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1

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

COSTS OF NUCLEAR POWER  

SciTech Connect

The discussion on the costs of nuclear power from stationary plants, designed primarily for the generation of electricity. deals with those plants in operation, being built, or being designed for construction at an early date. An attempt is made to consider the power costs on the basis of consistent definitions and assumptions for the various nuclear plants and for comparable fossil-fuel plants. Information on several new power reactor projects is included. (auth)

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plant Cycling Costs Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Subcontract Report NREL/SR-5500-55433 July 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Prepared under Subcontract No. NFT-1-11325-01

4

A greedy strategy for detecting negative cost cycles in networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we develop a greedy strategy for the problem of checking whether a network (directed graph) with positive and negative costs on its edges has a negative cost cycle. We call our approach the Vertex Contraction algorithm; it is the first ... Keywords: Bellman-Ford, Negative cost cycle detection, Relaxation, Vertex Contraction

K. Subramani; L. Kovalchick

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Electric power substation capital costs  

SciTech Connect

The displacement or deferral of substation equipment is a key benefit associated with several technologies that are being developed with the support of the US Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies. This could occur, for example, as a result of installing a distributed generating resource within an electricity distribution system. The objective of this study was to develop a model for preparing preliminary estimates of substation capital costs based on rudimentary conceptual design information. The model is intended to be used by energy systems analysts who need ``ballpark`` substation cost estimates to help establish the value of advanced utility technologies that result in the deferral or displacement of substation equipment. This cost-estimating model requires only minimal inputs. More detailed cost-estimating approaches are recommended when more detailed design information is available. The model was developed by collecting and evaluating approximately 20 sets of substation design and cost data from about 10 US sources, including federal power marketing agencies and private and public electric utilities. The model is principally based on data provided by one of these sources. Estimates prepared with the model were compared with estimated and actual costs for the data sets received from the other utilities. In general, good agreement (for conceptual level estimating) was found between estimates prepared with the cost-estimating model and those prepared by the individual utilities. Thus, the model was judged to be adequate for making preliminary estimates of typical substation costs for US utilities.

Dagle, J.E.; Brown, D.R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Costs Drop for Photovoltaic Power Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 23, 2009 ... The cost reduction over time was largest for smaller PV systems, such as those used to power individual households. Also, installed costs show ...

7

Update on the Cost of Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We update the cost of nuclear power as calculated in the MIT (2003) Future of Nuclear Power study. Our main focus is on the changing cost of construction of new plants. The MIT (2003) study provided useful data on the cost ...

Parsons, John E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Capital cost models for geothermal power plants  

SciTech Connect

A computer code, titled GEOCOST, has been developed at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, to rapidly and systematically calculate the potential costs of geothermal power. A description of the cost models in GEOCOST for the geothermal power plants is given here. Plant cost models include the flashed steam and binary systems. The data sources are described, along with the cost data correlations, resulting equations, and uncertainties. Comparison among GEOCOST plant cost estimates and recent A-E estimates are presented. The models are intended to predict plant costs for second and third generation units, rather than the more expensive first-of-a-kind units.

Cohn, P.D.; Bloomster, C.H.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Updated Costs for Decommissioning Nuclear Power Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This update of 1978 NRC cost estimates--in 1984 dollars--also estimates the costs of several special manpower and licensing options for decommissioning nuclear power facilities. The fully developed methodology offers utilities a sound basis on which to estimate the costs of decommissioning specific plants.

1985-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

10

Biomass Power Project Cost Analysis Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of biomass power projects presents a variety of challenges that result in high capital costs associated with developing, engineering, procuring, constructing, and operating biomass power projects. Although projects that rely on more homogeneous fuels such as natural gas must still account for site-specific issues when estimating development and construction costs, the complexities are not comparable.Recognizing the difficulties in estimating the capital costs for ...

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

11

Magnetically Controlled Reactor Shrinks Power Quality Costs and Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetically Controlled Reactor Shrinks Power Quality Costs and Power Magnetically Controlled Reactor Shrinks Power Quality Costs and Power Losses Speaker(s): Mark D. Galperin Date: December 18, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Diana Morris In a new, magnetically controlled reactor (MCR), in which DC pulsing through a special winding controls inductive susceptance, high saturation of the magnetic circuit steel with optimal magnetic and electrical circuit parameters ensures less than 2-3% main harmonic distortion even without special filters. Transformer-like construction ensures reliable operation. MCR's increase power quality through automatic voltage regulation, reduced fluctuation, and smoothing of reactive power surges at 1/2 the cost of thyristor-controlled reactors (TCR's). Damping of voltage-oscillation

12

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation An...

13

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix, Inc. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power...

14

Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant Cycling Necessary for Increased Wind and Solar in the West Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power...

15

COST FUNCTION STUDIES FOR POWER REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

A function to evaluate the cost of electricity produced by a nuclear power reactor was developed. The basic equation, revenue = capital charges + profit + operating expenses, was expanded in terms of various cost parameters to enable analysis of multiregion nuclear reactors with uranium and/or plutonium for fuel. A corresponding IBM 704 computer program, which will compute either the price of electricity or the value of plutonium, is presented in detail. (auth)

Heestand, J.; Wos, L.T.

1961-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources Home > Groups > DOE Wind Vision Community In the US DOEnergy, are there calcuations for real cost of energy considering the negative, socialized costs of all commercial large scale power generation soruces ? I am talking about the cost of mountain top removal for coal mined that way, the trip to the power plant, the sludge pond or ash heap, the cost of the gas out of the stack, toxificaiton of the lakes and streams, plant decommision costs. For nuclear yiou are talking about managing the waste in perpetuity. The plant decomission costs and so on. What I am tring to get at is the 'real cost' per MWh or KWh for the various sources ? I suspect that the costs commonly quoted for fossil fuels and nucelar are

17

Analysis of nuclear power plant construction costs  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to present the results of a statistical analysis of nuclear power plant construction costs and lead-times (where lead-time is defined as the duration of the construction period), using a sample of units that entered construction during the 1966-1977 period. For more than a decade, analysts have been attempting to understand the reasons for the divergence between predicted and actual construction costs and lead-times. More importantly, it is rapidly being recognized that the future of the nuclear power industry rests precariously on an improvement in the cost and lead-time situation. Thus, it is important to study the historical information on completed plants, not only to understand what has occurred to also to improve the ability to evaluate the economics of future plants. This requires an examination of the factors that have affected both the realized costs and lead-times and the expectations about these factors that have been formed during the construction process. 5 figs., 22 tabs.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

on Facebook icon Twitter icon Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation Jump to: navigation, search Name Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide...

19

Multi-Area Power System Reliability and Production Costing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-area power system operation can reduce costs without jeopardizing service reliability, but the interconnection of systems requires new means for estimating costs and reliability. This report describes methods for evaluating production costs and power system reliability in multi-area power systems.

1990-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

20

Wind Power Technology Status and Performance and Cost Estimates - 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update on the status and cost of wind power technology based on the Wind Power Technology Status and Performance and Cost Estimates – 2008 (EPRI report 1015806). It addresses the status of wind turbine and related technology for both onshore and offshore applications and the performance and cost of onshore wind power plants.

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "negative power cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Capital costs have major impact on projected power sector ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas-fired power plants dominate the 2011 Annual ... AEO2011 also includes several alternative cases with lower assumed capital costs of nuclear, fossil fuel ...

22

Cost Analysis and Reduction of Power Quality Mitigation Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many power quality mitigation systems have been planned, designed, produced, and operated with very little concern for their cumulative life-cycle cost. This report describes how to conduct a life-cycle cost analysis to determine the financial implications of a chosen power quality mitigation technology versus other competing technologies.

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

23

Filter system cost comparison for IGCC and PFBC power systems  

SciTech Connect

A cost comparison was conducted between the filter systems for two advanced coal-based power plants. The results from this study are presented. The filter system is based on a Westinghouse advanced particulate filter concept, which is designed to operate with ceramic candle filters. The Foster Wheeler second-generation 453 MWe (net) pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) and the KRW 458 MWe (net) integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants are used for the comparison. The comparison presents the general differences of the two power plants and the process-related filtration conditions for PFBC and IGCC systems. The results present the conceptual designs for the PFBC and IGCC filter systems as well as a cost summary comparison. The cost summary comparison includes the total plant cost, the fixed operating and maintenance cost, the variable operating and maintenance cost, and the effect on the cost of electricity (COE) for the two filter systems.

Dennis, R.A.; McDaniel, H.M.; Buchanan, T. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Fees Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Louisiana Public Service Commission The Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation establishes guidelines for any utility seeking to develop a nuclear power plant in Louisiana. The rule clarifies, as well as supplements the Louisiana Public Service Commission's 1983 General Order for the acquisition of nuclear generation resources. The goal of the rule is to provide a transparent process that identifies the responsibilities parties in the regulatory

25

Benchmarking Variable Cost Performance in an Industrial Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the most perplexing problems for industrial power plants committed to improving competitiveness is measuring variable cost performance over time. Because variable costs like fuel and electricity represent the overwhelming majority of power plant expenses, it is imperative to develop and deploy a tool that can help plants benchmark operating performance. This paper introduces a benchmarking methodology designed to meet this need. The "Energy Conversion Index" (ECI) ratios the "value" of utilities exported from the power plant to the actual cost of the fuel and electricity required to produce them, generating a single number or "index." Variable cost performance is benchmarked by comparing the index from one period of time to the index of another comparable period of time. Savings (or costs) attributable to excellent (or poor) performance can easily be calculated by using the former period's index to project the current period's cost.

Kane, J. F.; Bailey, W. F.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant Cycling Necessary for Increased Wind and Solar in the West Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant Cycling Necessary for Increased Wind and Solar in the West September 24, 2013 - 10:08am Addthis A new report released today by the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) examines the potential impacts of increasing wind and solar power generation on the operators of coal and gas plants in the West. To accommodate higher amounts of wind and solar power on the electric grid, utilities must ramp down and ramp up or stop and start conventional generators more frequently to provide reliable power for their customers - a practice called cycling. Grid operators typically cycle power plants to accommodate fluctuations in

27

Regional comparison of nuclear and fossil electric power generation costs  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear's main disadvantages are its high capital investment cost and uncertainty in schedule compared with alternatives. Nuclear plant costs continue to rise whereas coal plant investment costs are staying relative steady. Based on average experience, nuclear capital investment costs are nearly double those of coal-fired generation plants. The capital investment cost disadvantage of nuclear is balanced by its fuel cost advantages. New base load nuclear power plants were projected to be competitive with coal-fired plants in most regions of the country. Nuclear power costs wre projected to be significantly less (10% or more) than coal-fired power costs in the South Atlantic region. Coal-fired plants were projected to have a significant economic advantage over nuclear plants in the Central and North Central regions. In the remaining seven regions, the levelized cost of power from either option was projected to be within 10%. Uncertainties in future costs of materials, services, and financing affect the relative economics of the nuclear and coal options significantly. 10 figures.

Bowers, H.I.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Optimizing power delivery cost in datacenters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our increasing reliance on Internet-centric services and information technology has led to the proliferation of datacenters. The peak power consumption of these datacenters significantly impact their sustainability: both their recurring electricity ...

Sriram Govindan / Anand Sivasubramaniam; Bhuvan Urgaonkar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Fossil Power Plant Cost and Performance Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is one of two companion studies that describe trends in operating costs and reliability of fossil steam plants since 1970. The studies are a foundation for more sophisticated statistical studies aimed at modeling and predicting the impacts of cycling. This report summarizes results for coal-fired steam generating units, contrasting performance across 112 baseload plants, 68 load-following/cycling plants, and 118 plants that varied their operations for at least three years. Annual trends are p...

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant Cycling Necessary for Increased Wind and Solar in the West Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant Cycling Necessary for Increased Wind and Solar in the West September 24, 2013 - 10:08am Addthis A new report released today by the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) examines the potential impacts of increasing wind and solar power generation on the operators of coal and gas plants in the West. To accommodate higher amounts of wind and solar power on the electric grid, utilities must ramp down and ramp up or stop and start conventional generators more frequently to provide reliable power for their customers - a practice called cycling.

31

Cost Minimization in Power System Measurement Placement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, EMS: energy management system, PE: protection engineer, SC: substation control, IS: integrated system of substation automation systems, as reported in the March/April 2003 issue of IEEE Power & Energy Magazine fully automated while 1540-7977/04/$20.00©2004 IEEE figure 1. Layout of the typical substation equipment

Kezunovic, Mladen

32

Wind Power Technology Status and Performance and Cost Estimates - 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report addresses the status of wind turbine and related technology for both onshore and offshore applications, and the performance and cost of onshore wind power plants. It also presents a sample analysis of wind project financial performance.

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Cost estimate guidelines for advanced nuclear power technologies  

SciTech Connect

To make comparative assessments of competing technologies, consistent ground rules must be applied when developing cost estimates. This document provides a uniform set of assumptions, ground rules, and requirements that can be used in developing cost estimates for advanced nuclear power technologies. 10 refs., 8 figs., 32 tabs.

Delene, J.G.; Hudson, C.R. II.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Power Tower Technology Roadmap and cost reduction plan.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies continue to mature and are being deployed worldwide. Power towers will likely play an essential role in the future development of CSP due to their potential to provide dispatchable solar electricity at a low cost. This Power Tower Technology Roadmap has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to describe the current technology, the improvement opportunities that exist for the technology, and the specific activities needed to reach the DOE programmatic target of providing competitively-priced electricity in the intermediate and baseload power markets by 2020. As a first step in developing this roadmap, a Power Tower Roadmap Workshop that included the tower industry, national laboratories, and DOE was held in March 2010. A number of technology improvement opportunities (TIOs) were identified at this workshop and separated into four categories associated with power tower subsystems: solar collector field, solar receiver, thermal energy storage, and power block/balance of plant. In this roadmap, the TIOs associated with power tower technologies are identified along with their respective impacts on the cost of delivered electricity. In addition, development timelines and estimated budgets to achieve cost reduction goals are presented. The roadmap does not present a single path for achieving these goals, but rather provides a process for evaluating a set of options from which DOE and industry can select to accelerate power tower R&D, cost reductions, and commercial deployment.

Mancini, Thomas R.; Gary, Jesse A. (U.S. Department of Energy); Kolb, Gregory J.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

The Potential for Low-Cost Concentrating Solar Power Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Concern over the possibility of global climate change as a result of anthropogenic greenhouse gas buildup in the atmosphere is resulting in increased interest in renewable energy technologies. The World Bank recently sponsored a study to determine whether solar thermal power plants can achieve cost parity with conventional power plants. The paper reviews the conclusions of that study.

Price, H. W. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Carpenter, S. (Enermodal Engineering Limited)

1999-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

36

Report on Geothermal Power Plant Cost and Comparative Cost of Geothermal and Coal Fired Steam Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is to be used by Utah Power and Light Company (UP and L) in making studies of geothermal power plants. The dollars per kilowatt comparison between a geothermal plant and a UP and L coal-fired plant is to be developed. Geothermal gathering system costs and return to owner are to be developed for information.

None

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Active negative-index metamaterial powered by an electron beam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An active negative index metamaterial that derives its gain from an electron beam is introduced. The metamaterial consists of a stack of equidistant parallel metal plates perforated by a periodic array of holes shaped as ...

Shapiro, Michael

38

Cost and carbon emissions of coal and combined cycle power plants...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost and carbon emissions of coal and combined cycle power plants in India: international implications Title Cost and carbon emissions of coal and combined cycle power plants in...

39

Yankee Nuclear Power Station - analysis of decommissioning costs  

SciTech Connect

The preparation of decommissioning cost estimates for nuclear power generating stations has received a great deal of interest in the last few years. Owners are required by regulation to ensure that adequate funds are collected for the timely decommissioning of their facilities. The unexpected premature shutdown of several facilities and uncertainties associated with radioactive waste disposal and long-term spent-fuel storage, when viewed in the light of a deregulated electric utility industry, has caused many companies to reevaluate their decommissioning cost estimates. The decommissioning of the Yankee Nuclear Power Station represents the first large-scale project involving the complete decontamination and dismantlement of a commercial light water nuclear power generation facility in the United States. Since this pressurized water reactor operated for 32 yr at a respectable 74% lifetime capacity factor, the actual costs and resources required to decommission the plant, when compared with decommissioning estimates, will yield valuable benchmarking data.

Lessard, L.P. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

User manual for PACTOLUS: a code for computing power costs.  

SciTech Connect

PACTOLUS is a computer code for calculating the cost of generating electricity. Through appropriate definition of the input data, PACTOLUS can calculate the cost of generating electricity from a wide variety of power plants, including nuclear, fossil, geothermal, solar, and other types of advanced energy systems. The purpose of PACTOLUS is to develop cash flows and calculate the unit busbar power cost (mills/kWh) over the entire life of a power plant. The cash flow information is calculated by two principal models: the Fuel Model and the Discounted Cash Flow Model. The Fuel Model is an engineering cost model which calculates the cash flow for the fuel cycle costs over the project lifetime based on input data defining the fuel material requirements, the unit costs of fuel materials and processes, the process lead and lag times, and the schedule of the capacity factor for the plant. For nuclear plants, the Fuel Model calculates the cash flow for the entire nuclear fuel cycle. For fossil plants, the Fuel Model calculates the cash flow for the fossil fuel purchases. The Discounted Cash Flow Model combines the fuel costs generated by the Fuel Model with input data on the capital costs, capital structure, licensing time, construction time, rates of return on capital, tax rates, operating costs, and depreciation method of the plant to calculate the cash flow for the entire lifetime of the project. The financial and tax structure for both investor-owned utilities and municipal utilities can be simulated through varying the rates of return on equity and debt, the debt-equity ratios, and tax rates. The Discounted Cash Flow Model uses the principal that the present worth of the revenues will be equal to the present worth of the expenses including the return on investment over the economic life of the project. This manual explains how to prepare the input data, execute cases, and interpret the output results. (RWR)

Huber, H.D.; Bloomster, C.H.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "negative power cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Electric Power Costs in Texas in 1985 and 1990  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A major problem associated with energy conservation projects is how to estimate the financial savings associated with a reduction in energy consumption. Although many conservation projects can be implemented in a matter of months, the energy savings may extend over a period of years or decades. The decision to initiate a conservation project often hinges upon the favorable outcome of an "engineering economics" or "present worth" analysis which compares present costs and future incomes. For a conservation project, four sets of data are required for the economic analysis: project cost, rate of return or discount rate, the amount of energy saved, and the future price of energy. Estimating the future price of electricity requires considerable effort since utilities in Texas will be using a mix of fuels. This paper analyzes the cost of generating electricity from nuclear power, out-of-state coal, in-state lignite, fuel oil, natural gas, geothermal, and solar power. These costs are then used to estimate system costs for an electric utility with various mixes of power plants. The electricity costs can then be used to determine the economic value of various conservation projects.

Gordon, J. B.; White, D. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).

Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Battery-level material cost model facilitates high-power li-ion battery cost reductions.  

SciTech Connect

Under the FreedomCAR Partnership, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is working to identify and develop advanced anode, cathode, and electrolyte components that can significantly reduce the cost of the cell chemistry, while simultaneously enhancing the calendar life and inherent safety of high-power Li-Ion batteries. Material cost savings are quantified and tracked via the use of a cell and battery design model that establishes the quantity of each material needed in batteries designed to meet the requirements of hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). In order to quantify the material costs, relative to the FreedomCAR battery cost goals, ANL uses (1) laboratory cell performance data, (2) its battery design model and (3) battery manufacturing process yields to create battery-level material cost models. Using these models and industry-supplied material cost information, ANL assigns battery-level material costs for different cell chemistries. These costs can then be compared to the battery cost goals to determine the probability of meeting the goals with these cell chemistries. The most recent freedomCAR cost goals for 25-kW and 40-kW power-assist HEV batteries are $500 and $800, respectively, which is $20/kW in both cases. In 2001, ANL developed a high-power cell chemistry that was incorporated into high-power 18650 cells for use in extensive accelerated aging and thermal abuse characterization studies. This cell chemistry serves as a baseline for this material cost study. It incorporates a LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 cathode, a synthetic graphite anode, and a LiPF6 in EC:EMC electrolyte. Based on volume production cost estimates for these materials-as well as those for binders/solvents, cathode conductive additives, separator, and current collectors--the total cell winding material cost for a 25-kW power-assist HEV battery is estimated to be $399 (based on a 48- cell battery design, each cell having a capacity of 15.4 Ah). This corresponds to {approx}$16/kW. Our goal is to reduce the cell winding material cost to <$10/kW, in order to allow >$10/kW for the cell and battery manufacturing costs, as well as profit for the industrial manufacturer. The material cost information is obtained directly from the industrial material suppliers, based on supplying the material quantities necessary to support an introductory market of 100,000 HEV batteries/year. Using its battery design model, ANL provides the material suppliers with estimates of the material quantities needed to meet this market, for both 25-kW and 40-kW power-assist HEV batteries. Also, ANL has funded a few volume-production material cost analyses, with industrial material suppliers, to obtain needed cost information. In a related project, ANL evaluates and develops low-cost advanced materials for use in high-power Li-Ion HEV batteries. [This work is the subject of one or more separate papers at this conference.] Cell chemistries are developed from the most promising low-cost materials. The performance characteristics of test cells that employ these cell chemistries are used as input to the cost model. Batteries, employing these cell chemistries, are designed to meet the FreedomCAR power, energy, weight, and volume requirements. The cost model then provides a battery-level material cost and material cost breakdown for each battery design. Two of these advanced cell chemistries show promise for significantly reducing the battery-level material costs (see Table 1), as well as enhancing calendar life and inherent safety. It is projected that these two advanced cell chemistries (A and B) could reduce the battery-level material costs by an estimated 24% and 43%, respectively. An additional cost advantage is realized with advanced chemistry B, due to the high rate capability of the 3-dimensional LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel cathode. This means that a greater percentage of the total Ah capacity of the cell is usable and cells with reduced Ah capacity can be used. This allows for a reduction in the quantity of the anode, electrolyte, separator, and current collector materials needed f

Henriksen, G.; Chemical Engineering

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Cost of Providing Ancillary Services from Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a deregulated power supply market, extra generating capacity is needed to follow the moment-to-moment load variations in order to maintain the scheduled system frequency. This report describes a new methodology for determining the cost of providing regulation and frequency response service as an ancillary service.

1997-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

45

Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?  

SciTech Connect

The global wind power market has been growing at a phenomenal pace, driven by favorable policies towards renewable energy and the improving economics of wind projects. On a going forward basis, utility-scale wind power offers the potential for significant reductions in the carbon footprint of the electricity sector. Specifically, the global wind resource is vast and, though accessing this potential is not costless or lacking in barriers, wind power can be developed at scale in the near to medium term at what promises to be an acceptable cost.

Wiser, Ryan H; Hand, Maureen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Optimal Power Cost Management Using Stored Energy in Data Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the electricity bill of a data center constitutes a significant portion of its overall operational costs, reducing this has become important. We investigate cost reduction opportunities that arise by the use of uninterrupted power supply (UPS) units as energy storage devices. This represents a deviation from the usual use of these devices as mere transitional fail-over mechanisms between utility and captive sources such as diesel generators. We consider the problem of opportunistically using these devices to reduce the time average electric utility bill in a data center. Using the technique of Lyapunov optimization, we develop an online control algorithm that can optimally exploit these devices to minimize the time average cost. This algorithm operates without any knowledge of the statistics of the workload or electricity cost processes, making it attractive in the presence of workload and pricing uncertainties. An interesting feature of our algorithm is that its deviation from optimality reduces as the...

Urgaonkar, Rahul; Neely, Michael J; Sivasubramaniam, Anand

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Microsoft PowerPoint - 15.1615_Cost Estimating Panel | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

615Cost Estimating Panel Microsoft PowerPoint - 15.1615Cost Estimating Panel Microsoft PowerPoint - 15.1615Cost Estimating Panel More Documents & Publications Contractor SOW...

48

Use of experience curves to estimate the future cost of power plants with CO2 capture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. Experience curves for power plant emission controlassessments of fossil fuel power plants with CO 2 capturethe future cost of power plants with CO 2 capture Edward S.

Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Antes, Matt; Berkenpas, Michael; Davison, John

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Survey of nuclear power plant construction costs, 1983  

SciTech Connect

This report presents cost estimates, chronological data on construction progress, and the physical characteristics of nuclear units in the construction pipeline, collected on Form EIA-254. The information on US nuclear power plants in the construction pipeline is reported voluntarily each quarter by the electric utilities. This report presents the data collected in the first quarter of 1983 on the 71 nuclear units in the construction pipeline. Historical data on 73 units, totalling 57,287 net megawatts (MWe) of design capacity, in commercial operation as of March 31, 1983, are also given. Three types of information are included: plant characteristics and ownership, construction costs, and construction schedule or chronology. Summary statistics are presented on direct component costs and construction leadtimes for a sample of operating units and units in the construction pipeline. The reactor-specific cost data included in Chapter 4 are the estimated final nuclear production plant costs and, for units in the construction pipeline, the disbursed and sunk costs as of March 31, 1983. 7 figures, 5 tables.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

New low cost IGCC designs for competitive power generation  

SciTech Connect

Design studies of coal based 450 MW new IGCC power plants reveal their ability to compete in today's power generation market. Single train unit designs coupled with significant improvements in IGCC net output and efficiency have brought down the installed costs to the range of 850--1,000 $/kW and net thermal efficiency up to 43--47%. These improvements are shown to result from IGCC design configurations integrating new generation gas turbine combined cycles with High Pressure Texaco Gasification Technology and Elevated Pressure Air Separation Units.

Brdar, D.R.; Depuy, R.A.; Gulko, G.; Jandrisevits, M.; Paolino, J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Power-installed streetlight foundations lower substation construction costs  

SciTech Connect

The Alabama Power Company's power-installed streetlight foundation (SLF) saves 85% of labor costs and is practical as well as economical. After several foundation designs were tried, the multi-helix proved best for swampy terrain. A test of substation structure support began with soil testing to locate any rock on the site. Standard tubular-steel structures with modified baseplates were used. A truck-mounted derrick proved better for installation than a drill rig. Slight corrosive currents are not expected to cause appreciable deterioration to the foundation. (DCK)

Beason, D.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Correlating Cycle Duty with Cost at Fossil Fuel Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work described in this report is part of the ongoing EPRI Cycling Impacts Program to develop a range of analysis and simulation-capable planning tools. The objectives are to better determine cycling impacts (including incremental costs), reliability impact, component level effects, and impacts and other elements needed to better plan and manage operational and financial aspects of power generation. This report documents early efforts to establish strong correlations between the cycle duty of a produc...

2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

53

Cost Estimation Methodology for NETL Assessments of Power Plant Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Q Q Q U U A A L L I I T T Y Y G G U U I I D D E E L L I I N N E E S S F F O O R R E E N N E E R R G G Y Y S S Y Y S S T T E E M M S S T T U U D D I I E E S S C C o o s s t t E E s s t t i i m m a a t t i i o o n n M M e e t t h h o o d d o o l l o o g g y y f f o o r r N N E E T T L L A A s s s s e e s s s s m m e e n n t t s s o o f f P P o o w w e e r r P P l l a a n n t t P P e e r r f f o o r r m m a a n n c c e e March 2010 DOE/NETL-2010/???? April 2011 DOE/NETL-2011/1455 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Program Planning and Analysis 2 Power Plant Cost Estimation Methodology Quality Guidelines for Energy Systems Studies April 2011 Quality Guidelines for Energy Systems Studies Cost Estimation Methodology for NETL Assessments of Power Plant Performance Introduction This paper summarizes the costing methodology employed by NETL in its costing models and baseline reports. Further, it defines the specific levels of capital cost as well as outlines the costing metrics by which

54

GUIDE TO NUCLEAR POWER COST EVALUATION. VOLUME 4. FUEL CYCLE COSTS  

SciTech Connect

Information on fuel cycle cost is presented. Topics covered include: nuclear fuel, fuel management, fuel cost, fissionable material cost, use charge, conversion and fabrication costs, processing cost, and shipping cost. (M.C.G.)

1962-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

Parametric cost analysis of a HYLIFE-II power plant  

SciTech Connect

The SAFIRE (Systems Analysis for ICF Reactor Economics) code was adapted to model a power plant using a HYLIFE-II reactor chamber. The code was then used to examine the dependence of the plant capital costs and busbar cost of electricity (COE) on a variety of design parameters (type of driver, chamber repetition rate, and net electric power). The results show the most attractive operating space for each set of driver/target assumptions and quantify the benefits of improvements in key design parameters. The base case plant was a 1,000 MWe plant containing a reactor vessel driven by an induction linac heavy ion accelerator run at 7.3 Hz with a driver energy of 5 MJ and a target yield of 370 MJ. The total direct cost for this plant was 2,800 M$ (where all $ in this paper are 1988$s), and the COE was 9 {cents}/KW*hour. The COE and total capital costs for the base plant assumptions for a 1,000 MWe plant are approximately independent of chosen repetition rate for all repetition rates between 4 and 10 Hz. For comparison, the COE for a coal or future fission plant would be 4.5--5.5 {cents}/KW*hour. The COE for a 1,000 MWe plant could be reduced to 7.6 {cents}/KW*hour by using advanced targets and could be cut to 6.8 {cents}/KW*hour with conventional targets if the driver cost could be cut in half. There is a large economy of scale with heavy ion driven ICF plants; a 5,000 MWe plant with one heavy ion driver and either one or two HYLIFE-II chambers would have a COE of only 4.4 {cents}/KW*hour.

Bieri, R.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA) Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA))

1990-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

56

How much does it cost to build different types of power plants in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much does it cost to build different types of power plants in the United States? EIA publishes estimates for the capital costs for different types of electricity ...

57

Wind Fins: Novel Lower-Cost Wind Power System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project evaluated the technical feasibility of converting energy from the wind with a novel “wind fin” approach. This patent-pending technology has three major components: (1) a mast, (2) a vertical, hinged wind structure or fin, and (3) a power takeoff system. The wing structure responds to the wind with an oscillating motion, generating power. The overall project goal was to determine the basic technical feasibility of the wind fin technology. Specific objectives were the following: (1) to determine the wind energy-conversion performance of the wind fin and the degree to which its performance could be enhanced through basic design improvements; (2) to determine how best to design the wind fin system to survive extreme winds; (3) to determine the cost-effectiveness of the best wind fin designs compared to state-of-the-art wind turbines; and (4) to develop conclusions about the overall technical feasibility of the wind fin system. Project work involved extensive computer modeling, wind-tunnel testing with small models, and testing of bench-scale models in a wind tunnel and outdoors in the wind. This project determined that the wind fin approach is technically feasible and likely to be commercially viable. Project results suggest that this new technology has the potential to harvest wind energy at approximately half the system cost of wind turbines in the 10kW range. Overall, the project demonstrated that the wind fin technology has the potential to increase the economic viability of small wind-power generation. In addition, it has the potential to eliminate lethality to birds and bats, overcome public objections to the aesthetics of wind-power machines, and significantly expand wind-power’s contribution to the national energy supply.

David C. Morris; Dr. Will D. Swearingen

2007-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

58

Handbook for cost estimating. A method for developing estimates of costs for generic actions for nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides overall guidance to assist the NRC in preparing the types of cost estimates required by the Regulatory Analysis Guidelines and to assist in the assignment of priorities in resolving generic safety issues. The Handbook presents an overall cost model that allows the cost analyst to develop a chronological series of activities needed to implement a specific regulatory requirement throughout all applicable commercial LWR power plants and to identify the significant cost elements for each activity. References to available cost data are provided along with rules of thumb and cost factors to assist in evaluating each cost element. A suitable code-of-accounts data base is presented to assist in organizing and aggregating costs. Rudimentary cost analysis methods are described to allow the analyst to produce a constant-dollar, lifetime cost for the requirement. A step-by-step example cost estimate is included to demonstrate the overall use of the Handbook.

Ball, J.R.; Cohen, S.; Ziegler, E.Z.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

HYLIFE-II power conversion system design and cost study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power conversion system for the HYLIFE-2 fusion power plant has been defined to include the IHX's (intermediate heat exchangers) and everything that support the exchange of energy from the reactor. It is referred to simply as the BOP (balance of plant) in the rest of this report. The above is a convenient division between the reactor equipment and the rest of the fusion power plant since the BOP design and cost then depend only on the specification of the thermal power to the IHX's and the temperature of the primary Flibe coolant into and out of the IHX's, and is almost independent of the details of the reactor design. The main efforts during the first year have been on the definition and thermal-hydraulics of the IHX's, the steam generators and the steam power plant, leading to the definition of a reference BOP with the molten salt, Flibe, as the primary coolant. A summary of the key results in each of these areas is given in this report.

Hoffman, M.A. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA). Dept. of Mechanical, Aeronautical and Materials Engineering)

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

The Development of low cost LiFePO4-based high power lithium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of low cost LiFePO4-based high power lithium-ion batteries Title The Development of low cost LiFePO4-based high power lithium-ion batteries Publication Type Journal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "negative power cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2007 Title Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2007...

62

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006 Title Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006...

63

Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the potential and costs for rapid wind energy deployment inincremental costs of achieving 20% wind energy are projectedwind energy and that allow the model to incorporate the costs

Wiser, Ryan H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Effects of a shortened depreciation schedule on the investment costs for combined heat and power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

included. Therefore, the cost per kWh should not necessarilyproduction, i.e. the cost per kWh only relates to theof the tax shield and cost per kWh of power produced for

Kranz, Nicole; Worrell, Ernst

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 006 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Project Performance and Capital Costs Drive Wind Power Prices . . . . .14 Installed Project Costs Are On the Rise, After a Long Period of Decline. .15 Project Cost Increases Are a Function of Turbine Prices . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Wind Project

66

Cost of Power Interruptions to Electricity Consumers in the United States (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ever power-quality- cost estimate of $26 billion per yearcovers. Typically, outage-cost estimates are based on whatof uncertainty in the cost estimates that have been prepared

Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Eto, Joseph H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses an analysis of the total cost of ownership of fuel cell-powered and traditional battery-powered material handling equipment (MHE, or more typically 'forklifts'). A number of fuel cell MHE deployments have received funding support from the federal government. Using data from these government co-funded deployments, DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been evaluating the performance of fuel cells in material handling applications. NREL has assessed the total cost of ownership of fuel cell MHE and compared it to the cost of ownership of traditional battery-powered MHE. As part of its cost of ownership assessment, NREL looked at a range of costs associated with MHE operation, including the capital costs of battery and fuel cell systems, the cost of supporting infrastructure, maintenance costs, warehouse space costs, and labor costs. Considering all these costs, NREL found that fuel cell MHE can have a lower overall cost of ownership than comparable battery-powered MHE.

Ramsden, T.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Executive Summary: Assessment of Parabolic Trough and Power Tower Solar Technology Cost and Performance Forecasts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sargent& Lundy LLC conducted an independent analysis of parabolic trough and power tower solar technology cost and performance.

Not Available

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Assessment of Parabolic Trough and Power Tower Solar Technology Cost and Performance Forecasts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sargent and Lundy LLC conducted an independent analysis of parabolic trough and power tower solar technology cost and performance.

Not Available

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

VMFlow: leveraging VM mobility to reduce network power costs in data centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Networking costs play an important role in the overall costs of a modern data center. Network power, for example, has been estimated at 10-20% of the overall data center power consumption. Traditional power saving techniques in data centers focus on ... Keywords: VM placement, energy and power management, green networking, networking aspects in cloud services

Vijay Mann; Avinash Kumar; Partha Dutta; Shivkumar Kalyanaraman

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Increased by 27% inAre Significant. . . . . . . 9 Wind Power Prices Are Up in

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Microsoft PowerPoint - Cost-Allocation Customer Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 19-20, 2011 Agenda Agenda OCPOCI U d t OCPOCI Update Interim Cost Allocation Methodology P d C All i Proposed Cost Allocation Analysis of Proposed...

73

Program on Technology Innovation: Cost Escalation Impact on Power Plant New Capacity Additions - 2008 to 2020  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Cost Escalation Impact on Power Plant New Capacity Additions 2008 to 2020 is intended to provide a snapshot of most recent (2003 to 3rd quarter 2008) cost escalation of materials, equipment, and labor in the power generation sector. This document is designed to help with information on current options in power generation infrastructure capital investments. Over the last 4 years, there has been an unprecedented increase in the cost of power plant components such as concrete, steel, copper, electr...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

74

COST COMPARISONS OF CAPITOL INVESTMENT IN VARIOUS NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS FOR CENTRAL STATION APPLICATION  

SciTech Connect

The capital costs for a number of power reactors are compared after escalation to equivalent construction dates. It is shown that the most important factor affecting nuclear power plant capital costs is the net capacity of the plant. Steam conditions are shown to have a relatively minor effect on capital costs. (auth)

Bender, M.; Stulting, R.D.

1958-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

75

Carbonate fuel cell monolith design for high power density and low cost  

SciTech Connect

Objective is higher power density operation and cost reduction. This is accomplished by the design of a bipolar plate where the separate corrugated current collectors are eliminated; cost reduction was also derived through higher power density and reduced material usage. The higher volumetric power density operation was achieved through lower cell resistance, increased active component surface area, and reduced cell height.

Allen, J.; Doyon, J.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Consumers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Consumers Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Consumers The massive electric power blackout in the northeastern United States and Canada on August 14-15, 2003 resulted in the U.S. electricity system being called "antiquated" and catalyzed discussions about modernizing the grid. Industry sources suggested that investments of $50 to $100 billion would be needed. This report seeks to quantify an important piece of information that has been missing from these discussions: how much do power interruptions and fluctuations in power quality (power-quality events) cost U.S. electricity consumers? Accurately estimating this cost will help assess the potential benefits of investments in improving the reliability

77

Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluation of Global Wind Power." Journal of Geophysical2008. "The Economics of Wind Power with Energy Storage."Economics of Large-Scale Wind Power in a Carbon Constrained

Wiser, Ryan H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Low-Cost, High-Power Laser for Analytical and Other ...  

Search PNNL. PNNL Home; About; Research; Publications; Jobs; News; Contacts; Low-Cost, High-Power Laser for Analytical and Other Applications. ...

79

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Drive Wind Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 GE Wind Is the Dominant Turbine Manufacturer, with SiemensAnnual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Analysis of Nuclear Power Plant Operating Costs: A 1995 Update, An  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report provides an analysis of nuclear power plant operating costs. EIA published three reports on this subject during the period 1988-1995.

James G. Hewlett

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "negative power cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Cost of transporting coal to power plants rose almost 50% in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The average cost of shipping coal by railroad to power plants increased almost 50% in the United States from 2001 to 2010.

82

Cost of transporting coal to power plants rose almost 50% in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, ... The average cost of shipping coal by railroad to power plants increased almost 50% in the United ... National numbers can be ...

83

Capital cost models for geothermal power plants and fluid transmission systems. [GEOCOST  

SciTech Connect

The GEOCOST computer program is a simulation model for evaluating the economics of developing geothermal resources. The model was found to be both an accurate predictor of geothermal power production facility costs and a valid designer of such facilities. GEOCOST first designs a facility using thermodynamic optimization routines and then estimates costs for the selected design using cost models. Costs generated in this manner appear to correspond closely with detailed cost estimates made by industry planning groups. Through the use of this model, geothermal power production costs can be rapidly and accurately estimated for many alternative sites making the evaluation process much simpler yet more meaningful.

Schulte, S.C.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Microsoft PowerPoint - 15.1615_Cost Estimating Panel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industry Best Practices Industry Best Practices in Cost Estimating in Cost Estimating SM&A MCR, LLC U.S. COST Project Time & Cost Inc Project Time & Cost, Inc. * SM&A (Moderator) * SM&A (Moderator) - Michael R. Nosbisch, Vice President * MCR LLC MCR, LLC - Neal D. Hulkower, Vice President * U S Cost U.S. Cost - Wade L. Martin, Sr. Vice President * Project Time & Cost, Inc. Project Time & Cost, Inc. - Kenneth A. Roberts, Executive Vice President The Panel 2 15 March 2011 Modern Cost Estimating: A Work in Progress Neal D Hulkower Ph D Neal D. Hulkower, Ph.D. Vice President, Technical Planning d Q lit S t and Quality Support MCR, LLC "S-Curve" Value Percentile FY10$M 10% 516.81 20% 538.98 30% 557.85 Cumulative Chart .750 1.000 10,000 Trials Program Alpha 40% 575.48 50% 592.72 60% 609.70 70% 629.19 80%

85

Geothermal Electricity Technologies Evaluation Model DOE Tool for Assessing Impact of Research on Cost of Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a spreadsheet model to provide insight as to how its research activities can impact of cost of producing power from geothermal energy. This model is referred to as GETEM, which stands for “Geothermal Electricity Technologies Evaluation Model”. Based on user input, the model develops estimates of costs associated with exploration, well field development, and power plant construction that are used along with estimated operating costs to provide a predicted power generation cost. The model allows the user to evaluate how reductions in cost, or increases in performance or productivity will impact the predicted power generation cost. This feature provides a means of determining how specific technology improvements can impact generation costs, and as such assists DOE in both prioritizing research areas and identifying where research is needed.

Greg Mines

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Assessing the costs of solar power plants for the Island of Roatàn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is an analysis assessing the installation costs of different solar power plant technologies and the current commercial availability for installation on the Island or Roatàn. Commercial large-scale power plants have ...

Huwe, Ethan (Ethan L.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Hidden costs of power cuts and battery backups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many developing countries suffer from intense electricity deficits. For instance, the Indian electricity sector, despite having the world's fifth largest installed capacity, suffers from severe energy and peak power shortages. In February 2013, these ... Keywords: battery backups, electricity storage, inverters, losses, power cuts, power grids, uninterrupted power supply, ups

Deva P. Seetharam, Ankit Agrawal, Tanuja Ganu, Jagabondhu Hazra, Venkat Rajaraman, Rajesh Kunnath

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Microsoft PowerPoint - Cost Estimating for Hydro Planning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimating Estimating for Hydropower Project Planning M Th Mona Thomason Chief, Product Coordination Branch Hydroelectric Design Center 13 J 2012 13 June 2012 US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG ® Overview Overview  Background g  USACE hydropower project cost estimating y p p j g process  Challenges in cost estimating & strategies for mitigation of cost risk BUILDING STRONG ® HYDROELECTRIC DESIGN CENTER 2 USACE regulations USACE regulations  ER 1110-1-1300 Cost Engineering Policy and General Requirements  ER 1110-2-1150 Engineering and Design for Civil Works Project  ER 1110-2-1302 Civil Works Cost Engineering ETL 1110 2 573 C t ti C t E ti ti  ETL 1110-2-573 Construction Cost Estimating Guide for Civil Works BUILDING STRONG ® HYDROELECTRIC DESIGN CENTER 3 Hydroelectric

89

Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007. "Utility Wind Integration and Operating Impact Statethat the integration of 20% wind into US electricity marketsand integration costs, Figure 8 provides a supply curve for wind

Wiser, Ryan H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Microsoft PowerPoint - Cost Escalation.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydroelectric Design Center Hydroelectric Design Center Hydroelectric Design Center " " Cost Trends for Cost Trends for Hydropower Capital Hydropower Capital Replacements" Replacements" Presentation Outline Presentation Outline A little about HDC A little about HDC Cost Escalation of materials Cost Escalation of materials Issues impacting interest & bids Issues impacting interest & bids Discussion Discussion HDC Expertise HDC Expertise Mission Mission The Hydroelectric Design Center performs The Hydroelectric Design Center performs engineering and design, maintains engineering and design, maintains expertise, and develops standards for the expertise, and develops standards for the US Army Corps of Engineers hydroelectric US Army Corps of Engineers hydroelectric

91

Improved Solar Power Plant Efficiency: Low Cost Solar Irradiance Sensor  

A University of Colorado research group led by Fernando Mancilla-David has developed a low cost irradiance sensor using a network modeled on a neural ...

92

Lower power prices and high repair costs drive nuclear retirements ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

However, concerns over the length of the review process and the high costs associated with steam generator repairs led SCE to retire both reactors.

93

Beyond Silicon: Cutting the Costs of Solar Power | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beyond Silicon: Cutting the Costs of Solar Power Beyond Silicon: Cutting the Costs of Solar Power Stories of Discovery & Innovation Beyond Silicon: Cutting the Costs of Solar Power Enlarge Photo Courtesy of University of Illinois Mechanically flexible, high efficiency solar module that uses an interconnected array of microscale GaAs photovoltaic cells, grown in a multilayer stack on a wafer and then printed onto a sheet of plastic. Enlarge Photo 04.15.11 Beyond Silicon: Cutting the Costs of Solar Power New method of fabricating semiconductors from gallium arsenide promises more affordable solar power, improved semiconductor devices. The biggest single barrier to widespread adoption of solar power continues to be the cost of solar cells. University of Illinois materials scientists supported by the DOE Office of Science have scored a

94

Reducing the Cost of Energy from Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Parabolic trough solar technology is the most proven and lowest cost large-scale solar power technology available today, primarily because of the nine large commercial-scale solar power plants that are operating in the California Mojave Desert. However, no new plants have been built during the past ten years because the cost of power from these plants is more expensive than power from conventional fossil fuel power plants. This paper reviews the current cost of energy and the potential for reducing the cost of energy from parabolic trough solar power plant technology based on the latest technological advancements and projected improvements from industry and sponsored R&D. The paper also looks at the impact of project financing and incentives on the cost of energy.

Price, H.; Kearney, D.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

POWER COST NORMALIZATION STUDIES CIVILIAN POWER REACTOR PROGRAM--Sept. 1, 1959  

SciTech Connect

In connection with the development of a comprehensive plan for a ten- year civilian power reactor program, the AEC has had a series of status reports prepared to present a comprehensive review of the technical and economic status of various nuclear power reactor concepts. In as much as the economic data reported by the various contractors reflected different design philosophies, different estimating policies, and in some cases a technology not verified by the AEC definition of current status, Sargent and Lundy was requested to review the aforementioned status reports and to prepare normalized cost estimates of each of eight reactor concepts. The reactors were studied in three plant sizes: 75, 200, and 300 Mw(e). The reactor concepts considered were pressurized water, boiling water, organic cooled, sodium graphite, liquid metal cooled, fluid fuel (aqueous homogeneous), heavy water moderated, and gas cooled. (W.D.M.)

1960-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

Microsoft PowerPoint - Cost Escalation.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feb-07 May-07 P e rc e n t C h a n g e in In d e x MEPS NASS 304 US BLS 101508 Transformer Costs Transformer Costs 0 5 10 15 20 25 Jun-96 Jun-97 Jun-98 Jun-99 Jun-00 Jun-01...

97

Minimizing data center cooling and server power costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on power minimization in a data center accounting for both the information technology equipment and the air conditioning power usage. In particular we address the server consolidation (on/off state assignment) concurrently with the ... Keywords: datacenter

Ehsan Pakbaznia; Massoud Pedram

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Cost of Providing Ancillary Services from Power Plants: Reactive Supply and Voltage Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a methodology for determining the variable costs of generating and supplying reactive power to a transmission system, via the generator step-up transformer, for system voltage control. The report examines the costs of additional energy losses, maintenance, repair, and plant aging associated with the generation of reactive power. TR-107270-V3SI contains System of International units.

1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

99

Cost and performance analysis of biomass-based integrated gasification combined-cycle (BIGCC) power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To make a significant contribution to the power mix in the United States biomass power systems must be competitive on a cost and efficiency basis. We describe the cost and performance of three biomass-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. The economic viability and efficiency performance of the IGCC generation technology appear to be quite attractive.

Craig, K. R.; Mann, M. K.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses an analysis of the total cost of ownership of fuel cell-powered and traditional battery-powered material handling equipment (MHE, or more typically 'forklifts'). A number of fuel cell MHE deployments have received funding support from the federal government. Using data from these government co-funded deployments, DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been evaluating the performance of fuel cells in material handling applications. NREL has assessed the total cost of ownership of fuel cell MHE and compared it to the cost of ownership of traditional battery-powered MHE. As part of its cost of ownership assessment, NREL looked at a range of costs associated with MHE operation, including the capital costs of battery and fuel cell systems, the cost of supporting infrastructure, maintenance costs, warehouse space costs, and labor costs. Considering all these costs, NREL found that fuel cell MHE can have a lower overall cost of ownership than comparable battery-powered MHE.

Ramsden, T.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "negative power cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

An analysis of nuclear power plant operating costs: A 1995 update  

SciTech Connect

Over the years real (inflation-adjusted) O&M cost have begun to level off. The objective of this report is to determine whether the industry and NRC initiatives to control costs have resulted in this moderation in the growth of O&M costs. Because the industry agrees that the control of O&M costs is crucial to the viability of the technology, an examination of the factors causing the moderation in costs is important. A related issue deals with projecting nuclear operating costs into the future. Because of the escalation in nuclear operating costs (and the fall in fossil fuel prices) many State and Federal regulatory commissions are examining the economics of the continued operation of nuclear power plants under their jurisdiction. The economics of the continued operation of a nuclear power plant is typically examined by comparing the cost of the plants continued operation with the cost of obtaining the power from other sources. This assessment requires plant-specific projections of nuclear operating costs. Analysts preparing these projections look at past industry-wide cost trends and consider whether these trends are likely to continue. To determine whether these changes in trends will continue into the future, information about the causal factors influencing costs and the future trends in these factors are needed. An analysis of the factors explaining the moderation in cost growth will also yield important insights into the question of whether these trends will continue.

1995-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

102

Capping the electricity cost of cloud-scale data centers with impacts on power markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a novel electricity cost capping algorithm that not only minimizes the electricity cost of operating cloud-scale data centers, but also enforces a cost budget on the monthly electricity bill. Our solution first explicitly models the impacts of power demands on electricity prices and the power consumption of cooling and networking in the minimization of electricity cost. In the second step, if the electricity cost exceeds a desired monthly budget due to unexpectedly high workloads, our solution guarantees the quality of service for premium customers and trades off the request throughput of ordinary customers. We formulate electricity cost capping as two related constrained optimization problems and propose an efficient algorithm based on mixed integer programming. Simulation results show that our solution outperforms the state-ofthe-art solutions by having lower electricity costs and achieves desired cost capping with maximized request throughput.

Yanwei Zhang; Yefu Wang; Xiaorui Wang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Magnetically Controlled Reactor Shrinks Power Quality Costs and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ensures less than 2-3% main harmonic distortion even without special filters. Transformer-like construction ensures reliable operation. MCR's increase power quality through...

104

Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Power Capacity Incremental Capacity (2007, MW) United States China Spain Germany Indiaand India (Table 3). With major development now occurring on several continents, wind

Wiser, Ryan H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Cost and Performance Comparison Baseline for Fossil Energy Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for coal. Advances in technology are making it possible to generate power from fossil fuels with great improvements in the efficiency of energy use while at the same...

106

Tacomo Power/AVTA PHEV Demand and Energy Cost Demonstration ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

facility. This report provides results from charging of several PHEVs at the Tacoma Power facility as a preliminary assessment of how PHEVs will impact the electricity grid....

107

Cost-Effective Pole or Pad Mounted Power Quality Solution: Component and System Cost Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Static Series Compensation (SSC) devices, sometines called "dynamic voltage restorers" or DVRs, have been available on the marketplace since about 1994. These devices are designed to mitigate voltage sags and swells originating from the power system by injecting voltage in series with the power supply. The additive effect of the injected voltage produces an essentially undisturbed voltage for the load. There are several vendors presently producing SSCs. These devices all have essentially the same power e...

2000-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

108

Integrated gasification-combined-cycle power plants - Performance and cost estimates  

SciTech Connect

Several studies of Integrated Gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) power plants have indicated that these plants have the potential for providing performance and cost improvements over conventional coal-fired steam power plants with flue gas desulfurization. Generally, IGCC power plants have a higher energy-conversion efficiency, require less water, conform with existing environmental standards at lower cost, and are expected to convert coal to electricity at lower costs than coal-fired steam plants. This study compares estimated costs and performance of various IGCC plant design configurations. A second-law analysis identifies the real energy waste in each design configuration. In addition, a thermoeconomic analysis reveals the potential for reducing the cost of electricity generated by an IGCC power plant.

Tsatsaronis, G.; Tawfik, T.; Lin, L. (Tennessee State Univ., Nashville (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

NETL Patented CO2-Removal Sorbents Promise Power and Cost Savings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Patented CO2-Removal Sorbents Promise Power and Cost Savings Patented CO2-Removal Sorbents Promise Power and Cost Savings NETL Patented CO2-Removal Sorbents Promise Power and Cost Savings May 30, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Carbon dioxide removal sorbents developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) could result in power and cost savings for users of some heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems under a recently signed license agreement. NETL, the research and development laboratory for DOE's Office of Fossil Energy, entered into a patent license agreement with Boston-based Enverid Systems Inc. for NETL-developed solid sorbents that remove CO2 from gas streams. NETL's sorbents will be incorporated into an Enverid product called EnClaire™, which adds on to HVAC systems to reduce power

110

Understanding the cost of power interruptions to U.S. electricity consumers  

SciTech Connect

The massive electric power blackout in the northeastern United States and Canada on August 14-15, 2003 resulted in the U.S. electricity system being called ''antiquated'' and catalyzed discussions about modernizing the grid. Industry sources suggested that investments of $50 to $100 billion would be needed. This report seeks to quantify an important piece of information that has been missing from these discussions: how much do power interruptions and fluctuations in power quality (power-quality events) cost U.S. electricity consumers? Accurately estimating this cost will help assess the potential benefits of investments in improving the reliability of the grid. We develop a comprehensive end-use framework for assessing the cost to U.S. electricity consumers of power interruptions and power-quality events (referred to collectively as ''reliability events''). The framework expresses these costs as a function of: (1) Number of customers by type in a region; (2) Frequency and type of reliability events experienced annually (including both power interruptions and power-quality events) by these customers; (3) Cost of reliability events; and (4) Vulnerability of customers to these events. The framework is designed so that its cost estimate can be improved as additional data become available. Using our framework, we estimate that the national cost of power interruptions is about $80 billion annually, based on the best information available in the public domain. However, there are large gaps in and significant uncertainties about the information currently available. Notably, we were not able to develop an estimate of power-quality events. Sensitivity analysis of some of these uncertainties suggests that the total annual cost could range from less than $30 billion to more than $130 billion. Because of this large range and the enormous cost of the decisions that may be based on this estimate, we encourage policy makers, regulators, and industry to jointly under take the comparatively modest-cost improvements needed in the information used to estimate the cost of reliability events. Specific areas for improvement include: coordinated, nationwide collection of updated information on the cost of reliability events; consistent definition and recording of the duration and frequency of reliability events, including power-quality events; and improved information on the costs of and efforts by consumers to reduce their vulnerability to reliability events.

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Eto, Joseph H.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Understanding the cost of power interruptions to U.S. electricity consumers  

SciTech Connect

The massive electric power blackout in the northeastern United States and Canada on August 14-15, 2003 resulted in the U.S. electricity system being called ''antiquated'' and catalyzed discussions about modernizing the grid. Industry sources suggested that investments of $50 to $100 billion would be needed. This report seeks to quantify an important piece of information that has been missing from these discussions: how much do power interruptions and fluctuations in power quality (power-quality events) cost U.S. electricity consumers? Accurately estimating this cost will help assess the potential benefits of investments in improving the reliability of the grid. We develop a comprehensive end-use framework for assessing the cost to U.S. electricity consumers of power interruptions and power-quality events (referred to collectively as ''reliability events''). The framework expresses these costs as a function of: (1) Number of customers by type in a region; (2) Frequency and type of reliability events experienced annually (including both power interruptions and power-quality events) by these customers; (3) Cost of reliability events; and (4) Vulnerability of customers to these events. The framework is designed so that its cost estimate can be improved as additional data become available. Using our framework, we estimate that the national cost of power interruptions is about $80 billion annually, based on the best information available in the public domain. However, there are large gaps in and significant uncertainties about the information currently available. Notably, we were not able to develop an estimate of power-quality events. Sensitivity analysis of some of these uncertainties suggests that the total annual cost could range from less than $30 billion to more than $130 billion. Because of this large range and the enormous cost of the decisions that may be based on this estimate, we encourage policy makers, regulators, and industry to jointly under take the comparatively modest-cost improvements needed in the information used to estimate the cost of reliability events. Specific areas for improvement include: coordinated, nationwide collection of updated information on the cost of reliability events; consistent definition and recording of the duration and frequency of reliability events, including power-quality events; and improved information on the costs of and efforts by consumers to reduce their vulnerability to reliability events.

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Eto, Joseph H.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Small Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs Small Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs September 8, 2010 - 10:00am Addthis Kevin Craft Carmen, Oklahoma, is not your average small town. It was the first recipient of an Energy Efficiency and Conservation block grant - and the small town of 412 is using that Recovery Act funding to cut costs through wind energy. Through a $242,500 Recovery Act grant, town officials purchased four 5 kW and one 10 kW wind turbines. Officials are using wind energy to offset electricity costs for all town-owned buildings and save an estimated $24,000 a year. According to Therese Kephart, Carmen's town clerk and treasurer, the goal of the project is to produce enough electricity to run all town-owned buildings.

113

As Electric Vehicles Take Charge, Costs Power Down | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

As Electric Vehicles Take Charge, Costs Power Down As Electric Vehicles Take Charge, Costs Power Down As Electric Vehicles Take Charge, Costs Power Down January 13, 2012 - 1:29pm Addthis Thanks to a cost-sharing project with the Energy Department, General Motors has been able to develop the capacity to build electric and hybrid motors internally. That capacity has made cars like the upcoming Chevy Spark EV (above) possible. | Image courtesy of General Motors. Thanks to a cost-sharing project with the Energy Department, General Motors has been able to develop the capacity to build electric and hybrid motors internally. That capacity has made cars like the upcoming Chevy Spark EV (above) possible. | Image courtesy of General Motors. Patrick B. Davis Patrick B. Davis Vehicle Technologies Program Manager The record number of electric-drive vehicles on the floor of Detroit's

114

Preliminary benefit-cost analysis of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) power addition  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this report is to conduct a preliminary benefit-cost study for the proposed power addition to FFTF to determine whether the project is cost-effective. If the project is authorized, construction will begin in 1986 and end in 1991. Full power operation is scheduled to begin in 1991 and a project life of 20 years is assumed. The undiscounted cost during the construction period of the FFTF power addition is estimated to be approximately $117 million over the construction period (1984 dollars). An additional $3 million is estimated as the opportunity cost - or value of these resources in their most favorable alternative use - of surplus FFTF equipment and unused CRBR equipment, including materials for steam generator fabrication. The annual operating and maintenance cost of the project is estimated to be about $2.1 million in 1984 dollars. 20 references.

Callaway, J.M.; Lezberg, A.J.; Scott, M.J.; Tawil, J.J.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Low cost high power GaSB photovoltaic cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High power density and high capacity factor are important attributes of a thermophotovoltaics (TPV) system and GaSb cells are enabling for TPV systems. A TPV cogeneration unit at an off grid site will compliment solar arrays producing heat and electricity on cloudy days with the solar arrays generating electricity on sunny days. Herein

Lewis M. Fraas; Han X. Huang; Shi-Zhong Ye; She Hui; James Avery; Russell Ballantyne

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Low cost high power GaSb thermophotovoltaic cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High power density and high capacity factor are important attributes of a TPV system and GaSb cells are enabling for TPV systems. A TPV cogeneration unit at an off grid site will compliment solar arrays producing heat and electricity on cloudy days with the solar arrays generating electricity on sunny days. Herein

Lewis M. Fraas; Han X. Huang; Shi-Zhong Ye; James Avery; Russell Ballantyne

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Regulatory Control of Vehicle and Power Plant Emissions: How Effective and at What Cost?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passenger vehicles and power plants are major sources of greenhouse gas emissions. While economic analyses generally indicate that a broader market-based approach to greenhouse gas reduction would be less costly and more ...

Paltsev, S.

118

Fossil Energy RD&D: Reducing the Cost of CCUS for Coal Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Energy RD&D: Reducing the Cost of CCUS for Coal Power Plants Revision 1, January 31, 2012 DOENETL-20121550 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work...

119

Short-run interfuel substitution in West European power generation : a restriced cost function approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes short-run interfuel substitution between fossil fuels in West European power generation. The problem is studied within a restricted translog cost model, which is estimated by pooling time-series data ...

Söderholm, Patrik

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Low Cost High-H2 Syngas Production for Power and Liquid Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Cost High-H2 Syngas Production for Power and Liquid Fuels Gas Technology Institute (GTI) Project Number: FE0011958 Project Description Proof-of-concept of a metal-polymeric...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "negative power cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Table 1. Updated estimates of power plant capital and operating costs  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Updated estimates of power plant capital and operating costs" Updated estimates of power plant capital and operating costs" ,"Plant Characteristics",,,"Plant Costs (2012$)" ,"Nominal Capacity (MW)","Heat Rate (Btu/kWh)",,"Overnight Capital Cost ($/kW)","Fixed O&M Cost ($/kW-yr)","Variable O&M Cost ($/MWh)" ,,,,,,,"NEMS Input" " Coal" "Single Unit Advanced PC",650,8800,,3246,37.8,4.47,"N" "Dual Unit Advanced PC",1300,8800,,2934,31.18,4.47,"Y" "Single Unit Advanced PC with CCS",650,12000,,5227,80.53,9.51,"Y" "Dual Unit Advanced PC with CCS",1300,12000,,4724,66.43,9.51,"N" "Single Unit IGCC ",600,8700,,4400,62.25,7.22,"N"

122

Cutting Australia’s Carbon Abatement Costs with Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Australian Government Treasury modelling of a carbon price shows that Australia must purchase the benefits of overseas abatement efforts if it is to meet its emission reduction target by 2050. That is, foreign abatement will be required to supplement domestic abatement efforts. If more domestic abatement were available, fewer foreign credits would be needed. As an example, the analysis here shows that for the core Treasury policy scenario, Australia could save up to $185 billion net in abatement costs by 2050 if 25 gigawatts of nuclear generation capacity were built instead of building new fossil fuel generators.

Martin Nicholson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Effect of Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning Costs on Plant Life Cycle Decisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear utilities implementing Life Cycle Management (LCM) Programs and facing run-relicense-retire decisions need to evaluate the financial cost/benefit of such decisions. Decommissioning costs are one element of these evaluations. This report includes a decommissioning cost estimate for Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (CCNPP) that can be used as a reference source by nuclear utilities involved in LCM and license renewal (LR) decisions.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Minimizing Building Electricity Costs in a Dynamic Power Market: Algorithms and Impact on Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minimizing Building Electricity Costs in a Dynamic Power Market: Algorithms and Impact on Energy of Computing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, P. R. China 2 Department of Electrical and the electricity bills nowa- days are leading to unprecedented costs. Electricity price is market-based and dynamic

Wang, Dan

125

Reducing Power Production Costs by Utilizing Petroleum Coke  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petroleum coke, a byproduct of the petroleum-refining process, is an attractive primary or supplemental fuel for power production primarily because of a progressive and predictable increase in the production volumes of petroleum coke. It is most commonly blended with coal in proportions suitable to meet sulfur emission compliance, and is generally less reactive than coal. Therefore, the cofiring of petroleum coke with coal typically improves ignition, flame stability, and carbon loss relative to the comb...

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

126

REDUCING POWER PRODUCTION COSTS BY UTILIZING PETROLEUM COKE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petroleum coke, a byproduct of the petroleum-refining process, is an attractive primary or supplemental fuel for power production primarily because of a progressive and predictable increase in the production volumes of petroleum coke (1, 2). Petroleum coke is most commonly blended with coal in proportions suitable to meet sulfur emission compliance. Petroleum coke is generally less reactive than coal; therefore, the cofiring of petroleum coke with coal typically improves ignition, flame stability, and carbon loss relative to the combustion of petroleum coke alone. Although petroleum coke is a desirable fuel for producing relatively inexpensive electrical power, concerns about the effects of petroleum coke blending on combustion and pollution control processes exist in the coal-fired utility industry (3). The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) completed a 2-year technical assessment of petroleum coke as a supplemental fuel. A survey questionnaire was sent to seven electric utility companies that are currently cofiring coal and petroleum coke in an effort to solicit specific suggestions on research needs and fuel selections. An example of the letter and survey questionnaire is presented in Appendix A. Interest was expressed by most utilities in evaluating the effects of petroleum coke blending on grindability, combustion reactivity, fouling, slagging, and fly ash emissions control. Unexpectedly, concern over corrosion was not expressed by the utilities contacted. Although all seven utilities responded to the question, only two utilities, Northern States Power Company (NSP) and Ameren, sent fuels to the EERC for evaluation. Both utilities sent subbituminous coals from the Power River Basin and petroleum shot coke samples. Petroleum shot coke is produced unintentionally during operational upsets in the petroleum refining process. This report evaluates the effects of petroleum shot coke blending on grindability, fuel reactivity, fouling/slagging, and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) fly ash collection efficiency.

Kevin C. Galbreath; Donald L. Toman; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station: Comparison of two decommissioning cost estimates developed for the same commercial nuclear reactor power station  

SciTech Connect

This study presents the results of a comparison of a previous decommissioning cost study by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and a recent decommissioning cost study of TLG Engineering, Inc., for the same commercial nuclear power reactor station. The purpose of this comparative analysis on the same plant is to determine the reasons why subsequent estimates for similar plants by others were significantly higher in cost and external occupational radiation exposure (ORE) than the PNL study. The primary purpose of the original study by PNL (NUREG/CR-0672) was to provide information on the available technology, the safety considerations, and the probable costs and ORE for the decommissioning of a large boiling water reactor (BWR) power station at the end of its operating life. This information was intended for use as background data and bases in the modification of existing regulations and in the development of new regulations pertaining to decommissioning activities. It was also intended for use by utilities in planning for the decommissioning of their nuclear power stations. The TLG study, initiated in 1987 and completed in 1989, was for the same plant, Washington Public Supply System's Unit 2 (WNP-2), that PNL used as its reference plant in its 1980 decommissioning study. Areas of agreement and disagreement are identified, and reasons for the areas of disagreement are discussed. 31 refs., 3 figs., 22 tabs.

Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Marginal Cost of Steam and Power from Cogeneration Systems Using a Rational Value-Allocation Procedure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The problem of pricing steam and power from cogeneration systems has confounded engineers, economists, and accountants for a very long time. Normal industry practice is to fix the cost of one (usually power) at its local market price, and calculate the “n

Kumana, J. D.; Al-Gwaiz, M. M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Impacts on irrigated agriculture of changes in electricity costs resulting from Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Irrigation is a major factor in the growth of US agricultural productivity, especially in western states, which account for more than 85% of the nation`s irrigated acreage. In some of these states, almost all cropland is irrigated, and nearly 50% of the irrigation is done with electrically powered pumps. Therefore, even small increases in the cost of electricity could have a disproportionate impact on irrigated agriculture. This technical memorandum examines the impacts that could result from proposed changes in the power marketing programs of the Western Area Power Administration`s Salt Lake City Area Office. The changes could increase the cost of power to all Western customers, including rural municipalities and irrigation districts that rely on inexpensive federal power to pump water. The impacts are assessed by translating changes in Western`s wholesale power rate into changes in the cost of pumping water as an input for agricultural production. Farmers can adapt to higher electricity prices in many ways, such as (1) using different pumping fuels, (2) adding workers and increasing management to irrigate more efficiently, and (3) growing more drought-tolerant crops. This study projects several responses, including using less groundwater and planting fewer waterintensive crops. The study finds that when dependence on Western`s power is high, the cost of power can have a major effect on energy use, agricultural practices, and the distribution of planted acreage. The biggest percentage changes in farm income would occur (1) in Nevada and Utah (however, all projected changes are less than 2% of the baseline) and (2) under the marketing alternatives that represent the lowest capacity and energy offer considered in Western`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement. The aggregate impact on farm incomes and the value of total farm production would be much smaller than that suggested by the changes in water use and planted acreage.

Edwards, B.K.; Flaim, S.J.; Howitt, R.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Palmer, S.C. [Western Area Power Administration, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Wind Power Impacts on Electric Power System Operating Costs: Summary and Perspective on Work to Date; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electric utility system planners and operators are concerned that variations in wind plant output may increase the operating costs of the system. This concern arises because the system must maintain an instantaneous balance between the aggregate demand for electric power and the total power generated by all power plants feeding the system. This is a highly sophisticated task that utility operators and automatic controls perform routinely, based on well-known operating characteristics for conventional power plants and a great deal of experience accumulated over many years. System operators are concerned that variations in wind plant output will force the conventional power plants to provide compensating variations to maintain system balance, thus causing the conventional power plants to deviate from operating points chosen to minimize the total cost of operating the system. The operators' concerns are compounded by the fact that conventional power plants are generally under their control and thus are dispatchable, whereas wind plants are controlled instead by nature. Although these are valid concerns, the key issue is not whether a system with a significant amount of wind capacity can be operated reliably, but rather to what extent the system operating costs are increased by the variability of the wind.

Smith, J. C.; DeMeo, E. A.; Parsons, B.; Milligan, M.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Electric Power Interruption Cost Estimates for Individual Industries, Sectors, and U.S. Economy  

SciTech Connect

During the last 20 years, utilities and researchers have begun to understand the value in the collection and analysis of interruption cost data. The continued investigation of the monetary impact of power outages will facilitate the advancement of the analytical methods used to measure the costs and benefits from the perspective of the energy consumer. More in-depth analysis may be warranted because of the privatization and deregulation of power utilities, price instability in certain regions of the U.S. and the continued evolution of alternative auxiliary power systems.

Balducci, Patrick J.; Roop, Joseph M.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.; DeSteese, John G.; Weimar, Mark R.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

132

A Study on Cost Allocation in Nuclear Power Coupled with Desalination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As for a single-purpose desalination plant, there is no particular difficulty in computing the unit cost of the water, which is obtained by dividing the annual total costs by the output of fresh water. When it comes to a dual-purpose plant, cost allocation is needed between the two products. No cost allocation is needed in some cases where two alternatives producing the same water and electricity output are to be compared. In these cases, the consideration of the total cost is then sufficient. This study assumes MED (Multi-Effect Distillation) technology is adopted when nuclear power is coupled with desalination. The total production cost of the two commodities in dual-purpose plant can easily be obtained by using costing methods, if the necessary raw data are available. However, it is not easy to calculate a separate cost for each product, because high-pressure steam plant costs cannot be allocated to one or the other without adopting arbitrary methods. Investigation on power credit method is carried out focusing on the cost allocation of combined benefits due to dual production, electricity and water. The illustrative calculation is taken from Preliminary Economic Feasibility Study of Nuclear Desalination in Madura Island, Indonesia. The study is being performed by BATAN (National Nuclear Energy Agency), KAERI (Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute) and under support of the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) started in the year 2002 in order to perform a preliminary economic feasibility in providing the Madurese with sufficient power and potable water for the public and to support industrialization and tourism in Madura Region. The SMART reactor coupled with MED is considered to be an option to produce electricity and potable water. This study indicates that the correct recognition of combined benefits attributable to dual production is important in carrying out economics of desalination coupled with nuclear power. (authors)

Lee, ManKi; Kim, SeungSu; Moon, KeeHwan; Lim, ChaeYoung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 105, YuSung, DaeJon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amonix, Inc. Amonix, Inc. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix, Inc. A series of brief fact sheet on various topics including:Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation,High Efficiency Concentrating Photovoltaic Power System,Reaching Grid Parity Using BP Solar Crystalline Silicon Technology, Fully Integrated Building Science Solutions for Residential and Commercial Photovoltaic Energy Generation,A Value Chain Partnership to Accelerate U.S. Photovoltaic Industry Growth,AC Module PV System,Flexible Organic Polymer-Based PV For Building Integrated Commercial Applications,Flexable Integrated PV System,Delivering Grid-Parity Solar Electricity On Flat Commercial Rooftops,Fully Automated Systems Technology, Concentrating Solar Panels: Bringing the Highest Power and Lowest Cost to

134

REDUCING POWER PRODUCTION COSTS BY UTILIZING PETROLEUM COKE  

SciTech Connect

A Powder River Basin subbituminous coal from the North Antelope mine and a petroleum shot coke were received from Northern States Power Company (NSP) for testing the effects of parent fuel properties on coal-coke blend grindability and evaluating the utility of petroleum coke blending as a strategy for improving electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes are generally harder than coals, as indicated by Hardgrove grindability tests. Therefore, the weaker coal component may concentrate in the finer size fractions during the pulverizing of coal-coke blends. The possibility of a coal-coke size fractionation effect is being investigated because it may adversely affect combustion performance. Although the blending of petroleum coke with coal may adversely affect combustion performance, it may enhance ESP particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes contain much higher concentrations of V relative to coals. Consequently, coke blending can significantly increase the V content of fly ash resulting from coal-coke combustion. Pentavalent vanadium oxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) is a known catalyst for transforming gaseous sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}[g]) to gaseous sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}[g]). The presence of SO{sub 3}(g) strongly affects fly ash resistivity and, thus, ESP performance.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

NREL: News Feature - Super-Efficient Cells Key to Low-Cost Solar Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Super-Efficient Cells Key to Low-Cost Solar Power Super-Efficient Cells Key to Low-Cost Solar Power February 16, 2011 This photo shows eight Amonix 7700 solar power generators, those in front tilted horizontally, those in the rear tilted near vertically. Each is a huge rectangle divided into hundreds of squares holding cells and lenses. Enlarge image The Amonix 7700 Concentrated Photovoltaic (CPV) Solar Power Generators are showcasing reliability and undergoing validation-of-performance measurements at the SolarTAC facility in Aurora, Colo. Credit: Dennis Schroeder In this photo, a man in an orange safety vest and hardhat is using a laptop, with large concentrated photovoltaic generators in the background. Enlarge image A technician at SolarTAC in Aurora, CO, enters some numbers into a laptop as he monitors validation of the Amonix 7700 Solar Power Generators.

136

Cost of Power Interruptions to Electricity Consumers in the UnitedStates (U.S.)  

SciTech Connect

The massive electric power blackout in the northeastern U.S.and Canada on August 14-15, 2003 catalyzed discussions about modernizingthe U.S. electricity grid. Industry sources suggested that investments of$50 to $100 billion would be needed. This work seeks to better understandan important piece of information that has been missing from thesediscussions: What do power interruptions and fluctuations in powerquality (power-quality events) cost electricity consumers? We developed abottom-up approach for assessing the cost to U.S. electricity consumersof power interruptions and power-quality events (referred to collectivelyas "reliability events"). The approach can be used to help assess thepotential benefits of investments in improving the reliability of thegrid. We developed a new estimate based on publicly availableinformation, and assessed how uncertainties in these data affect thisestimate using sensitivity analysis.

Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Eto, Joseph H.

2006-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

137

Effects of Coal Quality on Power Plant Performance and Costs, Volume 4: Review of Coal Science Fundamentals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The costs of generating electricity in a coal-fired power plant depend not only on the delivered cost of coal but on how coal quality affects plant performance. Utilities need to account for both these factors to decide which coals provide the most power at the lowest cost.

1986-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

138

Materials cost evaluation report for high-power Li-ion batteries.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the lead federal agency in the partnership between the U.S. automobile industry and the federal government to develop fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) as part of the FreedomCAR Partnership. DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Office sponsors the Advanced Technology Development (ATD) Program--involving 5 of its national laboratories--to assist the industrial developers of high-power lithium-ion batteries to overcome the barriers of cost, calendar life, and abuse tolerance so that this technology can be rendered practical for use in HEV and FCEV applications under the FreedomCAR Partnership. In the area of cost reduction, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is working to identify and develop advanced anode, cathode, and electrolyte components that can significantly reduce the cost of the cell chemistry, while simultaneously extending the calendar life and enhancing the inherent safety of this electrochemical system. The material cost savings are quantified and tracked via the use of a cell and battery design model that establishes the quantity of each material needed in the production of batteries that are designed to meet the requirements of a minimum-power-assist HEV battery or a maximum-power-assist HEV battery for the FreedomCAR Partnership. Similar models will be developed for FEV batteries when the requirements for those batteries are finalized. In order to quantify the material costs relative to the FreedomCAR battery cost goals, ANL uses (1) laboratory cell performance data, (2) its battery design model and (3) battery manufacturing process yields to create battery-level material cost models. Using these models and industry-supplied material cost information, ANL assigns battery-level material costs for different cell chemistries. These costs can then be compared with the battery cost goals to determine the probability of meeting the goals with these cell chemistries. As can be seen from the results of this materials cost study, a cell chemistry based on the use of a LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode material is lowest-cost and meets our battery-level material cost goal of <$250 for a 25-kW minimum-power-assist HEV battery. A major contributing factor is the high-rate capability of this material, which allows one to design a lower-capacity cell to meet the battery-level power and energy requirements. This reduces the quantities of the other materials needed to produce a 25-kW minimum-power-assist HEV battery. The same is true for the 40-kW maximum-power-assist HEV battery. Additionally, the LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode is much more thermally and chemically stable than the LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} type cathode, which should enhance inherent safety and extend calendar life (if the LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode can be stabilized against dissolution via HF attack). Therefore, we recommend that the FreedomCAR Partnership focus its research and development efforts on developing this type of low-cost high-power lithium-ion cell chemistry. Details supporting this recommendation are provided in the body of this report.

Henriksen, G. L.; Amine, K.; Liu, J.

2003-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

139

Molten Salt Power Tower Cost Model for the System Advisor Model (SAM)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a component-based cost model developed for molten-salt power tower solar power plants. The cost model was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), using data from several prior studies, including a contracted analysis from WorleyParsons Group, which is included herein as an Appendix. The WorleyParsons' analysis also estimated material composition and mass for the plant to facilitate a life cycle analysis of the molten salt power tower technology. Details of the life cycle assessment have been published elsewhere. The cost model provides a reference plant that interfaces with NREL's System Advisor Model or SAM. The reference plant assumes a nominal 100-MWe (net) power tower running with a nitrate salt heat transfer fluid (HTF). Thermal energy storage is provided by direct storage of the HTF in a two-tank system. The design assumes dry-cooling. The model includes a spreadsheet that interfaces with SAM via the Excel Exchange option in SAM. The spreadsheet allows users to estimate the costs of different-size plants and to take into account changes in commodity prices. This report and the accompanying Excel spreadsheet can be downloaded at https://sam.nrel.gov/cost.

Turchi, C. S.; Heath, G. A.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Modeling regional end user price/cost relationships in a widespread interconnected power system  

SciTech Connect

A combined programming and regression modeling approach is developed to analyze regional retail price/cost relationships for a widespread interconnected power system characterized by low population density and uniform (regulated) retail tariffs. The programming model is designed to calculate on the hour the delivered cost of electricity from 5 thermal power stations and one pumped storage hydrostation to end users in 8 distribution regions. A simultaneous equation regression model then analyses the link between retail prices charged end users, regional demand and supply characteristics, industry financial objectives and departures from economically efficient pricing. The electricity supply industry in Queensland Australia is used as a framework.

Tamaschke, R.; Docwra, G.; Stillman, R. [Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "negative power cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Effects of regional insolation differences upon advanced solar thermal electric power plant performance and energy costs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study determines the performance and cost of four 10 MWe advanced solar thermal electric power plants sited in various regions of the continental United States. The solar plants are conceptualized to begin commercial operation in the year 2000. It is assumed that major subsystem performance will have improved substantially as compared to that of pilot plants currently operating or under construction. The net average annual system efficiency is therefore roughly twice that of current solar thermal electric power plant designs. Similarly, capital costs reflecting goals based on high-volume mass production that are considered to be appropriate for the year 2000 have been used. These costs, which are approximately an order of magnitude below the costs of current experimental projects, are believed to be achievable as a result of the anticipated sizeable solar penetration into the energy market in the 1990 to 2000 timeframe. The paraboloidal dish, central receiver, cylindrical parabolic trough, and compound parabolic concentrators comprise the advanced collector concepts studied. All concepts exhibit their best performance when sited in regional areas such as the sunbelt where the annual insolation is high. The regional variation in solar plant performance has been assessed in relation to the expected rise in the future cost of residential and commercial electricity in the same regions. A discussion of the regional insolation data base, a description of the solar systems performance and costs, and a presentation of a range for the forecast cost of conventional electricity by region and nationally over the next several decades are given.

Latta, A.F.; Bowyer, J.M.; Fujita, T.; Richter, P.H.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

2 Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2007 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Capital Costs Drive Wind Power Prices . . . . .20 Installed Project Costs Continued to Rise in 2007, After. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Project Cost Increases Are a Function of Turbine Prices, and Turbine Prices Have Increased . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Operations and Maintenance Costs Are Affected by the Age and Size of the Project, Among Other

143

NUCLEAR-CONVENTIONAL POWER PLANT COST STUDY CONVENTIONAL COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS, 25,000 KW TO 325,000 KW, FOR ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY, LEMONT, ILLINOIS  

SciTech Connect

In order to establish a basis for comparing the estimated cost of nuclear power plant designs, a set of general and detailed design considerations for conventional coal-fired power plants was established. Five preliminary designs of conventional coal-fired power plants ranging in size from 25to 325 mw were selected, and cost estimates were prepared. ( A.C.)

Chittenden, W.A.

1959-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Materials cost evaluation report for high-power Li-ion batteries.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the lead federal agency in the partnership between the U.S. automobile industry and the federal government to develop fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) as part of the FreedomCAR Partnership. DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Office sponsors the Advanced Technology Development (ATD) Program--involving 5 of its national laboratories--to assist the industrial developers of high-power lithium-ion batteries to overcome the barriers of cost, calendar life, and abuse tolerance so that this technology can be rendered practical for use in HEV and FCEV applications under the FreedomCAR Partnership. In the area of cost reduction, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is working to identify and develop advanced anode, cathode, and electrolyte components that can significantly reduce the cost of the cell chemistry, while simultaneously extending the calendar life and enhancing the inherent safety of this electrochemical system. The material cost savings are quantified and tracked via the use of a cell and battery design model that establishes the quantity of each material needed in the production of batteries that are designed to meet the requirements of a minimum-power-assist HEV battery or a maximum-power-assist HEV battery for the FreedomCAR Partnership. Similar models will be developed for FEV batteries when the requirements for those batteries are finalized. In order to quantify the material costs relative to the FreedomCAR battery cost goals, ANL uses (1) laboratory cell performance data, (2) its battery design model and (3) battery manufacturing process yields to create battery-level material cost models. Using these models and industry-supplied material cost information, ANL assigns battery-level material costs for different cell chemistries. These costs can then be compared with the battery cost goals to determine the probability of meeting the goals with these cell chemistries. As can be seen from the results of this materials cost study, a cell chemistry based on the use of a LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode material is lowest-cost and meets our battery-level material cost goal of battery. A major contributing factor is the high-rate capability of this material, which allows one to design a lower-capacity cell to meet the battery-level power and energy requirements. This reduces the quantities of the other materials needed to produce a 25-kW minimum-power-assist HEV battery. The same is true for the 40-kW maximum-power-assist HEV battery. Additionally, the LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode is much more thermally and chemically stable than the LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} type cathode, which should enhance inherent safety and extend calendar life (if the LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode can be stabilized against dissolution via HF attack). Therefore, we recommend that the FreedomCAR Partnership focus its research and development efforts on developing this type of low-cost high-power lithium-ion cell chemistry. Details supporting this recommendation are provided in the body of this report.

Henriksen, G. L.; Amine, K.; Liu, J.

2003-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

145

An Evolutionary Path for Concentrating Thermal Solar Power Technologies: A New Approach for Modeling CSP Power Costs and Potential  

SciTech Connect

Concentrating thermal solar power (CSP) technology is a potentially competitive power generation option, particularly in arid regions where direct sunlight is abundant. We examine the potential role of CSP power plants and their contribution to carbon emissions reduction. The answers to these questions depend on the cost of electricity generated by CSP plants. Although a few studies have projected future CSP costs based on assumptions for technology advancement and the effect of economies of scale and learning curves, few studies have considered the combined effects of intermittency, solar irradiance changes by season, and diurnal and seasonal system load changes. Because the generation of a solar plant varies over a day and by season, the interactions between CSP generators and other generators in the electric system can play an important role in determining costs. In effect, CSP electricity generation cost will depend on the CSP market penetration. This paper examines this relationship and explores possible evolutionary paths for CSP technologies with and without thermal storage.

Zhang, Yabei; Smith, Steven J.

2008-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

146

The Cost of Power Disturbances to Industrial and Digital Economy Companies June 2001 ID: 1006274  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was originally published and is the same as EPRI Product 1006274, The Cost of Power Disturbances to Industrial and Digital Economy Companies, (June 2001).The importance of reliable, high-quality electrical power continues to grow as society becomes ever more reliant on digital circuitry for everything from e-commerce to industrial process controllers to the onboard circuitry in toasters and televisions. With this shift to a digital society, business activities ...

2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

147

NREL: News - NREL Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant Cycling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

013 013 NREL Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant Cycling Necessary for Increased Wind and Solar in the West September 24, 2013 New research from the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) quantifies the potential impacts of increasing wind and solar power generation on the operators of fossil-fueled power plants in the West. To accommodate higher amounts of wind and solar power on the electric grid, utilities must ramp down and ramp up or stop and start conventional generators more frequently to provide reliable power for their customers - a practice called cycling. The study finds that the carbon emissions induced by more frequent cycling are negligible (<0.2%) compared with the carbon reductions achieved through the wind and solar power generation evaluated in the study. Sulfur dioxide

148

Rural electric cooperatives and the cost structure of the electric power industry: A multiproduct analysis  

SciTech Connect

Since 1935, the federal government of the United States has administered a program designed to make electricity available to rural Americans. This dissertation traces the history of the rural electrification program, as well as its costs. While the Congress intended to simply provide help in building the capital structure of rural electric distribution systems, the program continues to flourish some 35 years after these systems first fully covered the countryside. Once the rural distribution systems were built, the government began to provide cooperatives with billions of dollars in subsidized loans for the generation of electric power. Although this program costs the taxpayers nearly $1 billion per year, no one has ever tested its efficacy. The coops' owner/members do not have the right to trade their individual ownership shares. The RECs do not fully exploit the scale and scope economies observed in the investor-owned sector of this industry. This dissertation compares the relative productive efficiencies of the RECs and the investor-owned electric utilities (IOUs) in the United States. Using multiproduct translog cost functions, the estimated costs of cooperatives are compared to those of IOUs in providing identical output bundles. Three separate products are considered as outputs: (1) wholesale power; (2) power sold to large industrial customers; and (3) power sold to residential and commercial customers. It is estimated that, were the RECs forced to pay market prices for their inputs, their costs would exceed those incurred by the IOUs by about 24 percent. Several policy recommendations are made: (1) the RECs should be converted to stockholder-owned, tax-paying corporations; (2) the government should discontinue its subsidized loan program; (3) the government should sell its hydroelectric power at market prices, nullifying the current preference given to cooperatives and municipal distributors in the purchase of this currently underpriced power.

Berry, D.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Handbook for quick cost estimates. A method for developing quick approximate estimates of costs for generic actions for nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a supplement to a ''Handbook for Cost Estimating'' (NUREG/CR-3971) and provides specific guidance for developing ''quick'' approximate estimates of the cost of implementing generic regulatory requirements for nuclear power plants. A method is presented for relating the known construction costs for new nuclear power plants (as contained in the Energy Economic Data Base) to the cost of performing similar work, on a back-fit basis, at existing plants. Cost factors are presented to account for variations in such important cost areas as construction labor productivity, engineering and quality assurance, replacement energy, reworking of existing features, and regional variations in the cost of materials and labor. Other cost categories addressed in this handbook include those for changes in plant operating personnel and plant documents, licensee costs, NRC costs, and costs for other government agencies. Data sheets, worksheets, and appropriate cost algorithms are included to guide the user through preparation of rough estimates. A sample estimate is prepared using the method and the estimating tools provided.

Ball, J.R.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

www.eprg.group.cam.ac.uk Predicting the Contractual Cost of Unplanned Shutdowns of Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Keywords The growing penetration of intermittent power generation technologies is increasing the importance of efficient electricity balancing mechanisms. This paper presents a model for analysing the financial cost to an electricity supplier when a power generator unexpectedly instananeously shuts down, in the context of the UK National Grid. The simulation probabilistically selects historical market data and includes analysis on the impact on the system buy price of historical unplanned generator shutdowns. A case study is presented for one revolutionary nuclear power station design concept, the Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Reactor (ADSR). The reliability of ADSRs is a key issue facing their future development. The model is used to identify when the economic cost of improving reliability exceeds the cost of unplanned shutdowns. The results are presented in a form that allows the reader to scale the cost of accelerator system failures for any capacity factor and coefficient of reliability, for a range of discount rates and electricity prices. unplanned shutdown, cost, intermittent, accelerator-driven subcritical reactor Contact

Power Stations; An Accelerator-driven Subcritical; Steven J Steer; William J Nuttall; Geoffrey T Parks; Leonardo Vn Gonçalves; Steven J Steer; William J Nuttall; Geoffrey T Parks; Leonardo V N Gonçalves

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Review of Conservation Costs and Benefits: Five Years of Experience under the Northwest Power Act  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1980, Congress passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Public Law 96-501). In the Act, Congress mandated that conservation (i.e., improvements in energy efficiency that result in reduced consumptions) be treated as a resource and that all resources be evaluated against uniform criteria to determine the lowest cost mix of resources to meet the Northwest’s energy needs. Since the passage of the Act, the total regional expenditure on conservation by the federal Bonneville Power Administration, public utilities, and investor-owned utilities has been approximately $800 million to $900 million. This includes research and development elements of the program. This paper describes the costs and benefits of conservation programs implemented in the Pacific Northwest and some of the lessons learned to date. The analysis indicates that conservation programs that were run to acquire energy have achieved savings at levelized costs ranging between 1.9 and 2.9 cents per kilowatt hours. Research, development and pilot projects have produced savings at costs that range from less than .10 cents to 8.9 cents per kilowatt hour. Based on the results described in this paper, the Northwest Power Planning Council has concluded that conservation is indeed a resource that the Pacific Northwest can rely on to help meet future needs for electricity. The Council also concluded the region will be able secure conservation measure and resources at a cost lower than it would otherwise have to pay for additional generating resources.

Sheets, E.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Electric Power Interruption Cost Estimates for Individual Industries, Sectors, and the U.S. Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed energy resources (DER) have been promoted as the least-cost approach to meeting steadily increasing energy demand. However, it is unclear whether DER deployment can maintain or improve the electric power supply reliability and quality currently available to consumers. This report address two key factors relating to this question: 1) characteristics of existing power supply reliability, and 2) costs resulting from supply interruptions characteristic of the existing power grid. Interruption cost data collected by the University of Saskatchewan was used in conjunction with data generated by the Census Bureau’s Annual Survey of Manufacturers (Census Bureau, 1995), along with industry shares of gross domestic product (Bureau of Economic Analysis, 1995a) and gross output (Bureau of Economic Analysis, 1995b) to derive interruption cost estimates for U.S. industries at the 2-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) level, as well as for broader sectors and the U.S. economy. Interruption cost estimates are presented as a function of outage duration (e.g., 20 minutes, 1-hour, 3-hour), and are normalized in terms of dollars per peak kW.

Balducci, P. J.; Roop, J. M.; Schienbein, L. A.; DeSteese, J. G.; Weimar, M. R.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

FUEL CELL SYSTEM ECONOMICS: COMPARING THE COSTS OF GENERATING POWER WITH STATIONARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during many months of the year). * Similarly, use of PEM fuel cell waste heat for hot water heating wouldFUEL CELL SYSTEM ECONOMICS: COMPARING THE COSTS OF GENERATING POWER WITH STATIONARY AND MOTOR VEHICLE PEM FUEL CELL SYSTEMS UCD-ITS-RP-04-21 April 2004 by Timothy Lipman University of California

Kammen, Daniel M.

154

Statistical analysis of electric power production costs JORGE VALENZUELA and MAINAK MAZUMDAR*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

* Industrial Engineering Department, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA E-mail: mmazumd be sucient production at all times to meet the demand for electric power. If a low-cost generating unit fails variable because it depends upon two uncertain quantities, demand and the availability of the generating

Mazumdar, Mainak

155

Photovoltaics for municipal planners. Cost-effective municipal applications of photovoltaics for electric power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This booklet is intended for city and county government personnel, as well as community organizations, who deal with supplying, regulating, or recommending electric power resources. Specifically, this document deals with photovoltaic (PV) power, or power from solar cells, which is currently the most cost-effective energy source for electricity requirements that are relatively small, located in isolated areas, or difficult to serve with conventional technology. Recently, PV has been documented to be more cost-effective than conventional alternatives (such as line extensions or engine generators) in dozens of applications within the service territories of electric, gas, and communications utilities. Here, we document numerous cost-effective urban applications, chosen by planners and utilities because they were the most cost-effective option or because they were appropriate for environmental or logistical reasons. These applications occur within various municipal departments, including utility, parks and recreation, traffic engineering, transportation, and planning, and they include lighting applications, communications equipment, corrosion protection, irrigation control equipment, remote monitoring, and even portable power supplies for emergency situations.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ''U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries'' (NUREG/CR-6577, Supp. 2) report has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants during 2000-2001. Costs incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, which represent fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications, which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operations summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from operating reports submitted by the licensees, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) database for enforcement actions, and outage reports.

Reid, RL

2003-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

157

An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of the Total Cost Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell- Powered Material Handling Equipment Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-56408 April 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell- Powered Material Handling Equipment Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. HT12.8610 Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-56408

158

FUEL CONSUMPTION AND COST SAVINGS OF CLASS 8 HEAVY-DUTY TRUCKS POWERED BY NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We compare the fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas and diesel heavy-duty (HD) class 8 trucks under consistent simulated drive cycle conditions. Our study included both conventional and hybrid HD trucks operating with either natural gas or diesel engines, and we compare the resulting simulated fuel efficiencies, fuel costs, and payback periods. While trucks powered by natural gas engines have lower fuel economy, their CO2 emissions and costs are lower than comparable diesel trucks. Both diesel and natural gas powered hybrid trucks have significantly improved fuel economy, reasonable cost savings and payback time, and lower CO2 emissions under city driving conditions. However, under freeway-dominant driving conditions, the overall benefits of hybridization are considerably less. Based on payback period alone, non-hybrid natural gas trucks appear to be the most economic option for both urban and freeway driving environments.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Plant Design and Cost Assessment of Forced Circulation Lead-Bismuth Cooled Reactor with Conventional Power Conversion Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost of electricity is the key factor that determines competitiveness of a power plant. Thus the proper selection, design and optimization of the electric power generating cycle is of main importance. This report makes an ...

Dostal, Vaclav

160

Simulating the Value of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a Production Cost Model  

SciTech Connect

Concentrating solar power (CSP) deployed with thermal energy storage (TES) provides a dispatchable source of renewable energy. The value of CSP with TES, as with other potential generation resources, needs to be established using traditional utility planning tools. Production cost models, which simulate the operation of grid, are often used to estimate the operational value of different generation mixes. CSP with TES has historically had limited analysis in commercial production simulations. This document describes the implementation of CSP with TES in a commercial production cost model. It also describes the simulation of grid operations with CSP in a test system consisting of two balancing areas located primarily in Colorado.

Denholm, P.; Hummon, M.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "negative power cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

  Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 006 Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Increased by 7% in 006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The United States Leads the World in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . .4 Texas, Washington, and California Lead the U.S. in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 GE Wind Is the Dominant Turbine Manufacturer, with Siemens Gaining Market Share . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Average Turbine Size Continues to Increase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Developer Consolidation Accelerates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Innovation and Competition in Non-Utility Wind Financing Persists . . . .9

162

Current and Future Costs for Parabolic Trough and Power Tower Systems in the US Market: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL's Solar Advisor Model (SAM) is employed to estimate the current and future costs for parabolic trough and molten salt power towers in the US market. Future troughs are assumed to achieve higher field temperatures via the successful deployment of low melting-point, molten-salt heat transfer fluids by 2015-2020. Similarly, it is assumed that molten salt power towers are successfully deployed at 100MW scale over the same time period, increasing to 200MW by 2025. The levelized cost of electricity for both technologies is predicted to drop below 11 cents/kWh (assuming a 10% investment tax credit and other financial inputs outlined in the paper), making the technologies competitive in the marketplace as benchmarked by the California MPR. Both technologies can be deployed with large amounts of thermal energy storage, yielding capacity factors as high as 65% while maintaining an optimum LCOE.

Turchi, C.; Mehos, M.; Ho, C. K.; Kolb, G. J.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Effects of a shortened depreciation schedule on the investment costs for combined heat and power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate and compare several generic depreciation methods to assess the effectiveness of possible policy measures with respect to the depreciation schedules for investments in combined heat and power plants in the United States. We assess the different depreciation methods for CHP projects of various sizes (ranging from 1 MW to 100 MW). We evaluate the impact of different depreciation schedules on the tax shield, and the resulting tax savings to potential investors. We show that a shorter depreciation cycle could have a substantial impact on the cost of producing power, making cogeneration more attractive. The savings amount to approximately 6-7 percent of capital and fixed operation and maintenance costs, when changing from the current system to a 7 year depreciation scheme with switchover from declining balance to straight line depreciation. Suggestions for further research to improve the analysis are given.

Kranz, Nicole; Worrell, Ernst

2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Current and future costs for parabolic trough and power tower systems in the US market.  

SciTech Connect

NREL's Solar Advisor Model (SAM) is employed to estimate the current and future costs for parabolic trough and molten salt power towers in the US market. Future troughs are assumed to achieve higher field temperatures via the successful deployment of low melting-point, molten-salt heat transfer fluids by 2015-2020. Similarly, it is assumed that molten salt power towers are successfully deployed at 100MW scale over the same time period, increasing to 200MW by 2025. The levelized cost of electricity for both technologies is predicted to drop below 11 cents/kWh (assuming a 10% investment tax credit and other financial inputs outlined in the paper), making the technologies competitive in the marketplace as benchmarked by the California MPR. Both technologies can be deployed with large amounts of thermal energy storage, yielding capacity factors as high as 65% while maintaining an optimum LCOE.

Turchi, Craig (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); Kolb, Gregory J.; Mehos, Mark Steven (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); Ho, Clifford Kuofei

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Small-Scale Low Cost Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in tasks seeking greater cell power density and lower cost through new cell designs, new cell materials and lower operating temperature is summarized. The design of the program required Proof-of-Concept unit of residential capacity scale is reviewed along with a summary of results from its successful test. Attachment 1 summarizes the status of cell development. Attachment 2 summarizes the status of generator design, and Attachment 3 of BOP design.

S. D. Vora

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Avoided Costs and Competitive Negotiations for Power from Qualifying Facilities in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas is among the states with the highest potential for cogeneration. Currently, 3,121 MW of cogenerated power supplies more than ten percent of the energy needs of ERCOT under firm contracts. This paper summarizes the key aspects of the regulatory framework related to cogeneration in the State of Texas. In addition, it discusses the current round of standard avoided cost filings submitted to the Public Utility Commission of Texas for approval and focuses on future trends in the State's cogeneration market.

Panjavan, S.; Al-Jabir, A.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Sensitivity of Concentrating Solar Power Trough Performance, Cost and Financing with Solar Advisor Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive solar technology systems analysis model, the Solar Advisor Model (SAM) was developed to support the federal R&D community and the solar industry. This model, developed by staff at NREL and Sandia National Laboratory, is able to model the costs, finances, and performance of concentrating solar power and photovoltaics (PV). Currently, parabolic troughs and concentrating PV are the two concentrating technologies modeled within the SAM environment.

Blair, N.; Mehos, M.; Christensen, C.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Susitna?Watana Cost of Power Analysis Discussion Paper Comments Solicited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Summary In this paper I present a simple analysis of the cost of the proposed 600-megawatt Susitna-Watana project from a utility ratepayer perspective. The reference case assumptions include a capital cost of 5.0 billion year 2008 dollars, 100 % debt financing at 6%, and an on-line date of 2024. Under these assumptions plus others described below, the retail rate for Susitna power in 2024 at a Railbelt customer’s meter would be about 40 cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh). By comparison, if natural gas is available to electric utilities in year 2024 at a price of about $13 per million btu, and neglecting potential carbon taxes, then the retail rate for power from a new conventional combined cycle gas turbine going online in 2024 would be about 21 cents per kWh. If the State of Alaska were to contribute cash to cover part of the cost of the Watana project, required rates would be lower. For example, if the State paid 50 % of the reference case cost of $5 billion, then a retail rate of about 23 cents per kWh would be required to cover the remaining 50%. The required outlay by the State would be the equivalent of about $15,000 per family of three Railbelt residents.

Steve Colt; Prepared For; Matt Berman All Errors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Design and cost estimate of an 800 MVA superconducting power transmission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous studies involving cost estimates have been performed for superconducting power transmission systems. As these systems were usually aimed at providing transmission from large clusters of generation the base power rating of the corridor was very high; in the case of the most comprehensive study it was 10,000 MVA. The purpose of this study is to examine a system which is very closely based on the prototype 1000 MVA system which was operated at Brookhaven National Laboratory over a four year period. The purpose of the study is to provide cost estimates for the superconducting system and to compare these estimates with a design based on the use of advanced but conventional cable designs. The work is supported by funding from the Office of Energy Research's Industry/Laboratory Technology Exchange Program. This program is designed to commercialize energy technologies. The technical design of the superconducting system was prepared by the BNL staff, the design of the 800 MVA conventional cable system was done by engineers from Underground Systems Incorporated. Both institutions worked on the cost estimate of the superconducting system. The description and cost estimate of the conventional cable system is given in the Appendix. 5 refs.

Alex, P.; Ernst, A. (Underground Systems, Inc., Armonk, NY (USA)); Forsyth, E.; Gibbs, R.; Thomas, R.; Muller, T. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

1990-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

170

Reclaiming lost capability in power plant coal conversions: an innovative, low-cost approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some of the capability lost during coal conversion can be recovered for midrange/peaking power generation through low cost, turbine cycle and economizer modifications. The additional output can be realized by shutting off adjacent high pressure feedwater heaters (as specified by turbogenerator manufacturers) and simultaneously increasing heat input to the economizer. The supplemental economizer heat input makes up for heat lost to the feedwater when extraction steam is shut off. Several options for applying this novel approach to capability recovery are described. The reclaimed capability is realized at somewhat lower efficiency but at low cost, compared to the overall cost of a coal conversion. Rather than return converted units to up to 100% oil or gas firing during periods of high system demand, the proposed method allows the continued comsumption of coal for the base-load portion of the plant's output. The development of the low NO/sub x/ Slagging Combustor will allow even the added economizer heat input to be supplied by relatively low cost coal. Following a brief review of factors affecting boiler capability in coal conversions and current approaches to coal conversion in this country and overseas, the results of a preliminary study that apply the proposed novel concept to a West Coast power plant are described.

Miliaras, E.S.; Kelleher, P.J.; Fujimura, K.S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Nuclear power: least cost option for base-load electricity in Finland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a result of the outstanding operating experience and the low electricity production costs of the existing Finnish nuclear power plants, energy-intensive process industries in particular have a strong belief in nuclear power. There is a potential interest in building more nuclear capacity, the fifth unit, in order to guarantee for Finnish industry the availability of cheap electrical energy in the future. In any case more baseload generation capacity will be needed by 2010 to meet the future growth of electricity consumption in Finland. Nuclear power generation matches excellently with the long-duration load profile of the Finnish power system. The good performance of Finnish nuclear power has yielded benefits also to consumers through its contribution to decreasing the electricity price. Furthermore, the introduction of nuclear power has resulted in a clear drop in the carbon dioxide emissions from electricity generation during the 1970s and 1980s, as shown in Figure 1. In 1999 the four Finnish nuclear power units at Loviisa and Olkiluoto generated 22.1 TWh of electricity, roughly equivalent to one third of the total

Risto Tarjanne; Sauli Rissanen

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Toward a Common Method of Cost Estimation for CO2 Capture and Storage at Fossil Fuel Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are significant differences in the methods employed by various organizations to estimate the cost of carbon capture and storage (CCS) systems for fossil fuel power plants. Such differences often are not readily apparent in publicly reported CCS cost estimates. As a consequence, there is a significant degree of misunderstanding, confusion, and mis-representation of CCS cost information, especially among audiences not familiar with the details of CCS costing. Given the international importance ...

2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

173

Advanced gas turbines: The choice for low-cost, environmentally superior electric power generation  

SciTech Connect

In July 1993, the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated an ambitious 8-year program to advance state-of-the-art gas turbine technology for land-based electric power generation. The program, known as the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Program, is a joint government/industry program with the objective to demonstrate advanced industrial and utility gas turbine systems by the year 2000. The goals of the ATS Program are to develop gas turbine systems capable of providing low-cost electric power, while maintaining environmental superiority over competing power generation options. A progress report on the ATS Program pertaining to program status at DOE will be presented and reviewed in this paper. The technical challenges, advanced critical technology requirements, and systems designs meeting the goals of the program will be described and discussed.

Zeh, C.M.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Modeling Photovoltaic and Concentrating Solar Power Trough Performance, Cost, and Financing with Solar Advisor Model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive solar technology systems analysis model, the Solar Advisor Model (SAM), has been developed to support the federal R&D community and the solar industry by staff at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Sandia National Laboratory. This model is able to model the finances, incentives, and performance of flat-plate photovoltaic (PV), concentrating PV, and concentrating solar power (specifically, parabolic troughs). The primary function of the model is to allow users to investigate the impact of variations in performance, cost, and financial parameters to better understand their impact on key figures of merit. Figures of merit related to the cost and performance of these systems include, but aren't limited to, system output, system efficiencies, levelized cost of energy, return on investment, and system capital and O&M costs. SAM allows users to do complex system modeling with an intuitive graphical user interface (GUI). In fact, all tables and graphics for this paper are taken directly from the model GUI. This model has the capability to compare different solar technologies within the same interface, making use of similar cost and finance assumptions. Additionally, the ability to do parametric and sensitivity analysis is central to this model. There are several models within SAM to model the performance of photovoltaic modules and inverters. This paper presents an overview of each PV and inverter model, introduces a new generic model, and briefly discusses the concentrating solar power (CSP) parabolic trough model. A comparison of results using the different PV and inverter models is also presented.

Blair, N.; Mehos, M.; Christensen, C.; Cameron, C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

High-resolution modeling of the western North American power system demonstrates low-cost and low-carbon futures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Administration, 2008). A number of low- carbon power generation technologies are available today, but many-rated by their forced outage rates to represent the amount of power generation capacity that is available on average). Rather, it does so indirectly, by changing the relative costs of power generating technologies

Kammen, Daniel M.

176

Concentrating Solar Panels: Bringing the Highest Power and Lowest Cost to the Rooftop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Soliant Energy is a venture-capital-backed startup focused on bringing advanced concentrating solar panels to market. Our fundamental innovation is that we are the first company to develop a racking solar concentrator specifically for commercial rooftop applications, resulting in the lowest LCOE for rooftop electricity generation. Today, the commercial rooftop segment is the largest and fastest-growing market in the solar industry. Our concentrating panels can make a major contribution to the SAI's objectives: reducing the cost of solar electricity and rapidly deploying capacity. Our commercialization focus was re-shaped in 2009, shifting from an emphasis solely on panel efficiency to LCOE. Since the inception of the SAI program, LCOE has become the de facto standard for comparing commercial photovoltaic systems. While estimation and prediction models still differ, the emergence of performance-based incentive (PBI) and feed-in tariff (FIT) systems, as well as power purchase agreement (PPA) financing structures make LCOE the natural metric for photovoltaic systems. Soliant Energy has designed and demonstrated lower-cost, higher-power solar panels that consists of 6 (500X) PV module assemblies utilizing multi-junction cells and an integrated two-axis tracker. In addition, we have designed and demonstrated a prototype 1000X panel assembly with 8. Cost reductions relative to conventional flat panel PV systems were realized by (1) reducing the amount of costly semiconductor material and (2) developing strategies and processes to reduce the manufacturing costs of the entire system. Performance gains against conventional benchmarks were realized with (1) two-axis tracking and (2) higher-efficiency multi-junction PV cells capable of operating at a solar concentration ratio of 1000X (1000 kW/m2). The program objectives are: (1) Develop a tracking/concentrating solar module that has the same geometric form factor as a conventional flat, roof mounted photovoltaic (PV) panel - the Soliant module will produce more power and cost less than conventional panels of the same size; (2) Target LCOE: $0.079/kWh in 2010; (3) Target efficiency - 26% in 2010 (22% for 2008 prototype, 24% for 2009 pilot); and (4) Target performance - equivalent to 650Wp in 2010 (490W for 2008 prototype, 540W for 2009 pilot).

Michael Deck; Rick Russell

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

177

'Green energy' an option; PSC plan calls for costly wind power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

'Green energy' an option; PSC plan calls 'Green energy' an option; PSC plan calls for costly wind power Denver Post Staff Writer Colorado residents could choose between coal plants and windmills for their home electricity source under a plan by Public Service Company of Colorado, the state's largest utility. If enough people want "green energy," PSC will erect small wind plants in eastern Colorado within two years, company president Wayne Brunetti pledged yesterday. The hitch is that the renewable energy could cost up to 40 percent more, he said. The company may offer several pricing levels that would include a portion of renewable energy. The idea will be submitted to the state Public Utilities Commission in 90 days. Green pricing is PSC's first major commitment to promoting renewable energy since

178

An enumerative technique for modeling wind power variations in production costing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Production cost, generation expansion, and reliability models are used extensively by utilities in the planning process. Most models do not provide adequate means for representing the full range of potential variation in wind power plants. In order to properly account for expected variation in wind-generated electricity with these models, the authors describe an enumerated probabilistic approach that is performed outside the production cost model, compare it with a reduced enumerated approach, and present some selected utility results. The technique can be applied to any model, and can considerably reduce the number of model runs as compared to the full enumerated approach. They use both a load duration curve model and a chronological model to measure wind plant capacity credit, and also present some other selected results.

Milligan, M.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Graham, M.S. [Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association, Inc., Denver, CO (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Using phasors to analyze power system negative phase sequence voltages caused by unbalanced loads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical method is demonstrated which allows the level of negative phase sequence (NPS) voltage at a busbar to be expressed as a sum of phasors representing independent sources. The method is extended to enable the balancing capability of Static Var Compensators (SVCs) with individual phase voltage control to be assessed. The capability of such SVCs and the allowable levels of NPS voltage on the system, including any short term limits, can be combined in a capability chart showing the unbalanced loads which can be supplied from a substation. The approach facilitates the treatment of fixed unbalances due to filters or intentional offsets designed to maximize the SVC balancing range for specific loads. Field test results are presented which validate the analytical methods used.

Ledwich, G. (Univ. of Queensland, St. Lucia (Australia)); George, T.A. (Queensland Electricity Commission, Brisbane (Australia))

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Fuel Cell Power Model Elucidates Life-Cycle Costs for Fuel Cell-Based Combined Heat, Hydrogen, and Power (CHHP) Production Systems (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in accurately modeling costs for fuel cell-based combined heat, hydrogen, and power systems. Work was performed by NREL's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "negative power cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Minimization of investment costs and the effect on economy and availability of coal-fired power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low manufacturing costs and short construction periods are two factors with a major influence on the economy of power plants. This paper identifies, on the basis of a power plant design concept actually developed, potential plant cost savings at the concept design and component design levels and the sometimes contradictory implications to be considered and attempts to assess the impact of these savings on plant economy and availability. By comparison with a conventionally constructed plant, the cost savings that can be achieved over the entire plant, including erection costs, total just on 15 percent. The construction period can be reduced by about 20%. The simplifications implemented in this design concept with a view to minimizing plant costs are expected to entail only a negligible reduction in plant availability, so that this type of power plant retains its overall economic lead.

Hebel, G.; Hauenschild, R. (ABB Kraftwerke AG, Mannheim (DE))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

ASSESSMENT OF LOW COST NOVEL SORBENTS FOR COAL-FIRED POWER PLANT MERCURY CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a Technical Report under a program funded by the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to obtain the necessary information to assess the viability of lower cost alternatives to commercially available activated carbon for mercury control in coal-fired utilities. During this reporting period, several sorbent samples have been tested by URS in their laboratory fixed-bed system. The sorbents were evaluated under conditions simulating flue gas from power plants burning Powder River Basin (PRB) and low sulfur eastern bituminous coals. The equilibrium adsorption capacities of the sorbents for both elemental and oxidized mercury are presented. A team meeting discussing the overall program and meetings with Midwest Generation and Wisconsin Electric Power Company (WEPCO) concerning field testing occurred during this reporting period.

Sharon Sjostrom

2002-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

183

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prices. . . . . 14 Installed Project Costs Are On the Rise,of Decline. . 15 Project Cost Increases Are a Function ofin installed wind project costs, wind turbine transaction

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Use of experience curves to estimate the future cost of power plants with CO2 capture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 Keywords: CO 2 capture Cost estimates Experience curveshand, reliance on cost estimates for current technology hassummarizes the nominal cost estimates for each system based

Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Antes, Matt; Berkenpas, Michael; Davison, John

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of negative electrodes from high-power lithium-ion cells showing various levels of power fade  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High-power lithium-ion cells for transportation applications are being developed and studied at Argonne National Laboratory. The current generation of cells containing LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2}-based cathodes, graphite-based anodes, and LiPF6-based electrolytes show loss of capacity and power during accelerated testing at elevated temperatures. Negative electrode samples harvested from some cells that showed varying degrees of power and capacity fade were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The samples exhibited a surface film on the graphite, which was thicker on samples from cells that showed higher fade. Furthermore, solvent-based compounds were dominant on samples from low power fade cells, whereas LiPF{sub 6}-based products were dominant on samples from high power fade cells. The effect of sample rinsing and air exposure is discussed. Mechanisms are proposed to explain the formation of compounds suggested by the XPS data.

Herstedt, Marie; Abraham, Daniel P.; Kerr, John B.

2004-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

186

Line-Focus Solar Power Plant Cost Reduction Plan (Milestone Report)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Line-focus solar collectors, in particular parabolic trough collectors, are the most mature and proven technology available for producing central electricity from concentrated solar energy. Because this technology has over 25 years of successful operational experience, resulting in a low perceived risk, it is likely that it will continue to be a favorite of investors for some time. The concentrating solar power (CSP) industry is developing parabolic trough projects that will cost billions of dollars, and it is supporting these projects with hundreds of millions of dollars of research and development funding. While this technology offers many advantages over conventional electricity generation -- such as utilizing plentiful domestic renewable fuel and having very low emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants -- it provides electricity in the intermediate power market at about twice the cost of its conventional competitor, combined cycle natural gas. The purpose of this document is to define a set of activities from fiscal year 2011 to fiscal year 2016 that will make this technology economically competitive with conventional means.

Kutscher, C.; Mehos, M.; Turchi, C.; Glatzmaier, G.; Moss, T.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

ORCED: A model to simulate the operations and costs of bulk-power markets  

SciTech Connect

Dramatic changes in the structure and operation of US bulk-power markets require new analytical tools. The authors developed the Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch (ORCED) model to analyze a variety of public-policy issues related to the many changes underway in the US electricity industry. Such issues include: policy and technology options to reduce carbon emissions from electricity production; the effects of electricity trading between high- and low-cost regions on consumers and producers in both regions; the ability of the owners of certain generating units to exercise market power as functions of the transmission link between two regions and the characteristics of the generating units and loads in each region; and the market penetration of new energy-production and energy-use technologies and the effects of their adoption on fuel use, electricity use and costs, and carbon emissions. ORCED treats two electrical systems connected by a single transmission link ORCED uses two load-duration curves to represent the time-varying electricity consumption in each region. The two curves represent peak and offpeak seasons. User specification of demand elasticities permits ORCED to estimate the effects of changes in electricity price, both overall and hour by hour, on overall electricity use and load shapes. ORCED represents the electricity supply in each region with 26 generating units. The two regions are connected by a single transmission link. This link is characterized by its capacity (MW), cost ({cents}/kWh), and losses (%). This report explains the inputs to, outputs from, and operation of ORCED. It also presents four examples showing applications of the model to various public-policy issues related to restructuring of the US electricity industry.

Hadley, S.; Hirst, E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Low-Cost Superconducting Wire for Wind Generators: High Performance, Low Cost Superconducting Wires and Coils for High Power Wind Generators  

SciTech Connect

REACT Project: The University of Houston will develop a low-cost, high-current superconducting wire that could be used in high-power wind generators. Superconducting wire currently transports 600 times more electric current than a similarly sized copper wire, but is significantly more expensive. The University of Houston’s innovation is based on engineering nanoscale defects in the superconducting film. This could quadruple the current relative to today’s superconducting wires, supporting the same amount of current using 25% of the material. This would make wind generators lighter, more powerful and more efficient. The design could result in a several-fold reduction in wire costs and enable their commercial viability of high-power wind generators for use in offshore applications.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

of hydrogen-powered cars," he says. But a major hurdle remains: the cost of platinum metal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of hydrogen-powered cars," he says. But a major hurdle remains: the cost of platinum metal needed to produce nothing but pure water as exhaust and clean electricity for power. At the heart of every fuel cell is an advanced plastic membrane coated with a platinum catalyst. That's where the production of electricity takes

190

Conceptual design and cost evaluation of organic Rankine cycle electric generating plant powered by medium temperature geothermal water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic production of electrical power from high temperature steam and liquid dominated geothermal resources has been demonstrated. Large quantities of geothermal energy are considered to exist at moderate temperatures, however, the economics of converting this energy into electricity has not been established. This paper presents the design concept of a dual boiler isobutane cycle selected for use with the moderate temperature hydrothermal resource and presents a cost estimate for a 10 and 50 MW power plant. Cost of electrical power from these plants is estimated and compared with that from coal, oil and nuclear plants. The impact of selling a portion of the residual heat in the geothermal effluent is assessed. (auth)

Dart, R.H.; Neill, D.T.; Whitbeck, J.F.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Low-Cost High-Concentration Photovoltaic Systems for Utility Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under DOE's Technology Pathway Partnership (TPP) program, Amonix, Inc. developed a new generation of high-concentration photovoltaic systems using multijunction technology and established the manufacturing capacity needed to supply multi-megawatt power plants buing using the new Amonix 7700-series solar energy systems. For this effort, Amonix Collaborated with a variety of suppliers and partners to complete project tasks. Subcontractors included: Evonik/Cyro; Hitek; the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Raytech; Spectrolab; UL; University of Nevada, Las Vegas; and TUV Rheinland PTL. The Amonix TPP tasks included: Task 1: Multijunction Cell Optimization for Field Operation, Task 2: Fresnel Lens R&D, Task 3: Cell Package Design & Production, Task 4: Standards Compliance and Reliability Testing, Task 5: Receiver Plate Production, Task 6: MegaModule Performance, Task 7: MegaModule Cost Reduction, Task 8: Factory Setup and MegaModule Production, Task 9: Tracker and Tracking Controller, Task 10: Installation and Balance of System (BOS), Task 11: Field Testing, and Task 12: Solar Advisor Modeling and Market Analysis. Amonix's TPP addressed nearly the complete PV value chain from epitaxial layer design and wafer processing through system design, manufacturing, deployment and O&M. Amonix has made progress toward achieving these reduced costs through the development of its 28%+ efficient MegaModule, reduced manufacturing and installation cost through design for manufacturing and assembly, automated manufacturing processes, and reduced O&M costs. Program highlights include: (1) Optimized multijunction cell and cell package design to improve performance by > 10%; (2) Updated lens design provided 7% increased performance and higher concentration; (3) 28.7% DC STC MegaModule efficiency achieved in Phase II exceeded Phase III performance goal; (4) New 16' focal length MegaModule achieved target materials and manufacturing cost reduction; (5) Designed and placed into production 25 MW/yr manufacturing capacity for complete MegaModules, including cell packages, receiver plates, and structures with lenses; (6) Designed and deployed Amonix 7700 series systems rated at 63 kW PTC ac and higher. Based on an LCOE assessment using NREL's Solar Advisor Model, Amonix met DOE's LCOE targets: Amonix 2011 LCOE 12.8 cents/kWh (2010 DOE goal 10-15); 2015 LCOE 6.4 cents/kWh (2015 goal 5-7) Amonix and TPP participants would like to thank the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technology Program for funding received under this program through Agreement No. DE-FC36-07GO17042.

McConnell, R.; Garboushian, V.; Gordon, R.; Dutra, D.; Kinsey, G.; Geer, S.; Gomez, H.; Cameron, C.

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

Final Technical Report Power through Policy: "Best Practices" for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind  

SciTech Connect

Power through Policy: 'Best Practices' for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project to identify distributed wind technology policy best practices and to help policymakers, utilities, advocates, and consumers examine their effectiveness using a pro forma model. Incorporating a customized feed from the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), the Web-based Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool (Policy Tool) is designed to assist state, local, and utility officials in understanding the financial impacts of different policy options to help reduce the cost of distributed wind technologies. The project's final products include the Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool, found at www.windpolicytool.org, and its accompanying documentation: Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool Guidebook: User Instructions, Assumptions, and Case Studies. With only two initial user inputs required, the Policy Tool allows users to adjust and test a wide range of policy-related variables through a user-friendly dashboard interface with slider bars. The Policy Tool is populated with a variety of financial variables, including turbine costs, electricity rates, policies, and financial incentives; economic variables including discount and escalation rates; as well as technical variables that impact electricity production, such as turbine power curves and wind speed. The Policy Tool allows users to change many of the variables, including the policies, to gauge the expected impacts that various policy combinations could have on the cost of energy (COE), net present value (NPV), internal rate of return (IRR), and the simple payback of distributed wind projects ranging in size from 2.4 kilowatts (kW) to 100 kW. The project conducted case studies to demonstrate how the Policy Tool can provide insights into 'what if' scenarios and also allow the current status of incentives to be examined or defended when necessary. The ranking of distributed wind state policy and economic environments summarized in the attached report, based on the Policy Tool's default COE results, highlights favorable market opportunities for distributed wind growth as well as market conditions ripe for improvement. Best practices for distributed wind state policies are identified through an evaluation of their effect on improving the bottom line of project investments. The case studies and state rankings were based on incentives, power curves, and turbine pricing as of 2010, and may not match the current results from the Policy Tool. The Policy Tool can be used to evaluate the ways that a variety of federal and state policies and incentives impact the economics of distributed wind (and subsequently its expected market growth). It also allows policymakers to determine the impact of policy options, addressing market challenges identified in the U.S. DOE's '20% Wind Energy by 2030' report and helping to meet COE targets. In providing a simple and easy-to-use policy comparison tool that estimates financial performance, the Policy Tool and guidebook are expected to enhance market expansion by the small wind industry by increasing and refining the understanding of distributed wind costs, policy best practices, and key market opportunities in all 50 states. This comprehensive overview and customized software to quickly calculate and compare policy scenarios represent a fundamental step in allowing policymakers to see how their decisions impact the bottom line for distributed wind consumers, while estimating the relative advantages of different options available in their policy toolboxes. Interested stakeholders have suggested numerous ways to enhance and expand the initial effort to develop an even more user-friendly Policy Tool and guidebook, including the enhancement and expansion of the current tool, and conducting further analysis. The report and the project's Guidebook include further details on possible next steps. NREL Report No. BK-5500-53127; DOE/GO-102011-3453.

Rhoads-Weaver, Heather; Gagne, Matthew; Sahl, Kurt; Orrell, Alice; Banks, Jennifer

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

193

Power through Policy: "Best Practices" for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power through Policy: 'Best Practices' for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project to identify distributed wind technology policy best practices and to help policymakers, utilities, advocates, and consumers examine their effectiveness using a pro forma model. Incorporating a customized feed from the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), the Web-based Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool (Policy Tool) is designed to assist state, local, and utility officials in understanding the financial impacts of different policy options to help reduce the cost of distributed wind technologies. The project's final products include the Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool, found at www.windpolicytool.org, and its accompanying documentation: Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool Guidebook: User Instructions, Assumptions, and Case Studies. With only two initial user inputs required, the Policy Tool allows users to adjust and test a wide range of policy-related variables through a user-friendly dashboard interface with slider bars. The Policy Tool is populated with a variety of financial variables, including turbine costs, electricity rates, policies, and financial incentives; economic variables including discount and escalation rates; as well as technical variables that impact electricity production, such as turbine power curves and wind speed. The Policy Tool allows users to change many of the variables, including the policies, to gauge the expected impacts that various policy combinations could have on the cost of energy (COE), net present value (NPV), internal rate of return (IRR), and the simple payback of distributed wind projects ranging in size from 2.4 kilowatts (kW) to 100 kW. The project conducted case studies to demonstrate how the Policy Tool can provide insights into 'what if' scenarios and also allow the current status of incentives to be examined or defended when necessary. The ranking of distributed wind state policy and economic environments summarized in the attached report, based on the Policy Tool's default COE results, highlights favorable market opportunities for distributed wind growth as well as market conditions ripe for improvement. Best practices for distributed wind state policies are identified through an evaluation of their effect on improving the bottom line of project investments. The case studies and state rankings were based on incentives, power curves, and turbine pricing as of 2010, and may not match the current results from the Policy Tool. The Policy Tool can be used to evaluate the ways that a variety of federal and state policies and incentives impact the economics of distributed wind (and subsequently its expected market growth). It also allows policymakers to determine the impact of policy options, addressing market challenges identified in the U.S. DOE's '20% Wind Energy by 2030' report and helping to meet COE targets. In providing a simple and easy-to-use policy comparison tool that estimates financial performance, the Policy Tool and guidebook are expected to enhance market expansion by the small wind industry by increasing and refining the understanding of distributed wind costs, policy best practices, and key market opportunities in all 50 states. This comprehensive overview and customized software to quickly calculate and compare policy scenarios represent a fundamental step in allowing policymakers to see how their decisions impact the bottom line for distributed wind consumers, while estimating the relative advantages of different options available in their policy toolboxes. Interested stakeholders have suggested numerous ways to enhance and expand the initial effort to develop an even more user-friendly Policy Tool and guidebook, including the enhancement and expansion of the current tool, and conducting further analysis. The report and the project's Guidebook include further details on possible next steps. NREL Report No. BK-5500-53127; DOE/GO-102011-3453.

Rhoads-Weaver, Heather; Gagne, Matthew; Sahl, Kurt; Orrell, Alice; Banks, Jennifer

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

194

Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Consumers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5718 5718 Understanding the Cost of Power Interruptions to U.S. Electricity Consumers Kristina Hamachi LaCommare and Joseph H. Eto Energy Analysis Department Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley Berkeley, California 94720 Environmental Energy Technologies Division September 2004 http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMP/EMP-pubs.html This work described in this paper was funded by the Office of Electric Transmission and Distribution, Energy Storage Program and by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Planning, Budget, and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76F00098. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

195

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Low Cost, Manufacturable High Voltage Power Module for ESS - Brandon Passmore, APEI  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

W. Research Center Blvd. * Fayetteville, AR 72701 * (479) 443-5759 W. Research Center Blvd. * Fayetteville, AR 72701 * (479) 443-5759 Design and Development of a Low Cost, Manufacturable High Voltage Power Module for Energy Storage Systems Phase I SBIR September 27, 2012 Brandon Passmore, PhD Sr. Electronics Packaging Research Engineer Email: bpassmo@apei.net Acknowledgements * I would like to thank Dr. Imre Gyuk of the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program and Dr. Stan Atcitty for technical support * I would also like to thank 2 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

196

Single-shaft combined cycle packs power in at low cost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Worldwide demand for combined cycle (CC) powerplants has grown exponentially over the past decade, and most forecasts call for the boom to continue. Reasons, by now, are clear: the CC powerplant--in its basic form, a gas turbine exhausting into a heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG) that supplies a steam turbine--is the most efficient electric generating system commercially available today. It also exhibits capital costs significantly lower than competing nuclear, fossil-fired steam, and renewable-energy stations. In addition, its low air emissions, water consumption, space requirements, and physical profile are no trifling advantages in an era marked by tough permitting and siting processes. A relatively recent advance that may further cement the CC`s front-running position is combining the gas turbine, steam turbine, and electric generator on a single shaft. Locking together the turbines and generator to form one single-train operating system promises to simplify plant design and operation, and may lower first costs. Trade-offs of the single-shaft approach, however, include the need for higher starting power and less operating flexibility, particularly if no synchronous clutch is used between the gas and steam turbine. Also worth noting: the arrangement takes away the phased construction option where a simple-cycle gas turbine is installed first and the steam cycle is added later. But depending on project specifics, the rewards of the single-shaft CC can outweigh its drawbacks, as a look at several recent installations reveals in this article.

Swanekamp, R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Understanding the cost of power interruptions to U.S. electricity consumers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is designed so that its cost estimate can be improved asin data used for cost estimates. At the other extreme,Typically, outage-cost estimates are based on surveys that

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Eto, Joseph H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not represent wind energy generation costs, and generationXcel-UWIG We Energies Wind Capacity Penetration Cost ($/MWh)Wind Energy Program is currently funding additional efforts to better understand the drivers for O&M costs and

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

An Analysis of the Retail and Lifecycle Cost of Battery-Powered Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

±metal hydride (NiMH) battery costs, several di€erent ``in other cases. The battery cost per mile is low in partstorage energy ± and hence battery cost ± required to supply

Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

An Analysis of the Retail and Lifecycle Cost of Battery-Powered Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vehicles: Social costs and bene®ts in France. TransportationTransportation Research Part D 6 (2001) 371±404 Table 5 The social cost

Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "negative power cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006 Contents Primary authorsCost, and Performance Trends: 2006 Introduction The winda rapid pace, keeping up with trends in the marketplace has

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a power-take-off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drivetrain, power generator, and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost, and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency and low maintenance and cost, with a low impact on the device cost-of-energy (CoE).

Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a Power-Take-Off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drive train, power generator and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency, low maintenance and cost with a low impact on the device Cost-of-Energy (CoE).

Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and incentives, and continued uncertainty about the future cost and liabilities of conventional natural gas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Understanding the cost of power interruptions to U.S. electricity consumers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory, Berkeley CA. Electric Power Research Institute.Spectrum, 30 (6), 40. Electric Power Research Institute.Applications. Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Eto, Joseph H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Reliable, Efficient and Cost-Effective Electric Power Converter for Small Wind Turbines Based on AC-link Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Grid-tied inverter power electronics have been an Achilles heel of the small wind industry, providing opportunity for new technologies to provide lower costs, greater efficiency, and improved reliability. The small wind turbine market is also moving towards the 50-100kW size range. The unique AC-link power conversion technology provides efficiency, reliability, and power quality advantages over existing technologies, and Princeton Power will adapt prototype designs used for industrial asynchronous motor control to a 50kW small wind turbine design.

Darren Hammell; Mark Holveck; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Effects of vaporizer and evaporative-condenser size on geofluid effectiveness and cost of electricity for geothermal binary power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A special study was conducted to investigate the influences of minimum approach temperature differences occurring in supercritical-heater/vaporizer and evaporative-condenser heat rejection systems on geothermal-electric binary power plant performance and cost of electricity. For the systems investigated optimum pinch points for minimizing cost of electricity were estimated to range from 5 to 7/sup 0/F for the heater vaporizer. The minimum approach of condensing temperature to wet-bulb temperature for evaporative condensers was estimated to be about 30/sup 0/F in order to achieve the lowest cost of electricity.

Demuth, O.J.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Electric power transmission and distribution systems: costs and their allocation. Research report  

SciTech Connect

Transmission and distribution costs contribute significantly to the total costs of providing electrical service. The costs derived from the transmission and distribution (TandD) system have historically comprised about 2/3 the costs of producing and delivering electricity to residential-commercial customers, and over 1/3 the total costs supplying electricity to large industrial customers. This report: (1) estimates the differences in transmission and distribution equipment required to serve industrial and residential-commercial customers and allocates to the above two customer classes the average costs of installing this equipment; (2) estimates the costs of operation and maintenance of the transmission and distribution system, and allocates these costs to the customer classes; and (3) calculates the TandD derived average costs for the two customer classes. (GRA)

Baughman, M.L.; Bottaro, D.J.

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Nuclear economics 2000: Deterministic and probabilistic projections of nuclear and coal electric power generation costs for the year 2000  

SciTech Connect

The total busbar electric generating costs were estimated for locations in ten regions of the United States for base-load nuclear and coal-fired power plants with a startup date of January 2000. For the Midwest region a complete data set that specifies each parameter used to obtain the comparative results is supplied. When based on the reference set of input variables, the comparison of power generation costs is found to favor nuclear in most regions of the country. Nuclear power is most favored in the northeast and western regions where coal must be transported over long distances; however, coal-fired generation is most competitive in the north central region where large reserves of cheaply mineable coal exist. In several regions small changes in the reference variables could cause either option to be preferred. The reference data set reflects the better of recent electric utility construction cost experience (BE) for nuclear plants. This study assumes as its reference case a stable regulatory environment and improved planning and construction practices, resulting in nuclear plants typically built at the present BE costs. Today's BE nuclear-plant capital investment cost model is then being used as a surrogate for projected costs for the next generation of light-water reactor plants. An alternative analysis based on today's median experience (ME) nuclear-plant construction cost experience is also included. In this case, coal is favored in all ten regions, implying that typical nuclear capital investment costs must improve for nuclear to be competitive.

Williams, K.A.; Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Bowers, H.I.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Assessment of light water reactor power plant cost and ultra-acceleration depreciation financing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although in many regions of the U.S. the least expensive electricity is generated from light-water reactor (LWR) plants, the fixed (capital plus operation and maintenance) cost has increased to the level where the cost ...

El-Magboub, Sadek Abdulhafid.

211

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

per MWh or KWh for the various sources ? I suspect that the costs commonly quoted for fossil fuels and nucelar are artificially low and that these fake costs are used to 'sell'...

212

Cost Maps for Fossil Assets Management: Based on a Case Study With Minnesota Power Company  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The key to effective management of utility assets is determining the benefits and costs of options over various timeframes. This report describes and illustrates a structured approach to asset management decision making using cost maps.

1995-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

213

Supply of geothermal power from hydrothermal sources: A study of the cost of power in 20 and 40 years  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study develops estimates for the amount of hydrothermal geothermal power that could be on line in 20 and 40 years. This study was intended to represent a snapshot'' in 20 and 40 years of the hydrothermal energy available for electric power production should a market exist for this power. This does not represent the total or maximum amount of hydrothermal power, but is instead an attempt to estimate the rate at which power could be on line constrained by the exploration, development and support infrastructure available to the geothermal industry, but not constrained by the potential market for power.

Petty, S. (Petty (Susan) Consulting, Solano Beach, CA (United States)); Livesay, B.J. (Livesay Consultants, Inc., Encinitas, CA (United States)); Long, W.P. (Carlin Gold Co., Inc., Grass Valley, CA (United States)); Geyer, J. (Geyer (John) and Associates, Vancouver, WA (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

An Analysis of the Retail and Lifecycle Cost of Battery-Powered Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

product of an assumed cost per kWh and the total number ofmethod assumes that the cost per kWh does not vary with thethis battery has a low cost per kWh, and relatively few kWh

Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Low-cost flexible packaging for high-power Li-Ion HEV batteries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Batteries with various types of chemistries are typically sold in rigid hermetically sealed containers that, at the simplest level, must contain the electrolyte while keeping out the exterior atmosphere. However, such rigid containers can have limitations in packaging situations where the form of the battery is important, such as in hand-held electronics like personal digital assistants (PDAs), laptops, and cell phones. Other limitations exist as well. At least one of the electrode leads must be insulated from the metal can, which necessitates the inclusion of an insulated metal feed-through in the containment hardware. Another limitation may be in hardware and assembly cost, such as exists for the lithium-ion batteries that are being developed for use in electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). The large size (typically 10-100 Ah) of these batteries usually results in electric beam or laser welding of the metal cap to the metal can. The non-aqueous electrolyte used in these batteries are usually based on flammable solvents and therefore require the incorporation of a safety rupture vent to relieve pressure in the event of overcharging or overheating. Both of these features add cost to the battery. Flexible packaging provides an alternative to the rigid container. A common example of this is the multi-layered laminates used in the food packaging industry, such as for vacuum-sealed coffee bags. However, flexible packaging for batteries does not come without concerns. One of the main concerns is the slow egress of the electrolyte solvent through the face of the inner laminate layer and at the sealant edge. Also, moisture and air could enter from the outside via the same method. These exchanges may be acceptable for brief periods of time, but for the long lifetimes required for batteries in electric/hybrid electric vehicles, batteries in remote locations, and those in satellites, these exchanges are unacceptable. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in collaboration with several industrial partners, is working on low-cost flexible packaging as an alternative to the packaging currently being used for lithium-ion batteries [1,2]. This program is funded by the FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy. (It was originally funded under the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles, or PNGV, Program, which had as one of its mandates to develop a power-assist hybrid electric vehicle with triple the fuel economy of a typical sedan.) The goal in this packaging effort is to reduce the cost associated with the packaging of each cell several-fold to less than $1 per cell ({approx} 50 cells are required per battery, 1 battery per vehicle), while maintaining the integrity of the cell contents for a 15-year lifetime. Even though the battery chemistry of main interest is the lithium-ion system, the methodology used to develop the most appropriate laminate structure will be very similar for other battery chemistries.

Jansen, A. N.; Amine, K.; Henriksen, G. L.

2004-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

217

Low cost power and supply noise estimation and control in scan testing of vlsi circuits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Test power is an important issue in deep submicron semiconductor testing. Too much power supply noise and too much power dissipation can result in excessive temperature rise, both leading to overkill during delay test. Scan-based test has ...

Zhongwei Jiang / Duncan Walker

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

A Low Cost and High Efficient Facility for Removal of $\\SO_{2}$ and $\\NO_{x}$ in the Flue Gas from Coal Fire Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Low Cost and High Efficient Facility for Removal of $\\SO_{2}$ and $\\NO_{x}$ in the Flue Gas from Coal Fire Power Plant

Pei, Y J; Dong, X; Feng, G Y; Fu, S; Gao, H; Hong, Y; Li, G; Li, Y X; Shang, L; Sheng, L S; Tian, Y C; Wang, X Q; Wang, Y; Wei, W; Zhang, Y W; Zhou, H J

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Techno-Economic Feasibility of Highly Efficient Cost-Effective Thermoelectric-SOFC Hybrid Power Generation Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems have the potential to generate exhaust gas streams of high temperature, ranging from 400 to 800 C. These high temperature gas streams can be used for additional power generation with bottoming cycle technologies to achieve higher system power efficiency. One of the potential candidate bottoming cycles is power generation by means of thermoelectric (TE) devices, which have the inherent advantages of low noise, low maintenance and long life. This study was to analyze the feasibility of combining coal gas based SOFC and TE through system performance and cost techno-economic modeling in the context of multi-MW power plants, with 200 kW SOFC-TE module as building blocks. System and component concepts were generated for combining SOFC and TE covering electro-thermo-chemical system integration, power conditioning system (PCS) and component designs. SOFC cost and performance models previously developed at United Technologies Research Center were modified and used in overall system analysis. The TE model was validated and provided by BSST. The optimum system in terms of energy conversion efficiency was found to be a pressurized SOFC-TE, with system efficiency of 65.3% and cost of $390/kW of manufacturing cost. The pressurization ratio was approximately 4 and the assumed ZT of the TE was 2.5. System and component specifications were generated based on the modeling study. The major technology and cost barriers for maturing the system include pressurized SOFC stack using coal gas, the high temperature recycle blowers, and system control design. Finally, a 4-step development roadmap is proposed for future technology development, the first step being a 1 kW proof-of-concept demonstration unit.

Jifeng Zhang; Jean Yamanis

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

220

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Low Cost, High Performance and Long Life Flow Battery Electrodes - Tom Stepien, Primus Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

With ARPA-E we optimized With ARPA-E we optimized * Adhesion * Current density * Duration * Catalytic coatings * Voltaic performance Goals * Cost-effectiveness * High-efficiency * Uniformity EnergyPod Low Cost, High Performance and Long Life Flow Battery Electrodes TM A Breakthrough In Distributed, Grid Scale Energy Storage ARPA-E has enabled Primus Power to create an innovative and technically advanced electrode Electrode Zinc Plating This, combined with our other advances has enabled us to create a unique flow battery system with ...  Low cost electrodes  Long life  High efficiency  Flexibility For...  Ubiquitous  Dispatchable  Cost effective ... grid-scale electrical energy storage to: * Accelerate renewable

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "negative power cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A simple and low cost platform to perform Power Analysis Attacks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Power Analysis Attacks use the fact that power consumption in modern microprocessors and cryptographic devices depends on the instructions executed on them and so, it… (more)

Carmona, Manuel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

The development of low cost LiFePO4-based high power lithium-ion batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

development of low cost LiFePO4-based high power lithium-ion batteries development of low cost LiFePO4-based high power lithium-ion batteries Title The development of low cost LiFePO4-based high power lithium-ion batteries Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2005 Authors Striebel, Kathryn A., Joongpyo Shim, Azucena Sierra, Hui Yang, Xiangyun Song, Robert Kostecki, and Kathryn N. McCarthy Journal Journal of Power Sources Volume 146 Pagination 33-38 Keywords libob, lifepo4, lithium-ion, post-test, raman spectroscopy Abstract Pouch type LiFePO4-natural graphite lithium-ion cells were cycled at constant current with periodic pulse-power testing in several different configurations. Components were analyzed after cycling with electrochemical, Raman and TEM techniques to determine capacity fade mechanisms. The cells with carbon-coated current collectors in the cathode and LiBOB-salt electrolyte showed the best performance stability. In many cases, iron species were detected on the anodes removed from cells with both TEM and Raman spectroscopy. The LiFePO4 electrodes showed unchanged capacity suggesting that the iron is migrating in small quantities and is acting as a catalyst to destabilize the anode SEI in these cells.

223

Geothermal power plant R and D: an analysis of cost-performance tradeoffs and the Heber Binary-Cycle Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

A study of advancements in power plant designs for use at geothermal resources in the low to moderate (300 to 400F) temperature range is reported. In 3 case studies, the benefits of R and D to achieve these advancements are evaluated in terms of expected increases in installed geothermal generating capacity over the next 2 decades. A parametric sensitivity study is discussed which analyzes differential power development for combinations of power plant efficiency and capitol cost. Affordable tradeoffs between plant performance and capital costs are illustrated. The independent review and analysis of the expected costs of construction, operation and maintenance of the Heber Binary Cycle Geothermal Power Demonstration Plant are described. Included in this assessment is an analysis of each of the major cost components of the project, including (1) construction cost, (2) well field development costs, (3) fluid purchase costs, and (4) well field and power plant operation and maintenance costs. The total cost of power generated from the Heber Plant (in terms of mills per kWh) is then compared to the cost of power from alternative fossil-fueled base load units. Also evaluated are the provisions of both: (a) the Cooperative Agreement between the federal government and San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG and E); and (b) the Geothermal Heat Sales Contract with Union Oil Company.

Cassel, T.A.V.; Amundsen, C.B.; Blair, P.D.

1983-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

224

Coal-fired power-plant-capital-cost estimates. Final report. [Mid-1978 price level; 13 different sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conceptual designs and order-of-magnitude capital cost estimates have been prepared for typical 1000-MW coal-fired power plants. These subcritical plants will provide high efficiency in base load operation without excessive efficiency loss in cycling operation. In addition, an alternative supercritical design and a cost estimate were developed for each of the plants for maximum efficiency at 80 to 100% of design capacity. The power plants will be located in 13 representative regions of the United States and will be fueled by coal typically available in each region. In two locations, alternate coals are available and plants have been designed and estimated for both coals resulting in a total of 15 power plants. The capital cost estimates are at mid-1978 price level with no escalation and are based on the contractor's current construction projects. Conservative estimating parameters have been used to ensure their suitability as planning tools for utility companies. A flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system has been included for each plant to reflect the requirements of the promulgated New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) emissions. The estimated costs of the FGD facilities range from 74 to 169 $/kW depending on the coal characteristics and the location of the plant. The estimated total capital requirements for twin 500-MW units vary from 8088 $/kW for a southeastern plant burning bituminous Kentucky coal to 990 $/kW for a remote western plant burning subbituminous Wyoming coal.

Holstein, R.A.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results from Major Wind Integration Studies Completed 2003-a mini- mum) show that wind integration costs are generallyA number of additional wind integration analyses are planned

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

An Analysis of the Retail and Lifecycle Cost of Battery-Powered Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1997. Electric and hybrid electric vehicles: a technology1998. An assessment of electric vehicle life cycle costs tothe bene®ts of electric vehicles. Union of Concerned

Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

kWhth, The best system also had a cost that was similar to the base case, a direct two-tank molten salt system.

Gawlik, Keith

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

228

Advanced Thermal Control Enabling Cost Reduction for Automotive Power Electronics (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Describes NREL's work on next-generation vehicle cooling technologies (jets, sprays, microchannels) and novel packaging topologies to reduce costs and increase performance and reliability.

Abraham, T.; Kelly, K.; Bennion, K.; Vlahinos, A.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Summary of: Simulating the Value of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a Production Cost Model (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Concentrating solar power (CSP) deployed with thermal energy storage (TES) provides a dispatchable source of renewable energy. The value of CSP with TES, as with other potential generation resources, needs to be established using traditional utility planning tools. Production cost models, which simulate the operation of grid, are often used to estimate the operational value of different generation mixes. CSP with TES has historically had limited analysis in commercial production simulations. This document describes the implementation of CSP with TES in a commercial production cost model. It also describes the simulation of grid operations with CSP in a test system consisting of two balancing areas located primarily in Colorado.

Denholm, P.; Hummon, M.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2007 (Revised)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report focuses on key trends in the U.S. wind power market, with an emphasis on the latest year, and presents a wealth of data, some of which has not historically been mined by wind power analysts.

Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Power Rankings: The Top 20 States Cumulative Capacity (end of 2006, MW) Texas California Iowa Minnesota Washington Oklahoma

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Plant power : the cost of using biomass for power generation and potential for decreased greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To date, biomass has not been a large source of power generation in the United States, despite the potential for greenhouse gas (GHG) benefits from displacing coal with carbon neutral biomass. In this thesis, the fuel cycle ...

Cuellar, Amanda Dulcinea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The development of low cost LiFePO4-based high power lithium-ion batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cycling performance of low-cost LiFePO4-based high-power lithium-ion cells was investigated and the components were analyzed after cycling to determine capacity fade mechanisms. Pouch type LiFePO4/natural graphite cells were assembled and evaluated by constant C/2 cycling, pulse-power and impedance measurements. From post-test electrochemical analysis after cycling, active materials, LiFePO4 and natural graphite, showed no degradation structurally or electrochemically. The main reasons for the capacity fade of cell were lithium inventory loss by side reaction and possible lithium deposition on the anode.

Shim, Joongpyo; Sierra, Azucena; Striebel, Kathryn A.

2003-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

234

Alternative wind power modeling methods using chronological and load duration curve production cost models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As an intermittent resource, capturing the temporal variation in windpower is an important issue in the context of utility production cost modeling. Many of the production cost models use a method that creates a cumulative probability distribution that is outside the time domain. The purpose of this report is to examine two production cost models that represent the two major model types: chronological and load duration cure models. This report is part of the ongoing research undertaken by the Wind Technology Division of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in utility modeling and wind system integration.

Milligan, M R

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Effects of vaporizer and evaporative condenser pinch points on geofluid effectiveness and cost of electricity for geothermal binary power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief study was conducted in support of the DOE/DGHT Heat Cycle Research Program to investigate the influences of minimum approach temperature differences occurring in supercritical-heater/vaporizer and evaporative-condenser heat rejection systems on geothermal-electric binary power plant performance and cost of electricity. For the systems investigated optimum pinch points for minimizing cost of electricity were estimated to range from 5 to 7/sup 0/F (3 to 4/sup 0/C) for the heater vaporizer. The minimum approach of condensing temperature to wet-bulb temperature for evaporative condensers was estimated to be about 15/sup 0/F (8/sup 0/C) in order to achieve the highest plant net geofluid effectiveness, and approximately 30/sup 0/F (17/sup 0/C) to attain the minimum cost of electricity.

Demuth, O.J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Modeling Photovoltaic and Concentrating Solar Power Trough Performance, Cost, and Financing with the Solar Advisor Model: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive solar technology systems analysis model, the Solar Advisor Model (SAM), has been developed to support the federal R&D community and the solar industry by staff at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Sandia National Laboratory. This model is able to model the finances, incentives, and performance of flat-plate photovoltaic (PV), concentrating PV, and concentrating solar power (specifically, parabolic troughs). The primary function of the model is to allow users to investigate the impact of variations in performance, cost, and financial parameters to better understand their impact on key figures of merit. Figures of merit related to the cost and performance of these systems include, but aren't limited to, system output, system efficiencies, levelized cost of energy, return on investment, and system capital and O&M costs. There are several models within SAM to model the performance of photovoltaic modules and inverters. This paper presents an overview of each PV and inverter model, introduces a new generic model, and briefly discusses the concentrating solar power (CSP) parabolic trough model. A comparison of results using the different PV and inverter models is also presented.

Blair, N.; Mehos, M.; Christensen, C.; Cameron, C.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Reducing Operations and Maintenance Costs of Nuclear Power Plant Fire Protection Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses opportunities for utilities to reduce fire protection operations and maintenance (O&M) costs. A number of these opportunities have been implemented by some utilities and can be implemented now by others. Other opportunities can be implemented in the short term with some additional development. These other opportunities are amenable to cooperative projects with costs shared by multiple utilities. There is also a group of opportunities that are probably best developed on an industry w...

1997-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

238

Comparative cost analyses: total flow vs other power conversion systems for the Salton Sea Geothermal Resource  

SciTech Connect

Cost studies were done for Total Flow, double flash, and multistage flash binary systems for electric Energy production from the Salton Sea Geothermal Resource. The purpose was to provide the Department of energy's Division of Geothermal Energy with information by which to judge whether to continue development of the Total Flow system. Results indicate that the Total Flow and double flash systems have capital costs of $1,135 and $1,026 /kW with energy costs of 40.9 and 39.7 mills/kW h respectively. The Total Flow and double flash systems are not distinguishable on a cost basis alone; the multistage flash binary system, with capital cost of $1,343 /kW and energy cost of 46.9 mills/kW h, is significantly more expensive. If oil savings are considered in the total analysis, the Total Flow system could save 30% more oil than the double flash system, $3.5 billion at 1978 oil prices.

Wright, G.W.

1978-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

239

Comparative cost analyses: total flow vs other power conversion systems for the Salton Sea Geothermal Resource  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cost studies were done for Total Flow, double flash, and multistage flash binary systems for electric Energy production from the Salton Sea Geothermal Resource. The purpose was to provide the Department of energy's Division of Geothermal Energy with information by which to judge whether to continue development of the Total Flow system. Results indicate that the Total Flow and double flash systems have capital costs of $1,135 and $1,026 /kW with energy costs of 40.9 and 39.7 mills/kW h respectively. The Total Flow and double flash systems are not distinguishable on a cost basis alone; the multistage flash binary system, with capital cost of $1,343 /kW and energy cost of 46.9 mills/kW h, is significantly more expensive. If oil savings are considered in the total analysis, the Total Flow system could save 30% more oil than the double flash system, $3.5 billion at 1978 oil prices.

Wright, G.W.

1978-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

240

Cost Effective Pole or Pad Mounted Power Quality Solution: Functional Specifications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Static Series Compensation (SSC) devices, sometimes called "dynamic voltage restorers" or DVRs, have been available on the marketplace since about 1994. These devices are designed to mitigate voltage sags and swells originating from the power system by injecting voltage in series with the power supply. The additive effect of the injected voltage produces an essentially undisturbed voltage for the load. There are several vendors presently producing SSCs. These devices all have essentially the same power e...

2000-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "negative power cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Understanding the cost of power interruptions to U.S. electricity consumers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PUD #1 (Washington) Tacoma Power (Washington) Xcel (SouthDakota) Xcel Sioux Falls (South Dakota) Xcel SW Sioux Falls (South Dakota) Western

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Eto, Joseph H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Optimization of a SEGS solar field for cost effective power output.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents and demonstrates procedures to model and optimize the collector field of a parabolic trough solar thermal power plant. The collector field of… (more)

Bialobrzeski, Robert Wetherill

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Cost analysis of power plant cooling using aquifer thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Most utilities in the US experience their peak demand for electric power during periods with high ambient temperature. Unfortunately, the performance of many power plants decreases with high ambient temperature. The use of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) for seasonal storage of chill can be an alternative method for heat rejection. Cold water produced during the previous winter is stored in the aquifer and can be used to provide augmented cooling during peak demand periods increasing the output of many Rankine cycle power plants. This report documents an investigation of the technical and economic feasibility of using aquifer thermal energy storage for peak cooling of power plants. 9 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

Zimmerman, P.W.; Drost, M.K.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Analysis of environmental factors impacting the life cycle cost analysis of conventional and fuel cell/battery-powered passenger vehicles. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the further developments and testing of the Life Cycle Cost (LCC) Model previously developed by Engineering Systems Management, Inc. (ESM) on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under contract No. DE-AC02-91CH10491. The Model incorporates specific analytical relationships and cost/performance data relevant to internal combustion engine (ICE) powered vehicles, battery powered electric vehicles (BPEVs), and fuel cell/battery-powered electric vehicles (FCEVs).

NONE

1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

WARP TM TECHNOLOGY FOR LOW COST & ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY MARINE BASED WIND POWER PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Major consideration and effort has gone into the selection of locations for wind power plants with relatively high wind speed which is relatively near the place of energy demand. The reason is that as wind speed increases, collectable energy from the wind increases by the third power. That is, in a location with 20 % higher wind speed, it is possible to generate 73 % more power. If 50 % higher wind velocity is available, 300 % more power and energy can be generated. The ‘father of modern day wind power’, William Heronemus, former US Nuclear Navy officer, Engineering Professor of the University of Massachusetts, recognized this and therefore proposed offshore wind power plants which helped launch the wind industry in 1972 with his landmark paper (Ref. 1). However, subsequent studies in the US and Europe found that proposed large diameter windmills in offshore installations are relatively uneconomic (Ref. 2, 3) due to a number of unavoidable characteristic features. Recently, Danish wind power firms are finding reasonably promising economic performance when such turbines are limited to very shallow water of 3-5 meters near land where no platform is required to support them (Ref. 4 & 5). However, ENECO’s Wind Amplified Rotor Platform (WARP TM) technology when applied in spar buoy design configuration has exceptional features and benefits desired by an offshore wind power plant:

Dr. David; L. Rainey; Alfred L. Weisbrich

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Perpetual and low-cost power meter for monitoring residential and industrial appliances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recent research efforts in smart grids and residential power management are oriented to monitor pervasively the power consumption of appliances in domestic and non-domestic buildings. Knowing the status of a residential grid is fundamental to keep ... Keywords: active ORing, energy harvesting, energy measuring, smart metering, wireless sensor networks

Danilo Porcarelli, Domenico Balsamo, Davide Brunelli, Giacomo Paci

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Microsoft PowerPoint - Cost-Allocation Customer Presentation_09082011.pptx [Read-Only]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 19-20, 2011 Agenda Agenda OCP/OCI U d t  OCP/OCI Update  Interim Cost Allocation Methodology P d C All i  Proposed Cost Allocation  Analysis of Proposed Allocation  Discussion and Comments  Contacts 2 OCP/OCI Update OCP/OCI Update  2007 Strategic Initiative for RMR BA and DSW BA to  2007 Strategic Initiative for RMR BA and DSW BA to operationally back each other up  Drivers from planning Drivers from planning  NERC compliance  Staffing  Cost avoidance of supporting two Alternate Control Centers (ACCs)  $2.1M for two ACCs $  Potential of manning ACCs 24/7  Changes to industry DSS EDT 15 min te sched ling  DSS, EDT, 15 minute scheduling 3 Strategic Planning Decision Strategic Planning Decision

248

NGL comparable to 193-nm lithography in cost, footprint, and power consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparison of ArF immersion single exposure, double patterning, extreme UV, and multi-e-beam maskless lithography (MEB ML2) systems, is made on their special characteristics, then in footprint, cost, and raw energy consumption. Only the MEB ML2 system ... Keywords: Direct-write lithography, E-beam lithography, EUV lithography, Maskless lithography, Microlithography, Next-generation lithography

Burn J. Lin

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

SLA-based Optimization of Power and Migration Cost in Cloud Computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud computing systems (or hosting datacenters) have attracted a lot of attention in recent years. Utility computing, reliable data storage, and infrastructure-independent computing are example applications of such systems. Electrical energy cost of ... Keywords: Cloud Computing, Virtual Machine Placement, Service Level Agreement, Energy Efficiency, Data center, Server Consolidation

Hadi Goudarzi; Mohammad Ghasemazar; Massoud Pedram

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Development of Advanced Technologies to Reduce Design, Fabrication and Construction Costs for Future Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 This report presents a summation of the third and final year of a three-year investigation into methods and technologies for substantially reducing the capital costs and total schedule for future nuclear plants. In addition, this is the final technical report for the three-year period of studies.

Camillo A. DiNunzio Framatome ANP DE& S; Dr. Abhinav Gupta Assistant Professor NCSU; Dr. Michael Golay Professor MIT Dr. Vincent Luk Sandia National Laboratories; Rich Turk Westinghouse Electric Company Nuclear Systems; Charles Morrow, Sandia National Laboratories; Geum-Taek Jin, Korea Power Engineering Company Inc.

2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

251

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry trends · Evolution of wind pricing · Installed wind project costs · Wind turbine transaction turbines and projects over 50 kW in size · Data sources include AWEA, EIA, FERC, SEC, etc. (see full report PercentofAnnualCapacityAdditions 0 20 40 60 80 100 TotalAnnualCapacityAdditions(GW) Wind Other Renewable Gas

252

Understanding Wind Power Costs: The Value of a Comprehensive Approach (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The evolution and maturity of the wind industry have often been assessed by considering changes in key metrics including capital costs, capacity factor, turbine pricing, and in some cases electricity sales data. However, wind turbines and plants represent a complex system optimization problem and each of these metrics, in isolation, fails to tell the complete story of technological progress and industry advancement. By contrast, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) provides a more comprehensive and nuanced perspective on industry trends. LCOE can be used to analyze the effect of individual changes (by holding other variables constant) or to understand the complex interactions that might occur for example between turbine costs and productivity. Moreover, LCOE offers a reflection of the total production costs and required revenue for wind plants. This presentation provides examples of how a narrow focus on individual industry metrics can provide inaccurate representations of industry trends while also demonstrating how LCOE captures the array of critical industry variables to provide a greater level of insight.

Lantz, E.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Advanced design nuclear power plants: Competitive, economical electricity. An analysis of the cost of electricity from coal, gas and nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an updated analysis of the projected cost of electricity from new baseload power plants beginning operation around the year 2000. Included in the study are: (1) advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants; (2) low emissions coal-fired power plants; (3) gasified coal-fired power plants; and (4) natural gas-fired power plants. This analysis shows that electricity from advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants will be economically competitive with all other baseload electric generating system alternatives. This does not mean that any one source of electric power is always preferable to another. Rather, what this analysis indicates is that, as utilities and others begin planning for future baseload power plants, advanced-design nuclear plants should be considered an economically viable option to be included in their detailed studies of alternatives. Even with aggressive and successful conservation, efficiency and demand-side management programs, some new baseload electric supply will be needed during the 1990s and into the future. The baseload generating plants required in the 1990s are currently being designed and constructed. For those required shortly after 2000, the planning and alternatives assessment process must start now. It takes up to ten years to plan, design, license and construct a new coal-fired or nuclear fueled baseload electric generating plant and about six years for a natural gas-fired plant. This study indicates that for 600-megawatt blocks of capacity, advanced-design nuclear plants could supply electricity at an average of 4.5 cents per kilowatt-hour versus 4.8 cents per kilowatt-hour for an advanced pulverized-coal plant, 5.0 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gasified-coal combined cycle plant, and 4.3 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gas-fired combined cycle combustion turbine plant.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Assessment of generic solar thermal systems for large power applications: analysis of electric power generating costs for systems larger than 10 MWe  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Seven generic types of collectors, together with associated subsystems for electric power generation, were considered. The collectors can be classified into three categories: (1) two-axis tracking (with compound-curvature reflecting surfaces); (2) one-axis tracking (with single-curvature reflecting surfaces); and (3) nontracking (with low-concentration reflecting surfaces). All seven collectors were analyzed in conceptual system configurations with Rankine-cycle engines. In addition, two of the collectors were analyzed with Brayton-cycle engines, and one was analyzed with a Stirling-cycle engine. With these engine options, and the consideration of both thermal and electrical storage for the Brayton-cycle central receiver, 11 systems were formulated for analysis. Conceptual designs developed for the 11 systems were based on common assumptions of available technology in the 1990 to 2000 time frame. No attempt was made to perform a detailed optimization of each conceptual design. Rather, designs best suited for a comparative evaluation of the concepts were formulated. Costs were estimated on the basis of identical assumptions, ground rules, methodologies, and unit costs of materials and labor applied uniformly to all of the concepts. The computer code SOLSTEP was used to analyze the thermodynamic performance characteristics and energy costs of the 11 concepts. Year-long simulations were performed using meteorological and insolation data for Barstow, California. Results for each concept include levelized energy costs and capacity factors for various combinations of storage capacity and collector field size.

Apley, W.J.; Bird, S.P.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.; Fort, J.A.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Patton, W.P.; Williams, T.A.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Power Price Source: FERC 2006 and 2004 “State of the12 projects 691 MW Source: FERC 2006 "State of the Market"the strong competi- Source: FERC 2006 "State of the Market"

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Understanding the cost of power interruptions to U.S. electricity consumers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. Pilot Evaluation of Electricity-Reliability and Power-in the Economic Value of Electricity Reliability to the U.S.of the economic value of electricity reliability, the U.S.

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Eto, Joseph H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

How much does it cost to build different types of power plants in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How many nuclear power plants are in the U.S. and where are they located? How many smart meters are installed in the U.S. and who has them? How much coal, ...

258

Distributed Generation Planning for Loss and Cost Minimisation in Power Distribution Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, a method based on a sensitivity analysis and quadratic curve-fitting technique for power loss reduction in a low-voltage distribution area is proposed.… (more)

Anwar, Adnan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Western Wind, and Midwest Wind Energy. Table 4. Merger andHorizon) Noble Power CPV Wind Catamount Western Wind EnergyCoastal Wind Energy LLC Tierra Energy, LLC Renewable

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Plant-Wide Performance and Cost Analysis of ITM-Based IGCC Power Generation Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), in conjunction with Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (AP), and WorleyParsons, Inc. (WP), has reviewed and modeled integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. IGCC is a method of burning coal in which the coal is gasified, creating a synthetic gas, or “syngas.” After being cleaned¾including potentially of carbon dioxide (CO2)¾this syngas can be used in a traditional combined cycle to produce power. This ...

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "negative power cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

IM-GEO: Impact of R and D on cost of geothermal power: Documentation of Model Version 2. 09  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

IM-GEO is an analysis used to estimate the impact of technology improvements on the relative cost of hydrothermal power. The analysis is available in a tutorial program for use on personal computers. It is designed for use by R and D program managers to evaluate R and D options. Only the potential impact of technologies is considered with all economic factors being held constant. This analysis has one unique feature. The economic impact of reducing risk by improving reservoir characterization is included using a strategy currently employed by financial institutions. This report describes the basis of the calculations, documents the code, and describes the operational procedures. Application of the code to study potential cost reductions due to R and D success will be done by R and D managers to evaluate and direct their own programs.

Petty, S.; Entingh, D.; Livesay, B.J.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Electric power high-voltage transmission lines: Design options, cost, and electric and magnetic field levels  

SciTech Connect

This report provides background information about (1) the electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) of high-voltage transmission lines at typical voltages and line configurations and (2) typical transmission line costs to assist on alternatives in environmental documents. EMF strengths at 0 {+-} 200 ft from centerline were calculated for ac overhead lines, and for 345 and 230-kV ac underground line and for a {+-}450-kV dc overhead line. Compacting and height sensitivity factors were computed for the variation in EMFs when line conductors are moved closer or raised. Estimated costs for the lines are presented and discussed so that the impact of using alternative strategies for reducing EMF strengths and the implications of implementing the strategies can be better appreciated.

Stoffel, J.B.; Pentecost, E.D.; Roman, R.D.; Traczyk, P.A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Appendices. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

Appendices are presented concerning the evaluations of decommissioning financing alternatives; reference site description; reference BWR facility description; radiation dose rate and concrete surface contamination data; radionuclide inventories; public radiation dose models and calculated maximum annual doses; decommissioning methods; generic decommissioning information; immediate dismantlement details; passive safe storage, continuing care, and deferred dismantlement details; entombment details; demolition and site restoration details; cost estimating bases; public radiological safety assessment details; and details of alternate study bases.

Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Program on Technology Innovation: Fossil Power Plant Cost and Performance Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is one of two companion studies that describe trends in operating costs and reliability of fossil steam plants since 1970. The studies are a foundation for more sophisticated statistical studies aimed at modeling and predicting the impacts of cycling. This report summarizes results for gas- and oil-fired steam generating units, contrasting two-shift or daily cycling with all other operating modes. It also includes systematic and similar data on coal plants. Chronological trends since 1982 are...

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transaction prices · Wind project performance · O&M cost trends · Integration/transmission/policy · Coming up is Reasonably Broad #12;10 Interest in Offshore Wind Continues in the U.S., but No Such Projects Are Yet Online · All wind projects installed in the U.S. to date are land-based · Some interest exists in offshore wind

266

Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Thermal energy storage systems using phase change materials were evaluated for trough systems that use oil, steam, and high temperature salts as heat transfer fluids. A variety of eutectic salts and metal alloys were considered as phase change materials in a cascaded arrangement. Literature values of specific heat, latent heat, density, and other thermophysical properties were used in initial analyses. Testing laboratories were contracted to measure properties for candidate materials for comparison to the literature and for updating the models. A TRNSYS model from Phase 1 was further developed for optimizing the system, including a novel control algorithm. A concept for increasing the bulk thermal conductivity of the phase change system was developed using expanded metal sheets. Outside companies were contracted to design and cost systems using platecoil heat exchangers immersed in the phase change material. Laboratory evaluations of the one-dimensional and three-dimensional behavior of expanded metal sheets in a low conductivity medium were used to optimize the amount of thermal conductivity enhancement. The thermal energy storage systems were compared to baseline conventional systems. The best phase change system found in this project, which was for the high temperature plant, had a projected cost of $25.2 per kWhth, The best system also had a cost that was similar to the base case, a direct two-tank molten salt system.

Gawlik, Keith

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

267

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Surged by 46% in 2007, with 5,329 MW Added and $9 Billion Invested . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Wind Power Contributed 35% of All New U.S. Electric Generating Capacity in 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The United States Continued to Lead the World in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Texas Easily Exceeded Other States in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . .6 Data from Interconnection Queues Demonstrate that an Enormous Amount of Wind Capacity Is Under Development . . . . . . . . . .9 GE Wind Remained the Dominant Turbine Manufacturer, but a Growing Number of Other Manufacturers Are Capturing Market Share .

268

Commerce study looks at cost of pollution control for fossil-fuel power industry  

SciTech Connect

Environmental controls for fossil-fuel power plants consumed 1.3 percent of the national fuel used in 1974, with the largest demand going for sulfur dioxide emission control. Projections for power plant consumption to meet environmental standards range as high as eight percent in the 1980s. Less-energy-consuming systems include coal blending, tall stacks, and supplementary control systems; while high consumers are using coal washing operations in place of scrubbers, fuel transportation, conversion to acceptable fuels, waste heat disposal, and particulate controls. A summary table presents sulfur dioxide regulations in terms of their goals and their anticipated minimum and maximum fuel consumption. (DCK)

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1: CDRL Item 2, pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume VII. Pilot plant cost and commercial plant cost and performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed cost and performance data for the proposed tower focus pilot plant and commercial plant are given. The baseline central receiver concept defined by the MDAC team consists of the following features: (A) an external receiver mounted on a tower, and located in a 360/sup 0/ array of sun-tracking heliostats which comprise the collector subsystem. (B) feedwater from the electrical power generation subsystem is pumped through a riser to the receiver, where the feedwater is converted to superheated steam in a single pass through the tubes of the receiver panels. (C) The steam from the receiver is routed through a downcomer to the ground and introduced to a turbine directly for expansion and generation of electricity, and/or to a thermal storage subsystem, where the steam is condensed in charging heat exchangers to heat a dual-medium oil and rock thermal storage unit (TSU). (D) Extended operation after daylight hours is facilitated by discharging the TSU to generate steam for feeding the admission port of the turbine. (E) Overall control of the system is provided by a master control unit, which handles the interactions between subsystems that take place during startup, shutdown, and transitions between operating modes. (WHK)

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report--the first in what is envisioned to be an ongoing annual series--attempts to fill this need by providing a detailed overview of developments and trends in the U.S. wind power market, with a particular focus on 2006.

Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO A Low-Cost, Low-Power, Wireless Occupancy Sensing Platform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for 73% of the electricity usage in the United States[4]. For a typical building, the highest use;2 Technology accounts for 50-80% of the energy usage at the Computer Science building at UCSD, depending containing two hallways, a total of eight per floor. 4.4 Power Usage At present the energy consumption

272

Impact on the steam electric power industry of deleting Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act: Capital costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many power plants discharge large volumes of cooling water. In some cases, the temperature of the discharge exceeds state thermal requirements. Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) allows a thermal discharger to demonstrate that less stringent thermal effluent limitations would still protect aquatic life. About 32% of total US steam electric generating capacity operates under Section 316(a) variances. In 1991, the US Senate proposed legislation that would delete Section 316(a) from the CWA. This study, presented in two companion reports, examines how this legislation would affect the steam electric power industry. This report describes alternatives available to nuclear and coal-fired plants currently operating under variances. Data from 38 plants representing 14 companies are used to estimate the national cost of implementing such alternatives. Although there are other alternatives, most affected plants would be retrofitted with cooling towers. Assuming that all plants currently operating under variances would install cooling towers, the national capital cost estimate for these retrofits ranges from $22.7 billion to $24.4 billion (in 1992 dollars). The second report quantitatively and qualitatively evaluates the energy and environmental impacts of deleting the variance. Little justification has been found for removing the Section 316(a) variance from the CWA.

Veil, J.A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Cyclic Operation of Power Plant: Technical, Operational and Cost Issues -- An International Seminar: Proceedings: ''Two Shifting'' Seminar  

SciTech Connect

Because of changes in demand and competition within the power industry, fossil fuel plants in many countries are now subject to two-shift operation, that is, generating power for 10-15 hours during the day only, usually in combination with a complete shutdown on weekends. Other fossil-fueled units, although running around the clock, need to follow changes in electricity demand. This mode of functioning, in which temperatures and pressures are never stable for more than a few hours, is referred to as ''cyclic operation of plant.'' The aim of the seminar at which these papers were presented was to identify the basic causes of component and equipment problems in two-shift operation, and to begin to identify procedures that could minimize operating and maintenance costs. The papers cover the following topics: Session 1: Plant Operation Experience and Design Issues; Session 2: Materials Issues; Session 3: Cost, Manpower and Management Issues; Session 4: Plant Automation Issues; Session 5: Hot Section Gas Turbine Issues; and Session 6: HRSG [heat recovery steam generator] Issues.

None

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Low Cost Sorbent for Capturing CO{sub 2} Emissions Generated by Existing Coal-fired Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

TDA Research, Inc. has developed a novel sorbent based post-combustion CO{sub 2} removal technology. This low cost sorbent can be regenerated with low-pressure (ca. 1 atm) superheated steam without temperature swing or pressure-swing. The isothermal and isobaric operation is a unique and advantageous feature of this process. The objective of this project was to demonstrate the technical and economic merit of this sorbent based CO{sub 2} capture approach. Through laboratory, bench-scale and field testing we demonstrated that this technology can effectively and efficiently capture CO{sub 2} produced at an existing pulverized coal power plants. TDA Research, Inc is developing both the solid sorbent and the process designed around that material. This project addresses the DOE Program Goal to develop a capture technology that can be added to an existing or new coal fired power plant, and can capture 90% of the CO{sub 2} produced with the lowest possible increase in the cost of energy. .

Elliott, Jeannine

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

Cost comparison of the satellite power system and six alternative technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A framework is described for comparing the Satellite Power System (SPS) with various projected alternative energy sources on the basis of technical possibility, economic viability, and social and environmental acceptability. Each of the following energy sources is briefly described: conventional coal, light water reactor, coal gasification/combined cycle, liquid-metal fast-breeder reactor, central station terrestrial photovoltaic, fusion, and the SPS. The analysis consists of comparison of characterizations, side-by-side analysis, and alternative futures analysis. (LEW)

Wolsko, T.; Samsa, M.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Record of Decision for the Safety-Net Cost Recovery Adjustment Clause (SN CRAC) Adjustment to 2002 Wholesale Power Rates (DOE/EIS-0183) (6/30/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT RECORD OF DECISION for the Safety-Net Cost Recovery Adjustment Clause (SN CRAC) Adjustment to 2002 Wholesale Power Rates INTRODUCTION The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to implement its proposed Safety-Net Cost Recovery Adjustment Clause (SN CRAC) Adjustment to 2002 Wholesale Power Rates. This rate adjustment allows BPA to address potential revenue shortfalls and recover its costs through rates. This rate adjustment involves implementation of one of BPA's existing risk mitigation tools that has been previously subject to review under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), as described more fully below. I have reviewed this previous NEPA documentation and determined that the SN CRAC rate adjustment is adequately covered within

277

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Increased by 27% in 2006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The United States Leads the World in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . .4 Texas, Washington, and California Lead the U.S. in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 GE Wind Is the Dominant Turbine Manufacturer, with Siemens Gaining Market Share . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Average Turbine Size Continues to Increase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Developer Consolidation Accelerates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Innovation and Competition in Non-Utility Wind Financing Persists . . . .9 Utility Interest in Wind Asset Ownership Strengthens; Community Wind Grows Modestly . . . . . . . . . . . .

278

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 2. Appendices. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979  

SciTech Connect

Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE. This volume contains the appendices.

Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Negative mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some physical aspects of negative mass are examined. Several unusual properties, such as the ability of negative mass to penetrate any armor, are analyzed. Other surprising effects include the bizarre system of negative mass chasing positive pass, naked singularities and the violation of cosmic censorship, wormholes, and quantum mechanical results as well. In addition, a brief look into the implications for strings is given.

Richard T Hammond

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

280

paper “CO2 Regulations and Electricity Prices: Cost Estimates for Coal-Fired Power Plants. ” We thank  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For fossil fuel power plants to be built in the future, carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies offer the potential for significant reductions in CO2 emissions. We examine the break-even value for CCS adoptions, that is, the critical value in the charge for CO2 emissions that would justify investment in CCS capabilities. Our analysis takes explicitly into account that the supply of electricity at the wholesale level (generation) is organized competitively in some U.S. jurisdictions, while in others a regulated utility provides integrated generation and distribution services. For either market structure, we find that emissions charges in the range of $25-$30 per tonne of CO2 would be the break-even value for adopting CCS capabilities at new coal-fired power plants. The corresponding break-even values for natural gas plants are substantially higher, near $60 per tonne. Our break-even estimates serve as a basis for projecting the change in electricity prices once carbon emissions become costly. CCS capabilities effectively put an upper bound on the rise in electricity prices. We estimate this bound to be near 30 % at the retail level for both coal and natural gas plants. In contrast to the competitive power supply scenario, however, these price increases materialize only gradually for a regulated utility. The delay in price adjustments reflects that for regulated

Stefan Reichelstein; Erica Plambeck

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "negative power cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Mars Pathfinder Microrover A Small, Low-Cost, Low-Power Spacecraft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On December 5, 1996, NASA will launch its first Discovery Class Mission, the Mars Pathfinder. On July 4, 1997 the 450 kg spacecraft will enter into the Martian atmosphere and descend directly to the surface using a viking style aeroshell, parachutes, RAD rockets, and airbags to slow its decent. Once on the surface the tetrahedrally-shaped lander will open like a flower and release a 10.5 kg rover previously to the inside surface of one of the lander's three deployable petals. The rover will then drive off the lander and begin to perform a wide range of scientific and technological experiments. The significance of the rover is that although it is formally part of the mission's instrument payload, it is in reality a small spacecraft. It performs all the functions that a typical spacecraft performs including: navigation; command and data handling (command execution, data acquisition, telemetry packetization); power generation, distribution, and control; thermal control; telecommunications...

Henry Stone

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Key Issues for the control of refueling outage duration and costs in PWR Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

For several years, EDF, within the framework of the CIDEM1 project and in collaboration with some German Utilities, has undertaken a detailed review of the operating experience both of its own NPP and of foreign units, in order to improve the performances of future units under design, particularly the French-German European Pressurized Reactor (EPR) project. This review made it possible to identify the key issues allowing to decrease the duration of refueling and maintenance outages. These key issues can be classified in 3 categories Design, Maintenance and Logistic Support, Outage Management. Most of the key issues in the design field and some in the logistic support field have been studied and could be integrated into the design of any future PWR unit, as for the EPR project. Some of them could also be adapted to current plants, provided they are feasible and profitable. The organization must be tailored to each country, utility or period: it widely depends on the power production environment, particularly in a deregulation context. (author)

Degrave, Claude [Electricite de France, EDF-SEPTEN, 12-14 avenue Dutrievoz 69628 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Microsoft Word - 20110321_LTI_PPM_Tetra Tech_Cost Effective Wireless Application in Power Generation Markets.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11/1483 11/1483 Cost-Effective Wireless Application in the Power Generation Market 21 March, 2011 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe on privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or

284

An analysis of the impacts of economic incentive programs on commercial nuclear power plant operations and maintenance costs  

SciTech Connect

Operations and Maintenance (O and M) expenditures by nuclear power plant owner/operators possess a very logical and vital link in considerations relating to plant safety and reliability. Since the determinants of O and M outlays are considerable and varied, the potential linkages to plant safety, both directly and indirectly, can likewise be substantial. One significant issue before the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is the impact, if any, on O and M spending from state programs that attempt to improve plant operating performance, and how and to what extent these programs may affect plant safety and pose public health risks. The purpose of this study is to examine the role and degree of impacts from state promulgated economic incentive programs (EIPs) on plant O and M spending. A multivariate regression framework is specified, and the model is estimated on industry data over a five-year period, 1986--1990. Explanatory variables for the O and M spending model include plant characteristics, regulatory effects, financial strength factors, replacement power costs, and the performance incentive programs. EIPs are found to have statistically significant effects on plant O and M outlays, albeit small in relation to other factors. Moreover, the results indicate that the relatively financially weaker firms are more sensitive in their O and M spending to the presence of such programs. Formulations for linking spending behavior and EIPs with plant safety performance remains for future analysis.

Kavanaugh, D.C.; Monroe, W.H. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Wood, R.S. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Energy and cost analysis of a solar-hydrogen combined heat and power system for remote power supply using a computer simulation  

SciTech Connect

A simulation program, based on Visual Pascal, for sizing and techno-economic analysis of the performance of solar-hydrogen combined heat and power systems for remote applications is described. The accuracy of the submodels is checked by comparing the real performances of the system's components obtained from experimental measurements with model outputs. The use of the heat generated by the PEM fuel cell, and any unused excess hydrogen, is investigated for hot water production or space heating while the solar-hydrogen system is supplying electricity. A 5 kWh daily demand profile and the solar radiation profile of Melbourne have been used in a case study to investigate the typical techno-economic characteristics of the system to supply a remote household. The simulation shows that by harnessing both thermal load and excess hydrogen it is possible to increase the average yearly energy efficiency of the fuel cell in the solar-hydrogen system from just below 40% up to about 80% in both heat and power generation (based on the high heating value of hydrogen). The fuel cell in the system is conventionally sized to meet the peak of the demand profile. However, an economic optimisation analysis illustrates that installing a larger fuel cell could lead to up to a 15% reduction in the unit cost of the electricity to an average of just below 90 c/kWh over the assessment period of 30 years. Further, for an economically optimal size of the fuel cell, nearly a half the yearly energy demand for hot water of the remote household could be supplied by heat recovery from the fuel cell and utilising unused hydrogen in the exit stream. Such a system could then complement a conventional solar water heating system by providing the boosting energy (usually in the order of 40% of the total) normally obtained from gas or electricity. (author)

Shabani, Bahman; Andrews, John; Watkins, Simon [School of Aerospace Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

Environmental Costs and Benefits Case Study : Nuclear Power Plant : Quantifications and Economic Valuation of Selected Environmental Impacts/Effects. Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

This case study is an application, to a nuclear power plant, of the methodology for quantifying environmental costs and benefits, contained in the regional energy plan, adopted in April, 1983, by the Northwest Power Planning Council, pursuant to Public Law 96-501.The study is based on plant number 2 of the Washington Public Power Supply System (WNP-2), currently nearing completion on the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in eastern Washington State. This report describes and documents efforts to quantify and estimate monetary values for the following seven areas of environmental effects: radiation/health effects, socioeconomic/infrastructure effects, consumptive use of water, psychological/health effects (fear/stress), waste management, nuclear power plant accidents, and decommissioning costs. 103 references.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Office of Power and Resources Management.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

SOLERAS - Solar-Powered Water Desalination Project at Yanbu: Forecasting models for operating and maintenance cost of the pilot plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was conducted in cooperation with the Department of Industrial Engineering of King Abdulaziz University. The main objective of this study is to meet some of the goals of the Solar Energy Water Desalination Plant (SEWDP) plan in the area of economic evaluation. The first part of this project focused on describing the existing trend in the operation and maintenance (OandM) cost for the SOLERAS Solar Energy Water Desalination Plant in Yanbu. The second part used the information obtained on existing trends to find suitable forecasting models. These models, which are found here, are sensitive to changes in costs trends. Nevertheless, the study presented here has established the foundation for (OandM) costs estimating in the plant. The methodologies used in this study should continue as more data on operation and maintenance costs become available, because, in the long run, the trend in costs will help determine where cost effectiveness might be improved. 7 refs., 24 figs., 15 tabs.

Al-Idrisi, M.; Hamad, G.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 1: Cost of feedstock supply logistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supply of corn stover to produce heat and power for a typical 170 dam3 dry mill ethanol plant is proposed. The corn ethanol plant requires 5.6 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat, which creates the annual stover demand of as much as 140 Gg. The corn stover supply system consists of collection, preprocessing, transportation and on-site fuel storage and preparation to produce heat and power for the ethanol plant. Economics of the entire supply system was conducted using the Integrated Biomass Supply Analysis and Logistics (IBSAL) simulation model. Corn stover was delivered in three formats (square bales, dry chops and pellets) to the combined heat and power plant. Delivered cost of biomass ready to be burned was calculated at 73 $ Mg-1 for bales, 86 $ Mg-1 for pellets and 84 $ Mg-1 for field chopped biomass. Among the three formats of stover supply systems, delivered cost of pelleted biomass was the highest due to high pelleting cost. Bulk transport of biomass in the form of chops and pellets can provide a promising future biomass supply logistic system in the US, if the costs of pelleting and transport are minimized.

Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

THE COST OF MAINTENANCE TRANSFER UNDER LOAD TAP OF THE TRANSFORMERS POWER OF EXTRA HIGH VOLTAGE THE ELETRONORTE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this work a methodology for reduction of maintenance cost in the on-load tap changers (OLTC) of extra high voltage is proposed. The methodology is… (more)

RAIMUNDO NONATO ROSA FILHO

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Cost-based optimizations of power density and target-blanket modularity for {sup 232}Th/{sup 233}U-based ADEP  

SciTech Connect

A cost-based parametric systems model is developed for an Accelerator-Driven Energy Production (ADEP) system based on a {sup 232}Th/{sup 233}U fuel cycle and a molten-salt (LiF/BeF{sub 2}/ThF{sub 3}) fluid-fuel primary system. Simplified neutron-balance, accelerator, reactor-core, chemical-processing, and balance-of-plant models are combined parametrically with a simplified costing model. The main focus of this model is to examine trade offs related to fission power density, reactor-core modularity, {sup 233}U breeding rate, and fission product transmutation capacity.

Krakowski, R.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

ALTERNATE POWER AND ENERGY STORAGE/REUSE FOR DRILLING RIGS: REDUCED COST AND LOWER EMISSIONS PROVIDE LOWER FOOTPRINT FOR DRILLING OPERATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diesel engines operating the rig pose the problems of low efficiency and large amount of emissions. In addition the rig power requirements vary a lot with time and ongoing operation. Therefore it is in the best interest of operators to research on alternate drilling energy sources which can make entire drilling process economic and environmentally friendly. One of the major ways to reduce the footprint of drilling operations is to provide more efficient power sources for drilling operations. There are various sources of alternate energy storage/reuse. A quantitative comparison of physical size and economics shows that rigs powered by the electrical grid can provide lower cost operations, emit fewer emissions, are quieter, and have a smaller surface footprint than conventional diesel powered drilling. This thesis describes a study to evaluate the feasibility of adopting technology to reduce the size of the power generating equipment on drilling rigs and to provide ?peak shaving? energy through the new energy generating and energy storage devices such as flywheels. An energy audit was conducted on a new generation light weight Huisman LOC 250 rig drilling in South Texas to gather comprehensive time stamped drilling data. A study of emissions while drilling operation was also conducted during the audit. The data was analyzed using MATLAB and compared to a theoretical energy audit. The study showed that it is possible to remove peaks of rig power requirement by a flywheel kinetic energy recovery and storage (KERS) system and that linking to the electrical grid would supply sufficient power to operate the rig normally. Both the link to the grid and the KERS system would fit within a standard ISO container. A cost benefit analysis of the containerized system to transfer grid power to a rig, coupled with the KERS indicated that such a design had the potential to save more than $10,000 per week of drilling operations with significantly lower emissions, quieter operation, and smaller size well pad.

Verma, Ankit

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Development of a Low-Cost 3-10 kW Tubular SOFC Power System - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Norman Bessette Acumentrics Corporation 20 Southwest Park Westwood, MA 02090 Phone: (781) 461-8251; Email: nbessette@acumentrics.com DOE Managers HQ: Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos Phone: (202) 586-5463 Email: Dimitrios.Papageorgopoulos@ee.doe.gov GO: Reginald Tyler Phone: (720) 356-1805 Email: Reginald.Tyler@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FC36-03NT41838 Project Start Date: April 1, 2008 Project End Date: March 31, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives The goal of the project is to develop a low-cost 3-10 kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power generator capable of meeting multiple market applications. This is accomplished by: Improving cell power and stability * Cost reduction of cell manufacturing

293

Specifications to Improve Power Quality Immunity in Electronic Systems for Industrial Applications: Suggestions for Higher Quality a nd Lower Cost Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the work described in this report is to provide suggestions for a specification language that will allow end-users to integrate successfully electronic industrial equipment with the existing electrical systems. Cost effective solutions to improve system reliability and performance are specifically addressed. The intention is to eliminate disruptions induced by power quality-related problems and incompatibilities between process equipment and the electrical environment. Most of these technique...

2000-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

294

A $70/tCO2 greenhouse gas mitigation backstop for China’s industrial and electric power sectors: insights from a comprehensive CCS cost curve  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As one of the world's fastest growing economies with abundant coal reserves, China's carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions have doubled in the last decade and are expected to continue growing for the foreseeable future. While the Central Government has been promoting development and growth of cleaner and more efficient energy systems, efforts to reduce carbon emissions from the heavily coal-based economy may require continued and increased development and deployment of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies. This paper presents the first detailed, national-scale assessment of CCS potential across the diverse geographic, geologic, and industrial landscape of China, through the lens of an integrated CCS cost curve. It summarizes the development of a cost curve representing the full chain of components necessary for the capture and geologic storage of CO2 from China's power generation and industrial sectors. Individual component cost estimates are described, along with the optimized source-sink matching of over 1,600 large stationary CO2 sources and 2300 gigatons of CO2 storage capacity within 90 major deep geologic onshore sedimentary sub-basins, to develop a cost curve incorporating CO2 capture, compression, transport, and storage. Results suggest that CCS can provide an important greenhouse gas mitigation option for most regions and industrial sectors in China, able to store more than 80% of emissions from these large CO2 sources (2900 million tons of CO2 annually) at costs less than $70/tCO2 for perhaps a century or more.

Dahowski, Robert T.; Davidson, Casie L.; Li, Xiaochun; Wei, Ning

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

295

Negative Electrodes Improve Safety in Lithium Cells and Batteries...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Negative Electrodes Improve Safety in Lithium Cells and Batteries Technology available for licensing: Enhanced stability at a lower cost negativeelectrodes...

296

Energy Department Announces New University-Led Projects to Create More Efficient, Lower Cost Concentrating Solar Power Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As part of the Energy Department’s SunShot Initiative, Secretary Steven Chu announced today new investments to advance innovative concentrating solar power (CSP) system technologies.

297

Operations Cost Allocation Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project (OCP) Cost Allocation Presentation - September 20, 2011 OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation List of Acronyms OCP Cost Allocation Spreadsheets OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation - Questions and Answers - September 19 - 20, 2011 Additional Questions and Answers Customer Comments/Questions and Answers: Arizona Municipal Power Users Association Arizona Power Authority Central Arizona Project Colorado River Commission Colorado River Energy Distributors Association City of Gilbert, AZ Irrigation and Electrical Districts Association of Arizona Town of Marana, AZ City of Mesa, AZ Town of Wickenburg, AZ Western's Final Decision Regarding the Long-Term Cost Allocation Methodology for Operations Staff Costs

298

Nuclear fuel cycle costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The costs for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, which were developed as part of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP), are presented. Total fuel cycle costs are given for the pressurized water reactor once-through and fuel recycle systems, and for the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor system. These calculations show that fuel cycle costs are a small part of the total power costs. For breeder reactors, fuel cycle costs are about half that of the present once-through system. The total power cost of the breeder reactor system is greater than that of light-water reactor at today's prices for uranium and enrichment.

Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J.; Rainey, R.H.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Final Report Providing the Design for Low-Cost Wireless Current Transducer and Electric Power Sensor Prototype  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the design and development of a wireless current transducer and electric power sensor prototype. The report includes annotated schematics of the power sensor circuitry and the printed circuit board. The application program used to illustrate the functionality of the wireless sensors is described in this document as well.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Burghard, Brion J.; Reid, Larry D.

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

300

Development of a low cost integrated 15 kW A.C. solar tracking sub-array for grid connected PV power system applications  

SciTech Connect

Utility Power Group has achieved a significant reduction in the installed cost of grid-connected PV systems. The two part technical approach focused on (1) The utilization of a large area factory assembled PV panel, and (2) The integration and packaging of all sub-array power conversion and control functions within a single factory produced enclosure. Eight engineering prototype 15kW ac single axis solar tracking sub-arrays were designed, fabricated, and installed at the Sacramento Municipal Utility District{close_quote}s Hedge Substation site in 1996 and are being evaluated for performance and reliability. A number of design enhancements will be implemented in 1997 and demonstrated by the field deployment and operation of over twenty advanced sub-array PV power systems. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Stern, M.; West, R.; Fourer, G.; Whalen, W.; Van Loo, M.; Duran, G. [Utility Power Group, 9410 G De Soto Avenue, Chatsworth, California 91311 (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "negative power cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for Power Burst Facility (PER-620) Final End State and PBF Vessel Disposal  

SciTech Connect

Preparation of this engineering evaluation/cost analysis is consistent with the joint U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, (DOE and EPA 1995) which establishes the Comprehensive Environmental, Response, Compensation, and Liability Act non-time critical removal action process as an approach for decommissioning. The scope of this engineering evaluation/cost analysis is to evaluate alternatives and recommend a preferred alternative for the final end state of the PBF and the final disposal location for the PBF vessel.

B. C. Culp

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Powerful, Efficient Electric Vehicle Chargers: Low-Cost, Highly-Integrated Silicon Carbide (SiC) Multichip Power Modules (MCPMs) for Plug-In Hybrid Electric  

SciTech Connect

ADEPT Project: Currently, charging the battery of an electric vehicle (EV) is a time-consuming process because chargers can only draw about as much power from the grid as a hair dryer. APEI is developing an EV charger that can draw as much power as a clothes dryer, which would drastically speed up charging time. APEI's charger uses silicon carbide (SiC)-based power transistors. These transistors control the electrical energy flowing through the charger's circuits more effectively and efficiently than traditional transistors made of straight silicon. The SiC-based transistors also require less cooling, enabling APEI to create EV chargers that are 10 times smaller than existing chargers.

None

2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

303

Plant Design and Cost Estimation of a Natural Circulation Lead-Bismuth Reactor with Helium Power Conversion Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analysis of an indirect helium power conversion system with lead-bismuth natural circulation primary system has been performed. The work of this report is focused on 1) identifying the allowable design region for the ...

Kim, D.

304

Plant Design and Cost Estimation of a Natural Circulation Lead-Bismuth Reactor with Steam Power Conversion Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analysis of an indirect steam power conversion system with lead-bismuth natural circulation primary system has been performed. The work of this report is focused on 1) identifying the allowable design region for the ...

Kim, D.

305

Impact of Cycling on the Operation and Maintenance Cost of Conventional and Combined-Cycle Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ongoing privatization of electricity generation across the world, competition and shareholder demand for higher profits, stricter regulations on environmental impacts, changes in fuel prices, and the increasing penetration of nondispatchable energy have resulted in an increasing need for larger energy generators to operate as non-baseload units. As a result, both conventional power plants and combined-cycle power plants are increasingly being subjected to load-following and cyclic operation. ...

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

306

Development of a low-cost integrated 20-kW-AC solar tracking subarray for grid-connected PV power system applications. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report chronicles Utility Power Group's (UPG) successful two-year Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Phase 4A1 work effort which began in July, 1995. During this period, UPG completed design, fabrication, testing and demonstration of a modular and fully integrated 15-kW-ac, solar tracking PV power system sub-array. The two key and innovative components which were developed are a Modular Panel which optimizes factory assembly of PV modules into a large area, field-deployable, structurally-integrated PV panel, and an Integrated Power Processing Unit which combines all dc and ac power collection, conversion and control functions within a single, field-deployable structurally-integrated electrical enclosure. These two key sub-array elements, when combined with a number of other electrical, mechanical, and structural components, create a low-cost and high-performance PV power system. This system, or sub-array, can be deployed in individual units, or paralleled with any number of other sub-arrays, to construct multi-megawatt P fields. 21 figs.

Stern, M.; Duran, G.; Fourer, G.; Mackamul, K.; Whalen, W.; Loo, M. van; West, R. [Utility Power Group, Chatsworth, CA (US)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1. Pilot plant cost and commercial plant cost and performance preliminary design report. [150 MW commercial tower focus plant and 10 MW pilot plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed cost and performance data for the 10 MWe Pilot Plant and the 150 MWe Commercial Plant are given. The Commercial Plant consists of 15 integrated collector - receiver modules. Each module contains 1325 heliostats and an internally mounted steam-generating receiver on a steel tower with an aperture height of 90 M. The Pilot Plant consists of one full-scale collector - receiver module. The two-stage sensible heat storage system utilizes a heat transfer salt medium and a hydrocarbon oil storage medium. The electric power generation system uses a conventional steam turbine-generator. The Pilot Plant is one module of the Commercial Plant, providing for one-to-one scaling in the most critical areas. (WHK)

None

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Title: Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field Demonstration of Ways to Reduce Operating Costs of Small Producers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Title: Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field Demonstration of Ways to Reduce produced water to create "green" electricity usable on site or for transmission off site . The goal the environmental impact by creating green electricity using produced water and no additional fossil fuel. Approach

309

Low Cost, Durable Seal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost, Durable Seal Cost, Durable Seal George M. Roberts UTC Power Corporation February 14, 2007 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information 1 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Outline * Project Objective * Technical Approach * Timeline * Team Roles * Budget * Q&A 2 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Project Objective Develop advanced, low cost, durable seal materials and sealing techniques amenable to high volume manufacture of PEM cell stacks. DOE Targets/Goals/Objectives Project Goal Durability Transportation: 5,000 hr Stationary: 40,000 hr Durability Improve mechanical and chemical stability to achieve 40,000 hr of useful operating life. Low Cost Low Cost A material cost equivalent to or less than the cost of silicones in common use. 3 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL

310

Plant-Wide Performance and Cost Analysis of Ion Transport Membrane-Based Oxy-Combustion Power Generation Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in conjunction with Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., (AP) and WorleyParsons, Inc. (WP) has reviewed and modeled oxy-combustion, a method of burning coal using oxygen rather than air to facilitate the separation, capture, and remediation of carbon by producing a flue gas stream more concentrated in carbon dioxide (CO2). This report presents modeling results for oxy-combustion systems using two different oxygen separation techniques: traditional ...

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

311

The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study: The Effects of Wind and Solar PowerÂ…Induced Cycling on Wear-and-Tear Costs and Emissions (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind and Solar Power- Wind and Solar Power- Induced Cycling on Wear-and-Tear Costs and Emissions Results From the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2 The electric grid is a highly complex, interconnected machine. Changing one part of the grid can have consequences elsewhere. Adding variable renewable generation such as wind and solar power affects the operation of conventional power plants, and adding high penetrations can induce cycling of fossil-fueled generators. Cycling leads to wear-and-tear costs and changes in emissions. Phase 2 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-2) was initiated to determine the wear-and-tear costs and emissions impacts of cycling and to simulate grid operations to investigate the detailed impact of wind and solar power on

312

Crude Glycerol as Cost-Effective Fuel for Combined Heat and Power to Replace Fossil Fuels, Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The primary objectives of this work can be summed into two major categories. Firstly, the fundamentals of the combustion of glycerol (in both a refined and unrefined form) were to be investigated, with emphasis of the development of a system capable of reliably and repeatedly combusting glycerol as well as an analysis of the emissions produced during glycerol combustion. Focus was placed on quantifying common emissions in comparison to more traditional fuels and this work showed that the burner developed was able to completely combust glycerol within a relatively wide range of operating conditions. Additionally, focus was placed on examining specific emissions in more detail, namely interesting NOx emissions observed in initial trials, acrolein and other volatile organic emissions, and particulate and ash emissions. This work showed that the combustion of crude glycerol could result in significantly reduced NOx emissions as a function of the high fuel bound oxygen content within the glycerol fuel. It also showed that when burned properly, the combustion of crude glycerol did not result in excessive emissions of acrolein or any other VOC compared to the combustion from more traditional fuels. Lastly however, this work has shown that in any practical application in which glycerol is being burned, it will be necessary to explore ash mitigation techniques due to the very high particulate matter concentrations produced during glycerol combustion. These emissions are comparable to unfiltered coal combustion and are directly tied to the biodiesel production method. The second focus of this work was directed to developing a commercialization strategy for the use of glycerol as a fuel replacement. This strategy has identified a 30 month plan for the scaling up of the laboratory scale burner into a pre-pilot scale system. Additionally, financing options were explored and an assessment was made of the economics of replacing a traditional fuel (namely natural gas) with crude glycerol from biodiesel production. This analysis showed that the cost of replacing natural gas with crude glycerol requires a strong function of the market price per unit of energy for the traditional fuel. However, the economics can be improved through the inclusion of a federal tax credit for the use of a renewable fuel. The conclusion of this analysis also shows that the ideal customer for energy replacement via crude glycerol is biodiesel producers who are located in remote regions, where the cost of energy is higher and the cost of crude glycerol is lowest. Lastly, the commercialization strategy analyzed competing technologies, namely traditional natural gas and electric heaters, as well as competing glycerol burners, and concludes with a discussion of the requirements for a pilot demonstration.

William L. ROberts

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

PRELIMINARY DESIGN AND COST ESTIMATE FOR THE PRODUCTION OF CENTRAL STATION POWER FROM AN AQUEOUS HOMOGENEOUS REACTOR UTILIZING THORIUM-URANIUM-233  

SciTech Connect

The design and economics of the Aqueous Homogeneous Reactor as basically under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory are presented. The reactor system utilizes thorium-U-233 fuel. Conditions accompanying reactor systems generating up to l080 mw of net electrical energy are covered. The study indicates that a generating station, with a net thermal efficiency of 28.l%, might be constructed for approximately 0/kw and 0/kw at the l80 mw and l080 mw electrical levels, respectively. These values result in capital expenses of approximately 4.72 and 2.86 milis/kwh. A major part of fuel cost is the expense of chemical processing. It is therefore advantageous 10 schedule fuel through a relatively large processing system since fixed charges are insensitive to chemical plant size. By handling fuel through a plant large enough for processing 200 kg of thorium per day, total fuel costa of about 1 mill/kwh result. This cost for fuel processing appears applicable to generating stations up to abeut 540 mw in size, decreasing to about 0.6 mills/kwh at the l080 mw level. Operating and maintenance expense, including heavy water cost on a lease basis, varies between l.34 and 0.89 mills/kwh for l80 and l080 megawatts respectively. If the purchase of heavy water is required, 0.3 to 0.4 mills/kwh must be added. It is concluded that the Aqueous Homogeneous Reactor may produce electrical power competitive with conventional generating systems when the remaining technical problems are solved. It is felt ihat the research and development now programed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory will solve these problems and affect costs favorably. (auth)

Carson, H.G.; Landrum, L.H. eds.

1955-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Dynamically Adjustable Wind Turbine Blades: Adaptive Turbine Blades, Blown Wing Technology for Low-Cost Wind Power  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Caitin is developing wind turbines with a control system that delivers compressed air from special slots located in the surface of its blades. The compressed air dynamically adjusts the aerodynamic performance of the blades, and can essentially be used to control lift, drag, and ultimately power. This control system has been shown to exhibit high levels of control in combination with an exceptionally fast response rate. The deployment of such a control system in modern wind turbines would lead to better management of the load on the system during peak usage, allowing larger blades to be deployed with a resulting increase in energy production.

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

315

Development of a low-cost integrated 20-kW ac solar tracking sub- array for grid-connected PV power system applications. Phase 1, Annual technical report, 11 July 1995--31 July 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of this effort is to reduce the installed cost of utility scale grid connected photovoltaic power systems. The focus of the effort is on ``BOS`` (Balance-Of-System) component manufacturing technology, which essentially involves all PV power system engineering, manufacturing, assembly and construction tasks from the receipt of a PV module to the deliver of grid connected electricity.

Stern, M.; West, R.; Fourer, G.; Whalen, W.; Van Loo, M.; Duran, G. [Utility Power Group, Chatsworth, CA (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon: Challenging Students to Build Energy Efficient, Cost-Effective, and Attractive Solar-Powered Houses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon challenges collegiate teams to design, build, and operate solar-powered houses that are cost-effective, energy-efficient, and attractive. The winner of the competition is the team that best blends affordability, consumer appeal, and design excellence with optimal energy production and maximum efficiency. The paper discusses the solutions developed for the event. We believe that the solutions implemented for Solar Decathlon 2011 represent current trends and that by analyzing, critiquing, and exposing the solutions pursued, the industry can become better suited to address challenges of the future. Constructing a solar community using high-efficiency design and unique materials while remaining code compliant, safe, and effective results in solutions that are market relevant, important, and interesting to the industry as a whole.

Simon, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Environmental externalities: Applying the concept to Asian coal-based power generation. [Includes external environmental and societal costs and methods of evaluating them  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the concept of environmental externality. It discusses various factors -- the atmospheric transformations, relationship of point-source emissions to ambient air quality, dose-response relationships, applicable cause-and-effect principles, and risk and valuation research -- that are considered by a number of state utilities when they apply the environmental externality concept to energy resource planning. It describes a methodology developed by Argonne National Laboratory for general use in resource planning, in combination with traditional methods that consider the cost of electricity production. Finally, it shows how the methodology can be applied in Indonesia, Thailand, and Taiwan to potential coal-fired power plant projects that will make use of clean coal technologies.

Szpunar, C.B.; Gillette, J.L.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

LIFE Cost of Electricity, Capital and Operating Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Successful commercialization of fusion energy requires economic viability as well as technical and scientific feasibility. To assess economic viability, we have conducted a pre-conceptual level evaluation of LIFE economics. Unit costs are estimated from a combination of bottom-up costs estimates, working with representative vendors, and scaled results from previous studies of fission and fusion plants. An integrated process model of a LIFE power plant was developed to integrate and optimize unit costs and calculate top level metrics such as cost of electricity and power plant capital cost. The scope of this activity was the entire power plant site. Separately, a development program to deliver the required specialized equipment has been assembled. Results show that LIFE power plant cost of electricity and plant capital cost compare favorably to estimates for new-build LWR's, coal and gas - particularly if indicative costs of carbon capture and sequestration are accounted for.

Anklam, T

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

319

Low cost MCFC anodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper outlines a project, funded under a DOE SBIR grant, which tested a potentially lower cost method of manufacturing MCFC stack anodes and evaluated the feasibility of using the technology in the existing M-C Power Corp. manufacturing facility. The procedure involves adding activator salts to the anode tape casting slurry with the Ni and Cr or Al powders. Two different processes occur during heat treatment in a reducing environment: sintering of the base Ni structure, and alloying or cementation of the Cr or Al powders. To determine whether it was cost-effective to implement the cementation alloying manufacturing process, the M-C Power manufacturing cost model was used to determine the impact of different material costs and processing parameters on total anode cost. Cost analysis included equipment expenditures and facility modifications required by the cementation alloying process.

Erickson, D.S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

320

Definition: Reduced Restoration Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Restoration Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Restoration Cost The functions that provide this benefit lead to fewer outages andor help restore power quicker...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "negative power cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Changes related to "Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Changes related to "Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation" Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation...

322

Estimating decommissioning costs: The 1994 YNPS decommissioning cost study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Early this year, Yankee Atomic Electric Company began developing a revised decommissioning cost estimate for the Yankee Nuclear Power Station (YNPS) to provide a basis for detailed decommissioning planning and to reflect slow progress in siting low-level waste (LLW) and spent-nuclear-fuel disposal facilities. The revision also reflects the need to change from a cost estimate that focuses on overall costs to a cost estimate that is sufficiently detailed to implement decommissioning and identify the final cost of decommissioning.

Szymczak, W.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

Conceptual design of advanced central receiver power systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Volume 4. Commercial and pilot plant cost data. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume of the advanced central receiver final report presents the cost data using the cost breakdown structure identified in the preliminary specification. Cost summaries are presented in the following sections for the 100-MWe and 281-MWe commercial plant and a 10-MWe pilot plant. Cost substantiation data for this volume are presented in the appendices. Other cost summary data include Nth plant data for the 100-MWe and 281-MWe commercial plants, and a summary for the alternative concept air-rock storage system. The main description of the plant costing technique occurs as part of Section II for the 100-MWe baseline concept.

Not Available

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

TIBER-II cost models and estimates  

SciTech Connect

This report consists of a series of viewgraphs dealing with cost associated with construction of a thermonuclear power plant. (JDH)

Thomson, S.L.

1987-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

325

Low-Cost Hydrogen-from-Ethanol: A Distributed Production System...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calculate: Power Law Cost Scaling Actual Single Unit Capital Cost Estimate 500 unityear production costs with progress ratios Estimate Cost Using Power Law Cost Scaling 7 The H 2...

326

A flexible simulator to evaluate a power saving system for HPC clusters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years power consumption of high performance computing (HPC) clusters has become a growing problem due, e.g., to the economic cost of electricity, the emission of carbon dioxide (with negative impact on the environment), and the generation of ... Keywords: energy-saving simulation, high performance computing, power consumption

Manuel F. Dolz; Juan C. Fernández; Sergio Iserte; Rafael Mayo; Enrique S. Quintana-Ortí

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Negative ion generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A negative ion generator is formed from a magnetically insulated transmission line having a coating of graphite on the cathode for producing negative ions and a plurality of apertures on the opposed anode for the release of negative ions. Magnetic insulation keeps electrons from flowing from the cathode to the anode. A transverse magnetic field removes electrons which do escape through the apertures from the trajectory of the negative ions. 8 figs.

Stinnett, R.W.

1984-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

328

Negative ion generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A negative ion generator is formed from a magnetically insulated transmission line having a coating of graphite on the cathode for producing negative ions and a plurality of apertures on the opposed anode for the release of negative ions. Magnetic insulation keeps electrons from flowing from the cathode to the anode. A transverse magnetic field removes electrons which do escape through the apertures from the trajectory of the negative ions.

Stinnett, Regan W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Economics and policies for carbon capture and sequestration in the western United States : a marginal cost analysis of potential power plant deployment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is a technology that can significantly reduce power sector greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from coal-fired power plants. CCS technology is currently in development and requires higher ...

Shu, Gary

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Transmission line capital costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The displacement or deferral of conventional AC transmission line installation is a key benefit associated with several technologies being developed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management (OEM). Previous benefits assessments conducted within OEM have been based on significantly different assumptions for the average cost per mile of AC transmission line. In response to this uncertainty, an investigation of transmission line capital cost data was initiated. The objective of this study was to develop a database for preparing preliminary estimates of transmission line costs. An extensive search of potential data sources identified databases maintained by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) as superior sources of transmission line cost data. The BPA and WAPA data were adjusted to a common basis and combined together. The composite database covers voltage levels from 13.8 to 765 W, with cost estimates for a given voltage level varying depending on conductor size, tower material type, tower frame type, and number of circuits. Reported transmission line costs vary significantly, even for a given voltage level. This can usually be explained by variation in the design factors noted above and variation in environmental and land (right-of-way) costs, which are extremely site-specific. Cost estimates prepared from the composite database were compared to cost data collected by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for investor-owned utilities from across the United States. The comparison was hampered because the only design specifications included with the FERC data were voltage level and line length. Working within this limitation, the FERC data were not found to differ significantly from the composite database. Therefore, the composite database was judged to be a reasonable proxy for estimating national average costs.

Hughes, K.R.; Brown, D.R.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

A Smart Recording Power Analyzer Prototype Using LabVIEW and Low-Cost Data Acquisition (DAQ) in Being a Smart Renewable Monitoring System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nowadays, to indicate the quality of Thailand's existing power system including the newly-installed distributed renewable energy sources, a number of pricy power quality analyzers are being used in most areas. This article proposes an alternative of ... Keywords: Power Quality, LabVIEWTM, Data acquisition (DAQ), Total Harmonics Distortion (THD), Flickers, Smart grid, Renewable monitoring system (REMS)

Chow Chompoo-Inwai, Jade Mungkornassawakul

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Electricity Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Emissions Caps and the Impact of a Radical Change in Nuclear Electricity Costs journal International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy volume year month chapter...

333

Negative ion detachment processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses the following topics: H{sup {minus}} and D{sup {minus}} collisions with atomic hydrogen; collisional decomposition of SF{sub 6}{sup {minus}}; two-electron loss processes in negative ion collisions; associative electron detachment; and negative ion desorption from surfaces.

Champion, R.L.; Doverspike, L.D.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Heliostat cost reduction study.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power towers are capable of producing solar-generated electricity and hydrogen on a large scale. Heliostats are the most important cost element of a solar power tower plant. Since they constitute {approx} 50% of the capital cost of the plant it is important to reduce heliostat cost as much as possible to improve the economic performance of power towers. In this study we evaluate current heliostat technology and estimate a price of $126/m{sup 2} given year-2006 materials and labor costs for a deployment of {approx}600 MW of power towers per year. This 2006 price yields electricity at $0.067/kWh and hydrogen at $3.20/kg. We propose research and development that should ultimately lead to a price as low as $90/m{sup 2}, which equates to $0.056/kWh and $2.75/kg H{sup 2}. Approximately 30 heliostat and manufacturing experts from the United States, Europe, and Australia contributed to the content of this report during two separate workshops conducted at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility.

Jones, Scott A.; Lumia, Ronald. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Davenport, Roger (Science Applications International Corporation, San Diego, CA); Thomas, Robert C. (Advanced Thermal Systems, Centennial, CO); Gorman, David (Advanced Thermal Systems, Larkspur, CO); Kolb, Gregory J.; Donnelly, Matthew W.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

An economic feasibility analysis of distributed electric power generation based upon the Natural Gas-Fired Fuel Cell: a model of the operations cost.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This model description establishes the revenues, expenses incentives and avoided costs of Operation of a Natural Gas-Fired Fuel Cell-Based. Fuel is the major element of the cost of operation of a natural gas-fired fuel cell. Forecasts of the change in the price of this commodity a re an important consideration in the ownership of an energy conversion system. Differences between forecasts, the interests of the forecaster or geographical areas can all have significant effects on imputed fuel costs. There is less effect on judgments made on the feasibility of an energy conversion system since changes in fuel price can affect the cost of operation of the alternatives to the fuel cell in a similar fashion. The forecasts used in this model are only intended to provide the potential owner or operator with the means to examine alternate future scenarios. The operations model computes operating costs of a system suitable for a large condominium complex or a residential institution such as a hotel, boarding school or prison. The user may also select large office buildings that are characterized by 12 to 16 hours per day of operation or industrial users with a steady demand for thermal and electrical energy around the clock.

Not Available

1993-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

336

Developing a power-efficient and low-cost 3D NoC using smart GALS-based vertical channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shorter global interconnects enable 3D NoC structures to offer higher performance, improved packaging density, and lower interconnect power consumption to CMPs and SoCs compared to their 2D counterparts. However, substantial challenges such as high peak ... Keywords: 3D Networks-on-Chip, Bidirectional Bisynchronous Vertical Channels, Forecasting-based dynamic power management

Amir-Mohammad Rahmani; Pasi Liljeberg; Juha Plosila; Hannu Tenhunen

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Negative electrode composition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A secondary electrochemical cell and a negative electrode composition for use therewith comprising a positive electrode containing an active material of a chalcogen or a transiton metal chalcogenide, a negative electrode containing a lithium-aluminum alloy and an amount of a ternary alloy sufficient to provide at least about 5 percent overcharge capacity relative to a negative electrode solely of the lithium-aluminum alloy, the ternary alloy comprising lithium, aluminum, and iron or cobalt, and an electrolyte containing lithium ions in contact with both of the positive and the negative electrodes. The ternary alloy is present in the electrode in the range of from about 5 percent to about 50 percent by weight of the electrode composition and may include lithium-aluminum-nickel alloy in combination with either the ternary iron or cobalt alloys. A plurality of series connected cells having overcharge capacity can be equalized on the discharge side without expensive electrical equipment.

Kaun, Thomas D. (New Lenox, IL); Chilenskas, Albert A. (Western Springs, IL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

High Power SiC Modules for HEVs and PHEVs Abstract--With efforts to reduce the cost, size, and thermal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and electric machinery (APEEM) activity is to develop technology towards achieving overall electric propulsion of these components. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) cost targets for the APEEM as established by DOE for PHEVs. Research in eliminating the low temperature loop and using the engine coolant for the APEEM shows

Tolbert, Leon M.

339

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12;· Marginal Cost: ­ Change in total cost ­ Any production process involves fixed and variable costs. As production increases/expands, fixed costs are unchanged, so

Boisvert, Jeff

340

Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "negative power cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Reducing the Costs of Manufacturing Flow...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and power generation. * Design and material cost reductions are a means to reducing battery costs. * Is it possible to accelerate the knowledge building that comes from...

342

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Electricity Generation Plants  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper provides information on the cost of building new electricity power plants. These cost estimates are critical inputs in the development of energy projections and analyses.

Michael Leff

2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

343

Specifications to Improve Power Quality Immunity in Electronic Systems for Industrial Applications -- A Downloadable Web Product: Su ggestions for Higher Quality and Lower Cost Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To help improve power quality performance in electronic process equipment, this technical progress report is made available to users for download in PDF (192K). Key power quality issues are presented to provide a systematic approach to integrating electronic equipment into the industrial environment. As with the traditional hardcopy version (1000693), the goal is to provide suggestions for a specification language that will allow end-users to integrate electronic industrial equipment with the existing el...

2000-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

344

Production Cost Optimization Assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The benefits of improved thermal performance of coal-fired power plants continue to grow, as the costs of fuel rise and the prospect of a carbon dioxide cap and trade program looms on the horizon. This report summarizes the efforts to date of utilities committed to reducing their heat rate by 1.0% in the Production Cost Optimization (PCO) Project. The process includes benchmarking of plant thermal performance using existing plant data and a site-specific performance appraisal. The appraisal determines po...

2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

345

Assessment of generic solar thermal systems for large power applications. Volume II. Analysis of thermal energy production costs for systems from 50 to 600 MWt  

SciTech Connect

A comparative analysis of solar thermal concepts that are potentially suitable for development as large process heat systems (50 to 600 MWt) was performed. The concepts considered can be classified into three categories based on the type of solar tracking used by the collector: (1) two-axis tracking, in which concentrators track the sun's motion in both azimuth and altitude; (2) one-axis tracking, in which concentrators track changes in either azimuth or altitude; and (3) non-tracking, in which the concentrators are fixed. Seven generic types of collectors were considered. Conceptual designs developed for the seven systems were based on common assumptions of available technology in the 1990 to 2000 time frame. Costs were estimated on the basis of identical assumptions, ground rules, methodologies, and unit costs of materials and labor applied uniformly to all of the concepts.

Bird, S.P.; Apley, W.J.; Barnhart, J.S.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.; Fort, J.A.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Williams, T.A.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Assessment of generic solar thermal systems for large power applications. Volume II. Analysis of thermal energy production costs for systems from 50 to 600 MWt  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparative analysis of solar thermal concepts that are potentially suitable for development as large process heat systems (50 to 600 MWt) was performed. The concepts considered can be classified into three categories based on the type of solar tracking used by the collector: (1) two-axis tracking, in which concentrators track the sun's motion in both azimuth and altitude; (2) one-axis tracking, in which concentrators track changes in either azimuth or altitude; and (3) non-tracking, in which the concentrators are fixed. Seven generic types of collectors were considered. Conceptual designs developed for the seven systems were based on common assumptions of available technology in the 1990 to 2000 time frame. Costs were estimated on the basis of identical assumptions, ground rules, methodologies, and unit costs of materials and labor applied uniformly to all of the concepts.

Bird, S.P.; Apley, W.J.; Barnhart, J.S.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.; Fort, J.A.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Williams, T.A.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Pages that link to "Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Pages that link to "Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation" Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation...

348

The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of Congestion Costs. The Electricity Journal 17,Incremental Transmission Costs Due to Wind Power. Rockville,and Intermittency Really Cost? Supply Curves for Electricity

Mills, Andrew D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Design and cost of near-term OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) plants for the production of desalinated water and electric power. [Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There currently is an increasing need for both potable water and power for many islands in the Pacific and Caribbean. The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology fills these needs and is a viable option because of the unlimited supply of ocean thermal energy for the production of both desalinated water and electricity. The OTEC plant design must be flexible to meet the product-mix demands that can be very different from site to site. This paper describes different OTEC plants that can supply various mixes of desalinated water and vapor -- the extremes being either all water and no power or no water and all power. The economics for these plants are also presented. The same flow rates and pipe sizes for both the warm and cold seawater streams are used for different plant designs. The OTEC plant designs are characterized as near-term because no major technical issues need to be resolved or demonstrated. The plant concepts are based on DOE-sponsored experiments dealing with power systems, advanced heat exchanger designs, corrosion and fouling of heat exchange surfaces, and flash evaporation and moisture removal from the vapor using multiple spouts. In addition, the mature multistage flash evaporator technology is incorporated into the plant designs were appropriate. For the supply and discharge warm and cold uncertainties do exist because the required pipe sizes are larger than the maximum currently deployed -- 40-inch high-density polyethylene pipe at Keahole Point in Hawaii. 30 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

Rabas, T.; Panchal, C.; Genens, L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

A framework for real-time power management of a grid-tied microgrid to extend battery lifetime and reduce cost of energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of different technical and economical concerns, battery is happened to be an inevitable part of a microgrid as well as the most expensive component. This fact brings up the necessity of a real-time power management to guarantee the maximum possible ...

S. A. Pourmousavi; Ratnesh K. Sharma; Babak Asghari

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Design, development, and performance evaluation of a low-cost, low-power wake-up radio system for wireless sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy-efficient operation is a challenge for wireless sensor networks (WSNs). A common method employed for this purpose is duty-cycled operation, which extends battery lifetime yet incurs several types of energy wastes and challenges. A promising alternative ... Keywords: Wireless sensor networks, asynchronous, low-power, wake-up receiver

Joaquim Oller, Ilker Demirkol, Jordi Casademont, Josep Paradells

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

2006 Update of Business Downtime Costs  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to assess the downtime cost of power outages to businesses in the commercial and industrial sectors, updating and improving upon studies that have already been published on this subject. The goal is to produce a study that, relative to existing studies, (1) applies to a wider set of business types (2) reflects more current downtime costs, (3) accounts for the time duration factor of power outages, and (4) includes data on the costs imposed by real outages in a well-defined market. This study examines power outage costs in 11 commercial subsectors and 5 industrial subsectors, using data on downtime costs that was collected in the 1990's. This study also assesses power outage costs for power outages of 20 minutes, 1 hour, and 4 hours duration. Finally, this study incorporates data on the costs of real power outages for two business subsectors. However, the current limited state of data availability on the topic of downtime costs means there is room to improve upon this study. Useful next steps would be to generate more recent data on downtime costs, data that covers outages shorter than 20 minutes duration and longer than 4 hours duration, and more data that is based on the costs caused by real-world outages. Nevertheless, with the limited data that is currently available, this study is able to generate a clear and detailed picture of the downtime costs that are faced by different types of businesses.

Hinrichs, Mr. Doug [Sentech, Inc.; Goggin, Mr. Michael [Sentech, Inc.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

2006 Update of Business Downtime Costs  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to assess the downtime cost of power outages to businesses in the commercial and industrial sectors, updating and improving upon studies that have already been published on this subject. The goal is to produce a study that, relative to existing studies, (1) applies to a wider set of business types (2) reflects more current downtime costs, (3) accounts for the time duration factor of power outages, and (4) includes data on the costs imposed by real outages in a well-defined market. This study examines power outage costs in 11 commercial subsectors and 5 industrial subsectors, using data on downtime costs that was collected in the 1990's. This study also assesses power outage costs for power outages of 20 minutes, 1 hour, and 4 hours duration. Finally, this study incorporates data on the costs of real power outages for two business subsectors. However, the current limited state of data availability on the topic of downtime costs means there is room to improve upon this study. Useful next steps would be to generate more recent data on downtime costs, data that covers outages shorter than 20 minutes duration and longer than 4 hours duration, and more data that is based on the costs caused by real-world outages. Nevertheless, with the limited data that is currently available, this study is able to generate a clear and detailed picture of the downtime costs that are faced by different types of businesses.

Hinrichs, Mr. Doug [Sentech, Inc.; Goggin, Mr. Michael [Sentech, Inc.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Investigation of the viability and cost effectiveness of solid fuel gasifiers close coupled to internal combustion engines for 200 kWe power generation. Technical progress report No. 9  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The viability and cost effectiveness of a 200 kWe engine generator unit fueled by a direct coupled, solid fuel gasifier were studied. Recent literature describing gasifier technology was obtained and personal visits were made to test facility sites and engine manufacturing plants to discuss the subject with researchers and engineers. Two prototype units were inspected, one of which was in partial operation. This report presents a brief discussion of fuel and gasifier technology, gas treatment (clean up) for engine use, engine use technology, other uses for gasifiers, the viability of close coupled units, and an estimate of cost effectiveness. Present small experimental gasifier systems perform as expected and have served to demonstrate the technology. Typically they operate with fuel species which are present and collected on the site of a processing plant. Certain needed development efforts are discussed. Also, fuel must be available at low cost and even then electric power produced in this way is unlikely to be competitive economically where utility poles are available. (LTN)

Mingle, J. G.; Junge, D. C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - Power Block R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the potential of advanced power cycles to integrate with concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. This research increases the efficiency and reduces the levelized cost of...

356

NREL: Water Power Research - Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Projects NREL's water power R&D projects support industry efforts to develop and deploy cost-effective water power...

357

Buyer Power through Producer's Differentiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that when upstream production costs are convex, the share of7 Indeed, when production cost are convex the greater thehere only a?ect the production cost and the balance of power

Chambolle, Claire; Villas-Boas, Sofia B

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Ion-driver fast ignition: Reducing heavy-ion fusion driver energy and cost, simplifying chamber design, target fab, tritium fueling and power conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ion fast ignition, like laser fast ignition, can potentially reduce driver energy for high target gain by an order of magnitude, while reducing fuel capsule implosion velocity, convergence ratio, and required precisions in target fabrication and illumination symmetry, all of which should further improve and simplify IFE power plants. From fast-ignition target requirements, we determine requirements for ion beam acceleration, pulse-compression, and final focus for advanced accelerators that must be developed for much shorter pulses and higher voltage gradients than today's accelerators, to deliver the petawatt peak powers and small focal spots ({approx}100 {micro}m) required. Although such peak powers and small focal spots are available today with lasers, development of such advanced accelerators is motivated by the greater likely efficiency of deep ion penetration and deposition into pre-compressed 1000x liquid density DT cores. Ion ignitor beam parameters for acceleration, pulse compression, and final focus are estimated for two examples based on a Dielectric Wall Accelerator; (1) a small target with {rho}r {approx} 2 g/cm{sup 2} for a small demo/pilot plant producing {approx}40 MJ of fusion yield per target, and (2) a large target with {rho}r {approx} 10 g/cm{sup 2} producing {approx}1 GJ yield for multi-unit electricity/hydrogen plants, allowing internal T-breeding with low T/D ratios, >75 % of the total fusion yield captured for plasma direct conversion, and simple liquid-protected chambers with gravity clearing. Key enabling development needs for ion fast ignition are found to be (1) ''Close-coupled'' target designs for single-ended illumination of both compressor and ignitor beams; (2) Development of high gradient (>25 MV/m) linacs with high charge-state (q {approx} 26) ion sources for short ({approx}5 ns) accelerator output pulses; (3) Small mm-scale laser-driven plasma lens of {approx}10 MG fields to provide steep focusing angles close-in to the target (built-in as part of each target); (4) beam space charge-neutralization during both drift compression and final focus to target. Except for (1) and (2), these critical issues may be explored on existing heavy-ion storage ring accelerator facilities.

Logan, G.; Callahan-Miller, D.; Perkins, J.; Caporaso, G.; Tabak, M.; Moir, R.; Meier, W.; Bangerter, Roger; Lee, Ed

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Costing the Target May 17, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to provide it with the right information! ­ Broken down into 3 project phases with associated costs and man-power. · Costing workshop on 25th May at CERN ­ Plan is to discuss Project Breakdown Structures (PBSs, to document how costs are derived. · Project has 3 phases · Industrialisation · Procurement · Reception (i

McDonald, Kirk

360

Today's geothermal power economics and risks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Capital and power generation costs are developed as a parameterized composite of a number of ongoing geothermal power projects, and evaluates several of the most commonly accepted risks of geothermal power in terms of cost penalties to a basic cost of power. The status of geothermal power in the US is also reviewed briefly.

Lawford, T.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "negative power cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Polarized negative ions  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a survey of methods, commonly in use or under development, to produce beams of polarized negative ions for injection into accelerators. A short summary recalls how the hyperfine interaction is used to obtain nuclear polarization in beams of atoms. Atomic-beam sources for light ions are discussed. If the best presently known techniques are incorporated in all stages of the source, polarized H/sup -/ and D/sup -/ beams in excess of 10 ..mu..A can probably be achieved. Production of polarized ions from fast (keV) beams of polarized atoms is treated separately for atoms in the H(25) excited state (Lamb-Shift source) and atoms in the H(1S) ground state. The negative ion beam from Lamb-Shift sources has reached a plateau just above 1 ..mu..A, but this beam current is adequate for many applications and the somewhat lower beam current is compensated by other desirable characteristics. Sources using fast polarized ground state atoms are in a stage of intense development. The next sections summarize production of polarized heavy ions by the atomic beam method, which is well established, and by optical pumping, which has recently been demonstrated to yield very large nuclear polarization. A short discussion of proposed ion sources for polarized /sup 3/He/sup -/ ions is followed by some concluding remarks.

Haeberli, W.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The future of wind power will depend on the ability of the industry to continue to achieve cost reductions. To better understand the potential for cost reductions, this report provides a review of historical costs, evaluates near-term market trends, and summarizes the range of projected costs. It also notes potential sources of future cost reductions.

Lantz, E.; Hand, M.; Wiser, R.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Photovoltaic Costs to Reducing Photovoltaic Costs to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Research & Development Competitive Awards Systems Integration Balance of Systems Reducing Photovoltaic Costs Photo of gloved hands pouring liquid from a glass bottle to glass beaker. Past Incubator awardee, Innovalight, is creating high-efficiency, low-cost

364

Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. March 10, 2009 - 6:00am Addthis John Lippert Power supplies convert the AC power that you get from your electric company into the DC power consumed by most electronics, including your computer. We expect our power supplies to be safe, reliable, and durable. If they meet those criteria, then they're all alike, except for cost, right? Well, not exactly. You see, there's one other important feature that sets them apart: efficiency. And I don't know about you, but I believe waste is bad. For me, high efficiency is one important feature that's needed for something to be high quality. So isn't it ridiculous that most power

365

Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors. March 10, 2009 - 6:00am Addthis John Lippert Power supplies convert the AC power that you get from your electric company into the DC power consumed by most electronics, including your computer. We expect our power supplies to be safe, reliable, and durable. If they meet those criteria, then they're all alike, except for cost, right? Well, not exactly. You see, there's one other important feature that sets them apart: efficiency. And I don't know about you, but I believe waste is bad. For me, high efficiency is one important feature that's needed for something to be high quality. So isn't it ridiculous that most power

366

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408) costs apply to those items that are consumed in production process and are roughly proportional to level in cash flow analysis and in the decision to use the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12

Boisvert, Jeff

367

Experimental evaluation of a negative ion source for a heavy ionfusion negative ion driver  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Negative halogen ions have recently been proposed as a possible alternative to positive ions for heavy ion fusion drivers because electron accumulation would not be a problem in the accelerator, and if desired, the beams could be photodetached to neutrals [1,2,3]. To test the ability to make suitable quality beams, an experiment was conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory using chlorine in an RF-driven ion source. Without introducing any cesium (which is required to enhance negative ion production in hydrogen ion sources) a negative chlorine current density of 45 mA/cm{sup 2} was obtained under the same conditions that gave 57 mA/cm{sup 2} of positive chlorine, suggesting the presence of nearly as many negative ions as positive ions in the plasma near the extraction plane. The negative ion spectrum was 99.5% atomic chlorine ions, with only 0.5% molecular chlorine, and essentially no impurities. Although this experiment did not incorporate the type of electron suppression technology that is used in negative hydrogen beam extraction, the ratio of co-extracted electrons to Cl{sup -} was as low as 7 to 1, many times lower than the ratio of their mobilities, suggesting that few electrons are present in the near-extractor plasma. This, along with the near-equivalence of the positive and negative ion currents, suggests that the plasma in this region was mostly an ion-ion plasma. The negative chlorine current density was relatively insensitive to pressure, and scaled linearly with RF power. If this linear scaling continues to hold at higher RF powers, it should permit current densities of 100 mA/cm{sup 2}, sufficient for present heavy ion fusion injector concepts. The effective ion temperatures of the positive and negative ions appeared to be similar and relatively low for a plasma source.

Grisham, L.R.; Hahto, S.K.; Hahto, S.T.; Kwan, J.W.; Leung, K.N.

2005-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

368

Experimental Evaluation of a Negative Ion Source for a Heavy Ion Fusion Negative Ion Driver  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Negative halogen ions have recently been proposed as a possible alternative to positive ions for heavy ion fusion drivers because electron accumulation would not be a problem in the accelerator, and if desired, the beams could be photo-detached to neutrals. To test the ability to make suitable quality beams, an experiment was conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory using chlorine in an RF-driven ion source. Without introducing any cesium (which is required to enhance negative ion production in hydrogen ion sources) a negative chlorine current density of 45 mA/cm{sup 2} was obtained under the same conditions that gave 57 45 mA/cm{sup 2} of positive chlorine, suggesting the presence of nearly as many negative ions as positive ions in the plasma near the extraction plane. The negative ion spectrum was 99.5% atomic chlorine ions, with only 0.5% molecular chlorine, and essentially no impurities. Although this experiment did not incorporate the type of electron suppression technology that i s used in negative hydrogen beam extraction, the ratio of co-extracted electrons to Cl{sup -} was as low as 7 to 1, many times lower than the ratio of their mobilities, suggesting that few electrons are present in the near-extractor plasma. This, along with the near-equivalence of the positive and negative ion currents, suggests that the plasma in this region was mostly an ion-ion plasma. The negative chlorine current density was relatively insensitive to pressure, and scaled linearly with RF power. If this linear scaling continues to hold at higher RF powers, it should permit current densities of 100 45 mA/cm{sup 2}, sufficient for present heavy ion fusion injector concepts. The effective ion temperatures of the positive and negative ions appeared to be similar and relatively low for a plasma source.

L.R. Grisham, S.K. Hahto, S.T. Hahto, J.W. Kwan, and K.N. Leung

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

369

Electric Power Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

4. Weighted Average Cost of Fossil Fuels for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2011 Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Total Fossil Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite All Coal Ranks...

370

Realistic costs of carbon capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a growing interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However there are substantial uncertainties about the costs of CCS. Costs for pre-combustion capture with compression (i.e. excluding costs of transport and storage and any revenue from EOR associated with storage) are examined in this discussion paper for First-of-a-Kind (FOAK) plant and for more mature technologies, or Nth-of-a-Kind plant (NOAK). For FOAK plant using solid fuels the levelised cost of electricity on a 2008 basis is approximately 10 cents/kWh higher with capture than for conventional plants (with a range of 8-12 cents/kWh). Costs of abatement are found typically to be approximately US$150/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$120-180/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants the additional cost of electricity with capture is approximately 2-5 cents/kWh, with costs of the range of US$35-70/tCO2 avoided. Costs of abatement with carbon capture for other fuels and technologies are also estimated for NOAK plants. The costs of abatement are calculated with reference to conventional SCPC plant for both emissions and costs of electricity. Estimates for both FOAK and NOAK are mainly based on cost data from 2008, which was at the end of a period of sustained escalation in the costs of power generation plant and other large capital projects. There are now indications of costs falling from these levels. This may reduce the costs of abatement and costs presented here may be 'peak of the market' estimates. If general cost levels return, for example, to those prevailing in 2005 to 2006 (by which time significant cost escalation had already occurred from previous levels), then costs of capture and compression for FOAK plants are expected to be US$110/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$90-135/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants costs are expected to be US$25-50/tCO2. Based on these considerations a likely representative range of costs of abatement from CCS excluding transport and storage costs appears to be US$100-150/tCO2 for first-of-a-kind plants and perhaps US$30-50/tCO2 for nth-of-a-kind plants.The estimates for FOAK and NOAK costs appear to be broadly consistent in the light of estimates of the potential for cost reductions with increased experience. Cost reductions are expected from increasing scale, learning on individual components, and technological innovation including improved plant integration. Innovation and integration can both lower costs and increase net output with a given cost base. These factors are expected to reduce abatement costs by approximately 65% by 2030. The range of estimated costs for NOAK plants is within the range of plausible future carbon prices, implying that mature technology would be competitive with conventional fossil fuel plants at prevailing carbon prices.

Al Juaied, Mohammed (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (US). Belfer Center for Science and International Affiaris); Whitmore, Adam (Hydrogen Energy International Ltd., Weybridge (GB))

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Primitive Virtual Negative Charge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physical fields, such as gravity and electromagnetic field, are interpreted as results from rearrangement of vacuum particles to get the equilibrium of net charge density and net mass density in 4-dimensional complex space. Then, both fields should interact to each other in that physical interaction is considered as a field-to-field interaction. Hence, Mass-Charge interaction is introduced with primitive-virtual negative charge defined for the mass. With the concept of Mass-Charge interaction electric equilibrium of the earth is discussed, especially about the electric field and magnetic field of the earth. For unsettled phenomena related with the earth's gravity, such as antigravity phenomenon, gravity anomalies during the solar eclipses, the connection between geomagnetic storms and earthquakes, etc., possible explanations are discussed.

Kim, Kiyoung

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Primitive Virtual Negative Charge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physical fields, such as gravity and electromagnetic field, are interpreted as results from rearrangement of vacuum particles to get the equilibrium of net charge density and net mass density in 4-dimensional complex space. Then, both fields should interact to each other in that physical interaction is considered as a field-to-field interaction. Hence, Mass-Charge interaction is introduced with primitive-virtual negative charge defined for the mass. With the concept of Mass-Charge interaction electric equilibrium of the earth is discussed, especially about the electric field and magnetic field of the earth. For unsettled phenomena related with the earth's gravity, such as antigravity phenomenon, gravity anomalies during the solar eclipses, the connection between geomagnetic storms and earthquakes, etc., possible explanations are discussed.

Kiyoung Kim

2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

373

Negative ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ionization vessel is divided into an ionizing zone and an extraction zone by a magnetic filter. The magnetic filter prevents high-energy electrons from crossing from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. A small positive voltage impressed on a plasma grid, located adjacent an extraction grid, positively biases the plasma in the extraction zone to thereby prevent positive ions from migrating from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. Low-energy electrons, which would ordinarily be dragged by the positive ions into the extraction zone, are thereby prevented from being present in the extraction zone and being extracted along with negative ions by the extraction grid. Additional electrons are suppressed from the output flux using ExB drift provided by permanent magnets and the extractor grid electrical field. 14 figs.

Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.

1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

374

Negative ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ionization vessel is divided into an ionizing zone and an extraction zone by a magnetic filter. The magnetic filter prevents high-energy electrons from crossing from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. A small positive voltage impressed on a plasma grid, located adjacent an extraction grid, positively biases the plasma in the extraction zone to thereby prevent positive ions from migrating from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. Low-energy electrons, which would ordinarily be dragged by the positive ions into the extraction zone, are thereby prevented from being present in the extraction zone and being extracted along with negative ions by the extraction grid. Additional electrons are suppressed from the output flux using ExB drift provided by permanent magnets and the extractor grid electrical field.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Ehlers, Kenneth W. (Alamo, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Negative ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ionization vessel is divided into an ionizing zone and an extraction zone by a magnetic filter. The magnetic filter prevents high-energy electrons from crossing from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. A small positive voltage impressed on a plasma grid, located adjacent an extraction grid, positively biases the plasma in the extraction zone to thereby prevent positive ions from migrating from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. Low-energy electrons, which would ordinarily be dragged by the positive ions into the extraction zone, are thereby prevented from being present in the extraction zone and being extracted along with negative ions by the extraction grid. Additional electrons are suppressed from the output flux using ExB drift provided by permanent magnets and the extractor grid electrical field.

Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.

1982-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

376

HTGR Cost Model Users' Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Temperature Gas-Cooler Reactor (HTGR) Cost Model was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The HTGR Cost Model calculates an estimate of the capital costs, annual operating and maintenance costs, and decommissioning costs for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. The user can generate these costs for multiple reactor outlet temperatures; with and without power cycles, including either a Brayton or Rankine cycle; for the demonstration plant, first of a kind, or nth of a kind project phases; for a single or four-pack configuration; and for a reactor size of 350 or 600 MWt. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for the HTGR Cost Model. Instructions, screenshots, and examples are provided to guide the user through the HTGR Cost Model. This model was design for users who are familiar with the HTGR design and Excel. Modification of the HTGR Cost Model should only be performed by users familiar with Excel and Visual Basic.

A.M. Gandrik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

The Political Economy of Wind Power in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

???], ?Analysis of Renewable Energy Cost- Sharing Methods? [???], ?Analysis of Renewable Energy Cost-Sharing Methods? [?on Management of Cost-Sharing for Renewable Energy Power

Swanson, Ryan Landon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the relationship between wind power class and cost is showncosts associated with wind power. The cost implications ofprice electricity, wind power directly reduces exposure to

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Negative Sequence Effects on Generator Rotors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Main generator rotors are constructed and designed to provide decades of reliable and trouble-free operation. However, a number of negative sequence and motoring incidences have occurred over the years that can adversely impact reliable operation of generator rotors and, ultimately, production of electrical power. Severe overheating leads to rotor material changes, such as steel hardness, and may if not detected, ultimately lead to catastrophic failure. This report discusses the effects of severe negativ...

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

380

PAFC Cost Challenges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PAFC Cost Challenges Sridhar Kanuri Manager, PAFC Technology *Sridhar.Kanuri@utcpower.com 2 AGENDA Purecell 400 cost challenge Cost reduction opportunities Summary 3 PURECELL ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "negative power cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Economic analysis of geothermal energy costs  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of the computer program, GEOCOST, and its application to some analyses of the economics of geothermal energy. GEOCOST combines both technical and economic factors into one systematic cost accounting framework. The program, which simulates production of electricity from most types of geothermal resources, is composed of two parts: a reservoir model which simulates the costs associated with the exploration, development, and operation of a geothermal reservoir; and a power-plant model which simulates the costs associated with the design, construction, and operation of the power plant. The costs from the reservoir model become the energy supply costs to the power plant. The combined reservoir and power plant models represent the complete energy production system. (LBS)

Bloomster, C.H.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Negative ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for providing a negative ion source accelerates electrons away from a hot filament electron emitter into a region of crossed electric and magnetic fields arranged in a magnetron configuration. During a portion of the resulting cycloidal path, the electron velocity is reduced below its initial value. The electron accelerates as it leaves the surface at a rate of only slightly less than if there were no magnetic field, thereby preventing a charge buildup at the surface of the emitter. As the electron traverses the cycloid, it is decelerated during the second, third, and fourth quadrants, then reeccelerated as it approaches the end of the fourth quadrant to regain its original velocity. The minimum velocity occurs during the fourth quadrant, and corresponds to an electron temperature of 200.degree. to 500.degree. for the electric and magnetic fields commonly encountered in the ion sources of magnetic sector mass spectrometers. An ion source using the above-described thermalized electrons is also disclosed.

Delmore, James E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Improved negative ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for providing a negative ion source accelerates electrons away from a hot filament electron emitter into a region of crossed electric and magnetic fields arranged in a magnetron configuration. During a portion of the resulting cycloidal path, the electron velocity is reduced below its initial value. The electron accelerates as it leaves the surface at a rate of only slightly less than if there were no magnetic field, thereby preventing a charge buildup at the surface of the emitter. As the electron traverses the cycloid, it is decelerated during the second, third, and fourth quadrants, then reaccelerated as it approaches the end of the fourth quadrant to regain its original velocity. The minimum velocity occurs during the fourth quadrant, and corresponds to an electron temperature of 200 to 500/sup 0/C for the electric and magnetic fields commonly encountered in the ion sources of magnetic sector mass spectrometers. An ion source using the above-described thermalized electrons is also disclosed.

Delmore, J.E.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Light-Weight, Low-Cost, Single-Phase, Liquid-Cooled Cold Plate (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation, 'Light-Weight, Low-Cost, Single-Phase Liquid-Cooled Cold Plate,' directly addresses program goals of increased power density, specific power, and lower cost of power electronics components through improved thermal management.

Narumanchi, S.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Minimum Changeover Cost Arborescence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

having minimum changeover cost, a cost that we now describe. ... We define the changeover cost at j, denoted by d(j), as the sum of the costs at j paid for each of  ...

386

Fuel Cell Power Model Elucidates Life-Cycle Costs for Fuel Cell-Based Combined Heat, Hydrogen, and Power (CHHP) Production Systems (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 * November 2010 3 * November 2010 Electricity Natural Gas Power Heat Natural Gas or Biogas Tri-Generation Fuel Cell Hydrogen Natural Gas Converted to hydrogen on site via steam-methane reforming electrolyzer peak burner heat sink FC SYSTEM + H 2 Renewables H 2 -FC H 2 -storage 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Electricity Demand (kW) Heat Demand (kW) Hydrogen Demand (kW) 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Electricity Demand (kW) Heat Demand (kW) Hydrogen Demand (kW) 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Electricity Demand (kW) Heat Demand (kW) Hydrogen Demand (kW) 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Electricity Demand (kW) Heat Demand (kW) Hydrogen Demand (kW) * Grid electricity (hourly) * Fuel prices * Water price 0 2 4

387

Review of cost estimates for reducing CO2 emissions. Final report, Task 9  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the ground breaking work of William Nordhaus in 1977, cost estimates for reducing CO{sub 2} emissions have been developed by numerous groups. The various studies have reported sometimes widely divergent cost estimates for reducing CO{sub 2} emissions. Some recent analyses have indicated that large reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions could be achieved at zero or negative costs (e.g. Rocky Mountain Institute 1989). In contrast, a recent study by Alan Manne of Stanford and Richard Richels of the Electric Power Research Institute (Manne-Richels 1989) concluded that in the US the total discounted costs of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions by 20 percent below the 1990 level could be as much as 3.6 trillion dollars over the period from 1990 to 2100. Costs of this order of magnitude would represent about 5 percent of US GNP. The purpose of this briefing paper is to summarize the different cost estimates for CO{sub 2} emission reduction and to identify the key issues and assumptions that underlie these cost estimates.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Audit Costs for the 1986 Texas Energy Cost Containment Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct program costs for detailed audits of 13.5 million square feet of institutional building space in the 1986 Texas Energy Cost Containment Program were $0.047/SF. The building area was 63 percent simple (offices, schools, and universities) and 37 percent complex (medical buildings and power plants). Allowing for the influence of one large facility which received less-extensive treatment due to previous work, thorough audits were obtained for an average cost of $0.050/SF. Large medical buildings (greater than about 170,000 square feet) were audited for $0.050/SF or less, and program costs for survey audits of 17.2 million square feet were $0.0028/SF. The effect on audit costs of complexity of recommended modifications, amount of savings determined, amount of implementation costs, building size, and building complexity are discussed. Primary effects on audit costs are size and complexity of buildings. Program guidelines limited consideration of projects with greater than a four year payback.

Heffington, W. M.; Lum, S. K.; Bauer, V. A.; Turner, W. D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costs to access in-state wind power, either in their 2004 IRPs, or in subsequent renewable energycost and performance of wind power, with limited analysis of geothermal. In its subsequent 2005 renewable energyWind Power Cost and Performance Assumptions .23 5.1.1 Busbar Costs ..26 5.1.2 Indirect Costs .29 5.1.3 Treatment of Renewable Energy

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

New England Wind Forum: Cost Trends  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Cost Trends Cost Trends Figure 1: Cost of Energy and Cumulative Domestic Capacity This graph shows how the cumulative domestic wind capacity (MW) has increased since 1980, while the cost of energy from wind power has declined by a factor of approximately 20 times during the same period but has increased slightly since 2001. Click on the image to view a larger version. This graph shows how the cumulative domestic wind capacity (MW) has increased since 1980, while the cost of energy from wind power has declined by a factor of approximately 20 times during the same period but has increased slightly since 2001. View a larger version of the graph. Overall, the wind industry is experiencing long-term decreases in the cost to produce wind-generated electricity (Figure 1), despite recent short-term increases in upfront equipment costs. Even in the short term, however, the effect of increases in up-front capital costs on the cost of energy from wind power projects has been dampened by improvements in energy capture from the wind and decreases in operating and maintenance costs.

391

Data Center Power Consumption  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Center Power Consumption Center Power Consumption A new look at a growing problem Fact - Data center power density up 10x in the last 10 years 2.1 kW/rack (1992); 14 kW/rack (2007) Racks are not fully populated due to power/cooling constraints Fact - Increasing processor power Moore's law Fact - Energy cost going up 3 yr. energy cost equivalent to acquisition cost Fact - Iterative power life cycle Takes as much energy to cool computers as it takes to power them. Fact - Over-provisioning Most data centers are over-provisioned with cooling and still have hot spots November 2007 SubZero Engineering An Industry at the Crossroads Conflict between scaling IT demands and energy efficiency Server Efficiency is improving year after year Performance/Watt doubles every 2 years Power Density is Going Up

392

Definition: Reduced Congestion Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Congestion Cost Transmission congestion is a phenomenon that occurs in electric power markets. It happens when scheduled market transactions (generation and load) result in power flow over a transmission element that exceeds the available capacity for that element. Since grid operators must ensure that physical overloads do not occur, they will dispatch generation so as to prevent them. The functions that provide this benefit provide lower cost energy, decrease loading on system elements, shift load to off-peak, or allow the grid operator to manage the flow of electricity around constrained interfaces (i.e. dynamic line capability or power flow control).[1] Related Terms power, transmission lines, load, element, electricity

393

Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

BestPractices Steam tip sheet regarding ways to assess steam system efficiency. To determine the effective cost of steam, use a combined heat and power simulation model that includes all the significant effects.

Papar, R. [U.S. Department of Energy (US)

2000-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

394

Utility-Scale Solar 2012: An Empirical Analysis of Project Cost...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

through key findings from this report. The webinar covers trends in not only installed project costs or prices, but also operating costs, capacity factors, and power purchase...

395

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost of Wind Power Also important to how renewable energyenergy considered in these plans. Not surprisingly, the total modeled cost of wind

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Managing distributed ups energy for effective power capping in data centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power over-subscription can reduce costs for modern data centers. However, designing the power infrastructure for a lower operating power point than the aggregated peak power of all servers requires dynamic techniques to avoid high peak power costs and, ...

Vasileios Kontorinis; Liuyi Eric Zhang; Baris Aksanli; Jack Sampson; Houman Homayoun; Eddie Pettis; Dean M. Tullsen; Tajana Simunic Rosing

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Cost Reduction Strategies for Mixed Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential for generating mixed waste is a reality at all nuclear power plants. The report provides utilities with a means for developing cost reduction strategies to minimize the volume of waste generated, optimize treatment and disposal options, and maximize overall cost savings.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

398

Draft Submission; Social Cost of Energy Generation  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended to provide a general understanding of the social costs associated with electric power generation. Based on a thorough review of recent literature on the subject, the report describes how these social costs can be most fully and accurately evaluated, and discusses important considerations in applying this information within the competitive bidding process. [DJE 2005

1990-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

399

Power routing: dynamic power provisioning in the data center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data center power infrastructure incurs massive capital costs, which typically exceed energy costs over the life of the facility. To squeeze maximum value from the infrastructure, researchers have proposed over-subscribing power circuits, relying on ... Keywords: data centers, power infrastructure

Steven Pelley; David Meisner; Pooya Zandevakili; Thomas F. Wenisch; Jack Underwood

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

PowerPerfector | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Product Voltage Power Optimisation technology that reduces electricity consumption, costs and carbon emissions. References PowerPerfector1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "negative power cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

NREL: Advanced Power Electronics - Laboratory Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Capabilities Key to making hybrid electric and fuel cell vehicles practical is the development of low-cost, high-power integrated power electronics devices. The research...

402

Cost Study Manual  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28, 2012 28, 2012 Cost Study Manual Executive Summary This Cost Study Manual documents the procedures for preparing a Cost Study to compare the cost of a contractor's employee benefits to the industry average from a broad-based national benefit cost survey. The annual Employee Benefits Cost Study Comparison (Cost Study) assists with the analysis of contractors' employee benefits costs. The Contracting Officer (CO) may require corrective action when the average benefit per capita cost or the benefit cost as a percent of payroll exceeds the comparator group by more than five percent. For example, if per capita benefit costs for the comparator group are $10,000 and the benefit costs as a percent of payroll for the comparator group are 20%, the threshold for the contractor's benefits as a

403

Three chamber negative ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A negative ion vessel is divided into an excitation chamber, a negative ionization chamber and an extraction chamber by two magnetic filters. Input means introduces neutral molecules into a first chamber where a first electron discharge means vibrationally excites the molecules which migrate to a second chamber. In the second chamber a second electron discharge means ionizes the molecules, producing negative ions which are extracted into or by a third chamber. A first magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the negative ionization chamber from the excitation chamber. A second magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the extraction chamber from the negative ionizing chamber. An extraction grid at the end of the negative ion vessel attracts negative ions into the third chamber and accelerates them. Another grid, located adjacent to the extraction grid, carries a small positive voltage in order to inhibit positive ions from migrating into the extraction chamber and contour the plasma potential. Additional electrons can be suppressed from the output flux using ExB forces provided by magnetic field means and the extractor grid electric potential.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Ehlers, Kenneth W. (Alamo, CA); Hiskes, John R. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

factors add 20 percent to liquefaction plant total installed cost 6 Distribution Pipeline Costs Collected historical Oil & Gas Journal data, and surveyed for current urban and...

405

External Costs of Energy Technologies Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Nuclear Society believes that decisions concerning national energy policy should appropriately take external costs into account. In some energy options, external costs are not included in the cost of the energy produced; instead, they are borne by parties not involved in the original transaction, generally without consent or due compensation. External costs 1 may be related to many factors, including impacts on public health, environmental impacts, degradation of quality of life, degradation of agricultural land, depletion of natural resources, and reduction in security. These costs are incurred at various stages of the life cycle of an energy technology. While some energy technologies may appear to have smaller environmental impacts than others, their external costs may be significant when the complete life cycle costs are taken into account. Particularly, an energy source that is inherently intermittent will require, for applications demanding reliable performance, either a backup energy supply or an energy storage facility, whose external costs are not negligible. On the other hand, practically all the costs to make nuclear power technology safe and secure, including the costs of waste management and disposal, are already incorporated into the cost of electricity generation. 2 Appropriately accounting for external costs should be an essential element in energy policy since in doing so, the final product is compared based on a consistent set of parameters for all technologies, and the resulting mix of energy sources will more appropriately balance the competing economic, environmental, and social needs from energy production and consumption.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Sandia creates lifelike, cost-effective robotic hand that can...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

creates lifelike, cost-effective robotic hand that can disable IEDs | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering...

407

Report on Transmission Cost Allocation for RTOs and Others (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation describes in summary fashion some present transmission cost allocation methods, especially as this relates to the development of utility-scale renewable power sources.

Coles, L.; Porter, K.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Chapter 4. Receipts and Cost of Fossil Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

74 U.S. Energy Information Administration/Electric Power Monthly June 2012 Chapter 4. Receipts and Cost of Fossil Fuels

409

High Temperature Stainless Steel Alloy with Low Cost Manganese  

High Temperature Stainless Steel Alloy with Low Cost Manganese ... ••Power industry components such as boiler tubing and piping, pressure vessels, chemical

410

Solar Power Purchase Agreements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Power Purchase Agreements Solar Power Purchase Agreements Brian Millberg | Energy Manager, City of Minneapolis Direct Ownership * Financial: Even at $3/kW installed cost, simple payback is 18 years (initial electricity cost of $0.10/kWh and 3%/year electricity cost inflation) * Politics: How to justify expense with such a long payback * If RECS begin to have some real value, this would be a positive for ownership. 2 PPA Advantages * No/low up-front costs * City can take advantage of Investment Tax Credits (ITCs) - This leads to low electricity costs * Predictable electricity cost for length of contract * Avoid direct design/rebate/permitting work * No maintenance/operation headaches 3 PPA Financial Case (1 MW system) * PPA allows a developer to reduce system cost through:

411

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural-Draft Dry-Cooling Tower • Power-Generation SubsystemSubsystem Costs Cost a, b, Dry-Cooling Tower Costs c, II.Steam Wet-Cooling Tower Costs Turbine~Generator STORAGE UNIT

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

California Biomass Collaborative Energy Cost Calculators | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California Biomass Collaborative Energy Cost Calculators California Biomass Collaborative Energy Cost Calculators Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: California Biomass Collaborative Energy Cost Calculators Agency/Company /Organization: California Biomass Collaborative Partner: Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, University of California Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Biofuels, - Landfill Gas, - Waste to Energy Phase: Evaluate Options Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: biomass.ucdavis.edu/calculator.html Locality: California Cost: Free Provides energy cost and financial assessment tools for biomass power, bio gas, biomass combined heat and power, and landfill gas. Overview The California Biomass Collaborative provides energy cost and financial

413

THE NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE: PROSPECTS FOR REDUCING ITS COST  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear fuel cost of 1.25 mills/kwh would make nuclear power competitive with conventional power in lowcost coal areas if capital and operating costs can be brought to within about 10 percent of those of coal-fired plants. Substantial decreases in fuel fabrication cost are anticipated by 1970: other costs in the fuel cycle are expccted to remain about the same as at present. Unit costs and irradiation levels that would be needed to give a fuel cost of 1.25 mills/kwh are believed to be attainable by 1970. (auth)

Albrecht, W.L.

1959-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

414

Présentation PowerPoint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant * Clean power with entire flue gas treated to capture 2 Mty CO 2 * Biomass co-firing option leading to zero (or negative) CO 2 emissions * Anchor project for National...

415

Highly Insulating Windows - Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Cost The following is an estimate of the cost effective incremental cost of highly-insulating windows (U-factor=0.20 Btu/hr-ft2-F) compared to regular ENERGY STAR windows (U-factor 0.35 Btu/hr-ft2-F). Energy savings from lower U-factors were simulated with RESFEN over an assumed useful window life of 25 years. To determine the maximum incremental cost at which highly-insulating windows would still be cost-effective, we used a formula used by many utility companies to calculate the cost of saved energy from energy efficiency programs, based on the programs' cost and savings. We turned this formula around so that the cost of saved energy equals the present energy prices in the studied locations, whereas the program cost (the incremental cost of the windows) is the dependent variable. By entering 5%

416

Today's geothermal power economics and risks  

SciTech Connect

Capital and power generation costs are developed as a parameterized composite of a number of ongoing geothermal power projects, and evaluates several of the most commonly accepted risks of geothermal power in terms of cost penalties to a basic cost of power. The status of geothermal power in the US is also reviewed briefly.

Lawford, T.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Vehicle-to-Grid Power: Battery, Hybrid, and Fuel Cell Vehicles as Resources for Distributed Electric Power in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Costs Revenue Costs a b Using utilities’ “internal rule ofof revenues and costs based on a utilities’ "internal ruleRevenue and costs of using EDVs for regulation: power capacity limited only by the internal

Kempton, Willett; Tomic, Jasna; Letendre, Steven; Brooks, Alec; Lipman, Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

New tools to cut labor costs  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Research Institute is developing new techniques that will reduce the labor costs of building and maintaining power-distribution systems. The new tools include a cable plow for underground cables, concrete cutters, an underground borer, tree growth retardants, and other devices which reduce labor requirements and cause less environmental disruption. 2 references. (DCK)

Lihach, N.; Kendrew, T.; Rodenbaugh, T.; Steiner, R.; Tackaberry, R.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Power outages often spur questions around burying power lines ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Despite the cost, underground power lines are often found in urban areas, where the density of the required overhead wire would cause significant obstructions.

420

Transparent Cost Database | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hide data for this chart (-)Show data for this chart (+) Loading data... Transparent Cost Database Generation Showing: Historical Projections Year Published: Release mouse to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "negative power cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Transmission Valuation and Cost Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update provides information on the status of the electric power industry regarding the economic valuation of transmission projects. Such valuations became critical with the introduction of economic transmission projects in the context of competitive electricity markets. Economic valuation is also becoming increasingly important for traditional reliability upgrades, because of the need for consistency in cost allocations between the two types of upgrades. The year 2005 has brought significa...

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

422

Low Cost, High Performance, 50-year Electrode  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

this ARPA-E project, Primus Power will develop an this ARPA-E project, Primus Power will develop an extremely durable, highly active, conductive, and inexpensive electrode for flow batteries. Flow batteries offer one of the most exciting opportunities for affordable grid storage, however electrodes are costly and are the single largest cost component in a well integrated design. Grid storage can yield numerous benefits in utility and customer- owned applications:  renewable firming  peak load reduction  load shifting  capital deferral  frequency regulation By incorporating volume production practices from the chlorine, filter media, and electroplating industries, Primus Power will effectively reduce electrode costs to exceed GRIDS cost targets while providing the durability essential for widespread grid-scale adoption.

423

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating Procedures INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating...

424

Early Station Costs Questionnaire  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early Station Costs Questionnaire Early Station Costs Questionnaire Marc Melaina Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center Market Readiness Workshop February 16-17th, 2011 Washington, DC Questionnaire Goals * The Early Station Costs questionnaire provides an anonymous mechanism for organizations with direct experience with hydrogen station costs to provide feedback on current costs, near-term costs, economies of scale, and R&D priorities. * This feedback serves the hydrogen community and government agencies by increasing awareness of the status of refueling infrastructure costs National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Questions for Market Readiness Workshop Attendees * Are these questions the right ones to be asking?

425

Cost-Energy Dynamics: An Engineering - Economic Basis for Industrial Energy Conservation Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper develops a theory called cost-energy dynamics that can be used to shape policies for industrial energy conservation. It is built on two hypotheses commonly observed in process engineering; namely, cost varies as positive power function while energy varies as negative power function of the system size and/ or complexity. These two hypotheses, which have roots in thermodynamics, give rise to a technological parameter (denoted c) that can be determined for each unit process. Cost-energy dynamics ranks energy conservation potentials of industrial processes by the technology parameter c, aggregates energy consumption by unit processes, considers energy embodied in the investment, considers the trade-offs between cost and energy, and distinguishes bases for decision making in the public and private sectors. Five unit processes are used to represent the U.S. manufacturing industry. The aggregated technology parameter for industry is determined to be about 3.5. This value and the data on existing energy consumption allow the determination of energy conservation potentials, extra capital investment requirements, and the possible energy picture by the year 2000. Several public policy tools are evaluated for their effectiveness in stimulating energy conservation.

Phung, D. L.; van Gool, W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Simple cost model for EV traction motors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A simple cost model has been developed that allows the calculation of the OEM cost of electric traction motors of three different types, normalized as a function of power in order to accommodate different power and size. The model includes enough information on the various elements integrated in the motors to allow analysis of individual components and to factor-in the effects of changes in commodities prices. A scalable cost model for each of the main components of an electric vehicle (EV) is a useful tool that can have direct application in computer simulation or in parametric studies. For the cost model to have wide usefulness, it needs to be valid for a range of values of some parameter that determines the magnitude or size of the component. For instance, in the case of batteries, size may be determined by energy capacity, usually expressed in kilowatt-hours (kWh), while in the case of traction motors, size is better determined by rated power, usually expressed in kilowatts (kW). The simplest case is when the cost of the component in question is a direct function of its size; then cost is simply the product of its specific cost ($/unit size) and the number of units (size) in the vehicle in question. Batteries usually fall in this category (cost = energy capacity x $/kWh). But cost is not always linear with size or magnitude; motors (and controllers), for instance, become relatively less expensive as power rating increases. Traction motors, one of the main components for EV powertrains are examined in this paper, and a simplified cost model is developed for the three most popular design variations.

Cuenca, R.M.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

DOE-Sponsored IGCC Project Could Lead to Lower-Cost Carbon Capture...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

manufactured catalysts can produce both power generation increases and significant cost savings at Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants, according to...

428

OOTW COST TOOLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports the results of a study of cost tools to support the analysis of Operations Other Than War (OOTW). It recommends the continued development of the Department of Defense (DoD) Contingency Operational Support Tool (COST) as the basic cost analysis tool for 00TWS. It also recommends modifications to be included in future versions of COST and the development of an 00TW mission planning tool to supply valid input for costing.

HARTLEY, D.S.III; PACKARD, S.L.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Recent Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy from U.S...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recent Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy from U.S. Wind Power Projects Title Recent Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy from U.S. Wind Power Projects...

430

Cost Study for Large Wind Turbine Blades  

SciTech Connect

The cost study for large wind turbine blades reviewed three blades of 30 meters, 50 meters, and 70 meters in length. Blade extreme wind design loads were estimated in accordance with IEC Class I recommendations. Structural analyses of three blade sizes were performed at representative spanwise stations assuming a stressed shell design approach and E-glass/vinylester laminate. A bill of materials was prepared for each of the three blade sizes using the laminate requirements prepared during the structural analysis effort. The labor requirements were prepared for twelve major manufacturing tasks. TPI Composites developed a conceptual design of the manufacturing facility for each of the three blade sizes, which was used for determining the cost of labor and overhead (capital equipment and facilities). Each of the three potential manufacturing facilities was sized to provide a constant annual rated power production (MW per year) of the blades it produced. The cost of the production tooling and overland transportation was also estimated. The results indicate that as blades get larger, materials become a greater proportion of total cost, while the percentage of labor cost is decreased. Transportation costs decreased as a percentage of total cost. The study also suggests that blade cost reduction efforts should focus on reducing material cost and lowering manufacturing labor, because cost reductions in those areas will have the strongest impact on overall blade cost.

ASHWILL, THOMAS D.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

SunShot Initiative: Reducing Non-Hardware Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Non-Hardware Costs to Reducing Non-Hardware Costs to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Reducing Non-Hardware Costs on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Reducing Non-Hardware Costs on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Reducing Non-Hardware Costs on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Reducing Non-Hardware Costs on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Reducing Non-Hardware Costs on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Reducing Non-Hardware Costs on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Systems Integration Balance of Systems Reducing Non-Hardware Costs Lowering Barriers Fostering Growth Reducing Non-Hardware Costs DOE supports efforts to dramatically reduce the non-hardware, balance of systems costs associated with solar energy systems. Representing as much as

432

Environmental protection using social costing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions and other residual wastes come from industrial production, commercial and household activities, and transportation. These wastes damage the environment, including human health. As economies grow, so does concern about balancing that growth with the desire for environmental protection. At issue is how much environmental protection we should have. We address this issue using the concept of social costing. The issue is discussed in the context of electric power generation. There is particular concern about the use of fossil fuels such as petroleum, the major fuel used in the Republic of China, and coal which is the most common fuel used in the U. S. Electric power generation is a major source of airborne pollutants such as SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} particulate matter, volatile organic compounds, CO, and CO{sub 2}. It also results in liquid and solid wastes, and other effects such as changes in land use. To generate electric power, fuel (such as petroleum, coal or enriched uranium) or some other resource (e.g., wind or geothermal) is needed. A fuel cycle consists of a sequence of activities and processes involved in generating electric power. These activities include fuel extraction, treatment and processing; fuel conversion into electricity; transmission; waste disposal; and transportation of fuel and wastes between the different stages of the fuel cycle. Each stage results in emissions or other residuals. Several recent-studies have been about the environmental costs of electricity.

Lee, R.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Increased Power Flow Guidebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Increased Power Flow (IPF) Guidebook is a state-of-the-art and best practices guidebook on increasing power flow capacities of existing overhead transmission lines, underground cables, power transformers, and substation equipment without compromising safety and reliability. The Guidebook discusses power system concerns and limiting conditions to increasing capacity, reviews available technology options and methods, illustrates alternatives with case studies, and analyzes costs and benefits of differe...

2005-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

434

Minimum Cost Arborescences ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze the cost allocation problem when a group of agents or nodes have to be connected to a source, and where the cost matrix describing the cost of connecting each pair of agents is not necessarily symmetric, thus extending the well-studied problem of minimum cost spanning tree games, where the costs are assumed to be symmetric. The focus is on rules which satisfy axioms representing incentive and fairness properties. We show that while some results are similar, there are also significant differences between the frameworks corresponding to symmetric and asymmetric cost matrices.

Bhaskar Dutta; Debasis Mishra; We Thank Daniel Granot; Anirban Kar; Herve Moulin For Comments

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Estimates of Production Cost Variance Using Chronological Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forecasts of production costs are key inputs in the operational planning decisions of electric power utilities. This report describes the effects of uncertainty in annual load variation and uncertainty in generation availability on the variance of cost in an electrical power system.

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

436

Recent Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Recent Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy from U.S. Wind Power Projects Ryan Wiser This analysis was funded by the Wind & Water Power Program, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy factor trends fails to convey recent improvements in the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) from wind

437

ELECTRICITY CASE: ECONOMIC COST ESTIMATION FACTORS FOR ECONOMIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of numbers of people affected DRAFT #12;6 · costs per hour of disruption or outage are used in conjunction with consequences in terms of duration, which is particularly common in electric power outages · costs per dollar for residences. Per Unit of Duration of Outage Duration as an influence in the cost of outages has received a lot

Wang, Hai

438

Electricity Plant Cost Uncertainties (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Construction costs for new power plants have increased at an extraordinary rate over the past several years. One study, published in mid-2008, reported that construction costs had more than doubled since 2000, with most of the increase occurring since 2005. Construction costs have increased for plants of all types, including coal, nuclear, natural gas, and wind.

Information Center

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 11007 Date: March 25, 2011 Title: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation Originator: Mark Ruth & Fred Joseck Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: March 24, 2011 Description: The hydrogen threshold cost is defined as the hydrogen cost in the range of $2.00-$4.00/gge (2007$) which represents the cost at which hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are projected to become competitive on a cost per mile basis with the competing vehicles [gasoline in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs)] in 2020. This record documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate that threshold cost. Principles: The cost threshold analysis is a "top-down" analysis of the cost at which hydrogen would be

440

Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pathway Cost Distributions Pathway Cost Distributions Jim Uihlein Fuel Pathways Integration Tech Team January 25, 2006 2 Outline * Pathway-Independent Cost Goal * Cost Distribution Objective * Overview * H2A Influence * Approach * Implementation * Results * Discussion Process * Summary 3 Hydrogen R&D Cost Goal * Goal is pathway independent * Developed through a well defined, transparent process * Consumer fueling costs are equivalent or less on a cents per mile basis * Evolved gasoline ICE and gasoline-electric hybrids are benchmarks * R&D guidance provided in two forms * Evolved gasoline ICE defines a threshold hydrogen cost used to screen or eliminate options which can't show ability to meet target * Gasoline-electric hybrid defines a lower hydrogen cost used to prioritize projects for resource allocation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "negative power cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Documents: Cost Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents Cost Analysis PDF Icon Summary of the Cost Analysis Report for the Long-term Management of Depleted UF6...

442

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs U.S. Petroleum Use, 1970-2010 Nearly 40% of the oil we use is imported, costing us roughly 300 billion annually. Increased domestic oil production from...

443

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Presented by: J.M. Hieb, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company CHPRC1204-04 Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Everyone is trying to stretch a...

444

Wind Farm Diversification and Its Impact on Power System Reliability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As wind exploitation gains prominence in the power industry, the extensive use of this intermittent source of power may heavily rely on our ability to select the best combination of wind farming sites that yields maximal reliability of power systems at minimal cost. This research proposes a general method to minimize the wind park global power output variance by optimally distributing a predetermined number of wind turbines over a preselected number of potential wind farming sites for which the wind patterns are statistically known. The objective is to demonstrate the benefits of diversification for the reliability of wind-sustained systems through the search for steadier overall power outputs. Three years of wind data from the recent NREL/3TIER study in the western US provides the statistics for evaluating each site for their mean power output, variance and correlation with each other so that the best allocations can be determined. Some traditional reliability indices such as the LOLP are computed by using sequential Monte Carlo simulations to emulate the behavior of a power system uniquely composed of wind turbines and a load modeled from the 1996 IEEE RTS. It is shown that configurations featuring minimal global power output variances generally prove the most reliable for moderate load cases, provided the sites are not significantly correlated with the modeled load. Under these conditions, the choice of uncorrelated/negatively correlated sites is favored. The correlations between the optimized global wind power outputs and the modeled load are studied as well.

Degeilh, Yannick

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Cost Estimation Recommendations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...D.P. Hoult and C.L. Meador, Manufacturing Cost Estimating, Materials Selection and Design, Vol 20, ASM Handbook,

446

APT cost scaling: Preliminary indications from a Parametric Costing Model (PCM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Parametric Costing Model has been created and evaluate as a first step in quantitatively understanding important design options for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) concept. This model couples key economic and technical elements of APT in a two-parameter search of beam energy and beam power that minimizes costs within a range of operating constraints. The costing and engineering depth of the Parametric Costing Model is minimal at the present {open_quotes}entry level{close_quotes}, and is intended only to demonstrate a potential for a more-detailed, cost-based integrating design tool. After describing the present basis of the Parametric Costing Model and giving an example of a single parametric scaling run derived therefrom, the impacts of choices related to resistive versus superconducting accelerator structures and cost of electricity versus plant availability ({open_quotes}load curve{close_quotes}) are reported. Areas of further development and application are suggested.

Krakowski, R.A.

1995-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

447

SUPPORTING ONLINE MATERIAL FOR High-resolution modeling of the western North American power system demonstrates low-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

&M) costs incurred yearly by all active power plants 3. variable costs incurred). The capital cost of each project is locked in at the first year of construction. Construction costs for power plants are tallied yearly, discounted

Kammen, Daniel M.

448

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Life-Cycle Cost Analysis October 16, 2013 - 4:41pm Addthis Constructed Costs of a Net-Zero Office Building Facility: Research Support Facility at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado Operational: August 2010 Constructed cost: $259/ft2 to achieve 50% less energy use than code Constructed cost of similar office buildings in area: $225 to $300/ft2 Reaching Net-Zero: A 1.27 MW photovoltaic system was added to the project in two phases to bring the system to net-zero. This system was financed through a power purchase agreement and did not add to the constructed cost of the building. If those costs were included in the capital costs, the total constructed cost would have been 291/ft2 to reach net-zero energy use. Learn more about the Research Support

449

WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY  

SciTech Connect

The future of wind power will depend on the ability of the industry to continue to achieve cost reductions. To better understand the potential for cost reductions, this report provides a review of historical costs, evaluates near-term market trends, and summarizes the range of projected costs. It also notes potential sources of future cost reductions. Our findings indicate that steady cost reductions were interrupted between 2004 and 2010, but falling turbine prices and improved turbine performance are expected to drive a historically low LCOE for current installations. In addition, the majority of studies indicate continued cost reductions on the order of 20%-30% through 2030. Moreover, useful cost projections are likely to benefit from stronger consideration of the interactions between capital cost and performance as well as trends in the quality of the wind resource where projects are located, transmission, grid integration, and other cost variables.

NREL,; Wiser, Ryan; Lantz, Eric; Hand, Maureen

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

450

Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and economic cost?benefit analysis of offshore wind energy,energy sources [Jacobson, 2009]. Onshore wind power costs

Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Estimating demolition cost of plutonium buildings for dummies  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of the Rocky Flats Field Office of the US Department of Energy is to decommission the entire plant. In an effort to improve the basis and the accuracy of the future decommissioning cost, Rocky Flats has developed a powerful but easy-to-use tool to determine budget cost estimates to characterize, decontaminate, and demolish all its buildings. The parametric cost-estimating tool is called the Facilities Disposition Cost Model (FDCM).

Tower, S.E.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Cost of Renewable Energy Technology Options | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost of Renewable Energy Technology Options Cost of Renewable Energy Technology Options Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Cost of Renewable Energy Technology Options Focus Area: Solar Topics: Opportunity Assessment & Screening Website: www1.eere.energy.gov/tribalenergy/guide/renewable_technologies_costs.h Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/cost-renewable-energy-technology-opti Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation This resource has been extracted and reformatted from the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Power Technologies Energy Data Book. The data book is an excellent source of consistent information on renewable energy technology status and future expectations. Cost information is available

453

How to Reduce Energy Supply Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rising energy costs have many businesses looking for creative ways to reduce their energy usage and lower the costs of energy delivered to their facilities. This paper explores innovative renewable and alternative energy technologies that can help customers control their supply-side costs of energy. Specific topics include distributive wind power generation and solid fuel boilers. It identities factors to consider in determining whether these technologies are economically viable for customers and stresses the importance of fully researching alternatives before committing to major equipment investments.

Swanson, G.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Practical Application of Second Law Costing Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The key to proper allocation of fuel and feedstock costs to the products from a plant or from any one of its components is the commodity called exergy - the central concept of the Second Law of Thermodynamics, commonly named available energy or availability. The methods for composing exergy cost flow diagrams will be explained. The results will be shown for several plants - electric-power, co-generation, coal-gasification, and others. The application of such results will be shown for cost-accounting, for plant operation economics, for maintenance decisions, and for design decisions - at both the preliminary and detailed design states.

Wepfer, W. J.; Gaggioli, R. A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Particle Swarm Optimization Based Reactive Power Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactive power plays an important role in supporting the real power transfer by maintaining voltage stability and system reliability. It is a critical element for a transmission operator to ensure the reliability of an electric system while minimizing the cost associated with it. The traditional objectives of reactive power dispatch are focused on the technical side of reactive support such as minimization of transmission losses. Reactive power cost compensation to a generator is based on the incurred cost of its reactive power contribution less the cost of its obligation to support the active power delivery. In this paper an efficient Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) based reactive power optimization approach is presented. The optimal reactive power dispatch problem is a nonlinear optimization problem with several constraints. The objective of the proposed PSO is to minimize the total support cost from generators and reactive compensators. It is achieved by maintaining the whole system power loss as minimum...

Sujin, P R; Linda, M Mary

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Commercial equipment cost database  

SciTech Connect

This report, prepared for DOE, Office of Codes and Standards, as part of the Commercial Equipment Standards Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, specifically addresses the equipment cost estimates used to evaluate the economic impacts of revised standards. A database including commercial equipment list prices and estimated contractor costs was developed, and through statistical modeling, estimated contractor costs are related to equipment parameters including performance. These models are then used to evaluate cost estimates developed by the ASHRAE 90.1 Standing Standards Project Committee, which is in the process of developing a revised ASHRAE 90.1 standard. The database will also be used to support further evaluation of the manufacturer and consumer impacts of standards. Cost estimates developed from the database will serve as inputs to economic modeling tools, which will be used to estimate these impacts. Preliminary results suggest that list pricing is a suitable measure from which to estimate contractor costs for commercial equipment. Models developed from these cost estimates accurately predict estimated costs. The models also confirm the expected relationships between equipment characteristics and cost. Cost models were developed for gas-fired and electric water heaters, gas-fired packaged boilers, and warm air furnaces for indoor installation. Because of industry concerns about the use of the data, information was not available for the other categories of EPAct-covered equipment. These concerns must be addressed to extend the analysis to all EPAct equipment categories.

Freeman, S.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skip Navigation Links Skip Navigation Links DOE Order No. RA 6120.2 Repayment Process Under Department of Energy Order No. RA 6120.2, Southwestern conducts power repayment studies each year to determine the amount of revenue required to recover costs assigned to power, including the annual cost of marketing power, the cost of operating and maintaining the generating facilities, and, for the Integrated System and Sam Rayburn, the cost of the original investment in building the facilities, plus interest. Southwestern conducts three such studies, one for the Integrated System, one for Sam Rayburn Dam, and one for Robert D. Willis Dam. Upon completion of the studies, Southwestern conducts a formal public participation process, including solicitation of public comments on any proposed revenue

458

Cost effectiveness of sonic drilling  

SciTech Connect

Sonic drilling (combination of mechanical vibrations and rotary power) is an innovative environmental technology being developed in cooperation with DOE`s Arid-Site Volatile Organic Compounds Integrated Demonstration at Hanford and the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration at Sandia. This report studies the cost effectiveness of sonic drilling compared with cable-tool and mud rotary drilling. Benefit of sonic drilling is its ability to drill in all types of formations without introducing a circulating medium, thus producing little secondary waste at hazardous sites. Progress has been made in addressing the early problems of failures and downtime.

Masten, D.; Booth, S.R.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

The power of power-laws: Or how to save power in SoC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power and energy issues have significantly gained in importance in computing environments in the last few decades. In a world of mobile devices and massive-scale data centers, low-power systems are crucial for cost, availability, and the environment. ... Keywords: power-efficient computers, power-laws, power saving, SoC, computing environments, mobile devices, massive-scale data centers, low-power systems, power consumption, system-on-chip, power-efficient network-on-chip topologies, nonlocal interconnect architectures, complex network perspective, optimization technique, small-world networks, power-law distance-dependent wire-length distributions

C. Teuscher; Haera Chung; A. Grimm; A. Amarnath; N. Parashar

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Negative selection algorithms without generating detectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Negative selection algorithms are immune-inspired classifiers that are trained on negative examples only. Classification is performed by generating detectors that match none of the negative examples, and these detectors are then matched against ... Keywords: artificial immune systems, consistent learning, negative selection

Maciej Li?kiewicz; Johannes Textor

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "negative power cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Photovoltaic Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is an overview of photovoltaic power generation. The purpose of the report is to provide the reader with a general understanding of photovoltaic power generation and how PV technology can be practically applied. There is a brief discussion of early research and a description of how photovoltaic cells convert sunlight to electricity. The report covers concentrating collectors, flat-plate collectors, thin-film technology, and building-integrated systems. The discussion of photovoltaic cell types includes single-crystal, poly-crystalline, and thin-film materials. The report covers progress in improving cell efficiencies, reducing manufacturing cost, and finding economic applications of photovoltaic technology. Lists of major manufacturers and organizations are included, along with a discussion of market trends and projections. The conclusion is that photovoltaic power generation is still more costly than conventional systems in general. However, large variations in cost of conventional electrical power, and other factors, such as cost of distribution, create situations in which the use of PV power is economically sound. PV power is used in remote applications such as communications, homes and villages in developing countries, water pumping, camping, and boating. Gridconnected applications such as electric utility generating facilities and residential rooftop installations make up a smaller but more rapidly expanding segment of PV use. Furthermore, as technological advances narrow the cost gap, more applications are becoming economically feasible at an accelerating rate. iii TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES AND FIGURES ...................................................................................v

Tom Penick; Gale Greenleaf Instructor; Thomas Penick; Bill Louk; Bill Louk

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Methods | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methods Methods Disclaimer The data gathered here are for informational purposes only. Inclusion of a report in the database does not represent approval of the estimates by DOE or NREL. Levelized cost calculations DO NOT represent real world market conditions. The calculation uses a single discount rate in order to compare technology costs only. About the Cost Database For emerging energy technologies, a variety of cost and performance numbers are cited in presentations and reports for present-day characteristics and potential improvements. Amid a variety of sources and methods for these data, the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's technology development programs determine estimates for use in program planning. The Transparent Cost Database collects program cost and performance