sector  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Making Africa's Power Sector Sustainable: An Analysis of Power Sector Making Africa's Power Sector Sustainable: An Analysis of Power Sector Reforms in Africa Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Making Africa's Power Sector Sustainable: An Analysis of Power Sector Reforms in Africa Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme, United Nations Economic Commission for Africa Sector: Energy Topics: Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.uneca.org/eca_programmes/nrid/pubs/powersectorreport.pdf UN Region: Eastern Africa References: Making Africa's Power Sector Sustainable: An Analysis of Power Sector Reforms in Africa[1] Overview "This study assesses the socio-economic and environmental impacts of power

279

City of San Jose - Private Sector Green Building Policy | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Jose - Private Sector Green Building Policy Jose - Private Sector Green Building Policy City of San Jose - Private Sector Green Building Policy < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State California Program Type Building Energy Code Provider City of San Jose In October 2008, the City of San Jose enacted the Private Sector Green Building Policy (Policy No. 6-32). The policy was adopted in Ordinance No. 28622 in June, 2009. All new buildings must meet certain green building requirements in order to receive a building permit. Requirements are dependent on the size and type of the project. * Tier 1 Commercial Projects include commercial industrial projects

280

Energy Efficiency and the Finance Sector | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Finance Sector the Finance Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name Energy Efficiency and the Finance Sector Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Finance, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.unepfi.org/fileadmi References Energy Efficiency and the Finance Sector[1] Summary "This survey was carried out in 2008, when high and volatile oil prices, steadily rising demand for energy, and global imperatives, such as climate change, created significant renewed attention to energy efficiency - both in the policy and commercial world. UNEP Finance Initiative sought to provide an evidence base on current lending activities in the energy efficiency space, as well as views on this issue through a survey among

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems commercial sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Property:Incentive/ImplSector | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ImplSector ImplSector Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Incentive/ImplSector Property Type String Description Implementing Sector. Pages using the property "Incentive/ImplSector" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2003 Climate Change Fuel Cell Buy-Down Program (Federal) + Federal + 3 30% Business Tax Credit for Solar (Vermont) + State/Territory + 4 401 Certification (Vermont) + State/Province + A AEP (Central and North) - CitySmart Program (Texas) + Utility + AEP (Central and North) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs (Texas) + Utility + AEP (Central and SWEPCO) - Coolsaver A/C Tune Up (Texas) + Utility + AEP (Central, North and SWEPCO) - Commercial Solutions Program (Texas) + Utility + AEP (SWEPCO) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs (Texas) + Utility +

282

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Sector Energy Demand Commercial Sector Energy Demand On This Page End-use efficiency... Growth in electricity use... Core technologies... Improved interconnection... End-use efficiency improvements could lower energy consumption per capita The AEO2011 Reference case shows minimal change in commercial energy use per capita between 2009 and 2035 (Figure 62). While growth in commercial floorspace (1.2 percent per year) is faster than growth in population (0.9 percent per year), energy use per capita remains relatively steady due to efficiency improvements in equipment and building shells. Efficiency standards and the addition of more efficient technologies account for a large share of the improvement in the efficiency of end-use services, notably in space cooling, refrigeration, and lighting. figure data

283

Best Management Practice: Commercial Kitchen Equipment | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Best Management Practice: Commercial Kitchen Equipment Best Management Practice: Commercial Kitchen Equipment Best Management Practice: Commercial Kitchen Equipment October 8, 2013 - 9:42am Addthis Commercial kitchen equipment represents a large set of water users in the non-residential sector. Water efficiency for commercial kitchen equipment is especially important because high volume applications typically use mostly hot water. Ensuring commercial kitchen equipment uses water efficiently affords both significant water and energy savings. Water-using commercial kitchen equipment include pre-rinse spray valves, wash tanks and sinks, commercial dishwashers, food steamers, steam kettles, commercial ice makers, and combination ovens (combination oven/steamer). Operation and Maintenance To maintain water efficiency in operations and maintenance, Federal

284

1992 Commercial Buildings Characteristics -- Overview/Executive Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Overview Overview Overview Percent of Buildings and Floorspace by Census Region, 1992 Percent of Buildings and Floorspace By Census Region divider line Executive Summary Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 presents statistics about the number, type, and size of commercial buildings in the United States as well as their energy-related characteristics. These data are collected in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national survey of buildings in the commercial sector. The 1992 CBECS is the fifth in a series conducted since 1979 by the Energy Information Administration. Approximately 6,600 commercial buildings were surveyed, representing the characteristics and energy consumption of 4.8 million commercial buildings and 67.9 billion square feet of commercial floorspace nationwide. Overall, the amount of commercial floorspace in the United States increased an average of 2.4 percent annually between 1989 and 1992, while the number of commercial buildings increased an average of 2.0 percent annually.

285

Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of offering NEM for biogas-electric systems and fuel cells.but AB 2228 (2002) allowed biogas-electric facilities up to

McAllister, Joseph Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Analysis &  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

All Reports & Publications All Reports & Publications Search By: Go Pick a date range: From: To: Go Commercial BuildingsAvailable formats PDF Modeling Distributed Generation in the Buildings Sectors Released: August 29, 2013 This report focuses on how EIA models residential and commercial sector distributed generation, including combined heat and power, for the Annual Energy Outlook. PDF Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector Released: August 7, 2013 EIA works with technology experts to project the cost and performance of future residential and commercial sector photovoltaic (PV) and small wind installations rather than developing technology projections in-house. These reports have always been available by request. By providing the reports

287

New and Underutilized Technology: Commercial Ground Source Heat Pumps |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Ground Source Heat Commercial Ground Source Heat Pumps New and Underutilized Technology: Commercial Ground Source Heat Pumps October 8, 2013 - 2:59pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for commercial ground source heat pumps within the Federal sector. Benefits Commercial ground source heat pumps are ground source heat pump with loops that feed multiple packaged heat pumps and a single ground source water loop. Unit capacity is typically 1-10 tons and may be utilized in an array of multiple units to serve a large load. Application Condensing boilers are appropriate for housing, service, office, and research and development applications. Key Factors for Deployment FEMP has made great progress with commercial ground source heat pump technology deployment within the Federal sector. Primary barriers deal with

288

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODULE COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Floorspace Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Energy Service Demand Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Equipment Choice Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Energy Consumption Submodule The commercial demand module (CDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for eight marketed energy sources plus solar thermal energy. For the three major commercial sector fuels, electricity, natural gas and distillate oil, the CDM is a "structural" model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the commercial floorspace stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. For the remaining five marketed "minor fuels," simple econometric projections are made. The commercial sector encompasses business establishments that are not

289

EERE: Commercialization & Deployment  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

marketplace. Commercialization Commercialization initiatives help bridge the gap between technology R&D and venture capital funding and marketing. Energy Innovation Portal...

290

Enhancing Commercial Outcomes from R&D: A Framework for a Public-Private Partnership to Increase the Yield of Federally Funded R&D Investments and Promote Economic Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores a new model for public sector investors to enhance and accelerate the commercialization of clean energy investments.

Murphy, L. M.; Jerde, P.; Rutherford, L.; Barone, R.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Private Sector Outreach and Partnerships  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

ISERs partnerships with the private sector are a strength which has enabled the division to respond to the needs of the sector and the nation. The divisions domestic capabilities have been...

292

Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model. The NEMS Transportation Model comprises a series of semi-independent models which address different aspects of the transportation sector. The primary purpose of this model is to provide mid-term forecasts of transportation energy demand by fuel type including, but not limited to, motor gasoline, distillate, jet fuel, and alternative fuels (such as CNG) not commonly associated with transportation. The current NEMS forecast horizon extends to the year 2010 and uses 1990 as the base year. Forecasts are generated through the separate consideration of energy consumption within the various modes of transport, including: private and fleet light-duty vehicles; aircraft; marine, rail, and truck freight; and various modes with minor overall impacts, such as mass transit and recreational boating. This approach is useful in assessing the impacts of policy initiatives, legislative mandates which affect individual modes of travel, and technological developments. The model also provides forecasts of selected intermediate values which are generated in order to determine energy consumption. These elements include estimates of passenger travel demand by automobile, air, or mass transit; estimates of the efficiency with which that demand is met; projections of vehicle stocks and the penetration of new technologies; and estimates of the demand for freight transport which are linked to forecasts of industrial output. Following the estimation of energy demand, TRAN produces forecasts of vehicular emissions of the following pollutants by source: oxides of sulfur, oxides of nitrogen, total carbon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Survey Background and Technical Information Survey Background and Technical Information Survey Background The commercial sector encompasses a vast range of building types-service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as certain buildings that would not be considered "commercial" in a traditional economic sense, such as public and private schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Excluded from the sector are the goods-producing industries: manufacturing, agriculture, mining, forestry and fisheries, and construction. Nearly all energy use in the commercial sector takes place in, or is associated with, the buildings that house these commercial activities. Analysis of the structures, activities, and equipment associated with

294

Residential/commercial market for energy technologies  

SciTech Connect

The residential/commercial market sector, particularly as it relates to energy technologies, is described. Buildings account for about 25% of the total energy consumed in the US. Market response to energy technologies is influenced by several considerations. Some considerations discussed are: industry characteristics; market sectors; energy-consumption characeristics; industry forecasts; and market influences. Market acceptance may be slow or nonexistent, the technology may have little impact on energy consumption, and redesign or modification may be necessary to overcome belatedly perceived market barriers. 7 figures, 20 tables.

Glesk, M.M.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Heavy Flavor & Dark Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider some contributions to rare processes in $B$ meson decays from a Dark Sector containing 2 light unstable scalars, with large couplings to each other and small mixings with Standard Model Higgs scalars. We show that existing constraints allow for an exotic contribution to high multiplicity final states with a branching fraction as large as $\\mathcal{O}(10^{-4})$, and that exotic particles could appear as narrow resonances or long lived particles which are mainly found in high multiplicity final states from $B$ decays.

Nelson, Ann E

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Commercialization Home Page - EERE Commercialization Office  

The Commercialization Team of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) works to bridge the gap between research and development ...

297

Commercialization Home Page - EERE Commercialization Office  

The Commercialization Team of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) works to bridge the gap between research and development (R&D), and venture ...

298

Figure 7. U.S. dry natural gas consumption by sector, 2005-2040 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 7. U.S. dry natural gas consumption by sector, 2005-2040 (trllion cubic feet) Residential Commercial Transportation Gas to liquids

299

Commercial Building National Accounts | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Building National Accounts Commercial Building National Accounts Jump to: navigation, search National Accounts is part of DOE's Net-Zero Energy Commercial Building Initiative (CBI), which was mandated by the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA). EISA enabled DOE to bring together parties from the private sector, DOE national labs, other federal agencies and nongovernmental organizations to advance research into low- and zero-net-energy buildings. CBI's goal is to develop market-ready, net zero-energy commercial buildings by 2025. A net zero-energy building makes as much energy as it uses over a year[1] [2]. As of 2009, estimates indicated that retail and office buildings consume 18 percent of the nation's total energy and half of nation's overall building energy (including homes, schools, and other structures). The program

300

Department of Energy and Commercial Real Estate Executives Launch Alliance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Commercial Real Estate Executives Launch and Commercial Real Estate Executives Launch Alliance to Reduce Energy Consumption of Buildings Department of Energy and Commercial Real Estate Executives Launch Alliance to Reduce Energy Consumption of Buildings April 9, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Top executives from 19 commercial real estate companies met with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) officials in New York City today to discuss plans to dramatically reduce the sector's energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. The meeting officially launched DOE's Commercial Real Estate Energy Alliance (CREEA), a partnership of commercial real estate owners and operators who have volunteered to work together with DOE to make lasting change in the energy consumption of commercial real estate buildings in the United States. Currently, commercial buildings

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems commercial sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

High-performance commercial building systems  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes key technical accomplishments resulting from the three year PIER-funded R&D program, ''High Performance Commercial Building Systems'' (HPCBS). The program targets the commercial building sector in California, an end-use sector that accounts for about one-third of all California electricity consumption and an even larger fraction of peak demand, at a cost of over $10B/year. Commercial buildings also have a major impact on occupant health, comfort and productivity. Building design and operations practices that influence energy use are deeply engrained in a fragmented, risk-averse industry that is slow to change. Although California's aggressive standards efforts have resulted in new buildings designed to use less energy than those constructed 20 years ago, the actual savings realized are still well below technical and economic potentials. The broad goal of this program is to develop and deploy a set of energy-saving technologies, strategies, and techniques, and improve processes for designing, commissioning, and operating commercial buildings, while improving health, comfort, and performance of occupants, all in a manner consistent with sound economic investment practices. Results are to be broadly applicable to the commercial sector for different building sizes and types, e.g. offices and schools, for different classes of ownership, both public and private, and for owner-occupied as well as speculative buildings. The program aims to facilitate significant electricity use savings in the California commercial sector by 2015, while assuring that these savings are affordable and promote high quality indoor environments. The five linked technical program elements contain 14 projects with 41 distinct R&D tasks. Collectively they form a comprehensive Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) program with the potential to capture large savings in the commercial building sector, providing significant economic benefits to building owners and health and performance benefits to occupants. At the same time this program can strengthen the growing energy efficiency industry in California by providing new jobs and growth opportunities for companies providing the technology, systems, software, design, and building services to the commercial sector. The broad objectives across all five program elements were: (1) To develop and deploy an integrated set of tools and techniques to support the design and operation of energy-efficient commercial buildings; (2) To develop open software specifications for a building data model that will support the interoperability of these tools throughout the building life-cycle; (3) To create new technology options (hardware and controls) for substantially reducing controllable lighting, envelope, and cooling loads in buildings; (4) To create and implement a new generation of diagnostic techniques so that commissioning and efficient building operations can be accomplished reliably and cost effectively and provide sustained energy savings; (5) To enhance the health, comfort and performance of building occupants. (6) To provide the information technology infrastructure for owners to minimize their energy costs and manage their energy information in a manner that creates added value for their buildings as the commercial sector transitions to an era of deregulated utility markets, distributed generation, and changing business practices. Our ultimate goal is for our R&D effort to have measurable market impact. This requires that the research tasks be carried out with a variety of connections to key market actors or trends so that they are recognized as relevant and useful and can be adopted by expected users. While some of this activity is directly integrated into our research tasks, the handoff from ''market-connected R&D'' to ''field deployment'' is still an art as well as a science and in many areas requires resources and a timeframe well beyond the scope of this PIER research program. The TAGs, PAC

Selkowitz, Stephen

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

High-performance commercial building systems  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes key technical accomplishments resulting from the three year PIER-funded R&D program, ''High Performance Commercial Building Systems'' (HPCBS). The program targets the commercial building sector in California, an end-use sector that accounts for about one-third of all California electricity consumption and an even larger fraction of peak demand, at a cost of over $10B/year. Commercial buildings also have a major impact on occupant health, comfort and productivity. Building design and operations practices that influence energy use are deeply engrained in a fragmented, risk-averse industry that is slow to change. Although California's aggressive standards efforts have resulted in new buildings designed to use less energy than those constructed 20 years ago, the actual savings realized are still well below technical and economic potentials. The broad goal of this program is to develop and deploy a set of energy-saving technologies, strategies, and techniques, and improve processes for designing, commissioning, and operating commercial buildings, while improving health, comfort, and performance of occupants, all in a manner consistent with sound economic investment practices. Results are to be broadly applicable to the commercial sector for different building sizes and types, e.g. offices and schools, for different classes of ownership, both public and private, and for owner-occupied as well as speculative buildings. The program aims to facilitate significant electricity use savings in the California commercial sector by 2015, while assuring that these savings are affordable and promote high quality indoor environments. The five linked technical program elements contain 14 projects with 41 distinct R&D tasks. Collectively they form a comprehensive Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) program with the potential to capture large savings in the commercial building sector, providing significant economic benefits to building owners and health and performance benefits to occupants. At the same time this program can strengthen the growing energy efficiency industry in California by providing new jobs and growth opportunities for companies providing the technology, systems, software, design, and building services to the commercial sector. The broad objectives across all five program elements were: (1) To develop and deploy an integrated set of tools and techniques to support the design and operation of energy-efficient commercial buildings; (2) To develop open software specifications for a building data model that will support the interoperability of these tools throughout the building life-cycle; (3) To create new technology options (hardware and controls) for substantially reducing controllable lighting, envelope, and cooling loads in buildings; (4) To create and implement a new generation of diagnostic techniques so that commissioning and efficient building operations can be accomplished reliably and cost effectively and provide sustained energy savings; (5) To enhance the health, comfort and performance of building occupants. (6) To provide the information technology infrastructure for owners to minimize their energy costs and manage their energy information in a manner that creates added value for their buildings as the commercial sector transitions to an era of deregulated utility markets, distributed generation, and changing business practices. Our ultimate goal is for our R&D effort to have measurable market impact. This requires that the research tasks be carried out with a variety of connections to key market actors or trends so that they are recognized as relevant and useful and can be adopted by expected users. While some of this activity is directly integrated into our research tasks, the handoff from ''market-connected R&D'' to ''field deployment'' is still an art as well as a science and in many areas requires resources and a timeframe well beyond the scope of this PIER research program. The TAGs, PAC and other industry partners have assisted directly in this effort

Selkowitz, Stephen

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Commercial Mkt trends Market Trends The AEO2011 Reference case shows minimal change in commercial energy use per capita between 2009 and 2035 (Figure 62). While growth in commercial floorspace (1.2 percent per year) is faster than growth in population (0.9 percent per year), energy use per capita remains relatively steady due to efficiency improvements in equipment and building shells. Efficiency standards and the addition of more efficient technologies account for a large share of the improvement in the efficiency of end-use services, notably in space cooling, refrigeration, and lighting. See more issues Issues in Focus In 2009, the residential and commercial buildings sectors used 19.6 quadrillion Btu of delivered energy, or 21 percent of total U.S. energy

304

Sector 6 Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 APS Pubs. Database Sector 6 Publications Publications 2013:(45) "Classical and quantum phase transitions revealed using transport and x-ray measurements," Arnab Banerjee, Ph.D.-Thesis, University of Chicago, 2013. "Charge transfer and multiple density waves in the rare earth tellurides," A. Banerjee, Yejun Feng, D.M. Silevitch, Jiyang Wang, J.C. Lang, H.-H. Kuo, I.R. Fisher, T.F. Rosenbaum, Phys. Rev. B 87, 155131 (2013). "Controlling Size-Induced Phase Transformations Using Chemically Designed Nanolaminates," Matt Beekman, Sabrina Disch, Sergei Rouvimov, Deepa Kasinathan, Klaus Koepernik, Helge Rosner, Paul Zschack, Wolfgang S. Neumann, David C. Johnson, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 52, 13211 (2013).

305

Sector 1 - Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS Software APS Software Scientists and researchers at the APS develop custom scientific software to help with acquisition and analysis of beamline data. Several packages are available for a variety of platforms and uses. Data Acquisition Motion control and data collection at the 1-BM and 1-ID beamlines are primarily executed using EPICS software. We also utilize SPEC, running through EPICS, for many experiments. Data Analysis Some of the programs used at Sector 1 to analyse 1-d and/or 2-d data sets are described: Fit2d, for viewing and analysing 2-dimensional data Igor, for analysis of small-angle scattering data Matlab, for strain/texture analysis and image analysis. GSAS/EXPGUI, for structural refinement of diffraction data. A comprehensive list of Powder Diffraction Software and Resources can be

306

Louisville Private Sector Agenda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thursday, December 13, 2007 Thursday, December 13, 2007 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM Agenda * Welcome and introductions from the Mayor (9:00-9:15) o The Mayor's energy and climate protection goals for Louisville o Request for private sector input for the upcoming public-private partnership to promote increased energy efficiency in buildings throughout the Louisville community o Highlights from the December 12 meeting of the ENERGY STAR Challenge implementation group o Introduction to Metro's Green Initiative and goals for today's session * Getting started with ENERGY STAR (9:15-10:00) o Introduction to the program and overview of ENERGY STAR resources o Kentucky and regional ENERGY STAR Partners and labeled buildings o Simple steps for energy savings o The benefits of energy savings

307

Energy Sector Market Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of energy market analysis sponsored by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Weatherization and International Program (WIP) within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The analysis was conducted by a team of DOE laboratory experts from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with additional input from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The analysis was structured to identify those markets and niches where government can create the biggest impact by informing management decisions in the private and public sectors. The analysis identifies those markets and niches where opportunities exist for increasing energy efficiency and renewable energy use.

Arent, D.; Benioff, R.; Mosey, G.; Bird, L.; Brown, J.; Brown, E.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Aabakken, J.; Parks, K.; Lapsa, M.; Davis, S.; Olszewski, M.; Cox, D.; McElhaney, K.; Hadley, S.; Hostick, D.; Nicholls, A.; McDonald, S.; Holloman, B.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Electric Power Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Electric Power Sector Hydroelectric Power (a) ............... 0.670 0.785 0.653 0.561 0.633 0.775 0.631 0.566 0.659 0.776 0.625 0.572 2.668 2.605 2.633 Wood Biomass (b) ........................ 0.048 0.043 0.052 0.046 0.045 0.039 0.051 0.052 0.055 0.049 0.060 0.054 0.190 0.187 0.218 Waste Biomass (c) ....................... 0.063 0.064 0.066 0.069 0.061 0.063 0.063 0.064 0.062 0.065 0.068 0.065 0.262 0.250 0.261 Wind ............................................. 0.376 0.361 0.253 0.377 0.428 0.461 0.315 0.400 0.417 0.461 0.340 0.424 1.368 1.604 1.641 Geothermal ................................. 0.036 0.037 0.038 0.039 0.041 0.041 0.041 0.042 0.041 0.040 0.041 0.042 0.149 0.164 0.165 Solar ............................................. 0.007 0.022 0.021 0.014 0.013 0.022 0.026 0.016 0.021 0.048 0.048 0.025 0.064

309

Program Program Organization Country Region Topic Sector Sector  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Program Organization Country Region Topic Sector Sector Program Organization Country Region Topic Sector Sector Albania Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies EC LEDS Albania Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies EC LEDS United States Agency for International Development USAID United States Environmental Protection Agency United States Department of Energy United States Department of Agriculture United States Department of State Albania Southern Asia Low emission development planning LEDS Energy Land Climate Algeria Clean Technology Fund CTF Algeria Clean Technology Fund CTF African Development Bank Asian Development Bank European Bank for Reconstruction and Development EBRD Inter American Development Bank IDB World Bank Algeria South Eastern Asia Background analysis Finance Implementation

310

Commercial | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Commercial Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (7 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (5 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

311

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NEMS overview and brief description of cases NEMS overview and brief description of cases JUMP TO: The National Energy Modeling System | Component modules | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 cases The National Energy Modeling System Projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) are generated using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) [148], developed and maintained by the Office of Energy Analysis of the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). In addition to its use in developing the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections, NEMS is also used to complete analytical studies for the U.S. Congress, the Executive Office of the President, other offices within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and other Federal agencies. NEMS is also used by other nongovernment groups, such as the Electric Power Research Institute, Duke University, and Georgia Institute

312

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NEMS overview and brief description of cases NEMS overview and brief description of cases JUMP TO: The National Energy Modeling System | Component modules | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 cases The National Energy Modeling System Projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) are generated using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) [148], developed and maintained by the Office of Energy Analysis of the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). In addition to its use in developing the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections, NEMS is also used to complete analytical studies for the U.S. Congress, the Executive Office of the President, other offices within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and other Federal agencies. NEMS is also used by other nongovernment groups, such as the Electric Power Research Institute, Duke University, and Georgia Institute

313

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NEMS overview and brief description of cases NEMS overview and brief description of cases On This Page The National Energy Modeling... Component modules Annual Energy Outlook 2011... The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 (AEO2011) are generated from the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) [1], developed and maintained by the Office of Energy Analysis (OEA), formerly known as the Office Integrated Analysis and Forecasting (OIAF), of the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) [2]. In addition to its use in developing the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections, NEMS is also used to complete analytical studies for the U.S. Congress, the Executive Office of the President, other offices within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and other Federal agencies. NEMS is also used by other nongovernment groups,

314

Agriculture, land use, and commercial biomass energy  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we have considered commercial biomass energy in the context of overall agriculture and land-use change. We have described a model of energy, agriculture, and land-use and employed that model to examine the implications of commercial biomass energy or both energy sector and land-use change carbon emissions. In general we find that the introduction of biomass energy has a negative effect on the extent of unmanaged ecosystems. Commercial biomass introduces a major new land use which raises land rental rates, and provides an incentive to bring more land into production, increasing the rate of incursion into unmanaged ecosystems. But while the emergence of a commercial biomass industry may increase land-use change emissions, the overall effect is strongly to reduce total anthropogenic carbon emissions. Further, the higher the rate of commercial biomass energy productivity, the lower net emissions. Higher commercial biomass energy productivity, while leading to higher land-use change emissions, has a far stronger effect on fossil fuel carbon emissions. Highly productive and inexpensive commercial biomass energy technologies appear to have a substantial depressing effect on total anthropogenic carbon emissions, though their introduction raises the rental rate on land, providing incentives for greater rates of deforestation than in the reference case.

Edmonds, J.A.; Wise, M.A.; Sands, R.D.; Brown, R.A.; Kheshgi, H.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 Data) --  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Home > Special Topics and Data Reports > Types of Lights Commercial Buildings Home > Special Topics and Data Reports > Types of Lights Picture of a light bulb At Home and At Work: What Types of Lights Are We Using? Two national EIA surveys report that . . . Of residential households, 98 percent use incandescent, 42 percent use fluorescent. Of commercial buildings, 59 percent use incandescent, 92 percent use fluorescent. At a glance, we might conclude that substantial energy savings could occur in both the residential and commercial sectors if they replaced their incandescent lights with fluorescent lights, given that fluorescent lights consume approximately 75-85 percent less electricity than incandescent lights. In the residential sector, this is true. However, in the commercial sector, where approximately 92 percent of the buildings already use fluorescent lights, increasing energy savings will require upgrading existing lights and lighting systems. To maximize energy savings, analysis must also consider the hours the lights are used and the amount of floorspace lit by that lighting type. Figures 1 and 2 show the types of lights used by the percent of households and by the percent of floorspace lit for the residential and the commercial sectors, respectively.

316

Transportation Sector Module 1999, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model.

John Maples

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Transportation Sector Module 1994, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model.

John Maples

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Transportation Sector Module 1997, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Over the past year, several modifications have been made to the NEMS Transportation Model,incorporating greater levels of detail and analysis in modules previously represented in the aggregate or under a profusion of simplifying assumptions. This document is intended to amend those sections of the Model Documentation Report (MDR) which describe these superseded modules.

John Maples

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Sector 9 | Operations and Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sector 9 Operations and Schedule Contents: 9-ID User Manual 9-BM User Manual Common Tasks Computers and Software Troubleshooting Web Cameras...

320

Technology Commercialization and Partnerships |  

Staff Directory; BNL People Technology Commercialization & Partnerships. Home; For BNL Inventors; ... a nonprofit applied science and technology organization. ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems commercial sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Contacts - EERE Commercialization Office  

Contacts. For more information about the National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition, or about other commercialization initiatives, please contact ...

322

Average Commercial Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Price Average Commercial Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes...

323

Model documentation report: Residential sector demand module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description for energy analysts, other users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports according to Public Law 93-275, section 57(b)(1). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Model documentation report: Residential sector demand module of the National Energy Modeling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document that provides a detailed description for energy analysts, other users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports according to Public Law 93-275, section 57(b)(1). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Commercial New Construction Rebate Program  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities (Electric) - Commercial New Construction Rebate Program Utilities (Electric) - Commercial New Construction Rebate Program (New Hampshire) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Summary Last modified on March 13, 2013. Financial Incentive Program Place New Hampshire Name Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Commercial New Construction Rebate Program (New Hampshire) Incentive Type Utility Rebate Program Applicable Sector Commercial, Industrial, Local Government, Schools Eligible Technologies Central Air conditioners, Chillers, Compressed air, Custom/Others pending approval, Energy Mgmt. Systems/Building Controls, Heat pumps, Lighting, Lighting Controls/Sensors, Motor VFDs, Motors, Geothermal Heat Pumps, Control Sensors, Economizers

326

US National Institute of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Commercialization | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Institute of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Commercialization Institute of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Commercialization Jump to: navigation, search Name US National Institute of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Commercialization Place Columbia, South Carolina Zip 29250-0768 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product The National Institute of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Commercialization, a nonprofit organization, will work to find commercial opportunities for USC and other state research institutions doing fuel cell research. References US National Institute of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Commercialization[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. US National Institute of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Commercialization is a company located in Columbia, South Carolina . References

327

Electricity savings potentials in the residential sector of Bahrain  

SciTech Connect

Electricity is the major fuel (over 99%) used in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors in Bahrain. In 1992, the total annual electricity consumption in Bahrain was 3.45 terawatt-hours (TWh), of which 1.95 TWh (56%) was used in the residential sector, 0.89 TWh (26%) in the commercial sector, and 0.59 TWh (17%) in the industrial sector. Agricultural energy consumption was 0.02 TWh (less than 1%) of the total energy use. In Bahrain, most residences are air conditioned with window units. The air-conditioning electricity use is at least 50% of total annual residential use. The contribution of residential AC to the peak power consumption is even more significant, approaching 80% of residential peak power demand. Air-conditioning electricity use in the commercial sector is also significant, about 45% of the annual use and over 60% of peak power demand. This paper presents a cost/benefit analysis of energy-efficient technologies in the residential sector. Technologies studied include: energy-efficient air conditioners, insulating houses, improved infiltration, increasing thermostat settings, efficient refrigerators and freezers, efficient water heaters, efficient clothes washers, and compact fluorescent lights. We conservatively estimate a 32% savings in residential electricity use at an average cost of about 4 fils per kWh. (The subsidized cost of residential electricity is about 12 fils per kWh. 1000 fils = 1 Bahrain Dinar = US$ 2.67). We also discuss major policy options needed for implementation of energy-efficiency technologies.

Akbari, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Morsy, M.G.; Al-Baharna, N.S. [Univ. of Bahrain, Manama (Bahrain)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Table 2.1a Energy Consumption Estimates by Sector, 1949-2011 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

R 8: R 97,722: 2011 P: 6,585: 21,619: 4,090: 18,021: 20,291: 30,592: 26,999: 27,079: 39,346-9: 97,301: 1 Commercial sector, including commercial combined-heat-and ...

329

Commercial Building Partnerships | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Partnerships Building Partnerships Commercial Building Partnerships Image shows a well-lit, warehouse-like produce section of a Whole Foods store. Much of the lighting in the photo eminates from windows along the left side of the photo. The Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) initiative is demonstrating dramatic energy savings in commercial buildings. Through this cost-shared initiative, partner organizations team with Building Technologies Office (BTO) representatives and others to improve energy efficiency in new and existing buildings. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory staff and private-sector technical experts provide energy analysis support and engineering expertise to explore energy-saving ideas and strategies. Organizations not involved with CBP will benefit from the lessons learned,

330

Constraints on the commercialization of oil shale  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The problems and prospects for the commercialization of oil shale from surface retorting are examined. Commercialization refers to the process of private sector adoption of a technology for general use after most of the technological uncertainties have been resolved. Three categories of constraints and uncertainties can be identified: technical constraints relating to the performance characteristics of the technology; economic constraints on the ability of the technology to yield an acceptable rate of return to investors; and institutional constraints that arise from the organizational and political context in which commercialization takes place. Because surface retorting involves relatively well understood technologies, this study deals almost exclusively with economic and institutional constraints. At the present time, a government commercialization effort for oil shale surface retorting would not be likely to result in a viable industry in this century. Alternative oil shale technologies such as modified in situ processes offer prospects of lower shale oil costs, but are less well developed. Data on modified in situ processes are not abundant enough as yet to permit serious estimates of commercial-scale costs. Consequently, government decisions regarding the commercialization of modified in situ technologies should await the completion of further technical tests and an independent definitive plant design.

Merrow, E.W.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

A look at commercial buildings in 1995: Characteristics, energy consumption, and energy expenditures  

SciTech Connect

The commercial sector consists of business establishments and other organizations that provide services. The sector includes service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as a wide range of facilities that would not be considered commercial in a traditional economic sense, such as public schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Nearly all energy use in the commercial sector takes place in, or is associated with, the buildings that house these commercial activities. Analysis of the structures, activities, and equipment associated with different types of buildings is the clearest way to evaluate commercial sector energy use. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is a national-level sample survey of commercial buildings and their energy suppliers conducted quadrennially (previously triennially) by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The target population for the 1995 CBECS consisted of all commercial buildings in the US with more than 1,000 square feet of floorspace. Decision makers, businesses, and other organizations that are concerned with the use of energy--building owners and managers, regulators, legislative bodies and executive agencies at all levels of government, utilities and other energy suppliers--are confronted with a buildings sector that is complex. Data on major characteristics (e.g., type of building, size, year constructed, location) collected from the buildings, along with the amount and types of energy the buildings consume, help answer fundamental questions about the use of energy in commercial buildings.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Market Assessment of Public Sector Energy Efficiency Potential in India  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market Assessment of Public Sector Energy Efficiency Potential in India Market Assessment of Public Sector Energy Efficiency Potential in India Title Market Assessment of Public Sector Energy Efficiency Potential in India Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Iyer, Maithili, and Jayant A. Sathaye Date Published 10-Mar Publisher LBNL Keywords energy efficiency, india, market assessment Abstract The purpose of this study is to assess, with limited resources, the potential for improving energy efficiency in public buildings by providing preliminary estimates of the size of the public sector buildings market, the patterns of energy use in public buildings, and the opportunity for reducing energy use in public buildings. This report estimates the size of this market and the potential for carbon savings with conservative assumptions requiring moderate investment towards efficiency improvement in public sector buildings-here defined as the sum of the public sector commercial and institutional buildings as characterized by the Ministry of Statistics and Program Implementation (MOSPI). Information from this study will be provided to the World Bank and the BEE to assist them in designing effective energy efficiency programs for public buildings

333

Lighting in Commercial Buildings, 1986  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 Lighting in Commercial Buildings Lighting in Commercial Buildings --1986 Overview Full Report and Tables Detailed analysis of energy consumption for lighting for U.S. commercial...

334

Solar Photovoltaic Financing: Residential Sector Deployment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the information that homeowners and policy makers need to facilitate PV financing at the residential level. The full range of cash payments, bill savings, and tax incentives is covered, as well as potentially available solar attribute payments. Traditional financing is also compared to innovative solutions, many of which are borrowed from the commercial sector. Together, these mechanisms are critical for making the economic case for a residential PV installation, given its high upfront costs. Unfortunately, these programs are presently limited to select locations around the country. By calling attention to these innovative initiatives, this report aims to help policy makers consider greater adoption of these models to benefit homeowners interested installing a residential PV system.

Coughlin, J.; Cory, K.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

See most recent version of AEO See most recent version of AEO Annual Energy Outlook Products - Archive Annual Energy Outlook Supplement Tables Assumptions NEM System (NEMS): An Overview NEMS Retrospective Early Release HTML PDF HTML PDF HTML PDF HTML PDF HTML PDF HTML PDF 2013 2013 2013 2013 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2009 2008 2008 2008 2008 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007

336

Commercial Building Energy Efficiency and Efficient Technologies Guidebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercial buildings account for 18% of all energy use in the United States and about 27% of energy use in buildings. Improving overall energy efficiency in this sector remains challenging due to the diversity of building types and equipment, especially since business operators are focused on their core business operating issues and lack familiarity with means for improving energy efficiency. This guidebook provides basic information on how commercial buildings use energy today and suggests opportunities...

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

337

Commercial Building Energy Efficiency and Efficient Technologies Guidebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercial buildings account for 18 of all energy use in the United States and about 27 of energy use in buildings. Improving overall energy efficiency in this sector remains challenging due to the diversity of building types and equipment, especially since business operators are focused on their core business operating issues and lack familiarity with means for improving energy efficiency. This guidebook provides basic information on how commercial buildings use energy today and suggests opportunities f...

2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

338

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7. Key assumptions for the commercial sector in the AEO2012 integrated demand technology cases 7. Key assumptions for the commercial sector in the AEO2012 integrated demand technology cases Assumptions Integrated 2011 Deand Technology Integraged High Demand Technologya Integrated Buildings Best Available Demand Technologya End-use equipment Limited to technology menu available in 2011. Promulgated standards still take effect. Earlier availability, lower cost, and/ or higher efficiencies for advanced equipment. Purchases limited to highest available efficiency for each technology class, regardless of cost. Hurdle rates Same as Reference case distribution. All energy efficiency investments evaluated at 7-percent real interest rate. All energy efficiency investments evaluated at 7-percent real interest rate. Building shells Fixed at 2011 levels. 25 percent more improvement than in the Reference case by 2035. 50 percent more improvement than in the Reference case by 2035.

339

Transforming Commercial Building Operations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Ron Underhill Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ronald.underhill@pnnl.gov (509)375-9765 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Most buildings are not commissioned (Cx) before occupancy, including HVAC and lighting systems * Buildings often are poorly operated and maintained leading to significant energy waste of 5 to 20%, even when they have building automation systems (BASs)

340

Transforming Commercial Building Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Ron Underhill Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ronald.underhill@pnnl.gov (509)375-9765 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Most buildings are not commissioned (Cx) before occupancy, including HVAC and lighting systems * Buildings often are poorly operated and maintained leading to significant energy waste of 5 to 20%, even when they have building automation systems (BASs)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems commercial sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Commercialization Info 080611  

sponsors of the research that led to the Invention; the inventors of the Licensed Patents; and their ... of funding for the development and commercialization:

342

Commercial Buildings Integration Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings Integration Program Arah Schuur Program Manager arah.schuur@ee.doe.gov April 2, 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Vision Commercial buildings are constructed, operated, renovated and transacted with energy performance in mind and net zero ready commercial buildings are common and cost-effective. Commercial Buildings Integration Program Mission Accelerate voluntary uptake of significant energy performance improvements in existing and new commercial buildings. 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov BTO Goals: BTO supports the development and deployment of technologies and systems to reduce

343

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings Characteristics 1992 Buildings Characteristics Overview Full Report Tables National and Census region estimates of the number of commercial buildings in the U.S. and...

344

Commercial New Construction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Efficiency Vermont offers support to encourage energy efficient design for new construction. Efficiency Vermont will provide support for new commercial buildings, including technical assistance at...

345

Commercial Buildings Integration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Vision Commercial buildings are constructed, operated, renovated and...

346

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Energy Sources and End Uses  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Sources and End Uses Energy Sources and End Uses Topics: Energy Sources and End Uses End-Use Equipment Conservation Features and Practices Energy Sources and End Uses CBECS collects information that is used to answer questions about the use of energy in the commercial buildings sector. Questions such as: What kind of energy sources are used? What is energy used for? and What kinds of equipment use energy? Energy Sources Nearly all commercial buildings used at least one source of energy for some end use (Figure 1). Electricity was the most commonly used energy source in commercial buildings (94 percent of buildings comprising 98 percent of commercial floorspace). More than half of commercial buildings (57 percent) and two-thirds of commercial floorspace (68 percent) were served by natural gas. Three sources-fuel oil, district heat, and district chilled water-when used, were used more often in larger buildings.

347

service sector | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

service sector service sector Dataset Summary Description The energy consumption data consists of five spreadsheets: "overall data tables" plus energy consumption data for each of the following sectors: transport, domestic, industrial and service. Each of the five spreadsheets contains a page of commentary and interpretation. Source UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Date Released July 31st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption coal Coke domestic Electricity Electricity Consumption energy data Industrial Natural Gas Petroleum service sector transportation UK Data application/zip icon Five Excel spreadsheets with UK Energy Consumption data (zip, 2.6 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment The data in ECUK are classified as National Statistics

348

industrial sector | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

industrial sector industrial sector Dataset Summary Description Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial sector by industry and energy source in 2008. This data is published and compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords 2008 biomass consumption industrial sector Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon industrial_biomass_energy_consumption_and_electricity_2008.xls (xls, 27.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

349

Effective Occupied and Vacant Square Footage in Commercial Buildigs in 1992  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Effective Occupied and Vacant Sq. Ft. Effective Occupied and Vacant Sq. Ft. Effective Occupied and Vacant Square Footage in Commercial Buildings in 1992 -- A Useful Benchmark of Commercial Floorspace Vacancy Rates -- Introduction One of the major approaches to analyzing energy use in end-use sectors is to relate energy use to measures of the extent of utilization of the sector, either in absolute terms or in terms relative to some maximum utilization level. For example, vehicle miles traveled is a measure of vehicle utilization in the transportation sector. The percent of maximum production capability at which an industry or an individual plant is operating is a measure of industrial capacity utilization in the industrial sector. For the commercial buildings sector, two concepts that measure how intensely a building is utilized seem to predominate: the number of hours the building is in operation and the amount of floorspace in the building that is occupied (or conversely, the amount that is vacant).

350

Introduction to the Buildings Sector Module of SEDS  

SciTech Connect

SEDS is a stochastic engineering-economics model that forecasts economy-wide energy consumption in the U.S. to 2050. It is the product of multi-laboratory collaboration among the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and Lumina Decision Systems. Among national energy models, SEDS is unique, as it is the only model written to explicitly incorporate uncertainty in its inputs and outputs. The primary purpose of SEDS is to estimate the impact of various US Department of Energy (DOE)R&D and policy programs on the performance and subsequent adoption rates of technologies relating to every energy consuming sector of the economy (shown below). It has previously been used to assist DOE in complying with the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (GPRA). The focus of LBNL research has been exclusively on develop the buildings model (SBEAM), which is capable of running as a stand-alone forecasting model, or as a part of SEDS as a whole. The full version of SEDS, containing all sectors and interaction is also called the 'integrated' version and is managed by NREL. Forecasts from SEDS are often compared to those coming from National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The intention of this document is to present new users and developers with a general description of the purpose, functionality and structure of the buildings module within the Stochastic Energy Deployment System (SEDS). The Buildings module, which is capable of running as a standalone model, is also called the Stochastic Buildings Energy and Adoption Model (SBEAM). This document will focus exclusively on SBEAM and its interaction with other major sector modules present within SEDS. The methodologies and major assumptions employed in SBEAM will also be discussed. The organization of this report will parallel the organization of the model itself, being divided into major submodules. As the description progresses, the nature of modules will change from broad, easily understood concepts to lower-level data manipulation. Because SBEAM contains dozens of submodules and hundreds of variables, it would not be relevant or useful to describe each and every one. Rather, the investigation will focus more generally on the operations performed throughout the model. This manual is by no means a complete description of SBEAM; however it should provide the foundation for an introductory understanding of the model. The manual assumes a basic level of understating of Analytica{reg_sign}, the platform on which SEDS and SBEAM have been developed.

DeForest, Nicholas; Bonnet, Florence; Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0. Comparisons of energy consumption by sector projections, 2025, 2035, and 2040 0. Comparisons of energy consumption by sector projections, 2025, 2035, and 2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector AEO2013 Reference INFORUM IHSGI ExxonMobil IEA 2011 Residential 11.3 11.5 10.8 -- -- Residential excluding electricity 6.4 6.6 6.0 5.0 -- Commercial 8.6 8.6 8.5 -- -- Commercial excluding electricity 4.1 4.1 4.0 4.0 -- Buildings sector 19.9 20.1 19.3 -- 19.3a Industrial 24.0 23.6 -- -- 23.7a Industrial excluding electricity 20.7 20.2 -- 20.0 -- Lossesb 0.7 -- -- -- -- Natural gas feedstocks 0.5 -- -- -- -- Industrial removing losses and feedstocks 22.9 -- 21.7 -- -- Transportation 27.1 27.2 26.2 27.0 23.1a Electric power 39.4 39.2 40.5 37.0 37.2a Less: electricity demandc 12.7 12.8 12.7 -- 15.0a

352

Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial Building Sector to Support Policy and Innovation Planning Title Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock:...

353

Energy Sector Jobs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sector Jobs Energy Sector Jobs New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector: Taking a moment to break-down key findings from the latest Clean Energy Jobs...

354

Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

impact of rate design and net metering on the bill savingsJ. , K. Fox, et al. (2009). Net Metering & Interconnectionsmetering (NEM, or net metering), to which we turn next. By

McAllister, Joseph Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Transportation Sector Module 2000 Vol 2, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model.

John Maples

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Transportation Sector Module 2000 Vol 1, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model.

John Maples

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Attribution of climate forcing to economic sectors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Attribution of climate forcing to economic sectors Title Attribution of climate forcing to economic sectors Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2010 Authors Unger,...

358

Energy Efficiency Report: Chapter 3: Residential Sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3. The Residential Sector Introduction. More than 90 million single-family, multifamily, and mobile home households encompass the residential sector.

359

Building Energy Retrofit Research: Multifamily Sector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Retrofit Research: Multifamily Sector Title Building Energy Retrofit Research: Multifamily Sector Publication Type Report Year of Publication 1985 Authors Diamond,...

360

Analysis of institutional mechanisms affecting residential and commercial buildings retrofit  

SciTech Connect

Barriers to energy conservation in the residential and commercial sectors influence (1) the willingness of building occupants to modify their energy usage habits, and (2) the willingness of building owners/occupants to upgrade the thermal characteristics of the structures within which they live or work and the appliances which they use. The barriers that influence the willingness of building owners/occupants to modify the thermal efficiency characteristics of building structures and heating/cooling systems are discussed. This focus is further narrowed to include only those barriers that impede modifications to existing buildings, i.e., energy conservation retrofit activity. Eight barriers selected for their suitability for Federal action in the residential and commercial sectors and examined are: fuel pricing policies that in the short term do not provide enough incentive to invest in energy conservation; high finance cost; inability to evaluate contractor performance; inability to evaluate retrofit products; lack of well-integrated or one-stop marketing systems (referred to as lack of delivery systems); lack of precise or customized information; lack of sociological/psychological incentives; and use of the first-cost decision criterion (expanded to include short-term payback criterion for the commercial sector). The impacts of these barriers on energy conservation are separately assessed for the residential and commercial sectors.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems commercial sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

High Performance Commercial Buildings Technology Roadmap | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » High Performance Commercial Buildings Technology Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: High Performance Commercial Buildings Technology Roadmap Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Buildings Topics: Technology characterizations Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.nrel.gov/docs/fy01osti/30171.pdf References: High Performance Commercial Buildings Technology Roadmap[1] Overview "This technology roadmap describes the vision and strategies for addressing these challenges developed by representatives of the buildings industry. Collaborative research, development, and deployment of new technologies, coupled with an integrated "whole-buildings" approach, can shape future

362

Sector 1 Frequently Asked Questions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sector 1 - General Information Sector 1 - General Information Sector 1 Safety Plan (pdf) Useful X-Ray Related Numbers Si a0 = 5.4308 Angstrom CeO2 a0=5.411 Angstrom Cd-109 gamma = 88.036 keV X-ray energy/wavelength conversion constant = 12.39842 Angstrom/keV Useful 1-ID Operations Information Always set the undulator by closing from large to small gap. Always scan the Kohzu monochromator from high to low energy. A Cd-109 source that can be used to calibrate detectors can be obtained by contacting Ali. It has Ag flourescent lines and a 88.036 keV gamma line. Tim Mooney's telephone number is 2-5417. Frequently Asked Questions The following questions come up often when using the Sector 1 beamlines. If you have a question (and maybe answer) that would be of general interest to Sector 1 users, please give it to Jon or Greg for inclusion in this list.

363

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Buildings and Floorspace  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Trends in Buildings Floorspace Data tables Commercial Buildings Trend—Detail Commercial Floorspace Trend—Detail Background: Adjustment to data Trends in Buildings and Floorspace Each year buildings are added to and removed from the commercial buildings sector. Buildings are added by new construction or conversion of existing buildings from noncommercial to commercial activity. Buildings are removed by demolition or conversion from commercial to noncommercial activity. Number of Commercial Buildings In 1979, the Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey estimated that there were 3.8 million commercial buildings in the United States; by 1992, the number increased 27 percent to 4.8 million (an average annual increase of 1.8%) (Figure 1). In 1995, the estimated number declined to 4.6 million buildings, but it is unlikely that there was an actual decline in the number of buildings. To understand the apparent decline, two factors should be considered—the change in the way that the target population of commercial buildings was defined in 1995 and the uncertainty of estimates from sample surveys:

364

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 - Executive  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& Expenditures > Executive Summary & Expenditures > Executive Summary 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Executive Summary Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 presents statistics about the amount of energy consumed in commercial buildings and the corresponding expenditures for that energy. These data are based on the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national energy survey of buildings in the commercial sector, conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy. Figure ES1. Energy Consumption is Commercial Buidings by Energy Source, 1992 Energy Consumption: In 1992, the 4.8 million commercial buildings in the United States consumed 5.5 quadrillion Btu of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat. Of those 5.5 quadrillion Btu, consumption of site electricity accounted for 2.6 quadrillion Btu, or 48.0 percent, and consumption of natural gas accounted for 2.2 quadrillion Btu, or 39.6 percent. Fuel oil consumption made up 0.3 quadrillion Btu, or 4.0 percent of the total, while consumption of district heat made up 0.4 quadrillion Btu, or 7.9 percent of energy consumption in that sector. When the energy losses that occur at the electricity generating plants are included, the overall energy consumed by commercial buildings increases to about 10.8 quadrillion Btu (Figure ES1).

365

Computers in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

has risen as well. The Annual Energy Outlook 2002 forecasts that commercial energy demand will grow at an average annual rate of 1.7 percent, with the most rapid increases in...

366

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey—Commercial Buildings Characteristics Released: May 2002 Topics: Energy Sources and End Uses | End-Use Equipment | Conservation Features and Practices Additional Information on: Survey methods, data limitations, and other information supporting the data The 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) was the seventh in the series begun in 1979. The 1999 CBECS estimated that 4.7 million commercial buildings (± 0.4 million buildings, at the 95% confidence level) were present in the United States in that year. Those buildings comprised a total of 67.3 (± 4.6) billion square feet of floorspace. Additional information on 1979 to 1999 trends

367

OpenEI - Commercial  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

are given by a location defined by the Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) for which the weather data was collected. Commercial load data is sorted by the (TMY) site as a...

368

Commercial Grade Dedication RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The objective of this Standard Review Plan (SRP) on Commercial Grade Dedication (CGD) is to provide guidance for a uniform review of the CGD activities for office of Environmental Management...

369

Regional hydrothermal commercialization plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan for the Rocky Mountain Basin and Range Region articulates the complete range of initiatives (federal, state, local, and industrial) required for the early commercialization of the regions geothermal resources. (MHR)

1978-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

370

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Consumption by Sector and Source | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption by Sector and Source Consumption by Sector and Source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 17, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into marketed renewable energy, residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electric power. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Commercial Electric Power Industrial Renewable Energy Consumption Residential sector source transportation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Consumption by Sector and Source- Reference Case (xls, 105 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

371

Technology Commercialization Program 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This reference compilation describes the Technology Commercialization Program of the Department of Energy, Defense Programs. The compilation consists of two sections. Section 1, Plans and Procedures, describes the plans and procedures of the Defense Programs Technology Commercialization Program. The second section, Legislation and Policy, identifies legislation and policy related to the Program. The procedures for implementing statutory and regulatory requirements are evolving with time. This document will be periodically updated to reflect changes and new material.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Commercial Building Energy Asset Rating Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BUILDING BUILDING ENERGY ASSET RATING WORKSHOP December 8-9, 2011 Washington, D.C. Nora Wang (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) Will Gorrissen (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) Molly McCabe (Hayden Tanner, LLC) Cody Taylor (Department of Energy) 1 I Asset Rating D.C. Workshop eere.energy.gov PRE-DECISIONAL Information included in this document is for discussion purposes and does not constitute the final program design. FOR INFORMATION ONLY 2 I Asset Rating D.C. Workshop eere.energy.gov Program Goals * Facilitate cost-effective investment in energy efficiency and reduce energy use in the commercial building sector * Establish a national standard for voluntary commercial building asset rating * Create a tool to help building owners identify and implement

373

Commercial Solar Ventures | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ventures Ventures Jump to: navigation, search Name Commercial Solar Ventures Place Portland, Oregon Zip 97205 Sector Solar Product Portland based company that specializes in commercial scale solar installations throughout Oregon. Coordinates 45.511795°, -122.675629° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.511795,"lon":-122.675629,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

374

List of Commercial Cooking Equipment Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooking Equipment Incentives Cooking Equipment Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 39 Commercial Cooking Equipment Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 39) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active AEP Ohio - Commercial New Construction Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Ohio) Utility Rebate Program Ohio Commercial Industrial Local Government Municipal Utility Nonprofit Schools State Government Central Air conditioners Chillers Comprehensive Measures/Whole Building Custom/Others pending approval Energy Mgmt. Systems/Building Controls Heat pumps Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Motor VFDs Motors Water Heaters Commercial Cooking Equipment Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Room Air Conditioners Yes Agricultural Energy Efficiency Program (New York) State Rebate Program New York Agricultural Agricultural Equipment

375

Export.gov - Leading Sectors in Singapore  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

services; sanitation equipment & products; cleaning products and services; commercial laundry equipment; cleaners - commercialindustrial; wipes for commercial use; industrial...

376

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies andStrategies in Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Commercial buildings account for a large portion of summer peak electric demand. Research results show that there is significant potential to reduce peak demand in commercial buildings through advanced control technologies and strategies. However, a better understanding of commercial buildings contribution to peak demand and the use of energy management and control systems is required to develop this demand response resource to its full potential. The main objectives of the study were: (1) To evaluate the size of contributions of peak demand commercial buildings in the U.S.; (2) To understand how commercial building control systems support energy efficiency and DR; and (3) To disseminate the results to the building owners, facility managers and building controls industry. In order to estimate the commercial buildings contribution to peak demand, two sources of data are used: (1) Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and (2) National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). These two sources indicate that commercial buildings noncoincidental peak demand is about 330GW. The project then focused on technologies and strategies that deliver energy efficiency and also target 5-10% of this peak. Based on a building operations perspective, a demand-side management framework with three main features: (1) daily energy efficiency, (2) daily peak load management and (3) dynamic, event-driven DR are outlined. A general description of DR, its benefits, and nationwide DR potential in commercial buildings are presented. Case studies involving these technologies and strategies are described. The findings of this project are shared with building owners, building controls industry, researchers and government entities through a webcast and their input is requested. Their input is presented in the appendix section of this report.

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Estimating the Economic Impact for the Commercial Hard Clam Culture Industry on the Economy of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Estimating the Economic Impact for the Commercial Hard Clam Culture Industry on the Economy Commercially cultured hard clams have become the single most economically important food item grown hard clams have equaled or exceeded the growth realized by the more established aquaculture sectors

Florida, University of

378

Number of Retail Customers by State by Sector, 1990-2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Retail Customers by State by Sector, 1990-2012" Number of Retail Customers by State by Sector, 1990-2012" "Year","State","Industry Sector Category","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Other","Total" 2012,"AK","Total Electric Industry",275405,48790,1263,0,"NA",325458 2012,"AL","Total Electric Industry",2150977,357395,7168,0,"NA",2515540 2012,"AR","Total Electric Industry",1332154,181823,33926,2,"NA",1547905 2012,"AZ","Total Electric Industry",2585638,305250,7740,0,"NA",2898628 2012,"CA","Total Electric Industry",13101887,1834779,73805,12,"NA",15010483

379

Retail Sales of Electricity (Megawatthours) by State by Sector by Provider, 1990  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Retail Sales of Electricity (Megawatthours) by State by Sector by Provider, 1990-2012" Retail Sales of Electricity (Megawatthours) by State by Sector by Provider, 1990-2012" "Year","State","Industry Sector Category","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Other","Total" 2012,"AK","Total Electric Industry",2160196,2875038,1381177,0,"NA",6416411 2012,"AL","Total Electric Industry",30632261,21799181,33751106,0,"NA",86182548 2012,"AR","Total Electric Industry",17909301,12102048,16847755,463,"NA",46859567 2012,"AZ","Total Electric Industry",32922970,29692256,12448117,0,"NA",75063343 2012,"CA","Total Electric Industry",90109995,121791536,46951714,684793,"NA",259538038

380

DOE Brings Together Private-Sector Leaders to Reduce Petroleum Use  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brings Together Private-Sector Leaders to Reduce Petroleum Use Brings Together Private-Sector Leaders to Reduce Petroleum Use The National Clean Fleets Partnership is helping America's largest commercial fleets speed the adoption of alternative fuels, electric vehicles, and fuel economy improvements. In April 2011, President Barack Obama announced the launch of the National Clean Fleets Partnership - an initiative to reduce the country's dependence on imported oil. Less than a year later, the partnership has grown to include 14 of the nation's largest private-sector fleets (noted in sidebar). Together, the partners operate more than 1 million vehicles across the nation and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems commercial sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Working with the Private Sector to Achieve a Clean Energy Economy |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

with the Private Sector to Achieve a Clean Energy Economy with the Private Sector to Achieve a Clean Energy Economy Working with the Private Sector to Achieve a Clean Energy Economy October 29, 2010 - 10:39am Addthis Doug Schultz Program Director, Loan Programs Office of the Department of Energy. What does this project do? Brings more certainty to the market by incentivizing the capital markets. Increases non-government lending capacity to the renewable sector. Provides a bridge between innovative but high tech risk projects and commercial technology projects whose risk profiles banks readily assume. It's an example of how the Administration is working with the private sector to achieve its goal of a clean energy economy. Today, I had the pleasure to speak to some of the leading power industry players about the DOE Loan Program Office's (LPO) Financial Institution

382

Renewable Energy Consumption by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 Dataset Summary Description Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption biodiesel Biofuels biomass energy use by sector ethanol geothermal Hydroelectric Conventional Landfill Gas MSW Biogenic Other Biomass renewable energy Solar Thermal/PV Waste wind Wood and Derived Fuels Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon RE Consumption by Energy Use Sector, Excel file (xls, 32.8 KiB)

383

Working with the Private Sector to Achieve a Clean Energy Economy |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Working with the Private Sector to Achieve a Clean Energy Economy Working with the Private Sector to Achieve a Clean Energy Economy Working with the Private Sector to Achieve a Clean Energy Economy October 29, 2010 - 10:39am Addthis Doug Schultz Program Director, Loan Programs Office of the Department of Energy. What does this project do? Brings more certainty to the market by incentivizing the capital markets. Increases non-government lending capacity to the renewable sector. Provides a bridge between innovative but high tech risk projects and commercial technology projects whose risk profiles banks readily assume. It's an example of how the Administration is working with the private sector to achieve its goal of a clean energy economy. Today, I had the pleasure to speak to some of the leading power industry players about the DOE Loan Program Office's (LPO) Financial Institution

384

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

been required to comply with the Department of Energy's (DOE) energy conservation standards for commercial clothes washers since 2007. Commercial clothes washers use a water...

385

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that are used for space conditioning of commercial and industrial buildings. The standards implemented in 2010 for small and large, air-cooled commercial package air...

386

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to comply with the Department of Energy's (DOE) energy conservation standards for commercial clothes washers since 2007. Commercial clothes washers use a water solution of soap,...

387

Jennifer Caldwell Senior Commercialization Manager  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Caldwell, 865-574-4180, caldwelljt@ornl.gov Jennifer Caldwell Senior Commercialization Manager Jennifer Caldwell is a Senior Commercialization Manager for the Partnerships...

388

Tax Deductions for Commercial Buildings  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of interest to businesses, including incen- tives for distributed generation and hybrid fuel fleet vehicles. Tax Deductions for Commercial Building Owners Commercial building...

389

Productive commercialization of university technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Productive commercialization of university technology is a concern for the many stakeholders of the commercialization system. Do more total university research expenditures and more university (more)

Winder, Charles

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Average Commercial Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

391

Average Commercial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

392

Energy conservation opportunities in commercial appliances. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study establishes a data base of energy-consuming appliances in the commercial sector, and identifies and rates the most-promising development opportunities that would save significant amounts of energy on a national level. A detailed national inventory of 45 major appliances and their energy consumption was established for the year 1975. Thirty-four potential appliance improvements were identified, evaluated, and ranked. The opportunities are identified by means of a literature search and contact with industry representatives. The commercial sector is defined in terms of the divisions prescribed in the S.I.C. Manual (1972) of the OMB. These groups are recombined into the commercial subsectors of communications; utilities; wholesale; retail; finance, insurance, real estate, and services; hospital; schools; and public administration. The major energy-consuming appliances in the following six functional-use categories were identified: space heating and cooling; water heating; refrigeration; cooking; and lighting. The equipment in these categories was estimated to consume 87% of the total energy used in the commercial sector, with the remaining 13% consumed by equipment such as computers, business machines, laundry equipment, dishwashing, and other food-service equipment. (MCW)

Hurley, J.R.; Searight, E.F.; Wong, A.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

IID Energy - Commercial Rebate Program (Commercial Check Me) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IID Energy - Commercial Rebate Program (Commercial Check Me) IID Energy - Commercial Rebate Program (Commercial Check Me) IID Energy - Commercial Rebate Program (Commercial Check Me) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Commercial Weatherization Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate General: $100,000 per customer per year; may not exceed 50% of the total installed cost of measures New Construction (Whole Building Approach - Owner): $150,000 per year New Construction (Whole Building Approach - Design Team): $30,000 per year New Construction (Systems Approach): $50,000 per year Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Programmable Thermostats: $50/unit

394

FLARING SOLAR HALE SECTOR BOUNDARIES  

SciTech Connect

The sector structure that organizes the magnetic field of the solar wind into large-scale domains has a clear pattern in the photospheric magnetic field as well. The rotation rate, 27-28.5 days, implies an effectively rigid rotation originating deeper in the solar interior than the sunspots. The photospheric magnetic field is known to be concentrated near that portion (the Hale boundary) in each solar hemisphere, where the change in magnetic sector polarity matches that between the leading and following sunspot polarities in active regions in the respective hemispheres. We report here that flares and microflares also concentrate at the Hale boundaries, implying that flux emergence and the creation of free magnetic energy in the corona also have a direct cause in the deep interior.

Svalgaard, L. [HEPL, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94304 (United States); Hannah, I. G.; Hudson, H. S., E-mail: leif@leif.org [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

395

Pathways to commercial success  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HYDROGEN, FUEL CELLS & INFRASTRUCTURE HYDROGEN, FUEL CELLS & INFRASTRUCTURE TECHNOLOGIES (HFCIT) PROGRAM Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program August 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program iii Table of Contents Summary .................................................................................................................................................................................................................. v 1.0 Introduction.......................................................................................................................................................................................................1-1

396

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

coal Residential coal Residential market trends icon Market Trends In the AEO2011 Reference case, residential energy use per capita declines by 17.0 percent from 2009 to 2035 (Figure 58). Delivered energy use stays relatively constant while population grows by 26.7 percent during the period. Growth in the number of homes and in average square footage leads to increased demand for energy services, which is offset in part by efficiency gains in space heating, water heating, and lighting equipment. Population shifts to warmer and drier climates also reduce energy demand for space heating. See more issues Issues in Focus In 2009, the residential and commercial buildings sectors used 19.6 quadrillion Btu of delivered energy, or 21 percent of total U.S. energy consumption. The residential sector accounted for 57 percent of that energy

397

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial sector energy demand Industrial sector energy demand On This Page Heat and power energy... Industrial fuel mix changes... Iron and steel... Delivered energy use... Chemical industry use of fuels... Output growth for... Industrial and commercial... Heat and power energy consumption increases in manufacturing industries Despite a 54-percent increase in industrial shipments, industrial energy consumption increases by only 19 percent from 2009 to 2035 in the AEO2011 Reference case. Energy consumption growth is moderated by a shift in the mix of output, as growth in energy-intensive manufacturing output (aluminum, steel, bulk chemicals, paper, and refining) slows and growth in high-value (but less energy-intensive) industries, such as computers and transportation equipment, accelerates. figure data

398

Site Map - EERE Commercialization Office  

Quick Links. Energy Innovation Portal; Site Map Commercialization Home Page. About. Success Stories; Legacy Initiatives

399

Lakeland Electric - Commercial Conservation Rebate Program |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Conservation Rebate Program Lakeland Electric - Commercial Conservation Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Nonprofit State...

400

Midstate Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industrial Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Midstate Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems commercial sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Lane Electric Cooperative - Residential and Commercial Weatherization...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Commercial Weatherization Grant Program Lane Electric Cooperative - Residential and Commercial Weatherization Grant Program Eligibility Commercial Low-Income Residential...

402

Coast Electric Power Association - Commercial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Coast Electric Power Association - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Savings For Heating & Cooling...

403

Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric) - Commercial and Industrial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric) - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs Eligibility Commercial Industrial...

404

Commonwealth Solar Hot Water Commercial Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Program Commonwealth Solar Hot Water Commercial Program Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Multi-Family Residential...

405

Coldwater Board of Public Utilities - Commercial & Industrial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial & Industrial Lighting Rebate Program Coldwater Board of Public Utilities - Commercial & Industrial Lighting Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local...

406

Golden Valley Electric Association - Commercial Lighting Retrofit...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program Golden Valley Electric Association - Commercial Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Savings For Appliances &...

407

Calistoga Private and Commercial Industrial Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Calistoga Private and Commercial Industrial Low Temperature Geothermal Calistoga Private and Commercial Industrial Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Calistoga Private and Commercial Industrial Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Calistoga Private and Commercial Sector Geothermal energy Type Industrial Location Calistoga, California Coordinates 38.5787965°, -122.5797054° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

408

Local Option - Commercial PACE Financing (Utah) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Option - Commercial PACE Financing (Utah) Option - Commercial PACE Financing (Utah) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Summary Last modified on April 2, 2013. Financial Incentive Program Place Utah Name Local Option - Commercial PACE Financing (Utah) Incentive Type PACE Financing Applicable Sector Commercial, Fed. Government, Industrial, Local Government, Multi-Family Residential, Nonprofit, State Government Eligible Technologies Boilers, Building Insulation, Caulking/Weather-stripping, Central Air conditioners, Chillers, Custom/Others pending approval, Doors, Energy Mgmt. Systems/Building Controls, Equipment Insulation, Furnaces, Heat pumps, Heat recovery, Lighting, Programmable Thermostats, Roofs, Windows, Daylighting, Geothermal Direct Use, Geothermal Electric, Geothermal Heat Pumps, Other Distributed Generation Technologies, Photovoltaics, Small Hydroelectric, Small Wind, Solar Water Heat, Wind

409

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Transportation Sector...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2009 Figure 69. OECD and Non-OECD Transportation Sector Liquids Consumption, 2006-2030 Figure 70. World Liquids Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2006-2030 Figure 71. OECD and...

410

Water Impacts of the Electricity Sector (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation discusses the water impacts of the electricity sector. Nationally, the electricity sector is a major end-user of water. Water issues affect power plants throughout the nation.

Macknick, J.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Biomass Resources for the Federal Sector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass Resources for the Federal Sector is a fact sheet that explains how biomass resources can be incorporated into the federal sector, and also how they can provide opportunities to meet federal renewable energy goals.

Not Available

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

EEMIS data sector correspondence with conceptual database design  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is fivefold: (1) it provides an introduction to database systems and critieria that are important in the selection of a commercial database management system; (2) it demonstrates that the mapping of the EEMIS data sector structure into the conceptual database model is complete and preserves the hierarchies implied by the EEMIS data structure; (3) it describes all fields and associated field lengths; (4) it provides accurate formulae for estimating the computer storage requirements for the conceptual models at the facility level; and (5) it provides the details of the storage requirements for oil refineries, petroleum crude storage facilities, natural gas transmission and distribution facilities, and company description records.

Croteau, K; Kydes, A S; Maier, D

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Electric Commercial Cooking Appliance Development Needs: Preparation and Characterization of Chromium- Coated Residual Heat Removal System Piping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Foodservice establishments are the most energy-intensive customers in the commercial sector. This report addresses the need to improve the energy efficiency of electric cooking appliances by identifying current market opportunities and technologies for further development.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Average Commercial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

415

Commercializing solar architecture  

SciTech Connect

The seminar discussions on attitudinal, technical, and institutional issues and the suggestions related to information development, acquisition, and dissemination; education and training; demonstrations and design competitions; and other actions are documented. Information on SERI's overall mission and a paper titled, The Architectural Role of SERI, and a matrix of barriers and actions from this assessment, related to the commercialization profile for passive solar heating, are attached as appendices.

Franta, G.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Commercial equipment cost database  

SciTech Connect

This report, prepared for DOE, Office of Codes and Standards, as part of the Commercial Equipment Standards Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, specifically addresses the equipment cost estimates used to evaluate the economic impacts of revised standards. A database including commercial equipment list prices and estimated contractor costs was developed, and through statistical modeling, estimated contractor costs are related to equipment parameters including performance. These models are then used to evaluate cost estimates developed by the ASHRAE 90.1 Standing Standards Project Committee, which is in the process of developing a revised ASHRAE 90.1 standard. The database will also be used to support further evaluation of the manufacturer and consumer impacts of standards. Cost estimates developed from the database will serve as inputs to economic modeling tools, which will be used to estimate these impacts. Preliminary results suggest that list pricing is a suitable measure from which to estimate contractor costs for commercial equipment. Models developed from these cost estimates accurately predict estimated costs. The models also confirm the expected relationships between equipment characteristics and cost. Cost models were developed for gas-fired and electric water heaters, gas-fired packaged boilers, and warm air furnaces for indoor installation. Because of industry concerns about the use of the data, information was not available for the other categories of EPAct-covered equipment. These concerns must be addressed to extend the analysis to all EPAct equipment categories.

Freeman, S.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Commercial national accounts program is a gas industry revenue builder  

SciTech Connect

The need for gas distributors to implement revenue-generating strategies is clearly evident in the commercial sector - their fastest growing market. One strategy is A.G.A.'s commercial national accounts marketing program, designed to establish working relationships with national and regional food, hotel, and retail chains and with the firms that design energy systems for them. The program supplies these chains with information on gas industry services and research aimed at increasing energy utilization efficiency. Regular communications and coordinated sales calls by gas utility executives on chain headquarters often produce increased gas sales, even of traditionally all-electric chains, as illustrated by several case histories.

Moskitis, T.L.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Danish Government - Sector Programmes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Government - Sector Programmes Government - Sector Programmes Jump to: navigation, search Name Danish Government - Sector Programmes Agency/Company /Organization Danish Government Partner Danish Ministry for Climate, Energy, and Building; The Danish Energy Agency Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Wind Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Policies/deployment programs Program End 2012 Country South Africa, Vietnam Southern Africa, South-Eastern Asia References Denmark[1] Promoting wind energy in South Africa and energy efficiency in Vietnam (subject to parliamentary approval) References ↑ "Denmark" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Danish_Government_-_Sector_Programmes&oldid=580876" Category: Programs

419

Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave | 1 Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave | 1 Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave INFORME para la Sostenibilidad Energética y Ambiental, FUNSEAM. #12;Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave eléctrica y los diferentes sectores que forman la smart grid. 6 Figura 2. Evolución y previsión de

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

420

The Open Source Stochastic Building Simulation Tool SLBM and Its Capabilities to Capture Uncertainty of Policymaking in the U.S. Building Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CA, USA applied and change the service demand. An example ofUSA Figure 9. Total US Commercial Building Sector Electricity Demand (USA For the frequently discussed carbon cap approach, the carbon emissions as well as energy demand

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems commercial sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The impact on photovoltaic worth of utulity rate and reform and of specific market, financial, and policy variables : a commercialindustrialinstitution sector analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work provides an assessment of the economic outlook for photovoltaic systems in the commercial, industrial and institutional sectors in the year 1986. We first summarize the expected cost and performance goals for ...

Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Total Use of Water by Buildings (Million Gallons per Day) (1) Year 1985 1990 1995 2000 (2) 2005 (3) Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes water from the public supply and self-supplied sources (e.g., wells) for residential and commercial sectors. 2) USGS did not estimate water use in the commercial and residential sectors for 2000. Estimates are based on available data and 1995 splits between domestic and commercial use. 3) USGS did not estimate commercial sector use for 2005. Estimated based on available data and commercial percentage in 1995. U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of Water in the U.S. in 1985, U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1004, 1988; U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of Water in the U.S. in 1990, U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1081, 1993; U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of Water in the U.S. in 1995, U.S. Geological

423

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 6a. U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy

424

Thermal energy storage for cooling of commercial buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The storage of coolness'' has been in use in limited applications for more than a half century. Recently, because of high electricity costs during utilities' peak power periods, thermal storage for cooling has become a prime target for load management strategies. Systems with cool storage shift all or part of the electricity requirement from peak to off-peak hours to take advantage of reduced demand charges and/or off-peak rates. Thermal storage technology applies equally to industrial, commercial, and residential sectors. In the industrial sector, because of the lack of economic incentives and the custom design required for each application, the penetration of this technology has been limited to a few industries. The penetration rate in the residential sector has been also very limited due to the absence of economic incentives, sizing problems, and the lack of compact packaged systems. To date, the most promising applications of these systems, therefore, appear to be for commercial cooling. In this report, the current and potential use of thermal energy storage systems for cooling commercial buildings is investigated. In addition, a general overview of the technology is presented and the applicability and cost-effectiveness of this technology for developed and developing countries are discussed. 28 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Akbari, H. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Mertol, A. (Science Applications International Corp., Los Altos, CA (USA))

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Proceedings: Commercial Refrigeration Research Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improving refrigeration systems for commercial use can enhance both utility load factors and supermarket profits. This workshop has pinpointed research needs in commercial refrigeration and systems integration for a supermarket environment.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Commercial Building Profiles | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Profiles Building Profiles Dataset Summary Description This dataset includes simulation results from a national-scale study of the commercial buildings sector. Electric load profiles contain the hour-by-hour demand for electricity for each building. Summary tables describe individual buildings and their overall annual energy performance. The study developed detailed EnergyPlus models for 4,820 different samples in 2003 CBECS. Simulation output is available for all and organized by CBECS's identification number in public use datasets. Three modeling scenarios are available: existing stock (with 2003 historical weather), stock as if rebuilt new (with typical weather), and the stock if rebuilt using maximum efficiency technology (with typical weather). The following reports describe how the dataset was developed:

427

Technology Commercialization Showcase - Home - Energy ...  

Small Business and Clean Energy Alliance (CEA) Partnership; ... The Department Of Energy Technology Commercialization Showcase provides effective ...

428

Information Resources - EERE Commercialization Office  

Information Resources. Here you will find various informational resources related to the commercialization of clean energy technologies. Hawaiian ...

429

Success Stories - EERE Commercialization Office  

Success Stories. As new energy efficient and renewable energy technologies emerge, so do potential business opportunities. These commercialization success stories ...

430

Information Resources - EERE Commercialization Office  

Information Resources. Here you will find various informational resources related to the commercialization of clean energy technologies. Hawaiian Renewable Energy ...

431

Inventor Resources | Technology Commercialization and ...  

Search Technologies; Patents; Contacts. TCP Director Connie Cleary. Tech Commercialization Christine Brakel Cyrena Condemi Kimberley Elcess Poornima ...

432

Aerocapacitor commercialization plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the Power-One Aerocapacitor Commercialization Plan is to communicate to members of management and to all employees the overall objectives of the corporation. Power-One, Inc., has participated in a US Federal Government Technology Reinvestment Project (TRP), entitled {open_quotes}Advanced Power Conversion based on the Aerocapacitor{close_quotes}: the project is a group effort, with Lawrence Livermore National Labs, GenCorp/Aerojet, PolyStor Corp. (a start-up company), and Power-One forming the consortium. The expected resulting technology is the {open_quotes}Aerocapacitor{close_quotes}, which possesses much higher performance levels than the usual capacitors on the market today. Power-One hopes to incorporate the Aerocapacitor into some of its products, hence enhancing their performance, as well as market privately-labeled aerocapacitors through its distribution channels. This document describes the details of Power-One`s plan to bring to market and commercialize the Aerocapacitor and Aerocapacitor-based products. This plan was formulated while Power-One was part of the Oerocap project. It has since pulled out of this project. What is presented in this plan is the work which was developed prior to the business decision to terminate this work.

NONE

1995-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

433

Commercial nuclear power 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

Not Available

1990-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

434

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.14

435

Energy Efficient Commercial Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Technologies April 11th, 2012 Presented by: Warren Willits Energy Solutions Center (202) 824-7150 www.ESCenter.org Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Spring 2012 Jekyll Island, GA Todays Energy Efficient Technologies  Water Heating  Heating  Air Conditioning  Humidity Control  CHP / Cogeneration Atmospheric Direct Vent High Efficiency .7 EF Atmospheric water heaters now available 97 % efficient tank water heaters now available Traditional Tank Style Water Heating  Tankless Water Heaters  EF = .82 Standard Unit  EF = .97 Condensing  Solar Water Heaters  With H.E. gas back up systems Newer Water Heaters Water Heater Life Cycle Cost Life Cycle Costs Electric Tank Water Heater Gas Water Heater

436

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(92) (92) Distribution Category UC-950 Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 April 1994 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepared this publication under the general direction of W. Calvin Kilgore, Director of the Office of Energy Markets and End Use (202-586-1617). The project was directed by Lynda T. Carlson, Director of the Energy End Use and Integrated Statistics Division (EEUISD) (202-586-1112) and Nancy L. Leach, Chief

437

Transportation Sector Module 1998 - Volume I, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model.

John Maples

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Clothes Washers Commercial Clothes Washers Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products Manufacturers have been required to comply with the Department of Energy's (DOE) energy conservation standards for commercial clothes washers since 2007. Commercial clothes washers use a water solution of soap, detergent, or both and mechanical movement to clean clothes. Commercial clothes washers are used in commercial settings, multi-family housing, or laundromats. There are two classes of commercial clothes washers: front-loading and top-loading clothes washers. The current standard will save approximately 0.12 quads of energy and result in approximately $1.1 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 2007-2036. The standard will avoid about 6.4 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of 1.3 million automobiles.

439

Energy-economy interactions revisited within a comprehensive sectoral model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model with considerable sector and technology detail, the ``All Modular Industry Growth Assessment'' Model (AMIGA). It is argued that a detailed model is important to capture and understand the several rolls that energy plays within the economy. Fundamental consumer and industrial demands are for the services from energy; hence, energy demand is a derived demand based on the need for heating, cooling mechanical, electrical, and transportation services. Technologies that provide energy-services more efficiently (on a life cycle basis), when adopted, result in increased future output of the economy and higher paths of household consumption. The AMIGA model can examine the effects on energy use and economic output of increases in energy prices (e.g., a carbon charge) and other incentive-based policies or energy-efficiency programs. Energy sectors and sub-sector activities included in the model involve energy extraction conversion and transportation. There are business opportunities to produce energy-efficient goods (i.e., appliances, control systems, buildings, automobiles, clean electricity). These activities are represented in the model by characterizing their likely production processes (e.g., lighter weight motor vehicles). Also, multiple industrial processes can produce the same output but with different technologies and inputs. Secondary recovery, i.e., recycling processes, are examples of these multiple processes. Combined heat and power (CHP) is also represented for energy-intensive industries. Other modules represent residential and commercial building technologies to supply energy services. All sectors of the economy command real resources (capital services and labor).

Hanson, D. A.; Laitner, J. A.

2000-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

440

Federal Opportunities to Leverage the Commercial Building Energy Alliance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

| Building Technologies Program | Building Technologies Program buildings.energy.gov Federal Opportunities to Leverage the Commercial Building Energy Alliance Brian Holuj Building Technologies Program March 15, 2012 IATF Technology Deployment Working Group - Commercial Building Energy Alliance Building owners and operators, efficiency organizations and DOE target common energy efficiency challenges and opportunities Retail and Food Commercial Real Estate Hospitals Service and Hospitality * 55 members * 2.2+ billion ft 2 * 95 members * 5.3+ billion ft 2 * 51 members * 0.5+ billion ft 2 Strength in numbers → Higher Ed sector added in 2011; new members join regularly www.commercialbuildings.energy.gov/alliances 1 | Building Technologies Program buildings.energy.gov Approx. market % from member reported ft

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems commercial sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Federal Opportunities to Leverage the Commercial Building Energy Alliance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| Building Technologies Program | Building Technologies Program buildings.energy.gov Federal Opportunities to Leverage the Commercial Building Energy Alliance Brian Holuj Building Technologies Program March 15, 2012 IATF Technology Deployment Working Group - Commercial Building Energy Alliance Building owners and operators, efficiency organizations and DOE target common energy efficiency challenges and opportunities Retail and Food Commercial Real Estate Hospitals Service and Hospitality * 55 members * 2.2+ billion ft 2 * 95 members * 5.3+ billion ft 2 * 51 members * 0.5+ billion ft 2 Strength in numbers → Higher Ed sector added in 2011; new members join regularly www.commercialbuildings.energy.gov/alliances 1 | Building Technologies Program buildings.energy.gov Approx. market % from member reported ft

442

Supplychain - Additional Market Sectors | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Additional Market Sectors Sustainable Supply Chains Submissions Let's Talk About Sustainable Supply Chain You are here Data.gov Communities Sustainable Supply Chain...

443

Pick a Market Sector | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pick a Market Sector Sustainable Supply Chains Submissions Let's Talk About Sustainable Supply Chain You are here Data.gov Communities Sustainable Supply Chain Pick a Market...

444

DOE Issues Energy Sector Cyber Organization NOI  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issues National Energy Sector Cyber Organization Notice of Intent February 11, 2010 The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) announced on Jan....

445

DOE Issues Energy Sector Cyber Organization NOI  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issues National Energy Sector Cyber Organization Notice of Intent Issues National Energy Sector Cyber Organization Notice of Intent February 11, 2010 The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) announced on Jan. 7 that it intends to issue a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) for a National Energy Sector Cyber Organization, envisioned as a partnership between the federal government and energy sector stakeholders to protect the bulk power electric grid and aid the integration of smart grid technology to enhance the security of the grid. The cyber organization is expected to have the knowledge, expertise, capabilities, and capacity, at a minimum to: * Identify and prioritize cyber security research and development issues.

446

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Business Roundtable...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Results Every Sector, One RESOLVE: A Progress Report on Business Roundtable's Climate RESOLVE Program, September 2004 (PDF 1.8 MB) Download Acrobat Reader...

447

Financial Services Sector Signs Cybersecurity Research ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... trading and funds management, and many other business and consumer ... to protect its customers by enhancing the sector's resilience and integrity. ...

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

448

OpenEI - energy use by sector  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm340 en New Zealand Energy Use Survey: Industrial and Trade Sectors (2009) http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode365

Statistics New...

449

ProgramSector Land | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Towards a Low Carbon Economy + A Conceptual Framework for Progressing Towards Sustainability in the Agriculture and Food Sector + A Low Carbon Economic Strategy for Scotland +...

450

US Energy Sector Vulnerabilities to Climate Change  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

corn field near Somers, Iowa; wind turbines in Texas. Photo credits: iStockphoto U.S. ENERGY SECTOR VULNERABILITIES TO CLIMATE CHANGE AND EXTREME WEATHER Acknowledgements This...

451

Energy conservation opportunities in small commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

As part of a joint project between Duke Power Co. and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a study was performed to determine the energy savings potential of small commercial buildings, located in the Duke Power service territory. This relatively untouched portion of the commercial sector has the potential for reducing energy consumption by 13% - 25%, which corresponds to a reduction in average annual operating costs of $500 - $1000 per building. A database of over sixty customers was used to target five buildings with unusually high levels of energy consumption and/or peak demand. Conservation measures in these buildings were selected on the basis of cost-effectiveness and relative non-intrusiveness on the occupants. Together, ORNL and Duke Power representatives worked on data analysis, site-audits, and measure recommendations. Duke Power supplied hourly and monthly utility data, customer survey information and participated in site-audits. ORNL analyzed the data, developed targeting indices, performed site-audits and corresponding first-order energy simulations on candidate buildings, and recommended individualized conservation retrofits. For the five buildings examined, retrofits including lighting, controls, and HVAC systems accounted for a total reduction in consumption of 32%, and in peak demand of 22%. In addition, the study emphasizes the importance of continuous attention to the operating conditions of HVAC equipment and controls, in order to ensure long-term sustainability of these energy savings.

Abraham, M.M.; MacDonald, J.M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Normalized Annual End Uses of Water in Select Supermarkets in Western United States (1) Fixture/End Use Toilets/Urinals Other/Misc. Indoor (2) Cooling Total Building Size (SF) Benchmarking Values for Supermarkets (3) N Indoor Use with Cooling, gal./SF/year 38 Indoor Use with Cooling, gal./SF/daily transaction 38 Note(s): Source(s): 25th Percentile of Users 52 - 64 9 - 16 1) Water use data for the buildings was collected over a few days. Estimates of annual use were created by accounting for seasonal use and other variables, billing data, and interviews with building managers. 2) Includes water for sinks, spraying vegetables, cleaning, etc. 3) The study derived efficiency benchmarks by analyzing measured data and audit data. The benchmark was set at the lower 25th percentile of

453

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 Normalized Annual End Uses of Water in Select Hotels in Western United States (Gallons per Room per Year) (1) Fixture/End Use Bathtub (2) Faucets Showers Toilets Leaks Laundry Ice making (3) Other/misc. indoor Total Indoor Use Number of Rooms Logged average daily use, kgal: Peak instantaneous demand, gpm: Benchmarking Values for Hotels N Indoor Use, gal./day/occupied room 98 Cooling Use, gal./year/occupied room 97 Note(s): Source(s): 25th Percentile of Users 60 - 115 7,400 - 41,600 Based on four budget hotels and one luxury hotel. Three budget hotels in Southern California, one in Phoenix, AZ. Luxury hotel in Los Angeles, CA. 1) Water use data for the buildings was collected over a few days. Estimates of annual use were created by accounting for seasonal use and other variables, billing data, and interviews with building managers. 2) Based on one hotel. 3) Based on three hotels. 5) The

454

Conservation screening curves to compare efficiency investments to power plants: Applications to commercial sector conservation programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

variable costs, and cost per delivered kWh. The informationvariable costs, and cost per delivered kWh. The informationto represent the cost per delivered kWh), while CAPP may be

Koomey, Jonathan; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Conservation screening curves to compare efficiency investments to power plants: Applications to commercial sector conservation programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Ashok K. Gadgil. 1989. Conservation Screening Curves forof Utility Experience with Conservation and Load ManagementSupport Document: Energy Conservation Standards for Consumer

Koomey, Jonathan; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Accelerator-driven transmutation of high-level waste from the defense and commercial sectors  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The major goal has been to develop accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) system designs that will thoroughly and rapidly transmute nuclear waste, including plutonium from dismantled weapons and spent reactor fuel, while generating useful electrical power and without producing a long-lived radioactive waste stream. We have identified and quantified the unique qualities of subcritical nuclear systems and their capabilities in bringing about the complete destruction of plutonium. Although the 1191 subcritical systems involved in our most effective designs radically depart from traditional nuclear reactor concepts, they are based on extrapolations of existing technologies. Overall, care was taken to retain the highly desired features that nuclear technology has developed over the years within a conservative design envelope. We believe that the ATW systems designed in this project will enable almost complete destruction of nuclear waste (conversion to stable species) at a faster rate and without many of the safety concerns associated with the possible reactor approaches.

Bowman, C.; Arthur, E.; Beard, C. [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

The energy-savings potential of electrochromic windows in the US commercial buildings sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information Agency climate zones [19]. TMY2 weather tapestapes. Fig. 2. US climate zones defined by CBECS 1999. Fig.and 16 California climate zones. The energy performance of

Lee, Eleanor; Yazdanian, Mehry; Selkowitz, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Conservation screening curves to compare efficiency investments to power plants: Applications to commercial sector conservation programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

kW. 9/kWh 7/kWh Gas Turbine 5/kWh Combined-Cycle Oilhigh operating costs (such as gas turbines) during those fewtechnology. 9/kWh 7/kWh Gas Turbine 5/kWh Combined-Cycle

Koomey, Jonathan; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Conservation screening curves to compare efficiency investments to power plants: Applications to commercial sector conservation programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EFFICIENCY INVESTMENTS TO POWER PLANTS: APPLICATIONS TOEFFICIENCY INVESTMENTS TO POWER PLANTS: APPLICATIONS TOEfficiency Investments to Power Plants: Applications to

Koomey, Jonathan; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

The energy-savings potential of electrochromic windows in the US commercial buildings sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evaluated solely on space conditioning use impacts, then itbe controlled to minimize space conditioning energy use (

Lee, Eleanor; Yazdanian, Mehry; Selkowitz, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems commercial sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Table 2.1c Commercial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 1949 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 See "Primary Energy Consumption" in Glossary. 9 Wind electricity net generation (converted to Btu using the fossil-fuels heat ratesee Table A6).

462

Where Did the Money Go? The Cost and Performance of the Largest Commercial Sector DSM Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Electric Power Research Institute, and in-kind support from the Energy Foundation. Contents Tables............................................................. iii Figures............................................................. v

Joseph Eto; Suzie Kito; Leslie Shown; Richard Sonnenblick

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

The energy-savings potential of electrochromic windows in the US commercial buildings sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control system and energy savings potential for switchableto Assess the Gross Annual Energy-Saving Potential of Energysales. Fig. 14. Primary energy savings (TBtu) for each of

Lee, Eleanor; Yazdanian, Mehry; Selkowitz, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Dissemination of Climate Model Output to the Public and Commercial Sector  

SciTech Connect

Climate is defined by the Glossary of Meteorology as the mean of atmospheric variables over a period of time ranging from as short as a few months to multiple years and longer. Although the term climate is often used to refer to long-term weather statistics, the broader definition of climate is the time evolution of a system consisting of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere. Physical, chemical, and biological processes are involved in interactions among the components of the climate system. Vegetation, soil moisture, and glaciers are part of the climate system in addition to the usually considered temperature and precipitation (Pielke, 2008). Climate change refers to any systematic change in the long-term statistics of climate elements (such as temperature, pressure, or winds) sustained over several decades or longer. Climate change can be initiated by external forces, such as cyclical variations in the Earth's solar orbit that are thought to have caused glacial and interglacial periods within the last 2 million years (Milankovitch, 1941). However, a linear response to astronomical forcing does not explain many other observed glacial and interglacial cycles (Petit et al., 1999). It is now understood that climate is influenced by the interaction of solar radiation with atmospheric greenhouse gasses (e.g., carbon dioxide, chlorofluorocarbons, methane, nitrous oxide, etc.), aerosols (airborne particles), and Earth's surface. A significant aspect of climate are the interannual cycles, such as the El Nino La Nina cycle which profoundly affects the weather in North America but is outside the scope of weather forecasts. Some of the most significant advances in understanding climate change have evolved from the recognition of the influence of ocean circulations upon the atmosphere (IPCC, 2007). Human activity can affect the climate system through increasing concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases, air pollution, increasing concentrations of aerosol, and land alteration. A particular concern is that atmospheric levels of CO{sub 2} may be rising faster than at any time in Earth's history, except possibly following rare events like impacts from large extraterrestrial objects (AMS, 2007). Atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations have increased since the mid-1700s through fossil fuel burning and changes in land use, with more than 80% of this increase occurring since 1900. The increased levels of CO{sub 2} will remain in the atmosphere for hundreds to thousands of years. The complexity of the climate system makes it difficult to predict specific aspects of human-induced climate change, such as exactly how and where changes will occur, and their magnitude. The Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) was established by World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the United Nations in 1988. The IPCC was tasked with assessing the scientific, technical and socioeconomic information needed to understand the risk of human-induced climate change, its observed and projected impacts, and options for adaptation and mitigation. The IPCC concluded in its Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) that warming of the climate system is unequivocal, and that most of the observed increase in globally averaged temperatures since the mid-20th century is very likely due to the observed increased in anthropogenic greenhouse gas concentrations (IPCC, 2007).

Robert Stockwell, PhD

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

465

Utility bill comprehension in the commercial and industrial sector: results of field research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy providers now available. Supporters of market transformation activities assume that providing information

Payne, Christopher T.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

The energy-savings potential of electrochromic windows in the US commercial buildings sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Renewable Energy's (EERE) Building Technologies Program.and Renewable Energy (EERE). For the fiscal year 2004 (FY04)

Lee, Eleanor; Yazdanian, Mehry; Selkowitz, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

The energy-savings potential of electrochromic windows in the US commercial buildings sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. http://Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE)Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). For

Lee, Eleanor; Yazdanian, Mehry; Selkowitz, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Conservation screening curves to compare efficiency investments to power plants: Applications to commercial sector conservation programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7/kWh Gas Turbine 5/kWh Combined-Cycle Oil Baseload Coal7/kWh Gas Turbine 5/kWh Combined-Cycle Oi Baseload Coalof Supply Technologies CT Combined- Cycle Oil Baseload Coal

Koomey, Jonathan; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

The energy-savings potential of electrochromic windows in the US commercial buildings sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

database of energy use and peak demand savings for perimeterscope of this work. Refer to peak demand reductions given inprimary energy use or peak demand is plotted as a function

Lee, Eleanor; Yazdanian, Mehry; Selkowitz, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Conservation screening curves to compare efficiency investments to power plants: Applications to commercial sector conservation programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the number of kWh saved or peak demand (kW) avoided. CCE iscalculation of the peak demand avoided from a given amountat the time of utility peak demand) is based on measured

Koomey, Jonathan; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Conservation screening curves to compare efficiency investments to power plants: Applications to commercial sector conservation programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

20%. High capital cost baseload plants are only economic/kWh Combined-Cycle Oil Baseload Coal Annualized Cost $/kW/capacity factor. For a baseload plant, one kW that generates

Koomey, Jonathan; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Impact of cool storage air-conditioning in commercial sector on power system operation in Thailand  

SciTech Connect

The results are presented from an investigation into the potential application for cool storage air-conditioning, and the resultant beneficial impact on power system operation in Thailand is discussed. Field assessment through interviews with decision makers in the identified customer groups produces results that show good potential for cool storage application. Results from a computer program used to calculate power production cost and other characteristics show that substantial benefits would also accrue to the generating utility.

Surapong, C.; Bundit, L. [Asian Inst. of Tech., Bangkok (Thailand)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Market Requirements and Opportunities for Distributred Energy Storage Systems in the Commercial Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy storage systems sited at customer locations could enable and complement utility end-use efficiency programs. As a dispatchable resource, energy storage systems can provide utility distribution planners and grid operators with more certainty in terms of peak reduction, demand response, and load shifting. This research was conducted to identify and scope ideal energy storage systems configurations and cost requirements which best leverage utility end-use energy efficiency programs.

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

474

The energy-savings potential of electrochromic windows in the US commercial buildings sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fixed windows: Minneapolis Chicago Washington DC Los AngelesWashington DC and California climate zone 9 Large windows (Window-to-wall ratio (WWR): Assembly maximum SHGC: Minneapolis SHGC max SHGC north Chicago SHGC max SHGC north Washington DC

Lee, Eleanor; Yazdanian, Mehry; Selkowitz, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Xcel Energy (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (New Mexico) Xcel Energy (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (New Mexico) Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings...

476

Commercial Motor Vehicle Brake-Related Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial Motor Vehicle Brake-Related Research Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor Safety Technology Showcase October 14, 2010 Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor

477

Table 4. 2010 State energy-related carbon dioxide emission shares by sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2010 State energy-related carbon dioxide emission shares by sector " 2010 State energy-related carbon dioxide emission shares by sector " "percent of total" ,"Shares" "State","Commercial","Electric Power","Residential","Industrial","Transportation" "Alabama",0.01584875241,0.5778871607,0.02136328943,0.1334667239,0.2514340736 "Alaska",0.06448385239,0.0785744956,0.0462016929,0.4291084798,0.3816314793 "Arizona",0.02474932909,0.5668758159,0.02425067581,0.04966758421,0.334456595 "Arkansas",0.03882032779,0.4886410984,0.03509200153,0.1307772146,0.3066693577 "California",0.04308920353,0.1176161395,0.07822332929,0.1824277392,0.5786435885 "Colorado",0.04301641968,0.4131279202,0.08115394032,0.1545280216,0.3081736982

478

Residential Commercial Industrial Year  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Residential Commercial Industrial Year and State Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers 2000 Total ................... 4,996,179 59,252,728 3,182,469 5,010,817 8,142,240 220,251 2001 Total ................... 4,771,340 60,286,364 3,022,712 4,996,446 7,344,219 217,026 2002 Total ................... 4,888,816 61,107,254 3,144,169 5,064,384 7,507,180 205,915 2003 Total ................... R 5,079,351 R 61,871,450 R 3,179,493 R 5,152,177 R 7,150,396 R 205,514 2004 Total ................... 4,884,521 62,469,142 3,141,653 5,135,985 7,250,634 212,191 Alabama ...................... 43,842 806,175 26,418 65,040 169,135 2,800 Alaska.......................... 18,200 104,360 18,373 13,999 46,580 10 Arizona ........................

479

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Warm Air Furnaces Commercial Warm Air Furnaces Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the energy efficiency level of commercial warm air furnaces since 1994. Commercial warm air furnaces are self-contained oil-fired or gas-fired furnaces that are designed to supply heated air through ducts to spaces that require it. Commercial warm air furnaces are industrial equipment and have a maximum rated input capacity of 225,000 British thermal units (Btu) an hour or more. Recent Updates | Standards | Test Procedures | Waiver, Exception, and Exemption Information | Statutory Authority | Historical Information | Contact Information Recent Updates DOE published a request for information regarding energy conservation standards for commercial warm air furnaces. 78 FR 25627 (May 2, 2013). For more information, please see the rulemaking webpage.

480

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial and Industrial Pumps Energy Conservation Standards Commercial and Industrial Pumps Energy Conservation Standards Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) is considering developing test procedures, labels, and energy conservation standards for commercial and industrial pumps. Pumps exist in numerous applications, including agriculture, oil and gas production, water and wastewater, manufacturing, mining, and commercial building systems. There are currently no federal standards or test procedures for commercial and industrial pumps. Recent Updates | Public Meeting Information | Submitting Public Comments | Milestones and Documents | Related Rulemakings | Statutory Authority | Contact Information Recent Updates DOE published a notice of public meeting and availability of the framework document regarding commercial and industrial pumps. 78 FR 7304 (February 1, 2013).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nems commercial sector" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Assessment of the Technical Potential for Achieving Zero-Energy Commercial Buildings: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Building Technologies Program has adopted the goal of making zero-energy commercial buildings (ZEBs) marketable by 2025. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory conducted an assessment of the entire commercial sector to evaluate the technical potential for meeting this goal with technology available in 2005 and projected forward to possible technology improvements for 2025. The analysis looked at the technical feasibility of ZEBs, limitations in market penetration and utility grid structures notwithstanding.

Griffith, B.; Torcellini, P.; Long, N.; Crawley, D.; Ryan, J.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Assessment of the Technical Potential for Achieving Zero-Energy Commercial Buildings: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Building Technologies Program has adopted the goal of making zero-energy commercial buildings (ZEBs) marketable by 2025. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory conducted an assessment of the entire commercial sector to evaluate the technical potential for meeting this goal with technology available in 2005 and projected forward to possible technology improvements for 2025. The analysis looked at the technical feasibility of ZEBs, limitations in market penetration and utility grid structures notwithstanding.

Griffith, B.; Torcellini, P.; Long, N.; Crawley, D.; Ryan, J.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

energy use by sector | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

use by sector use by sector Dataset Summary Description Statistics New Zealand conducted and published results of an energy use survey across industry and trade sectors to evaluate energy use in 2009. The data includes: energy use by fuel type and industry (2009); petrol and diesel purchasing and end use by industry (2009); energy saving initiatives by industry (2009); and areas identified as possibilities for less energy use (2009). Source Statistics New Zealand Date Released October 15th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords diesel energy savings energy use by sector New Zealand petrol Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon New Zealand Energy Use Survey: Industrial and Trade Sectors (xls, 108 KiB) application/zip icon Energy Use Survey (zip, 127 KiB) Quality Metrics

484

residential sector key indicators | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

residential sector key indicators residential sector key indicators Dataset Summary Description This dataset is the 2009 United States Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption, part of the Source EIA Date Released March 01st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO consumption EIA energy residential sector key indicators Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2009 Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption (xls, 55.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment http://www.eia.gov/abouteia/copyrights_reuse.cfm Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote

485

Commercial Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting Lighting Commercial Lighting At an estimated cost of $38 billion a year, lighting represents the largest source of electricity consumption in U.S. commercial buildings. By combining an inexpensive camera with a high-speed microprocessor and algorithms, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Lab developed an occupancy sensor can recognize the presence of human occupants more than 90 percent of the time -- an advancement that could lead to enormous energy savings in commercial buildings. At an estimated cost of $38 billion a year, lighting represents the largest source of electricity consumption in U.S. commercial buildings. By combining an inexpensive camera with a high-speed microprocessor and

486

Technology Commercialization & Partnerships | BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Commercialization & Partnerships Technology Commercialization & Partnerships Home For BNL Inventors For Industry For Entrepreneurs Sponsored Research Search Technologies Patents Contacts TCP Director Connie Cleary Tech Commercialization Christine Brakel Cyrena Condemi Kimberley Elcess Poornima Upadhya Partnerships Mike Furey, Manager Ginny Coccorese Alison Schwarz Intellectual Property Legal Group (Legal Dept.) Dorene Price, Chief Intellectual Property Counsel Lars Husebo, Attorney Maria Pacella, Sr. Staff Specialist William Russell, Asst. Staff Specialist INNOVATION MEETS BUSINESS at Brookhaven National Laboratory. WE GRANT LICENSES for our intellectual property to existing and start up companies. WE SEEK FUNDING from experienced investors to develop our intellectual assets. Tech Commercialization News

487

NREL: Technology Transfer - Commercialization Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercialization Programs Commercialization Programs Through our commercialization programs, we help accelerate the transfer of renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies into the marketplace. Clean Energy Alliance The Clean Energy Alliance is an alliance of the nation's top business incubators that provide business services to nascent clean energy entrepreneurs. NREL partners with these elite business incubators to help foster the growth of robust clean energy businesses and commercialize their technologies. Colorado Center for Renewable Energy Economic Development Formerly the Colorado Cleantech Initiative program, the Colorado Center for Renewable Energy Economic Development (CREED) is a joint effort between NREL, the State of Colorado, and affiliated stakeholders to provide

488

Commercial Weatherization | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Commercial Weatherization When high energy bills and a dwindling customer base threatened the Athenian Corner's well-being, the restaurant turned to energy efficiency upgrades to help operating costs and improve its bottom line. Learn how energy efficiency upgrades are helping the Athenian Corner be a viable business. When high energy bills and a dwindling customer base threatened the Athenian Corner's well-being, the restaurant turned to energy efficiency upgrades to help operating costs and improve its bottom line. Learn how energy efficiency upgrades are helping the Athenian Corner be a viable business. Commercial buildings consume 19 percent of the energy used in the U.S.

489

National Laboratories - EERE Commercialization Office  

National Laboratories. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) national laboratories play an important role in the development and commercialization of ...

490

Commercial Wind Energy Property Valuation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Prior to 2007, wind energy devices generating electricity for commercial sale were assessed differently depending on where they were located. Some counties valued the entire turbine structure ...

491

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Certification of Commercial Heating, Ventilating, Air-Conditioning, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Equipment Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products...

492

Technology Commercialization Fund - Home - Energy ...  

How the Technology Commercialization Fund Works. When awarded, fund dollars must be spent on prototype advancement and cannot be used for scientific ...

493

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

subpart W. Statutory Authority The current energy conservation standards for commercial refrigeration equipment are mandated by Part A-1, the "Certain Industrial Equipment" of...

494

OpenEI - commercial building  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4040 en Commercial Reference Building: Quick Service Restaurant http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode441

495

National Laboratories - EERE Commercialization Office  

National Laboratories. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) national laboratories play an important role in the development and commercialization of new energy ...

496

Contacts - EERE Commercialization Office - Energy  

Commercialization Contacts. Here you'll find contact information for any questions or comments you may have about the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy ...

497

Available Technologies: Superinsulated Commercial Window ...  

Superinsulated Commercial Window Framing System. IB-3155. APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Window and faade framing systems for non-residential building c ...

498

SF 6432-CI Commercial Items  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or alcoholic beverages while on the premises; Control : SF 6432-CI Title: Standard Terms and Conditions for Commercial Items Owner: Procurement Policy & Quality Dept Release...

499

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Amendments and Correction to Petitions for Waiver and Interim Waiver for Consumer Products and Commercial and Industrial Equipment Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for...

500

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Warm Air Furnaces Standard Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) is considering amending energy...