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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Electric Power Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications Electric Power Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications Stationary energy storage technologies will address the growing limitations of the electricity infrastructure and meet the increasing demand for renewable energy use. Widespread integration of energy storage devices offers many benefits, including the following: Alleviating momentary electricity interruptions Meeting peak demand Postponing or avoiding upgrades to grid infrastructure Facilitating the integration of high penetrations of renewable energy Providing other ancillary services that can improve the stability and resiliency of the electric grid Electric Power Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications More Documents & Publications

2

Chilled Water Storage System and Demand Response at the University...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chilled Water Storage System and Demand Response at the University of California at Merced Title Chilled Water Storage System and Demand Response at the University of California at...

3

Tape storage solutions: meeting growing data demands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The exponential data growth caused by content-rich applications and new data compliance regulations has led to an increased demand for tape storage due to tape's low cost per GB and long shelf-life. However, tape technology suffers from several disadvantages: ...

Xianbo Zhang / David H. Du

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Construction of a Demand Side Plant with Thermal Energy Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utility managements have two primary responsibilities. They must supply reliable electric service to meet the needs of their customers at the most efficient price possible while at the same time generating the maximum rate of return possible for their shareholders. Regulator hostility towards the addition of generating capacity has made it difficult for utilities to simultaneously satisfy both the needs of their ratepayers and the needs of their shareholders. Recent advances in thermal energy storage may solve the utilities' paradox. Residential thermal energy storage promises to provide the ratepayers significantly lower electricity rates and greater comfort levels. Utilities benefit from improved load factors, peak capacity additions at low cost, improved shareholder value (ie. a better return on assets), improved reliability, and a means of satisfying growing demand without the regulatory and litigious nightmares associated with current supply side solutions. This paper discusses thermal energy storage and its potential impact on the electric utilities and introduces the demand side plant concept.

Michel, M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Optimal Demand Response with Energy Storage Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we consider the problem of optimal demand response and energy storage management for a power consuming entity. The entity's objective is to find an optimal control policy for deciding how much load to consume, how much power to purchase from/sell to the power grid, and how to use the finite capacity energy storage device and renewable energy, to minimize his average cost, being the disutility due to load- shedding and cost for purchasing power. Due to the coupling effect of the finite size energy storage, such problems are challenging and are typically tackled using dynamic programming, which is often complex in computation and requires substantial statistical information of the system dynamics. We instead develop a low-complexity algorithm called Demand Response with Energy Storage Management (DR-ESM). DR-ESM does not require any statistical knowledge of the system dynamics, including the renewable energy and the power prices. It only requires the entity to solve a small convex optimization pr...

Huang, Longbo; Ramchandran, Kannan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Poster: Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Poster: Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike Title Poster: Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity...

7

Powertech: Hydrogen Expertise Storage Needs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Stations 700 bar Retail Stations 700 bar Retail Stations (Shell Newport Beach) Hydrogen Energy Storage Projects (BC Hydro Renewable Power - HARP) Lightweight Transport Trailers...

8

Demand response can lower electric power load when needed - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

February 15, 2011 Demand response can lower electric power load when needed . Consumers can play a major role in ensuring reliable electricity supply by reducing ...

9

Chilled Water Thermal Storage System and Demand Response at the University of California at Merced  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Techniques for Demand Response. California EnergyTest Results of Automated Demand Response in a Large OfficeStorage System and Demand Response at the University of

Granderson, Jessica

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

A Brief Overview of Hydrogen Storage Issues and Needs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brief Overview of Hydrogen Storage Issues and Needs George Thomas and Sunita Satyapal Joint Tech Team Meeting Delivery, Storage and Fuels Pathway Tech Teams May 8-9, 2007 Storage...

11

EIA forecasts increased oil demand, need for additional supply ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

World oil demand is forecast to increase by 1.7 million barrels per day (bbl/d) ... Cooling demand in the Middle East is expected to rise to record levels this summer.

12

Away-from-reactor storage of spent nuclear fuel: factors affecting demand  

SciTech Connect

This report analyzes factors that affect the magnitude and timing of demand for government AFRs, relative to the demand for other storage options, to assist policymakers in predicting this demand. Past predictions of AFT demand range widely and often appear to conflict. This report helps to explain the apparent conflicts among existing demand predictions by demonstrating their sensitivity to changes in key assumptions. Specifically, the report analyzes factors affecting the demand for government AFR storage facilities; illustrates why demand estimates may vary; and identifies actions that may be undertaken by groups, within and outside the government, to influence the level and timing of demands.

Dinneen, P.M.; Solomon, K.A.; Triplett, M.B.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Demand Response and Storage Integration Study: Markets Report Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Andy Satchwell Andy Satchwell Scientific Engineering Associate Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, ER&E Committee Meeting, July 24, 2012 Portland, OR Tools and Methods Working Group Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department Outline of Presentation  Introduction and background: DR Estimation Tools and Methods Working Group  Working group members  Work plan  Identification of estimation tools and methods needs  Preliminary gap analysis  Next steps 2 Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department Introduction and Background  Tools and techniques have been developed to help characterize demand response (DR) resources  Given diversity in types of DR programs and relative

14

Is Carbon Capture and Storage Really Needed?  

SciTech Connect

Two of the greatest contemporary global challenges are anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and energy sustainability. A popular proposed solution to the former problem is carbon capture and storage (CCS). Unfortunately, CCS has little benefit for energy sustainability and introduces significant long-term costs and risks. Thus, we propose the adoption of 'virtual CCS' by directing the resources that would have been spent on CCS to alternative energy technologies. (The term 'virtual' is used here because the concept described in this work satisfies the Merriam-Webster Dictionary definition of virtual: 'being such in essence or effect though not formally recognized or admitted.') In this example, we consider wind and nuclear power and use the funds that would have been required by CCS to invest in installation and operation of these technologies. Many other options exist in addition to wind and nuclear power including solar, biomass, geothermal, and others. These additional energy technologies can be considered in future studies. While CCS involves spending resources to concentrate CO{sub 2} in sinks, such as underground reservoirs, low-carbon alternative energy produces power, which will displace fossil fuel use while simultaneously generating revenues. Thus, these alternative energy technologies achieve the same objective as that of CCS, namely, the avoidance of atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions.

Tsouris, Costas [ORNL; Williams, Kent Alan [ORNL; Aaron, D [Georgia Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Greater fuel diversity needed to meet growing US electricity demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electricity demand is growing in the USA. One way to manage the uncertainty is to diversity fuel sources. Fuel sources include coal, natural gas, nuclear and renewable energy sources. Tables show actual and planned generation projects by fuel types. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Burt, B.; Mullins, S. [Industrial Info Resources (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

Hydrogen Storage Needs for Early Motive Fuel Cell Markets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) objective for this project is to identify performance needs for onboard energy storage of early motive fuel cell markets by working with end users, manufacturers, and experts. The performance needs analysis is combined with a hydrogen storage technology gap analysis to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Program with information about the needs and gaps that can be used to focus research and development activities that are capable of supporting market growth.

Kurtz, J.; Ainscough, C.; Simpson, L.; Caton, M.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Energy packet networks: smart electricity storage to meet surges in demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When renewable energy is used either as a primary source, or as a back-up source to meet excess demand, energy storage becomes very useful. Simple examples of energy storage units include electric car batteries and uninterruptible power supplies. More ... Keywords: energy packet networks, network control of energy flow, on-demand energy dispatching, smart grid, store and forward energy, storing renewable energy

Erol Gelenbe

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Hydrogen Storage Needs for Early Motive Fuel Cell Markets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Needs for Storage Needs for Early Motive Fuel Cell Markets J. Kurtz, C. Ainscough, L. Simpson, and M. Caton Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-52783 November 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Hydrogen Storage Needs for Early Motive Fuel Cell Markets J. Kurtz, C. Ainscough, L. Simpson, and M. Caton Prepared under Task No. H272.4410 Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-52783 November 2012 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

19

Demand Response and Storage Integration Study: Markets Report...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Background Tools and techniques have been developed to help characterize demand response (DR) resources Given diversity in types of DR programs and relative...

20

Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| Chart credit ENERGY STAR Estimating the Cost and Energy Efficiency of a Solar Water Heater Diagram of a tankless water heater. Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters Water...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Optimal Sizing of Energy Storage and Photovoltaic Power Systems for Demand Charge Mitigation (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Commercial facility utility bills are often a strong function of demand charges -- a fee proportional to peak power demand rather than total energy consumed. In some instances, demand charges can constitute more than 50% of a commercial customer's monthly electricity cost. While installation of behind-the-meter solar power generation decreases energy costs, its variability makes it likely to leave the peak load -- and thereby demand charges -- unaffected. This then makes demand charges an even larger fraction of remaining electricity costs. Adding controllable behind-the-meter energy storage can more predictably affect building peak demand, thus reducing electricity costs. Due to the high cost of energy storage technology, the size and operation of an energy storage system providing demand charge management (DCM) service must be optimized to yield a positive return on investment (ROI). The peak demand reduction achievable with an energy storage system depends heavily on a facility's load profile, so the optimal configuration will be specific to both the customer and the amount of installed solar power capacity. We explore the sensitivity of DCM value to the power and energy levels of installed solar power and energy storage systems. An optimal peak load reduction control algorithm for energy storage systems will be introduced and applied to historic solar power data and meter load data from multiple facilities for a broad range of energy storage system configurations. For each scenario, the peak load reduction and electricity cost savings will be computed. From this, we will identify a favorable energy storage system configuration that maximizes ROI.

Neubauer, J.; Simpson, M.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

The Demand Component of Electric Service: Linkages to Service Reliability and Need for Transparency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This white paper distinguishes the demand component of electric service (measured in kilowatts)distinct from the energy component (measured in kilowatthours)and emphasizes the need for power demand cost transparency. Customers' experience with electric service reliability is described in terms of continuity of electric service, availability of service, and restoration time after service interruption. The paper discusses the connection between power demand and electric service reliability, as experienced ...

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

23

A needs-based approach to activity generation for travel demand analysis/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a needs-based framework for behavioral enhancement of conventional activity-based travel demand models. Operational activity-based models specify activity generation models based on empirical considerations ...

Pattabhiraman, Varun R. (Varun Ramakrishna)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Chilled Water Thermal Storage System and Demand Response at the University of California at Merced  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of California at Merced is a unique campus that has benefited from intensive efforts to maximize energy efficiency, and has participated in a demand response program for the past two years. Campus demand response evaluations are often difficult because of the complexities introduced by central heating and cooling, non-coincident and diverse building loads, and existence of a single electrical meter for the entire campus. At the University of California at Merced, a two million gallon chilled water storage system is charged daily during off-peak price periods and used to flatten the load profile during peak demand periods. This makes demand response more subtle and challenges typical evaluation protocols. The goal of this research is to study demand response savings in the presence of storage systems in a campus setting. First, University of California at Merced summer electric loads are characterized; second, its participation in two demand response events is detailed. In each event a set of strategies were pre-programmed into the campus control system to enable semi-automated response. Finally, demand savings results are applied to the utility's DR incentives structure to calculate the financial savings under various DR programs and tariffs. A key conclusion to this research is that there is significant demand reduction using a zone temperature set point change event with the full off peak storage cooling in use.

Granderson, Jessica; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

25

The geothermal analog of pumped storage for electrical demand load following  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 6 day cycle Load-Following Experiment, conducted in July 1995 at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) test site in New Mexico, has verified that an HDR geothermal reservoir has the capability for a significant, rapid increase in thermal power output upon demand. The objective was to study the behavior of the HDR reservoir in a high-production- backpressure (2200 psi) baseload operating condition when there was superimposed a demand for significantly increased power production for a 4 hour period each day. In practice, this enhanced production, an increase of 65%, was accomplished by a programmed decrease in the production well backpressure over 4 hours, from an initial 2200 psi down to 500 psi. The rapid depressurization of the wellbore during the period of enhanced production resulted in the draining of a portion of the fluid stored in the pressure dilated joints surrounding the production well. These joints were then gradually reinflated during the following 20-hour period of high backpressure baseload operation. In essence, the HDR reservoir was acting as a fluid capacitor, being discharged for 4 hours and then slowly recharged during the subsequent 20 hours of baseload operation. In this mode, there would be no increase in the reservoir size of number of wells (the {ital in situ} capital investment) for a significant amount of peaking power production for a few hours each day. Thus, one of the advantages of geothermal load following over utility options such as pumped storage or compressed air storage is that the HDR power plant would be operated during off-peak hours in a baseline mode, with an augmented return on investment compared to these other peaking systems which would normally not be operated during off-peak periods. The surface power plant and the geofluid reinjection pumps would need to be sized for the peak rate of thermal energy production, adding somewhat to the overall HDR system capital costs when compared to a simple baseload power plant design.

Brown, D.W.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Chilled Water Thermal Storage System and Demand Response at the University of California at Merced  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of California at Merced is a unique campus that has benefited from intensive efforts to maximize energy efficiency, and has participated in a demand response program for the past two years. Campus demand response evaluations are often difficult because of the complexities introduced by central heating and cooling, non-coincident and diverse building loads, and existence of a single electrical meter for the entire campus. At the University of California at Merced, a two million gallon chilled water storage system is charged daily during off-peak price periods and used to flatten the load profile during peak demand periods, further complicating demand response scenarios. The goal of this research is to study demand response savings in the presence of storage systems in a campus setting. First, University of California at Merced is described and its participation in a demand response event during 2008 is detailed. Second, a set of demand response strategies were pre-programmed into the campus control system to enable semi-automated demand response during a 2009 event, which is also evaluated. Finally, demand savings results are applied to the utilitys DR incentives structure to calculate the financial savings under various DR programs and tariffs.

Granderson, J.; Dudley, J. H.; Kiliccote, S.; Piette, M. A.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Water  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Water Heaters Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Water Heaters June 14, 2012 - 7:38pm Addthis A water heater's energy efficiency is determined by the energy factor (EF), which is based on the amount of hot water produced per unit of fuel consumed over a typical day. The higher the energy factor, the more efficient the water heater. A water heater's energy efficiency is determined by the energy factor (EF), which is based on the amount of hot water produced per unit of fuel consumed over a typical day. The higher the energy factor, the more efficient the water heater. What does this mean for me? Estimate the annual operating costs and compare several water heaters to determine whether it is worth investing in a more efficient

28

Demand for Food for People in Need Remains High Throughout the Year |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand for Food for People in Need Remains High Throughout the Year Demand for Food for People in Need Remains High Throughout the Year Demand for Food for People in Need Remains High Throughout the Year December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Pictured are donations the Office of Human Capital at EM headquarters provided to the campaign. Pictured are donations the Office of Human Capital at EM headquarters provided to the campaign. WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM and its field sites donated 53,630 pounds - or 27 tons - of non-perishable items to a food drive by federal workers to help feed families across the country in 2013. EM surpassed its goal to donate 50,000 pounds to the 2013 Feds Feed Families Campaign. In Ohio, EM's Portsmouth site donated to the Community Action Committee of Pike County Food Pantry, which typically feeds about 250 needy families

29

Energy Basics: Tankless Demand Water Heaters  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

only as needed and without the use of a storage tank. They don't produce the standby energy losses associated with storage water heaters. How Demand Water Heaters Work Demand...

30

Thermal energy storage for space cooling. Technology for reducing on-peak electricity demand and cost  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cool storage technology can be used to significantly reduce energy costs by allowing energy intensive, electrically driven cooling equipment to be predominantly operated during off-peak hours when electricity rates are lower. In addition, some system configurations may result in lower first costs and/or lower operating costs. Cool storage systems of one type or another could potentially be cost-effectively applied in most buildings with a space cooling system. A survey of approximately 25 manufacturers providing cool storage systems or components identified several thousand current installations, but less than 1% of these were at Federal facilities. With the Federal sector representing nearly 4% of commercial building floor space and 5% of commercial building energy use, Federal utilization would appear to be lagging. Although current applications are relatively few, the estimated potential annual savings from using cool storage in the Federal sector is $50 million. There are many different types of cool storage systems representing different combinations of storage media, charging mechanisms, and discharging mechanisms. The basic media options are water, ice, and eutectic salts. Ice systems can be further broken down into ice harvesting, ice-on-coil, ice slurry, and encapsulated ice options. Ice-on-coil systems may be internal melt or external melt and may be charged and discharged with refrigerant or a single-phase coolant (typically a water/glycol mixture). Independent of the technology choice, cool storage systems can be designed to provide full storage or partial storage, with load-leveling and demand-limiting options for partial storage. Finally, storage systems can be operated on a chiller-priority or storage priority basis whenever the cooling load is less than the design conditions. The first section describes the basic types of cool storage technologies and cooling system integration options. The next three sections define the savings potential in the Federal sector, present application advice, and describe the performance experience of specific Federal users. A step-by-step methodology illustrating how to evaluate cool storage options is presented next, followed by a case study of a GSA building using cool storage. Latter sections list manufacturers, selected Federal users, and reference materials. Finally, the appendixes give Federal life-cycle costing procedures and results for a case study.

None

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Materials for Energy How pressing needs for innovative technologies demand new ways of creating materials and putting them together  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Littlewood Littlewood Associate Lab Director, Physical Sciences and Engineering Argonne National Laboratory Secretary of Energy Advisory Board 17 April 2012 Materials for Energy How pressing needs for innovative technologies demand new ways of creating materials and putting them together The scale of the challenge: Energy usage per m 2 Courtesy D J Mackay, UK DECC Renewable deployments are country-sized Courtesy D J Mackay, UK DECC Challenges of Geography, Efficiency, and Cost Power density Watt/m 2 Full insolation Arizona desert 300 Concentrated solar power (desert) 15-20 Solar photovoltaic 5-20 Biomass 1-2 Tidal pools/tidal stream 3-8 Wind 2-8 Rainwater (highland) 0.3 US energy consumption (all sources) 0.3 In the US: Solar + wind + storage + grid infrastructure= sustainable economy

32

Tankless Demand Water Heaters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Demand (tankless or instantaneous) water heaters have heating devices that are activated by the flow of water, so they provide hot water only as needed and without the use of a storage tank. They...

33

Chilled Water Thermal Storage System and Demand Response at the University of California at Merced  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2008 the maximum and average demand reduction throughoutthe table, average and maximum absolute demand reduction arethe average and maximum percent demand reductions, relative

Granderson, Jessica

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Chilled Water Storage System and Demand Response at the University of California at Merced  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

53E 53E Chilled Water Storage System and Demand Response at the University of California at Merced J. Granderson, J.H. Dudley, S. Kiliccote, M.A. Piette Environmental Energy Technologies Division September 2009 Presented at the 9 th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Austin, TX, November 17-18, 2009, and published in the Proceedings DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information,

35

Demand Response-Ready End-Use Devices: Guiding Principles for Defining Criteria to Support Grid Needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes technology capabilities that support more automated and ubiquitous demand response. It reviews the Demand ResponseReady (DR-Ready) concept and related industry activities that support realization of the concept. In the DR-Ready vision, consumers receive DR-Ready end-use products at the point of purchase, thus eliminating the need for utility truck service visits to retrofit equipment, and thereby significantly reducing the cost of deploying DR-enabling ...

2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

36

Identification of Changes Needed in Supermarket Design for Energy Demand Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supermarkets use 3 percent of UK energy. To satisfy building regulations supermarket buildings are modeled in considerable detail. Lighting, occupancy, and small electrical energy impacts are included in this modeling. However, refrigeration energy is not, as it is classified as process energy rather than building related. Refrigeration energy, which can be very significant, is therefore currently unregulated and as a result, heat transfers related to refrigeration cabinets are typically not incorporated in modeling of the building at design stage. This paper explores the comparative energy demands of supermarket stores modeled, using a simple first order dynamic model, executed on Excel, and optimized firstly with, and secondly without, the cooling effect of refrigeration cabinets included in the model. A recently built supermarket is modeled. Results suggest that the energy demand of a new store could be reduced by 15 to 25 percent by improvement of the building envelope design with process energy included in the modeling.

Hill, F.; Edwards, R.; Levermore, G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Results from a workshop on research needs for modeling aquifer thermal energy storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A workshop an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system modeling was conducted in Seattle, Washington, on November 30 and December 1, 1989 by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The goal of the workshop was to develop a list of high-priority research activities that would facilitate the commercial success of ATES. During the workshop, participants reviewed currently available modeling tools for ATES systems and produced a list of significant issues related to modeling ATES systems. Participants assigned a priority to each issue on the list by voting and developed a list of research needs for each of four high-priority research areas; the need for a feasibility study model, the need for engineering design models, the need for aquifer characterization, and the need for an economic model. The workshop participants concluded that ATES commercialization can be accelerated by aggressive development of ATES modeling tools and made specific recommendations for that development. 2 tabs.

Drost, M K

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Industrial demand-side management programs: What`s happened, what works, what`s needed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to analyze experience to date with industrial demand-side management (DSM), a survey of utilities was conducted and a database of industrial DSM programs was prepared. More than eighty utilities and third-party organizations were interviewed. Data were collected via phone, fax, and/or mail from the utilities and entered into a database. In order to limit the scope of this study, the database contains incentive-based, energy-saving programs and not load management or information-only programs (including technical assistance programs). Programs in the database were divided into four categories: two ``prescriptive rebate`` categories and two ``custom rebate`` categories. The database contains 31 incentive-based, energy-saving industrial DSM programs offered by 17 utilities. The appendix to this report summarizes the results approximately 60 industrial DSM programs. Most of the programs included in the appendix, but not in the database, are either C&I programs for which commercial and industrial data were not disaggregated or new industrial DSM programs for which data are not yet available.

Jordan, J.A.; Nadel, S.M. [American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Storage optimization for a peer-to-peer video-on-demand network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores requirements for efficient pre-seeding of video-on-demand (VoD) movie data onto numerous customer set-top boxes in a cable ISP environment. The pre-seeded content will then be distributed to other set-top boxes in the same cable community ... Keywords: bittorrent, experimental systems, multimedia streaming, nonlinear programming, peer-to-peer, video-on-demand

Jagadeesh M. Dyaberi; Karthik Kannan; Vijay S. Pai

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Hot Thermal Storage/Selective Energy System Reduces Electric Demand for Space Cooling As Well As Heating in Commercial Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on an experimental residential retrofit incorporating thermal storage, and extensive subsequent modeling, a commercial design was developed and implemented to use hot thermal storage to significantly reduce electric demand and utility energy costs during the cooling season as well as the heating season. To achieve air conditioning savings, the system separates dehumidification from sensible cooling; dehumidifies by desiccant absorption, using heat from storage to dry the desiccant; and then cools at an elevated temperature improving overall system efficiency. Efficient heat for desiccant regeneration is provided by a selective-energy system coupled with thermal storage. The selective-energy system incorporates diesel cogeneration, solar energy and off-peak electric resistance heating. Estimated energy and first cost savings, as compared with an all-electric VAV HVAC system, are: 30 to 50% in ductwork size and cost; 30% in fan energy; 25% in air handling equipment; 20 to 40% in utility energy for refrigeration; 10 to 20% in refrigeration equipment; and space savings due to smaller ductwork and equipment.

Meckler, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Evaluating Potential for Large Releases from CO2 StorageReservoirs: Analogs, Scenarios, and Modeling Needs  

SciTech Connect

While the purpose of geologic storage of CO{sub 2} in deep saline formations is to trap greenhouse gases underground, the potential exists for CO{sub 2} to escape from the target reservoir, migrate upward along permeable pathways, and discharge at the land surface. Such discharge is not necessarily a serious concern, as CO{sub 2} is a naturally abundant and relatively benign gas in low concentrations. However, there is a potential risk to health, safety and environment (HSE) in the event that large localized fluxes of CO{sub 2} were to occur at the land surface, especially where CO{sub 2} could accumulate. In this paper, we develop possible scenarios for large CO{sub 2} fluxes based on the analysis of natural analogues, where large releases of gas have been observed. We are particularly interested in scenarios which could generate sudden, possibly self-enhancing, or even eruptive release events. The probability for such events may be low, but the circumstances under which they might occur and potential consequences need to be evaluated in order to design appropriate site selection and risk management strategies. Numerical modeling of hypothetical test cases is needed to determine critical conditions for such events, to evaluate whether such conditions may be possible at designated storage sites, and, if applicable, to evaluate the potential HSE impacts of such events and design appropriate mitigation strategies.

Birkholzer, Jens; Pruess, Karsten; Lewicki, Jennifer; Tsang,Chin-Fu; Karimjee, Anhar

2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

42

Gas Storage for Power Generation -- Critical New Bridge Between Power Demand and Gas Supply: Report Series on Natural Gas and Power Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas storage is a "sleeper" issue for the power industry that will demand a great deal of attention very soon as the building boom of gas-fired capacity draws to a close and these plants begin to operate. While an entire industry has emerged in recent years to develop high-deliverability gas storage, the new facilities are likely the tip of an iceberg. Pipelines will be taxed to meet fluctuating requirements of new units, and companies will turn to gas storage for reliability at an affordable cost...

2002-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

43

Demand-Side and Supply-Side Load Management: Optimizing with Thermal Energy Storage (TES) for the Restructuring Energy Marketplace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current and future restructuring energy marketplace represents a number of challenges and opportunities to maximize value through the management of peak power. This is true both on the demand-side regarding peak power use and on the supply-side regarding power generation. Thermal Energy Storage (TES) can provide the flexibility essential to the economical management of power. In large industrial applications, the added value of TES has been demonstrated, not only in managing operating costs, but also in delivering a net saving in capital cost versus conventional, non-storage approaches. This capital cost saving is often realized in situations where investments in chiller plant capacity, or in on-site power generating capacity, are required. On the demand-side, TES has long been used to shift air-conditioning loads and process cooling loads from on-peak to off-peak periods. In today's and tomorrow's restructuring energy markets, price spikes are increasingly likely during periods of peak power demand. TES is performing an important role, especially when coupled with a proper understanding of modern TES technology options. The inherent advantages and limitations of the available TES technology options are briefly reviewed and discussed. Examples of existing large TES installations are presented, identifying the TES technology types they utilize. The applications include industrial facilities, as well as universities, hospitals, government, and District Cooling utility systems. The power management impact and the economic benefits of TES are illustrated through a review of several TES case studies. Combustion Turbines (CTs) are a common choice for modern on-site and utility power generation facilities. Inlet air cooling of CTs enhances their hot weather performance and has been successfully accomplished for many years, using a variety of technologies. In many instances, TES can and does provide a uniquely advantageous method of optimizing the economics of CT Inlet Cooling (CTIC) systems. TES systems can achieve low inlet air temperatures, with resulting high levels of power augmentation. The TES approach also minimizes the installed capacity (and capital cost) of cooling systems, as well as limiting the parasitic loads occurring during periods of peak power demand and peak power value. Chilled water, ice, and low temperature fluid TES systems are all applicable to CTIC. The inherent pros and cons of each TES type are discussed. Sensitivity analyses are presented to explore the impact of cooling hours per day on capital cost per kW of power enhancement. Case histories illustrate the beneficial impact of TES-based CTIC on both capital cost and operating cost of CT power plants. TES-based CTIC is advantageous as an economical, peaking power enhancement for either peaking or base-load plants. It is applied to both new and existing CTs. TES is projected to have even greater value in future restructuring energy markets.

Andrepont, J. S.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Carbon cryogel based nanomaterials for efficient energy storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As demand for fossil fuel alternatives intensifies, energy storage will be a growing concern especially for portable power needs such as automobiles and portable electronic (more)

Feaver, Aaron

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Storage DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Storage A discussion of depleted UF6 cylinder storage activities and associated risks. Management Activities for Cylinders in Storage The long-term management of the existing DUF6 storage cylinders and the continual effort to remediate and maintain the safe condition of the DUF6 storage cylinders will remain a Departmental responsibility for many years into the future. The day to day management of the DUF6 cylinders includes actions designed to cost effectively maintain and improve their storage conditions, such as: General storage cylinder and storage yard maintenance; Performing regular inspections of cylinders; Restacking and respacing the cylinders to improve drainage and to

46

Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Risks » Storage Environmental Risks » Storage Depleted UF6 Environmental Risks line line Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Environmental Risks of Depleted UF6 Storage Discussion of the potential environmental impacts from storage of depleted UF6 at the three current storage sites, as well as potential impacts from the storage of depleted uranium after conversion to an oxide form. Impacts Analyzed in the PEIS The PEIS included an analysis of the potential environmental impacts from continuing to store depleted UF6 cylinders at the three current storage sites, as well as potential impacts from the storage of depleted uranium after conversion to an oxide form. Impacts from Continued Storage of UF6 Cylinders Continued storage of the UF6 cylinders would require extending the use of a

47

Analysis of H2 storage needs for early market non-motive fuel cell applications.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen fuel cells can potentially reduce greenhouse gas emissions and the United States dependence on foreign oil, but issues with hydrogen storage are impeding their widespread use. To help overcome these challenges, this study analyzes opportunities for their near-term deployment in five categories of non-motive equipment: portable power, construction equipment, airport ground support equipment, telecom backup power, and man-portable power and personal electronics. To this end, researchers engaged end users, equipment manufacturers, and technical experts via workshops, interviews, and electronic means, and then compiled these data into meaningful and realistic requirements for hydrogen storage in specific target applications. In addition to developing these requirements, end-user benefits (e.g., low noise and emissions, high efficiency, potentially lower maintenance costs) and concerns (e.g., capital cost, hydrogen availability) of hydrogen fuel cells in these applications were identified. Market data show potential deployments vary with application from hundreds to hundreds of thousands of units.

Johnson, Terry Alan; Moreno, Marcina; Arienti, Marco; Pratt, Joseph William; Shaw, Leo; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Current trends in commercial cool storage. Final report. [Use of chilled water and ice storage to reduce demand charges and electric bills; 85 projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this study were to identify, by means of a phone-and-mail survey, recent installations of off-peak cool storage air conditioning systems in commercial buildings; to monitor new developments; and to indicate trends. This report contains descriptions of over 80 systems installed since 1981, plus findings and conclusions based on site-specific information. Analysis of the findings suggests that storage cooling systems in commercial buildings can, in many cases, offer technical and cost advantages over nonstorage systems. The detailed information should be of value to potential customers and HVAC engineers in making cooling equipment decisions that would be advantageous to customer, utility, and HVAC industry alike. 20 refs.

Hersh, H.N.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters May 2, 2012 - 6:47pm Addthis Diagram of a tankless water heater. Diagram of a tankless water heater. How does it work? Tankless water heaters deliver hot water as it is needed, eliminating the need for storage tanks. Tankless water heaters, also known as demand-type or instantaneous water heaters, provide hot water only as it is needed. They don't produce the standby energy losses associated with storage water heaters, which can save you money. Here you'll find basic information about how they work, whether a tankless water heater might be right for your home, and what criteria to use when selecting the right model. Check out the Energy Saver 101: Water Heating infographic to learn if a tankless water heater is right for you.

50

Energy Storage | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Energy Storage Energy Storage One of the distinctive characteristics of the electric power sector is that the amount of electricity that can be generated is relatively fixed over short periods of time, although demand for electricity fluctuates throughout the day. Developing technology to store electrical energy so it can be available to meet demand whenever needed would represent a major breakthrough in electricity distribution. Helping to try and meet this goal, electricity storage devices can manage the amount of power required to supply customers at times when need is greatest, which is during peak load. These devices can also help make renewable energy, whose power output cannot be controlled by grid operators, smooth and dispatchable. They can also balance microgrids to achieve a good match between generation

51

Basic Research Needs for the Hydrogen Economy. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Hydrogen Production, Storage and Use, May 13-15, 2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The coupled challenges of a doubling in the world's energy needs by the year 2050 and the increasing demands for ''clean'' energy sources that do not add more carbon dioxide and other pollutants to the environment have resulted in increased attention worldwide to the possibilities of a ''hydrogen economy'' as a long-term solution for a secure energy future.

Dresselhaus, M; Crabtree, G.; Buchanan, M.; Mallouk, T.; Mets, L.; Taylor, K.; Jena, P.; DiSalvo, F.; Zawodzinski, T.; Kung, H.; Anderson, I.S.; Britt, P.; Curtiss, L.; Keller, J.; Kumar, R.; Kwok, W.; Taylor, J.; Allgood, J.; Campbell, B.; Talamini, K.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand Response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

53

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

54

Basic Research Needs for Electrical Energy Storage. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Electrical Energy Storage, April 2-4, 2007  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

To identify research areas in geosciences, such as behavior of multiphase fluid-solid systems on a variety of scales, chemical migration processes in geologic media, characterization of geologic systems, and modeling and simulation of geologic systems, needed for improved energy systems.

Goodenough, J. B.; Abruna, H. D.; Buchanan, M. V.

2007-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

55

Demand-side management in office buildings in Kuwait through an ice-storage assisted HVAC system with model predictive control.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Examining methods for controlling the electricity demand in Kuwait was the main objective and motivation of this researchp roject. The extensiveu se of air-conditioning for (more)

Al-Hadban, Yehya

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Activities during this time period were: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006; (2) Award 8 projects for co-funding by GSTC for 2006; (3) New members recruitment; and (4) Improving communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

57

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

58

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) GSTC administration changes, (2) participating in the American Gas Association Operations Conference and Biennial Exhibition, (3) issuing a Request for Proposals (RFP) for proposal solicitation for funding, and (4) organizing the proposal selection meeting.

Joel Morrison

2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

59

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and...

62

Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable Energy Sources, and Energy Storages:...

63

Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demand shifting are thermal energy storage systems, whichlockout, pre-cooling, thermal energy storage, cooling loadlockout Pre-cooling Thermal energy storage Cooling

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

NREL: Energy Analysis: Electric System Flexibility and Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric System Flexibility and Storage Electric System Flexibility and Storage Options for Increasing Electric System Flexibility to Accommodate Higher Levels of Variable Renewable Electricity Increased electric system flexibility, needed to enable electricity supply-demand balance with high levels of renewable generation, can come from a portfolio of supply- and demand-side options, including flexible conventional generation, grid storage, curtailment of some renewable generation, new transmission, and more responsive loads. NREL's electric system flexibility studies investigate the role of various electric system flexibility options on large-scale deployment of renewable energy. NREL's electric system flexibility analyses show that: Key factors in improving grid flexibility include (1) increasing the

65

Flywheel energy storage using superconducting magnetic bearings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Storage of electrical energy on a utility scale is currently not practicable for most utilities, preventing the full utilization of existing base-load capacity. A potential solution to this problem is Flywheel Energy Storage (FES), made possible by technological developments in high-temperature superconducting materials. Commonwealth Research Corporation (CRC), the research arm of Commonwealth Edison Company, and Argonne National Laboratory are implementing a demonstration project to advance the state of the art in high temperature superconductor (HTS) bearing performance and the overall demonstration of efficient Flywheel Energy Storage. Currently, electricity must be used simultaneously with its generation as electrical energy storage is not available for most utilities. Existing storage methods either are dependent on special geography, are too expensive, or are too inefficient. Without energy storage, electric utilities, such as Commonwealth Edison Company, are forced to cycle base load power plants to meet load swings in hourly customer demand. Demand can change by as much as 30% over a 12-hour period and result in significant costs to utilities as power plant output is adjusted to meet these changes. HTS FES systems can reduce demand-based power plant cycling by storing unused nighttime capacity until it is needed to meet daytime demand.

Abboud, R.G. [Commonwealth Research Corp., Chicago, IL (United States); Uherka, K.; Hull, J.; Mulcahy, T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with the second 3-months of the project and encompasses the period December 31, 2003, through March 31, 2003. During this 3-month, the dialogue of individuals representing the storage industry, universities and the Department of energy was continued and resulted in a constitution for the operation of the consortium and a draft of the initial Request for Proposals (RFP).

Robert W. Watson

2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

67

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created-the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2006 to September 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: {lg_bullet} Subaward contracts for all 2006 GSTC projects completed; {lg_bullet} Implement a formal project mentoring process by a mentor team; {lg_bullet} Upcoming Technology Transfer meetings: {sm_bullet} Finalize agenda for the American Gas Association Fall Underground Storage Committee/GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting in San Francisco, CA. on October 4, 2006; {sm_bullet} Identify projects and finalize agenda for the Fall GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA on November 8, 2006; {lg_bullet} Draft and compile an electronic newsletter, the GSTC Insider; and {lg_bullet} New members update.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

68

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period April 1, 2004, through June 30, 2004. During this 3-month period, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was made. A total of 17 proposals were submitted to the GSTC. A proposal selection meeting was held June 9-10, 2004 in Morgantown, West Virginia. Of the 17 proposals, 6 were selected for funding.

Robert W. Watson

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight and passenger rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous

70

Energy Storage Market Opportunities: Application Value Analysis and Technology Gap Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A confluence of industry drivers including increased deployment of renewable generation, high capital costs for managing grid peak demands, grid infrastructure for reliability, and smart grid initiatives are creating a new interest in electric energy storage systems. Electricity storage systems may play a pivotal role in addressing these industry drivers. Utilities and industry stakeholders need cost and value information to support the business case for energy storage system investments. However, tradit...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

71

Market Driven Distributed Energy Storage Requirements for Load Management Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric energy storage systems are an enabling technology that could help meet the needs of electric utility by managing peak energy demands, helping shift the peak loads to off peak hours and improving the load factor of the electric distribution system. Applications of distributed energy storage systems (DESS) could also provide power quality and reliability benefits to customers and to the electric system. EPRI collaborated with several investor owned utilities to conduct a study to understand the te...

2007-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

72

Optimization of compression and storage requirements at hydrogen refueling stations.  

SciTech Connect

The transition to hydrogen-powered vehicles requires detailed technical and economic analyses of all aspects of hydrogen infrastructure, including refueling stations. The cost of such stations is a major contributor to the delivered cost of hydrogen. Hydrogen refueling stations require not only dispensers to transfer fuel onto a vehicle, but also an array of such ancillary equipment as a cascade charging system, storage vessels, compressors and/or pumps/evaporators. This paper provides detailed information on design requirements for gaseous and liquid hydrogen refueling stations and their associated capital and operating costs, which in turn impact hydrogen selling price at various levels of hydrogen demand. It summarizes an engineering economics approach which captures the effect of variations in station size, seasonal, daily and hourly demand, and alternative dispensing rates and pressures on station cost. Tradeoffs in the capacity of refueling station compressors, storage vessels, and the cascade charging system result in many possible configurations for the station. Total costs can be minimized by optimizing that configuration. Using a methodology to iterate among the costs of compression, storage and cascade charging, it was found that the optimum hourly capacity of the compressor is approximately twice the station's average hourly demand, and the optimum capacity of the cascade charging system is approximately 15% of the station's average daily demand. Further, for an hourly demand profile typical of today's gasoline stations, onsite hydrogen storage equivalent to at least 1/3 of the station's average daily demand is needed to accommodate peak demand.

Elgowainy, A.; Mintz, M.; Kelly, B.; Hooks, M.; Paster, M. (Energy Systems); (Nexant, Inc.); (TIAX LLC)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Demand Response In California  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency & Energy Efficiency & Demand Response Programs Dian M. Grueneich, Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich, Commissioner California Public Utilities Commission California Public Utilities Commission FUPWG 2006 Fall Meeting November 2, 2006 Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 1 Highest Priority Resource Energy Efficiency is California's highest priority resource to: Meet energy needs in a low cost manner Aggressively reduce GHG emissions November 2, 2006 2 Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 3 http://www.cpuc.ca.gov/PUBLISHED/REPORT/51604.htm Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 4 Energy Action Plan II Loading order continued "Pursue all cost-effective energy efficiency, first." Strong demand response and advanced metering

74

Automated Demand Response Today  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response (DR) has progressed over recent years beyond manual and semi-automated DR to include growing implementation and experience with fully automated demand response (AutoDR). AutoDR has been shown to be of great value over manual and semi-automated DR because it reduces the need for human interactions and decisions, and it increases the speed and reliability of the response. AutoDR, in turn, has evolved into the specification known as OpenADR v1.0 (California Energy Commission, PIER Program, C...

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

75

Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment for Eastern Interconnection Youngsun Baek, Stanton W. Hadley, Rocio Martinez, Gbadebo Oladosu, Alexander M. Smith, Fran Li, Paul Leiby and Russell Lee Prepared for FY12 DOE-CERTS Transmission Reliability R&D Internal Program Review September 20, 2012 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy DOE National Laboratory Studies Funded to Support FOA 63 * DOE set aside $20 million from transmission funding for national laboratory studies. * DOE identified four areas of interest: 1. Transmission Reliability 2. Demand Side Issues 3. Water and Energy 4. Other Topics * Argonne, NREL, and ORNL support for EIPC/SSC/EISPC and the EISPC Energy Zone is funded through Area 4. * Area 2 covers LBNL and NREL work in WECC and

76

Demand or Request: Will Load Behave?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power planning engineers are trained to design an electric system that satisfies predicted electrical demand under stringent conditions of availability and power quality. Like responsible custodians, we plan for the provision of electrical sustenance and shelter to those in whose care regulators have given us the responsibility to serve. Though most customers accept this nurturing gladly, a growing number are concerned with the economic costs and environmental impacts of service at a time when technology (particularly distributed generation, storage, automation, and information networks) offers alternatives for localized control and competitive service. As customers and their systems mature, a new relationship with the electricity provider is emerging. Demand response is perhaps the first unsteady step where the customer participates as a partner in system operations. This paper explores issues system planners need to consider as demand response matures to significant levels beyond direct load control and toward a situation where service is requested and bargains are reached with the electricity provider based on desired load behavior. On one hand, predicting load growth and behavior appears more daunting than ever. On the other, for the first time load becomes a new resource whose behavior can be influenced during system operations to balance system conditions.

Widergren, Steven E.

2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

77

Energy storage fundamentally decouples supply and demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... MARKET PRICE 10 50 mills Frequency Regulation average market clearing price ... 14 Wind Challenge: Persistent Cycling Intermittency ...

2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

78

Enabling Utility-Scale Electrical Energy Storage through Underground Hydrogen-Natural Gas Co-Storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Energy storage technology is needed for the storage of surplus baseload generation and the storage of intermittent wind power, because it can increase the flexibility (more)

Peng, Dan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Renewable Energy, Demand Response, Energy Efficiency, and Advanced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy, Demand Response, Energy Efficiency, and Advanced Energy Storage Infrastructure in UC San Diego's Microgrid Speaker(s): Byron Washom Date: August 14, 2008 -...

80

Hydrogen energy for tomorrow: Advanced hydrogen transport and storage technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The future use of hydrogen to generate electricity, heat homes and businesses, and fuel vehicles will require the creation of a distribution infrastructure of safe, and cost-effective transport and storage. Present storage methods are too expensive and will not meet the performance requirements of future applications. Transport technologies will need to be developed based on the production and storage systems that come into use as the hydrogen energy economy evolves. Different applications will require the development of different types of storage technologies. Utility electricity generation and home and office use will have storage fixed in one location--stationary storage--and size and weight will be less important than energy efficiency and costs of the system. Fueling a vehicle, however, will require hydrogen storage in an ``on-board`` system--mobile storage--with weight and size similar to the gasoline tank in today`s vehicle. Researchers are working to develop physical and solid-state storage systems that will meet these diverse future application demands. Physical storage systems and solid-state storage methods (metal hydrides, gas-on-solids adsorption, and glass microspheres) are described.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

82

Variability in electricity demand highlights potential roles for ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Demand-response programs and technologies that tend to reduce the variability of hourly electric demand and the resulting supply requirement would reduce the need ...

83

Forecourt Storage and Compression Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pressure, capacity ­ Compressor output, power, electric demand ­ Station and dispenser load profiles Pro > Station demand profiles > Operational analysis results ­ Compressor-storage relationships and On-Board Storage Analysis Workshop DOE Headquarters 25 January 2006 Mark E. Richards Gas Technology

84

Cool Storage Technology Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is a fact that avoiding load growth is cheaper than constructing new power plants. Cool storage technologies offer one method for strategically stemming the impact of future peak demand growth. This guide provides a comprehensive resource for understanding and evaluating cool storage technologies.

2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

85

ADVANCED UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE CONCEPTS REFRIGERATED-MINED CAVERN STORAGE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Limited demand and high cost has prevented the construction of hard rock caverns in this country for a number of years. The storage of natural gas in mined caverns may prove technically feasible if the geology of the targeted market area is suitable; and economically feasible if the cost and convenience of service is competitive with alternative available storage methods for peak supply requirements. It is believed that mined cavern storage can provide the advantages of high delivery rates and multiple fill-withdrawal cycles in areas where salt cavern storage is not possible. In this research project, PB-KBB merged advanced mining technologies and gas refrigeration techniques to develop conceptual designs and cost estimates to demonstrate the commercialization potential of the storage of refrigerated natural gas in hard rock caverns. Five regions of the U.S.A. were studied for underground storage development and PB-KBB reviewed the literature to determine if the geology of these regions was suitable for siting hard rock storage caverns. Area gas market conditions in these regions were also studied to determine the need for such storage. Based on an analysis of many factors, a possible site was determined to be in Howard and Montgomery Counties, Maryland. The area has compatible geology and a gas industry infrastructure for the nearby market populous of Baltimore and Washington D.C.. As Gas temperature is lowered, the compressibility of the gas reaches an optimum value. The compressibility of the gas, and the resultant gas density, is a function of temperature and pressure. This relationship can be used to commercial advantage by reducing the size of a storage cavern for a given working volume of natural gas. This study looks at this relationship and and the potential for commercialization of the process in a storage application. A conceptual process design, and cavern design were developed for various operating conditions. Potential site locations were considered and a typical plant layout was developed. In addition a geomechanical review of the proposed cavern design was performed, evaluating the stability of the mine rooms and shafts, and the effects of the refrigerated gas temperatures on the stability of the cavern. Capital and operating cost estimates were also developed for the various temperature cases considered. The cost estimates developed were used to perform a comparative market analysis of this type of gas storage system to other systems that are commercially used in the region of the study.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Advanced Underground Gas Storage Concepts: Refrigerated-Mined Cavern Storage, Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past 40 years, cavern storage of LPG's, petrochemicals, such as ethylene and propylene, and other petroleum products has increased dramatically. In 1991, the Gas Processors Association (GPA) lists the total U.S. underground storage capacity for LPG's and related products of approximately 519 million barrels (82.5 million cubic meters) in 1,122 separate caverns. Of this total, 70 are hard rock caverns and the remaining 1,052 are caverns in salt deposits. However, along the eastern seaboard of the U.S. and the Pacific northwest, salt deposits are not available and therefore, storage in hard rocks is required. Limited demand and high cost has prevented the construction of hard rock caverns in this country for a number of years. The storage of natural gas in mined caverns may prove technically feasible if the geology of the targeted market area is suitable; and economically feasible if the cost and convenience of service is competitive with alternative available storage methods for peak supply requirements. Competing methods include LNG facilities and remote underground storage combined with pipeline transportation to the area. It is believed that mined cavern storage can provide the advantages of high delivery rates and multiple fill withdrawal cycles in areas where salt cavern storage is not possible. In this research project, PB-KBB merged advanced mining technologies and gas refrigeration techniques to develop conceptual designs and cost estimates to demonstrate the commercialization potential of the storage of refrigerated natural gas in hard rock caverns. DOE has identified five regions, that have not had favorable geological conditions for underground storage development: New England, Mid-Atlantic (NY/NJ), South Atlantic (DL/MD/VA), South Atlantic (NC/SC/GA), and the Pacific Northwest (WA/OR). PB-KBB reviewed published literature and in-house databases of the geology of these regions to determine suitability of hard rock formations for siting storage caverns, and gas market area storage needs of these regions.

none

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

87

Metal Hydride Thermal Storage: Reversible Metal Hydride Thermal Storage for High-Temperature Power Generation Systems  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: PNNL is developing a thermal energy storage system based on a Reversible Metal Hydride Thermochemical (RMHT) system, which uses metal hydride as a heat storage material. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at nightwhen the sun is not outto drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. PNNLs metal hydride material can reversibly store heat as hydrogen cycles in and out of the material. In a RHMT system, metal hydrides remain stable in high temperatures (600- 800C). A high-temperature tank in PNNLs storage system releases heat as hydrogen is absorbed, and a low-temperature tank stores the heat until it is needed. The low-cost material and simplicity of PNNLs thermal energy storage system is expected to keep costs down. The system has the potential to significantly increase energy density.

None

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

88

HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-Es HEATS program, short for High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage, seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Developing a Regulatory Framework for Extended Storage and Transportat...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage and Transportation Developing a Regulatory Framework for Extended Storage and Transportation Outline: Current Regulatory Framework Future Regulatory Needs Technical...

90

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center Technical Advisory Group Meeting August 31, 2007 10:30 AM - Noon Meeting Agenda * Introductions (10 minutes) * Main Presentation (~ 1 hour) * Questions, comments from panel (15 minutes) Project History * Lighting Scoping Study (completed January 2007) - Identified potential for energy and demand savings using demand responsive lighting systems - Importance of dimming - New wireless controls technologies * Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) Objectives * Provide up-to-date information on the reliability, predictability of dimmable lighting as a demand resource under realistic operating load conditions * Identify potential negative impacts of DR lighting on lighting quality Potential of Demand Responsive Lighting Control

91

Transportation Demand This  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates...

92

Demand Response Spinning Reserve  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Title Demand Response Spinning Reserve Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2007 Authors Eto, Joseph H., Janine Nelson-Hoffman, Carlos...

93

Addressing Energy Demand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Bo Shen, Girish Ghatikar, Chun Chun Ni, and Junqiao Dudley Environmental Energy...

94

Propane Sector Demand Shares  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... agricultural demand does not impact regional propane markets except when unusually high and late demand for propane for crop drying combines with early cold ...

95

An ICT-based energy management system to integrate renewable energy and storage for grid balancing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Among the different renewable sources the "green" energy coming from wind or solar farms is often injected into the grid when it is not expected or there is no demand. The integration of photovoltaic and wind energy into the grid entails the need to ... Keywords: electric grid balancing, energy management systems, energy storage, renewable sources integration

Diego Arnone, Massimo Bertoncini, Alessandro Rossi, Fabrizio D'Errico, Carlos Garca-Santiago, Diana Moneta, Cristiano D'Orinzi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Control of Combined Storage and Generation in Dynamic Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Battery energy storage units provide an added degree of freedom to a microgrid that allows time-shifting between the generation and use of energy. Microgrid energy storage elements are very similar to any other inverter-based source with the exception of bi-directional power flow capabilities. Having the ability to generate and accept power means that the demand and the supply can be disparate by as far as the power capabilities of the energy storage unit allow. This enables combined heat power systems to support a heat load demand independent of local electric power demand. Having an energy storage element on standby also allows for a certain amount of immediately available power to reduce the need for idling or lightly loaded rotating generators under the n-1 stability criterion. The relative speed of any inverter based source allows a sub-cycle change in power output to ensure that dynamic loads will be supplied regardless of the slow reaction of larger rotating sources that require seconds of response time to transients. Thirdly, they can act as a UPS system during grid faults, providing backup power for some time even for non-essential loads while the microgrid is islanded. Lastly, the energy storage element can provide an economic and/or logistical advantage by

Certs Microgrid; Robert Lasseter; Micah Erickson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Using Utility Load Data to Estimate Demand for Space Cooling and Potential for Shiftable Loads  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a simple method to estimate hourly cooling demand from historical utility load data. It compares total hourly demand to demand on cool days and compares these estimates of total cooling demand to previous regional and national estimates. Load profiles generated from this method may be used to estimate the potential for aggregated demand response or load shifting via cold storage.

Denholm, P.; Ong, S.; Booten, C.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Materials. Storage Respondents submitted additional needs for R&D in the area of hydrogen storage: Advanced metal alloys in order to lower the cost of hydrogen...

99

Energy Storage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Storage Storage Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Source information Contents 1 Introduction 2 Benefits 3 Technologies 4 References Introduction Energy storage is a tool that can be used by grid operators to help regulate the electrical grid and help meet demand. In its most basic form, energy storage "stores" excess energy that would otherwise be wasted so that it can be used later when demand is higher. Energy Storage can be used to balance microgrids, perform frequency regulation, and provide more reliable power for high tech industrial facilities.[1] Energy storage will also allow for the expansion of intermittent renewable energy, like wind and solar, to provide electricity around the clock. Some of the major issues concerning energy storage include cost, efficiency, and size.

100

A Feasibility Analysis of Limited Energy Storage for Regulation Service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Incorporating more electricity through solar and wind generation into the power grid will result in a larger need for regulation service, due to the unpredictable oscillation in variable generation, as described in EPRI report 1018716, Evaluation of the Impacts of Wind Generation on HELCO AGC and System Performance8212Phase 2. The integration of limited energy storage (LES) devices to the grid could be an ideal solution to providing enough power to meet the demand because LES responds quickly and is easi...

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Title Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers...

102

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of integrating demand response and energy efficiencyand D. Kathan (2009), Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityFRAMEWORKS THAT PROMOTE DEMAND RESPONSE 3.1. Demand Response

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Demand Trading: Building Liquidity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand trading holds substantial promise as a mechanism for efficiently integrating demand-response resources into regional power markets. However, regulatory uncertainty, the lack of proper price signals, limited progress toward standardization, problems in supply-side markets, and other factors have produced illiquidity in demand-trading markets and stalled the expansion of demand-response resources. This report shows how key obstacles to demand trading can be overcome, including how to remove the unce...

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

104

Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technology Brief provides an update on the current state of cool thermal energy storage systems (TES) for end-use applications. Because of its ability to shape energy use, TES is strategic technology that allows end-users to reduce their energy costs while simultaneously providing benefits for electric utilities through persistent peak demand reduction and peak shifting. In addition to discussing the concepts of thermal energy storage, the Brief discusses the current state of TES technologies and dr...

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

105

Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Introduction 2 Technology Description 3 Plants 4 References Introduction Compressed air energy storage (CAES) is a way to store energy that is generated at night and deliver the energy during the day to meet peak demand. This is performed by compressing air and storing it during periods of excess electricity and expanding the air through a turbine when electricity is needed. Technology Description Diabatic Diabatic compressed air energy storage is what the two existing compressed air energy storage facilities currently employ. This method is

106

Storage Sub-committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Sub-committee Storage Sub-committee 2012 Work Plan Confidential 1 2012 Storage Subcommittee Work Plan * Report to Congress. (legislative requirement) - Review existing and projected research and funding - Review existing DOE, Arpa-e projects and the OE 5 year plan - Identify gaps and recommend additional topics - Outline distributed (review as group) * Develop and analysis of the need for large scale storage deployment (outline distributed again) * Develop analysis on regulatory issues especially valuation and cost recovery Confidential 2 Large Scale Storage * Problem Statement * Situation Today * Benefits Analysis * Policy Issues * Technology Gaps * Recommendations * Renewables Variability - Reserves and capacity requirements - Financial impacts - IRC Response to FERC NOI and update

107

NREL: Learning - Energy Storage Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Basics Energy Storage Basics The demand for electricity is seldom constant over time. Excess generating capacity available during periods of low demand can be used to energize an energy storage device. The stored energy can then be used to provide electricity during periods of high demand, helping to reduce power system loads during these times. Energy storage can improve the efficiency and reliability of the electric utility system by reducing the requirements for spinning reserves to meet peak power demands, making better use of efficient baseload generation, and allowing greater use of renewable energy technologies. A "spinning reserve" is a generator that is spinning and synchronized with the grid, ready for immediate power generation - like a car engine running with the gearbox

108

Hydrogen Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... Energy Storage: Materials, Systems and Applications: Hydrogen Storage Program Organizers: Zhenguo "Gary" Yang, Pacific Northwest...

109

Compressed air energy storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An internal combustion reciprocating engine is operable as a compressor during slack demand periods utilizing excess power from a power grid to charge air into an air storage reservoir and as an expander during peak demand periods to feed power into the power grid utilizing air obtained from the air storage reservoir together with combustible fuel. Preferably the internal combustion reciprocating engine is operated at high pressure and a low pressure turbine and compressor are also employed for air compression and power generation.

Ahrens, Frederick W. (Naperville, IL); Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Residential Energy Demand Reduction Analysis and Monitoring Platform - REDRAMP  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dramatic Peak Residential Dramatic Peak Residential Demand Reduction in the Desert Southwest Yahia Baghzouz Center for Energy Research University of Nevada, Las Vegas Golden, CO Overview * Project description * Subdivision energy efficiency features * Home energy monitoring * Demand side management * Feeder loading * Battery Energy Storage System * Future Work Team Members Project Objective and Methodology * The main objective is to reduce peak power demand of a housing subdivision by 65% (compared to housing development that is built to conventional code). * This objective will be achieved by - Energy efficient home construction with roof- integrated PV system - Demand Side Management - Battery Energy Storage System Project schematic Diagram Project Physical Location: Las Vegas, NV Red Rock Hotel/Casino

111

Aquifer thermal energy storage: a survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The disparity between energy production and demand in many power plants has led to increased research on the long-term, large-scale storage of thermal energy in aquifers. Field experiments have been conducted in Switzerland, France, the United States, Japan, and the People's Republic of China to study various technical aspects of aquifer storage of both hot and cold water. Furthermore, feasibility studies now in progress include technical, economic, and environmental analyses, regional exploration to locate favorable storage sites, and evaluation and design of pilot plants. Several theoretical and modeling studies are also under way. Among the topics being studied using numerical models are fluid and heat flow, dispersion, land subsidence or uplift, the efficiency of different injection/withdrawal schemes, buoyancy tilting, numerical dispersion, the use of compensation wells to counter regional flow, steam injection, and storage in narrow glacial deposits of high permeability. Experiments to date illustrate the need for further research and development to ensure successful implementation of an aquifer storage system. Some of the areas identified for further research include shape and location of the hydrodynamic and thermal fronts, choice of appropriate aquifers, thermal dispersion, possibility of land subsidence or uplift, thermal pollution, water chemistry, wellbore plugging and heat exchange efficiency, and control of corrosion.

Tsang, C.F.; Hopkins, D.; Hellstroem, G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Are they equal yet. [Demand side management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand-side management (DSM) is considered an important tool in meeting the load growth of many utilities. Northwest regional and utility resource plans forecast demand-side resources to meet from one-half to two-thirds of additional electrical energy needs over the next 10 years. Numerous sources have stated that barriers, both regulatory and financial, exist to utility acquisition of demand-side resources. Regulatory actions are being implemented in Oregon to make demand-side investments competitive with supply-side investments. In 1989, the Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC) took two actions regarding demand-side investments. The PUC's Order 89-1700 directed utilities to capitalize demand-side investments to properly match amortization expense with the multiyear benefits provided by DSM. The PUC also began an informal investigation concerning incentives for Oregon's regulated electric utilities to acquire demand-side resources.

Irwin, K.; Phillips-Israel, K.; Busch, E.

1994-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

Mass Market Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response Mass Market Demand Response Speaker(s): Karen Herter Date: July 24, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory,

114

Demand Impacted by Weather  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

When you look at demand, its also interesting to note the weather. The weather has a big impact on the demand of heating fuels, if its cold, consumers will use ...

115

NETL: Carbon Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Storage Technologies Carbon Storage (formerly referred to as the "Carbon Sequestration Program") Program Overview For quick navigation of NETL's Carbon Storage Program website, please click on the image. NETL's Carbon Storage Program Fossil fuels are considered the most dependable, cost-effective energy source in the world. The availability of these fuels to provide clean, affordable energy is essential for domestic and global prosperity and security well into the 21st century. However, a balance is needed between energy security and concerns over the impacts of concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere - particularly carbon dioxide (CO2). NETL's Carbon Storage Program is developing a technology portfolio of safe, cost-effective, commercial-scale CO2 capture, storage, and mitigation

116

Demand Trading Toolkit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Download report 1006017 for FREE. The global movement toward competitive markets is paving the way for a variety of market mechanisms that promise to increase market efficiency and expand customer choice options. Demand trading offers customers, energy service providers, and other participants in power markets the opportunity to buy and sell demand-response resources, just as they now buy and sell blocks of power. EPRI's Demand Trading Toolkit (DTT) describes the principles and practice of demand trading...

2001-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

117

INTEGRATION OF PV IN DEMAND RESPONSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the baseline defining a customer's load profile, and (2) PVs cannot be turned on at will for scheduled tests customers to curtail demand when needed to reduce risk of grid failure during times of peak loading load. The value of this credit may reach or exceed $100/kW/year [1] Demand response is typically

Perez, Richard R.

118

Gas hydrate cool storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

1984-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

119

Electricity Energy Storage Technology Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A confluence of industry drivers8212including increased deployment of renewable generation, the high capital cost of managing grid peak demands, and large capital investments in grid infrastructure for reliability8212is creating new interest in electric energy storage systems. New EPRI research offers a current snapshot of the storage landscape and an analytical framework for estimating the benefits of applications and life-cycle costs of energy storage systems. This paper describes in detail 10 key appl...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

120

Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand & Infrastructure Analysis (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation given at the 2006 DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Annual Merit Review in Washington, D.C., May 16-19, 2006, discusses potential future hydrogen demand and the infrastructure needed to support hydrogen vehicles.

Melendez, M.

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Tri-State Demand Response Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the results of a demand response framework development project of Tri-State Generation and Transmission, a wholesale provider to a number of rural electric associations in the Rocky Mountain west. Tri-State has developed an assortment of planned demand response and energy shaping products and services designed to both shave peak and shift consumption to off-peak hours. The applications, networks, and devices that will be needed to support these needs will involve many ...

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

122

AMI Communication Requirements to Implement Demand-Response: Applicability of Hybrid Spread Spectrum Wireless  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While holistically defining the smart grid is a challenge, one area of interest is demand-response. In 2009, the Department of Energy announced over $4 billion in grant and project funding for the Smart Grid. A significant amount of this funding was allotted to utilities for cost sharing projects to deploy Smart Grid technologies, many of whom have deployed and are deploying advanced metering infrastructure (AMI). AMI is an enabler to increase the efficiency of utilities and the bulk power grid. The bulk electrical system is unique in that it produces electricity as it is consumed. Most other industries have a delay between generation and consumption. This aspect of the power grid means that there must be enough generation capacity to meet the highest demand whereas other industries could over produce during off-peak times. This requires significant investment in generation capacity to cover the few days a year of peak consumption. Since bulk electrical storage doesn't yet exist at scale another way to curb the need for new peak period generation is through demand-response; that is to incentivize consumers (demand) to curtail (respond) electrical usage during peak periods. Of the various methods proposed for enabling demand-response, this paper will focus on the communication requirements for creating an energy market using transactional controls. More specifically, the paper will focus on the communication requirements needed to send the peak period notices and receive the response back from the consumers.

Hadley, Mark D.; Clements, Samuel L.; Carroll, Thomas E.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

123

A new wholesale bidding mechanism for enhanced demand response in smart grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calls to improve customer participation as a key element of smart grids have reinvigorated interest in demand-side features such as distributed generation, on-site storage and demand response. In the context of deregulated ...

Wang, Jiankang

124

A demand responsive bidding mechanism with price elasticity matrix in wholesale electricity pools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past several decades, many demand-side participation features have been applied in the electricity power systems. These features, such as distributed generation, on-site storage and demand response, add uncertainties ...

Wang, Jiankang, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

On-demand computation of policy based routes for large-scale network simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Routing table storage demands pose a significant obstacle for large-scale network simulation. On-demand computation of routes can alleviate those problems for models that do not require representation of routing dynamics. However, policy based routes, ...

Michael Liljenstam; David M. Nicol

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Technical Progress Report for the Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2005 through September 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) receiving proposals in response to the RFP, and (2) organizing and hosting the proposal selection meeting on August 30-31, 2005.

Joel L. Morrison

2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

127

Technical Progress Report for the Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of October 1, 2005 through December 31, 2005. Activities during this time period were: (1) Nomination and election of Executive Council members for 2006-07 term, (2) Release the 2006 GSTC request-for-proposals (RFP), (3) Recruit and invoice membership for FY2006, (4) Improve communication efforts, and (5) Continue planning the GSTC spring meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

128

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Title Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Publication Type...

129

Definition: Demand Side Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Side Management Side Management Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Demand Side Management The term for all activities or programs undertaken by Load-Serving Entity or its customers to influence the amount or timing of electricity they use.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Energy demand management, also known as demand side management (DSM), is the modification of consumer demand for energy through various methods such as financial incentives and education. Usually, the goal of demand side management is to encourage the consumer to use less energy during peak hours, or to move the time of energy use to off-peak times such as nighttime and weekends. Peak demand management does not necessarily decrease total energy consumption, but could be expected to reduce the need

130

Electrical Demand Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Demand Management Plan set forth in this paper has proven to be a viable action to reduce a 3 million per year electric bill at the Columbus Works location of Western Electric. Measures are outlined which have reduced the peak demand 5% below the previous year's level and yielded $150,000 annual savings. These measures include rescheduling of selected operations and demand limiting techniques such as fuel switching to alternate power sources during periods of high peak demand. For example, by rescheduling the startup of five heat treat annealing ovens to second shift, 950 kW of load was shifted off peak. Also, retired, non-productive steam turbine chillers and a diesel air compressor have been effectively operated to displaced 1330 kW during peak periods each day. Installed metering devices have enabled the recognition of critical demand periods. The paper concludes with a brief look at future plans and long range objectives of the Demand Management Plan.

Fetters, J. L.; Teets, S. J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Collector: storage wall systems  

SciTech Connect

Passive Trombe wall systems require massive masonry walls to minimize large temperature swings and movable night insulation to prevent excessive night heat losses. As a solar energy collection system, Trombe wall systems have low efficiencies because of the nature of the wall and, if auxiliary heat is needed, because of absorption of this heat. Separation of collector and storage functions markedly improves the efficiency. A simple fiberglass absorber can provide high efficiency while phase change storage provides a compact storage unit. The need for movable insulation is obviated.

Boardman, H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Towards continuous policy-driven demand response in data centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response (DR) is a technique for balancing electricity supply and demand by regulating power consumption instead of generation. DR is a key technology for emerging smart electric grids that aim to increase grid efficiency, while incorporating ... Keywords: blink, power, renewable energy, storage

David Irwin; Navin Sharma; Prashant Shenoy

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable Energy Sources, and Energy Storages: State-of-the-Art Report, Volume 1, Main Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable Energy Sources, and Energy Storages: State-of-the-Art Report, Volume 1, Main Report Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.ieadsm.org/Files/Tasks/Task%20XVII%20-%20Integration%20of%20Demand Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/integration-demand-side-management-di Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Resource Integration Planning This task of the International Energy Agency's (IEA's) Demand-Side

134

Demand Dispatch-Intelligent  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and energy efficiency throughout the value chain resulting in the most economical price for electricity. Having adequate quantities and capacities of demand resources is a...

135

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

xxxv Option Value of Electricity Demand Response, Osmanelasticity in aggregate electricity demand. With these newii) reduction in electricity demand during peak periods (

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

U.S. Propane Demand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Demand is higher in 1999 due to higher petrochemical demand and a strong economy. We are also seeing strong demand in the first quarter of 2000; however, ...

137

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully-Automated Demand Response Test in Large Facilities14in DR systems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercialof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response Spinning Reserve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Grid Applications for Energy Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applications for Energy Storage Applications for Energy Storage Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop Washington DC 7-8 March 2012 Joe Eto jheto@lbl.gov (510) 486-7284 Referencing a Recent Sandia Study,* This Talk Will: Describe and illustrate selected grid applications for energy storage Time-of-use energy cost management Demand charge management Load following Area Regulation Renewables energy time shift Renewables capacity firming Compare Sandia's estimates of the economic value of these applications to the Electricity Storage Association's estimates of the capital costs of energy storage technologies *Eyer, J. and G. Corey. Energy Storage for the Electricity Grid: Benefits and Market Potential Assessment Guide. February 2010. SAND2010-0815 A Recent Sandia Study Estimates the Economic

140

Application of Thermal Storage, Peak Shaving and Cogeneration for Hospitals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy costs of hospitals can be managed by employing various strategies to control peak electrical demand (KW) while at the same time providing additional security of operation in the event that an equipment failure or a disruption of power from the electric utility occurs. Some electric utilities offer their customers demand (KW) reduction rate incentives. Many hospitals have additional emergency back-up needs for electrical energy. Demand is relatively constant in many hospitals due to high internal loads. These factors coupled with the present competitive alternate fuel market and present opportunities for hospitals to significantly reduce operating costs and provide additional stand-by or back-up electric sources. This paper employs a hospital case study to define and illustrate three energy planning strategies applicable to hospitals. These strategies are peak shaving, thermal storage, cogeneration and/or paralleling with the electric utility.

McClure, J. D.; Estes, J. M.; Estes, M. C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

CONSULTANT REPORT DEMAND FORECAST EXPERT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSULTANT REPORT DEMAND FORECAST EXPERT PANEL INITIAL forecast, end-use demand modeling, econometric modeling, hybrid demand modeling, energyMahon, Carl Linvill 2012. Demand Forecast Expert Panel Initial Assessment. California Energy

142

Superconducting magnetic energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Long-time varying-daily, weekly, and seasonal-power demands require the electric utility industry to have installed generating capacity in excess of the average load. Energy storage can reduce the requirement for less efficient excess generating capacity used to meet peak load demands. Short-time fluctuations in electric power can occur as negatively damped oscillations in complex power systems with generators connected by long transmission lines. Superconducting inductors with their associated converter systems are under development for both load leveling and transmission line stabilization in electric utility systems. Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is based upon the phenomenon of the nearly lossless behavior of superconductors. Application is, in principal, efficient since the electromagnetic energy can be transferred to and from the storage coils without any intermediate conversion to other energy forms. Results from a reference design for a 10-GWh SMES unit for load leveling are presented. The conceptual engineering design of a 30-MJ, 10-MW energy storage coil is discussed with regard to system stabilization, and tests of a small scale, 100-KJ SMES system are presented. Some results of experiments are provided from a related technology based program which uses superconducting inductive energy storage to drive fusion plasmas.

Rogers, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.; Hassenzahl, W.V.; Schermer, R.I.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

internal conditions. Maximum Demand Saving Intensity [W/ft2]automated electric demand sheds. The maximum electric shed

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Accelerator Need  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Need for Large Accelerators An Article Written Originally for Midlevel Teachers Back In order to study small particles, a high energy beam of particles must be generated. The...

145

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA

146

Understanding and improving computational science storage access through continuous characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computational science applications are driving a demand for increasingly powerful storage systems. While many techniques are available for capturing the I/O behavior of individual application trial runs and specific components of the storage system, ...

Philip Carns; Kevin Harms; William Allcock; Charles Bacon; Samuel Lang; Robert Latham; Robert Ross

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

White Paper for TIP Critical National Needs Nanomaterials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... water, air pollution, hydrogen storage, biosensors ... Infrastructure Needs for HVM Carbon Based ... Photovoltaics, Sensors, Fuel Cells, Batteries, Devices ...

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

148

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Electricity Demand Figure 60. Annual electricity sales by sector, 1980-2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel, 2006 and 2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Residential and Commercial Sectors Dominate Electricity Demand Growth Total electricity sales increase by 29 percent in the AEO2008 reference case, from 3,659 billion kilowatthours in 2006 to 4,705 billion in 2030, at an average rate of 1.1 percent per year. The relatively slow growth follows the historical trend, with the growth rate slowing in each succeeding

149

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Demand Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Demand Module calculates energy consumption for the four Census Regions (see Figure 5) and disaggregates the energy consumption

150

demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

151

Demand Response Database & Demo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Database & Demo Speaker(s): Mike Graveley William M. Smith Date: June 7, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Mary Ann Piette Infotility...

152

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

153

Industrial Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Kelly Perl

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

154

Industrial Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Kelly Perl

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

155

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

156

Transportation Demand This  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Transportation Demand Transportation Demand This page inTenTionally lefT blank 75 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific and associated technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight

157

Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable Energy Sources, and Energy Storages: State-of-the-Art Report, Volume 2, Annexes Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable Energy Sources, and Energy Storages: State-of-the-Art Report, Volume 2, Annexes Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.ieadsm.org/Files/Tasks/Task%20XVII%20-%20Integration%20of%20Demand Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/integration-demand-side-management-di Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Resource Integration Planning This report provides Annexes 1 through 7, which are country reports from

158

Automated Demand Response Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report includes assessments and test results of four end-use technologies, representing products in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors, each configured to automatically receive real-time pricing information and critical peak pricing (CPP) demand response (DR) event notifications. Four different vendors were asked to follow the interface requirements set forth in the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) standard that was introduced to the public in 2008 and currently used in two ...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

159

Automated Demand Response Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, which is an update to EPRI Report 1016082, includes assessments and test results of four end-use vendor technologies. These technologies represent products in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors, each configured to automatically receive real-time pricing information and critical peak pricing (CPP) demand response (DR) event notifications. Four different vendors were asked to follow the interface requirements set forth in the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) Communicat...

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

160

Measuring the capacity impacts of demand response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Critical peak pricing and peak time rebate programs offer benefits by increasing system reliability, and therefore, reducing capacity needs of the electric power system. These benefits, however, decrease substantially as the size of the programs grows relative to the system size. More flexible schemes for deployment of demand response can help address the decreasing returns to scale in capacity value, but more flexible demand response has decreasing returns to scale as well. (author)

Earle, Robert; Kahn, Edward P.; Macan, Edo

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Energy Storage Program Overview - Ross...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PUC Regulatory Guidebook for Energy Storage National Needs and Successes Providing energy storage information and analysis to public, utilities, partners and decision makers...

162

2012 SG Peer Review - Interoperability of Demand Response Resources in New York - Andre Wellington, ConEd NY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interoperability of Demand Response Interoperability of Demand Response Resources in NY Andre Wellington Con Edison June 8, 2012 December 2008 Interoperability of Demand Resource Resources in NY Objective Life-cycle Funding ($M) FY08 - FY13 $6.8 million Technical Scope (Insert graphic here) Develop and demonstrate technology required to integrate customer owned resources into the electrical distribution system * Evaluate interconnection designs * Design and install thermal storage plant with enhanced capabilities * Develop AutoDR application for targeted distributed resources 2 December 2008 Needs and Project Targets Develop the technology required to integrate customer owned distributed resources into the distribution system to enable the of deferment capital investments. * Remote dispatch of customer resources

163

Boosting CSP Production with Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combining concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage shows promise for increasing grid flexibility by providing firm system capacity with a high ramp rate and acceptable part-load operation. When backed by energy storage capability, CSP can supplement photovoltaics by adding generation from solar resources during periods of low solar insolation. The falling cost of solar photovoltaic (PV) - generated electricity has led to a rapid increase in the deployment of PV and projections that PV could play a significant role in the future U.S. electric sector. The solar resource itself is virtually unlimited; however, the actual contribution of PV electricity is limited by several factors related to the current grid. The first is the limited coincidence between the solar resource and normal electricity demand patterns. The second is the limited flexibility of conventional generators to accommodate this highly variable generation resource. At high penetration of solar generation, increased grid flexibility will be needed to fully utilize the variable and uncertain output from PV generation and to shift energy production to periods of high demand or reduced solar output. Energy storage is one way to increase grid flexibility, and many storage options are available or under development. In this article, however, we consider a technology already beginning to be used at scale - thermal energy storage (TES) deployed with concentrating solar power (CSP). PV and CSP are both deployable in areas of high direct normal irradiance such as the U.S. Southwest. The role of these two technologies is dependent on their costs and relative value, including how their value to the grid changes as a function of what percentage of total generation they contribute to the grid, and how they may actually work together to increase overall usefulness of the solar resource. Both PV and CSP use solar energy to generate electricity. A key difference is the ability of CSP to utilize high-efficiency TES, which turns CSP into a partially dispatchable resource. The addition of TES produces additional value by shifting the delivery of solar energy to periods of peak demand, providing firm capacity and ancillary services, and reducing integration challenges. Given the dispatchability of CSP enabled by TES, it is possible that PV and CSP are at least partially complementary. The dispatchability of CSP with TES can enable higher overall penetration of the grid by solar energy by providing solar-generated electricity during periods of cloudy weather or at night, when PV-generated power is unavailable. Such systems also have the potential to improve grid flexibility, thereby enabling greater penetration of PV energy (and other variable generation sources such as wind) than if PV were deployed without CSP.

Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Comparison of cask and drywell storage concepts for a monitored retrievable storage/interim storage system  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy, through its Richland Operations Office is evaluating the feasibility, timing, and cost of providing a federal capability for storing the spent fuel, high-level wastes, and transuranic wastes that DOE may be obligated by law to manage until permanent waste disposal facilities are available. Three concepts utilizing a monitored retrievable storage/interim storage (MRS/IS) facility have been developed and analyzed. The first concept, co-location with a reprocessing plant, has been developed by staff of Allied General Nuclear Services. the second concept, a stand-alone facility, has been developed by staff of the General Atomic Company. The third concept, co-location with a deep geologic repository, has been developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory with the assistance of the Westinghouse Hanford Company and Kaiser Engineers. The objectives of this study are: to develop preconceptual designs for MRS/IS facilities: to examine various issues such as transportation of wastes, licensing of the facilities, and environmental concerns associated with operation of such facilities; and to estimate the life-cycle costs of the facilities when operated in response to a set of scenarios that define the quantities and types of waste requiring storage in specific time periods, generally spanning the years 1989 to 2037. Three scenarios are examined to develop estimates of life-cycle costs for the MRS/IS facilities. In the first scenario, the reprocessing plant is placed in service in 1989 and HLW canisters are stored until a repository is opened in the year 1998. Additional reprocessing plants and repositories are placed in service at intervals as needed to meet the demand. In the second scenario, the reprocessing plants are delayed in starting operations by 10 years, but the repositories open on schedule. In the third scenario, the repositories are delayed 10 years, but the reprocessing plants open on schedule.

Rasmussen, D.E.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

time. 4 Reducing this peak demand through DR programs meansthat a 5% reduction in peak demand would have resulted insame 5% reduction in the peak demand of the US as a whole.

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shift in the short-run price elasticity of gasoline demand.A meta-analysis of the price elasticity of gasoline demand.2007. Consumer demand un- der price uncertainty: Empirical

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

California Independent System Operator demand response & proxy demand resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response programs are designed to allow end use customers to contribute to energy load reduction individually or through a demand response provider. One form of demand response can occur when an end use customer reduces their electrical usage ...

John Goodin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Hydrogen Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applied Neutron Scattering in Engineering and Materials Science Research: Hydrogen Storage Sponsored by: Metallurgical Society of the Canadian Institute of...

169

Enabling Renewable Energy and the Future Grid with Advanced Electricity Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Environmental concerns about using fossil fuels and their resource constrains, along with that on energy security, have spurred great interests in generating electrical energy from renewable sources such as wind and solar. The variable and stochastic nature of renewable sources however makes solar and wind power difficult to manage, especially at high levels of penetration. To effectively use the intermittent renewable energy and enable its delivery demand electrical energy storage (EES) that can also improve the reliability, stability, and efficiency of the electrical grid, which is expected to support plug-in electrical vehicles; enable real-time, two-way communication to balance demand and supply. While EES has gained wide attention for hybrid and electrical vehicle (e.g. plug-in-hybrid electrical) needs, public awareness and understanding of the critical challenges in energy storage for renewable integration and the future grid is relatively lacking. This paper examines the benefits and challenges of EES, in particular electrochemical storage or battery technologies, and discusses the fundamental principles, economics, and feasibility of the storage technologies. It intends to provide an understanding of the needs and challenges of electrical storage technologies for the stationary applications and offer general directions of research and development to the materials community.

Yang, Zhenguo; Liu, Jun; Baskaran, Suresh; Imhoff, Carl H.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.

2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

170

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic Storage Geologic Storage Carbon Storage Geologic Storage Focus Area Geologiccarbon dioxide (CO2) storage involves the injection of supercritical CO2 into deep geologic formations (injection zones) overlain by competent sealing formations and geologic traps that will prevent the CO2 from escaping. Current research and field studies are focused on developing better understanding 11 major types of geologic storage reservoir classes, each having their own unique opportunities and challenges. Understanding these different storage classes provides insight into how the systems influence fluids flow within these systems today, and how CO2 in geologic storage would be anticipated to flow in the future. The different storage formation classes include: deltaic, coal/shale, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Basaltic interflow zones are also being considered as potential reservoirs. These storage reservoirs contain fluids that may include natural gas, oil, or saline water; any of which may impact CO2 storage differently. The following summarizes the potential for storage and the challenges related to CO2 storage capability for fluids that may be present in more conventional clastic and carbonate reservoirs (saline water, and oil and gas), as well as unconventional reservoirs (unmineable coal seams, organic-rich shales, and basalts):

171

NV Energy Electricity Storage Valuation  

SciTech Connect

This study examines how grid-level electricity storage may benet the operations of NV Energy in 2020, and assesses whether those benets justify the cost of the storage system. In order to determine how grid-level storage might impact NV Energy, an hourly production cost model of the Nevada Balancing Authority (\\BA") as projected for 2020 was built and used for the study. Storage facilities were found to add value primarily by providing reserve. Value provided by the provision of time-of-day shifting was found to be limited. If regulating reserve from storage is valued the same as that from slower ramp rate resources, then it appears that a reciprocating engine generator could provide additional capacity at a lower cost than a pumped storage hydro plant or large storage capacity battery system. In addition, a 25-MW battery storage facility would need to cost $650/kW or less in order to produce a positive Net Present Value (NPV). However, if regulating reserve provided by storage is considered to be more useful to the grid than that from slower ramp rate resources, then a grid-level storage facility may have a positive NPV even at today's storage system capital costs. The value of having storage provide services beyond reserve and time-of-day shifting was not assessed in this study, and was therefore not included in storage cost-benefit calculations.

Ellison, James F.; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Samaan, Nader A.; Jin, Chunlian

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

172

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 39 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial.

173

Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" (UEC) by appliance (in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type

174

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 12 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS 27 data.

175

Aquifer thermal energy storage. International symposium: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aquifers have been used to store large quantities of thermal energy to supply process cooling, space cooling, space heating, and ventilation air preheating, and can be used with or without heat pumps. Aquifers are used as energy sinks and sources when supply and demand for energy do not coincide. Aquifer thermal energy storage may be used on a short-term or long-term basis; as the sole source of energy or as a partial storage; at a temperature useful for direct application or needing upgrade. The sources of energy used for aquifer storage are ambient air, usually cold winter air; waste or by-product energy; and renewable energy such as solar. The present technical, financial and environmental status of ATES is promising. Numerous projects are operating and under development in several countries. These projects are listed and results from Canada and elsewhere are used to illustrate the present status of ATES. Technical obstacles have been addressed and have largely been overcome. Cold storage in aquifers can be seen as a standard design option in the near future as it presently is in some countries. The cost-effectiveness of aquifer thermal energy storage is based on the capital cost avoidance of conventional chilling equipment and energy savings. ATES is one of many developments in energy efficient building technology and its success depends on relating it to important building market and environmental trends. This paper attempts to provide guidance for the future implementation of ATES. Individual projects have been processed separately for entry onto the Department of Energy databases.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Travel Demand Modeling  

SciTech Connect

This chapter describes the principal types of both passenger and freight demand models in use today, providing a brief history of model development supported by references to a number of popular texts on the subject, and directing the reader to papers covering some of the more recent technical developments in the area. Over the past half century a variety of methods have been used to estimate and forecast travel demands, drawing concepts from economic/utility maximization theory, transportation system optimization and spatial interaction theory, using and often combining solution techniques as varied as Box-Jenkins methods, non-linear multivariate regression, non-linear mathematical programming, and agent-based microsimulation.

Southworth, Frank [ORNL; Garrow, Dr. Laurie [Georgia Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

United States lubricant demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines United States Lubricant Demand for Automotive and Industrial Lubricants by year from 1978 to 1992 and 1997. Projected total United States Lubricant Demand for 1988 is 2,725 million (or MM) gallons. Automotive oils are expected to account for 1,469MM gallons or (53.9%), greases 59MM gallons (or 2.2%), and Industrial oils will account for the remaining 1,197MM gallons (or 43.9%) in 1988. This proportional relationship between Automotive and Industrial is projected to remain relatively constant until 1992 and out to 1997. Projections for individual years between 1978 to 1992 and 1997 are summarized.

Solomon, L.K.; Pruitt, P.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No. ER06-615-000 CAISO Demand Response Resource User Guide -8 2.1. Demand Response Provides a Range of Benefits to8 2.2. Demand Response Benefits can be Quantified in Several

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Analysis of the need for intermediate and peaking technologies in the year 2000. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This analysis was conducted to assess the impact of load management on the future need for intermediate- and peak-generating technologies (IPTs) such as combustion turbines, pumped storage, and cycling coal plants. There would be a reduced need for IPTs if load-management activities such as time-of-use pricing, together with customer-owned energy-storage devices, hot-water-heater controls, and interruptible service can economically remove most of the variation from electric power demands. The objective of this analysis is to assess the need for IPTs in an uncertain future, which will probably include load management and time-differentiated electricity prices. The analysis is exploratory in nature and broad in scope. It does not attempt to predict the future or to model precisely the technical characteristics or economic desirability of load management. Rather, its purpose is to provide research and development planners with some basic insights into the order of magnitude of possible hourly demand shifts on a regional basis and to determine the impact of load management on daily and seasonal variations in electricity demand.

Barrager, S.M.; Campbell, G.L.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

On Demand Guarantees in Iran.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??On Demand Guarantees in Iran This thesis examines on demand guarantees in Iran concentrating on bid bonds and performance guarantees. The main guarantee types and (more)

Ahvenainen, Laura

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Transportation Demand Management Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Demand Management Plan FALL 2009 #12;T r a n s p o r t a t i o n D e m a n d M a n the transportation impacts the expanded enrollment will have. Purpose and Goal The primary goal of the TDM plan is to ensure that adequate measures are undertaken and maintained to minimize the transportation impacts

182

Commercial Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Kevin Jarzomski

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

Commercial Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Kevin Jarzomski

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

184

China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling Speaker(s): Nan Zhou Date: October 8, 2009 (All day) Location: 90-3122 As a consequence of soaring energy demand due to the staggering pace of its economic growth, China overtook the United States in 2007 to become the world's biggest contributor to CO2 emissions (IEA, 2007). Since China is still in an early stage of industrialization and urbanization, economic development promises to keep China's energy demand growing strongly. Furthermore, China's reliance on fossil fuel is unlikely to change in the long term, and increased needs will only heighten concerns about energy security and climate change. In response, the Chinese government has developed a series of policies and targets aimed at improving energy efficiency, including both short-term targets and long-term strategic

185

Radioactive waste storage issues  

SciTech Connect

In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

Kunz, D.E.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Hydrogen Storage- Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- - Overview George Thomas, Hydrogen Consultant to SNL * and Jay Keller, Hydrogen Program Manager Sandia National Laboratories H 2 Delivery and Infrastructure Workshop May 7-8, 2003 * Most of this presentation has been extracted from George Thomas' invited BES Hydrogen Workshop presentation (May 13-14, 2003) Sandia National Laboratories 4/14/03 2 Sandia National Laboratories From George Thomas, BES workshop 5/13/03 H 2 storage is a critical enabling technology for H 2 use as an energy carrier The low volumetric density of gaseous fuels requires a storage method which compacts the fuel. Hence, hydrogen storage systems are inherently more complex than liquid fuels. Storage technologies are needed in all aspects of hydrogen utilization. production distribution utilization

187

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Energy Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Energy Demand Figure 40. Energy use per capita and per dollar of gross domestic product, 1980-2030 (index, 1980 = 1). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 41. Primary energy use by fuel, 2006-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Average Energy Use per Person Levels Off Through 2030 Because energy use for housing, services, and travel in the United States is closely linked to population levels, energy use per capita is relatively stable (Figure 40). In addition, the economy is becoming less dependent on energy in general. Energy intensity (energy use per 2000 dollar of GDP) declines by an average

188

Assessing the impacts of future demand for saline groundwater on commercial deployment of CCS in the United States  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a preliminary assessment of the potential impact that future demand for groundwater might have on the commercial deployment of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies within the United States. A number of regions within the U.S. have populations, agriculture and industries that are particularly dependent upon groundwater. Moreover, some key freshwater aquifers are already over-utilized or depleted, and others are likely to be moving toward depletion as demand grows. The need to meet future water demands may lead some parts of the nation to consider supplementing existing supplies with lower quality groundwater resources, including brackish waters that are currently not considered sources of drinking water but which could provide supplemental water via desalination. In some areas, these same deep saline-filled geologic formations also represent possible candidate carbon dioxide (CO2) storage reservoirs. The analysis presented here suggests that future constraints on CCS deployment due to potential needs to supplement conventional water supplies by desalinating deeper and more brackish waters are likely to be necessary only in limited regions across the country, particularly in areas that are already experiencing water stress.

Davidson, Casie L.; Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

189

Components of Congestion: Delay from Incidents, Special Events, Lane Closures, Weather, Potential Ramp Metering Gain, and Excess Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

potential reduction due to metering needs to be interpretedCollisions, Potential Ramp Metering Gain, and Excess Demand.Weather, Potential Ramp Metering Gain, and Excess Demand

Kwon, Jaimyoung; Mauch, Michael; Varaiya, Pravin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Storage-Space Capacitated Inventory System with (r, Q) Policies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We deal with an inventory system with limited storage space for a single item or multiple items. For the single-item system, customers' demand is stochastic. The inventory is controlled by a continuous-review (r, Q) policy. Goods are replenished ... Keywords: (r, Q) policy, algorithm, inventory/production, programming, stochastic demand, storage-space constraint

Xiaobo Zhao; Fan Fan; Xiaoliang Liu; Jinxing Xie

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the fact that the off-peak power plant might be coal and substitute "clean" on- peak natural gas plants@lbl.gov Keywords Combined heat and power, CO2 emissions, demand response, electric storage, energy efficiency, heat storage, micro-generation systems, photovoltaic, software, solar thermal systems Abstract The addition

192

Letters: Energy demand prediction using GMDH networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric power industry is in transition as it moves towards a competitive and deregulated environment. In this emerging market, traditional electric utilities as well as energy traders, power pools and independent system operators (ISOs) need the ... Keywords: Artificial neural networks, Energy demand, Forecasting, Group method of data handling (GMDH) networks, Self-organizing networks

Dipti Srinivasan

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 The commercial module forecasts consumption by fuel 15 at the Census division level using prices from the NEMS energy supply modules, and macroeconomic variables from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM), as well as external data sources (technology characterizations, for example). Energy demands are forecast for ten end-use services 16 for eleven building categories 17 in each of the nine Census divisions (see Figure 5). The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division combinations. Next, the ten end-use service demands required for the projected floorspace are developed. The electricity generation and water and space heating supplied by distributed generation and combined heat and power technologies are projected. Technologies are then

194

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Module calculates

195

On Demand Paging Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The power consumption of the network interface plays a major role in determining the total operating lifetime of wireless handheld devices. On demand paging has been proposed earlier to reduce power consumption in cellular networks. In this scheme, a low power secondary radio is used to wake up the higher power radio, allowing the latter to sleep or remain off for longer periods of time. In this paper we present use of Bluetooth radios to serve as a paging channel for the 802.11 wireless LAN. We have implemented an on-demand paging scheme on a WLAN consisting of iPAQ PDAs equipped with Bluetooth radios and Cisco Aironet wireless networking cards. Our results show power saving ranging from 19% to 46% over the present 802.11b standard operating modes with negligible impact on performance.

Bluetooth Radios On; Yuvraj Agarwal; Rajesh K. Gupta

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT Companion Report to the California Energy Demand 2006-2016 Staff Energy Demand Forecast Report STAFFREPORT June 2005 CEC-400 .......................................................................................................................................1-1 ENERGY DEMAND FORECASTING AT THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION: AN OVERVIEW

197

Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY A 20-year forecast of electricity demand is a required of any forecast of electricity demand and developing ways to reduce the risk of planning errors that could arise from this and other uncertainties in the planning process. Electricity demand is forecast

198

Overview of geologic storage of natural gas with an emphasis on assessing the feasibility of storing hydrogen.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In many regions across the nation geologic formations are currently being used to store natural gas underground. Storage options are dictated by the regional geology and the operational need. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an interest in understanding theses various geologic storage options, the advantages and disadvantages, in the hopes of developing an underground facility for the storage of hydrogen as a low cost storage option, as part of the hydrogen delivery infrastructure. Currently, depleted gas/oil reservoirs, aquifers, and salt caverns are the three main types of underground natural gas storage in use today. The other storage options available currently and in the near future, such as abandoned coal mines, lined hard rock caverns, and refrigerated mined caverns, will become more popular as the demand for natural gas storage grows, especially in regions were depleted reservoirs, aquifers, and salt deposits are not available. The storage of hydrogen within the same type of facilities, currently used for natural gas, may add new operational challenges to the existing cavern storage industry, such as the loss of hydrogen through chemical reactions and the occurrence of hydrogen embrittlement. Currently there are only three locations worldwide, two of which are in the United States, which store hydrogen. All three sites store hydrogen within salt caverns.

Lord, Anna Snider

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Net Demand3 Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contract Number: DE-FE0004002 (Subcontract: S013-JTH-PPM4002 MOD 00) Summary The US DOE has identified a number of materials that are both used by clean energy technologies and are at risk of supply disruptions in the short term. Several of these materials, especially the rare earth elements (REEs) yttrium, cerium, and lanthanum were identified by DOE as critical (USDOE 2010) and are crucial to the function and performance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) 1. In addition, US DOE has issued a second Request For Information regarding uses of and markets for these critical materials (RFI;(USDOE 2011)). This report examines how critical materials demand for SOFC applications could impact markets for these materials and vice versa, addressing categories 1,2,5, and 6 in the RFI. Category 1 REE Content of SOFC Yttria (yttrium oxide) is the only critical material (as defined for the timeframe of interest for SOFC) used in SOFC 2. Yttrium is used as a dopant in the SOFCs core ceramic cells.. In addition, continuing developments in SOFC technology will likely further reduce REE demand for SOFC, providing credible scope for at least an additional 50 % reduction in REE use if desirable. Category 2 Supply Chain and Market Demand SOFC developers expect to purchase

J. Thijssen Llc

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Laboratories September 27, 2007 San Francisco, CA PEER REVIEW 2007 DOE(SNL)CEC Energy Storage Program FYO7 Projects Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Demand Side Bidding. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This document sets forth the final report for a financial assistance award for the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) to enhance coordination between the building operators and power system operators in terms of demand-side responses to Location Based Marginal Pricing (LBMP). Potential benefits of this project include improved power system reliability, enhanced environmental quality, mitigation of high locational prices within congested areas, and the reduction of market barriers for demand-side market participants. NARUC, led by its Committee on Energy Resources and the Environment (ERE), actively works to promote the development and use of energy efficiency and clean distributive energy policies within the framework of a dynamic regulatory environment. Electric industry restructuring, energy shortages in California, and energy market transformation intensifies the need for reliable information and strategies regarding electric reliability policy and practice. NARUC promotes clean distributive generation and increased energy efficiency in the context of the energy sector restructuring process. NARUC, through ERE's Subcommittee on Energy Efficiency, strives to improve energy efficiency by creating working markets. Market transformation seeks opportunities where small amounts of investment can create sustainable markets for more efficient products, services, and design practices.

Spahn, Andrew

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

Compressed Air Storage for Electric Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Report focuses on the use of underground storage of natural gas as a means of leveling the load between supply and demand. The book presents a view of the way compressed air storage can reduce costs when constructing new facilities for generating peak load electricity. The primary emphasis given concerns underground storage of air in underground porous media, the vehicle utilized on a large scale for over 25 years by the natural gas industry.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Third Generation Flywheels for electric storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electricity is critical to our economy, but growth in demand has saturated the power grid causing instability and blackouts. The economic penalty due to lost productivity in the US exceeds $100 billion per year. Opposition to new transmission lines and power plants, environmental restrictions, and an expected $100 billion grid upgrade cost have slowed system improvements. Flywheel electricity storage could provide a more economical, environmentally benign alternative and slash economic losses if units could be scaled up in a cost effective manner to much larger power and capacity than the present maximum of a few hundred kW and a few kWh per flywheel. The goal of this project is to design, construct, and demonstrate a small-scale third generation electricity storage flywheel using a revolutionary architecture scalable to megawatt-hours per unit. First generation flywheels are built from bulk materials such as steel and provide inertia to smooth the motion of mechanical devices such as engines. They can be scaled up to tens of tons or more, but have relatively low energy storage density. Second generation flywheels use similar designs but are fabricated with composite materials such as carbon fiber and epoxy. They are capable of much higher energy storage density but cannot economically be built larger than a few kWh of storage capacity due to structural and stability limitations. LaunchPoint is developing a third generation flywheel the "Power Ring" with energy densities as high or higher than second generation flywheels and a totally new architecture scalable to enormous sizes. Electricity storage capacities exceeding 5 megawatt-hours per unit appear both technically feasible and economically attractive. Our design uses a new class of magnetic bearing a radial gap shear-force levitator that we discovered and patented, and a thin-walled composite hoop rotated at high speed to store kinetic energy. One immediate application is power grid frequency regulation, where Power Rings could cut costs, reduce fuel consumption, eliminate emissions, and reduce the need for new power plants. Other applications include hybrid diesel-electric locomotives, grid power quality, support for renewable energy, spinning reserve, energy management, and facility deferral. Decreased need for new generation and transmission alone could save the nation $2.5 billion per year. Improved grid reliability could cut economic losses due to poor power quality by tens of billions of dollars per year. A large export market for this technology could also develop. Power Ring technology will directly support the EERE mission, and the goals of the Distributed Energy Technologies Subprogram in particular, by helping to reduce blackouts, brownouts, electricity costs, and emissions, by relieving transmission bottlenecks, and by greatly improving grid power quality.

Ricci, Michael, R.; Fiske, O. James

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

204

The Role of Enabling Technologies in Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides a study of the technologies that are crucial to the success of demand response programs. It takes a look at the historical development of demand response programs and analyzes how new technology is needed to enable demand response to make the transition from a small scale pilot operation to a mass market means of improving grid reliability. Additionally, the report discusses the key technologies needed to enable a large scale demand response effort and evaluates current efforts to develop and integrate these technologies. Finally, the report provides profiles of leading developers of these key technologies.

NONE

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Demands..xi Annual natural gas demand for each alternativeused in natural gas demand projections. 34

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Demand-Side Response from Industrial Loads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through a research study funded by the Department of Energy, Smart Grid solutions company ENBALA Power Networks along with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have geospatially quantified the potential flexibility within industrial loads to leverage their inherent process storage to help support the management of the electricity grid. The study found that there is an excess of 12 GW of demand-side load flexibility available in a select list of top industrial facilities in the United States. Future studies will expand on this quantity of flexibility as more in-depth analysis of different industries is conducted and demonstrations are completed.

Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Letto, Daryl [Enbala Power Networks; Johnson, Brandon [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Dowling, Kevin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); George, Raoule [Enbala Power Networks; Khan, Saqib [University of Texas, Austin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Ocean Renewable Energy Storage (ORES) System: Analysis of an Undersea Energy Storage Concept  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to its higher capacity factor and proximity to densely populated areas, offshore wind power with integrated energy storage could satisfy > 20% of U.S. electricity demand. Similar results could also be obtained in many ...

Slocum, Alexander H.

208

Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

more efficient system. When considering a water heater model for your home, estimate its energy efficiency and annual operating cost. Then, compare costs with other more andor...

209

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minimum demand and Maximum demand incorporate assumptionslevels, or very minor Maximum demand household size, growthvehicles in Increasing Maximum demand 23 mpg truck share

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Demonstration Development Project: Solar Thermocline Storage Systems: Preliminary Design Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar thermal energy storage (TES) has the potential to significantly increase the operating flexibility of solar power. TES allows solar power plant operators to adjust electricity production to match consumer demand, enabling the sale of electricity during peak demand periods and boosting plant revenues. To date, TES systems have been prohibitively expensive except in certain markets. Two of the most significant capital costs in a TES system are the storage medium (typically molten salt) and the storag...

2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

211

Dividends with Demand Response  

SciTech Connect

To assist facility managers in assessing whether and to what extent they should participate in demand response programs offered by ISOs, we introduce a systematic process by which a curtailment supply curve can be developed that integrates costs and other program provisions and features. This curtailment supply curve functions as bid curve, which allows the facility manager to incrementally offer load to the market under terms and conditions acceptable to the customer. We applied this load curtailment assessment process to a stylized example of an office building, using programs offered by NYISO to provide detail and realism.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Goldman, Charles; Sezgen, O.; Pratt, D.

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

NETL: Carbon Storage FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

different options for CO2 storage? different options for CO2 storage? Oil and gas reservoirs, many containing carbon dioxide (CO2), as well as natural deposits of almost pure CO2, can be found in many places in the United States and around the world. These are examples of long-term storage of CO2 by nature, where "long term" means millions of years. Their existence demonstrates that naturally occurring geologic formations and structures of various kinds are capable of securely storing CO2 deep in the subsurface for very long periods of time. Because of the economic importance of oil and gas, scientists and engineers have studied these natural deposits for many decades in order to understand the physical and chemical processes which led to their formation. There are also many decades of engineering experience in subsurface operations similar to those needed for CO2 storage. The most directly applicable experience comes from the oil industry, which, for 40 years, has injected CO2 in depleted oil reservoirs for the recovery of additional product through enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Additional experience comes from natural gas storage operations, which have utilized depleted gas reservoirs, as well as reservoirs containing only water. Scientists and engineers are now combining the knowledge obtained from study of natural deposits with experience from analogous operations as a basis for studying the potential for large-scale storage of CO2 in the deep subsurface.

213

Energy storage in datacenters: what, where, and how much?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy storage - in the form of UPS units - in a datacenter has been primarily used to fail-over to diesel generators upon power outages. There has been recent interest in using these Energy Storage Devices (ESDs) for demand-response (DR) to either shift ... Keywords: cost reduction, datacenters, energy storage, power provisioning

Di Wang; Chuangang Ren; Anand Sivasubramaniam; Bhuvan Urgaonkar; Hosam Fathy

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

NETL: Carbon Storage - Program Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Overview Program Overview Carbon Storage Program Overview The Carbon Storage Program involves three key elements for technology development: Core Research and Development (Core R&D), Infrastructure, and Global Collaborations. The image below displays the relationship among the three elements and provides a means for navigation throughout NETL's Storage Program Website. Click on Image to Navigate Storage Website Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player NETL's Carbon Storage Program Structure CORE R&D Core R&D is driven by industry's technology needs and segregates those needs into focus areas to more efficiently obtain solutions that can then be tested and deployed in the field. The Core R&D Element contains four

215

Chinese demand drives global deforestation Chinese demand drives global deforestation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chinese demand drives global deforestation Chinese demand drives global deforestation By Tansa Musa zones and do not respect size limits in their quest for maximum financial returns. "I lack words economy. China's demand for hardwood drives illegal logging says "Both illegal and authorized

216

Estimating a Demand System with Nonnegativity Constraints: Mexican Meat Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Properties of the AIDS Generalized Maximum Entropy Estimator 24 #12;Estimating a Demand SystemEstimating a Demand System with Nonnegativity Constraints: Mexican Meat Demand Amos Golan* Jeffrey with nonnegativity constraints is presented. This approach, called generalized maximum entropy (GME), is more

Perloff, Jeffrey M.

217

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST Demand Forecast report is the product of the efforts of many current and former California Energy Commission staff. Staff contributors to the current forecast are: Project Management and Technical Direction

218

Heuristic batching policies for video-on-demand services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A video-on-demand (VOD) service imposes extremely severe resource requirement in terms of bandwidth and storage. Batching policies that use a single channel to serve multiple active clients for the same video program can reduce system resource requirement ... Keywords: Batching policy, Channel allocation, Instantaneous MFQL, Maximum factored queue length, Rate-based, Regular-interval, Statistical MFQL

J.-K Chen; J. -L. C Wu

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

The National Storage Laboratory: Overview and status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Storage Laboratory (NSL) was organized to investigate, demonstrate, and commercialize high-performance hardware and software storage technologies that promise to remove network computing bottlenecks and provide critically needed new storage systems functionality. This paper briefly outlines the goals, collaboration and current status of the NSL.

Watson, R.W.; Coyne, R.

1994-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

220

Demand Response Enabling Technologies and Approaches for Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are numerous programs sponsored by Independent System Operators (ISOs) and utility or state efficiency programs that have an objective of reducing peak demand. Most of these programs have targeted the residential and commercial sector, however, there are also huge opportunities for demand response in the industrial sector. This paper describes some of the demand response initiatives that are currently active in New York State, explaining applicability of industrial facilities. Next, we discuss demand response-enabling technologies, which can help an industrial plant effectively address demand response needs. Finally, the paper is concluded with a discussion of case study projects that illustrate application of some of these demand response enabling technologies for process operations. These case studies, illustrating some key projects from the NYSERDA Peak Load Reduction program, will describe the technologies and approaches deployed to achieve the demand reduction at the site, the quantitative impact of the project, and a discussion of the overall successes at each site.

Epstein, G.; D'Antonio, M.; Schmidt, C.; Seryak, J.; Smith, C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Analysis of the need for intermediate and peaking technologies in the year 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This analysis was conducted to assess the impact of load management on the future need for intermediate- and peak-generating technologies (IPTs) such as combustion turbines, pumped storage, and cycling coal plants. There will be a reduced need for IPTs if load-management activities such as time-of-use pricing, together with customer-owned energy-storage devices, hot-water-heater controls, and interruptible service, can economically remove most of the variation from electric-power demands. Therefore, the analysis assesses the need for IPTs in an uncertain future, which will probably include load management and time-differentiated electricity prices. Section 2 provides a condensed description of the models used in the analysis. (Details and data sets are contained in the appendixes.) Results of sensitivities on growth rates, model parameters, and appliance saturations are discussed in Section 3, which also contains the analysis of the potential impacts of customer energy storage, appliance control, and time-of-use pricing. The future need for intermediate and peaking technologies is analyzed in Section 4.

Barrager, S.M.; Campbell, G.L.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Demand Response | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand response provides an opportunity for consumers to play a significant role in the operation of the electric grid by reducing or shifting their electricity usage during peak periods in response to time-based rates or other forms of financial incentives. Demand response programs are being used by electric system planners and operators as resource options for balancing supply and demand. Such programs can lower the cost of electricity in wholesale markets, and in turn, lead to lower retail rates. Methods of engaging customers in demand response efforts include offering time-based rates such as time-of-use pricing, critical peak pricing, variable peak pricing, real time pricing, and critical peak rebates. It also includes direct load control programs which provide the

223

Basic Research Needs for the Hydrogen Economy  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

The Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Workshop on Hydrogen Production, Storage and Use was held May 13-15, 2003 to assess the basic research needs to assure a secure energy future. This report is based on t

224

Production Will Meet Demand Increase This Summer  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: Production must meet increases in demand this year. Last year, increased imports met most of the summer demand increase, and increases in stock draws met almost all of the remainder. Production did not increase much. But this year, inventories will not be available, and increased imports seem unlikely. Thus, increases in production will be needed to meet increased demand. Imports availability is uncertain this summer. Imports in 1999 were high, and with Phase II RFG product requirements, maintaining this level could be challenging since not all refineries exporting to the U.S. will be able to meet the new gasoline specifications. Stocks will also contribute little supply this summer. Last year's high gasoline stocks allowed for a stock draw that was 58 MB/D higher than

225

ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT STAFFREPORT June 2005 ..............................................................................3 Residential Forecast Comparison ..............................................................................................5 Nonresidential Forecast Comparisons

226

Energy storage for the electricity grid : benefits and market potential assessment guide : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This guide describes a high-level, technology-neutral framework for assessing potential benefits from and economic market potential for energy storage used for electric-utility-related applications. The overarching theme addressed is the concept of combining applications/benefits into attractive value propositions that include use of energy storage, possibly including distributed and/or modular systems. Other topics addressed include: high-level estimates of application-specific lifecycle benefit (10 years) in $/kW and maximum market potential (10 years) in MW. Combined, these criteria indicate the economic potential (in $Millions) for a given energy storage application/benefit. The benefits and value propositions characterized provide an important indication of storage system cost targets for system and subsystem developers, vendors, and prospective users. Maximum market potential estimates provide developers, vendors, and energy policymakers with an indication of the upper bound of the potential demand for storage. The combination of the value of an individual benefit (in $/kW) and the corresponding maximum market potential estimate (in MW) indicates the possible impact that storage could have on the U.S. economy. The intended audience for this document includes persons or organizations needing a framework for making first-cut or high-level estimates of benefits for a specific storage project and/or those seeking a high-level estimate of viable price points and/or maximum market potential for their products. Thus, the intended audience includes: electric utility planners, electricity end users, non-utility electric energy and electric services providers, electric utility regulators and policymakers, intermittent renewables advocates and developers, Smart Grid advocates and developers, storage technology and project developers, and energy storage advocates.

Eyer, James M. (Distributed Utility Associates, Inc., Livermore, CA); Corey, Garth P. (KTech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM)

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Overview of Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

08 PJM 08 PJM www.pjm.com ©2003 PJM Overview of Demand Response PJM ©2008 PJM www.pjm.com ©2003 PJM Growth, Statistics, and Current Footprint AEP, Dayton, ComEd, & DUQ Dominion Generating Units 1,200 + Generation Capacity 165,000 MW Peak Load 144,644 MW Transmission Miles 56,070 Area (Square Miles) 164,250 Members 500 + Population Served 51 Million Area Served 13 States and DC Generating Units 1,200 + Generation Capacity 165,000 MW Peak Load 144,644 MW Transmission Miles 56,070 Area (Square Miles) 164,250 Members 500 + Population Served 51 Million Area Served 13 States and DC Current PJM RTO Statistics Current PJM RTO Statistics PJM Mid-Atlantic Integrations completed as of May 1 st , 2005 ©2008 PJM

228

Hydrogen Storage  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen storage technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains the different ways in which hydrogen can be stored, as well a

229

Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Development Concept Nitrogen-Air Battery F.M. Delnick, D. Ingersoll, K.Waldrip Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM presented to U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems...

230

Fact Sheet: Grid-Scale Flywheel Energy Storage Plant (October 2012)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazle Spindle LLC Hazle Spindle LLC American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Beacon Power will design, build, and operate a utility-scale 20 MW flywheel energy storage plant at the Humboldt Industrial Park in Hazle Township, Pennsylvania for Hazle Spindle LLC, the Recipient of the ARRA Cooperative Agreement. The plant will provide frequency regulation services to grid operator PJM Interconnection. Flywheel systems are kinetic energy storage devices that react instantly when needed. By accelerating a cylindrical rotor (flywheel) to a very high speed and maintaining the energy in the system as rotational energy, flywheel energy storage systems can moderate fluctuations in grid demand. When generated power exceeds load, the flywheel speeds up; when load exceeds generation, the flywheel is slowed to convert the energy for

231

Economical Energy Storage Option Enhances Energy Purchasing Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chilled Water Thermal Energy Storage (TES) offers benefits to both the electricity supplier and the electricity user. This well-established technology uses stratified chilled water to store energy in thermal form so that electricity can be purchased during off-peak periods for use during on-peak periods. This energy shift offers both the user and the generator an opportunity to match their needs to get a win-win arrangement. The advantages to the electricity user not only include lower energy costs (due to reduced demand charges or other means). Chilled Water TES has also been shown to provide added cooling for less than the chiller equipment that it offsets. Finally, the various non-standard rate structures available today offer opportunities for electricity users who have some control over their demand profile. For the electricity generator, Chilled Water TES shifts electrical load from on-peak periods to off-peak periods. This has the effect of increasing the demand for base-load power while decreasing the demand for peaking power. Also, since Chilled Water TES installations are usually fairly large (1 MW or more per site), a small number of installations will produce a significant impact on the generators peaking power generation requirements.

Hansen, D. W.; Winters, P. J.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Stochastic dynamic optimization of consumption and the induced price elasticity of demand in smart grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a mathematical model of consumer behavior in response to stochastically-varying electricity prices, and a characterization of price-elasticity of demand created by optimal utilization of storage and ...

Faghih, Ali

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The Road Ahead for Light Duty Vehicle Fuel Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Logo. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800 The Road Ahead for Light Duty Vehicle Fuel Demand Click here to start...

234

A Successful Cool Storage Rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Houston Lighting & Power (HL&P) initiated design and development of its commercial cool storage program as part of an integrated resource planning process with a targeted 225 MW of demand reduction through DSM. Houston's extensive commercial air conditioning load, which is highly coincident with HL&P's system peak, provided a large market for cool storage technologies. Initial market research made it very clear that a special cool storage rate was required to successfully market the technology. Development of the rate required an integrated, multidepartment effort and extensive use of DSManager, an integrated resource planning model. An experimental version of the rate was initially implemented as part of the initial phase of the cool storage program. A permanent rate, incorporating lessons learned from the experimental rate, was then developed for the long term implementation of the program. The permanent rate went through a lengthy regulatory approval process which included intervention by a local natural gas distribution company. The end result is a very successful cool storage program with 52 projects and 31 megawatts of demand reduction in the first three and one-half years of program implementation.

Ahrens, A. C.; Sobey, T. M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model By Tancred C.M. Lidderdale This article first appeared in the Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1995, Energy Information Administration, DOE/EIA-0202(95) (Washington, DC, July 1995), pp. 33-42, 83-85. The regression results and historical data for production, inventories, and imports have been updated in this presentation. Contents * Introduction o Table 1. Oxygenate production capacity and demand * Oxygenate demand o Table 2. Estimated RFG demand share - mandated RFG areas, January 1998 * Fuel ethanol supply and demand balance o Table 3. Fuel ethanol annual statistics * MTBE supply and demand balance o Table 4. EIA MTBE annual statistics * Refinery balances

236

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment is an energy intensive process which, together with water treatment, comprises about three percent of U.S. annual energy use. Yet, since wastewater treatment facilities are often peripheral to major electricity-using industries, they are frequently an overlooked area for automated demand response opportunities. Demand response is a set of actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies or congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, and/or market conditions occur that raise electric supply costs. Demand response programs are designed to improve the reliability of the electric grid and to lower the use of electricity during peak times to reduce the total system costs. Open automated demand response is a set of continuous, open communication signals and systems provided over the Internet to allow facilities to automate their demand response activities without the need for manual actions. Automated demand response strategies can be implemented as an enhanced use of upgraded equipment and facility control strategies installed as energy efficiency measures. Conversely, installation of controls to support automated demand response may result in improved energy efficiency through real-time access to operational data. This paper argues that the implementation of energy efficiency opportunities in wastewater treatment facilities creates a base for achieving successful demand reductions. This paper characterizes energy use and the state of demand response readiness in wastewater treatment facilities and outlines automated demand response opportunities.

Thompson, Lisa; Song, Katherine; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

237

DUF6 Storage Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Safety Depleted UF6 Storage line line How DUF6 is Stored Where DUF6 is Stored DUF6 Storage Safety Cylinder Leakage Depleted UF6 Storage Safety Continued cylinder storage is...

238

Grid Reliability Considerations for High Levels of Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this white paper are to: (1) consider the unique characteristics of demand response relative to bulk electric system reliability needs and present contributions to system reliability, (2) identify potential bulk electric system reliability impacts of high levels of demand response without appropriate characterization of the resource over time and at increasing penetration levels, and (3) identify research needs to address these impacts so that the potential benefits of DR as system ...

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

239

Off peak ice storage generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Due to the high costs associated with peak demand charges imposed by most electrical companies today, various means of shifting the peak HVAC load have been identified by the industry. This paper discusses the results of a study based upon a building site located in the high desert of the southwestern United States that evaluated ice storage as a mechanism of operating cost reductions. The discussion addresses both the seasonal and the annual cost and energy impacts of an ice storage system when used in place of an air-to-air heat pump system.

Davis, R.E.; Cerbo, F.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Only tough choices in Meeting growing demand  

SciTech Connect

U.S. electricity demand is not growing very fast by international or historical standards. Yet meeting this relatively modest growth is proving difficult because investment in new capacity is expected to grow at an even slower pace. What is more worrisome is that a confluence of factors has added considerable uncertainties, making the investment community less willing to make the long-term commitments that will be needed during the coming decade.

NONE

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Correlation Between Geographically Dispersed Concentrating Solar Power and Demand in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Correlations between the electricity generated by concentrating solar thermal power (CSP) plants, as well as cross-correlations between CSP, wind power and electricity demand, have significant impacts on decisions for how much and where to build utility-scale CSP capacity, the optimal amount of thermal storage in the CSP plants, reserve capacity needed to back-up the system, as well as the expected levels of curtailed renewable power. Accurately estimating these correlations is vital to performing detailed analyses of high renewable penetration scenarios. This study quantifies the degree of correlation between geographically dispersed CSP, as well as the correlation between CSP and wind power, and CSP and electricity demand in 356 discrete regions in the contiguous US. Correlations are calculated using hourly data on an annual basis. Maps of the correlations will be presented to illustrate the degree of correlation between solar power and the demand it is serving, as well as the synergies between the negatively-correlated wind power and solar power serving the same region.

Mowers, M.; Helm, C.; Blair, N.; Short, W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Future demand for electricity in the Nassau--Suffolk region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory established a new technology for load forecasting for the Long Island Lighting Company and prepared an independent forecast of the demand for electricity in the LILCO area. The method includes: demand for electricity placed in a total energy perspective so that substitutions between electricity and other fuels can be examined; assessment of the impact of conservation, new technology, gas curtailment, and other factors upon demand for electricity; and construction of the probability distribution of the demand for electricity. A detailed analysis of changing levels of demand for electricity, and other fuels, associated with these new developments is founded upon a disaggregated end-use characterization of energy utilization, including space heat, lighting, process energy, etc., coupled to basic driving forces for future demand, namely: population, housing mix, and economic growth in the region. The range of future events covers conservation, heat pumps, solar systems, storage resistance heaters, electric vehicles, extension of electrified rail, total energy systems, and gas curtailment. Based upon cost and other elements of the competition between technologies, BNL assessed the likelihood of these future developments. An optimistic view toward conservation leads to ''low'' demand for electricity, whereas rapid development of new technologies suggests ''high'' demand. (MCW)

Carroll, T.W.; Palmedo, P.F.; Stern, R.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Demand Response Programs, 6. edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides a look at the past, present, and future state of the market for demand/load response based upon market price signals. It is intended to provide significant value to individuals and companies who are considering participating in demand response programs, energy providers and ISOs interested in offering demand response programs, and consultants and analysts looking for detailed information on demand response technology, applications, and participants. The report offers a look at the current Demand Response environment in the energy industry by: defining what demand response programs are; detailing the evolution of program types over the last 30 years; discussing the key drivers of current initiatives; identifying barriers and keys to success for the programs; discussing the argument against subsidization of demand response; describing the different types of programs that exist including:direct load control, interruptible load, curtailable load, time-of-use, real time pricing, and demand bidding/buyback; providing examples of the different types of programs; examining the enablers of demand response programs; and, providing a look at major demand response programs.

NONE

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 EMCS EPACT ERCOT FCM FERC FRCC demand side managementEnergy Regulatory Commission (FERC). EPAct began the processin wholesale markets, which FERC Order 888 furthered by

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Analysis of novel, above-ground thermal energy storage concept utilizing low-cost, solid medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Clean energy power plants cannot effectively match peak demands without utilizing energy storage technologies. Currently, several solutions address short term demand cycles, but little work has been done to address seasonal ...

Barineau, Mark Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Design and development of Ethernet-based storage area network protocol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to the trend of rapidly growing volume of and increasingly critical role played by data storage, there is a strong demand to share storage over network. In this paper, we present an Ethernet-based storage area network protocol, called HyperSCSI. ... Keywords: Ethernet, HyperSCSI, Network Storage, Protocol, SAN

Wilson Yong Hong Wang; Heng Ngi Yeo; Yao Long Zhu; Tow Chong Chong; Teck Yoong Chai; Luying Zhou; Jit Bitwas

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Encapsulation of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Thermal energy storage is a major contributor to bridge the gap between energy demand (consumption) and energy production (supply) by concentrating solar power. The utilization (more)

Nath, Rupa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Electricity storage can smooth out moment-to-moment variations in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fast-response capability is a distinct advantage of power quality ... Order 890 required RTOs to allow energy storage and demand response to bid into ancillary ...

249

Impact of reservoir properties on mixing of inert cushion and natural gas in storage reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Underground natural gas storage is a process which effectively balances a variable demand market with a nearly constant supply of energy provided by the pipeline (more)

Srinivasan, Balaji S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Stability Analyses of Differently Shaped Salt Caverns for Underground Natural Gas Storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The primary purpose of underground storage for natural gas is to balance the variable demand for gas in high consumption seasons against the constant supply (more)

Onal, Erol

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Demand and Price Outlook for Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline, 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Demand and Price Outlook for Demand and Price Outlook for Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline, 2000 Tancred Lidderdale and Aileen Bohn (1) Contents * Summary * Introduction * Reformulated Gasoline Demand * Oxygenate Demand * Logistics o Interstate Movements and Storage o Local Distribution o Phase 2 RFG Logistics o Possible Opt-Ins to the RFG Program o State Low Sulfur, Low RVP Gasoline Initiatives o NAAQS o Tier 2 Gasoline * RFG Production Options o Toxic Air Pollutants (TAP) Reduction o Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) Reduction o Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) Reduction o Summary of RFG Production Options * Costs of Reformulated Gasoline o Phase 1 RFG Price Premium o California Clean Gasoline Price Premium o Phase 2 RFG Price Premium o Reduced Fuel Economy

252

electricity demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity consumption and demand datasets, specifically: annual observed electricity consumption by sector (1974 to 2009); observed percentage of consumers by sector (2002 - 2009); and regional electricity demand, as a percentage of total demand (2009). Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords Electricity Consumption electricity demand energy use by sector New Zealand Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Electricity Consumption by Sector (1974 - 2009) (xls, 46.1 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Percentage of Consumers by Sector (2002 - 2009) (xls, 43.5 KiB)

253

Annual World Oil Demand Growth  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Following relatively small increases of 1.3 million barrels per day in 1999 and 0.9 million barrels per day in 2000, EIA is estimating world demand may grow by 1.6 million barrels per day in 2001. Of this increase, about 3/5 comes from non-OECD countries, while U.S. oil demand growth represents more than half of the growth projected in OECD countries. Demand in Asia grew steadily during most of the 1990s, with 1991-1997 average growth per year at just above 0.8 million barrels per day. However, in 1998, demand dropped by 0.3 million barrels per day as a result of the Asian economic crisis that year. Since 1998, annual growth in oil demand has rebounded, but has not yet reached the average growth seen during 1991-1997. In the Former Soviet Union, oil demand plummeted during most of the

254

Solar applications of thermal energy storage. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technology assessment is presented on solar energy systems which use thermal energy storage. The study includes characterization of the current state-of-the-art of thermal energy storage, an assessment of the energy storage needs of solar energy systems, and the synthesis of this information into preliminary design criteria which would form the basis for detailed designs of thermal energy storage. (MHR)

Lee, C.; Taylor, L.; DeVries, J.; Heibein, S.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Thermal Storage with Conventional Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The newly opened Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia, PA; Exxon's Computer Facility at Florham Park, NJ; The Center Square Building in Philadelphia, are success stories for demand shifting through thermal storage. These buildings employ a simple thermal energy storage system that already exists in almost every structure - concrete. Thermal storage calculations simulate sub-cooling of a building's structure during unoccupied times. During occupied times, the sub-cooled concrete reduces peak cooling demand, thereby lowering demand and saving money. In addition, significant savings are possible in the first cost of chilled water equipment, and the smaller chillers run at peak capacity and efficiency during a greater portion of their run time. The building, controlled by an Energy Management and Control System (EMCS), "learns" from past experience how to run the building efficiently. The result is an optimized balance between energy cost and comfort.

Kieninger, R. T.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Fuzzy financial profitability analyses of demand side management alternatives from participant perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper derives fuzzy profitability models for the financial evaluation of different demand side management (DSM) alternatives. The present value of cost (PVC) and equivalent uniform annual cost (EUAC) models are selected to determine the least-cost ... Keywords: Mellin transform, cogeneration, cooling energy storage, demand side management, fuzzy mathematics, fuzzy ranking, profitability analyses

J. N. Sheen

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Towards a systematic characterization of the potential of demand side management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With an increasing share of electric energy produced from non-dispatchable renewable sources both energy storage and demand side management might gain tremendously in importance. While there has been significant progress in general properties and technologies of energy storage, the systematic characterization of features particular to demand side management such as its intermittent, time-dependent potential seems to be lagging behind. As a consequence, the development of efficient and sustainable strategies for demand side management and its integration into large-scale energy system models are impeded. This work introduces a novel framework for a systematic time-resolved characterization of the potential for demand side management. It is based on the specification of individual devices both with respect to their scheduled demand and their potential of load shifting. On larger scales sector-specific profiles can straightforwardly be taken into account. The potential for demand side management is then specifie...

Kleinhans, David

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lvi Southern California Edison filed its SmartConnectinfrastructure (e.g. , Edison Electric Institute, DemandSouthern California Edison Standard Practice Manual

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Commissioning Title Automated Demand Response and Commissioning Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-57384 Year of Publication 2005 Authors Piette, Mary...

260

Demand Uncertainty and Price Dispersion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Demand uncertainty has been recognized as one factor that may cause price dispersion in perfectly competitive markets with costly and perishable capacity. With the persistence (more)

Li, Suxi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

1995 Demand-Side Managment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1995 January 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels

262

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8 Figure 7: Maximum Demands Savings Intensity due toaddressed in this report. Maximum Demand Savings Intensity (Echelon Figure 7: Maximum Demands Savings Intensity due to

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy efficiency and demand response programs and tariffs.energy efficiency and demand response program and tariffenergy efficiency and demand response programs and tariffs.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency,Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,technical support from the Demand Response Research Center (

Federspiel, Clifford

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT) The opportunities for demand reduction and cost saving with building demand responsive control vary tremendously with building type...

266

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 2.0 Demand ResponseFully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8.4 Demand Response Integration . . . . . . . . . . .for each day type for the demand response study - moderatefor each day type for the demand response study - moderate

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their partnership in demand response automation research andand Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.

Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilitiesof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

23 ii Retail Demand Response in SPP List of Figures and10 Figure 3. Demand Response Resources by11 Figure 4. Existing Demand Response Resources by Type of

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 1. Economic demand response and real time pricing (Implications of Demand Response Programs in CompetitiveAdvanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Objectives - Develop and verify: On-board hydrogen storage systems achieving: 1.5 kWhkg (4.5 wt%), 1.2 kWhL, and 6kWh by 2005 2 kWhkg (6 wt%), 1.5 kWhL, and 4kWh by...

274

Battery resource assessment. Interim report No. 1. Battery materials demand scenarios  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Projections of demand for batteries and battery materials between 1980 and 2000 are presented. The estimates are based on existing predictions for the future of the electric vehicle, photovoltaic, utility load-leveling, and existing battery industry. Battery demand was first computed as kilowatt-hours of storage for various types of batteries. Using estimates for the materials required for each battery, the maximum demand that could be expected for each battery material was determined.

Sullivan, D.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Superconducting 30-MJ Energy Storage Coil", Proc. 19 80 ASC,Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant", IEEE Trans.SlIperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Unit", in Advances

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Storage | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Usage Storage Storage Energy storage isnt just for AA batteries. Thanks to investments from the Energy Department's Advanced Research...

279

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scale Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant", IEEEfor SlIperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Unit", inSuperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant, Advances in

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts on...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

282

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

283

China, India demand cushions prices  

SciTech Connect

Despite the hopes of coal consumers, coal prices did not plummet in 2006 as demand stayed firm. China and India's growing economies, coupled with solid supply-demand fundamentals in North America and Europe, and highly volatile prices for alternatives are likely to keep physical coal prices from wide swings in the coming year.

Boyle, M.

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

Harnessing the power of demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response can provide a series of economic services to the market and also provide ''insurance value'' under low-likelihood, but high-impact circumstances in which grid reliablity is enhanced. Here is how ISOs and RTOs are fostering demand response within wholesale electricity markets. (author)

Sheffrin, Anjali; Yoshimura, Henry; LaPlante, David; Neenan, Bernard

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Project Technologies: Demand Response  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of a limited number of demand response technologies and implementations deployed in the SGIG projects.

Fuller, Jason C.; Prakash Kumar, Nirupama; Bonebrake, Christopher A.

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

286

Demand Response for Ancillary Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many demand response resources are technically capable of providing ancillary services. In some cases, they can provide superior response to generators, as the curtailment of load is typically much faster than ramping thermal and hydropower plants. Analysis and quantification of demand response resources providing ancillary services is necessary to understand the resources economic value and impact on the power system. Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and illustrate a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of the demand response resource and to examine how to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to translate the technical potential for demand response providing ancillary services into a realizable potential.

Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

New York Power Authority Sodium Sulfur Battery Storage Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Battery Storage Project Yan Kishinevsky New York Power Authority LI Bus Issues LIPA Tariff Time Energy (kWh) Demand (kWmonth) I, off peak Mid-7am 0.0440 - II, peak...

288

ESS 2012 Peer Review - NYSERDA Energy Storage Projects - Dhruv...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Program in the DOE Office of Electricity for its support in this work. LIPA Tariff Time Energy Charge (kWh) Demand Charge (kWmonth) I. Off peak 11pm - 7am...

289

RECOURCES SOLARCARRIERS, STORAGE, & TRANSFORMATION ELECTRICAL FLOW SEE ALSO SIDEBAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by natural disasters, purposeful attack, or unusually high demand). When failures occur at various locations and thermal energy storage; n microgrids, ac and dc, including both self-contained, cellu- lar, and universal

Amin, S. Massoud

290

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the average and maximum peak demand savings. The electricity1: Average and Maximum Peak Electric Demand Savings during

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California Title Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California...

292

Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Daniel R. Borneo, PE Daniel R. Borneo, PE Sandia National Laboratories September 27, 2007 San Francisco, CA PEER REVIEW 2007 DOE(SNL)/CEC Energy Storage Program FYO7 Projects Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. 2 Presentation Outline * DOE(SNL)/CEC Collaboration - Background of DOE(SNL)/CEC Collaboration - FY07 Project Review * Zinc Bromine Battery (ZBB) Demonstration * Palmdale Super capacitor Demonstration * Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) Regional Transit (RT) Super capacitor demonstration * Beacon Flywheel Energy Storage System (FESS) 3 Background of DOE(SNL)/CEC Collaboration * Memorandum of Understanding Between CEC and DOE (SNL). - In Place since 2004

293

Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development Concept Development Concept Nitrogen-Air Battery F.M. Delnick, D. Ingersoll, K.Waldrip Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM presented to U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Research Program Washington, DC November 2-4, 2010 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Funded by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy through Sandia National Laboratories Full Air Breathing Battery Concept * Concept is to use O 2 and N 2 as the electrodes in a battery * Novel because N 2 is considered inert * Our group routinely reacts N 2 electrochemically

294

Potential of solar cooling systems for peak demand reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We investigated the technical feasibility of solar cooling for peak demand reduction using a building energy simulation program (DOE2.1D). The system studied was an absorption cooling system with a thermal coefficient of performance of 0.8 driven by a solar collector system with an efficiency of 50% with no thermal storage. The analysis for three different climates showed that, on the day with peak cooling load, about 17% of the peak load could be met satisfactorily with the solar-assisted cooling system without any thermal storage. A performance availability analysis indicated that the solar cooling system should be designed for lower amounts of available solar resources that coincide with the hours during which peak demand reduction is required. The analysis indicated that in dry climates, direct-normal concentrating collectors work well for solar cooling; however, in humid climates, collectors that absorb diffuse radiation work better.

Pesaran, A.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Neymark, J. [Neymark (Joel), Golden, CO (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model of the Global Crude Oil Market and the U.S. RetailNoureddine. 2002. World crude oil and natural gas: a demandanalysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. Energy

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Joint Model of the Global Crude Oil Market and the U.S.Noureddine. 2002. World crude oil and natural gas: a demandelasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline. Results

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Joint Model of the Global Crude Oil Market and the U.S.Noureddine. 2002. World crude oil and natural gas: a demandelasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline. Results

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

global gasoline and diesel price and income elasticities.shift in the short-run price elasticity of gasoline demand.Habits and Uncertain Relative Prices: Simulating Petrol Con-

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

NETL: Carbon Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) Programmatic Points of Contact Carbon Storage Program Infrastructure Coordinator Carbon Storage...

300

A Stable Vanadium Redox-Flow Battery with High Energy Density for Large-scale Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

Low cost, high performance redox flow batteries are highly demanded for up to multi-megawatt levels of renewable and grid energy storage. Here, we report a new vanadium redox flow battery with a significant improvement over the current technologies. This new battery utilizes a sulfate-chloride mixed solution, which is capable of dissolving more than 2.5 M vanadium or about a 70% increase in the energy storage capacity over the current vanadium sulfate system. More importantly, the new electrolyte remains stable over a wide temperature range of -5 to 60oC, potentially eliminating the need of active heat management. Its high energy density, broad operational temperature window, and excellent electrochemical performance would lead to a significant reduction in the cost of energy storage, thus accelerating its market penetration.

Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Wang, Wei; Vijayakumar, M.; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Baowei; Zhang, Jianlu; Xia, Guanguang; Hu, Jian Z.; Graff, Gordon L.; Liu, Jun; Yang, Zhenguo

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Superconducting magnetic energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fusion power production requires energy storage and transfer on short time scales to create confining magnetic fields and for heating plasmas. The theta-pinch Scyllac Fusion Test Reactor (SFTR) requires 480 MJ of energy to drive the 5-T compression field with a 0.7-ms rise time. Tokamak Experimental Power Reactors (EPR) require 1 to 2 GJ of energy with a 1 to 2-s rise time for plasma ohmic heating. The design, development, and testing of four 300-kJ energy storage coils to satisfy the SFTR needs are described. Potential rotating machinery and homopolar energy systems for both the Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor (RTPR) and tokamak ohmic-heating are presented.

Rogers, J.D.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Status and Challenges in Electrochemical Energy Storage Technologies for Stationary Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are a number of EES technologies that exist and are potential candidates for the stationary applications. Among the most promising ones are batteries that store electrical energy via electrochemical conversion and release it according to demands. But all the exiting battery technologies are facing challenges in cost and performance for the particular applications. To advance the technology and accelerate market penetration requires substantial progress in advanced materials and chemistries, along with design and engineering. Given this is a relative new field to the materials community, this issue JOM includes a topic on the stationary electrical energy storage, with focus on the needs, requirements and status and challenges in technologies.

Yang, Zhenguo

2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

303

Application-storage discovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Discovering application dependency on data and storage is a key prerequisite for many storage optimization tasks such as data assignment to storage tiers, storage consolidation, virtualization, and handling unused data. However, in the real world these ... Keywords: enterprise storage, experimental evaluation, storage discovery

Nikolai Joukov; Birgit Pfitzmann; HariGovind V. Ramasamy; Murthy V. Devarakonda

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Silo Storage Preconceptual Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has a need to develop and field a low-cost option for the long-term storage of a variety of radiological material. The storage options primary requirement is to provide both environmental and physical protection of the materials. Design criteria for this effort require a low initial cost and minimum maintenance over a 50-year design life. In 1999, Argonne National Laboratory-West was tasked with developing a dry silo storage option for the BN-350 Spent Fuel in Aktau Kazakhstan. Argons design consisted of a carbon steel cylinder approximately 16 ft long, 18 in. outside diameter and 0.375 in. wall thickness. The carbon steel silo was protected from corrosion by a duplex coating system consisting of zinc and epoxy. Although the study indicated that the duplex coating design would provide a design life well in excess of the required 50 years, the review board was concerned because of the novelty of the design and the lack of historical use. In 2012, NNSA tasked Idaho National Laboratory (INL) with reinvestigating the silo storage concept and development of alternative corrosion protection strategies. The 2012 study, Silo Storage Concepts, Cathodic Protection Options Study (INL/EST-12-26627), concludes that the option which best fits the design criterion is a passive cathotic protection scheme, consisting of a carbon steel tube coated with zinc or a zinc-aluminum alloy encapsulated in either concrete or a cement grout. The hot dipped zinc coating option was considered most efficient, but the flame-sprayed option could be used if a thicker zinc coating was determined to be necessary.

Stephanie L. Austad; Patrick W. Bragassa; Kevin M Croft; David S Ferguson; Scott C Gladson; Annette L Shafer; John H Weathersby

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Understanding Energy Storage Solutions and Capabilities on Utility Distribution Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Widespread use of storage will require better grid integration tools to plan for the optimal size, use, and location of energy storage systems. Also important will be a coordinated effort between technology developers and utilities to ensure that storage systems are designed to adequately address utility needs. Utilities must understand the technical attributes and grid operational benefits of energy storage systems. Such operational benefits can also improve the definition of storage system functional r...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

306

Ice storage rooftop retrofit for rooftop air conditioning  

SciTech Connect

A significant fraction of the floor space in commercial and federal buildings is cooled by single-package rooftop air conditioning units. These units are located on flat roofs and usually operate during the day under hot conditions. They are usually less energy efficient than a chiller system for building cooling. Several U.S. companies are developing systems that employ ice storage in conjunction with chillers to replace older, inefficient rooftop units for improved performance and minimal use of on-peak electricity. Although the low evaporator temperatures needed for ice making tend to reduce the efficiency of the chiller, the overall operating costs of the ice storage system may be lower than that of a packaged, conventional rooftop installation. One version of this concept, the Roofberg{reg_sign} System developed by the Calmac Corporation, was evaluated on a small building at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The Roofberg system consists of a chiller, an ice storage tank, and one or more rooftop units whose evaporator coils have been adapted to use a glycol solution for cooling. The ice storage component decouples the cooling demand of the building from the operation of the chiller. Therefore, the chiller can operate at night (cooler, more efficient condensing temperatures) to meet a daytime cooling demand. This flexibility permits a smaller chiller to satisfy a larger peak cooling load. Further, the system can be operated to shift the cooling demand to off-peak hours when electricity from the utility is generated more efficiently and at lower cost. This Roofberg system was successfully installed last year on a small one-story office building in Oak Ridge and is currently being operated to cool the building. The building and system were sufficiently instrumented to allow a determination of the performance and efficiency of the Roofberg system. Although the energy efficiency of a simulated Roofberg storage/chiller concept operating in the full storage mode was about equal to what could be expected through a simple rooftop efficiency upgrade, the operating costs for the Roofberg system could be much more favorable depending on the utility rate structure. The ability of Roofberg to move much of the cooling load to off-peak periods enables it to take advantage of on-peak demand charges and time-of-use electricity rates. The Roofberg system, as installed, was able to reduce the on-peak energy use of the cooling system to 35% of the on-peak energy consumption of the baseline system. A comparative analysis of a rooftop replacement and Roofberg indicated that the Roofberg system on Building 2518 would be the better economic choice over a range of demand charges and on-off peak energy prices which are typical of utility rate tariffs for commercial buildings.

Tomlinson, J.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Jennings, L.W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Concentrated solar power on demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes a new concentrating solar power central receiver system with integral thermal storage. Hillside mounted heliostats direct sunlight into a volumetric absorption molten salt pool, which also functions ...

Codd, Daniel Shawn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Residential Demand Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" by appliance (or UEC-in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock,

309

World Crude Production Not Keeping Pace with Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: The crude market is the major factor behind today’s low stocks. This graph shows the balance between world production and demand for petroleum. Normally, production exceeds demand in the summer, building stocks, and is less than demand in the winter months, drawing the stocks back down (dark blue areas). However, production exceeded demand through most of 1997 and 1998, building world stocks to very high levels and driving prices down. But the situation reversed in 1999. Recently, there has been more petroleum demand than supply, requiring the use of stocks to meet petroleum needs. Following the extremely low crude oil prices at the beginning of 1999, OPEC agreed to remove about 6% of world production from the market in order to work off excess inventories and bring prices back up.

310

New and Underutilized Technology: Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control New and Underutilized Technology: Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control October 4, 2013 - 4:23pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for carbon dioxide (CO2) demand ventilation control within the Federal sector. Benefits Demand ventilation control systems modulate ventilation levels based on current building occupancy, saving energy while still maintaining proper indoor air quality (IAQ). CO2 sensors are commonly used, but a multiple-parameter approach using total volatile organic compounds (TVOC), particulate matter (PM), formaldehyde, and relative humidity (RH) levels can also be used. CO2 sensors control the outside air damper to reduce the amount of outside air that needs to be conditioned and supplied to the building when

311

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acknowledgments SUMMARY Electricity Demand ElectricityAdverse Impacts ELECTRICITY DEMAND . . . .Demand forElectricity Sales Electricity Demand by Major Utility

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Industrial Demand Module Table 6.1. Industry Categories. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 6.2.Retirement Rates. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting

313

building demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

314

Demand Response Research in Spain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Research in Spain Demand Response Research in Spain Speaker(s): Iñigo Cobelo Date: August 22, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mary Ann Piette The Spanish power system is becoming increasingly difficult to operate. The peak load grows every year, and the permission to build new transmission and distribution infrastructures is difficult to obtain. In this scenario Demand Response can play an important role, and become a resource that could help network operators. The present deployment of demand response measures is small, but this situation however may change in the short term. The two main Spanish utilities and the transmission network operator are designing research projects in this field. All customer segments are targeted, and the research will lead to pilot installations and tests.

315

EIA - AEO2010 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Electricity Demand Figure 69. U.S. electricity demand growth 1950-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 60. Average annual U.S. retail electricity prices in three cases, 1970-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel in three cases, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 62. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 63. Levelized electricity costs for new power plants, 2020 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 64. Electricity generating capacity at U.S. nuclear power plants in three cases, 2008, 2020, and 2035

316

Winter Demand Impacted by Weather  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 Notes: Heating oil demand is strongly influenced by weather. The "normal" numbers are the expected values for winter 2000-2001 used in EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook. The chart...

317

Demand for money in China .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research investigates the long-run equilibrium relationship between money demand and its determinants in China over the period 1952-2004 for three definitions of money (more)

Zhang, Qing

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Thermal Mass and Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Mass and Demand Response Speaker(s): Gregor Henze Phil C. Bomrad Date: November 2, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Janie Page The topic of...

319

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference on Building Commissioning: May 4-6, 2005 Motegi,National Conference on Building Commissioning: May 4-6, 2005Demand Response and Commissioning Mary Ann Piette, David S.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Distillate Demand Strong Last Winter  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Notes: Well, distillate fuel demand wasn't the reason that stocks increased in January 2001 and kept prices from going higher. As you will hear shortly, natural gas prices spiked...

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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Leslie Mancebo (7234) Transportation Demand &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Leslie Mancebo (7234) Transportation Demand & Marketing Coordinator 1 FTE, 1 HC Administrative Vice Chancellor Transportation and Parking Services Clifford A. Contreras (0245) Director 30.10 FTE Alternative Transportation & Marketing Reconciliation Lourdes Lupercio (4723) Michelle McArdle (7512) Parking

Hammock, Bruce D.

322

STEO December 2012 - coal demand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

coal demand seen below 1 billion tons in 2012 for fourth year in a row Coal consumption by U.S. power plants to generate electricity is expected to fall below 1 billion tons in...

323

Estimating Flexibility Requirements in a Demand-Driven Lean/JIT Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand-driven JIT manufacturing is based on the assumption of a level stable demand rate. This is however not the reality experienced by most companies. To handle fluctuations from a level stable demand rate, the manufacturing system needs flexibility. ... Keywords: JIT, capacity matching, flexibility

Peter Nielsen; Kenn Steger-Jensen

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneeringdemonstration of how existing utility load-management assets can providean important electricity system reliability resource known as spinningreserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinningreserve will give grid operators at the California Independent SystemOperator (CAISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful, newtool to improve system reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lowersystem operating costs.

Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Torres, Carlos; Hirth,Scott; Yinger, Bob; Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan; Bernier, Clark; Wright,Roger; Barat, A.; Watson, David S.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Program on Technology Innovation: Evaluation of Concentrating Solar Thermal Energy Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adding solar thermal energy storage to concentrating solar thermal power plants expands both the amount of power and the timing of production. With thermal energy storage, plant power output can be firmed and shaped to better match consumer demand for electricity. Thermal storage associated with these plants is typically much more efficient and cost-effective than electrical or mechanical forms of storage. In many cases, the addition of thermal energy storage can lower the levelized electricity productio...

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

326

Optimal Control of Harvesting Ice Thermal Storage Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal storage is becoming a standard consideration in HVAC and process cooling systems. As the technology is refined, more attention is being given to minimize the energy consumption and power demand requirements. This paper addresses a method for optimal control of a harvesting ice storage system. A simplified procedure is used to develop 24 hour load data. Example installations will be shown.

Knebel, D. E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Understanding and Improving Computational Science Storage Access through Continuous Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computational science applications are driving a demand for increasingly powerful storage systems. While many techniques are available for capturing the I/O behavior of individual application trial runs and specific components of the storage system, ... Keywords: I/O characterization, parallel file systems

Philip Carns; Kevin Harms; William Allcock; Charles Bacon; Samuel Lang; Robert Latham; Robert Ross

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

329

Energy Programs | Advanced Storage Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Storage Systems Advanced Storage Systems Tapping Into Fuel Cells and Batteries Page 1 of 2 Imagine being able to drive a forty-mile round-trip commute every day without ever going near a gas pump. As the United States moves towards an energy economy with reduced dependence on foreign oil and fewer carbon emissions, development of alternative fuel sources and transmission of the energy they provide is only part of the equation. An increase in energy generated from intermittent renewable sources and the growing need for mobile energy will require new, efficient means of storing it, and technological advancements will be necessary to support the nation's future energy storage needs. A change toward alternative transportation - hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid-electric vehicles and electric

330

Bulk Hydrogen Storage - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Hydrogen Storage Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop May 7-8, 2003 Crystal City, Virginia Breakout Session - Bulk Hydrogen Storage Main Themes/Caveats Bulk Storage = Anything not on the vehicle 10's of Tons -- End use point 50-100 Tons - Terminals/City Gates 1000's Tons - Between Production Facility and Terminal/City Gate Bulk storage requirements less restrictive and different from on-board storage Uncertainty about evolution of infrastructure requires multiple pathways to be considered Bulk storage is an economic solution to address supply/demand imbalance Breakout Session - Bulk Hydrogen Storage Targets/Objectives Hard to quantify - scenario & end-use dependent Storage Materials (solid state) and container require different targets

331

24/07/20031 Hydrogen Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

24/07/20031 Slide no. Hydrogen Storage with Emphasis on Metal Hydrides Allan Schrøder Pedersen. A need for energy storage may be foreseen if we will not rely on fossils · Buffer between consumption and production · Transport · Hydrogen may well be such an intermediate energy carrier #12;24/07/20037 Slide no

332

Energy Storage Integration Council (ESIC): 2013 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent electric energy storage deployments have encountered several challenges, including problems stemming from poor system integration, grid integration difficulties, insufficient factory testing and qualification, safety and reliability issues, and inadequate common test protocols. The utility industry needs clear requirements developed so vendors can manufacture cost-effective energy storage products to support the generation, transmission, and distribution system. To address these and related ...

2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

333

National Action Plan on Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Action Plan on Demand National Action Plan on Demand Action Plan on Demand National Action Plan on Demand Response Response Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group November 18, 2008 November 18, 2008 Daniel Gore Daniel Gore Office of Energy Market Regulation Office of Energy Market Regulation Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The author's views do not necessarily represent the views of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Presentation Contents Presentation Contents Statutory Requirements Statutory Requirements National Assessment [Study] of Demand Response National Assessment [Study] of Demand Response National Action Plan on Demand Response National Action Plan on Demand Response General Discussion on Demand Response and Energy Outlook

334

Thai gas demand seen outstripping supply  

SciTech Connect

Thailand's demand for gas will outstrip supplies in the late 1990s as rapid economic growth continues. Gas will be a cornerstone for Thai energy policy throughout the growth, although sources in neighboring countries need development. Thai gas production will rise 25% from 1992 to average 1 bcfd by 1995. Including production from new discoveries, production could rise to 1.5 bcfd by 2000, up almost 90% from the 1992 level. Increased gas flow output in the mid-1990s will be due largely to development of Gulf of Thailand fields. By 1998, production from Gulf of Thailand fields will not be enough to offset the decline in today's fields. Thailand will need to import more than 1 bcfd by 2005 in the absence of future discoveries in the country. The paper discusses new pipelines and imports.

1993-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

335

Global irrigation demand - A holistic approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To develop a research track on global irrigation demand and the use of future water resources to help feed the world, we need to adopt a holistic approach to understand inter-dependencies and the main drivers of the global water system and unravel positive (reinforcing) and negative (balancing) feedback loops that can lead to cascading consequences. Thus, there needs to be more research dedicated to 1) the modeling of the agricultural and water systems as components within an integrated assessment human-Earth modeling framework, 2) the understanding of the linkages between the physical processes and the human system, and to integrate them in an economic framework to capture the dynamics of market price, and institutional regulations. This editorial discusses the importance of tackling the global irrigation problem in an integrated assessment modeling framework.

Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

336

Environmental assessment of the potential effects of aquifer thermal energy storage systems on microorganisms in groundwater  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the potential environmental effects (both adverse and beneficials) of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) technology pertaining to microbial communities indigenous to subsurface environments (i.e., aquifers) and the propagation, movement, and potential release of pathogenic microorganisms (specifically, Legionella) within ATES systems. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in aquifers shows great promise to reduce peak demand; reduce electric utility load problems; contribute to establishing favorable economics for district heating and cooling systems; and reduce pollution from extraction, refining, and combustion of fossil fuels. However, concerns that the widespread implementation of this technology may have adverse effects on biological systems indigeneous to aquifers, as well as help to propagate and release pathogenic organisms that enter thee environments need to be resolved. 101 refs., 2 tabs.

Hicks, R.J.; Stewart, D.L.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Regulating carbon dioxide capture and storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This essay examines several legal, regulatory and organizational issues that need to be addressed to create an effective regulatory regime for carbon dioxide capture and storage ("CCS"). Legal, regulatory, and organizational ...

De Figueiredo, Mark A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals. Presented atand Automated Demand Response in Industrial RefrigeratedActions for Industrial Demand Response in California. LBNL-

Mares, K.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Barat, D. Watson. 2006 Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby 2008. Demand Response Spinning ReserveReport 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communications

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4. Option Value of a Thermal Energy Storage System for 5counter Real-time Prices Thermal Energy Storage vii Abstractfor the day, operating thermal energy storage overnight for

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Design and manufacture study of Ocean Renewable Energy Storage (ORES) prototype  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utility scale energy storage is needed to balance rapidly varying outputs from renewable energy systems such as wind and solar. In order to address this need, an innovative utility scale energy storage concept has been ...

Dndar, Gkhan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

FCT Hydrogen Storage: The 'National Hydrogen Storage Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The 'National Hydrogen Storage Project' to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: The 'National Hydrogen Storage Project' on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: The...

343

Definition: Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Demand Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Demand The rate at which electric energy is delivered to or by a system or part of a system, generally expressed in kilowatts or megawatts, at a given instant or averaged over any designated interval of time., The rate at which energy is being used by the customer.[1] Related Terms energy, electricity generation References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An i Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. nline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Demand&oldid=480555"

344

Successful demand-side management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is a brief summary of a series of case studies of five publicly-owned utilities that are noted for their success with demand-side management. These utilities are: (1) city of Austin, Texas, (2) Burlington Electric Department in Vermont, (3) Sacramento Municipal Utility District in California, (4) Seattle City Light, and (5) Waverly Light and Power in Iowa. From these case studies, the authors identified a number of traits associated with a successful demand-side management program. These traits are: (1) high rates, (2) economic factors, (3) environmental awareness, (4) state emphasis on integrated resource planning/demand side management, (5) local political support, (6) large-sized utilities, and (7) presence of a champion.

Hadley, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); Flanigan, T. [Results Center, Aspen, CO (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Winter Demand Impacted by Weather  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: Heating oil demand is strongly influenced by weather. The "normal" numbers are the expected values for winter 2000-2001 used in EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook. The chart indicates the extent to which the last winter exhibited below-normal heating degree-days (and thus below-normal heating demand). Temperatures were consistently warmer than normal throughout the 1999-2000 heating season. This was particularly true in November 1999, February 2001 and March 2001. For the heating season as a whole (October through March), the 1999-2000 winter yielded total HDDs 10.7% below normal. Normal temperatures this coming winter would, then, be expected to bring about 11% higher heating demand than we saw last year. Relative to normal, the 1999-2000 heating season was the warmest in

346

Turkey's energy demand and supply  

SciTech Connect

The aim of the present article is to investigate Turkey's energy demand and the contribution of domestic energy sources to energy consumption. Turkey, the 17th largest economy in the world, is an emerging country with a buoyant economy challenged by a growing demand for energy. Turkey's energy consumption has grown and will continue to grow along with its economy. Turkey's energy consumption is high, but its domestic primary energy sources are oil and natural gas reserves and their production is low. Total primary energy production met about 27% of the total primary energy demand in 2005. Oil has the biggest share in total primary energy consumption. Lignite has the biggest share in Turkey's primary energy production at 45%. Domestic production should be to be nearly doubled by 2010, mainly in coal (lignite), which, at present, accounts for almost half of the total energy production. The hydropower should also increase two-fold over the same period.

Balat, M. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to jointly host technology transfer meetings and occasional field excursions. A total of 15 technology transfer/strategic planning workshops were held.

Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

348

Energy storage criteria handbook. Final report mar 81-jun 82  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this handbook is to provide information and criteria necessary for the selection and sizing of energy storage technologies for use at U.S. Naval facilities. The handbook gives Naval base personnel procedures and information to select the most viable energy storage options to provide the space conditioning (heating and cooling) and domestic hot water needs of their facility. The handbook may also be used by contractors, installers, designers, engineers, architects, and manufacturers who intend to enter the energy storage business. The handbook is organized into three major sections: a general section, a technical section, and an example section. While a technical background is assumed for the latter two sections, the general section is simply written and can serve as an introduction to the field of energy storage. The technical section examines the following energy storage technologies: sensible heat storage, latent heat storage, cold storage, thermochemical storage, mechanical storage, pumped hydro storage, and electrochemical storage. The example section is limited to thermal storage and includes examples for: water tank storage, rockbed storage, latent heat storage, and cold water storage.

Hull, J.R.; Cole, R.L.; Hull, A.B.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

MONTHLY UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE REPORT FORM EIA-191M ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Page 2 DEFINITIONS Base (Cushion) Gas: The volume of gas needed as a permanent inventory to maintain adequate storage reservoir pressures and deliverability rates.

350

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential electricity consumption, the flattening of the demand curves (except Maximum demand) reflects decreasing population growth ratesresidential electricity demand are described in Table 11. For simplicity, end use-specific UEC and saturation rates

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

EIA projections of coal supply and demand  

SciTech Connect

Contents of this report include: EIA projections of coal supply and demand which covers forecasted coal supply and transportation, forecasted coal demand by consuming sector, and forecasted coal demand by the electric utility sector; and policy discussion.

Klein, D.E.

1989-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

352

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover,138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW by 2030, or 14

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pricing tariffs have a peak demand reduction potential ofneed to reduce summer peak demand that is used to set demandcustomers and a system peak demand of over 43,000 MW. SPPs

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with total Statewide peak demand and on peak days isto examine the electric peak demand related to lighting inDaily) - TOU Savings - Peak Demand Charges - Grid Peak -Low

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Tankless Demand Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Water Heaters Tankless Demand Water Heaters August 19, 2013 - 2:57pm Addthis Illustration of an electric demand water heater. At the top of the image, the heating unit is...

356

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand.Oglesby Executive Director #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product to the contributing authors listed previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad

357

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work and expertise of numerous California Energy previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped prepare

358

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand Robert P. Oglesby Executive Director #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped prepare the industrial forecast

359

A Semi-Lagrangian Approach for Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Semi-Lagrangian Approach for Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation Zhuliang Chen]. As such, natural gas storage facilities are constructed to provide a cushion for such fluctuations by releasing natural gas in storage in seasons with high demand. Recently, several authors [1, 32, 35, 36, 25

Forsyth, Peter A.

360

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997 Executive Summary Background Demand-side management (DSM) programs consist of the planning, implementing, and monitoring ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Equity Capital Flows and Demand for REITs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the shape of the market demand curve for ... Our results do not support a downward demand curve for ... Charleston, IL 61920, USA e-mail:...

362

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in...

363

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Long-term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan. B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response> B-4 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

al: Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand ResponseConference on Building Commissioning: April 22 24, 2008al: Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response

Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data Rate of Electricity Demand Growth Slows, Following the Historical Trend Electricity demand fluctuates in the short term in response to business cycles, weather conditions,...

366

Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource Title Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Eto, Joseph H.,...

367

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oakland CA, December. PJM Demand Side Response WorkingPrice Response Program a PJM Economic Load Response ProgramLoad Response Statistics PJM Demand Response Working Group

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulatory Commission (FERC) 2006. Assessment of DemandRegulatory Commission (FERC) 2007. Assessment of DemandRegulatory Commission (FERC) 2008a. Wholesale Competition

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

29 5.6. Peak and hourly demand43 6.6. Peak and seasonal demandthe average percent of peak demand) significantly impact the

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past several years, interest in large-scale control of peak energy demand and total consumption has increased. While motivated by a number of factors, this interest has primarily been spurred on the demand side by the increasing cost of energy and, on the supply side by the limited ability of utilities to build sufficient electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in electricity use through the use of price incentives. DR systems are also be design to shift or curtail energy demand at critical times when the generation, transmission, and distribution systems (i.e. the 'grid') are threatened with instabilities. To be effectively deployed on a large-scale, these proposed DR systems need to be automated. Automation will require robust and efficient data communications infrastructures across geographically dispersed markets. The present availability of widespread Internet connectivity and inexpensive, reliable computing hardware combined with the growing confidence in the capabilities of distributed, application-level communications protocols suggests that now is the time for designing and deploying practical systems. Centralized computer systems that are capable of providing continuous signals to automate customers reduction of power demand, are known as Demand Response Automation Servers (DRAS). The deployment of prototype DRAS systems has already begun - with most initial deployments targeting large commercial and industrial (C & I) customers. An examination of the current overall energy consumption by economic sector shows that the C & I market is responsible for roughly half of all energy consumption in the US. On a per customer basis, large C & I customers clearly have the most to offer - and to gain - by participating in DR programs to reduce peak demand. And, by concentrating on a small number of relatively sophisticated energy consumers, it has been possible to improve the DR 'state of the art' with a manageable commitment of technical resources on both the utility and consumer side. Although numerous C & I DR applications of a DRAS infrastructure are still in either prototype or early production phases, these early attempts at automating DR have been notably successful for both utilities and C & I customers. Several factors have strongly contributed to this success and will be discussed below. These successes have motivated utilities and regulators to look closely at how DR programs can be expanded to encompass the remaining (roughly) half of the state's energy load - the light commercial and, in numerical terms, the more important residential customer market. This survey examines technical issues facing the implementation of automated DR in the residential environment. In particular, we will look at the potential role of home automation networks in implementing wide-scale DR systems that communicate directly to individual residences.

McParland, Charles

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Advanced Thermal Energy Storage: Novel Tuning of Critical Fluctuations for Advanced Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HEATS Project: NAVITASMAX is developing a novel thermal energy storage solution. This innovative technology is based on simple and complex supercritical fluids substances where distinct liquid and gas phases do not exist, and tuning the properties of these fluid systems to increase their ability to store more heat. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in NAVITASMAXs system during the day and released at nightwhen the sun is not shiningto drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in NAVITASMAXs system at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours.

None

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Sorption Storage Technology Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Technology Summary DOE H2 Storage Workshop, Feb 14-15, 2011, Washington, DC 1 Compressed & Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshop February 14 - 15, 2011, Washington, DC...

373

Occult Trucking and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At least we used to. We are Occult Trucking and Storage andNOTHING. FLASHBACK -- OCCULT TRUCKING AND STORAGE DEPOT --I saw him. FLASHBACK - OCCULT TRUCKING AND STORAGE DEPOT -

Eyres, Jeffrey Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adki ns, "Raccoon Mountain Pumped-Storage Plant- Ten Years2J O. D. Johnson, "Worldwide Pumped-Storage Projects", PowerUnderground Pumped Hydro Storage", Proc. 1976 Eng.

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics on Google...

376

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Water demand management in Kuwait  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kuwait is an arid country located in the Middle East, with limited access to water resources. Yet water demand per capita is much higher than in other countries in the world, estimated to be around 450 L/capita/day. There ...

Milutinovic, Milan, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Demand-Side Management Glossary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, demand-side management (DSM) programs have grown in significance within the U.S. electric power industry. Such rapid growth has resulted in new terms, standards, and vocabulary used by DSM professionals. This report is a first attempt to provide a consistent set of definitions for the expanding DSM terminology.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Late January Cold Impacted Both Supply & Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A brief cold spell occurred in the second half of January on top of A brief cold spell occurred in the second half of January on top of the low stocks. Cold weather increases demand, but it also can interfere with supply, as happened this past January. During the week ending January 22, temperatures in the New England and the Mid-Atlantic areas shifted from being15 percent and 17 percent warmer than normal, respectively, to 24 percent and 22 percent colder than normal. The weather change increased weekly heating requirements by about 40 percent. Temperature declines during the winter affect heating oil demand in a number of ways: Space heating demand increases; Electricity peaking demand increases and power generators must turn to distillate to meet the new peak needs; Fuel switching from natural gas to distillate occurs among large

380

Demand Dispatch Intelligent Demand for a More Efficient Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed therein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. Demand Dispatch: Intelligent Demand for a More Efficient Grid

Keith Dodrill

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

NERSC HPSS Storage Statistics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Trends and Summaries Storage by Scientific Discipline Troubleshooting Optimizing IO performance on the Lustre file system IO Formats Sharing Data Transferring Data Unix...

382

Subsea Pumped Hydro Storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A new technology for energy storage called Subsea Pumped Hydro Storage (SPHS) has been evaluated from a techno-economical point of view. Intermittent renewable energy sources (more)

Erik, Almen John

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Energy Storage Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Testing The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is tasked by the U.S. Department of Energys Vehicle Technology Program to conduct various types of energy storage...

384

Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Underground Natural Gas Storage. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Monthly Survey of Storage Field Operators -- asking injections, withdrawals, base gas, working gas.

385

The alchemy of demand response: turning demand into supply  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Paying customers to refrain from purchasing products they want seems to run counter to the normal operation of markets. Demand response should be interpreted not as a supply-side resource but as a secondary market that attempts to correct the misallocation of electricity among electric users caused by regulated average rate tariffs. In a world with costless metering, the DR solution results in inefficiency as measured by deadweight losses. (author)

Rochlin, Cliff

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier Approach Massimo www.cepe.ethz.ch #12;US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier Approach Page 1 of 25 US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier

387

Optimal Technology Investment and Operation in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings with Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy has launched the Zero-Net-Energy (ZNE) Commercial Building Initiative (CBI) in order to develop commercial buildings that produce as much energy as they use. Its objective is to make these buildings marketable by 2025 such that they minimize their energy use through cutting-edge energy-efficient technologies and meet their remaining energy needs through on-site renewable energy generation. We examine how such buildings may be implemented within the context of a cost- or carbon-minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various technologies, such as photovoltaic (PV) on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and passive / demand-response technologies. We use a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has a multi-criteria objective function: the minimization of a weighted average of the building's annual energy costs and carbon / CO2 emissions. The MILP's constraints ensure energy balance and capacity limits. In addition, constraining the building's energy consumed to equal its energy exports enables us to explore how energy sales and demand-response measures may enable compliance with the CBI. Using a nursing home in northern California and New York with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find that a ZNE building requires ample PV capacity installed to ensure electricity sales during the day. This is complemented by investment in energy-efficient combined heat and power equipment, while occasional demand response shaves energy consumption. A large amount of storage is also adopted, which may be impractical. Nevertheless, it shows the nature of the solutions and costs necessary to achieve ZNE. For comparison, we analyze a nursing home facility in New York to examine the effects of a flatter tariff structure and different load profiles. It has trouble reaching ZNE status and its load reductions as well as efficiency measures need to be more effective than those in the CA case. Finally, we illustrate that the multi-criteria frontier that considers costs and carbon emissions in the presence of demand response dominates the one without it.

Stadler , Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; ,, Hirohisa Aki; Lai, Judy

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

388

OEM Perspective on Cryogenic H2 Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

compressed compressed Hydrogen Storage. Tobias Brunner February 15 th , 2011, Washington D.C. BMW Hydrogen. Hydrogen Storage Workshop. BMW EfficientDynamics Less emissions. More driving pleasure. BMW Hydrogen Washington DC 02/15/2011 Page 2 BMW Hydrogen Technology Strategy. Advancement of key components. Source: BMW Advanced key components Next vehicle & infrastructure Hydrogen 7 small series LH 2 Storage  Capacity   Safety   Boil-off loss   Pressure supply   Complexity   Infrastructure  Technology leap storage & drive train Efficient long-range mobility:  Zero Emission  Focus on vehicles with high energy demand.  Range > 500 km (6-8 kg H 2 )  Fast refueling (< 4 min / 6 kg)  Optimized safety oriented vehicle package & component

389

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Natural Gas Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Demand Natural Gas Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Natural Gas Demand Figure 72. Natural gas consumption by sector, 1990-2030 (trillion cubic feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 73. Total natural gas consumption, 1990-2030 (trillion cubic feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Fastest Increase in Natural Gas Use Is Expected for the Buildings Sectors In the reference case, total natural gas consumption increases from 21.7 trillion cubic feet in 2006 to a peak value of 23.8 trillion cubic feet in 2016, followed by a decline to 22.7 trillion cubic feet in 2030. The natural gas share of total energy consumption drops from 22 percent in 2006

390

Digital Data Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... projections expect the annual demand for rigid disk ... imaging are creating new demands for alternate ... Tribology: Develop new lubricants and surface ...

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

391

Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries Title Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5319E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ghatikar, Girish, Aimee T. McKane, Sasank Goli, Peter L. Therkelsen, and Daniel Olsen Date Published 01/2012 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords automated dr, controls and automation, demand response, dynamic pricing, industrial controls, market sectors, openadr Abstract California's electricity markets are moving toward dynamic pricing models, such as real-time pricing, within the next few years, which could have a significant impact on an industrial facility's cost of energy use during the times of peak use. Adequate controls and automated systems that provide industrial facility managers real-time energy use and cost information are necessary for successful implementation of a comprehensive electricity strategy; however, little is known about the current control capacity of California industries. To address this gap, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, in close collaboration with California industrial trade associations, conducted a survey to determine the current state of controls technologies in California industries. This study identifies sectors that have the technical capability to implement Demand Response (DR) and Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). In an effort to assist policy makers and industry in meeting the challenges of real-time pricing, facility operational and organizational factors were taken into consideration to generate recommendations on which sectors Demand Response efforts should be focused. Analysis of the survey responses showed that while the vast majority of industrial facilities have semi- or fully automated control systems, participation in Demand Response programs is still low due to perceived barriers. The results also showed that the facilities that use continuous processes are good Demand Response candidates. When comparing facilities participating in Demand Response to those not participating, several similarities and differences emerged. Demand Response-participating facilities and non-participating facilities had similar timings of peak energy use, production processes, and participation in energy audits. Though the survey sample was smaller than anticipated, the results seemed to support our preliminary assumptions. Demonstrations of Auto-Demand Response in industrial facilities with good control capabilities are needed to dispel perceived barriers to participation and to investigate industrial subsectors suggested of having inherent Demand Response potential.

392

Energy Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data Figure 55 From AEO2011 report . Market Trends Growth in energy use is linked to population growth through increases in housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, and goods and services. These changes affect not only the level of energy use, but also the mix of fuels used. Energy consumption per capita declined from 337 million Btu in 2007 to 308 million Btu in 2009, the lowest level since 1967. In the AEO2011 Reference case, energy use per capita increases slightly through 2013, as the economy recovers from the 2008-2009 economic downturn. After 2013, energy use per capita declines by 0.3 percent per year on average, to 293 million Btu in 2035, as higher efficiency standards for vehicles and

393

Q:\asufinal_0107_demand.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

00 00 (AEO2000) Assumptions to the January 2000 With Projections to 2020 DOE/EIA-0554(2000) Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution

394

Mission Need Statement: Calcine Disposition Project Major Systems Acquisition Project  

SciTech Connect

This document identifies the need to establish the Calcine Disposition Project to determine and implement the final disposition of calcine including characterization, retrieval, treatment (if necessary), packaging, loading, onsite interim storage pending shipment to a repository or interim storage facility, and disposition of related facilities.

J. T. Beck

2007-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

395

Demand Response and Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For several decades, power companies have deployed various types of demand response (DR), such as interruptible contracts, and there is substantial ongoing research and development on sophisticated mechanisms for triggering DR. In this white paper, EPRI discusses the increasing use of electricity DR in the power industry and how this will affect the practice of energy risk management. This paper outlines 1) characteristics of a common approach to energy risk management, 2) the variety of types of DR impl...

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

396

Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Predictive Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on AddThis.com...

397

Demand Trading: Measurement, Verification, and Settlement (MVS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With this report, EPRI's trilogy of publications on demand trading is complete. The first report (1006015), the "Demand Trading Toolkit," documented how to conduct demand trading based on price. The second report (1001635), "Demand Trading: Building Liquidity," focused on the problem of liquidity in the energy industry and developed the Demand Response Resource Bank concept for governing electricity markets based on reliability. The present report focuses on the emerging price/risk partnerships in electr...

2004-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

398

Demand Response For Power System Reliability: FAQ  

SciTech Connect

Demand response is the most underutilized power system reliability resource in North America. Technological advances now make it possible to tap this resource to both reduce costs and improve. Misconceptions concerning response capabilities tend to force loads to provide responses that they are less able to provide and often prohibit them from providing the most valuable reliability services. Fortunately this is beginning to change with some ISOs making more extensive use of load response. This report is structured as a series of short questions and answers that address load response capabilities and power system reliability needs. Its objective is to further the use of responsive load as a bulk power system reliability resource in providing the fastest and most valuable ancillary services.

Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Summary of seasonal thermal energy storage field test projects in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves storage of available heat or chill for distribution at a later time to meet thermal loads. STES can reduce energy consumption, peak energy demand, and emissions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere over conventional systems. It is estimated that full-scale application of STES would provide 2% to 4% of total energy needs in the United States. One STES technology, aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES), has been determined to be the most cost-effective option in the United States when site conditions enable its use. ATES has been analyzed in the laboratory and investigated in the field in the United States since the program was established at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in 1979. Two field test facilities (FTFs), one for heating ATES at the University of Minnesota and the other for cooling ATES at the University of Alabama, have been primary testing grounds for US ATES research. Computer models have been developed to analyze the complex thermal and fluid dynamics. Extensive monitoring of FTFs has provided verification of and refinements to the computer models. The areas of geochemistry and microbiology have been explored as they apply to the aquifer environment. In general, the two FTFs have been successful in demonstrating the steps needed to make an ATES system operational.

Johnson, B.K.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Superconducting magnetic energy storage  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. electric utility industry transmits power to customers at a rate equivalent to only 60% of generating capacity because, on an annual basis, the demand for power is not constant. Load leveling and peak shaving units of various types are being used to increase the utilization of the base load nuclear and fossil power plants. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) is developing superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems which will store and deliver electrical energy for the purpose of load leveling, peak shaving, and the stabilization of electric utility networks. This technology may prove to be an effective means of storing energy for the electric utilities because (1) it has a high efficiency (approximately 90%), (2) it may improve system stability through the fast response of the converter, and (3) there should be fewer siting restrictions than for other load leveling systems. A general SMES system and a reference design for a 10-GWh unit for load leveling are described; and the results of some recent converter tests are presented.

Hassenzahl, W.V.; Boenig, H.J.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Storage | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Storage Storage Energy storage isn’t just for AA batteries. Thanks to investments from the Energy Department's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), energy storage may soon play a bigger part in our electricity grid, making it possible to generate more renewable electricity. Learn more. Energy storage isn't just for AA batteries. Thanks to investments from the Energy Department's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), energy storage may soon play a bigger part in our electricity grid, making it possible to generate more renewable electricity. Learn more.

402

Enhanced oil recovery: major equipment and its projected demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After years of research and pilot tests, the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) industry is taking major leaps forward in 1981. With the launching of several hundred new EOR pilot tests, the announcement of major CO/sub 2/ pipelines into W. Texas, and a $3.6-billion purchase of South Belridge heavy oil by Shell, oil companies are showing their confidence in this technologically-emerging area. While much research remains to be done to make these processes more efficient and economic, the important commercial stage of the EOR industry's growth has clearly been reached. Along with the growth of the EOR industry will come a major demand for equipment and facilities. This demand will include traditional requirements for steam generators and compressors, although on a scale many times larger than at present, as well as new requirements for gas separation, chemical storage, and special tubulars.

Kuuskraa, V.A.; Hammershaimb, E.C.; Wicks, D.E.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,study of automated demand response in wastewater treatmentopportunities for demand response control strategies in

Thompson, Lisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Techniques for Demand Response, report for theand Reliability Demand Response Programs: Final Report.Demand Response

McKane, Aimee T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsand Techniques for Demand Response. California Energyand S. Kiliccote. Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts:

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEMAND . . . .Demand for Electricity and Power PeakDemand . . . . ELECTRICITY REQUIREMENTS FOR AGRICULTUREResults . . Coriclusions ELECTRICITY SUPPLY Hydroelectric

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

14 Peak Demand Baselinewinter morning electric peak demand in commercial buildings.California to reduce peak demand during summer afternoons,

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

An Academic development model for university and technikon students : meeting the demands of the 21st century.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The demands of a rapidly changing future on learners of Higher Education Institutions who need to be effectively employed, necessitate that these institutions become responsive (more)

Celliers, Mariana

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Electrochemical Energy Storage for Green Grid  

SciTech Connect

The is a comprehensive review on the needs and potential storage technologies for electrical grid that is expected to integrate significant levels of renewables. This review offers details of the technologies, in terms of needs, status, challenges and future R&d directions.

Yang, Zhenguo; Zhang, Jianlu; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Lu, Xiaochuan; Choi, Daiwon; Lemmon, John P.; Liu, Jun

2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

410

Price-elastic demand in deregulated electricity markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the amount of electricity demand that is settled forward.unresponsive demand side, electricity demand has to be metxed percentage of overall electricity demand. The ISO, thus,

Siddiqui, Afzal S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Building Energy Software Tools Directory : Demand Response Quick...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Back to Tool Demand response quick assessment tool screenshot Demand response quick assessment tool screenshot Demand response quick...

412

Automated Demand Response Strategies and Commissioning Commercial Building Controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Braun (Purdue). 2004. Peak demand reduction from pre-coolingthe average and maximum peak demand savings. The electricityuse charges, demand ratchets, peak demand charges, and other

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 1 - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook In the IEO2009 projections, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 44 percent from 2006 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD economies. Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 11. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 12. Marketed Energy Use by Region, 1990-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

414

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 1 - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook In the IEO2008 projections, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 50 percent from 2005 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD economies. Figure 9. World Marketed EnergyConsumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 11. Marketed Energy Use in the Non-OECD Economies by Region, 1990-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

415

Molten Glass for Thermal Storage: Advanced Molten Glass for Heat Transfer and Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HEATS Project: Halotechnics is developing a high-temperature thermal energy storage system using a new thermal-storage and heat-transfer material: earth-abundant and low-melting-point molten glass. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at nightwhen the sun is not outto drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Halotechnics new thermal storage material targets a price that is potentially cheaper than the molten salt used in most commercial solar thermal storage systems today. It is also extremely stable at temperatures up to 1200Chundreds of degrees hotter than the highest temperature molten salt can handle. Being able to function at high temperatures will significantly increase the efficiency of turning heat into electricity. Halotechnics is developing a scalable system to pump, heat, store, and discharge the molten glass. The company is leveraging technology used in the modern glass industry, which has decades of experience handling molten glass.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While there is general agreement that demand response (DR) is a valued component in a utility resource plan, there is a lack of consensus regarding how to value DR. Establishing the value of DR is a prerequisite to determining how much and what types of DR should be implemented, to which customers DR should be targeted, and a key determinant that drives the development of economically viable DR consumer technology. Most approaches for quantifying the value of DR focus on changes in utility system revenue requirements based on resource plans with and without DR. This ''utility centric'' approach does not assign any value to DR impacts that lower energy and capacity prices, improve reliability, lower system and network operating costs, produce better air quality, and provide improved customer choice and control. Proper valuation of these benefits requires a different basis for monetization. The review concludes that no single methodology today adequately captures the wide range of benefits and value potentially attributed to DR. To provide a more comprehensive valuation approach, current methods such as the Standard Practice Method (SPM) will most likely have to be supplemented with one or more alternative benefit-valuation approaches. This report provides an updated perspective on the DR valuation framework. It includes an introduction and four chapters that address the key elements of demand response valuation, a comprehensive literature review, and specific research recommendations.

Heffner, Grayson

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Transportation Storage Interface | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Interface Transportation Storage Interface Regulation of Future Extended Storage and Transportation. Transportation Storage Interface More Documents & Publications Status...

418

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Storage On-board hydrogen storage for transportation applications continues to be one of the most technically challenging barriers to the widespread commercialization of hydrogen-fueled vehicles. The EERE hydrogen storage activity focuses primarily on the applied research and development (R&D) of low-pressure, materials-based technologies to allow for a driving range of more than 300 miles (500 km) while meeting packaging, cost, safety, and performance requirements to be competitive with current vehicles. While automakers have recently demonstrated progress with some prototype vehicles traveling more than 300 miles on a single fill, this driving range must be achievable across different vehicle models and without compromising space, performance, or cost. In addition, hydrogen storage will be needed for both other niche vehicular applications and off-board uses such as for stationary power generation and for hydrogen delivery and refueling infrastructure.

419

Why Systems Analysis for Energy Storage?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cost Effectiveness Evaluation, Cost Effectiveness Evaluation, DNV KEMA Modeling for CPUC Energy Storage Proceeding Energy Storage Panel, EAC Meeting June 6, 2013 Common Pitfalls  Using historical prices - Prices are likely to change due to rule modifications, changes in regulation supply resources over time, changes in regulation needs over time - Depending on the amount of storage added to the market, the introduction of storage can change market prices  Modeling deterministic behavior (perfect performance assuming knowledge of upcoming prices) - Future prices are unknown and actual revenues will likely not reflect strategy that gets maximum revenue 100% of the time  Ignoring system effects - In addition to affecting prices, certain amounts of storage can affect imports/exports

420

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Definitions Definitions Definitions Since 2006, EIA has reported two measures of aggregate capacity, one based on demonstrated peak working gas storage, the other on working gas design capacity. Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity: This measure sums the highest storage inventory level of working gas observed in each facility over the 5-year range from May 2005 to April 2010, as reported by the operator on the Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Underground Gas Storage Report." This data-driven estimate reflects actual operator experience. However, the timing for peaks for different fields need not coincide. Also, actual available maximum capacity for any storage facility may exceed its reported maximum storage level over the last 5 years, and is virtually certain to do so in the case of newly commissioned or expanded facilities. Therefore, this measure provides a conservative indicator of capacity that may understate the amount that can actually be stored.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Energy storage systems cost update : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reports the methodology for calculating present worth of system and operating costs for a number of energy storage technologies for representative electric utility applications. The values are an update from earlier reports, categorized by application use parameters. This work presents an update of energy storage system costs assessed previously and separately by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Storage Systems Program. The primary objective of the series of studies has been to express electricity storage benefits and costs using consistent assumptions, so that helpful benefit/cost comparisons can be made. Costs of energy storage systems depend not only on the type of technology, but also on the planned operation and especially the hours of storage needed. Calculating the present worth of life-cycle costs makes it possible to compare benefit values estimated on the same basis.

Schoenung, Susan M. (Longitude 122 West, Menlo Park, CA)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Control and Optimization Meet the Smart Power Grid - Scheduling of Power Demands for Optimal Energy Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The smart power grid aims at harnessing information and communication technologies to enhance reliability and enforce sensible use of energy. Its realization is geared by the fundamental goal of effective management of demand load. In this work, we envision a scenario with real-time communication between the operator and consumers. The grid operator controller receives requests for power demands from consumers, with different power requirement, duration, and a deadline by which it is to be completed. The objective is to devise a power demand task scheduling policy that minimizes the grid operational cost over a time horizon. The operational cost is a convex function of instantaneous power consumption and reflects the fact that each additional unit of power needed to serve demands is more expensive as demand load increases.First, we study the off-line demand scheduling problem, where parameters are fixed and known. Next, we devise a stochastic model for the case when demands are generated continually and sched...

Koutsopoulos, Iordanis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Distributed Energy Storage Product Reference Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distribution-scale energy storage deployments have increased significantly in the last few years. These deployments have resulted in several lessons learned, and have pointed out the need for standardization and development of common industry agreed approaches to grid-scale energy storage deployments. This report documents the progress in many of these deployments and summarizes the lessons learned. In addition, the report presents a brief update on a PNNL/Sandia-lead multi stakeholder pre-standard ...

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

424

Definition: Peak Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peak Demand Peak Demand Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Peak Demand The highest hourly integrated Net Energy For Load within a Balancing Authority Area occurring within a given period (e.g., day, month, season, or year)., The highest instantaneous demand within the Balancing Authority Area.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Peak demand is used to refer to a historically high point in the sales record of a particular product. In terms of energy use, peak demand describes a period of strong consumer demand. Related Terms Balancing Authority Area, energy, demand, balancing authority, smart grid References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inli LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ne Glossary Definition Retrieved from

425

Distillate Demand Strong in December 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5% higher than in the prior year, due mainly to diesel demand growth, since warm weather kept heating oil demand from growing much. Last December, when stocks dropped below...

426

Solar in Demand | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Demand Solar in Demand June 15, 2012 - 10:23am Addthis Kyle Travis, left and Jon Jackson, with Lighthouse Solar, install microcrystalline PV modules on top of Kevin Donovan's...

427

Demand Response - Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

over the last 11 years when interest in demand response increased. Demand response is an electricity tariff or program established to motivate changes in electric use by end-use...

428

Propane Demand by Sector - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In order to understand markets you also have to look at supply and demand. First, demand or who uses propane. For the most part, the major components of propane ...

429

Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Scoping Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services in U.S. Electricity Markets Peter Cappers, Jason MacDonald, Charles Goldman April 2013 Report Summary 1 Energy Analysis Department  Electricity Markets and Policy Group Presentation Overview  Objectives and Approach  Wholesale and Retail Market Environments  Market and Policy Barrier Typology  Prototypical Regional Barrier Assessment 2 Energy Analysis Department  Electricity Markets and Policy Group A Role for Demand Response to Provide Ancillary Services  Increasing penetration of renewable energy generation in U.S. electricity markets means that bulk power system operators will need to manage the variable and uncertain nature of many renewable resources

430

Both Distillate Supply and Demand Reached Extraordinary Levels This Winter  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: This chart shows some critical differences in distillate supply and demand during this winter heating season, in comparison to the past two winters. Typically, distillate demand peaks during the winter months, but "new supply" (refinery production and net imports) cannot increase as much, so the remaining supply needed is drawn from inventories. This pattern is evident in each of the past two winter heating seasons. This winter, however, the pattern was very different, for several reasons: With inventories entering the season at extremely low levels, a "typical" winter stockdraw would have been nearly impossible, particularly in the Northeast, the region most dependent on heating oil. Demand reached near-record levels in December, as colder-than-normal

431

Travel Behavior and Demand Analysis and Prediction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Demand Analysis and Prediction Konstadinos G. Goulias University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, USA

Goulias, Konstadinos G

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Forecasting the demand for commercial telecommunications satellites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the key elements of a forecast methodology for predicting demand for commercial satellite services and the resulting demand for satellite hardware and launches. The paper discusses the characterization of satellite services into more than a dozen applications (including emerging satellite Internet applications) used by Futron Corporation in its forecasts. The paper discusses the relationship between demand for satellite services and demand for satellite hardware

Carissa Bryce Christensen; Carie A. Mullins; Linda A. Williams

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Analysis of the Hydrogen Infrastructure Needed to Enable Commercial Introduction of Hydrogen-Fueled Vehicles: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper for the 2005 National Hydrogen Association conference analyzes the hydrogen infrastructure needed to accommodate a transitional hydrogen fuel cell vehicle demand.

Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Forecasting Uncertain Hotel Room Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic systems are characterized by increasing uncertainty in their dynamics. This increasing uncertainty is likely to incur bad decisions that can be costly in financial terms. This makes forecasting of uncertain economic variables an instrumental activity in any organization. This paper takes the hotel industry as a practical application of forecasting using the Holt-Winters method. The problem here is to forecast the uncertain demand for rooms at a hotel for each arrival day. Forecasting is part of hotel revenue management system whose objective is to maximize the revenue by making decisions regarding when to make rooms available for customers and at what price. The forecast approach discussed in this paper is based on quantitative models and does not incorporate management expertise. Even though, forecast results are found to be satisfactory for certain days, this is not the case for other arrival days. It is believed that human judgment is important when dealing with ...

Mihir Rajopadhye Mounir; Mounir Ben Ghaliay; Paul P. Wang; Timothy Baker; Craig V. Eister

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Storing hydroelectricity to meet peak-hour demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on pumped storage plants which have become an effective way for some utility companies that derive power from hydroelectric facilities to economically store baseload energy during off-peak hours for use during peak hourly demands. According to the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in Palo Alto, Calif., 36 of these plants provide approximately 20 gigawatts, or about 3 percent of U.S. generating capacity. During peak-demand periods, utilities are often stretched beyond their capacity to provide power and must therefore purchase it from neighboring utilities. Building new baseload power plants, typically nuclear or coal-fired facilities that run 24 hours per day seven days a week, is expensive, about $1500 per kilowatt, according to Robert Schainker, program manager for energy storage at the EPRI. Schainker the that building peaking plants at $400 per kilowatt, which run a few hours a day on gas or oil fuel, is less costly than building baseload plants. Operating them, however, is more expensive because peaking plants are less efficient that baseload plants.

Valenti, M.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Upcoming Natural Gas Storage Facilities.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Kentucky Energy Hub Project Orbit Gas Storage Inc KY Leader One Gas Storage Project Peregrine Midstream Partners WY Tricor Ten Section Storage Project

437

Vehicle Technologies Office: Energy Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Energy Storage on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Energy Storage on Twitter Bookmark...

438

Forecasting demand of commodities after natural disasters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand forecasting after natural disasters is especially important in emergency management. However, since the time series of commodities demand after natural disasters usually has a great deal of nonlinearity and irregularity, it has poor prediction ... Keywords: ARIMA, Demand forecasting, EMD, Emergency management, Natural disaster

Xiaoyan Xu; Yuqing Qi; Zhongsheng Hua

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Leveraging gamification in demand dispatch systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern demand-side management techniques are an integral part of the envisioned smart grid paradigm. They require an active involvement of the consumer for an optimization of the grid's efficiency and a better utilization of renewable energy sources. ... Keywords: demand response, demand side management, direct load control, gamification, smart grid, sustainability

Benjamin Gnauk; Lars Dannecker; Martin Hahmann

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014­2024 FINAL FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work to the contributing authors listed previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014­2024 REVISED FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work listed previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped

442

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022 Volume 2: Electricity Demand by Utility ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The staff demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work and expertise of numerous, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped prepare

443

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022 Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The staff demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work listed previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped

444

FINAL STAFF FORECAST OF 2008 PEAK DEMAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION FINAL STAFF FORECAST OF 2008 PEAK DEMAND STAFFREPORT June 2007 CEC-200 of the information in this paper. #12;Abstract This document describes staff's final forecast of 2008 peak demand demand forecasts for the respective territories of the state's three investor-owned utilities (IOUs

445

Ups and downs of demand limiting  

SciTech Connect

Electric power load management by limiting power demand can be used for energy conservation. Methods for affecting demand limiting, reducing peak usage in buildings, particularly usage for heating and ventilating systems, and power pricing to encourage demand limiting are discussed. (LCL)

Pannkoke, T.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Sensor-based demand controlled ventilation  

SciTech Connect

In most buildings, occupancy and indoor pollutant emission rates vary with time. With sensor-based demand-controlled ventilation (SBDCV), the rate of ventilation (i.e., rate of outside air supply) also varies with time to compensate for the changes in pollutant generation. In other words, SBDCV involves the application of sensing, feedback and control to modulate ventilation. Compared to ventilation without feedback, SBDCV offers two potential advantages: (1) better control of indoor pollutant concentrations; and (2) lower energy use and peak energy demand. SBDCV has the potential to improve indoor air quality by increasing the rate of ventilation when indoor pollutant generation rates are high and occupants are present. SBDCV can also save energy by decreasing the rate of ventilation when indoor pollutant generation rates are low or occupants are absent. After providing background information on indoor air quality and ventilation, this report provides a relatively comprehensive discussion of SBDCV. Topics covered in the report include basic principles of SBDCV, sensor technologies, technologies for controlling air flow rates, case studies of SBDCV, application of SBDCV to laboratory buildings, and research needs. SBDCV appears to be an increasingly attractive technology option. Based on the review of literature and theoretical considerations, the application of SBDCV has the potential to be cost-effective in applications with the following characteristics: (a) a single or small number of dominant pollutants, so that ventilation sufficient to control the concentration of the dominant pollutants provides effective control of all other pollutants; (b) large buildings or rooms with unpredictable temporally variable occupancy or pollutant emission; and (c) climates with high heating or cooling loads or locations with expensive energy.

De Almeida, A.T. [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Dep. Eng. Electrotecnica; Fisk, W.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

2012 SG Peer Review - Recovery Act: Enhanced Demand and Distribution Management Regional Demonstration - Craig Miller, NRECA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enhanced Distribution and Demand Management Enhanced Distribution and Demand Management Regional Demonstration Craig Miller Cooperative Research Network National Rural Electric Cooperative Association 8 June 2012 December 2008 Project Title Objective Life-cycle Funding ($K) $68 million with match Hardware: $43 million Research: $11.6 Co-op Labor: $13.4 Technical Scope * 23 Co-ops, Distributed Nationally * 275,000 components deployed * Meters & DR * Distribution Automation * Infrastructure * In home displays and web portals * Demand response over AMI * Prepaid metering * Interactive thermal storage * Electrical storage (20x10kWh, 1MWh 0.5MWh) * Renewable energy * Smart feeder switching * Conservation voltage reduction * Advanced metering infrastructure * Meter data management * Communications infrastructure * SCADA To advance the deployment of the smart grid

448

NREL: Energy Storage - News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage News Below are news stories related to NREL's energy storage research. August 28, 2013 NREL Battery Calorimeters Win R&D 100 Award The award-wining Isothermal...

449

NETL: Carbon Storage Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Carbon Storage Newsletter PDF-571KB has been posted. 08.27.2013 Publications August 2013 Carbon Storage Newsletter PDF-1.1MB has been posted. 08.15.2013 News Ancient...

450

Carbon Storage Review 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23,...

451

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pumped hydro, compressed air, and battery energy storage areto other energy storage sys tem s suc h as pumped hydro andenergy would be $50/MJ whereas the cost of the pumped hydro

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Using Alternative Energy Storage in UPS Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Data Management for Data Management for CEC/DOE Energy Storage Demonstration Project Work performed under contract with Sandia National Labs Garth Corey Project Manager Project funded by the US DOE ESS Program Dr. Imre Gyuk, Program Manager Presented by Doug Dorr ESI Project Manager ddorr@eprisolutions.com 2 Presentation Outline  Project Overview and Objectives  Data acquisition status for the demonstration projects  Updates to the Energy Storage Initiative Website  Examples of Website Data Analysis 3 Project Overview and Objectives  Promote New Energy Storage Technologies that can achieve California's long range energy goals:  Increased energy utilization efficiency  Reduced demand for out of state energy procurement  Reduced overall energy costs to consumers

453

Solar Storage Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Storage Company Storage Company Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar Storage Company Place Palo Alto, California Zip 94301 Sector Solar Product Distibuted On-Demand Solar Year founded 2009 Coordinates 37.4457966°, -122.1575745° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.4457966,"lon":-122.1575745,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

454

Thermal energy storage technical progress report, April 1990--March 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting development of thermal energy storage (TES) as a means of efficiently coupling energy supplies to variable heating or cooling demands. Uses of TES include electrical demand-side management in buildings and industry, extending the utilization of renewable energy resources such as solar, and recovery of waste heat from periodic industrial processes. Technical progress to develop TES for specific diurnal and industrial applications under Oak Ridge National Laboratory's TES program from April 1990 to March 1992 is reported and covers research in the areas of low temperature sorption, direct contact ice making, latent heat storage plasterboard and latent/sensible heat regenerator technology development.

Tomlinson, J.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Thermal energy storage technical progress report, April 1990--March 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting development of thermal energy storage (TES) as a means of efficiently coupling energy supplies to variable heating or cooling demands. Uses of TES include electrical demand-side management in buildings and industry, extending the utilization of renewable energy resources such as solar, and recovery of waste heat from periodic industrial processes. Technical progress to develop TES for specific diurnal and industrial applications under Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s TES program from April 1990 to March 1992 is reported and covers research in the areas of low temperature sorption, direct contact ice making, latent heat storage plasterboard and latent/sensible heat regenerator technology development.

Tomlinson, J.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Air ejector augmented compressed air energy storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Energy is stored in slack demand periods by charging a plurality of underground reservoirs with air to the same peak storage pressure, during peak demand periods throttling the air from one storage reservoir into a gas turbine system at a constant inlet pressure until the air pressure in the reservoir falls to said constant inlet pressure, thereupon permitting air in a second reservoir to flow into said gas turbine system while drawing air from the first reservoir through a variable geometry air ejector and adjusting said variable geometry air ejector, said air flow being essentially at the constant inlet pressure of the gas turbine system.

Ahrens, Frederick W. (Naperville, IL); Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY DISTRIBUTED ENERGY STORAGE BATTERY  

SciTech Connect

Electro Energy, Inc. conducted a research project to develop an energy efficient and environmentally friendly bipolar Ni-MH battery for distributed energy storage applications. Rechargeable batteries with long life and low cost potentially play a significant role by reducing electricity cost and pollution. A rechargeable battery functions as a reservoir for storage for electrical energy, carries energy for portable applications, or can provide peaking energy when a demand for electrical power exceeds primary generating capabilities.

LANDI, J.T.; PLIVELICH, R.F.

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

458

Electrical Energy Storage Activities in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spurred by increased public and private sector investment as well as policy initiatives, electrical energy storage project activities are on the upswing worldwide. The growing number of operating and planned initiatives demands that they be rigorously documented and evaluated to promote information sharing and collective learning. This report provides descriptive case studies on ten U.S.-based energy storage projects offering insight into their background, status, successes, shortcomings, and lessons lea...

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Swing options: a mechanism for pricing IT peak demand, http: //www.hpl.hp.com/research/idl/papers/swings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since usage patterns of information technology within organizations can be bursty, the peak demand for IT resources can at times exceed the installed capacity within the enterprise. If providers of such peak capacity emerge, as was the case for electricity and natural gas, the problem arises as to how to efficiently provide and price such peak demand. We present a swing option mechanism that allows for the efficient pricing of IT resources ranging from CPU usage to storage and bandwidth. This mechanism allows users to buy the right but not the obligation to future peak use. A statistical simulation tool allows the users to price these swings according to their own utilization patterns and to recover some of their costs if the options are not exercised. The provider in turn exploits its ability to statistically multiplex its resources to price peak usage. The use of these swing options serves as an incentive to the users to accurately forecasts of their own needs, thus leading to more efficient utilization of the providers resources.

Scott H. Clearwater; Bernardo A. Huberman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Projection of needs for gamma radiation sources and other radioisotopes and assessment of alternatives for providing radiation sources  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed the projected uses and demands for a variety of nuclear byproducts. Because the major large-scale near-term demand is for gamma irradiation sources, this report concentrates on the needs for gamma sources and evaluates the options for providing the needed material. Projections of possible growth in the irradiation treatment industry indicate that there will be a need for 180 to 320 MCi of /sup 60/Co (including /sup 137/Cs equivalent) in service in the year 2000. The largest current and projected use of gamma irradiation is for the sterilization of medical devices and disposable medical supplies. Currently, 40% of US disposable medical products are treated by irradiation, and within 10 years it is expected that 90% will be treated in this manner. Irradiation treatment of food for destruction of pathogens or parasites, disinfestation, or extension of allowable storage periods is estimated to require an active inventory of 75 MCi of /sup 60/Co-equivalent gamma source in about a decade. 90 refs., 7 figs., 25 tabs.

Ross, W.A.; Jensen, G.A.; Clark, L.L.; Eakin, D.E.; Jarrett, J.H.; Katayama, Y.B.; McKee, R.W.; Morgan, L.G.; Nealey, S.M.; Platt, A.M.; Tingey, G.L.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Energy Storage & Delivery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Storage & Delivery. Summary: Schematic of Membrane Molecular Structure The goal of the project is to develop ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

462

Conventional Storage Water Heaters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Conventional storage water heaters remain the most popular type of water heating system for homes and buildings.

463

Coal in transition 1980--2000 demand considerations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The usefulness of the Brookhaven model, TESOM, lies in its exploration of the demand side of the energy system. Sectors where coal may be substituted for other energy forms are identified, and attractive technologies are highlighted. The results of the runs accord well with intuitive expectations. The increasing prices of oil and natural gas usually imply that (a) coal synthetics become increasingly attractive technologies, except in the High Demand and CRUNCH Cases (b) nuclear and hydro-electric generation are preferred technologies, (c) coal steam electric, even with expensive scrubbers, becomes more attractive than oil or gas steam electric by year 1990, (d) fluidized bed combustion for electricity generation is cost effective (with relatively small environmental impacts) when compared to oil, gas and coal steam electric. FBC process steam exhibits similar behavior. In the High Demand and CRUNCH scenarios, technologies such as solar electric, which are usually not chosen on the basis of cost, enter the solution because meeting demands has become extremely difficult. As the allowed coal expansion rate becomes a limiting factor, coal synthetics manufacturing becomes an unattractive alternative. This is due both to the need for coal electric generation to meet high electricity demand levels, and to the inefficiencies in the manufacturing process. Due to preferred allocation of coal to electricity generation or synthetics, direct coal use is reduced, although this is normally a preferred option.

Kydes, A S; Cherniavsky, E A

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Thermal storage HVAC system retrofit provides economical air conditioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes an EMS-controlled HVAC system that meets the ventilation and cooling needs of an 18,000-seat indoor ice hockey arena. The Buffalo Memorial Auditorium (affectionately referred to as the Aud) was built in 1937 under the Works Project Administration of the federal government. Its original configuration included a 12,000-seat arena with an ice skating rink. By the late 1980s, the city was unsuccessfully attempting to attract events and tenants to the auditorium, which lacked air conditioning and other modern amenities. Thus, it was decided to renovate the facility to make it marketable. The first phase of the renovation included installing an air-conditioning system in the arena and repairing the existing building systems that were inoperable because of deferred maintenance. After considering the existing conditions (such as size of the space, intermittent usage, construction restrictions, operating budgets and the limited operations staff), the engineering team designed an innovative HVAC system. The system's features include: a carbon dioxide monitoring device that controls the intake of outside air; an ice storage system that provides chilled water and shifts electrical demand to off-peak hours; and a design that uses the building mass as a heat sink. A new energy management system (EMS) determines building cooling needs based on the type of event, ambient conditions and projected audience size. Then, it selects the most economical method to obtain the desired arena temperature.

Smith, S.F. (Wendel Engineers, P.C., Buffalo, NY (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

SRS Site Needs  

SRS Site Needs Neil R. Davis Program Manager Technology Development and Tank Closure Projects Washington Savannah River Company Aluminum/Chromium Leaching Technical ...

466

Measurement and Verification for Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Measurement and Verification for Measurement and Verification for Demand Response Prepared for the National Forum on the National Action Plan on Demand Response: Measurement and Verification Working Group AUTHORS: Miriam L. Goldberg & G. Kennedy Agnew-DNV KEMA Energy and Sustainability National Forum of the National Action Plan on Demand Response Measurement and Verification for Demand Response was developed to fulfill part of the Implementation Proposal for The National Action Plan on Demand Response, a report to Congress jointly issued by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) in June 2011. Part of that implementation proposal called for a "National Forum" on demand response to be conducted by DOE and FERC. Given that demand response has matured, DOE and FERC decided that a "virtual" project

467

Thermochemical seasonal energy storage for solar thermal power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the many years that thermochemical energy storage has been under investigation, the concept has been plagued with two persistent problems: high capital cost and poor efficiency. Literally hundreds of chemical reactions have also been carried out. For short-term storage, thermochemical systems suffer in comparison with highly efficient sensible storage media such as molten salts. Long-term storage, on the other hand, is not cost-competitive with systems employing fossil backup power. Thermochemical storage will play a significant role in solar thermal electric conversion only under highly select circumstances. The portion of electric demand served by solar plants must be sufficiently high that the balance of the grid cannot fully supplant seasonal storage. High fossil fuel costs must preclude the use of gas turbines for backup power. Significant breakthroughs in the development of one or more chemical reaction systems must occur. Ingeniously integrated systems must be employed to enhance the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of thermochemical storage. A promising integration scheme discussed herein consists of using sensible storage for diurnal cycling in parallel with thermochemical seasonal storage. Under the most favorable circumstances, thermochemical storage can be expected to play a small but perhaps vital role in supplying baseload energy from solar thermal electric conversion plants.

Barnhart, J.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Appropriate storage for high-penetration grid-connected photovoltaic plants A.A. Solomon a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% of the annual load requirements could have been achieved, albeit at the cost of having to dump approximately 5 be derived by detailed consideration of the three-way mutual interactions among storage, demand profile

Kammen, Daniel M.

469

Development of a Procedure for the Predictive Control Strategy of a Chilled Water Storage System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal energy storage systems store the thermal energy produced by the chiller plant in periods of off-peak electrical demand or when cheaper electricity is available. The stored thermal energy is then withdrawn from the reservoir to satisfy cooling load during peak demand periods. This paper discusses the development of a simplified predictive control strategy for a 7000 ton-hour chilled water storage system serving a hospital. Control strategies are developed for both on-peak and off-peak months to minimize demand charges. By optimizing the operation of the building air handling units (AHUs), chilled water pumps, chiller plant and the thermal storage system, the storage tank is better charged while chiller run time is reduced. Both on-peak and off-peak electrical demands are expected to be reduced significantly.

Wei, G.; Sakuri, Y.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.; Liu, M.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Modular Electromechanical Batteries for Cost-Effective Bulk Storage of Electrical Energy  

or wind power systems, or for "spinning reserve" for the utility network. At present virtually the only type of system that can meet these demands is of the "pumped storage" type, where water is pumped up into ...

471

Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Notes: EIA sees a tenuous supply/demand balance over the remainder of 2001 and into the beginning of 2002, as illustrated by the low OECD inventory levels. Global inventories remain low, and need to recover to more adequate levels in order to avoid continued price volatility. While we saw some stocking in April and May, typical third quarter stock builds may not occur. Even with Iraqi oil exports resuming in early July, OPEC was going to need to increase its oil production to account for demand increases over the 2nd half of the year to prevent stocks from falling further. However, they not only haven't agreed to increase production, but agreed to cut production quotas by 1 million barrels per day beginning on September 1! EIA's forecast of a continued low stock cushion implies we not only

472

Photovoltaic-based Demand Response and Ancillary Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photovoltaic-based Demand Response and Ancillary Services Photovoltaic-based Demand Response and Ancillary Services Speaker(s): Bill Vogel Date: June 22, 2012 - 1:00pm Location: 90-1099 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: David S. Watson This presentation describes innovations in intelligent micro inverters for use with photovoltaic (PV) systems. The micro-inverters enable remotely adjustable phase angles (+/- up to 45 degrees). The technology includes dynamic impedance matching and ultra-low cost dynamic reactive power management of digital power sources. These attributes can help mitigate grid balancing challenges introduced by most renewable generation resources as we strive to reach aggressive renewable portfolio standards and their associated needs for voltage support and ancillary services. The software-enabled device eliminates several pieces of heavy equipment needed

473

Regulatory risks paralyzing power industry while demand grows  

SciTech Connect

2008 will be the year the US generation industry grapples with CO{sub 2} emission. Project developers are suddenly coal-shy, mostly flirting with new nuclear plants waiting impatiently in line for equipment manufacturers to catch up with the demand for wind turbines, and finding gas more attractive again. With no proven greenhouse gas sequestration technology on the horizon, utilities will be playing it safe with energy-efficiency ploys rather than rushing to contract for much-needed new generation.

Maize, K.; Peltier, R.

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

474

New coal plant technologies will demand more water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Population shifts, growing electricity demand, and greater competition for water resources have heightened interest in the link between energy and water. The US Energy Information Administration projects a 22% increase in US installed generating capacity by 2030. Of the 259 GE of new capacity expected to have come on-line by then, more than 192 GW will be thermoelectric and thus require some water for cooling. Our challenge will become balancing people's needs for power and for water. 1 ref., 7 figs.

Peltier, R.; Shuster, E.; McNemar, A.; Stiegel, G.J.; Murphy, J.

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

475

Smart Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Demand Response Pilot  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses a unique pilot project to evaluate electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) capable of demand response (DR) and its integration into the utility smart metering infrastructure.BackgroundThere is an immediate need to research grid interface compatibility of public charging apparatus and to develop requirements and reference design blueprints for the entire plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging infrastructurefrom the vehicle ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

476

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology DOE R&D Activities National Hydrogen Storage Compressed/Liquid Hydrogen Tanks Testing and Analysis Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards

477

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

SciTech Connect

In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in wholesale markets and develop policies to overcome these barriers. One of the initiatives of this Task Force was to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This report describes the results of a comprehensive survey conducted by LBNL in support of the Customer Response Task Force and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into wholesale markets in the SPP region. LBNL conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs administered by SPP's member utilities. Survey respondents were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g. seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. Nearly all of the 30 load-serving entities in SPP responded to the survey. Of this group, fourteen SPP member utilities administer 36 DR programs, five dynamic pricing tariffs, and six voluntary customer response initiatives. These existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs have a peak demand reduction potential of 1,552 MW. Other major findings of this study are: o About 81percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;14percent. o Arkansas accounts for ~;;50percent of the DR resources in the SPP footprint; these DR resources are primarily managed by cooperatives. o Publicly-owned cooperatives accounted for 54percent of the existing DR resources among SPP members. For these entities, investment in DR is often driven by the need to reduce summer peak demand that is used to set demand charges for each distribution cooperative. o About 65-70percent of the interruptible/curtailable tariffs and DLC programs are routinely triggered based on market conditions, not just for system emergencies. Approximately, 53percent of the DR resources are available with less than two hours advance notice and 447 MW can be dispatched with less than thirty minutes notice. o Most legacy DR programs offered a reservation payment ($/kW) for participation; incentive payment levels ranged from $0.40 to $8.30/kW-month for interruptible rate tariffs and $0.30 to $4.60/kW-month for DLC programs. A few interruptible programs offered incentive payments which were explicitly linkedto actual load reductions during events; payments ranged from 2 to 40 cents/kWh for load curtailed.

Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Heffner, Grayson; Goldman, Charles

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

478

Chemical Storage-Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage - Storage - Overview Ali T-Raissi, FSEC Hydrogen Storage Workshop Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois August 14-15, 2002 Hydrogen Fuel - Attributes * H 2 +½ O 2 → H 2 O (1.23 V) * High gravimetric energy density: 27.1 Ah/g, based on LHV of 119.93 kJ/g * 1 wt % = 189.6 Wh/kg (0.7 V; i.e. η FC = 57%) * Li ion cells: 130-150 Wh/kg Chemical Hydrides - Definition * They are considered secondary storage methods in which the storage medium is expended - primary storage methods include reversible systems (e.g. MHs & C-nanostructures), GH 2 & LH 2 storage Chemical Hydrides - Definition (cont.) * The usual chemical hydride system is reaction of a reactant containing H in the "-1" oxidation state (hydride) with a reactant containing H in the "+1" oxidation

479

Energy Comparison Between Conventional and Chilled Water Thermal Storage Air Conditioning Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the summer of previous years, Kuwait faced a series of power shortages emphasizing the need for urgent commissioning of power generation projects. It is estimated that the demand for electricity is growing at an average of 6.2% per year, encouraged by government subsidies and driven by the rapid and continual expansion in building construction, urban development, and the heavy reliance on Air Conditioning (AC) systems for the cooling of buildings. The Chilled Water Thermal Storage (CWTS) system is one of the available techniques that can be utilized to reduce peak electricity demand of buildings when national electricity consumption is at its highest level. This paper demonstrates that the use of CWTS system reduces the peak power demand and energy consumption of AC systems for design day conditions by 36.7% - 87.5% and 5.4% - 7.2%, respectively. This reduction depends on selected operating strategies as compared with conventional AC system. Furthermore, results show that the annual energy consumption of CWTS systems decreases by between 4.5% and 6.9% compared with conventional systems, where chillers and pumps significantly contribute to this reduction.

Sebzali, M.; Hussain, H. J.; Ameer, B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Battery energy storage systems life cycle costs case studies  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a comparison of life cycle costs between battery energy storage systems and alternative mature technologies that could serve the same utility-scale applications. Two of the battery energy storage systems presented in this report are located on the supply side, providing spinning reserve and system stability benefits. These systems are compared with the alternative technologies of oil-fired combustion turbines and diesel generators. The other two battery energy storage systems are located on the demand side for use in power quality applications. These are compared with available uninterruptible power supply technologies.

Swaminathan, S.; Miller, N.F.; Sen, R.K. [SENTECH, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Response (DIADR) Building  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Response (DIADR) Building Management System Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Response (DIADR) Building Management System The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting research into distributed intelligent-automated demand response (DIADR) building management systems. Project Description This project aims to develop a DIADR building management system with intelligent optimization and control algorithms for demand management, taking into account a multitude of factors affecting cost including: Comfort Heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) Lighting Other building systems Climate Usage and occupancy patterns. The key challenge is to provide the demand response the ability to address more and more complex building systems that include a variety of loads,

482

Electricity Demand and Energy Consumption Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project describes the electricity demand and energy consumption management system and its application to the Smelter Plant of Southern Peru. It is composted of an hourly demand-forecasting module and of a simulation component for a plant electrical system. The first module was done using dynamic neural networks, with backpropagation training algorithm; it is used to predict the electric power demanded every hour, with an error percentage below of 1%. This information allows management the peak demand before this happen, distributing the raise of electric load to other hours or improving those equipments that increase the demand. The simulation module is based in advanced estimation techniques, such as: parametric estimation, neural network modeling, statistic regression and previously developed models, which simulates the electric behavior of the smelter plant. These modules allow the proper planning because it allows knowing the behavior of the hourly demand and the consumption patterns of the plant, in...

Sarmiento, Juan Ojeda

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

220-MW compressed air storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SOYLAND Power Cooperative, Inc., a Decatur, Illinois based co-op, could get reasonably priced baseload power from neighboring utilities, had a plant of its own planned for the near future as well as a share in another, but peaking power, generated by oil and gas, to meet surges in demand, was very costly. The co-op's solution, first in the U.S., is a 220-megawatt compressed air energy storage system (CAES), which the electric utility industry is watching with great interest. CAES splits the two basic stages of a conventional gas turbine, making the most of baseload power while using the least peaking or intermediate fuel. During off-peak periods, inexpensive baseload electricity from coal or nuclear power plants runs a combination motor-generator in motor mode which, in turn, operates a compressor. The compressed air is cooled and pumped into an underground storage reservoir hundreds of thousands of cubic yards in volume and about two thousand feet (about 610 m) below the surface. There the air remains, at pressures up to about 60 atm (6.1 MPa), until peaking or intermediate power is required. Then, the air is released into a combustor at a controlled rate, heated by oil or gas, and expanded through a turbine. The turbine drives the motor-generator in a generator mode, thereby supplying peaking or intermediate power to the grid.

Lihach, N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Advanced Materials and Devices for Stationary Electrical Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Materials and Devices for Stationary Electrical Energy Materials and Devices for Stationary Electrical Energy Storage Applications Advanced Materials and Devices for Stationary Electrical Energy Storage Applications Reliable access to cost-effective electricity is the backbone of the U.S. economy, and electrical energy storage is an integral element in this system. Without significant investments in stationary electrical energy storage, the current electric grid infrastructure will increasingly struggle to provide reliable, affordable electricity, jeopardizing the transformational changes envisioned for a modernized grid. Investment in energy storage is essential for keeping pace with the increasing demands for electricity arising from continued growth in U.S. productivity, shifts in and continued expansion of national cultural imperatives (e.g., the distributed

485

Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster Session 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster Session 1 (Day 1): ARPA-E Projects Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster Session 1 (Day 1): ARPA-E Projects The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a peer review and update meeting in Washington, DC on Sept. 26 - 28, 2012. The 3-day conference included 9 sessions plus two poster sessions. ARPA-E project presentations from the first poster session on Day 1, chaired by DOE's Mark Johnson, are below. ESS 2012 Peer Review - Dispatchable Wind--Wind Power on Demand - Ian Lawson, General Compression ESS 2012 Peer Review - Novel Regenerative Fuel Cells based on Anion Exchange Membranes - Katherine Ayers, Proton Onsite ESS 2012 Peer Review - Low Cost, High-Energy Density Flywheel Storage Grid

486

Variability in electricity demand highlights potential roles ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

These technologies convert electricity into another form of energy for storage: the potential energy in water pumped uphill to a reservoir and in compressed air, ...

487

Regulation Services with Demand Response - Energy Innovation ...  

Biomass and Biofuels; Building Energy Efficiency; Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; Geothermal; Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; ... (i.e. target ...

488

Corrections needed for Environmental Transport Processes Print-On-Demand Version (2/6/2009)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

liter of uracil and/or 30 mg/L of L-leucine was also added if required. DCW, dry cell weight. Results(III) accumulation from the engineered S. cerevisiae strain BY4742 expressing AtPCS. DCW, dry cell weight. Results. DCW, dry cell weight. Tsai et al.: Cysteine Desulfhydrase for Enhanced Arsenic Accumulation 607

489

Reconciling the new demands for food protection with environmental needs in the management of livestock wastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

only biogas production rate was 14 measured which complicates the analysis considerably. We show. Yet in many ex- 36 perimental settings only biogas production rate data is available which complicates acquisition system of on-line sensors, which provide measurements of pH, temperature, rH and 62 biogas flow

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

490

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry Title Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4849E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Olsen, Daniel, Sasank Goli, David Faulkner, and Aimee T. McKane Date Published 12/2010 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords cement industry, cement sector, demand response, electricity use, energy efficiency, market sectors, mineral manufacturing, technologies Abstract This study examines the characteristics of cement plants and their ability to shed or shift load to participate in demand response (DR). Relevant factors investigated include the various equipment and processes used to make cement, the operational limitations cement plants are subject to, and the quantities and sources of energy used in the cement-making process. Opportunities for energy efficiency improvements are also reviewed. The results suggest that cement plants are good candidates for DR participation. The cement industry consumes over 400 trillion Btu of energy annually in the United States, and consumes over 150 MW of electricity in California alone. The chemical reactions required to make cement occur only in the cement kiln, and intermediate products are routinely stored between processing stages without negative effects. Cement plants also operate continuously for months at a time between shutdowns, allowing flexibility in operational scheduling. In addition, several examples of cement plants altering their electricity consumption based on utility incentives are discussed. Further study is needed to determine the practical potential for automated demand response (Auto-DR) and to investigate the magnitude and shape of achievable sheds and shifts.

491

Energy storage options for space power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Including energy storage in a space power supply enhances the feasibility of using thermal power cycles (Rankine or Brayton) and providing high-power pulses. Review of storage options (superconducting magnets, capacitors, electrochemical batteries, thermal phase-change materials (PCM), and flywheels) suggests that flywheels and phase-change devices hold the most promise. Latent heat storage using inorganic salts and metallic eutectics offers thermal energy storage densities of 1500 to 2000 kJ/kg at temperatures to 1675/sup 0/K. Innovative techniques allow these media to operate in direct contact with the heat engine working fluid. Enhancing thermal conductivity and/or modifying PCM crystallization habit provide other options. Flywheels of low-strain graphite and Kevlar fibers have achieved mechanical energy storage densities of 300 kJ/kg. With high-strain graphite fibers, storage densities appropriate to space power needs (approx. 550 kJ/kg) seem feasible. Coupling advanced flywheels with emerging high power density homopolar generators and compulsators could result in electric pulse-power storage modules of significantly higher energy density.

Hoffman, H.W.; Martin, J.F.; Olszewski, M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

IAAP Needs Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEEDS ASSESSMENT-DECEMBER 2001 NEEDS ASSESSMENT-DECEMBER 2001 Burlington Atomic Energy Commission Plant- Former Worker Program A US DOE funded project conducted by: Dr. Laurence Fuortes, Principal Investigator Th