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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Electric Power Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications Electric Power Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications Stationary energy storage technologies will address the growing limitations of the electricity infrastructure and meet the increasing demand for renewable energy use. Widespread integration of energy storage devices offers many benefits, including the following: Alleviating momentary electricity interruptions Meeting peak demand Postponing or avoiding upgrades to grid infrastructure Facilitating the integration of high penetrations of renewable energy Providing other ancillary services that can improve the stability and resiliency of the electric grid Electric Power Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications More Documents & Publications

2

Construction of a Demand Side Plant with Thermal Energy Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

storage and its potential impact on the electric utilities and introduces the demand side plant concept....

Michel, M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Optimal Demand Response with Energy Storage Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we consider the problem of optimal demand response and energy storage management for a power consuming entity. The entity's objective is to find an optimal control policy for deciding how much load to consume, how much power to purchase from/sell to the power grid, and how to use the finite capacity energy storage device and renewable energy, to minimize his average cost, being the disutility due to load- shedding and cost for purchasing power. Due to the coupling effect of the finite size energy storage, such problems are challenging and are typically tackled using dynamic programming, which is often complex in computation and requires substantial statistical information of the system dynamics. We instead develop a low-complexity algorithm called Demand Response with Energy Storage Management (DR-ESM). DR-ESM does not require any statistical knowledge of the system dynamics, including the renewable energy and the power prices. It only requires the entity to solve a small convex optimization pr...

Huang, Longbo; Ramchandran, Kannan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Powertech: Hydrogen Expertise Storage Needs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation by Angela Das of Powertech was given at the DOE Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Workshop in March 2013.

5

Is Carbon Capture and Storage Really Needed?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Is Carbon Capture and Storage Really Needed?1 ... In addition to the costs associated with capturing CO2, equipment must also be in place to transport the captured stream. ... Due to their low price, wide availability, and stability of the resulting carbonates, Mg-rich minerals are promising materials for carbonating CO2. ...

Costas Tsouris; Douglas S. Aaron; Kent A. Williams

2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

6

Renewable power needs smart storage solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ancient Greek philosopher Heraclitus claimed that the only thing constant in life is change, a truth we must accept and even celebrate. Another truth we face today is a growing demand for more energy to help us power the kind and pace of change we’ve become accustomed to, while minimizing environmental consequences. Renewable energy--two words that often find themselves woven into environmentally conscious dialogue. And according to Dave Lucero, director of alternative energy storage at EaglePicher Technologies LLC, the Tri-Cities should be thinking about two more: energy storage. Lucero recently addressed the Tri-Cities Research District about tackling the persistent challenge of maximizing renewable energy, which is inherently variable due to changing weather patterns. Capturing that energy and making it available for later use is vital.

Madison, Alison L.

2010-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

7

A Brief Overview of Hydrogen Storage Issues and Needs  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Brief Overview of Hydrogen Storage Issues and Needs George Thomas and Sunita Satyapal Joint Tech Team Meeting Delivery, Storage and Fuels Pathway Tech Teams May 8-9, 2007 Storage...

8

A Brief Overview of Hydrogen Storage Issues and Needs | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A Brief Overview of Hydrogen Storage Issues and Needs A Brief Overview of Hydrogen Storage Issues and Needs Presentation by George Thomas at the Joint Meeting on Hydrogen Delivery...

9

Deployment of Behind-The-Meter Energy Storage for Demand Charge Reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigates how economically motivated customers will use energy storage for demand charge reduction, as well as how this changes in the presence of on-site photovoltaic power generation, to investigate the possible effects of incentivizing increased quantities of behind-the-meter storage. It finds that small, short-duration batteries are most cost effective regardless of solar power levels, serving to reduce short load spikes on the order of 2.5% of peak demand. While profitable to the customer, such action is unlikely to adequately benefit the utility as may be desired, thus highlighting the need for modified utility rate structures or properly structured incentives.

Neubauer, J.; Simpson, M.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Chapter 23 - Energy Storage and the Need for Flexibility on the Grid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Energy storage technologies provide valuable flexibility on the electric grid by making the grid more efficient and by absorbing the intermittent renewable resources of tomorrow’s grid. But realizing the full value of this new flexibility requires holistically optimizing the unique functionalities of an energy storage system across the full spectrum of grid operations, from generation, through transmission, and to the customer, including any self-generation and demand response. The control systems, communications infrastructure, and smart energy storage devices needed to do this are just beginning to meet needed economic and technical milestones to demonstrate how energy storage will function within a fully-optimized electric grid. This chapter describes how energy storage provides valuable flexibility resources to the grid and profiles several deployed energy storage systems.

David Mohler; Daniel Sowder

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Demand Response and Storage Integration Study: Markets Report Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Andy Satchwell Andy Satchwell Scientific Engineering Associate Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, ER&E Committee Meeting, July 24, 2012 Portland, OR Tools and Methods Working Group Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department Outline of Presentation  Introduction and background: DR Estimation Tools and Methods Working Group  Working group members  Work plan  Identification of estimation tools and methods needs  Preliminary gap analysis  Next steps 2 Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department Introduction and Background  Tools and techniques have been developed to help characterize demand response (DR) resources  Given diversity in types of DR programs and relative

12

Hydrogen Storage Needs for Early Motive Fuel Cell Markets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) objective for this project is to identify performance needs for onboard energy storage of early motive fuel cell markets by working with end users, manufacturers, and experts. The performance needs analysis is combined with a hydrogen storage technology gap analysis to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Program with information about the needs and gaps that can be used to focus research and development activities that are capable of supporting market growth.

Kurtz, J.; Ainscough, C.; Simpson, L.; Caton, M.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Hydrogen Storage Needs for Early Motive Fuel Cell Markets  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storage Needs for Storage Needs for Early Motive Fuel Cell Markets J. Kurtz, C. Ainscough, L. Simpson, and M. Caton Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-52783 November 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Hydrogen Storage Needs for Early Motive Fuel Cell Markets J. Kurtz, C. Ainscough, L. Simpson, and M. Caton Prepared under Task No. H272.4410 Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-52783 November 2012 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

14

Evaluation of ground energy storage assisted electric vehicle DC fast charger for demand charge reduction and providing demand response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In 2012 there was approximately 2400 electric vehicle DC Fast Charging stations sold globally. According to Pike Research (Jerram and Gartner, 2012), it is anticipated that by 2020 there will be approximately 460,000 of them installed worldwide. A typical public DC fast charger delivers a maximum power output of 50 kW which allows a typical passenger vehicle to be 80% charged in 10–15 min, compared with 6–8 h for a 6.6 kW AC level 2 charging unit. While DC fast chargers offer users the convenience of being able to rapidly charge their vehicle, the unit's high power demand has the potential to put sudden strain on the electricity network, and incur significant demand charges. Depending on the utility rate structure, a DC fast charger can experience annual demand charges of several thousand dollars. Therefore in these cases there is an opportunity to mitigate or even avoid the demand charges incurred by coupling the unit with an appropriately sized energy storage system and coordinating the way in which it integrates. This paper explores the technical and economical suitability of coupling a ground energy storage system with a DC fast charge unit for mitigation or avoidance of demand charges and lessening the impact on the local electricity network. This paper also discusses the concept of having the system participate in demand response programs in order to provide grid support and to further improve the economic suitability of an energy storage system.

Donald McPhail

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Energy Management Using Storage Batteries in Large Commercial Facilities Based on Projection of Power Demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study provides three methods for projection of power demand of large commercial facilities planned for construction, ... the operation algorithm of storage batteries to manage energy and minimize power costs...

Kentaro Kaji; Jing Zhang; Kenji Tanaka

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

the stored water compared to the heat content of the water (water heaters with storage tanks) Cycling losses - the loss of heat as the water circulates through a water heater...

17

Optimal Sizing of Energy Storage and Photovoltaic Power Systems for Demand Charge Mitigation (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercial facility utility bills are often a strong function of demand charges -- a fee proportional to peak power demand rather than total energy consumed. In some instances, demand charges can constitute more than 50% of a commercial customer's monthly electricity cost. While installation of behind-the-meter solar power generation decreases energy costs, its variability makes it likely to leave the peak load -- and thereby demand charges -- unaffected. This then makes demand charges an even larger fraction of remaining electricity costs. Adding controllable behind-the-meter energy storage can more predictably affect building peak demand, thus reducing electricity costs. Due to the high cost of energy storage technology, the size and operation of an energy storage system providing demand charge management (DCM) service must be optimized to yield a positive return on investment (ROI). The peak demand reduction achievable with an energy storage system depends heavily on a facility's load profile, so the optimal configuration will be specific to both the customer and the amount of installed solar power capacity. We explore the sensitivity of DCM value to the power and energy levels of installed solar power and energy storage systems. An optimal peak load reduction control algorithm for energy storage systems will be introduced and applied to historic solar power data and meter load data from multiple facilities for a broad range of energy storage system configurations. For each scenario, the peak load reduction and electricity cost savings will be computed. From this, we will identify a favorable energy storage system configuration that maximizes ROI.

Neubauer, J.; Simpson, M.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Nuclear Separations for Radiopharmacy:? The Need for Improved Separations To Meet Future Research and Clinical Demands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Separations for Radiopharmacy:? The Need for Improved Separations To Meet Future Research and Clinical Demands ... Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, and Department of Chemistry, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 ...

Andrew H. Bond; Robin D. Rogers; Mark L. Dietz

2000-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

19

On-Demand Student Success Workshops Help When YOU Need It 24/7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On-Demand Student Success Workshops Help When YOU Need It 24/7 These videos will teach you strategies to help you succeed in college. Access them 24/7 from your dorm room, classroom, office, or home

Stuart, Steven J.

20

Employer Based Travel Demand Management -Devising Options to Meet Employee Travel Needs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Employer Based Travel Demand Management - Devising Options to Meet Employee Travel Needs Bruce for presentation at the 2002 Annual Conference of the Canadian Institute of Transportation Engineers to be held May to Meet Employee Travel Needs Bruce Hellinga1 , Charles Lee2 , James Mallett3 , JoAnn Woodhall4 ABSTRACT

Hellinga, Bruce

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Demand for Food for People in Need Remains High Throughout the Year |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Demand for Food for People in Need Remains High Throughout the Year Demand for Food for People in Need Remains High Throughout the Year Demand for Food for People in Need Remains High Throughout the Year December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Pictured are donations the Office of Human Capital at EM headquarters provided to the campaign. Pictured are donations the Office of Human Capital at EM headquarters provided to the campaign. WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM and its field sites donated 53,630 pounds - or 27 tons - of non-perishable items to a food drive by federal workers to help feed families across the country in 2013. EM surpassed its goal to donate 50,000 pounds to the 2013 Feds Feed Families Campaign. In Ohio, EM's Portsmouth site donated to the Community Action Committee of Pike County Food Pantry, which typically feeds about 250 needy families

22

Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Water  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Water Heaters Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Water Heaters June 14, 2012 - 7:38pm Addthis A water heater's energy efficiency is determined by the energy factor (EF), which is based on the amount of hot water produced per unit of fuel consumed over a typical day. The higher the energy factor, the more efficient the water heater. A water heater's energy efficiency is determined by the energy factor (EF), which is based on the amount of hot water produced per unit of fuel consumed over a typical day. The higher the energy factor, the more efficient the water heater. What does this mean for me? Estimate the annual operating costs and compare several water heaters to determine whether it is worth investing in a more efficient

23

Potentials of Demand Side Management Using Heat Pumps with Building Mass as a Thermal Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Within this work, load-shifting possibilities of heat pumps in residential buildings as well as its influencing and limiting factors are displayed. The intermediate storage is achieved by using the thermal mass of the building so the heat supply can be postponed from the heat demand for a certain period, depending on the characteristics of the building. No additional water storage is considered.

Charlotte Ellerbrok

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Materials for Energy How pressing needs for innovative technologies demand new ways of creating materials and putting them together  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Littlewood Littlewood Associate Lab Director, Physical Sciences and Engineering Argonne National Laboratory Secretary of Energy Advisory Board 17 April 2012 Materials for Energy How pressing needs for innovative technologies demand new ways of creating materials and putting them together The scale of the challenge: Energy usage per m 2 Courtesy D J Mackay, UK DECC Renewable deployments are country-sized Courtesy D J Mackay, UK DECC Challenges of Geography, Efficiency, and Cost Power density Watt/m 2 Full insolation Arizona desert 300 Concentrated solar power (desert) 15-20 Solar photovoltaic 5-20 Biomass 1-2 Tidal pools/tidal stream 3-8 Wind 2-8 Rainwater (highland) 0.3 US energy consumption (all sources) 0.3 In the US: Solar + wind + storage + grid infrastructure= sustainable economy

25

Do we really need renewable energy storage? | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

really need renewable energy storage? Women in STEM: Making a Cleaner Future A hungry brain slurps up a kid's energy Bioenergy Documentary Thank You. Much Appreciated. F... more...

26

Carbon capture and storage deployment rates: needs and feasibility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) may become a ... , an important question is the scale of carbon dioxide abatement we require from CCS to ... to ‘fill the gap’ between scenarios’ carbon dioxide emissions levels a...

Asbjørn Torvanger; Marianne T. Lund…

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Storage and on-demand release of microwaves using superconducting resonators with tunable coupling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a system which allows to tune the coupling between a superconducting resonator and a transmission line. This storage resonator is addressed through a second, coupling resonator, which is frequency-tunable and controlled by a magnetic flux applied to a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). We experimentally demonstrate that the lifetime of the storage resonator can be tuned by more than three orders of magnitude. A field can be stored for 18 {\\mu}s when the coupling resonator is tuned off resonance and it can be released in 14 ns when the coupling resonator is tuned on resonance. The device allows capture, storage, and on-demand release of microwaves at a tunable rate.

Mathieu Pierre; Ida-Maria Svensson; Sankar Raman Sathyamoorthy; Göran Johansson; Per Delsing

2014-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

28

Energy dispatch schedule optimization for demand charge reduction using a photovoltaic-battery storage system with solar forecasting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A battery storage dispatch strategy that optimizes demand charge reduction in real-time was developed and the discharge of battery storage devices in a grid-connected, combined photovoltaic-battery storage system (PV+ system) was simulated for a summer month, July 2012, and a winter month, November 2012, in an operational environment. The problem is formulated as a linear programming (LP; or linear optimization) routine and daily minimization of peak non-coincident demand is sought to evaluate the robustness, reliability, and consistency of the battery dispatch algorithm. The LP routine leverages solar power and load forecasts to establish a load demand target (i.e., a minimum threshold to which demand can be reduced using a photovoltaic (PV) array and battery array) that is adjusted throughout the day in response to forecast error. The LP routine perfectly minimizes demand charge but forecasts errors necessitate adjustments to the perfect dispatch schedule. The PV+ system consistently reduced non-coincident demand on a metered load that has an elevated diurnal (i.e., daytime) peak. The average reduction in peak demand on weekdays (days that contain the elevated load peak) was 25.6% in July and 20.5% in November. By itself, the PV array (excluding the battery array) reduced the peak demand on average 19.6% in July and 11.4% in November. PV alone cannot perfectly mitigate load spikes due to inherent variability; the inclusion of a storage device reduced the peak demand a further 6.0% in July and 9.3% in November. Circumstances affecting algorithm robustness and peak reduction reliability are discussed.

R. Hanna; J. Kleissl; A. Nottrott; M. Ferry

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Chilled Water Storage System and Demand Response at the University of California at Merced  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

53E 53E Chilled Water Storage System and Demand Response at the University of California at Merced J. Granderson, J.H. Dudley, S. Kiliccote, M.A. Piette Environmental Energy Technologies Division September 2009 Presented at the 9 th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Austin, TX, November 17-18, 2009, and published in the Proceedings DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information,

30

Modelling useful energy demand system as derived from basic needs in the household sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inter-fuel substitution in the household sector depends on whether their target energy use is similar or not. To account ... for the effect of end-use application on energy demand, the concept of useful energy is...

Zahra A. Barkhordar; Yadollah Saboohi

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Domestic demand-side management (DSM): Role of heat pumps and thermal energy storage (TES) systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heat pumps are seen as a promising technology for load management in the built environment, in combination with the smart grid concept. They can be coupled with thermal energy storage (TES) systems to shift electrical loads from high-peak to off-peak hours, thus serving as a powerful tool in demand-side management (DSM). This paper analyzes heat pumps with radiators or underfloor heating distribution systems coupled with TES with a view to showing how a heat pump system behaves and how it influences the building occupants' thermal comfort under a DSM strategy designed to flatten the shape of the electricity load curve by switching off the heat pump during peak hours (16:00–19:00). The reference scenario for the analysis was Northern Ireland (UK). The results showed that the heat pump is a good tool for the purposes of DSM, also thanks to the use of TES systems, in particular with heating distribution systems that have a low thermal inertia, e.g. radiators. It proved possible to achieve a good control of the indoor temperature, even if the heat pump was turned off for 3 h, and to reduce the electricity bill if a “time of use” tariff structure was adopted.

A. Arteconi; N.J. Hewitt; F. Polonara

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

The Time Needed to Implement the Blue Ribbon Commission Recommendation on Interim Storage - 13124  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future [1] makes a number of important recommendations to be considered if Congress elects to redirect U.S. high-level radioactive waste disposal policy. Setting aside for the purposes of this discussion any issues related to political forces leading to stopping progress on the Yucca Mountain project and driving the creation of the Commission, an important recommendation of the Commission was to institute prompt efforts to develop one or more consolidated storage facilities. The Blue Ribbon Commission noted that this recommended strategy for future storage and disposal facilities and operations should be implemented regardless of what happens with Yucca Mountain. It is too easy, however, to focus on interim storage as an alternative to geologic disposal. The Blue Ribbon Commission report does not go far enough in addressing the magnitude of the contentious problems associated with reopening the issues of relative authorities of the states and federal government with which Congress wrestled in crafting the Nuclear Waste Policy Act [2]. The Blue Ribbon Commission recommendation for prompt adoption of an interim storage program does not appear to be fully informed about the actions that must be taken, the relative cost of the effort, or the realistic time line that would be involved. In essence, the recommendation leaves to others the details of the systems engineering analyses needed to understand the nature and details of all the operations required to reach an operational interim storage facility without derailing forever the true end goal of geologic disposal. The material presented identifies a number of impediments that must be overcome before the country could develop a centralized federal interim storage facility. In summary, and in the order presented, they are: 1. Change the law, HJR 87, PL 107-200, designating Yucca Mountain for the development of a repository. 2. Bring new nuclear waste legislation to the floor of the Senate, overcoming existing House support for Yucca Mountain; 3. Change the longstanding focus of Congress from disposal to storage; 4. Change the funding concepts embodied in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to allow the Nuclear Waste fund to be used to pay for interim storage; 5. Reverse the Congressional policy not to give states or tribes veto or consent authority, and to reserve to Congress the authority to override a state or tribal disapproval; 6. Promulgate interim storage facility siting regulations to reflect the new policies after such changes to policy and law; 7. Complete already underway changes to storage and transportation regulations, possibly incorporating changes to reflect changes to waste disposal law; 8. Promulgate new repository siting regulations if the interim storage facility is to support repository development; 9. Identify volunteer sites, negotiate agreements, and get Congressional approval for negotiated benefits packages; 10. Design, License and develop the interim storage facility. The time required to accomplish these ten items depends on many factors. The estimate developed assumes that certain of the items must be completed before other items are started; given past criticisms of the current program, such an assumption appears appropriate. Estimated times for completion of individual items are based on historical precedent. (authors)

Voegele, Michael D. [Consultant, Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office, 7404 Oak Grove Ave, Las Vegas, NV 89117 (United States)] [Consultant, Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office, 7404 Oak Grove Ave, Las Vegas, NV 89117 (United States); Vieth, Donald [1154 Chelttenham Place, Maineville, OH 45039 (United States)] [1154 Chelttenham Place, Maineville, OH 45039 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Power management strategies and energy storage needs to increase the operability of photovoltaic plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the effect of introducing an energy storage (ES) system in an intermittent renewable energy power plant such as a photovoltaic(PV) installation. The aim of this integration is to achieve an improvement in the operability of these power plants by increasing their production predictability. This will allow a further PV integration within the electrical power system facilitating the system's load–demand balance. In this manner the paper proposes two power management strategies (PMSs) each with different configurations for operating a PV power plant: the first focuses on fixing constant power production and the latter focuses on reducing the high frequency fluctuations of the production. Thereafter this paper analyzes and quantifies the ratings of the ES system (ESS) required to ensure a reliable performance of the plant on an annual basis for each of the PMSs with their different possible configurations. The resulting ES ratings vary with these PMS configurations. It can be concluded that significant improvements in production predictability are achieved with an ESS energy capacity of approximately 50% of the average daily energy produced by the PV panels and a power rating of around 55% of the plant's rated power. All the results are based on 1-year-long simulations which used real irradiance data sampled every 2?min.

H. Beltran; I. Etxeberria-Otadui; E. Belenguer; P. Rodriguez

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

N ATIONAL L ABORATORY Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity20, 2012. I. Dincer, On thermal energy storage systems andin research on cold thermal energy storage, International

DeForest, Nicholas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Carbon cryogel based nanomaterials for efficient energy storage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??As demand for fossil fuel alternatives intensifies, energy storage will be a growing concern especially for portable power needs such as automobiles and portable electronic… (more)

Feaver, Aaron

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

The need for high density energy storage for wind turbine and solar power has proven to be a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The need for high density energy storage for wind turbine and solar power has proven cost of these components but also considerably improve their lifetime and reliability as it removes. New breakthrough for single-layer ceramic capacitors with high performance #12;2 Benefits ANU has

Botea, Adi

37

Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storage Storage DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Storage A discussion of depleted UF6 cylinder storage activities and associated risks. Management Activities for Cylinders in Storage The long-term management of the existing DUF6 storage cylinders and the continual effort to remediate and maintain the safe condition of the DUF6 storage cylinders will remain a Departmental responsibility for many years into the future. The day to day management of the DUF6 cylinders includes actions designed to cost effectively maintain and improve their storage conditions, such as: General storage cylinder and storage yard maintenance; Performing regular inspections of cylinders; Restacking and respacing the cylinders to improve drainage and to

38

Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Risks » Storage Environmental Risks » Storage Depleted UF6 Environmental Risks line line Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Environmental Risks of Depleted UF6 Storage Discussion of the potential environmental impacts from storage of depleted UF6 at the three current storage sites, as well as potential impacts from the storage of depleted uranium after conversion to an oxide form. Impacts Analyzed in the PEIS The PEIS included an analysis of the potential environmental impacts from continuing to store depleted UF6 cylinders at the three current storage sites, as well as potential impacts from the storage of depleted uranium after conversion to an oxide form. Impacts from Continued Storage of UF6 Cylinders Continued storage of the UF6 cylinders would require extending the use of a

39

2013 IREP Symposium-Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control -IX (IREP), August 25-30, 2013, Rethymnon, Greece A Comparative Assessment of Demand Response and Energy Storage Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy for discharge over periods of hours, such as large-scale battery storage, compressed air energy, Rethymnon, Greece A Comparative Assessment of Demand Response and Energy Storage Resource Economic system operators, policy makers and other grid stakeholders in the expanded utilization of energy storage

Gross, George

40

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy storage and demand management can complement solarwith energy storage to firm the resource, or solar thermaland solar generation. And demand response or energy storage

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Workload Characterization and Analysis of Storage and Bandwidth Needs of LEAD Workspace  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the scalability and reliability of a software system. A workload is a set of requests, often based-related resource demand, specifically bandwidth in and out of the repository, and spinning disk and tape archive is in addition to community data collections, collections of observational and some model generated data that has

Plale, Beth

42

Analysis of H2 storage needs for early market non-motive fuel cell applications.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen fuel cells can potentially reduce greenhouse gas emissions and the United States dependence on foreign oil, but issues with hydrogen storage are impeding their widespread use. To help overcome these challenges, this study analyzes opportunities for their near-term deployment in five categories of non-motive equipment: portable power, construction equipment, airport ground support equipment, telecom backup power, and man-portable power and personal electronics. To this end, researchers engaged end users, equipment manufacturers, and technical experts via workshops, interviews, and electronic means, and then compiled these data into meaningful and realistic requirements for hydrogen storage in specific target applications. In addition to developing these requirements, end-user benefits (e.g., low noise and emissions, high efficiency, potentially lower maintenance costs) and concerns (e.g., capital cost, hydrogen availability) of hydrogen fuel cells in these applications were identified. Market data show potential deployments vary with application from hundreds to hundreds of thousands of units.

Johnson, Terry Alan; Moreno, Marcina; Arienti, Marco; Pratt, Joseph William; Shaw, Leo; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

An Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration report. Volume 1, Waste Characterization Data and Technology Development Needs Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Characterization Data and Technology Development Needs Assessment provides direct support to the Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID). Key users of the study`s products may also include individuals and programs within the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (EM-50), the Office of Waste Operations (EM-30), and the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40). The goal of this work is to provide the UST-ID with a procedure for allocating funds across competing characterization technologies in a timely and defensible manner. It resulted in three primary products: 1. It organizes and summarizes information on underground storage tank characterization data needs. 2. It describes current technology development activity related to each need and flags areas where technology development may be beneficial. 3. It presents a decision process, with supporting software, for evaluating, prioritizing, and integrating possible technology development funding packages. The data presented in this document can be readily updated as the needs of the Waste Operations and Environmental Restoration programs mature and as new and promising technology development options emerge.

Quadrel, M.J.; Hunter, V.L.; Young, J.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Lini, D.C.; Goldberg, C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Hydrogen storage enhanced in Li-doped carbon replica of zeolites: A possible route to achieve fuel cell demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We first report the atomistic grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of the synthesis of two realistic ordered microporous carbon replica in two siliceous forms of faujasite zeolite (cubic Y-FAU and hexagonal EMT). Atomistic simulations of hydrogen adsorption isotherms in these two carbon structures and their Li-doped composites were carried out to determine their storage capacities at 77 and 298 K. We found that these new forms of carbon solids and their Li-doped versions show very attractive hydrogen storage capacities at 77 and 298 K respectively. However for a filling pressure of 300 bars and at room temperature bare carbons do not show advantageous performances compared to a classical gas cylinder despite of their crystalline micropore network. In comparison Li-doped nanostructures provide reversible gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen storage capacities twice larger ( 3.75 ? wt ? % and 33.7 ? kg / m 3 ). The extreme lattice stiffness of their skeleton will prevent them from collapsing under large external applied pressure an interesting skill compared to bundle of carbon nanotubes and metal organic frameworks (MOFs). These new ordered composites are thus very promising materials for hydrogen storage issues by contrast with MOFs.

Thomas Roussel; Christophe Bichara; Keith E. Gubbins; Roland J.-M. Pellenq

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Marketing Cool Storage Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

storage has been substantiated. bv research conducted by Electric Power Research Institute, and by numerous installations, it has become acknowledged that cool stora~e can provide substantial benefits to utilities and end-users alike. A need was reco...~ned to improve utility load factors, reduce peak electric demands, and other-wise mana~e the demand-side use of electricity. As a result of these many pro~rams, it became apparent that the storage of coolin~, in the form of chilled water, ice, or other phase...

McCannon, L.

46

Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters May 2, 2012 - 6:47pm Addthis Diagram of a tankless water heater. Diagram of a tankless water heater. How does it work? Tankless water heaters deliver hot water as it is needed, eliminating the need for storage tanks. Tankless water heaters, also known as demand-type or instantaneous water heaters, provide hot water only as it is needed. They don't produce the standby energy losses associated with storage water heaters, which can save you money. Here you'll find basic information about how they work, whether a tankless water heater might be right for your home, and what criteria to use when selecting the right model. Check out the Energy Saver 101: Water Heating infographic to learn if a tankless water heater is right for you.

47

Energy Storage | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Energy Storage Energy Storage One of the distinctive characteristics of the electric power sector is that the amount of electricity that can be generated is relatively fixed over short periods of time, although demand for electricity fluctuates throughout the day. Developing technology to store electrical energy so it can be available to meet demand whenever needed would represent a major breakthrough in electricity distribution. Helping to try and meet this goal, electricity storage devices can manage the amount of power required to supply customers at times when need is greatest, which is during peak load. These devices can also help make renewable energy, whose power output cannot be controlled by grid operators, smooth and dispatchable. They can also balance microgrids to achieve a good match between generation

48

Basic Research Needs for Electrical Energy Storage. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Electrical Energy Storage, April 2-4, 2007  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

To identify research areas in geosciences, such as behavior of multiphase fluid-solid systems on a variety of scales, chemical migration processes in geologic media, characterization of geologic systems, and modeling and simulation of geologic systems, needed for improved energy systems.

Goodenough, J. B.; Abruna, H. D.; Buchanan, M. V.

2007-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

49

Investigation of Latent-Heat Storage Systems for Green Building Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In green building applications, highest energy demands are needed for air conditioning to ... heat storage systems during the usage of solar energy and ground-sourced heat pump systems for ... period, analyses sh...

Devrim Aydin; Zafer Utlu; Olcay Kincay

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Demand Reduction  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Grantees may use funds to coordinate with electricity supply companies and utilities to reduce energy demands on their power systems. These demand reduction programs are usually coordinated through...

51

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

53

Cool Storage Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilities have promoted the use of electric heat and thermal storage to increase off peak usage of power. High daytime demand charges and enticing discounts for off peak power have been used as economic incentives to promote thermal storage systems...

Eppelheimer, D. M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

NREL: Energy Analysis: Electric System Flexibility and Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electric System Flexibility and Storage Electric System Flexibility and Storage Options for Increasing Electric System Flexibility to Accommodate Higher Levels of Variable Renewable Electricity Increased electric system flexibility, needed to enable electricity supply-demand balance with high levels of renewable generation, can come from a portfolio of supply- and demand-side options, including flexible conventional generation, grid storage, curtailment of some renewable generation, new transmission, and more responsive loads. NREL's electric system flexibility studies investigate the role of various electric system flexibility options on large-scale deployment of renewable energy. NREL's electric system flexibility analyses show that: Key factors in improving grid flexibility include (1) increasing the

55

Flywheel energy storage using superconducting magnetic bearings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Storage of electrical energy on a utility scale is currently not practicable for most utilities, preventing the full utilization of existing base-load capacity. A potential solution to this problem is Flywheel Energy Storage (FES), made possible by technological developments in high-temperature superconducting materials. Commonwealth Research Corporation (CRC), the research arm of Commonwealth Edison Company, and Argonne National Laboratory are implementing a demonstration project to advance the state of the art in high temperature superconductor (HTS) bearing performance and the overall demonstration of efficient Flywheel Energy Storage. Currently, electricity must be used simultaneously with its generation as electrical energy storage is not available for most utilities. Existing storage methods either are dependent on special geography, are too expensive, or are too inefficient. Without energy storage, electric utilities, such as Commonwealth Edison Company, are forced to cycle base load power plants to meet load swings in hourly customer demand. Demand can change by as much as 30% over a 12-hour period and result in significant costs to utilities as power plant output is adjusted to meet these changes. HTS FES systems can reduce demand-based power plant cycling by storing unused nighttime capacity until it is needed to meet daytime demand.

Abboud, R.G. [Commonwealth Research Corp., Chicago, IL (United States); Uherka, K.; Hull, J.; Mulcahy, T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

The Role of Demand Response in Default Service Pricing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE ROLE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN DEFAULT SERVICE PRICING Galenfor providing much-needed demand response in electricitycompetitive retail markets, demand response often appears to

Barbose, Galen; Goldman, Chuck; Neenan, Bernie

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

The Role of Demand Response in Default Service Pricing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center onThe Role of Demand Response in Default Service Pricing Galenfor providing much-needed demand response in electricity

Barbose, Galen; Goldman, Charles; Neenan, Bernie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For the ice storage system, during direct cooling, thethe building cooling load. In dynamic systems, ice is formedcooling/demand-limited storage / electric load management / full storage / ice

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Energy demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The basic forces pushing up energy demand are population increase and economic growth. From ... of these it is possible to estimate future energy requirements.

Geoffrey Greenhalgh

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Metal Hydrides - Science Needs  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Storage Grand Challenge Pre-Solicitation Meeting, June 19, 2003 1 Metal Hydrides - Science Needs TRADITIONAL METALLIC HYDRIDES: 1.5 to 2 wt.% H. Well studied. COMPLEX...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Chapter 9 - Large-Scale Hydrogen Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Storage technologies are essential for the integration of fluctuating renewable energies. Large scale storage provides grid stability, which are fundamental for a reliable energy systems and the energy balancing in hours to weeks time ranges to match demand and supply. Our system analysis showed that storage needs are in the two-digit terawatt hour and gigawatt range. Other reports confirm that assessment by stating that by 2040, 40 TWh would be required for this application. The present chapter outlines the general components and functions as well as the economics of a large-scale hydrogen energy storage system.

Erik Wolf

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with the second 3-months of the project and encompasses the period December 31, 2003, through March 31, 2003. During this 3-month, the dialogue of individuals representing the storage industry, universities and the Department of energy was continued and resulted in a constitution for the operation of the consortium and a draft of the initial Request for Proposals (RFP).

Robert W. Watson

2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

63

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created-the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2006 to September 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: {lg_bullet} Subaward contracts for all 2006 GSTC projects completed; {lg_bullet} Implement a formal project mentoring process by a mentor team; {lg_bullet} Upcoming Technology Transfer meetings: {sm_bullet} Finalize agenda for the American Gas Association Fall Underground Storage Committee/GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting in San Francisco, CA. on October 4, 2006; {sm_bullet} Identify projects and finalize agenda for the Fall GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA on November 8, 2006; {lg_bullet} Draft and compile an electronic newsletter, the GSTC Insider; and {lg_bullet} New members update.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

64

Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems: Molten Salt Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With growing concerns in the production of reliable energy sources, the next generation in reliable power generation, hybrid energy systems, are being developed to stabilize these growing energy needs. The hybrid energy system incorporates multiple inputs and multiple outputs. The vitality and efficiency of these systems resides in the energy storage application. Energy storage is necessary for grid stabilizing and storing the overproduction of energy to meet peak demands of energy at the time of need. With high thermal energy production of the primary nuclear heat generation source, molten salt energy storage is an intriguing option because of its distinct properties. This paper will discuss the different energy storage options with the criteria for efficient energy storage set forth, and will primarily focus on different molten salt energy storage system options through a thermodynamic analysis

P. Sabharwall; M. Green; S.J. Yoon; S.M. Bragg-Sitton; C. Stoots

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Grid Integration of Aggregated Demand Response, Part 1: Load Availability Profiles and Constraints for the Western Interconnection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is estimated. Keywords: Demand response, ancillary services,of Aggregated Demand Response, Part 1: Load Availabilityof Energy (DOE) Demand Response and Energy Storage

Olsen, Daniel J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

On making energy demand and network constraints compatible in the last mile of the power grid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the classical electricity grid power demand is nearly instantaneously matched by power supply. In this paradigm, the changes in power demand in a low voltage distribution grid are essentially nothing but a disturbance that is compensated for by control at the generators. The disadvantage of this methodology is that it necessarily leads to a transmission and distribution network that must cater for peak demand. So-called smart meters and smart grid technologies provide an opportunity to change this paradigm by using demand side energy storage to moderate instantaneous power demand so as to facilitate the supply-demand match within network limitations. A receding horizon model predictive control method can be used to implement this idea. In this paradigm demand is matched with supply, such that the required customer energy needs are met but power demand is moderated, while ensuring that power flow in the grid is maintained within the safe operating region, and in particular peak demand is limited. This enables a much higher utilisation of the available grid infrastructure, as it reduces the peak-to-base demand ratio as compared to the classical control methodology of power supply following power demand. This paper investigates this approach for matching energy demand to generation in the last mile of the power grid while maintaining all network constraints through a number of case studies involving the charging of electric vehicles in a typical suburban low voltage distribution network in Melbourne, Australia.

Iven Mareels; Julian de Hoog; Doreen Thomas; Marcus Brazil; Tansu Alpcan; Derek Jayasuriya; Valentin Müenzel; Lu Xia; Ramachandra Rao Kolluri

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Optimization of compression and storage requirements at hydrogen refueling stations.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transition to hydrogen-powered vehicles requires detailed technical and economic analyses of all aspects of hydrogen infrastructure, including refueling stations. The cost of such stations is a major contributor to the delivered cost of hydrogen. Hydrogen refueling stations require not only dispensers to transfer fuel onto a vehicle, but also an array of such ancillary equipment as a cascade charging system, storage vessels, compressors and/or pumps/evaporators. This paper provides detailed information on design requirements for gaseous and liquid hydrogen refueling stations and their associated capital and operating costs, which in turn impact hydrogen selling price at various levels of hydrogen demand. It summarizes an engineering economics approach which captures the effect of variations in station size, seasonal, daily and hourly demand, and alternative dispensing rates and pressures on station cost. Tradeoffs in the capacity of refueling station compressors, storage vessels, and the cascade charging system result in many possible configurations for the station. Total costs can be minimized by optimizing that configuration. Using a methodology to iterate among the costs of compression, storage and cascade charging, it was found that the optimum hourly capacity of the compressor is approximately twice the station's average hourly demand, and the optimum capacity of the cascade charging system is approximately 15% of the station's average daily demand. Further, for an hourly demand profile typical of today's gasoline stations, onsite hydrogen storage equivalent to at least 1/3 of the station's average daily demand is needed to accommodate peak demand.

Elgowainy, A.; Mintz, M.; Kelly, B.; Hooks, M.; Paster, M. (Energy Systems); (Nexant, Inc.); (TIAX LLC)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

An Operational Model for Optimal NonDispatchable Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Operational Model for Optimal NonDispatchable Demand Response for Continuous PowerintensiveFACTS, $ Demand Response Energy Storage HVDC Industrial Customer PEV Renewable Energy Source: U.S.-Canada Power: To balance supply and demand of a power system, one can manipulate both: supply and demand demand response

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

69

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period April 1, 2004, through June 30, 2004. During this 3-month period, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was made. A total of 17 proposals were submitted to the GSTC. A proposal selection meeting was held June 9-10, 2004 in Morgantown, West Virginia. Of the 17 proposals, 6 were selected for funding.

Robert W. Watson

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

Regulatory, technical pressures prompt more U. S. salt-cavern gas storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural-gas storage in US salt caverns is meeting the need for flexible, high delivery and injection storage following implementation Nov. 1, 1993, of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Order 636. This ruling has opened the US underground natural-gas storage market to more participants and created a demand for a variety of storage previously provided by pipelines as part of their bundled sales services. Many of these new services such as no-notice and supply balancing center on use of high-delivery natural gas storage from salt caverns. Unlike reservoir storage, nothing restricts flow in a cavern. The paper discusses the unique properties of salt that make it ideal for gas storage, choosing a location for the storage facility, cavern depth and shape, cavern size, spacing, pressures, construction, conversion or brine or LPG storage caverns to natural gas, and operation.

Barron, T.F. (PB-KBB Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

1994-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

71

Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight and passenger rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous

72

Demand Response In California  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Efficiency & Energy Efficiency & Demand Response Programs Dian M. Grueneich, Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich, Commissioner California Public Utilities Commission California Public Utilities Commission FUPWG 2006 Fall Meeting November 2, 2006 Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 1 Highest Priority Resource Energy Efficiency is California's highest priority resource to: Meet energy needs in a low cost manner Aggressively reduce GHG emissions November 2, 2006 2 Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 3 http://www.cpuc.ca.gov/PUBLISHED/REPORT/51604.htm Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 4 Energy Action Plan II Loading order continued "Pursue all cost-effective energy efficiency, first." Strong demand response and advanced metering

73

Enabling Utility-Scale Electrical Energy Storage through Underground Hydrogen-Natural Gas Co-Storage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Energy storage technology is needed for the storage of surplus baseload generation and the storage of intermittent wind power, because it can increase the flexibility… (more)

Peng, Dan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

States. Annex 8 provides a list of software tools for analysing various aspects of demand response, distributed generation, smart grid and energy storage. Annex 9 is a list of...

75

Multiported storage devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the past decade the demand for systems that can process and deliver massive amounts of storage has increased. Traditionally, large disk farms have been deployed by connecting several disks to a single server. A problem with this configuration...

Grande, Marcus Bryan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

76

Solar Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The intermittent nature of the solar energy supply makes the provision of adequate energy storage essential for the majority of practical applications. Thermal storage is needed for both low-temperature and high-...

Brian Norton BSc; MSc; PhD; F Inst E; C Eng

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Overview of Demand Side Response | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Energy Officials Need to Know High Electric Demand Days: Clean Energy Strategies for Improving Air Quality Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence...

78

Demand Response  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessment for Eastern Interconnection Youngsun Baek, Stanton W. Hadley, Rocio Martinez, Gbadebo Oladosu, Alexander M. Smith, Fran Li, Paul Leiby and Russell Lee Prepared for FY12 DOE-CERTS Transmission Reliability R&D Internal Program Review September 20, 2012 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy DOE National Laboratory Studies Funded to Support FOA 63 * DOE set aside $20 million from transmission funding for national laboratory studies. * DOE identified four areas of interest: 1. Transmission Reliability 2. Demand Side Issues 3. Water and Energy 4. Other Topics * Argonne, NREL, and ORNL support for EIPC/SSC/EISPC and the EISPC Energy Zone is funded through Area 4. * Area 2 covers LBNL and NREL work in WECC and

79

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-3047E Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers G described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers. California Energy

80

Energy: world needs and reserves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy: world needs and reserves ... Lippencott takes stock of the world energy reserves and the demand the US places on these reserves. ...

W. T. Lippincott

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Commercial & Industrial Demand Response  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources News & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Agricultural Residential Demand Response Commercial & Industrial Demand Response...

82

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

83

Metal Hydride Thermal Storage: Reversible Metal Hydride Thermal Storage for High-Temperature Power Generation Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATS Project: PNNL is developing a thermal energy storage system based on a Reversible Metal Hydride Thermochemical (RMHT) system, which uses metal hydride as a heat storage material. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. PNNL’s metal hydride material can reversibly store heat as hydrogen cycles in and out of the material. In a RHMT system, metal hydrides remain stable in high temperatures (600- 800°C). A high-temperature tank in PNNL’s storage system releases heat as hydrogen is absorbed, and a low-temperature tank stores the heat until it is needed. The low-cost material and simplicity of PNNL’s thermal energy storage system is expected to keep costs down. The system has the potential to significantly increase energy density.

None

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

84

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the results from the second season of research to develop and evaluate the performance of new Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) hardware and software technology in large facilities. Demand Response (DR) is a set of activities to reduce or shift electricity use to improve the electric grid reliability and manage electricity costs. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. We refer to this as Auto-DR. The evaluation of the control and communications must be properly configured and pass through a set of test stages: Readiness, Approval, Price Client/Price Server Communication, Internet Gateway/Internet Relay Communication, Control of Equipment, and DR Shed Effectiveness. New commissioning tests are needed for such systems to improve connecting demand responsive building systems to the electric grid demand response systems.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

NREL: Energy Storage - Battery Materials Synthesis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

power requirements and system integration demands of EDVs pose significant challenges to energy storage technologies. Making these materials durable enough that batteries last...

87

Design methodologies for advanced flywheel energy storage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Higher penetration of volatile renewable sources and increasing load demand are putting a strain on the current utility grid structure. Energy storage solutions are required… (more)

Hearn, Clay Stephen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Introduction 2 Technology Description 3 Plants 4 References Introduction Compressed air energy storage (CAES) is a way to store energy that is generated at night and deliver the energy during the day to meet peak demand. This is performed by compressing air and storing it during periods of excess electricity and expanding the air through a turbine when electricity is needed. Technology Description Diabatic Diabatic compressed air energy storage is what the two existing compressed air energy storage facilities currently employ. This method is

89

Energy Storage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Storage Storage Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Source information Contents 1 Introduction 2 Benefits 3 Technologies 4 References Introduction Energy storage is a tool that can be used by grid operators to help regulate the electrical grid and help meet demand. In its most basic form, energy storage "stores" excess energy that would otherwise be wasted so that it can be used later when demand is higher. Energy Storage can be used to balance microgrids, perform frequency regulation, and provide more reliable power for high tech industrial facilities.[1] Energy storage will also allow for the expansion of intermittent renewable energy, like wind and solar, to provide electricity around the clock. Some of the major issues concerning energy storage include cost, efficiency, and size.

90

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Demand Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center Technical Advisory Group Meeting August 31, 2007 10:30 AM - Noon Meeting Agenda * Introductions (10 minutes) * Main Presentation (~ 1 hour) * Questions, comments from panel (15 minutes) Project History * Lighting Scoping Study (completed January 2007) - Identified potential for energy and demand savings using demand responsive lighting systems - Importance of dimming - New wireless controls technologies * Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) Objectives * Provide up-to-date information on the reliability, predictability of dimmable lighting as a demand resource under realistic operating load conditions * Identify potential negative impacts of DR lighting on lighting quality Potential of Demand Responsive Lighting Control

91

Storage Sub-committee  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Storage Sub-committee Storage Sub-committee 2012 Work Plan Confidential 1 2012 Storage Subcommittee Work Plan * Report to Congress. (legislative requirement) - Review existing and projected research and funding - Review existing DOE, Arpa-e projects and the OE 5 year plan - Identify gaps and recommend additional topics - Outline distributed (review as group) * Develop and analysis of the need for large scale storage deployment (outline distributed again) * Develop analysis on regulatory issues especially valuation and cost recovery Confidential 2 Large Scale Storage * Problem Statement * Situation Today * Benefits Analysis * Policy Issues * Technology Gaps * Recommendations * Renewables Variability - Reserves and capacity requirements - Financial impacts - IRC Response to FERC NOI and update

92

NREL: Learning - Energy Storage Basics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Basics Energy Storage Basics The demand for electricity is seldom constant over time. Excess generating capacity available during periods of low demand can be used to energize an energy storage device. The stored energy can then be used to provide electricity during periods of high demand, helping to reduce power system loads during these times. Energy storage can improve the efficiency and reliability of the electric utility system by reducing the requirements for spinning reserves to meet peak power demands, making better use of efficient baseload generation, and allowing greater use of renewable energy technologies. A "spinning reserve" is a generator that is spinning and synchronized with the grid, ready for immediate power generation - like a car engine running with the gearbox

93

A Successful Cool Storage Rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Houston Lighting & Power (HL&P) initiated design and development of its commercial cool storage program as part of an integrated resource planning process with a targeted 225 MW of demand reduction through DSM. Houston's extensive commercial air...

Ahrens, A. C.; Sobey, T. M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Thermal Storage of Solar Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal storage is needed to improve the efficiency and usefulness of solar thermal systems. The paper indicates the main storage ... which would greatly increase the practical use of solar energy — is more diffi...

H. Tabor

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response:both the avoided energy costs (and demand charges) as wellCoordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response,

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Compressed air energy storage system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An internal combustion reciprocating engine is operable as a compressor during slack demand periods utilizing excess power from a power grid to charge air into an air storage reservoir and as an expander during peak demand periods to feed power into the power grid utilizing air obtained from the air storage reservoir together with combustible fuel. Preferably the internal combustion reciprocating engine is operated at high pressure and a low pressure turbine and compressor are also employed for air compression and power generation.

Ahrens, Frederick W. (Naperville, IL); Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

benefits of Demand Side Management (DSM) are insufficient toefficiency, demand side management (DSM) cost effectivenessResearch Center Demand Side Management Demand Side Resources

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Residential Energy Demand Reduction Analysis and Monitoring Platform - REDRAMP  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Dramatic Peak Residential Dramatic Peak Residential Demand Reduction in the Desert Southwest Yahia Baghzouz Center for Energy Research University of Nevada, Las Vegas Golden, CO Overview * Project description * Subdivision energy efficiency features * Home energy monitoring * Demand side management * Feeder loading * Battery Energy Storage System * Future Work Team Members Project Objective and Methodology * The main objective is to reduce peak power demand of a housing subdivision by 65% (compared to housing development that is built to conventional code). * This objective will be achieved by - Energy efficient home construction with roof- integrated PV system - Demand Side Management - Battery Energy Storage System Project schematic Diagram Project Physical Location: Las Vegas, NV Red Rock Hotel/Casino

99

Analysis of novel, above-ground thermal energy storage concept utilizing low-cost, solid medium .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Clean energy power plants cannot effectively match peak demands without utilizing energy storage technologies. Currently, several solutions address short term demand cycles, but little work… (more)

Barineau, Mark Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

NETL: Carbon Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storage Storage Technologies Carbon Storage (formerly referred to as the "Carbon Sequestration Program") Program Overview For quick navigation of NETL's Carbon Storage Program website, please click on the image. NETL's Carbon Storage Program Fossil fuels are considered the most dependable, cost-effective energy source in the world. The availability of these fuels to provide clean, affordable energy is essential for domestic and global prosperity and security well into the 21st century. However, a balance is needed between energy security and concerns over the impacts of concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere - particularly carbon dioxide (CO2). NETL's Carbon Storage Program is developing a technology portfolio of safe, cost-effective, commercial-scale CO2 capture, storage, and mitigation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Creating a programmable object storage stack  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The current file system and storage stack is restricted in the amount of information that flows from application to storage and from storage to application. This limits the ability of applications to tailor the storage system to particular needs of the ... Keywords: filesystems, object storage

Orko Momin, Cengiz Karakoyunlu, Michael T. Runde, John A. Chandy

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Gas hydrate cool storage system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

1984-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

103

Mass Market Demand Response  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response Mass Market Demand Response Speaker(s): Karen Herter Date: July 24, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory,

104

A new wholesale bidding mechanism for enhanced demand response in smart grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calls to improve customer participation as a key element of smart grids have reinvigorated interest in demand-side features such as distributed generation, on-site storage and demand response. In the context of deregulated ...

Wang, Jiankang

105

Demand Response Assessment INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response Assessment INTRODUCTION This appendix provides more detail on some of the topics raised in Chapter 4, "Demand Response" of the body of the Plan. These topics include 1. The features, advantages and disadvantages of the main options for stimulating demand response (price mechanisms

106

Cool Storage Applications in the Texas LoanSTAR Program: Overview and Preliminary Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cool Storage Systems (CSS) are becoming a popular demand side management tool for utilities because that helps them avoid costly plant expansions and reduces summer-time peak electricity demand. This paper presents an analysis of cool storage...

Abbas, M.; Haberl, J. S.; Turner, W. D.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Definition: Demand Side Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Side Management Side Management Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Demand Side Management The term for all activities or programs undertaken by Load-Serving Entity or its customers to influence the amount or timing of electricity they use.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Energy demand management, also known as demand side management (DSM), is the modification of consumer demand for energy through various methods such as financial incentives and education. Usually, the goal of demand side management is to encourage the consumer to use less energy during peak hours, or to move the time of energy use to off-peak times such as nighttime and weekends. Peak demand management does not necessarily decrease total energy consumption, but could be expected to reduce the need

108

Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable Energy Sources, and Energy Storages: State-of-the-Art Report, Volume 1, Main Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable Energy Sources, and Energy Storages: State-of-the-Art Report, Volume 1, Main Report Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.ieadsm.org/Files/Tasks/Task%20XVII%20-%20Integration%20of%20Demand Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/integration-demand-side-management-di Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Resource Integration Planning This task of the International Energy Agency's (IEA's) Demand-Side

109

Towards continuous policy-driven demand response in data centers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Demand response (DR) is a technique for balancing electricity supply and demand by regulating power consumption instead of generation. DR is a key technology for emerging smart electric grids that aim to increase grid efficiency, while incorporating ... Keywords: blink, power, renewable energy, storage

David Irwin; Navin Sharma; Prashant Shenoy

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Mobile applications constantly demand additional memory, and traditional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This remote access could reduce local storage space, thereby reducing energy demands on the mobile plat- form60 Mobile applications constantly demand additional memory, and traditional designs increase- port connected ubiquitous environments. Engineers attempt to minimize network use because of its

Lee, Hsien-Hsin "Sean"

111

Grid Applications for Energy Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Applications for Energy Storage Applications for Energy Storage Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop Washington DC 7-8 March 2012 Joe Eto jheto@lbl.gov (510) 486-7284 Referencing a Recent Sandia Study,* This Talk Will: Describe and illustrate selected grid applications for energy storage Time-of-use energy cost management Demand charge management Load following Area Regulation Renewables energy time shift Renewables capacity firming Compare Sandia's estimates of the economic value of these applications to the Electricity Storage Association's estimates of the capital costs of energy storage technologies *Eyer, J. and G. Corey. Energy Storage for the Electricity Grid: Benefits and Market Potential Assessment Guide. February 2010. SAND2010-0815 A Recent Sandia Study Estimates the Economic

112

Demand response enabling technology development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response Enabling Technology Development Phase IEfficiency and Demand Response Programs for 2005/2006,Application to Demand Response Energy Pricing” SenSys 2003,

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response – SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response – Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response – Spinning Reserve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Cross-sector Demand Response  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources News & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Agricultural Residential Demand Response Commercial & Industrial Demand Response...

115

Demand Response Programs for Oregon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response Programs for Oregon Utilities Public Utility Commission May 2003 Public Utility ....................................................................................................................... 1 Types of Demand Response Programs............................................................................ 3 Demand Response Programs in Oregon

116

Demand response enabling technology development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

behavior in developing a demand response future. Phase_II_Demand Response Enabling Technology Development Phase IIYi Yuan The goal of the Demand Response Enabling Technology

Arens, Edward; Auslander, David; Huizenga, Charlie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fully-Automated Demand Response Test in Large Facilities14in DR systems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercialof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Demand Response In California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers the demand response in California and is given at the FUPWG 2006 Fall meeting, held on November 1-2, 2006 in San Francisco, California.

119

Energy Demand Forecasting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter presents alternative approaches used in forecasting energy demand and discusses their pros and cons. It... Chaps. 3 and 4 ...

S. C. Bhattacharyya

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

An Evaluation of Thermal Storage at Two Industrial Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal storage offers substantial energy cost savings potential in situations with favorable electrical rates and significant cooling demand. Full storage is usually restricted to facilities occupied only part of the day, but two industrial plants...

Brown, M. L.; Gurta, M. E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Fuel Quality and Metering: Current Status and Future Needs |...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Quality and Metering: Current Status and Future Needs Fuel Quality and Metering: Current Status and Future Needs These slides were presented at the Onboard Storage Tank...

122

H2A Delivery: Forecourt Compression & Storage Optimization (Part...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of the required storage to meet new demand profile 582007 11 Model Implementation MATLAB model and results used as the foundation for an Excel tool that performs these...

123

Review of electrical energy storage system for vehicular applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Recently, automotive original equipment manufacturers have focused their efforts on developing greener propulsion solutions in order to meet the societal demand and ecological need for clean transportation, so the development of new energy vehicle (NEV) has become a consensus among governments and automotive enterprises. Efficient electrical energy storage system (EESS) appears to be very promising for meeting the rapidly increased requirements of vehicular applications. It is necessary to understand performances of electrical energy storage technologies. Therefore, this paper reviews the various electrical energy storage technologies and their latest applications in vehicle, such as battery energy storage (BES), superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES), flywheel energy storage (FES), ultra-capacitor (UC) energy storage (UCES) and hybrid energy storage (HES). The research priorities and difficulties of each electrical energy storage technology are also presented and compared. Afterwards, the key technologies of EESS design for vehicles are presented. In addition, several conventional \\{EESSs\\} for vehicle applications are also analyzed; the comparison on advantages and disadvantages of various conventional \\{EESSs\\} is highlighted. From the rigorous review, it is observed that almost all current conventional \\{EESSs\\} for vehicles cannot meet a high-efficiency of power flow over the full operation range; optimization of EESS and improved control strategies will become an important research topic. Finally, this paper especially focuses on a type of linear engine, a brand new automotive propulsion system used for NEV; the guiding principle of EESS design for the new type of linear engine is proposed, an overview of a novel hybrid EESS based on hybrid power source and series–parallel switchover of UC with high efficiency under wide power flow range for the type of linear engine is presented, and advanced features of the novel hybrid EESS are highlighted.

Guizhou Ren; Guoqing Ma; Ning Cong

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

High Burnup Dry Storage Cask Research and Development Project...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

High Burnup Dry Storage Cask Research and Development Project: Final Test Plan High Burnup Dry Storage Cask Research and Development Project: Final Test Plan The potential need to...

125

Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements to Meet the 2017 On Board...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermal H 2 Storage Fuel Cell Vehicle Wheels Management BoP Engineered Heat Transfer BoP What is Needed Materials Designs Component of the Hydrogen Storage...

126

US DRIVE Hydrogen Storage Technical Team Roadmap | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

& Publications A Brief Overview of Hydrogen Storage Issues and Needs DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 9017: On-Board Hydrogen Storage Systems - Projected Performance...

127

2012 SG Peer Review - Interoperability of Demand Response Resources in New York - Andre Wellington, ConEd NY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Interoperability of Demand Response Interoperability of Demand Response Resources in NY Andre Wellington Con Edison June 8, 2012 December 2008 Interoperability of Demand Resource Resources in NY Objective Life-cycle Funding ($M) FY08 - FY13 $6.8 million Technical Scope (Insert graphic here) Develop and demonstrate technology required to integrate customer owned resources into the electrical distribution system * Evaluate interconnection designs * Design and install thermal storage plant with enhanced capabilities * Develop AutoDR application for targeted distributed resources 2 December 2008 Needs and Project Targets Develop the technology required to integrate customer owned distributed resources into the distribution system to enable the of deferment capital investments. * Remote dispatch of customer resources

128

Simplified numerical description of latent storage characteristics for phase change wallboard  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cooling of residential California buildings contributes significantly to electrical consumption and peak power demand. Thermal mass can be utilized to reduce the peak-power demand, down-size the cooling systems and/or switch to low-energy cooling sources. Large thermal storage devices have been used in the past to overcome the short-comings of alternative cooling sources or to avoid high demand charges. With the advent of phase change material (PCM) implemented in gypsum board, plaster or other wall-covering material, thermal storage can be part of the building structure even for light-weight buildings. PCMs have two important advantages as storage media: they can offer an order-of-magnitude increase in thermal storage capacity and their discharge is almost isothermal. This allows to store large amounts of energy without significantly changing the temperature of the sheathing. As heat storage takes place in the building part where the loads occur, rather than externally (e.g., ice or chilled water storage), additional transport energy is not needed. To numerically evaluate the latent storage performance of treated wallboard, RADCOOL, a thermal building simulation model based on the finite difference approach, will be used. RADCOOL has been developed in the SPARK environment in order to be compatible with the new family of simulation tools being developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. As logical statements are difficult to use in SPARK, a continuous function for the specific heat and the enthalpy had to be found. This report covers the development of a simplified description of latent storage characteristics for wallboard treated with phase change material.

Feustel, H.E.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Electricity Demand Figure 60. Annual electricity sales by sector, 1980-2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel, 2006 and 2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Residential and Commercial Sectors Dominate Electricity Demand Growth Total electricity sales increase by 29 percent in the AEO2008 reference case, from 3,659 billion kilowatthours in 2006 to 4,705 billion in 2030, at an average rate of 1.1 percent per year. The relatively slow growth follows the historical trend, with the growth rate slowing in each succeeding

130

Boosting CSP Production with Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combining concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage shows promise for increasing grid flexibility by providing firm system capacity with a high ramp rate and acceptable part-load operation. When backed by energy storage capability, CSP can supplement photovoltaics by adding generation from solar resources during periods of low solar insolation. The falling cost of solar photovoltaic (PV) - generated electricity has led to a rapid increase in the deployment of PV and projections that PV could play a significant role in the future U.S. electric sector. The solar resource itself is virtually unlimited; however, the actual contribution of PV electricity is limited by several factors related to the current grid. The first is the limited coincidence between the solar resource and normal electricity demand patterns. The second is the limited flexibility of conventional generators to accommodate this highly variable generation resource. At high penetration of solar generation, increased grid flexibility will be needed to fully utilize the variable and uncertain output from PV generation and to shift energy production to periods of high demand or reduced solar output. Energy storage is one way to increase grid flexibility, and many storage options are available or under development. In this article, however, we consider a technology already beginning to be used at scale - thermal energy storage (TES) deployed with concentrating solar power (CSP). PV and CSP are both deployable in areas of high direct normal irradiance such as the U.S. Southwest. The role of these two technologies is dependent on their costs and relative value, including how their value to the grid changes as a function of what percentage of total generation they contribute to the grid, and how they may actually work together to increase overall usefulness of the solar resource. Both PV and CSP use solar energy to generate electricity. A key difference is the ability of CSP to utilize high-efficiency TES, which turns CSP into a partially dispatchable resource. The addition of TES produces additional value by shifting the delivery of solar energy to periods of peak demand, providing firm capacity and ancillary services, and reducing integration challenges. Given the dispatchability of CSP enabled by TES, it is possible that PV and CSP are at least partially complementary. The dispatchability of CSP with TES can enable higher overall penetration of the grid by solar energy by providing solar-generated electricity during periods of cloudy weather or at night, when PV-generated power is unavailable. Such systems also have the potential to improve grid flexibility, thereby enabling greater penetration of PV energy (and other variable generation sources such as wind) than if PV were deployed without CSP.

Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable Energy Sources, and Energy Storages: State-of-the-Art Report, Volume 2, Annexes Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation, Renewable Energy Sources, and Energy Storages: State-of-the-Art Report, Volume 2, Annexes Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.ieadsm.org/Files/Tasks/Task%20XVII%20-%20Integration%20of%20Demand Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/integration-demand-side-management-di Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Resource Integration Planning This report provides Annexes 1 through 7, which are country reports from

132

Measuring the capacity impacts of demand response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Critical peak pricing and peak time rebate programs offer benefits by increasing system reliability, and therefore, reducing capacity needs of the electric power system. These benefits, however, decrease substantially as the size of the programs grows relative to the system size. More flexible schemes for deployment of demand response can help address the decreasing returns to scale in capacity value, but more flexible demand response has decreasing returns to scale as well. (author)

Earle, Robert; Kahn, Edward P.; Macan, Edo

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA

134

Thermal Storage with Conventional Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The newly opened Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia, PA; Exxon's Computer Facility at Florham Park, NJ; The Center Square Building in Philadelphia, are success stories for demand shifting through thermal storage. These buildings employ a...

Kieninger, R. T.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Demand Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Demand Module calculates energy consumption for the four Census Regions (see Figure 5) and disaggregates the energy consumption

136

demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

137

RTP Customer Demand Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides new evidence on customer demand response to hourly pricing from the largest and...real-time pricing...(RTP) program in the United States. RTP creates value by inducing load reductions at times...

Steven Braithwait; Michael O’Sheasy

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

World Energy Demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A reliable forecast of energy resources, energy consumption, and population in the future is a ... So, instead of absolute figures about future energy demand and sources worldwide, which would become...3.1 correl...

Giovanni Petrecca

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Transportation Demand This  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Transportation Demand Transportation Demand This page inTenTionally lefT blank 75 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific and associated technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight

140

NV Energy Electricity Storage Valuation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examines how grid-level electricity storage may benet the operations of NV Energy in 2020, and assesses whether those benets justify the cost of the storage system. In order to determine how grid-level storage might impact NV Energy, an hourly production cost model of the Nevada Balancing Authority (\\BA") as projected for 2020 was built and used for the study. Storage facilities were found to add value primarily by providing reserve. Value provided by the provision of time-of-day shifting was found to be limited. If regulating reserve from storage is valued the same as that from slower ramp rate resources, then it appears that a reciprocating engine generator could provide additional capacity at a lower cost than a pumped storage hydro plant or large storage capacity battery system. In addition, a 25-MW battery storage facility would need to cost $650/kW or less in order to produce a positive Net Present Value (NPV). However, if regulating reserve provided by storage is considered to be more useful to the grid than that from slower ramp rate resources, then a grid-level storage facility may have a positive NPV even at today's storage system capital costs. The value of having storage provide services beyond reserve and time-of-day shifting was not assessed in this study, and was therefore not included in storage cost-benefit calculations.

Ellison, James F.; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Samaan, Nader A.; Jin, Chunlian

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geologic Storage Geologic Storage Carbon Storage Geologic Storage Focus Area Geologiccarbon dioxide (CO2) storage involves the injection of supercritical CO2 into deep geologic formations (injection zones) overlain by competent sealing formations and geologic traps that will prevent the CO2 from escaping. Current research and field studies are focused on developing better understanding 11 major types of geologic storage reservoir classes, each having their own unique opportunities and challenges. Understanding these different storage classes provides insight into how the systems influence fluids flow within these systems today, and how CO2 in geologic storage would be anticipated to flow in the future. The different storage formation classes include: deltaic, coal/shale, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Basaltic interflow zones are also being considered as potential reservoirs. These storage reservoirs contain fluids that may include natural gas, oil, or saline water; any of which may impact CO2 storage differently. The following summarizes the potential for storage and the challenges related to CO2 storage capability for fluids that may be present in more conventional clastic and carbonate reservoirs (saline water, and oil and gas), as well as unconventional reservoirs (unmineable coal seams, organic-rich shales, and basalts):

142

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shift in the short-run price elasticity of gasoline demand.A meta-analysis of the price elasticity of gasoline demand.2007. Consumer demand un- der price uncertainty: Empirical

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. EnergyEstimates elasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline.World crude oil and natural gas: a demand and supply model.

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. EnergyEstimates elasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline.World crude oil and natural gas: a demand and supply model.

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Changing Energy Demand Behavior: Potential of Demand-Side Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is a great theoretical potential to save resources by managing our demand for energy. However, demand-side management (DSM) programs targeting behavioral patterns of...

Dr. Sylvia Breukers; Dr. Ruth Mourik…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Assessing the impacts of future demand for saline groundwater on commercial deployment of CCS in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides a preliminary assessment of the potential impact that future demand for groundwater might have on the commercial deployment of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies within the United States. A number of regions within the U.S. have populations, agriculture and industries that are particularly dependent upon groundwater. Moreover, some key freshwater aquifers are already over-utilized or depleted, and others are likely to be moving toward depletion as demand grows. The need to meet future water demands may lead some parts of the nation to consider supplementing existing supplies with lower quality groundwater resources, including brackish waters that are currently not considered sources of drinking water but which could provide supplemental water via desalination. In some areas, these same deep saline-filled geologic formations also represent possible candidate carbon dioxide (CO2) storage reservoirs. The analysis presented here suggests that future constraints on CCS deployment due to potential needs to supplement conventional water supplies by desalinating deeper and more brackish waters are likely to be necessary only in limited regions across the country, particularly in areas that are already experiencing water stress.

Davidson, Casie L.; Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

147

Potential for future development of salt cavern storage in the upper Silurian Syracuse Formation of south-central New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although depleted reservoirs remain the dominant structures used for storage fulfilling the demand for base load gas supply during the heating season, the current general surge in storage projects, nationwide, takes advantage of opportunities in Order 636, and makes greater use of salt caverns for gas storage. This reflects the increasing need by gas users, local distribution companies in particular, to quickly cycle a storage facility`s gas supply for services such as peak shaving, emergency supply, and system balancing to meet hourly swings. Occurrence of thick deposits of bedded salt deposits provides New York the capability to develop high deliverability salt cavern storage facilities. Furthermore, New York is uniquely positioned at the gateway to major northeastern markets to provide peak load storage services of natural gas supply. The thickest units of bedded salt in New York occur in the {open_quotes}F{close_quotes} horizon of the Upper Silurian Syracuse Formation. Three bedded salt cavern storage facilities have been recently proposed in New York. Two of these projects is much larger (with 5 Bcfg ultimate capacity), is under construction, and will provide valuable storage service to the Ellisburg-Leidy market center hub in Pennsylvania. Identification of possible sites for future salt cavern storage projects has been achieved chiefly by defining areas of thick beds of salt at sufficient depths close to gas transmission lines, with access to a freshwater supply for leaching, and possessing an acceptable method of brine disposal.

Bass, J.P.; Sarwar, G.; Guo, B. [Brooklyn College of the City Univ. of New York, Troy, NY (United States)] [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

No. ER06-615-000 CAISO Demand Response Resource User Guide -8 2.1. Demand Response Provides a Range of Benefits to8 2.2. Demand Response Benefits can be Quantified in Several

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling Speaker(s): Nan Zhou Date: October 8, 2009 (All day) Location: 90-3122 As a consequence of soaring energy demand due to the staggering pace of its economic growth, China overtook the United States in 2007 to become the world's biggest contributor to CO2 emissions (IEA, 2007). Since China is still in an early stage of industrialization and urbanization, economic development promises to keep China's energy demand growing strongly. Furthermore, China's reliance on fossil fuel is unlikely to change in the long term, and increased needs will only heighten concerns about energy security and climate change. In response, the Chinese government has developed a series of policies and targets aimed at improving energy efficiency, including both short-term targets and long-term strategic

150

Radioactive waste storage issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

Kunz, D.E.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 39 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial.

152

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 12 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS 27 data.

153

Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" (UEC) by appliance (in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type

154

Hydrogen Storage- Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- - Overview George Thomas, Hydrogen Consultant to SNL * and Jay Keller, Hydrogen Program Manager Sandia National Laboratories H 2 Delivery and Infrastructure Workshop May 7-8, 2003 * Most of this presentation has been extracted from George Thomas' invited BES Hydrogen Workshop presentation (May 13-14, 2003) Sandia National Laboratories 4/14/03 2 Sandia National Laboratories From George Thomas, BES workshop 5/13/03 H 2 storage is a critical enabling technology for H 2 use as an energy carrier The low volumetric density of gaseous fuels requires a storage method which compacts the fuel. Hence, hydrogen storage systems are inherently more complex than liquid fuels. Storage technologies are needed in all aspects of hydrogen utilization. production distribution utilization

155

Energy storage for desalination processes powered by renewable energy and waste heat sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Desalination has become imperative as a drinking water source for many parts of the world. Due to the large quantities of thermal energy and high quality electricity requirements for water purification, the desalination industry depends on waste heat resources and renewable energy sources such as solar collectors, photovoltaic arrays, geothermal and wind and tidal energy sources. Considering the mismatch between the source supply and demand and intermittent nature of these energy resources, energy storage is a must for reliable and continuous operation of desalination facilities. Thermal energy storage (TES) requires a suitable medium for storage and circulation while the photovoltaic/wind generated electricity needs to be stored in batteries for later use. Desalination technologies that utilize thermal energy and thus require storage for uninterrupted process operation are multi-stage flash distillation (MSF), multi-effect evaporation (MED), low temperature desalination (LTD) and humidification–dehumidification (HD) and membrane distillation (MD). Energy accumulation, storage and supply are the key components of energy storage concept which improve process performance along with better resource economics, and minimum environmental impact. Similarly, the battery energy storage (BES) is essential to store electrical energy for electrodialysis (ED), reverse osmosis (RO) and mechanical vapor compression (MVC) technologies. This research-review paper provides a critical review on current energy storage options for different desalination processes powered by various renewable energy and waste heat sources with focus on thermal energy storage and battery energy storage systems. Principles of energy storage (thermal and electrical energy) are discussed with details on the design, sizing, and economics for desalination process applications.

Veera Gnaneswar Gude

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

On Demand Guarantees in Iran.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??On Demand Guarantees in Iran This thesis examines on demand guarantees in Iran concentrating on bid bonds and performance guarantees. The main guarantee types and… (more)

Ahvenainen, Laura

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Energy Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Energy Demand Figure 40. Energy use per capita and per dollar of gross domestic product, 1980-2030 (index, 1980 = 1). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 41. Primary energy use by fuel, 2006-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Average Energy Use per Person Levels Off Through 2030 Because energy use for housing, services, and travel in the United States is closely linked to population levels, energy use per capita is relatively stable (Figure 40). In addition, the economy is becoming less dependent on energy in general. Energy intensity (energy use per 2000 dollar of GDP) declines by an average

158

Third Generation Flywheels for electric storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electricity is critical to our economy, but growth in demand has saturated the power grid causing instability and blackouts. The economic penalty due to lost productivity in the US exceeds $100 billion per year. Opposition to new transmission lines and power plants, environmental restrictions, and an expected $100 billion grid upgrade cost have slowed system improvements. Flywheel electricity storage could provide a more economical, environmentally benign alternative and slash economic losses if units could be scaled up in a cost effective manner to much larger power and capacity than the present maximum of a few hundred kW and a few kWh per flywheel. The goal of this project is to design, construct, and demonstrate a small-scale third generation electricity storage flywheel using a revolutionary architecture scalable to megawatt-hours per unit. First generation flywheels are built from bulk materials such as steel and provide inertia to smooth the motion of mechanical devices such as engines. They can be scaled up to tens of tons or more, but have relatively low energy storage density. Second generation flywheels use similar designs but are fabricated with composite materials such as carbon fiber and epoxy. They are capable of much higher energy storage density but cannot economically be built larger than a few kWh of storage capacity due to structural and stability limitations. LaunchPoint is developing a third generation flywheel — the "Power Ring" — with energy densities as high or higher than second generation flywheels and a totally new architecture scalable to enormous sizes. Electricity storage capacities exceeding 5 megawatt-hours per unit appear both technically feasible and economically attractive. Our design uses a new class of magnetic bearing – a radial gap “shear-force levitator” – that we discovered and patented, and a thin-walled composite hoop rotated at high speed to store kinetic energy. One immediate application is power grid frequency regulation, where Power Rings could cut costs, reduce fuel consumption, eliminate emissions, and reduce the need for new power plants. Other applications include hybrid diesel-electric locomotives, grid power quality, support for renewable energy, spinning reserve, energy management, and facility deferral. Decreased need for new generation and transmission alone could save the nation $2.5 billion per year. Improved grid reliability could cut economic losses due to poor power quality by tens of billions of dollars per year. A large export market for this technology could also develop. Power Ring technology will directly support the EERE mission, and the goals of the Distributed Energy Technologies Subprogram in particular, by helping to reduce blackouts, brownouts, electricity costs, and emissions, by relieving transmission bottlenecks, and by greatly improving grid power quality.

Ricci, Michael, R.; Fiske, O. James

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

159

An electric thermal storage marketing feasibility study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author presents a study undertaken to determine the market potential of a cooling storage rebate program in the Orange and Rockland service territory. The study was also designed to provide insight into which customer groups are the most likely candidates for cool storage. The information gained from this study is useful for both long term demand side planning and in focusing efforts cost effectively on future cool storage marketing programs.

Onofry, R. (Orange and Rockland Utilities (US))

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

The Role of Enabling Technologies in Demand Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report provides a study of the technologies that are crucial to the success of demand response programs. It takes a look at the historical development of demand response programs and analyzes how new technology is needed to enable demand response to make the transition from a small scale pilot operation to a mass market means of improving grid reliability. Additionally, the report discusses the key technologies needed to enable a large scale demand response effort and evaluates current efforts to develop and integrate these technologies. Finally, the report provides profiles of leading developers of these key technologies.

NONE

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Energy Demand Staff Scientist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Demand in China Lynn Price Staff Scientist February 2, 2010 #12;Founded in 1988 Focused on End-Use Energy Efficiency ~ 40 Current Projects in China Collaborations with ~50 Institutions in China Researcher #12;Talk OutlineTalk Outline · Overview · China's energy use and CO2 emission trends · Energy

Eisen, Michael

162

Energy Demand Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

From the end of World War II until the early 1970s there was a strong and steady increase in the demand for energy. The abundant supplies of fossil and other ... an actual fall in the real price of energy of abou...

S. L. Schwartz

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) engineers John Zimmerman and Tom Bender directed separate projects within this CRADA. This Project Accomplishments Summary contains their reports independently. Zimmerman: In 1998 Honeywell FM&T partnered with the Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) Cooperative Business Management Program to pilot the Supply Chain Integration Planning Prototype (SCIP). At the time, FM&T was developing an enterprise-wide supply chain management prototype called the Integrated Programmatic Scheduling System (IPSS) to improve the DOE's Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) supply chain. In the CRADA partnership, FM&T provided the IPSS technical and business infrastructure as a test bed for SCIP technology, and this would provide FM&T the opportunity to evaluate SCIP as the central schedule engine and decision support tool for IPSS. FM&T agreed to do the bulk of the work for piloting SCIP. In support of that aim, DAMA needed specific DOE Defense Programs opportunities to prove the value of its supply chain architecture and tools. In this partnership, FM&T teamed with Sandia National Labs (SNL), Division 6534, the other DAMA partner and developer of SCIP. FM&T tested SCIP in 1998 and 1999. Testing ended in 1999 when DAMA CRADA funding for FM&T ceased. Before entering the partnership, FM&T discovered that the DAMA SCIP technology had an array of applications in strategic, tactical, and operational planning and scheduling. At the time, FM&T planned to improve its supply chain performance by modernizing the NWC-wide planning and scheduling business processes and tools. The modernization took the form of a distributed client-server planning and scheduling system (IPSS) for planners and schedulers to use throughout the NWC on desktops through an off-the-shelf WEB browser. The planning and scheduling process within the NWC then, and today, is a labor-intensive paper-based method that plans and schedules more than 8,000 shipped parts per month based on more than 50 manually-created document types. The fact that DAMA and FM&T desired to move from paper-based manual architectures to digitally based computer architectures gave further incentive for the partnership to grow. FM&T's greatest strength was its knowledge of NWC-wide scheduling and planning with its role as the NWC leader in manufacturing logistics. DAMA's asset was its new knowledge gained in the research and development of advanced architectures and tools for supply chain management in the textiles industry. These complimentary strengths allowed the two parties to provide both the context and the tools for the pilot. Bender: Honeywell FM&T participated in a four-site supply chain project, also referred to as an Inter-Enterprise Pipeline Evaluation. The MSAD project was selected because it involves four NWC sites: FM&T, Pantex, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). FM&T had previously participated with Los Alamos National Laboratory in FY98 to model a two-site supply chain project, between FM&T and LANL. Evaluation of a Supply Chain Methodology is a subset of the DAMA project for the AMTEX consortium. LANL organization TSA-7, Enterprise Modeling and Simulation, has been involved in AMTEX and DAMA through development of process models and simulations for LANL, the NWC, and others. The FY 1998 and this FY 1999 projects directly involved collaboration between Honeywell and the Enterprise Modeling and Simulation (TSA-7) and Detonation Science and Technology (DX1) organizations at LANL.

Bender, T.R.; Zimmerman, J.J.

2001-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

164

A demand responsive bidding mechanism with price elasticity matrix in wholesale electricity pools ; A demand responsive bidding mechanism with price elasticity matrix .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In the past several decades, many demand-side participation features have been applied in the electricity power systems. These features, such as distributed generation, on-site storage… (more)

Wang, Jiankang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ORNL Distinguished Scientist Parans Paranthaman is discovering new materials with potential for greatly increasing batteries' energy storage capacity and bring manufacturing back to the US.

Paranthaman, Parans

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

166

Energy Storage  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

ORNL Distinguished Scientist Parans Paranthaman is discovering new materials with potential for greatly increasing batteries' energy storage capacity and bring manufacturing back to the US.

Paranthaman, Parans

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

167

Demand Side Bidding. Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document sets forth the final report for a financial assistance award for the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) to enhance coordination between the building operators and power system operators in terms of demand-side responses to Location Based Marginal Pricing (LBMP). Potential benefits of this project include improved power system reliability, enhanced environmental quality, mitigation of high locational prices within congested areas, and the reduction of market barriers for demand-side market participants. NARUC, led by its Committee on Energy Resources and the Environment (ERE), actively works to promote the development and use of energy efficiency and clean distributive energy policies within the framework of a dynamic regulatory environment. Electric industry restructuring, energy shortages in California, and energy market transformation intensifies the need for reliable information and strategies regarding electric reliability policy and practice. NARUC promotes clean distributive generation and increased energy efficiency in the context of the energy sector restructuring process. NARUC, through ERE's Subcommittee on Energy Efficiency, strives to improve energy efficiency by creating working markets. Market transformation seeks opportunities where small amounts of investment can create sustainable markets for more efficient products, services, and design practices.

Spahn, Andrew

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

168

Categorization of residential electricity consumption as a basis for the assessment of the impacts of demand response actions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In a smart(er) grid context, the existence of dynamic tariffs and bidirectional communications will simultaneously allow and require an active role from the end-user concerning electricity management. However, the residential end-user will not be always available to manage energy resources and decide, based on price signals and preferences/needs, the best response actions to implement or the best usage of the electricity produced locally. Therefore, energy management systems are required to monitor consumption/generation/storage and to make the best decisions according to input signals and the user's needs and preferences. The design of adequate algorithms to be implemented in those systems require the prior characterization of domestic electricity demand and categorization of loads, according to availability, typical usage patterns, working cycles and technical constraints. Automated demand response actions must be tailored and chosen according to this previous analysis of load characteristics. In this paper, a characterization of household electricity consumption is presented and an operational categorization of end-use loads is proposed. The existing potential for demand response to a diversified set of management actions is described and a tool to assess the impact of implementing several actions with different rates of penetration of energy management systems is presented. The results obtained show the potential savings for the end-user and expected changes in the load diagram with a decrease of the aggregated peak electricity demand and a smoothed valley.

Ana Soares; Álvaro Gomes; Carlos Henggeler Antunes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Basic Research Needs for the Hydrogen Economy  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

The Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Workshop on Hydrogen Production, Storage and Use was held May 13-15, 2003 to assess the basic research needs to assure a secure energy future. This report is based on t

170

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 The commercial module forecasts consumption by fuel 15 at the Census division level using prices from the NEMS energy supply modules, and macroeconomic variables from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM), as well as external data sources (technology characterizations, for example). Energy demands are forecast for ten end-use services 16 for eleven building categories 17 in each of the nine Census divisions (see Figure 5). The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division combinations. Next, the ten end-use service demands required for the projected floorspace are developed. The electricity generation and water and space heating supplied by distributed generation and combined heat and power technologies are projected. Technologies are then

171

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Module calculates

172

NETL: Carbon Storage FAQs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

different options for CO2 storage? different options for CO2 storage? Oil and gas reservoirs, many containing carbon dioxide (CO2), as well as natural deposits of almost pure CO2, can be found in many places in the United States and around the world. These are examples of long-term storage of CO2 by nature, where "long term" means millions of years. Their existence demonstrates that naturally occurring geologic formations and structures of various kinds are capable of securely storing CO2 deep in the subsurface for very long periods of time. Because of the economic importance of oil and gas, scientists and engineers have studied these natural deposits for many decades in order to understand the physical and chemical processes which led to their formation. There are also many decades of engineering experience in subsurface operations similar to those needed for CO2 storage. The most directly applicable experience comes from the oil industry, which, for 40 years, has injected CO2 in depleted oil reservoirs for the recovery of additional product through enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Additional experience comes from natural gas storage operations, which have utilized depleted gas reservoirs, as well as reservoirs containing only water. Scientists and engineers are now combining the knowledge obtained from study of natural deposits with experience from analogous operations as a basis for studying the potential for large-scale storage of CO2 in the deep subsurface.

173

NETL: Carbon Storage - Program Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Overview Program Overview Carbon Storage Program Overview The Carbon Storage Program involves three key elements for technology development: Core Research and Development (Core R&D), Infrastructure, and Global Collaborations. The image below displays the relationship among the three elements and provides a means for navigation throughout NETL's Storage Program Website. Click on Image to Navigate Storage Website Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player NETL's Carbon Storage Program Structure CORE R&D Core R&D is driven by industry's technology needs and segregates those needs into focus areas to more efficiently obtain solutions that can then be tested and deployed in the field. The Core R&D Element contains four

174

Electrochemistry: Metal-free energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... % of total energy capacity will require electric-energy storage systems to be deployed. For grid-scale applications and remote generation sites, cheap and flexible storage systems are needed, but ... level as a source of potential energy) or expensive (for example, conventional batteries, flywheels and superconductive electromagnetic storage). On page 195 of this issue, Huskinson et al. ...

Grigorii L. Soloveichik

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

175

Heat storage with CREDA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principle of operation of ETS or Electric Thermal Storage is discussed in this book. As can be seen by the diagram presented, heating elements buried deep within the core are energized during off-peak periods or periods of lower cost energy. These elements charge the core to a per-determined level, then during the on-peak periods when the cost of electricity is higher or demand is higher, the heat is extracted from the core. The author discusses how this technology has progressed to the ETS equipment of today; this being the finer control of charging rates and extraction of heat from the core.

Beal, T. (Fostoria Industries, Fostoria, OH (US))

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Fact Sheet: Grid-Scale Flywheel Energy Storage Plant (October 2012)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hazle Spindle LLC Hazle Spindle LLC American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Beacon Power will design, build, and operate a utility-scale 20 MW flywheel energy storage plant at the Humboldt Industrial Park in Hazle Township, Pennsylvania for Hazle Spindle LLC, the Recipient of the ARRA Cooperative Agreement. The plant will provide frequency regulation services to grid operator PJM Interconnection. Flywheel systems are kinetic energy storage devices that react instantly when needed. By accelerating a cylindrical rotor (flywheel) to a very high speed and maintaining the energy in the system as rotational energy, flywheel energy storage systems can moderate fluctuations in grid demand. When generated power exceeds load, the flywheel speeds up; when load exceeds generation, the flywheel is slowed to convert the energy for

177

Gigawatt-year nuclear-geothermal energy storage for light-water and high-temperature reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Capital-intensive, low-operating cost nuclear plants are most economical when operated under base-load conditions. However, electricity demand varies on a daily, weekly, and seasonal basis. In deregulated utility markets this implies high prices for electricity at times of high electricity demand and low prices for electricity at times of low electricity demand. We examined coupling nuclear heat sources to geothermal heat storage systems to enable these power sources to meet hourly to seasonal variable electricity demand. At times of low electricity demand the reactor heats a fluid that is then injected a kilometer or more underground to heat rock to high temperatures. The fluid travels through the permeable-rock heat-storage zone, transfers heat to the rock, is returned to the surface to be reheated, and re-injected underground. At times of high electricity demand the cycle is reversed, heat is extracted, and the heat is used to power a geothermal power plant to produce intermediate or peak power. When coupling geothermal heat storage with light-water reactors (LWRs), pressurized water (<300 deg. C) is the preferred heat transfer fluid. When coupling geothermal heat storage with high temperature reactors at higher temperatures, supercritical carbon dioxide is the preferred heat transfer fluid. The non-ideal characteristics of supercritical carbon dioxide create the potential for efficient coupling with supercritical carbon dioxide power cycles. Underground rock cannot be insulated, thus small heat storage systems with high surface to volume ratios are not feasible because of excessive heat losses. The minimum heat storage capacity to enable seasonal storage is {approx}0.1 Gigawatt-year. Three technologies can create the required permeable rock: (1) hydro-fracture, (2) cave-block mining, and (3) selective rock dissolution. The economic assessments indicated a potentially competitive system for production of intermediate load electricity. The basis for a nuclear geothermal system with LWRs exists today; but, there is need for added research and development before deployment. There are significantly greater challenges for geothermal heat storage at higher temperatures. Such systems are strongly dependent upon the local geology. (authors)

Forsberg, C. W.; Lee, Y.; Kulhanek, M.; Driscoll, M. J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Analysis of Ontario's hydrogen economy demands from hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ‘Hydrogen Economy’ is a proposed system where hydrogen is produced from carbon dioxide free energy sources and is used as an alternative fuel for transportation. The utilization of hydrogen to power fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) can significantly decrease air pollutants and greenhouse gases emission from the transportation sector. In order to build the future hydrogen economy, there must be a significant development in the hydrogen infrastructure, and huge investments will be needed for the development of hydrogen production, storage, and distribution technologies. This paper focuses on the analysis of hydrogen demand from hydrogen \\{FCVs\\} in Ontario, Canada, and the related cost of hydrogen. Three potential hydrogen demand scenarios over a long period of time were projected to estimate hydrogen \\{FCVs\\} market penetration, and the costs associated with the hydrogen production, storage and distribution were also calculated. A sensitivity analysis was implemented to investigate the uncertainties of some parameters on the design of the future hydrogen infrastructure. It was found that the cost of hydrogen is very sensitive to electricity price, but other factors such as water price, energy efficiency of electrolysis, and plant life have insignificant impact on the total cost of hydrogen produced.

Hui Liu; Ali Almansoori; Michael Fowler; Ali Elkamel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Metal Hydrides- Science Needs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation from the Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting held June 19, 2003 in Washington, DC.

180

Production Will Meet Demand Increase This Summer  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: Production must meet increases in demand this year. Last year, increased imports met most of the summer demand increase, and increases in stock draws met almost all of the remainder. Production did not increase much. But this year, inventories will not be available, and increased imports seem unlikely. Thus, increases in production will be needed to meet increased demand. Imports availability is uncertain this summer. Imports in 1999 were high, and with Phase II RFG product requirements, maintaining this level could be challenging since not all refineries exporting to the U.S. will be able to meet the new gasoline specifications. Stocks will also contribute little supply this summer. Last year's high gasoline stocks allowed for a stock draw that was 58 MB/D higher than

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Demand models for U.S. domestic air passenger markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The airline industry in recent years has suffered from the adverse effects of top level planning decisions based upon inaccurate demand forecasts. The air carriers have recognized the immediate need to develop their ...

Eriksen, Steven Edward

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Quality-functions for an uniform and comparable analysis of demand side management algorithms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to renewable energies, the feed-in to the power grid will fluctuate increasingly. As long as no highly efficient storage technology is found, the importance of demand side management (DSM) will grow. Differen...

Daniel Hölker; Daniel Brettschneider…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Stochastic dynamic optimization of consumption and the induced price elasticity of demand in smart grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents a mathematical model of consumer behavior in response to stochastically-varying electricity prices, and a characterization of price-elasticity of demand created by optimal utilization of storage and ...

Faghih, Ali

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Decentralized demand–supply matching using community microgrids and consumer demand response: A scenario analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Developing countries constantly face the challenge of reliably matching electricity supply to increasing consumer demand. The traditional policy decisions of increasing supply and reducing demand centrally, by building new power plants and/or load shedding, have been insufficient. Locally installed microgrids along with consumer demand response can be suitable decentralized options to augment the centralized grid based systems and plug the demand–supply gap. The objectives of this paper are to: (1) develop a framework to identify the appropriate decentralized energy options for demand–supply matching within a community, and, (2) determine which of these options can suitably plug the existing demand–supply gap at varying levels of grid unavailability. A scenario analysis framework is developed to identify and assess the impact of different decentralized energy options at a community level and demonstrated for a typical urban residential community – Vijayanagar, Bangalore in India. A combination of LPG based CHP microgrid and proactive demand response by the community is the appropriate option that enables the Vijayanagar community to meet its energy needs 24/7 in a reliable, cost-effective manner. The paper concludes with an enumeration of the barriers and feasible strategies for the implementation of community microgrids in India based on stakeholder inputs.

Kumudhini Ravindra; Parameshwar P. Iyer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

cryogenic storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Storage in which (a) the superconductive property of materials is used to store data and (b) use is made of the phenomenon that superconductivity is destroyed in the presence of a magnetic field, thus enabling...

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Hydrogen Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On-board hydrogen storage for transportation applications continues to be one of the most technically challenging barriers to the widespread commercialization of hydrogen-fueled vehicles. The EERE...

187

Demand Response | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand response provides an opportunity for consumers to play a significant role in the operation of the electric grid by reducing or shifting their electricity usage during peak periods in response to time-based rates or other forms of financial incentives. Demand response programs are being used by electric system planners and operators as resource options for balancing supply and demand. Such programs can lower the cost of electricity in wholesale markets, and in turn, lead to lower retail rates. Methods of engaging customers in demand response efforts include offering time-based rates such as time-of-use pricing, critical peak pricing, variable peak pricing, real time pricing, and critical peak rebates. It also includes direct load control programs which provide the

188

Understanding and Analysing Energy Demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter introduces the concept of energy demand using basic micro-economics and presents the three-stage decision making process of energy demand. It then provides a set of simple ... (such as price and inco...

Subhes C. Bhattacharyya

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment is an energy intensive process which, together with water treatment, comprises about three percent of U.S. annual energy use. Yet, since wastewater treatment facilities are often peripheral to major electricity-using industries, they are frequently an overlooked area for automated demand response opportunities. Demand response is a set of actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies or congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, and/or market conditions occur that raise electric supply costs. Demand response programs are designed to improve the reliability of the electric grid and to lower the use of electricity during peak times to reduce the total system costs. Open automated demand response is a set of continuous, open communication signals and systems provided over the Internet to allow facilities to automate their demand response activities without the need for manual actions. Automated demand response strategies can be implemented as an enhanced use of upgraded equipment and facility control strategies installed as energy efficiency measures. Conversely, installation of controls to support automated demand response may result in improved energy efficiency through real-time access to operational data. This paper argues that the implementation of energy efficiency opportunities in wastewater treatment facilities creates a base for achieving successful demand reductions. This paper characterizes energy use and the state of demand response readiness in wastewater treatment facilities and outlines automated demand response opportunities.

Thompson, Lisa; Song, Katherine; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

190

Analysis of novel, above-ground thermal energy storage concept utilizing low-cost, solid medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clean energy power plants cannot effectively match peak demands without utilizing energy storage technologies. Currently, several solutions address short term demand cycles, but little work has been done to address seasonal ...

Barineau, Mark Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Correlation Between Geographically Dispersed Concentrating Solar Power and Demand in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Correlations between the electricity generated by concentrating solar thermal power (CSP) plants, as well as cross-correlations between CSP, wind power and electricity demand, have significant impacts on decisions for how much and where to build utility-scale CSP capacity, the optimal amount of thermal storage in the CSP plants, reserve capacity needed to back-up the system, as well as the expected levels of curtailed renewable power. Accurately estimating these correlations is vital to performing detailed analyses of high renewable penetration scenarios. This study quantifies the degree of correlation between geographically dispersed CSP, as well as the correlation between CSP and wind power, and CSP and electricity demand in 356 discrete regions in the contiguous US. Correlations are calculated using hourly data on an annual basis. Maps of the correlations will be presented to illustrate the degree of correlation between solar power and the demand it is serving, as well as the synergies between the negatively-correlated wind power and solar power serving the same region.

Mowers, M.; Helm, C.; Blair, N.; Short, W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Demand Response: Load Management Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CenterPoint Load Management Programs CATEE Conference October, 2012 Agenda Outline I. General Demand Response Definition II. General Demand Response Program Rules III. CenterPoint Commercial Program IV. CenterPoint Residential Programs... V. Residential Discussion Points Demand Response Definition of load management per energy efficiency rule 25.181: ? Load control activities that result in a reduction in peak demand, or a shifting of energy usage from a peak to an off...

Simon, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Marketing Demand-Side Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

they the only game in town, enjoying a captive market. Demand-side management (DSM) again surfaced as a method for increasing customer value and meeting these competitive challenges. In designing and implementing demand-side management (DSM) programs we... have learned a great deal about what it takes to market and sell DSM. This paper focuses on how to successfully market demand-side management. KEY STEPS TO MARKETING DEMAND-SIDE MANAGEMENT Management Commitment The first key element in marketing...

O'Neill, M. L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Demand Charges | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Charges Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleDemandCharges&oldid488967"...

195

Assessment of Demand Response Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for PGE and Pacific Power Prepared for: Portland January 15, 2004 K:\\Projects\\2003-53 (PGE,PC) Assess Demand Response\\Report\\Revised Report_011504.doc #12;#12;quantec Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for I-1 PGE and Pacific Power I. Introduction

196

ERCOT Demand Response Paul Wattles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERCOT Demand Response Paul Wattles Senior Analyst, Market Design & Development, ERCOT Whitacre;Definitions of Demand Response · `The short-term adjustment of energy use by consumers in response to price to market or reliability conditions.' (NAESB) #12;Definitions of Demand Response · The common threads

Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

197

Pricing data center demand response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Demand response is crucial for the incorporation of renewable energy into the grid. In this paper, we focus on a particularly promising industry for demand response: data centers. We use simulations to show that, not only are data centers large loads, ... Keywords: data center, demand response, power network, prediction based pricing

Zhenhua Liu; Iris Liu; Steven Low; Adam Wierman

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Encapsulation of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Thermal energy storage is a major contributor to bridge the gap between energy demand (consumption) and energy production (supply) by concentrating solar power. The utilization… (more)

Nath, Rupa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Impact of reservoir properties on mixing of inert cushion and natural gas in storage reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Underground natural gas storage is a process which effectively balances a variable demand market with a nearly constant supply of energy provided by the pipeline… (more)

Srinivasan, Balaji S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Overview of Demand Response  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

08 PJM 08 PJM www.pjm.com ©2003 PJM Overview of Demand Response PJM ©2008 PJM www.pjm.com ©2003 PJM Growth, Statistics, and Current Footprint AEP, Dayton, ComEd, & DUQ Dominion Generating Units 1,200 + Generation Capacity 165,000 MW Peak Load 144,644 MW Transmission Miles 56,070 Area (Square Miles) 164,250 Members 500 + Population Served 51 Million Area Served 13 States and DC Generating Units 1,200 + Generation Capacity 165,000 MW Peak Load 144,644 MW Transmission Miles 56,070 Area (Square Miles) 164,250 Members 500 + Population Served 51 Million Area Served 13 States and DC Current PJM RTO Statistics Current PJM RTO Statistics PJM Mid-Atlantic Integrations completed as of May 1 st , 2005 ©2008 PJM

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Only tough choices in Meeting growing demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. electricity demand is not growing very fast by international or historical standards. Yet meeting this relatively modest growth is proving difficult because investment in new capacity is expected to grow at an even slower pace. What is more worrisome is that a confluence of factors has added considerable uncertainties, making the investment community less willing to make the long-term commitments that will be needed during the coming decade.

NONE

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model By Tancred C.M. Lidderdale This article first appeared in the Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1995, Energy Information Administration, DOE/EIA-0202(95) (Washington, DC, July 1995), pp. 33-42, 83-85. The regression results and historical data for production, inventories, and imports have been updated in this presentation. Contents * Introduction o Table 1. Oxygenate production capacity and demand * Oxygenate demand o Table 2. Estimated RFG demand share - mandated RFG areas, January 1998 * Fuel ethanol supply and demand balance o Table 3. Fuel ethanol annual statistics * MTBE supply and demand balance o Table 4. EIA MTBE annual statistics * Refinery balances

203

Modeling of Electric Water Heaters for Demand Response: A Baseline PDE Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand response (DR)control can effectively relieve balancing and frequency regulation burdens on conventional generators, facilitate integrating more renewable energy, and reduce generation and transmission investments needed to meet peak demands. Electric water heaters (EWHs) have a great potential in implementing DR control strategies because: (a) the EWH power consumption has a high correlation with daily load patterns; (b) they constitute a significant percentage of domestic electrical load; (c) the heating element is a resistor, without reactive power consumption; and (d) they can be used as energy storage devices when needed. Accurately modeling the dynamic behavior of EWHs is essential for designing DR controls. Various water heater models, simplified to different extents, were published in the literature; however, few of them were validated against field measurements, which may result in inaccuracy when implementing DR controls. In this paper, a partial differential equation physics-based model, developed to capture detailed temperature profiles at different tank locations, is validated against field test data for more than 10 days. The developed model shows very good performance in capturing water thermal dynamics for benchmark testing purposes

Xu, Zhijie; Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Shuai; Lian, Jianming; Zhang, Yu

2014-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

204

Demand and Price Outlook for Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline, 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Demand and Price Outlook for Demand and Price Outlook for Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline, 2000 Tancred Lidderdale and Aileen Bohn (1) Contents * Summary * Introduction * Reformulated Gasoline Demand * Oxygenate Demand * Logistics o Interstate Movements and Storage o Local Distribution o Phase 2 RFG Logistics o Possible Opt-Ins to the RFG Program o State Low Sulfur, Low RVP Gasoline Initiatives o NAAQS o Tier 2 Gasoline * RFG Production Options o Toxic Air Pollutants (TAP) Reduction o Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) Reduction o Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) Reduction o Summary of RFG Production Options * Costs of Reformulated Gasoline o Phase 1 RFG Price Premium o California Clean Gasoline Price Premium o Phase 2 RFG Price Premium o Reduced Fuel Economy

205

Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cells: A Market Need Provides Research Opportunities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been said that necessity is the mother of invention. Another way this can be stated is that market demands create research opportunities. Because of the increasing demand for oil (especially for fueling vehicles utilizing internal combustion engines) and the fact that oil is a depleting (not renewable) energy source, a market need for a renewable source of energy has created significant opportunities for research. This paper addresses the research opportunities associated with producing a market competitive (i.e., high performance, low cost and durable) hydrogen proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. Of the many research opportunities, the primary ones to be addressed directly are: Alternative membrane materials, Alternative catalysts, Impurity effects, and Water transport. A status of Department of Energy-sponsored research in these areas will be summarized and the impact of each on the ability to develop a market-competitive hydrogen PEM fuel cell powered vehicle will be discussed. Also, activities of the International Partnership for the Hydrogen Economy in areas such as advanced membranes for fuel cells and materials for storage will be summarized.

Payne, Terry L [ORNL; Brown, Gilbert M [ORNL; Bogomolny, David [Sentech, Inc.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Demand Response Programs, 6. edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report provides a look at the past, present, and future state of the market for demand/load response based upon market price signals. It is intended to provide significant value to individuals and companies who are considering participating in demand response programs, energy providers and ISOs interested in offering demand response programs, and consultants and analysts looking for detailed information on demand response technology, applications, and participants. The report offers a look at the current Demand Response environment in the energy industry by: defining what demand response programs are; detailing the evolution of program types over the last 30 years; discussing the key drivers of current initiatives; identifying barriers and keys to success for the programs; discussing the argument against subsidization of demand response; describing the different types of programs that exist including:direct load control, interruptible load, curtailable load, time-of-use, real time pricing, and demand bidding/buyback; providing examples of the different types of programs; examining the enablers of demand response programs; and, providing a look at major demand response programs.

NONE

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Thermal Energy Storage for Vacuum Precoolers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radically creating high peak demands and low load factors. An ice bank thermal energy storage (TES) and ice water vapor condenser were installed. The existing equipment and TES system were computer monitored to determine energy consumption and potential... efficiency at night. The ice bank thermal energy storage system has a 4.4 year simple payback. While building ice, the refrigeration system operated at a 6.26 Coefficient of Performance (COP). The refrigeration system operated more efficiently at night...

Nugent, D. M.

208

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of control. Water heater demand response options are notcurrent water heater and air conditioning demand responsecustomer response Demand response water heater participation

Levy, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Like HECO actual utility demand response implementations canindustry-wide utility demand response applications tend toobjective. Figure 4. Demand Response Objectives 17  

Levy, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their partnership in demand response automation research andand Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.

Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities,”Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.for Automated Demand Response. Technical Document to

Rubinstein, Francis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

23 ii Retail Demand Response in SPP List of Figures and10 Figure 3. Demand Response Resources by11 Figure 4. Existing Demand Response Resources by Type of

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Automating Demand Response Charles McParland, Lawrenceand Automating Demand Response Charles McParland, LBNLCommercial and Residential Demand Response Overview of the

McParland, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency,”Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,technical support from the Demand Response Research Center (

Federspiel, Clifford

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities”of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Table 1. “Economic” demand response and real time pricing (Implications of Demand Response Programs in CompetitiveAdvanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 2.1 Demand-Side Managementbuildings. The demand side management framework is discussedIssues 2.1 Demand-Side Management Framework Forecasting

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Energy demand-side management energy information systemdemand response. Demand-side management (DSM) program goalsa goal for demand-side management (DSM) coordination and

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

raising transportation oil demand. Growing internationalcoal by wire could reduce oil demand by stemming coal roadEastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand

Aden, Nathaniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

World: Renewable Energy and Demand Response Proliferation intogether the renewable energy and demand response communityimpacts of renewable energy and demand response integration

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

District Small Business Summer Solutions: Energy and DemandSummer Solutions: Energy and Demand Impacts Monthly Energy> B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

6.15 - Pumped Storage Hydropower Developments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter details how pumped storage hydroelectric projects differ from conventional hydroelectric projects. The concept of electrical energy storage has become a controversial issue in recent years. Many questions are raised in the electricity sector: Why is energy storage needed? What are the alternatives? One of the answers is pumped storage hydropower plants, using mainly pump–turbines. In this chapter, details of some remarkable examples of pumped storage power plants are given: Okinawa Seawater in Japan, Goldisthal in Germany, Tianhuangping in China, and Coo-Trois Ponts in Belgium.

T. Hino; A. Lejeune

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

electricity demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity consumption and demand datasets, specifically: annual observed electricity consumption by sector (1974 to 2009); observed percentage of consumers by sector (2002 - 2009); and regional electricity demand, as a percentage of total demand (2009). Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords Electricity Consumption electricity demand energy use by sector New Zealand Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Electricity Consumption by Sector (1974 - 2009) (xls, 46.1 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Percentage of Consumers by Sector (2002 - 2009) (xls, 43.5 KiB)

225

Annual World Oil Demand Growth  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Following relatively small increases of 1.3 million barrels per day in 1999 and 0.9 million barrels per day in 2000, EIA is estimating world demand may grow by 1.6 million barrels per day in 2001. Of this increase, about 3/5 comes from non-OECD countries, while U.S. oil demand growth represents more than half of the growth projected in OECD countries. Demand in Asia grew steadily during most of the 1990s, with 1991-1997 average growth per year at just above 0.8 million barrels per day. However, in 1998, demand dropped by 0.3 million barrels per day as a result of the Asian economic crisis that year. Since 1998, annual growth in oil demand has rebounded, but has not yet reached the average growth seen during 1991-1997. In the Former Soviet Union, oil demand plummeted during most of the

226

Review of Strategies and Technologies for Demand-Side Management on Isolated Mini-Grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

demand- side management (DSM) on mini-grids throughout theunderpin the need to employ DSM to reduce load or spreadand technologies for DSM vary. As described above, one

Harper, Meg

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Designing a Thermal Energy Storage Program for Electric Utilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electric utilities are looking at thermal energy storage technology as a viable demand side management (DSM) option. In order for this DSM measure to be effective, it must be incorporated into a workable, well-structured utility program. This paper...

Niehus, T. L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chalmers, Hannah. 2008. “Carbon Capture and Storage,” EnergyChalmers, Hannah. 2008. “Carbon Capture and Storage,” Energytechnology. 3.3.3 Carbon capture and storage: efficiency

Aden, Nathaniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Smart charging and appliance scheduling approaches to demand side management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Various forms of demand side management (DSM) programs are being deployed by utility companies for load flattening amongst the residential power users. These programs are tailored to offer monetary incentives to electricity customers so that they voluntarily consume electricity in an efficient way. Thus, DSM presents households with numerous opportunities to lower their electricity bills. However, systems that combine the various DSM strategies with a view to maximizing energy management benefits have not received sufficient attention. This study therefore proposes an intelligent energy management framework that can be used to implement both energy storage and appliance scheduling schemes. By adopting appliance scheduling, customers can realize cost savings by appropriately scheduling their power consumption during the low peak hours. More savings could further be achieved through smart electricity storage. Power storage allows electricity consumers to purchase power during off-peak hours when electricity prices are low and satisfy their demands when prices are high by discharging the batteries. For optimal cost savings, the customers must constantly monitor the price fluctuations in order to determine when to switch between the utility grid and the electricity storage devices. However, with a high penetration of consumer owned storage devices, the charging of the batteries must be properly coordinated and appropriately scheduled to avoid creating new peaks. This paper therefore proposes an autonomous smart charging framework that ensures both the stability of the power grid and customer savings.

Christopher O. Adika; Lingfeng Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

The Value of CSP with Thermal Energy Storage in Providing Grid Stability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract CSP plants both with and without thermal energy storage are unique renewable resources that provide clean electric power and a range of operational capabilities to support continued reliability of electric power systems. Utilizing stored thermal energy storage to operate a conventional synchronous generator, CSP plants with thermal energy storage can support power and provide ancillary services including voltage support, frequency response, regulation and spinning reserves, and ramping serves – services that would otherwise be provided, at least in part, by conventional fossil-fuel generation. By being available during peak demand in sunlight hours and providing the capability to shift energy to other hours, the addition of thermal energy storage to CSP plants improves their contribution to resource adequacy, or capacity requirements, especially as solar penetration increases. This makes CSP an ideal complement to support greater adaption of intermittent resources such as wind and PV. To make procurement decisions that include a balance of both solar PV and CSP, utilities need to see reasonable estimates of quantifiable economic benefits. In simulations of the California power system, recent studies by the Lawrence Berkeley National Labs (LBNL) found that the comparative value of CSP with storage increases as the amount of solar on the grid increases. If CSP with six hours of storage and PV with no storage were each providing five percent of the grid's power, CSP power would have an additional value of $19/MWh (1.9¢/kWh). At grid penetrations of 10 percent each, CSP power would be worth an additional $35/MWh (3.5¢/kWh). The added value results from a calculation of grid integration costs and market benefits. The author will outline how CSP with storage provides grid stability and its corresponding value to utilities.

J. Forrester

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Concentrated solar power on demand .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis describes a new concentrating solar power central receiver system with integral thermal storage. Hillside mounted heliostats direct sunlight into a volumetric absorption molten… (more)

Codd, Daniel Shawn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Harnessing the power of demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand response can provide a series of economic services to the market and also provide ''insurance value'' under low-likelihood, but high-impact circumstances in which grid reliablity is enhanced. Here is how ISOs and RTOs are fostering demand response within wholesale electricity markets. (author)

Sheffrin, Anjali; Yoshimura, Henry; LaPlante, David; Neenan, Bernard

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

China, India demand cushions prices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the hopes of coal consumers, coal prices did not plummet in 2006 as demand stayed firm. China and India's growing economies, coupled with solid supply-demand fundamentals in North America and Europe, and highly volatile prices for alternatives are likely to keep physical coal prices from wide swings in the coming year.

Boyle, M.

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Energy Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Daniel R. Borneo, PE Daniel R. Borneo, PE Sandia National Laboratories September 27, 2007 San Francisco, CA PEER REVIEW 2007 DOE(SNL)/CEC Energy Storage Program FYO7 Projects Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. 2 Presentation Outline * DOE(SNL)/CEC Collaboration - Background of DOE(SNL)/CEC Collaboration - FY07 Project Review * Zinc Bromine Battery (ZBB) Demonstration * Palmdale Super capacitor Demonstration * Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) Regional Transit (RT) Super capacitor demonstration * Beacon Flywheel Energy Storage System (FESS) 3 Background of DOE(SNL)/CEC Collaboration * Memorandum of Understanding Between CEC and DOE (SNL). - In Place since 2004

236

Energy Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Development Concept Development Concept Nitrogen-Air Battery F.M. Delnick, D. Ingersoll, K.Waldrip Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM presented to U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Research Program Washington, DC November 2-4, 2010 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Funded by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy through Sandia National Laboratories Full Air Breathing Battery Concept * Concept is to use O 2 and N 2 as the electrodes in a battery * Novel because N 2 is considered inert * Our group routinely reacts N 2 electrochemically

237

Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility, Commercial, and Industrial Customers Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility,...

238

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data Collection for Demand-side Management for QualifyingPrepared by Demand-side Management Task Force of the

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Industrial Demand Module Table 6.1. Industry Categories. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 6.2.Retirement Rates. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting

240

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Residential Demand Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" by appliance (or UEC-in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

World Crude Production Not Keeping Pace with Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: The crude market is the major factor behind today’s low stocks. This graph shows the balance between world production and demand for petroleum. Normally, production exceeds demand in the summer, building stocks, and is less than demand in the winter months, drawing the stocks back down (dark blue areas). However, production exceeded demand through most of 1997 and 1998, building world stocks to very high levels and driving prices down. But the situation reversed in 1999. Recently, there has been more petroleum demand than supply, requiring the use of stocks to meet petroleum needs. Following the extremely low crude oil prices at the beginning of 1999, OPEC agreed to remove about 6% of world production from the market in order to work off excess inventories and bring prices back up.

242

New and Underutilized Technology: Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control New and Underutilized Technology: Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control October 4, 2013 - 4:23pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for carbon dioxide (CO2) demand ventilation control within the Federal sector. Benefits Demand ventilation control systems modulate ventilation levels based on current building occupancy, saving energy while still maintaining proper indoor air quality (IAQ). CO2 sensors are commonly used, but a multiple-parameter approach using total volatile organic compounds (TVOC), particulate matter (PM), formaldehyde, and relative humidity (RH) levels can also be used. CO2 sensors control the outside air damper to reduce the amount of outside air that needs to be conditioned and supplied to the building when

243

Designing a residential hybrid electrical energy storage system based on the energy buffering strategy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to severe variation in load demand over time, utility companies generally raise electrical energy price during periods of high load demand. A grid-connected hybrid electrical energy storage (HEES) system can help residential users lower their electric ... Keywords: electric bill savings, energy management, hybrid electrical energy storage system

Di Zhu; Siyu Yue; Yanzhi Wang; Younghyun Kim; Naehyuck Chang; Massoud Pedram

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Compression Technology and Needs  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

* Others * Fueling Station * Liquid - Cryogenic Pump * Gaseous - Compressor & Storage Hydrogen Delivery From Production to Point-of-Use Liquefaction Loading Rack...

245

Managing Wind-based Electricity Generation and Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Managing Wind-based Electricity Generation and Storage by Yangfang Zhou Submitted to the Tepper, and to meet increasing electricity demand without harming the environment. Two of the most promising solutions for the energy issue are to rely on renewable energy, and to develop efficient electricity storage. Renewable

Sadeh, Norman M.

246

Optimization of Ice Thermal Storage Systems Design for HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice thermal storage is promising technology to reduce energy costs by shifting the cooling cost from on-peak to off-peak periods. The paper discusses the optimal design of ice thermal storage and its impact on energy consumption, demand, and total...

Nassif, N.; Hall, C.; Freelnad, D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Bulletin # 8 May 2003 It is the value of your records and data that should dictate the type of storage and protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the type of storage and protection you need for them. Off-Site storage is generally an efficient.......................................................1 The Role of Off Site Records Storage......................1 Prerequisites......................................................2 Off Site Storage..................................................2 General Questions to Ask

Sheridan, Jennifer

248

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

global gasoline and diesel price and income elasticities.shift in the short-run price elasticity of gasoline demand.Habits and Uncertain Relative Prices: Simulating Petrol Con-

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

MPEG-aware disk storage system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the past decades the demand for systems that can process and deliver massive amount of storage has increased. Multimedia applications such as streaming audio and video require large amounts of data to be read from disk and processed for timely...

Ren, Qian

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Design and evaluation of an advanced adiabatic compressed air energy storage system at the Michigan-Utah mine.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Compressed air energy storage (CAES) is considered a viable option for matching intermittent sustainable energy and the production of peak electrical demand. Economic advantages of… (more)

Beeman, Michael G

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Three Case Studues of the Application of Energy Systems Optimization Best Prectices for Automatic Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three Case Studies of the Application of Energy Systems Optimization Best Practices for Automatic Demand Response Yifu Shi Kelly Guiberteau Carlos Yagua, P.E. James Watt, P.E. Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University College.... INTRODUCTION The overall goal of the demand response program is to reduce facilities peak energy demand to reduce the cost of electricity for both Austin Energy and their customer. Reducing the demand mitigates the need to construct additional...

Shi, Y.; Guiberteau, K.; Yagua, C.; Watt, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Bulk Hydrogen Storage - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Hydrogen Storage Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop May 7-8, 2003 Crystal City, Virginia Breakout Session - Bulk Hydrogen Storage Main Themes/Caveats Bulk Storage = Anything not on the vehicle 10's of Tons -- End use point 50-100 Tons - Terminals/City Gates 1000's Tons - Between Production Facility and Terminal/City Gate Bulk storage requirements less restrictive and different from on-board storage Uncertainty about evolution of infrastructure requires multiple pathways to be considered Bulk storage is an economic solution to address supply/demand imbalance Breakout Session - Bulk Hydrogen Storage Targets/Objectives Hard to quantify - scenario & end-use dependent Storage Materials (solid state) and container require different targets

253

Energy Programs | Advanced Storage Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Storage Systems Advanced Storage Systems Tapping Into Fuel Cells and Batteries Page 1 of 2 Imagine being able to drive a forty-mile round-trip commute every day without ever going near a gas pump. As the United States moves towards an energy economy with reduced dependence on foreign oil and fewer carbon emissions, development of alternative fuel sources and transmission of the energy they provide is only part of the equation. An increase in energy generated from intermittent renewable sources and the growing need for mobile energy will require new, efficient means of storing it, and technological advancements will be necessary to support the nation's future energy storage needs. A change toward alternative transportation - hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid-electric vehicles and electric

254

Personal Computer-Based Model for Cool Storage Performance Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PERSONAL COMPUTER-BASED MODEL FOR COOL STORAGE PERFORMANCE SIMULATION Leszek M. Kasprowicz, Jerold W. Jones, and James Hitzfelder The University of Texas at Austin ust tin, ABSTRACT A personal computer based hourly simulation model... can be achieved by applying cool storage systems which use stored energy for air-conditioning purposes during peak periods. Customers benefit from cool storage in two ways. First, demand charges are reduced since customers with sufficient thermal...

Kasprowicz, L. M.; Jones, J. W.; Hitzfelder, J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

256

A MILP model for optimising multi-service portfolios of distributed energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Energy storage has the potential to provide multiple services to several sectors in electricity industry and thus support activities related to generation, network and system operation. Hence aggregating the value delivered by storage to these sectors is paramount for promoting its efficient deployment in the near future, which will provide the level of flexibility needed to deal with the envisaged high renewables share and the increase in peak demand driven by transport and heating electrification. In this context, we develop a Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP) model to schedule operation of distributed storage by coordinating provision of a range of system services which are rewarded at different market prices. The model maximises distributed storage’s net profit while providing distribution network congestion management, energy price arbitrage and various reserve and frequency regulation services through both active and reactive power control. We demonstrate benefits associated with the coordination of these services and its impacts on commercial strategies to determine optimal multi-service portfolios in the long term. We also demonstrate the value of reactive power control to support not only distribution network congestion management, but also efficient trading of energy and balancing services which are usually treated through active power-only control. In addition, we use the model to price the service of distribution network congestion management and propose an efficient investment policy to upgrade distribution network capacity in the presence of distributed storage. Finally, several case studies under current market conditions in Great Britain (GB) demonstrate that distributed storage revenues associated with frequency control services are significantly more profitable.

Rodrigo Moreno; Roberto Moreira; Goran Strbac

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

building demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

258

Demand Response Research in Spain  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Demand Response Research in Spain Demand Response Research in Spain Speaker(s): Iñigo Cobelo Date: August 22, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mary Ann Piette The Spanish power system is becoming increasingly difficult to operate. The peak load grows every year, and the permission to build new transmission and distribution infrastructures is difficult to obtain. In this scenario Demand Response can play an important role, and become a resource that could help network operators. The present deployment of demand response measures is small, but this situation however may change in the short term. The two main Spanish utilities and the transmission network operator are designing research projects in this field. All customer segments are targeted, and the research will lead to pilot installations and tests.

259

EIA - AEO2010 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Electricity Demand Figure 69. U.S. electricity demand growth 1950-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 60. Average annual U.S. retail electricity prices in three cases, 1970-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel in three cases, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 62. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 63. Levelized electricity costs for new power plants, 2020 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 64. Electricity generating capacity at U.S. nuclear power plants in three cases, 2008, 2020, and 2035

260

Full Rank Rational Demand Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a nominal income full rank QES. R EFERENCES (A.84)S. G. Donald. “Inferring the Rank of a Matrix. ” Journal of97-102. . “A Demand System Rank Theorem. ” Econometrica 57 (

LaFrance, Jeffrey T; Pope, Rulon D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Demand Forecasting of New Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Keeping Unit or SKU) employing attribute analysis techniques. The objective of this thesis is to improve Abstract This thesis is a study into the demand forecasting of new products (also referred to as Stock

Sun, Yu

262

Chapter 12 - Assessment of Thermal Energy Storage Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The foremost challenges of energy supply in meeting the energy demand apply to the development of energy efficient technologies to achieve energy security and environmental emissions. In the spectrum of energy-efficient technologies, thermal energy storage systems offer huge potential to bridge the mismatch between energy supply and energy demand. The overall operational performance of thermal storage systems depends on the quality of energy content and the energy degradation effects exhibited during the cyclic charging and discharging processes. The assessment pertaining to the exergy efficiency in addition to energy efficiency can have a pivotal role to enable thermal storage systems to outperform on a long-term basis.

S. Kalaiselvam; R. Parameshwaran

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Summary Report from Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of H 2 storage materials such as NaBH 4 - are needed due to missing experimental data. In addition, simulation techniques allow scientists and engineers to explore...

264

Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response & Energy Efficiency International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations ESL-IC-09-11-05 Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Austin, Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 2 ?Less than 5..., 2009 4 An Innovative Solution to Get the Ball Rolling ? Demand Response (DR) ? Monitoring Based Commissioning (MBCx) EnerNOC has a solution involving two complementary offerings. ESL-IC-09-11-05 Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference...

265

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneeringdemonstration of how existing utility load-management assets can providean important electricity system reliability resource known as spinningreserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinningreserve will give grid operators at the California Independent SystemOperator (CAISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful, newtool to improve system reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lowersystem operating costs.

Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Torres, Carlos; Hirth,Scott; Yinger, Bob; Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan; Bernier, Clark; Wright,Roger; Barat, A.; Watson, David S.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

National Action Plan on Demand Response  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Action Plan on Demand National Action Plan on Demand Action Plan on Demand National Action Plan on Demand Response Response Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group November 18, 2008 November 18, 2008 Daniel Gore Daniel Gore Office of Energy Market Regulation Office of Energy Market Regulation Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The author's views do not necessarily represent the views of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Presentation Contents Presentation Contents Statutory Requirements Statutory Requirements National Assessment [Study] of Demand Response National Assessment [Study] of Demand Response National Action Plan on Demand Response National Action Plan on Demand Response General Discussion on Demand Response and Energy Outlook

267

HYDROGEN STORAGE IN NICKEL DOPED MCM-41 Ezgi Dndar Tekkaya1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYDROGEN STORAGE IN NICKEL DOPED MCM-41 Ezgi Dündar Tekkaya1 and Yuda Yürüm1 1 Faculty of hydrogen results with increasing demand to hydrogen production and storage. Recent studies show that materials having high surface area, large pore size and high affinity to hydrogen have high hydrogen storage

Yanikoglu, Berrin

268

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to jointly host technology transfer meetings and occasional field excursions. A total of 15 technology transfer/strategic planning workshops were held.

Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

269

Solid-State Hydrogen Storage: Storage Capacity,Thermodynamics...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage: Storage Capacity,Thermodynamics and Kinetics. Solid-State Hydrogen Storage: Storage Capacity,Thermodynamics and Kinetics. Abstract: Solid-state reversible...

270

Demand Response Projects: Technical and Market Demonstrations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response Projects: Technical and Market Demonstrations Philip D. Lusk Deputy Director Energy Analyst #12;PLACE CAPTION HERE. #12;#12;#12;#12;City of Port Angeles Demand Response History energy charges · Demand charges during peak period only ­ Reduced demand charges for demand response

271

Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. Barat, D. Watson. 2006 Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby 2008. Demand Response Spinning ReserveReport 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communications

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals. Presented atand Automated Demand Response in Industrial RefrigeratedActions for Industrial Demand Response in California. LBNL-

Mares, K.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Facilitating Renewable Integration by Demand Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Demand response is seen as one of the resources ... expected to incentivize small consumers to participate in demand response. This chapter models the involvement of small consumers in demand response programs wi...

Juan M. Morales; Antonio J. Conejo…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Barat, and D. Watson. 2007. Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby. 2009. Demand Response Spinning ReserveFormat of 2009-2011 Demand Response Activity Applications.

Joseph, Eto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Demand response-enabled residential thermostat controls.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

human dimension of demand response technology from a caseArens, E. , et al. 2008. Demand Response Enabling TechnologyArens, E. , et al. 2006. Demand Response Enabling Technology

Chen, Xue; Jang, Jaehwi; Auslander, David M.; Peffer, Therese; Arens, Edward A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Value of Demand Response -Introduction Klaus Skytte  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Value of Demand Response - Introduction Klaus Skytte Systems Analysis Department February 7, 2006 Energinet.dk, Ballerup #12;What is Demand Response? Demand response (DR) is the short-term response

277

World Energy Use — Trends in Demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to provide adequate energy supplies in the future, trends in energy demand must be evaluated and projections of future demand developed. World energy use is far from static, and an understanding of the demand

Randy Hudson

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050 RyanCEC (2003a) California energy demand 2003-2013 forecast.CEC (2005a) California energy demand 2006-2016: Staff energy

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Balancing of Energy Supply and Residential Demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Power demand of private households shows daily fluctuations and ... (BEV) and heat pumps. This additional demand, especially when it remains unmanaged, will ... to an increase in fluctuations. To balance demand,

Martin Bock; Grit Walther

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Vacancies Needed | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vacancies Needed Vacancies Needed Itinerant electrons are vital in bonding oxygen to common oxide surface In a reaction important to a variety of catalytic and photocatalytic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5. Design of a Building Load Data Storage Platform Sub-taskand design of a building load data storage platform. Tasks5: Design of a Building Load Data Storage Platform xi xii

Joseph, Eto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Zakhidov, 1971. "Storage of Solar Energy in a Sandy-Aquifer Storage of Hot Water from Solar Energy Collectors,"with solar energy systems, aquifer energy storage provides a

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Carbon Storage in Basalt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...immobile and thus the storage more secure, though...continental margins have huge storage capacities adjacent...unlimited supplies of seawater. On the continents...present in the target storage formation can be pumped up and used to dissolve...

Sigurdur R. Gislason; Eric H. Oelkers

2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

284

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zakhidov, 1971. "Storage of Solar Energy in a Sandy-Gravelwith solar energy systems, aquifer energy storage provides aAquifer Storage of Hot Water from Solar Energy Collectors,"

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Solar Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various types of thermal energy storage systems are introduced and their importance and desired characteristics are outlined. Sensible heat storage, which is one of the most commonly used storage systems in pract...

E. Paykoç; S. Kakaç

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Late January Cold Impacted Both Supply & Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A brief cold spell occurred in the second half of January on top of A brief cold spell occurred in the second half of January on top of the low stocks. Cold weather increases demand, but it also can interfere with supply, as happened this past January. During the week ending January 22, temperatures in the New England and the Mid-Atlantic areas shifted from being15 percent and 17 percent warmer than normal, respectively, to 24 percent and 22 percent colder than normal. The weather change increased weekly heating requirements by about 40 percent. Temperature declines during the winter affect heating oil demand in a number of ways: Space heating demand increases; Electricity peaking demand increases and power generators must turn to distillate to meet the new peak needs; Fuel switching from natural gas to distillate occurs among large

288

Definition: Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Demand Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Demand The rate at which electric energy is delivered to or by a system or part of a system, generally expressed in kilowatts or megawatts, at a given instant or averaged over any designated interval of time., The rate at which energy is being used by the customer.[1] Related Terms energy, electricity generation References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An i Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. nline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Demand&oldid=480555"

289

Winter Demand Impacted by Weather  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: Heating oil demand is strongly influenced by weather. The "normal" numbers are the expected values for winter 2000-2001 used in EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook. The chart indicates the extent to which the last winter exhibited below-normal heating degree-days (and thus below-normal heating demand). Temperatures were consistently warmer than normal throughout the 1999-2000 heating season. This was particularly true in November 1999, February 2001 and March 2001. For the heating season as a whole (October through March), the 1999-2000 winter yielded total HDDs 10.7% below normal. Normal temperatures this coming winter would, then, be expected to bring about 11% higher heating demand than we saw last year. Relative to normal, the 1999-2000 heating season was the warmest in

290

Turkey's energy demand and supply  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of the present article is to investigate Turkey's energy demand and the contribution of domestic energy sources to energy consumption. Turkey, the 17th largest economy in the world, is an emerging country with a buoyant economy challenged by a growing demand for energy. Turkey's energy consumption has grown and will continue to grow along with its economy. Turkey's energy consumption is high, but its domestic primary energy sources are oil and natural gas reserves and their production is low. Total primary energy production met about 27% of the total primary energy demand in 2005. Oil has the biggest share in total primary energy consumption. Lignite has the biggest share in Turkey's primary energy production at 45%. Domestic production should be to be nearly doubled by 2010, mainly in coal (lignite), which, at present, accounts for almost half of the total energy production. The hydropower should also increase two-fold over the same period.

Balat, M. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

International Oil Supplies and Demands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--90 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

International Oil Supplies and Demands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--1990 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

OEM Perspective on Cryogenic H2 Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

compressed compressed Hydrogen Storage. Tobias Brunner February 15 th , 2011, Washington D.C. BMW Hydrogen. Hydrogen Storage Workshop. BMW EfficientDynamics Less emissions. More driving pleasure. BMW Hydrogen Washington DC 02/15/2011 Page 2 BMW Hydrogen Technology Strategy. Advancement of key components. Source: BMW Advanced key components Next vehicle & infrastructure Hydrogen 7 small series LH 2 Storage  Capacity   Safety   Boil-off loss   Pressure supply   Complexity   Infrastructure  Technology leap storage & drive train Efficient long-range mobility:  Zero Emission  Focus on vehicles with high energy demand.  Range > 500 km (6-8 kg H 2 )  Fast refueling (< 4 min / 6 kg)  Optimized safety oriented vehicle package & component

294

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past several years, interest in large-scale control of peak energy demand and total consumption has increased. While motivated by a number of factors, this interest has primarily been spurred on the demand side by the increasing cost of energy and, on the supply side by the limited ability of utilities to build sufficient electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in electricity use through the use of price incentives. DR systems are also be design to shift or curtail energy demand at critical times when the generation, transmission, and distribution systems (i.e. the 'grid') are threatened with instabilities. To be effectively deployed on a large-scale, these proposed DR systems need to be automated. Automation will require robust and efficient data communications infrastructures across geographically dispersed markets. The present availability of widespread Internet connectivity and inexpensive, reliable computing hardware combined with the growing confidence in the capabilities of distributed, application-level communications protocols suggests that now is the time for designing and deploying practical systems. Centralized computer systems that are capable of providing continuous signals to automate customers reduction of power demand, are known as Demand Response Automation Servers (DRAS). The deployment of prototype DRAS systems has already begun - with most initial deployments targeting large commercial and industrial (C & I) customers. An examination of the current overall energy consumption by economic sector shows that the C & I market is responsible for roughly half of all energy consumption in the US. On a per customer basis, large C & I customers clearly have the most to offer - and to gain - by participating in DR programs to reduce peak demand. And, by concentrating on a small number of relatively sophisticated energy consumers, it has been possible to improve the DR 'state of the art' with a manageable commitment of technical resources on both the utility and consumer side. Although numerous C & I DR applications of a DRAS infrastructure are still in either prototype or early production phases, these early attempts at automating DR have been notably successful for both utilities and C & I customers. Several factors have strongly contributed to this success and will be discussed below. These successes have motivated utilities and regulators to look closely at how DR programs can be expanded to encompass the remaining (roughly) half of the state's energy load - the light commercial and, in numerical terms, the more important residential customer market. This survey examines technical issues facing the implementation of automated DR in the residential environment. In particular, we will look at the potential role of home automation networks in implementing wide-scale DR systems that communicate directly to individual residences.

McParland, Charles

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Demand Response Technology Development The objective ofin planning demand response technology RD&D by conductingNew and Emerging Technologies into the California Smart Grid

Joseph, Eto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California Long-term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan. B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response> B-4 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Demand Response - Policy | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Demand Response - Policy Demand Response - Policy Since its inception, the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) has been committed to modernizing the nation's...

298

Sandia National Laboratories: demand response inverter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

demand response inverter ECIS-Princeton Power Systems, Inc.: Demand Response Inverter On March 19, 2013, in DETL, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Surety, Facilities,...

299

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Demand Response A pilot program from NSTAR in Massachusetts,Massachusetts, aiming to test whether an intensive program of energy efficiency and demand response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

annual per-capita electricity consumption by demand15 California electricity consumption projections by demandannual per-capita electricity consumption by demand

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies - January 16, 2011 Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies - January 16, 2011 January 16, 2011 Conference Call...

302

Marketing & Driving Demand Collaborative - Social Media Tools...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Demand Collaborative - Social Media Tools & Strategies Marketing & Driving Demand Collaborative - Social Media Tools & Strategies Presentation slides from the BetterBuildings...

303

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vehicle Conventional and Alternative Fuel Response Simulatormodified to include alternative fuel demand scenarios (whichvehicle adoption and alternative fuel demand) later in the

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Natural Gas Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Demand Natural Gas Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Natural Gas Demand Figure 72. Natural gas consumption by sector, 1990-2030 (trillion cubic feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 73. Total natural gas consumption, 1990-2030 (trillion cubic feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Fastest Increase in Natural Gas Use Is Expected for the Buildings Sectors In the reference case, total natural gas consumption increases from 21.7 trillion cubic feet in 2006 to a peak value of 23.8 trillion cubic feet in 2016, followed by a decline to 22.7 trillion cubic feet in 2030. The natural gas share of total energy consumption drops from 22 percent in 2006

305

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydro, compressed air, and battery energy storage are allenergy storage sys tem s suc h as pumped hydro and compressed air.

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries Title Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5319E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ghatikar, Girish, Aimee T. McKane, Sasank Goli, Peter L. Therkelsen, and Daniel Olsen Date Published 01/2012 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords automated dr, controls and automation, demand response, dynamic pricing, industrial controls, market sectors, openadr Abstract California's electricity markets are moving toward dynamic pricing models, such as real-time pricing, within the next few years, which could have a significant impact on an industrial facility's cost of energy use during the times of peak use. Adequate controls and automated systems that provide industrial facility managers real-time energy use and cost information are necessary for successful implementation of a comprehensive electricity strategy; however, little is known about the current control capacity of California industries. To address this gap, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, in close collaboration with California industrial trade associations, conducted a survey to determine the current state of controls technologies in California industries. This study identifies sectors that have the technical capability to implement Demand Response (DR) and Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). In an effort to assist policy makers and industry in meeting the challenges of real-time pricing, facility operational and organizational factors were taken into consideration to generate recommendations on which sectors Demand Response efforts should be focused. Analysis of the survey responses showed that while the vast majority of industrial facilities have semi- or fully automated control systems, participation in Demand Response programs is still low due to perceived barriers. The results also showed that the facilities that use continuous processes are good Demand Response candidates. When comparing facilities participating in Demand Response to those not participating, several similarities and differences emerged. Demand Response-participating facilities and non-participating facilities had similar timings of peak energy use, production processes, and participation in energy audits. Though the survey sample was smaller than anticipated, the results seemed to support our preliminary assumptions. Demonstrations of Auto-Demand Response in industrial facilities with good control capabilities are needed to dispel perceived barriers to participation and to investigate industrial subsectors suggested of having inherent Demand Response potential.

307

Smart Buildings and Demand Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advances in communications and control technology the strengthening of the Internet and the growing appreciation of the urgency to reduce demand side energy use are motivating the development of improvements in both energy efficiency and demand response (DR) systems in buildings. This paper provides a framework linking continuous energy management and continuous communications for automated demand response (Auto?DR) in various times scales. We provide a set of concepts for monitoring and controls linked to standards and procedures such as Open Automation Demand Response Communication Standards (OpenADR). Basic building energy science and control issues in this approach begin with key building components systems end?uses and whole building energy performance metrics. The paper presents a framework about when energy is used levels of services by energy using systems granularity of control and speed of telemetry. DR when defined as a discrete event requires a different set of building service levels than daily operations. We provide examples of lessons from DR case studies and links to energy efficiency.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Water demand management in Kuwait  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kuwait is an arid country located in the Middle East, with limited access to water resources. Yet water demand per capita is much higher than in other countries in the world, estimated to be around 450 L/capita/day. There ...

Milutinovic, Milan, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

21 - Thermal energy storage systems for concentrating solar power (CSP) technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The option to supply electricity on demand is a key advantage of solar thermal power plants with integrated thermal storage. Diurnal storage systems providing thermal power in the multi-MW range for several hours are required here, the temperature range being between 250 °C and 700 °C. This chapter describes the state of the art in commercial storage systems used in solar thermal power generation. An overview of alternative and innovative storage concepts for this application area is given.

W.-D. Steinmann

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

The alchemy of demand response: turning demand into supply  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Paying customers to refrain from purchasing products they want seems to run counter to the normal operation of markets. Demand response should be interpreted not as a supply-side resource but as a secondary market that attempts to correct the misallocation of electricity among electric users caused by regulated average rate tariffs. In a world with costless metering, the DR solution results in inefficiency as measured by deadweight losses. (author)

Rochlin, Cliff

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Q:\asufinal_0107_demand.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

00 00 (AEO2000) Assumptions to the January 2000 With Projections to 2020 DOE/EIA-0554(2000) Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution

312

Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;#12;2008 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering Staff Report Federal Energy metering penetration and potential peak load reduction from demand response have increased since 2006. Significant activity to promote demand response or to remove barriers to demand response occurred at the state

Tesfatsion, Leigh

313

INTEGRATION OF PV IN DEMAND RESPONSE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATION OF PV IN DEMAND RESPONSE PROGRAMS Prepared by Richard Perez et al. NREL subcontract response programs. This is because PV generation acts as a catalyst to demand response, markedly enhancing by solid evidence from three utility case studies. BACKGROUND Demand Response: demand response (DR

Perez, Richard R.

314

Demand Side Management in Rangan Banerjee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Side Management in Industry Rangan Banerjee Talk at Baroda in Birla Corporate Seminar August 31,2007 #12;Demand Side Management Indian utilities ­ energy shortage and peak power shortage. Supply for Options ­ Demand Side Management (DSM) & Load Management #12;DSM Concept Demand Side Management (DSM) - co

Banerjee, Rangan

315

Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Integrated Predictive Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on AddThis.com...

316

The Solar Heat Storage Twin-System of the Lübeck Solar House as an Example of a 2nd Generation Interseasonal Storage Concept  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This was achieved by a heat pump assisted solar heating system centered around a twin storage consisting...3...tank, kept at 35 to 50°C, takes care of the heat demand of the low-temperature heating system, and a ...

H. Weik; J. Plagge

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Storage | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Storage Storage Storage Energy storage isn’t just for AA batteries. Thanks to investments from the Energy Department's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), energy storage may soon play a bigger part in our electricity grid, making it possible to generate more renewable electricity. Learn more. Energy storage isn't just for AA batteries. Thanks to investments from the Energy Department's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), energy storage may soon play a bigger part in our electricity grid, making it possible to generate more renewable electricity. Learn more.

318

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsand Techniques for Demand Response. California Energyand S. Kiliccote. Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts:

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Incorporating Demand Response into Western Interconnection Transmission Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aggregator Programs. Demand Response Measurement andIncorporating Demand Response into Western Interconnection13 Demand Response Dispatch

Satchwell, Andrew

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Techniques for Demand Response, report for theand Reliability Demand Response Programs: Final Report.Demand Response

McKane, Aimee T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,study of automated demand response in wastewater treatmentopportunities for demand response control strategies in

Thompson, Lisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Global energy demand to 2060  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The projection of global energy demand to the year 2060 is of particular interest because of its relevance to the current greenhouse concerns. The long-term growth of global energy demand in the time scale of climatic change has received relatively little attention in the public discussion of national policy alternatives. The sociological, political, and economic issues have rarely been mentioned in this context. This study emphasizes that the two major driving forces are global population growth and economic growth (gross national product per capita), as would be expected. The modest annual increases assumed in this study result in a year 2060 annual energy use of >4 times the total global current use (year 1986) if present trends continue, and >2 times with extreme efficiency improvements in energy use. Even assuming a zero per capita growth for energy and economics, the population increase by the year 2060 results in a 1.5 times increase in total annual energy use.

Starr, C. (Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Energy Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data Figure 55 From AEO2011 report . Market Trends Growth in energy use is linked to population growth through increases in housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, and goods and services. These changes affect not only the level of energy use, but also the mix of fuels used. Energy consumption per capita declined from 337 million Btu in 2007 to 308 million Btu in 2009, the lowest level since 1967. In the AEO2011 Reference case, energy use per capita increases slightly through 2013, as the economy recovers from the 2008-2009 economic downturn. After 2013, energy use per capita declines by 0.3 percent per year on average, to 293 million Btu in 2035, as higher efficiency standards for vehicles and

324

Solving a Dial-a-Ride Problem with a Hybrid Evolutionary Multi-objective Application to Demand Responsive Transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Demand Responsive Transport R´emy Chevrier,a , Arnaud Liefoogheb,c , Laetitia Jourdanb,c , Clarisse, 59650 Villeneuve d'Ascq, France Abstract Demand responsive transport allows customers to be carried to improve the quality of service, demand responsive transport needs more flexibility. This paper tries

Boyer, Edmond

325

Energy-Efficient Reliable Paths for On-Demand Routing Protocols Tamer Nadeem, Suman Banerjee, Archan Misra, Ashok Agrawala  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Energy-Efficient Reliable Paths for On-Demand Routing Protocols Tamer Nadeem, Suman Banerjee within the framework of on-demand routing protocols. Computation of minimum energy reli- able paths does not work for on-demand protocols and some additional mechanisms are needed to compute energy

Banerjee, Suman

326

Thermal energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various types of thermal stares for solar systems are surveyed which include: long-term water stores for solar systems; ground storage using soil as an interseasonal energy store; ground-water aquifers; pebble or rock bed storage; phase change storage; solar ponds; high temperature storage; and cold stores for solar air conditioning system. The use of mathematical models for analysis of the storage systems is considered

W.E.J. Neal

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 1 - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook In the IEO2009 projections, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 44 percent from 2006 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD economies. Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 11. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 12. Marketed Energy Use by Region, 1990-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

328

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 1 - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook In the IEO2008 projections, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 50 percent from 2005 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD economies. Figure 9. World Marketed EnergyConsumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 11. Marketed Energy Use in the Non-OECD Economies by Region, 1990-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

329

Molten Glass for Thermal Storage: Advanced Molten Glass for Heat Transfer and Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATS Project: Halotechnics is developing a high-temperature thermal energy storage system using a new thermal-storage and heat-transfer material: earth-abundant and low-melting-point molten glass. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Halotechnics new thermal storage material targets a price that is potentially cheaper than the molten salt used in most commercial solar thermal storage systems today. It is also extremely stable at temperatures up to 1200°C—hundreds of degrees hotter than the highest temperature molten salt can handle. Being able to function at high temperatures will significantly increase the efficiency of turning heat into electricity. Halotechnics is developing a scalable system to pump, heat, store, and discharge the molten glass. The company is leveraging technology used in the modern glass industry, which has decades of experience handling molten glass.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

EPRI's Photovoltaic Research Needs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Smart inverters 7© 2011 Electric Power Research Institute, Inc. All rights reserved. · Storage #12 Executive Planning Workshop for a New Northeast Solar Energy Research Center January 11-12, 2011 #12;About sector on behalf of its members energ stakeholders and societ Chauncey Starr · The Electric Power

Homes, Christopher C.

331

A novel air-conditioning system for proactive power demand response to smart grid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Power demand response is considered as one of the most promising solutions in relieving the power imbalance of an electrical grid that results a series of critical problems to the gird and end-users. In order to effectively make use of the demand response potentials of buildings, this paper presents a novel air-conditioning system with proactive demand control for daily load shifting and real time power balance in the developing smart grid. This system consists of a chilled water storage system (CWS) and a temperature and humidity independent control (THIC) air-conditioning system, which can significantly reduce the storage volume of the chilled water tank and effectively enable a building with more flexibility in changing its electricity usage patterns. The power demand of the proposed air-conditioning system can be flexibly controlled as desired by implementing two types of demand response strategies: demand side bidding (DSB) strategy and demand as frequency controlled reserve (DFR) strategy, in respond to the day-ahead and hour-ahead power change requirements of the grid, respectively. Considerable benefits (e.g., energy and cost savings) can be achieved for both the electricity utilities and building owners under incentive pricing or tariffs. A case study is conducted in a simulation platform to demonstrate the application of the proposed system in an office building.

Chengchu Yan; Xue Xue; Shengwei Wang; Borui Cui

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Projection of needs for gamma radiation sources and other radioisotopes and assessment of alternatives for providing radiation sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed the projected uses and demands for a variety of nuclear byproducts. Because the major large-scale near-term demand is for gamma irradiation sources, this report concentrates on the needs for gamma sources and evaluates the options for providing the needed material. Projections of possible growth in the irradiation treatment industry indicate that there will be a need for 180 to 320 MCi of /sup 60/Co (including /sup 137/Cs equivalent) in service in the year 2000. The largest current and projected use of gamma irradiation is for the sterilization of medical devices and disposable medical supplies. Currently, 40% of US disposable medical products are treated by irradiation, and within 10 years it is expected that 90% will be treated in this manner. Irradiation treatment of food for destruction of pathogens or parasites, disinfestation, or extension of allowable storage periods is estimated to require an active inventory of 75 MCi of /sup 60/Co-equivalent gamma source in about a decade. 90 refs., 7 figs., 25 tabs.

Ross, W.A.; Jensen, G.A.; Clark, L.L.; Eakin, D.E.; Jarrett, J.H.; Katayama, Y.B.; McKee, R.W.; Morgan, L.G.; Nealey, S.M.; Platt, A.M.; Tingey, G.L.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storage Storage On-board hydrogen storage for transportation applications continues to be one of the most technically challenging barriers to the widespread commercialization of hydrogen-fueled vehicles. The EERE hydrogen storage activity focuses primarily on the applied research and development (R&D) of low-pressure, materials-based technologies to allow for a driving range of more than 300 miles (500 km) while meeting packaging, cost, safety, and performance requirements to be competitive with current vehicles. While automakers have recently demonstrated progress with some prototype vehicles traveling more than 300 miles on a single fill, this driving range must be achievable across different vehicle models and without compromising space, performance, or cost. In addition, hydrogen storage will be needed for both other niche vehicular applications and off-board uses such as for stationary power generation and for hydrogen delivery and refueling infrastructure.

334

Why Systems Analysis for Energy Storage?  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cost Effectiveness Evaluation, Cost Effectiveness Evaluation, DNV KEMA Modeling for CPUC Energy Storage Proceeding Energy Storage Panel, EAC Meeting June 6, 2013 Common Pitfalls  Using historical prices - Prices are likely to change due to rule modifications, changes in regulation supply resources over time, changes in regulation needs over time - Depending on the amount of storage added to the market, the introduction of storage can change market prices  Modeling deterministic behavior (perfect performance assuming knowledge of upcoming prices) - Future prices are unknown and actual revenues will likely not reflect strategy that gets maximum revenue 100% of the time  Ignoring system effects - In addition to affecting prices, certain amounts of storage can affect imports/exports

335

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Definitions Definitions Definitions Since 2006, EIA has reported two measures of aggregate capacity, one based on demonstrated peak working gas storage, the other on working gas design capacity. Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity: This measure sums the highest storage inventory level of working gas observed in each facility over the 5-year range from May 2005 to April 2010, as reported by the operator on the Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Underground Gas Storage Report." This data-driven estimate reflects actual operator experience. However, the timing for peaks for different fields need not coincide. Also, actual available maximum capacity for any storage facility may exceed its reported maximum storage level over the last 5 years, and is virtually certain to do so in the case of newly commissioned or expanded facilities. Therefore, this measure provides a conservative indicator of capacity that may understate the amount that can actually be stored.

336

Spent fuel storage requirements 1993--2040  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historical inventories of spent fuel are combined with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) projections of future discharges from commercial nuclear reactors in the United States to provide estimates of spent fuel storage requirements through the year 2040. The needs are estimated for storage capacity beyond that presently available in the reactor storage pools. These estimates incorporate the maximum capacities within current and planned in-pool storage facilities and any planned transshipments of spent fuel to other reactors or facilities. Existing and future dry storage facilities are also discussed. The nuclear utilities provide historical data through December 1992 on the end of reactor life are based on the DOE/Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates of future nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Heat pumps and energy storage – The challenges of implementation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The wider implementation of variable renewable energy sources such as wind across the UK and Ireland will demand interconnection, energy storage and more dynamic energy systems to maintain a stable energy system that makes full use of one of our best renewable energy resources. However large scale energy storage e.g. pumped storage may be economically challenging. Therefore can thermal energy storage deployed domestically fulfil an element of such an energy storage role? Current electricity pricing is based on a ½ hourly timeframe which will be demonstrated to have some benefits for hot water heating from electrical water heaters in the first instance. However heat pumps linked to energy storage can displace fossil fuel heating systems and therefore the question is whether a renewable tariff based on “excess” wind for example is sufficient to operate heat pumps. An initial analysis of this scenario will be presented and its potential role in challenging aspects of fuel poverty.

Neil J Hewitt

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

NREL: Energy Storage - Energy Storage Thermal Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Thermal Management Infrared image of rectangular battery cell. Infrared thermal image of a lithium-ion battery cell with poor terminal design. Graph of relative...

339

NREL: Energy Storage - Energy Storage Systems Evaluation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Systems Evaluation Photo of man standing between two vehicles and plugging the vehicle on the right into a charging station. NREL system evaluation has confirmed...

340

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provide more guidance and support. Large  Scale  Computing  and  Storage  Requirements  for  Fusion  Energy  provide much-needed additional resources there remains a need to employ codes Large  Scale  Computing  and  Storage  Requirements  for  Fusion  Energy  provide large gains with little application porting effort. Large  Scale  Computing  and  Storage  Requirements  for  Fusion  Energy  

Gerber, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Information needs for risk management/communication  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hazardous waste cleanup program under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (Superfund) is delegated to the ten Regions of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and has, to date, identified more than 33,000 sites for consideration. The size and complexity of the program places great demands on those who would provide information to achieve national consistency in application of risk assessment while meeting site-specific needs for risk management and risk communication.

Bennett, D.A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

SmartHG: Energy Demand Aware Open Services for Smart Grid Intelligent Automation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SmartHG: Energy Demand Aware Open Services for Smart Grid Intelligent Automation Enrico Tronci- ing, energy storage (e.g., batteries or plug-in hybrid electric vehicles) and energy production (e economically viable Intelligent Automation Services (IASs), which gather real-time data about energy usage from

Tronci, Enrico

343

Experimental investigation of an innovative thermochemical process operating with a hydrate salt and moist air for thermal storage of solar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and moist air for thermal storage of solar energy: global performance Benoit Michela, *, Nathalie Mazeta-gas reaction, hydration, thermal storage, seasonal storage, solar energy * Corresponding author: E-mail: mazet in solar energy. Solar energy is widely affordable and has the capability to meet household demand over

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

344

Abstract--A novel compressed air energy storage system for wind turbine is proposed. It captures excess power prior to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract-- A novel compressed air energy storage system for wind turbine is proposed. It captures instead of supply. Energy is stored in a high pressure dual chamber liquid-compressed air storage vessel components can be downsized for demand instead of supply. A novel Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES

Li, Perry Y.

345

Joint Center for Energy Storage Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR) is a major public-private research partnership that integrates U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories, major research universities and leading industrial companies to overcome critical scientific challenges and technical barriers, leading to the creation of breakthrough energy storage technologies. JCESR, centered at Argonne National Laboratory, outside of Chicago, consolidates decades of basic research experience that forms the foundation of innovative advanced battery technologies. The partnership has access to some of the world's leading battery researchers as well as scientific research facilities that are needed to develop energy storage materials that will revolutionize the way the United States and the world use energy.

Eric Isaacs

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

346

Thermal energy storage technical progress report, April 1990--March 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting development of thermal energy storage (TES) as a means of efficiently coupling energy supplies to variable heating or cooling demands. Uses of TES include electrical demand-side management in buildings and industry, extending the utilization of renewable energy resources such as solar, and recovery of waste heat from periodic industrial processes. Technical progress to develop TES for specific diurnal and industrial applications under Oak Ridge National Laboratory's TES program from April 1990 to March 1992 is reported and covers research in the areas of low temperature sorption, direct contact ice making, latent heat storage plasterboard and latent/sensible heat regenerator technology development.

Tomlinson, J.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Thermal energy storage technical progress report, April 1990--March 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting development of thermal energy storage (TES) as a means of efficiently coupling energy supplies to variable heating or cooling demands. Uses of TES include electrical demand-side management in buildings and industry, extending the utilization of renewable energy resources such as solar, and recovery of waste heat from periodic industrial processes. Technical progress to develop TES for specific diurnal and industrial applications under Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s TES program from April 1990 to March 1992 is reported and covers research in the areas of low temperature sorption, direct contact ice making, latent heat storage plasterboard and latent/sensible heat regenerator technology development.

Tomlinson, J.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Air ejector augmented compressed air energy storage system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Energy is stored in slack demand periods by charging a plurality of underground reservoirs with air to the same peak storage pressure, during peak demand periods throttling the air from one storage reservoir into a gas turbine system at a constant inlet pressure until the air pressure in the reservoir falls to said constant inlet pressure, thereupon permitting air in a second reservoir to flow into said gas turbine system while drawing air from the first reservoir through a variable geometry air ejector and adjusting said variable geometry air ejector, said air flow being essentially at the constant inlet pressure of the gas turbine system.

Ahrens, Frederick W. (Naperville, IL); Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Both Distillate Supply and Demand Reached Extraordinary Levels This Winter  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: This chart shows some critical differences in distillate supply and demand during this winter heating season, in comparison to the past two winters. Typically, distillate demand peaks during the winter months, but "new supply" (refinery production and net imports) cannot increase as much, so the remaining supply needed is drawn from inventories. This pattern is evident in each of the past two winter heating seasons. This winter, however, the pattern was very different, for several reasons: With inventories entering the season at extremely low levels, a "typical" winter stockdraw would have been nearly impossible, particularly in the Northeast, the region most dependent on heating oil. Demand reached near-record levels in December, as colder-than-normal

350

Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Scoping Study  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services in U.S. Electricity Markets Peter Cappers, Jason MacDonald, Charles Goldman April 2013 Report Summary 1 Energy Analysis Department  Electricity Markets and Policy Group Presentation Overview  Objectives and Approach  Wholesale and Retail Market Environments  Market and Policy Barrier Typology  Prototypical Regional Barrier Assessment 2 Energy Analysis Department  Electricity Markets and Policy Group A Role for Demand Response to Provide Ancillary Services  Increasing penetration of renewable energy generation in U.S. electricity markets means that bulk power system operators will need to manage the variable and uncertain nature of many renewable resources

351

Glass Needs for a Growing Photovoltaics Industry Keith Burrows1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Glass Needs for a Growing Photovoltaics Industry Keith Burrows1 and Vasilis Fthenakis1,2* 1, the demand for glass for the solar industry will far exceed the current supply, and thousands of new float-glass an opportunity for the solar industry to obtain products better suited to their needs, such as low-iron glass

352

Using Alternative Energy Storage in UPS Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Data Management for Data Management for CEC/DOE Energy Storage Demonstration Project Work performed under contract with Sandia National Labs Garth Corey Project Manager Project funded by the US DOE ESS Program Dr. Imre Gyuk, Program Manager Presented by Doug Dorr ESI Project Manager ddorr@eprisolutions.com 2 Presentation Outline  Project Overview and Objectives  Data acquisition status for the demonstration projects  Updates to the Energy Storage Initiative Website  Examples of Website Data Analysis 3 Project Overview and Objectives  Promote New Energy Storage Technologies that can achieve California's long range energy goals:  Increased energy utilization efficiency  Reduced demand for out of state energy procurement  Reduced overall energy costs to consumers

353

Solar Storage Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Storage Company Storage Company Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar Storage Company Place Palo Alto, California Zip 94301 Sector Solar Product Distibuted On-Demand Solar Year founded 2009 Coordinates 37.4457966°, -122.1575745° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.4457966,"lon":-122.1575745,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

354

Breaking down the silos: the integration of energy efficiency, renewable energy, demand response and climate change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper explores the feasibility of integrating energy efficiency program evaluation with the emerging need for the evaluation of programs from different “energy cultures” (demand response, renewable energy, a...

Edward Vine

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Report: Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Power Sector  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report examines the potential infrastructure needs of the U.S. interstate natural gas pipeline transmission system across a range of future natural gas demand scenarios that drive increased electric power sector natural gas use.

356

Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1973-2014 Withdrawals 43,752 63,495 73,368 47,070 52,054 361,393 1973-2014 Salt Cavern Storage Fields Natural Gas in Storage 381,232 399,293 406,677 450,460 510,558 515,041...

357

2012 SG Peer Review - Recovery Act: Enhanced Demand and Distribution Management Regional Demonstration - Craig Miller, NRECA  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Enhanced Distribution and Demand Management Enhanced Distribution and Demand Management Regional Demonstration Craig Miller Cooperative Research Network National Rural Electric Cooperative Association 8 June 2012 December 2008 Project Title Objective Life-cycle Funding ($K) $68 million with match Hardware: $43 million Research: $11.6 Co-op Labor: $13.4 Technical Scope * 23 Co-ops, Distributed Nationally * 275,000 components deployed * Meters & DR * Distribution Automation * Infrastructure * In home displays and web portals * Demand response over AMI * Prepaid metering * Interactive thermal storage * Electrical storage (20x10kWh, 1MWh 0.5MWh) * Renewable energy * Smart feeder switching * Conservation voltage reduction * Advanced metering infrastructure * Meter data management * Communications infrastructure * SCADA To advance the deployment of the smart grid

358

Thermal Energy Storage: It's not Just for Electric Cost Savings Anymore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large cool Thermal Energy Storage (TES), typically ice TES or chilled water (CHW) TES, has traditionally been thought of, and used for, managing time-of-day electricity use to reduce the cost associated with electric energy and demand charges...

Andrepont, J. S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Spray-cooling concept for wind-based compressed air energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind turbine output energy varies over time with local wind speed and is typically inconsistent with grid power demand. Without energy storage the resulting difference between rated (peak) power and average power output leads to over-sizing of electrical generator and transmission lines. This conventional arrangement can be avoided if wind turbines can be coupled with energy storage to eliminate the output variations and instead produce their average power on a continuous basis. This would allow a smaller lower-cost constant-speed generator and a reduced capacity transmission system sized only for average power output. To accomplish this goal this study discusses a concept for a storage system for a 5?MW off-shore wind turbine which integrates a spray-based compressed air energy storage with a 35?MPa accumulator. The compressor employs a liquid piston for air sealing and employs water spray to augment heat transfer for high-efficiency. The overall compression is proposed in three stages with pressure ratios of 10:1 7:1 and 5:1 all operated at 1?Hz to maintain moderate liquid surface acceleration. Based on a simple and fundamental description of the system compression efficiency was found to be strongly dependent on droplet surface area which can be achieved through either high mass loading or small drop sizes. The simulations also show that direct injection spray can increase overall three-stage compression efficiency to as high as 89% substantially better than the 27% associated with a conventional adiabatic compression at the same pressure ratio. In addition this study introduces a key performance parameter termed the Levelization Factor which can be used to quantify the impact of storage on wind energy systems. However experiments and simulations based on 3-D geometries with design details are needed to determine the potential of this concept.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Mexico Renewable Energy Storage Task Force On January 28, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Infrastructure Security, News, News & Events, Partnership,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Definition: Peak Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peak Demand Peak Demand Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Peak Demand The highest hourly integrated Net Energy For Load within a Balancing Authority Area occurring within a given period (e.g., day, month, season, or year)., The highest instantaneous demand within the Balancing Authority Area.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Peak demand is used to refer to a historically high point in the sales record of a particular product. In terms of energy use, peak demand describes a period of strong consumer demand. Related Terms Balancing Authority Area, energy, demand, balancing authority, smart grid References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inli LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ne Glossary Definition Retrieved from

362

Demand Response Programs Oregon Public Utility Commission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response Programs Oregon Public Utility Commission January 6, 2005 Mike Koszalka Director;Demand Response Results, 2004 Load Control ­ Cool Keeper ­ ID Irrigation Load Control Price Responsive

363

Industrial Equipment Demand and Duty Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand and duty factors have been measured for selected equipment (air compressors, electric furnaces, injection molding machines, centrifugal loads, and others) in industrial plants. Demand factors for heavily loaded air compressors were near 100...

Dooley, E. S.; Heffington, W. M.

364

ConservationandDemand ManagementPlan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Introduction Ontario Regulation 397/11 under the Green Energy Act 2009 requires public agencies and implement energy Conservation and Demand Management (CDM) plans starting in 2014. Requirementsofthe ConservationandDemand ManagementPlan 2014-2019 #12

Abolmaesumi, Purang

365

Energy Demand Analysis at a Disaggregated Level  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this chapter is to consider energy demand at the fuel level or at the ... . This chapter first presents the disaggregation of energy demand, discusses the information issues and introduces framewor...

Subhes C. Bhattacharyya

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Seasonal temperature variations and energy demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an empirical study of the relationship between residential energy demand and temperature. Unlike previous studies in this ... different regions and to the contrasting effects on energy demand ...

Enrica De Cian; Elisa Lanzi; Roberto Roson

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Onboard Storage Tank Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Sandia National Laboratories co-hosted the Onboard Storage Tank Workshop on April 29th, 2010. Onboard storage tank experts gathered to share lessons learned...

368

Storage of Solar Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy storage provides a means for improving the performance and efficiency of a wide range of energy systems. It also plays an important role in energy conservation. Typically, energy storage is used when there...

H. P. Garg

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Chemical Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The oldest and most commonly practiced method to store solar energy is sensible heat storage. The underlying technology is well developed and the basic storage materials, water and rocks, are available ... curren...

H. P. Garg; S. C. Mullick; A. K. Bhargava

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Safe Home Food Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proper food storage can preserve food quality and prevent spoilage and food/borne illness. The specifics of pantry, refrigerator and freezer storage are given, along with helpful information on new packaging, label dates, etc. A comprehensive table...

Van Laanen, Peggy

2002-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

371

Training Needs Assessment Presentation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The TNA PowerPoint Presentation is targeted for the training points of contacts whose organization's participate in the DOE training needs assessment (TNA). This presentation goes over how the training needs assessment (TNA) is done and the components of the TNA data collection tool.

372

Decentralized demand management for water distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Actual Daily Demand for Model 2 . . 26 4 Predicted vs. Actual Peak Hourly Demand for Model 1 27 5 Predicted vs. Actual Peak Hourly Demand for Model 2 28 6 Cumulative Hourly Demand Distribution 7 Bryan Distribution Network 8 Typical Summer Diurnal... locating and controlling water that has not been accounted for. The Ford Meter Box Company (1987) advises the testing and recalibration of existing water meters. Because operating costs in a distribution network can be quite substantial, a significant...

Zabolio, Dow Joseph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

373

Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not described in the previous literature for electrochemical reduction of spent fuels, have been attempted. A quantitative analytical method for measuring the concentration of sodium borohydride in alkaline aqueous solution has been developed as part of this work and is described herein. Finally, findings from stability tests for sodium borohydride in aqueous solutions of several different compositions are reported. For aminoborane, other research institutes have developed regeneration schemes involving tributyltin hydride. In this report, electrochemical reduction experiments attempting to regenerate tributyltin hydride from tributyltin chloride (a representative by-product of the regeneration scheme) are described. These experiments were performed in the non-aqueous solvents acetonitrile and 1,2-dimethoxyethane. A non-aqueous reference electrode for electrolysis experiments in acetonitrile was developed and is described. One class of boron hydrides, called polyhedral boranes, became of interest to the DOE due to their ability to contain a sufficient amount of hydrogen to meet program goals and because of their physical and chemical safety attributes. Unfortunately, the research performed here has shown that polyhedral boranes do not react in such a way as to allow enough hydrogen to be released, nor do they appear to undergo hydrogenation from the spent fuel form back to the original hydride. After the polyhedral boranes were investigated, the project goals remained the same but the hydrogen storage material was switched by the DOE to ammonia borane. Ammonia borane was found to undergo an irreversible hydrogen release process, so a direct hydrogenation was not able to occur. To achieve the hydrogenation of the spent ammonia borane fuel, an indirect hydrogenation reaction is possible by using compounds called organotin hydrides. In this process, the organotin hydrides will hydrogenate the spent ammonia borane fuel at the cost of their own oxidation, which forms organotin halides. To enable a closed-loop cycle, our task was then to be able to hydrogenate the organotin halides back to th

Dr. Digby Macdonald

2010-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

374

International auspices for the storage of spent nuclear fuel as a nonproliferation measure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The maintenance of spent nuclear fuel from power reactors will pose problems regardless of how or when the debate over reprocessing is resolved. At present, many reactor sites contain significant buildups of spent fuel stored in holding pools, and no measure short of shutting down reactors with no remaining storage capacity will alleviate the need for away-from-reactor storage. Although the federal government has committed itself to dealing with the spent fuel problem, no solution has been reached, largely because of a debate over differing projections of storage capacity requirements. Proliferation of weapons grade nuclear material in many nations presents another pressing issue. If nations with small nuclear programs are forced to deal with their own spent fuel accumulations, they will either have to reprocess it indigenously or contract to have it reprocessed in a foreign reprocessing plant. In either case, these nations may eventually possess sufficient resources to assemble a nuclear weapon. The problem of spent fuel management demands real global solutions, and further delay in solving the problem of spent nuclear fuel accumulation, both nationally and globally, can benefit only a small class of elected officials in the short term and may inflict substantial costs on the American public, and possibly the world. (JMT)

O'Brien, J.N.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Thermochemical Energy Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation summarizes the introduction given by Christian Sattler during the Thermochemical Energy Storage Workshop on January 8, 2013.

376

Energy Storage Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy Storage Systems – An Old Idea Doing New Things with New Technology article for the International Assoication of ELectrical Inspectors

Conover, David R.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests, and Project Team Metal hydride gas storage Cryogenic gas storage Compressed gas storage Adsorbed gas storage...

378

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-62226 Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study F. Rubinstein, S. Kiliccote Energy Environmental Technologies Division January 2007 #12;LBNL-62226 Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California Energy

379

Demand Response Resources in Pacific Northwest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response Resources in Pacific Northwest Chuck Goldman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory cagoldman@lbl.gov Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project Portland OR May 2, 2007 #12;Overview · Typology Annual Reports ­ Journal articles/Technical reports #12;Demand Response Resources · Incentive

380

Leveraging gamification in demand dispatch systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modern demand-side management techniques are an integral part of the envisioned smart grid paradigm. They require an active involvement of the consumer for an optimization of the grid's efficiency and a better utilization of renewable energy sources. ... Keywords: demand response, demand side management, direct load control, gamification, smart grid, sustainability

Benjamin Gnauk; Lars Dannecker; Martin Hahmann

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Demand Response and Ancillary Services September 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response and Ancillary Services September 2008 #12;© 2008 EnerNOC, Inc. All Rights Reserved programs The purpose of this presentation is to offer insight into the mechanics of demand response and industrial demand response resources across North America in both regulated and restructured markets As of 6

382

THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA Prepared For: California Energy in this report. #12; ABSTRACT By reducing system loads during criticalpeak times, demand response can help reduce the threat of planned rotational outages. Demand response is also widely regarded as having

383

THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA Prepared For: California Energy in this report. #12; ABSTRACT By reducing system loads during criticalpeak times, demand response (DR) can.S. and internationally and lay out ideas that could help move California forward. KEY WORDS demand response, peak

384

Modeling Energy Demand Aggregators for Residential Consumers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The current world-wide increase of energy demand cannot be matched by energy production and power grid updateModeling Energy Demand Aggregators for Residential Consumers G. Di Bella, L. Giarr`e, M. Ippolito, A. Jean-Marie, G. Neglia and I. Tinnirello § January 2, 2014 Abstract Energy demand aggregators

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

385

Response to changes in demand/supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Response to changes in demand/supply through improved marketing 21.2 #12;#12;111 Impacts of changes log demand in 1995. The composites board mills operating in Korea took advantage of flexibility environment changes on the production mix, some economic indications, statistics of demand and supply of wood

386

Response to changes in demand/supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Response to changes in demand/supply through improved marketing 21.2 http with the mill consuming 450 000 m3 , amounting to 30% of total plywood log demand in 1995. The composites board, statistics of demand and supply of wood, costs and competitiveness were analysed. The reactions

387

Energy demand forecasting: industry practices and challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accurate forecasting of energy demand plays a key role for utility companies, network operators, producers and suppliers of energy. Demand forecasts are utilized for unit commitment, market bidding, network operation and maintenance, integration of renewable ... Keywords: analytics, energy demand forecasting, machine learning, renewable energy sources, smart grids, smart meters

Mathieu Sinn

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Fuzzy Subtractive Clustering Technique Applied to Demand Response in a Smart Grid Scope  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper focuses on demand response in a smart grid scope using a fuzzy subtractive clustering technique for modeling demand response. Domestic consumption is classified into profiles in order to favorable cover the adequate modeling. The fuzzy subtractive clustering technique is applied to a case study of domestic consumption demand response with three scenarios and a comparison of the results is presented. The demand response developed model intends to support consumer's decisions given a compromise between the consumption imperative needs and possible economical benefits due to reshape and reschedule.

R. Pereira; A. Fagundes; R. Melício; V.M.F. Mendes; J. Figueiredo; J.C. Quadrado

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Smart Buildings Using Demand Response March 6, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Smart Buildings Using Demand Response March 6, 2011 Sila Kiliccote Deputy, Demand Response Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Demand Response Research Center 1 #12;Presentation Outline Demand Response Research Center ­ DRRC Vision and Research Portfolio Introduction to Demand

Kammen, Daniel M.

390

Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Notes: EIA sees a tenuous supply/demand balance over the remainder of 2001 and into the beginning of 2002, as illustrated by the low OECD inventory levels. Global inventories remain low, and need to recover to more adequate levels in order to avoid continued price volatility. While we saw some stocking in April and May, typical third quarter stock builds may not occur. Even with Iraqi oil exports resuming in early July, OPEC was going to need to increase its oil production to account for demand increases over the 2nd half of the year to prevent stocks from falling further. However, they not only haven't agreed to increase production, but agreed to cut production quotas by 1 million barrels per day beginning on September 1! EIA's forecast of a continued low stock cushion implies we not only

391

Photovoltaic-based Demand Response and Ancillary Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Photovoltaic-based Demand Response and Ancillary Services Photovoltaic-based Demand Response and Ancillary Services Speaker(s): Bill Vogel Date: June 22, 2012 - 1:00pm Location: 90-1099 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: David S. Watson This presentation describes innovations in intelligent micro inverters for use with photovoltaic (PV) systems. The micro-inverters enable remotely adjustable phase angles (+/- up to 45 degrees). The technology includes dynamic impedance matching and ultra-low cost dynamic reactive power management of digital power sources. These attributes can help mitigate grid balancing challenges introduced by most renewable generation resources as we strive to reach aggressive renewable portfolio standards and their associated needs for voltage support and ancillary services. The software-enabled device eliminates several pieces of heavy equipment needed

392

Energy demand and population changes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since World War II, US energy demand has grown more rapidly than population, so that per capita consumption of energy was about 60% higher in 1978 than in 1947. Population growth and the expansion of per capita real incomes have led to a greater use of energy. The aging of the US population is expected to increase per capita energy consumption, despite the increase in the proportion of persons over 65, who consume less energy than employed persons. The sharp decline in the population under 18 has led to an expansion in the relative proportion of population in the prime-labor-force age groups. Employed persons are heavy users of energy. The growth of the work force and GNP is largely attributable to the growing participation of females. Another important consequence of female employment is the growth in ownership of personal automobiles. A third factor pushing up labor-force growth is the steady influx of illegal aliens.

Allen, E.L.; Edmonds, J.A.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

New coal plant technologies will demand more water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Population shifts, growing electricity demand, and greater competition for water resources have heightened interest in the link between energy and water. The US Energy Information Administration projects a 22% increase in US installed generating capacity by 2030. Of the 259 GE of new capacity expected to have come on-line by then, more than 192 GW will be thermoelectric and thus require some water for cooling. Our challenge will become balancing people's needs for power and for water. 1 ref., 7 figs.

Peltier, R.; Shuster, E.; McNemar, A.; Stiegel, G.J.; Murphy, J.

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Regulatory risks paralyzing power industry while demand grows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

2008 will be the year the US generation industry grapples with CO{sub 2} emission. Project developers are suddenly coal-shy, mostly flirting with new nuclear plants waiting impatiently in line for equipment manufacturers to catch up with the demand for wind turbines, and finding gas more attractive again. With no proven greenhouse gas sequestration technology on the horizon, utilities will be playing it safe with energy-efficiency ploys rather than rushing to contract for much-needed new generation.

Maize, K.; Peltier, R.

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology DOE R&D Activities National Hydrogen Storage Compressed/Liquid Hydrogen Tanks Testing and Analysis Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards

396

Electricity demand analysis - unconstrained vs constrained scenarios  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In India, the electricity systems are chronically constrained by shortage of both capital and energy resources. These result in rationing and interruptions of supply with a severely disrupted electricity usage pattern. From this background, we try to analyse the demand patterns with and without resource constraints. Accordingly, it is necessary to model appropriately the dynamic nature of electricity demand, which cannot be captured by methods like annual load duration curves. Therefore, we use the concept - Representative Load Curves (RLCs) - to model the temporal and structural variations in demand. As a case study, the electricity system of the state of Karnataka in India is used. Four years demand data, two unconstrained and two constrained, are used and RLCs are developed using multiple discriminant analysis. It is found that these RLCs adequately model the variations in demand and bring out distinctions between unconstrained and constrained demand patterns. The demand analysis attempted here helped to study the differences in demand patterns with and without constraints, and the success of rationing measures in reducing demand levels as well as greatly disrupting the electricity usage patterns. Multifactor ANOVA analyses are performed to find out the statistical significance of the ability of logically obtained factors in explaining overall variations in demand. The results showed that the factors that are taken into consideration accounted for maximum variations in demand at very high significance levels.

P. Balachandra; V. Chandru; M.H. Bala Subrahmanya

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

IAAP Needs Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NEEDS ASSESSMENT-DECEMBER 2001 NEEDS ASSESSMENT-DECEMBER 2001 Burlington Atomic Energy Commission Plant- Former Worker Program A US DOE funded project conducted by: Dr. Laurence Fuortes, Principal Investigator The University of Iowa College of Public Health Department of Occupational and Environmental Health 5 2940 Steindler Building Iowa City, IA 52242 TEL: 319 335 9819 FAX: 319 335 9200 BACEP-FWP Needs Assessment 1. INTRODUCTION In August of 2000, the University of Iowa College of Public Health initiated a needs assessment study to evaluate whether or not individuals formerly employed by the Department of Energy (DOE) at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant (IAAP) near Burlington, Iowa, would benefit from a Former Worker Medical Surveillance Program. These workers were employed at IAAP in the atomic weapons industry on what was known at the facility as Line 1 or Division B at the

398

Measurement and Verification for Demand Response  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Measurement and Verification for Measurement and Verification for Demand Response Prepared for the National Forum on the National Action Plan on Demand Response: Measurement and Verification Working Group AUTHORS: Miriam L. Goldberg & G. Kennedy Agnew-DNV KEMA Energy and Sustainability National Forum of the National Action Plan on Demand Response Measurement and Verification for Demand Response was developed to fulfill part of the Implementation Proposal for The National Action Plan on Demand Response, a report to Congress jointly issued by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) in June 2011. Part of that implementation proposal called for a "National Forum" on demand response to be conducted by DOE and FERC. Given that demand response has matured, DOE and FERC decided that a "virtual" project

399

Demand Side Management by controlling refrigerators and its effects on consumers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Demand Side Management in power grids has become more and more important in recent years. Continuously growing energy demand both increases the need for distributed generation from renewable energy sources and brings out the topic of Demand Side Management. One of the major application areas of Demand Side Management in smart grids is cooling systems. In this paper, Demand Side Management with control of a refrigerator and its economic effects on consumers are analyzed. With a refrigerator model based on real measurements, several cooling schedules are simulated and annual energy fees for different pricing methods in use in Turkey are calculated and discussed. The results revealed that, 37.9% of refrigerator’s demand in peak period can be shifted to other periods and annual electricity bills for customers can be reduced by 11.4%.

M. Alparslan Zehir; Mustafa Bagriyanik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Chemical Storage-Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storage - Storage - Overview Ali T-Raissi, FSEC Hydrogen Storage Workshop Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois August 14-15, 2002 Hydrogen Fuel - Attributes * H 2 +½ O 2 → H 2 O (1.23 V) * High gravimetric energy density: 27.1 Ah/g, based on LHV of 119.93 kJ/g * 1 wt % = 189.6 Wh/kg (0.7 V; i.e. η FC = 57%) * Li ion cells: 130-150 Wh/kg Chemical Hydrides - Definition * They are considered secondary storage methods in which the storage medium is expended - primary storage methods include reversible systems (e.g. MHs & C-nanostructures), GH 2 & LH 2 storage Chemical Hydrides - Definition (cont.) * The usual chemical hydride system is reaction of a reactant containing H in the "-1" oxidation state (hydride) with a reactant containing H in the "+1" oxidation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Secure Demand Shaping for Smart Grid On constructing probabilistic demand response schemes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Secure Demand Shaping for Smart Grid On constructing probabilistic demand response schemes. Developing novel schemes for demand response in smart electric gird is an increasingly active research area/SCADA for demand response in smart infrastructures face the following dilemma: On one hand, in order to increase

Sastry, S. Shankar

402

US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that energy intensity is not necessarily a good indicator of energy efficiency, whereas by controllingUS Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier Approach Massimo www.cepe.ethz.ch #12;US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier

403

Intelligent demand side energy management system for autonomous polygeneration microgrids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Autonomous polygeneration microgrids is a novel approach in addressing the needs of remote areas. These needs can include power, fuel for transportation in the form of hydrogen, potable water through desalination and space heating and cooling. This approach has been investigated technically and economically and has proved viable. Further research has taken place in the supervisory management of this topology using computational intelligence techniques like fuzzy logic, which has optimized the concept minimizing the sizes of the installed components. The optimal design of the system can meet, though, only the design principles and needs. In reality experience has shown that most autonomous power systems operate out of specifications very shortly after installation or after a couple of years new needs arise and it is not possible economic wise for the people to extend it. In these cases the microgrid would struggle to cover the increased needs and in the end fail, causing blackouts. A solution to this is partial load shedding in an intelligent manner. This paper presents a multi agent system for intelligent demand side management of the polygeneration microgrid topology which also includes grey prediction algorithms for better management. This approach can also be used for designing the optimal polygeneration microgrid for a given amount of an investment. The results show that the proposed intelligent demand side management system can address its design principles successfully and guaranty the most effective operation even in conditions near and over the limits of the design specification of the autonomous polygeneration microgrid.

George Kyriakarakos; Dimitrios D. Piromalis; Anastasios I. Dounis; Konstantinos G. Arvanitis; George Papadakis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Advanced Materials and Devices for Stationary Electrical Energy Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Materials and Devices for Stationary Electrical Energy Materials and Devices for Stationary Electrical Energy Storage Applications Advanced Materials and Devices for Stationary Electrical Energy Storage Applications Reliable access to cost-effective electricity is the backbone of the U.S. economy, and electrical energy storage is an integral element in this system. Without significant investments in stationary electrical energy storage, the current electric grid infrastructure will increasingly struggle to provide reliable, affordable electricity, jeopardizing the transformational changes envisioned for a modernized grid. Investment in energy storage is essential for keeping pace with the increasing demands for electricity arising from continued growth in U.S. productivity, shifts in and continued expansion of national cultural imperatives (e.g., the distributed

405

Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster Session 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster Session 1 (Day 1): ARPA-E Projects Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster Session 1 (Day 1): ARPA-E Projects The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a peer review and update meeting in Washington, DC on Sept. 26 - 28, 2012. The 3-day conference included 9 sessions plus two poster sessions. ARPA-E project presentations from the first poster session on Day 1, chaired by DOE's Mark Johnson, are below. ESS 2012 Peer Review - Dispatchable Wind--Wind Power on Demand - Ian Lawson, General Compression ESS 2012 Peer Review - Novel Regenerative Fuel Cells based on Anion Exchange Membranes - Katherine Ayers, Proton Onsite ESS 2012 Peer Review - Low Cost, High-Energy Density Flywheel Storage Grid

406

The Application of Flywheels in Short-term Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT In many alternative energy systems there is a requirement for energy storage over periods of up to 20 seconds in order to match supply and demand at times when these are changing rapidly and independently. The flywheel forms an ideal basis for such storage because of its relatively high cycle life and potential power and energy density. Wind energy conversion is taken as an example and the requirement for energy storage in WTG systems is assessed. Flywheel energy storage is compared with other forms of storage and is shown to be potentially suitable for this requirement. Power transmission between the flywheel and the WTG grid system requires a variable speed regenerative drive and associated frequency conversion. Such a scheme might permit variable speed WTG operation. A DC link converter is described.

C.M. Jefferson; N. Larsen

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Predictive control and thermal energy storage for optimizing a multi-energy district boiler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and used when demand is high, instead of engaging the gas-fuel oil boiler. Keywords: multi-energy district believe that by 2015 the supply of oil and natural gas will be unable to keep up with demand [1 of La Rochelle (France) adding to the plant a controlled thermal storage tank. This plant supplies

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

408

A Semi-Lagrangian Approach for Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Semi-Lagrangian Approach for Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation Zhuliang Chen such as fuel and electricity, natural gas prices exhibit seasonality dynamics due to fluctuations in demand [28]. As such, natural gas storage facilities are constructed to provide a cushion for such fluctuations

Forsyth, Peter A.

409

Development of a Procedure for the Predictive Control Strategy of a Chilled Water Storage System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-peak months to minimize demand charges. By optimizing the operation of the building air handling units (AHUs), chilled water pumps, chiller plant and the thermal storage system, the storage tank is better charged while chiller run time is reduced. Both on...

Wei, G.; Sakuri, Y.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.; Liu, M.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

NETL: News Release - DOE Estimates Future Freshwater Needs to Meet  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5, 2006 5, 2006 DOE Estimates Future Freshwater Needs to Meet Thermoelectric Power Demand New Analysis Examines Regional Differences in Freshwater Needs, Provides Baseline for Measuring Research Progress WASHINGTON, DC - In support of an emerging energy-water research program, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has updated its groundbreaking 2004 study estimating future freshwater requirements for the U.S. thermoelectric generation sector. Bringing a much-needed regional focus, the new report, Estimating Freshwater Needs to Meet Future Thermoelectric Generation Requirements, identifies a dichotomy between national and local freshwater needs and pinpoints where critical water issues could develop. MORE INFO Read the report

411

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Storage Storage About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Underground Natural Gas Storage Overview | Regional Breakdowns Overview Underground natural gas storage provides pipelines, local distribution companies, producers, and pipeline shippers with an inventory management tool, seasonal supply backup, and access to natural gas needed to avoid imbalances between receipts and deliveries on a pipeline network. There are three principal types of underground storage sites used in the United States today. They are: · depleted natural gas or oil fields (326), · aquifers (43), or · salt caverns (31). In a few cases mine caverns have been used. Most underground storage facilities, 82 percent at the beginning of 2008, were created from reservoirs located in depleted natural gas production fields that were relatively easy to convert to storage service, and that were often close to consumption centers and existing natural gas pipeline systems.

412

Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Systems Workshop Agenda  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tuesday, February 15, 2011 - Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Systems Tuesday, February 15, 2011 - Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Systems Purpose: Identify R&D needs and technical pathways associated with the continued development and validation of cryo-compressed and cryo-sorption hydrogen storage technologies, highlighting those aspects common to both technologies as well as identifying their unique requirements and issues that should be addressed. 8:30 Welcome/Introductions/Workshop objectives/Recap of previous day Ned Stetson, DOE 9:00 OEM Perspective on Cryogenic H 2 Storage (20 min presentation/20 min discussion) Tobias Brunner, BMW 9:40 Performance Comparison and Cost Review (20 min presentation/20 min discussion) Rajesh Ahluwalia, ANL 10:20 Break (10 minutes) 10:30 Expert Panel Discussion (Members will each have 15 minutes for presentations)

413

Solar energy storage and conversion by hydrogen cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... ALL forms of 'current' energy-Sun, winds, waves, tides-are intermittent and variable and their use for large- ... and variable and their use for large-scale and domestic purposes alike demands provision of energy storage. This may well turn out to be more difficult than and just as ...

Robert W. Cahn

1978-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

414

Cool Storage Economic Feasibility Analysis for a Large Industrial Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The analysis of economic feasibility for adding a cool storage facility to shift electric demand to off-peak hours for a large industrial facility is presented. DOE-2 is used to generate the necessary cooling load profiles for the analysis...

Fazzolari, R.; Mascorro, J. A.; Ballard, R. H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry Title Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4849E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Olsen, Daniel, Sasank Goli, David Faulkner, and Aimee T. McKane Date Published 12/2010 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords cement industry, cement sector, demand response, electricity use, energy efficiency, market sectors, mineral manufacturing, technologies Abstract This study examines the characteristics of cement plants and their ability to shed or shift load to participate in demand response (DR). Relevant factors investigated include the various equipment and processes used to make cement, the operational limitations cement plants are subject to, and the quantities and sources of energy used in the cement-making process. Opportunities for energy efficiency improvements are also reviewed. The results suggest that cement plants are good candidates for DR participation. The cement industry consumes over 400 trillion Btu of energy annually in the United States, and consumes over 150 MW of electricity in California alone. The chemical reactions required to make cement occur only in the cement kiln, and intermediate products are routinely stored between processing stages without negative effects. Cement plants also operate continuously for months at a time between shutdowns, allowing flexibility in operational scheduling. In addition, several examples of cement plants altering their electricity consumption based on utility incentives are discussed. Further study is needed to determine the practical potential for automated demand response (Auto-DR) and to investigate the magnitude and shape of achievable sheds and shifts.

416

The Role of Demand Resources In Regional Transmission Expansion Planning and Reliable Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Investigating the role of demand resources in regional transmission planning has provided mixed results. On one hand there are only a few projects where demand response has been used as an explicit alternative to transmission enhancement. On the other hand there is a fair amount of demand response in the form of energy efficiency, peak reduction, emergency load shedding, and (recently) demand providing ancillary services. All of this demand response reduces the need for transmission enhancements. Demand response capability is typically (but not always) factored into transmission planning as a reduction in the load which must be served. In that sense demand response is utilized as an alternative to transmission expansion. Much more demand response is used (involuntarily) as load shedding under extreme conditions to prevent cascading blackouts. The amount of additional transmission and generation that would be required to provide the current level of reliability if load shedding were not available is difficult to imagine and would be impractical to build. In a very real sense demand response solutions are equitably treated in every region - when proposed, demand response projects are evaluated against existing reliability and economic criteria. The regional councils, RTOs, and ISOs identify needs. Others propose transmission, generation, or responsive load based solutions. Few demand response projects get included in transmission enhancement plans because few are proposed. But this is only part of the story. Several factors are responsible for the current very low use of demand response as a transmission enhancement alternative. First, while the generation, transmission, and load business sectors each deal with essentially the same amount of electric power, generation and transmission companies are explicitly in the electric power business but electricity is not the primary business focus of most loads. This changes the institutional focus of each sector. Second, market and reliability rules have, understandably, been written around the capabilities and limitations of generators, the historic reliability resources. Responsive load limitations and capabilities are often not accommodated in markets or reliability criteria. Third, because of the institutional structure, demand response alternatives are treated as temporary solutions that can delay but not replace transmission enhancement. Financing has to be based on a three to five year project life as opposed to the twenty to fifty year life of transmission facilities. More can be done to integrate demand response options into transmission expansion planning. Given the societal benefits it may be appropriate for independent transmission planning organizations to take a more proactive role in drawing demand response alternatives into the resource mix. Existing demand response programs provide a technical basis to build from. Regulatory and market obstacles will have to be overcome if demand response alternatives are to be routinely considered in transmission expansion planning.

Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

National Postirradiation Examination Workshop Needs Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of nuclear fuels and materials requires a clear understanding of irradiation effects on the materials performance. Development of this understanding at present relies on irradiation experiments ranging from tests aimed at targeted phenomenology to integral effects under both prototypic and off-normal conditions. Within the new DOE paradigm of a science-based approach aimed at more fundamental understanding of fuel performance, more specialized experiments and measurements are needed. To support the development of such fuels and materials, especially under a science-based development strategy, the nation needs a consolidated, state-of-the-art, post-irradiation examination (PIE) capability that can reliably extract the needed data from the experimental programs. In some cases, new capabilities beyond the current state-of-the art need to be developed and implemented to perform measurements that were not needed in the more empirically based approaches used in earlier fuel development and qualification programs. A national PIE workshop was held in March 2011 which solicited the PIE needs that are necessary to support both DOE and U.S. goals for nuclear energy. These needs recognize that significant capability already exists that must be maintained, upgraded and continued while bringing online new capabilities that support research on highly irradiated fuels and materials. Further, these needs mostly focus on the reducing the time and length scales in which materials can be examined and coupling these measurements with a robust modeling capability within an infrastructure that can meet the needs of higher demand and a variety of customers. A consolidated capability where a comprehensive set of measurements can be simultaneously performed is essential for efficiently implementing fuel and materials development programs in a cost effective manner. This document captures the national PIE needs necessary to support current and future research, and where possible identifies where those capabilities are allocated.

Not listed

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

BASIC RESEARCH NEEDS IN ENERGY CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Current Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Projects," Lawrenceof Workshop on Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers, LBL-k431,

Hollander, Jack M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

UK CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE, WHERE IS IT ? Stuart Haszeldine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

437 UK CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE, WHERE IS IT ? Stuart Haszeldine Professor of Carbon Capture.haszeldine@ed.ac.uk SUMMARY Carbon capture and storage, to capture CO2 from power plants and big industry, remains much strategy ­ either co-firing with biomass, or direct capture form the air ­ both need to bury CO2. How

Haszeldine, Stuart

420

Pantex Needs Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pantex Needs Assessment Pantex Needs Assessment Phase I Summary and Recommendation Based upon the availability of information to access former workers, and given the knowledge regarding past exposures to hazardous agents, it is recommended that a Phase II examination program be established for former Pantex workers. This will be in keeping with other DOE mandates and programs, and will assist with the current DOE compensation program. I. Introduction and Background The Department of Energy has established a program to meet the medical oversight needs of former workers who worked at a variety of Department of Energy facilities in connection with the nuclear programs of the United States. It has been recognized that these workers might have been exposed to potentially hazardous materials, and that they were deserving of medical

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Efficient Heat Storage Materials: Metallic Composites Phase-Change Materials for High-Temperature Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATS Project: MIT is developing efficient heat storage materials for use in solar and nuclear power plants. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun’s not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. MIT is designing nanostructured heat storage materials that can store a large amount of heat per unit mass and volume. To do this, MIT is using phase change materials, which absorb a large amount of latent heat to melt from solid to liquid. MIT’s heat storage materials are designed to melt at high temperatures and conduct heat well—this makes them efficient at storing and releasing heat and enhances the overall efficiency of the thermal storage and energy-generation process. MIT’s low-cost heat storage materials also have a long life cycle, which further enhances their efficiency.

None

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

422

Identification of Changes Needed in Supermarket Design for Energy Demand Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?not?catering?or?in?store?bakery ? Yet 8Frances?Hill?October?2012 0 2 4 6 8 10 1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 Occupancy 0 2 4 6 8 10 1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 Refrigeration?doors? opening Building?model ? Simple?U?value?box ? Plus?(north)?windows?and?aerogel...

Hill, F.; Edwards, R.; Levermore, G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

OUTDOOR RECREATION DEMAND AND EXPENDITURES: LOWER SNAKE RIVER RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i OUTDOOR RECREATION DEMAND AND EXPENDITURES: LOWER SNAKE RIVER RESERVOIRS John R. Mc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v SECTION ONE - OUTDOOR RECREATION DEMAND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Recreation Demand Methods

O'Laughlin, Jay

424

LEED Demand Response Credit: A Plan for Research towards Implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C. McParland, Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsand Open Automated Demand Response", Grid Interop Forum,Testing of Automated Demand Response for Integration of

Kiliccote, Sila

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Open Automated Demand Response. In Grid Interop Forum.work was sponsored by the Demand Response Research Center (load-management.php. Demand Response Research Center (2009).

Goli, Sasank

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. Barat, D. Watson. Demand Response Spinning ReserveOpen Automated Demand Response Communication Standards:Dynamic Controls for Demand Response in a New Commercial

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reliability signals for demand response GTA HTTPS HVAC IT kWand Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems. ”and Techniques for Demand Response. California Energy

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Techniques for Demand Response. May 2007. LBNL-59975.to facilitate automating  demand response actions at the Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Fully Automated Demand  Response in Large Facilities.  Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.  Open Automated  Demand Response Communication Standards: 

Dudley, June Han

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Scenarios for Consuming Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure.

Koch, Ed

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reliability Corporation. Demand response data task force:Energy. Benefits of demand response in electricity marketsAssessment of demand response & advanced metering, staff

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Direct versus Facility Centric Load Control for Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure.and Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayand Communications for Demand Response and Energy Efficiency

Piette, Mary Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Goodin. 2009. “Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsin Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services. ” InOpen Automated Demand Response Demonstration Project. LBNL-

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

advanced metering and demand response in electricityGoldman, and D. Kathan. “Demand response in U.S. electricity29] DOE. Benefits of demand response in electricity markets

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robinson, Michael, 2008, "Demand Response in Midwest ISOPresentation at MISO Demand Response Working Group Meeting,Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

13 Table 2. Demand Side Management Framework for IndustrialDR Strategies The demand-side management (DSM) frameworkpresented in Table 2. Demand Side Management Framework for

McKane, Aimee T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

description of six energy and demand management concepts.how quickly it can modify energy demand. This is not a newimprovements in both energy efficiency and demand response (

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Institute, “Curbing Global Energy Demand Growth: The Energyup Assessment of Energy Demand in India Transportationa profound effect on energy demand. Policy analysts wishing

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Electricity Demand and Energy Consumption Management System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project describes the electricity demand and energy consumption management system and its application to the Smelter Plant of Southern Peru. It is composted of an hourly demand-forecasting module and of a simulation component for a plant electrical system. The first module was done using dynamic neural networks, with backpropagation training algorithm; it is used to predict the electric power demanded every hour, with an error percentage below of 1%. This information allows management the peak demand before this happen, distributing the raise of electric load to other hours or improving those equipments that increase the demand. The simulation module is based in advanced estimation techniques, such as: parametric estimation, neural network modeling, statistic regression and previously developed models, which simulates the electric behavior of the smelter plant. These modules allow the proper planning because it allows knowing the behavior of the hourly demand and the consumption patterns of the plant, in...

Sarmiento, Juan Ojeda

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Response (DIADR) Building  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Response (DIADR) Building Management System Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Response (DIADR) Building Management System The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting research into distributed intelligent-automated demand response (DIADR) building management systems. Project Description This project aims to develop a DIADR building management system with intelligent optimization and control algorithms for demand management, taking into account a multitude of factors affecting cost including: Comfort Heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) Lighting Other building systems Climate Usage and occupancy patterns. The key challenge is to provide the demand response the ability to address more and more complex building systems that include a variety of loads,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Thermal energy storage technical progress report, April 1992--March 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting development of thermal energy storage (TES) as a means of efficiently coupling energy supplies to variable heating or cooling demands. Uses of TES include electrical demand-side management in buildings and industry, extending the utilization of renewable energy resources such as solar, and recovery of waste heat from periodic industrial processes. Technical progress to develop TES for specific diurnal and industrial applications under the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s TES program from April 1992 to March 1993 is reported and covers research in the areas of low temperature sorption, thermal energy storage water heater, latent heat storage wallboard and latent/sensible heat regenerator technology development.

Olszewski, M.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Southern company energy storage study : a study for the DOE energy storage systems program.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluates the business case for additional bulk electric energy storage in the Southern Company service territory for the year 2020. The model was used to examine how system operations are likely to change as additional storage is added. The storage resources were allowed to provide energy time shift, regulation reserve, and spinning reserve services. Several storage facilities, including pumped hydroelectric systems, flywheels, and bulk-scale batteries, were considered. These scenarios were tested against a range of sensitivities: three different natural gas price assumptions, a 15% decrease in coal-fired generation capacity, and a high renewable penetration (10% of total generation from wind energy). Only in the elevated natural gas price sensitivities did some of the additional bulk-scale storage projects appear justifiable on the basis of projected production cost savings. Enabling existing peak shaving hydroelectric plants to provide regulation and spinning reserve, however, is likely to provide savings that justify the project cost even at anticipated natural gas price levels. Transmission and distribution applications of storage were not examined in this study. Allowing new storage facilities to serve both bulk grid and transmission/distribution-level needs may provide for increased benefit streams, and thus make a stronger business case for additional storage.

Ellison, James; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Black, Clifton [Southern Company Services, Inc., Birmingham, AL; Jenkins, Kip [Southern Company Services, Inc., Birmingham, AL

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Algae Need Their Vitamins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Microbiology August 2006 MINIREVIEW MINIREVIEWS Algae Need Their Vitamins Supplemental material...Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NJ, United Kingdom Algae are simple photosynthetic eukaryotes which-owing...given rise to the three basal groups of algae: the chlorophyta (from which higher plants...

Martin T. Croft; Martin J. Warren; Alison G. Smith

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Review of Self-direct Demand Side Management (DSM) Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Review of Self-direct Demand Side Management (DSM) Programs Review of Self-direct Demand Side Management (DSM) Programs Title Review of Self-direct Demand Side Management (DSM) Programs Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication 2012 Authors Borgeson, Merrian Keywords demand side resources: policy, electricity markets, electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, energy efficiency, self direct programs, technical assistance Full Text LBNL recently provided technical assistance funded by DOE to the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio to inform their decision-making about changes to their existing self-direct program for commercial and industrial customers. Self-direct programs are usually targeted at large industrial customers with specialized needs or strong in-house energy engineering capacity. These programs are found in at least 24 states, and there is significant variety in how these programs are structured - with important implications for the additionality and reliability of the energy savings that result. LBNL reviewed existing programs and compared key elements of self-direct program design. For additional questions about this work, please contact Merrian Borgeson.

445

ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPBOARD POWER SYSTEMS SUPPLYING PULSED POWER LOADS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Energy storage systems will likely be needed for future shipboard power systems that supply loads with high power variability such as pulsed power loads. The… (more)

Duvoor, Prashanth

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia Agency/Company /Organization: Victoria Transport Policy Institute Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: Implementation Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.vtpi.org/tdm/tdm12.htm Cost: Free Language: English References: Victoria Transport Policy Institute[1] "The Online TDM Encyclopedia is the world's most comprehensive information resource concerning innovative transportation management strategies. It describes dozens of Transportation Demand Management (TDM) strategies and contains information on TDM planning, evaluation and implementation. It has thousands of hyperlinks that provide instant access

447

The Retail Planning Problem under Demand Uncertainty.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Rajaram K. , (2000), “Accurate Retail Testing of FashionThe Retail Planning Problem Under Demand Uncertainty GeorgeAbstract We consider the Retail Planning Problem in which

Georgiadis, G.; Rajaram, K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

17 6. Barriers to Retail23 ii Retail Demand Response in SPP List of Figures and6 Table 3. SPP Retail DR Survey

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water heaters with embedded demand responsive controls can be designed to automatically provide day-ahead and real-time response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Distributed Automated Demand Response - Energy Innovation Portal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transmission Find More Like This Return to Search Distributed Automated Demand Response Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Contact LLNL About This Technology...

451

Demand Response (transactional control) - Energy Innovation Portal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transmission Electricity Transmission Find More Like This Return to Search Demand Response (transactional control) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Contact PNNL About...

452

Regulation Services with Demand Response - Energy Innovation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regulation Services with Demand Response Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Contact PNNL About This Technology Using grid frequency information, researchers have created...

453

Topics in Residential Electric Demand Response.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Demand response and dynamic pricing are touted as ways to empower consumers, save consumers money, and capitalize on the “smart grid” and expensive advanced meter… (more)

Horowitz, Shira R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Maximum-Demand Rectangular Location Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oct 1, 2014 ... Demand and service can be defined in the most general sense. ... Industrial and Systems Engineering, Texas A&M University, September 2014.

Manish Bansal

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the presence of renewable resources and on the amount ofprimarily from renewable resources, and to a limited extentintegration of renewable resources and deferrable demand. We

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Basic Theory of Demand-Side Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Demand-Side Management (DSM) is pivotal in Integrated Resource ... to realize sustainable development, and advanced energy management activity. A project can be implemented only...

Zhaoguang Hu; Xinyang Han; Quan Wen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Demand response at the Naval Postgraduate School .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The purpose of this MBA project is to assist the Naval Postgraduate School's Public Works department to assimilate into a Demand Response program that will… (more)

Stouffer, Dean

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Demand response exchange in a deregulated environment .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis presents the development of a new and separate market for trading Demand Response (DR) in a deregulated power system. This market is termed… (more)

Nguyen, DT

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Demand response exchange in a deregulated environment.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis presents the development of a new and separate market for trading Demand Response (DR) in a deregulated power system. This market is termed… (more)

Nguyen, DT

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Rollout...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Rollout Scenario Analysis Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Rollout Scenario Analysis Presentation by Margo Melendez at the 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - International Energy Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

International Energy International Energy Storage Program Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - International Energy Storage Program Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) held an annual peer review on September 27, 2007 in San Francisco, CA. Eighteen presentations were divided into categories; those related to international energy storage programs are below. Other presentation categories were: Economics - Benefit Studies and Environment Benefit Studies Utility & Commercial Applications of Advanced Energy Storage Systems Power Electronics Innovations in Energy Storage Systems ESS 2007 Peer Review - DOE-CEC Energy Storage Program FY07 Projects - Daniel Borneo, SNL.pdf ESS 2007 Peer Review - Joint NYSERDA-DOE Energy Storage Initiative Projects

462

Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

required by MRTU AS and energy markets. Both California ISOopening electricity markets to energy storage competition.energy, improvement of grid infrastructure, and market

Joseph, Eto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

NETL: Carbon Storage - Infrastructure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Infrastructure Carbon Storage Infrastructure The Infrastructure Element of DOE's Carbon Storage Program is focused on research and development (R&D) initiatives to advance geologic CO2 storage toward commercialization. DOE determined early in the program's development that addressing CO2 mitigation on a regional level is the most effective way to address differences in geology, climate, population density, infrastructure, and socioeconomic development. This element includes the following efforts designed to support the development of regional infrastructure for carbon capture and storage (CCS). Click on Image to Navigate Infrastructure Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) - This

464

Sorption Storage Technology Summary  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presented at the R&D Strategies for Compressed, Cryo-Compressed and Cryo-Sorbent Hydrogen Storage Technologies Workshops on February 14 and 15, 2011.

465

Storage of solar energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A framework is presented for identifying appropriate systems for storage of electrical, mechanical, chemical, and thermal energy in solar energy supply systems. Classification categories include the nature ... su...

Theodore B. Taylor

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Carbon Capture and Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is the long-term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. This includes a range of approaches including soil carbon sequestration (e.g., through no-till farming), terrestrial biomass sequestration (e.g., through planting forests), direct ocean injection of CO{sub 2} either onto the deep seafloor or into the intermediate depths, injection into deep geological formations, or even direct conversion of CO{sub 2} to carbonate minerals. Some of these approaches are considered geoengineering (see the appropriate chapter herein). All are considered in the 2005 special report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 2005). Of the range of options available, geological carbon sequestration (GCS) appears to be the most actionable and economic option for major greenhouse gas reduction in the next 10-30 years. The basis for this interest includes several factors: (1) The potential capacities are large based on initial estimates. Formal estimates for global storage potential vary substantially, but are likely to be between 800 and 3300 Gt of C (3000 and 10,000 Gt of CO{sub 2}), with significant capacity located reasonably near large point sources of the CO{sub 2}. (2) GCS can begin operations with demonstrated technology. Carbon dioxide has been separated from large point sources for nearly 100 years, and has been injected underground for over 30 years (below). (3) Testing of GCS at intermediate scale is feasible. In the US, Canada, and many industrial countries, large CO{sub 2} sources like power plants and refineries lie near prospective storage sites. These plants could be retrofit today and injection begun (while bearing in mind scientific uncertainties and unknowns). Indeed, some have, and three projects described here provide a great deal of information on the operational needs and field implementation of CCS. Part of this interest comes from several key documents written in the last three years that provide information on the status, economics, technology, and impact of CCS. These are cited throughout this text and identified as key references at the end of this manuscript. When coupled with improvements in energy efficiency, renewable energy supplies, and nuclear power, CCS help dramatically reduce current and future emissions (US CCTP 2005, MIT 2007). If CCS is not available as a carbon management option, it will be much more difficult and much more expensive to stabilize atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions. Recent estimates put the cost of carbon abatement without CCS to be 30-80% higher that if CCS were to be available (Edmonds et al. 2004).

Friedmann, S

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

467

Control Strategies for Electric Vehicle (EV) Charging Using Renewables and Local Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increase of electric vehicle (EV) and plug-in hybrid-electric vehicle (PHEV) adoption creates a need for more EV supply equipment (EVSE) infrastructure (i.e., EV chargers). The impact of EVSE installations could be significant due to limitations in the electric grid and potential demand charges for residential and commercial customers. The use of renewables (e.g., solar) and local storage (e.g., battery bank) can mitigate loads caused by EVSE on the electric grid. This would eliminate costly upgrades needed by utilities and decrease demand charges for consumers. This paper aims to explore control systems that mitigate the impact of EVSE on the electric grid using solar energy and battery banks. Three control systems are investigated and compared in this study. The first control system discharges the battery bank at a constant rate during specific times of the day based on historical data. The second discharges the battery bank based on the number of EVs charging (linear) and the amount of solar energy being generated. The third discharges the battery bank based on a sigmoid function (non-linear) in response to the number of EVs charging, and also takes into consideration the amount of renewables being generated. The first and second control systems recharge the battery bank at night when demand charges are lowest. The third recharges the battery bank at night and during times of the day when there is an excess of solar. Experiments are conducted using data from a private site that has 25 solar-assisted charging stations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, TN and 4 at a public site in Nashville, TN. Results indicate the third control system having better performance, negating up to 71% of EVSE load, compared with the second control system (up to 61%) and the first control system (up to 58%).

Castello, Charles C [ORNL; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL; Maxey, L Curt [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

needs_assessment.html  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Education Office Needs Assessment Workshop Education Office Needs Assessment Workshop On October 2, 40 educators from 15 school districts met at Fermilab to discuss the status of science education in the context of state and national frameworks. Districts were selected at random from DuPage and Kane counties, and superintendents selected a team to represent the district at the workshop. The group provided input to the Education Office regarding future program direction. Over the next few months the Education Office will be reviewing program offerings in light of the issues raised below. In the meantime, we invite you to visit the Teacher Resource Center which serves as our clearinghouse or call Susan Dahl at 630-840-3094 for assistance. If you would like a scientist to visit your classroom, participate in a career fair or serve as

469

LANL Needs Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Medical Screening Program for Medical Screening Program for Former Los Alamos National Laboratory Workers United States Department of Energy Office of Occupational Medicine and Medical Surveillance Final Phase I Needs Assessment Report submitted by Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health Laborers' Health & Safety Fund of North America Los Alamos National Laboratory's Environment, Safety and Health Division National Jewish Medical and Research Center February 1999 Department of Environmental Health Sciences 615 North Wolfe Street Baltimore, Maryland 21205 Development of a Medical Screening Program for Former.Los Alamos National Laboratory Workers Phase I Needs Assessment Submitted by Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health Laborers' Health & Safety Fund of North America

470

LANL Needs Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Medical Screening Program for Medical Screening Program for Former Los Alamos National Laboratory Workers United States Department of Energy Office of Occupational Medicine and Medical Surveillance Final Phase I Needs Assessment Report submitted by Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health Laborers' Health & Safety Fund of North America Los Alamos National Laboratory's Environment, Safety and Health Division National Jewish Medical and Research Center February 1999 Department of Environmental Health Sciences 615 North Wolfe Street Baltimore, Maryland 21205 Development of a Medical Screening Program for Former.Los Alamos National Laboratory Workers Phase I Needs Assessment Submitted by Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health Laborers' Health & Safety Fund of North America

471

1 BASEMENT STORAGE 3 MICROSCOPE LAB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MECHANICAL ROOM 13 SHOWER ROOMSAIR COMPRESSOR 14 NITROGEN STORAGE 15 DIESEL FUEL STORAGE 16 ACID NEUT. TANK 17a ACID STORAGE 17b INERT GAS STORAGE 17c BASE STORAGE 17d SHELVES STORAGE * KNOCK-OUT PANEL

Boonstra, Rudy

472

A fast chiller power demand response control strategy for buildings connected to smart grid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract With the increasing integration of renewable energies into electrical grids, power imbalance has become one of the most critical issues in grid operations. The end-users at power demand side can actually make use of their demand reduction potentials to contribute to the grid power balance. Conventional demand responses of end-users can provide considerable power demand reductions, but the demand responses are usually subject to significant delay and cannot fulfill the needs of grid real time operation. In this paper, a fast chiller power demand response control strategy for commercial buildings is therefore proposed which facilitates buildings to act as grid “operating reserves” by providing rapid demand responses to grid request within minutes. However, simply shutting down some essential operating chillers would result in disordered chilled water flow distribution and uneven indoor thermal comfort degradation. This strategy has therefore taken essential measures to solve such problems effectively. Simulation case studies are conducted to investigate the operation dynamics and energy performance of HVAC systems in the demand response events controlled by the strategy. Results show that fast and significant power demand reductions can be achieved without sacrificing the thermal comfort too much.

Xue Xue; Shengwei Wang; Chengchu Yan; Borui Cui

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

NETL: Carbon Storage - Reference Shelf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf Carbon Storage Reference Shelf Below are links to Carbon Storage Program documents and reference materials. Each of the 10 categories has a variety of documents posted for easy access to current information - just click on the category link to view all related materials. RSS Icon Subscribe to the Carbon Storage RSS Feed. Carbon Storage Collage 2012 Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas IV Carbon Sequestration Project Portfolio DOE/NETL Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage RD&D Roadmap Public Outreach and Education for Carbon Storage Projects Carbon Storage Technology Program Plan Carbon Storage Newsletter Archive Impact of the Marcellus Shale Gas Play on Current and Future CCS Activities Site Screening, Selection, and Initial Characterization for Storage of CO2 in Deep Geologic Formations Carbon Storage Systems and Well Management Activities Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting of CO2 Stored in Deep Geologic Formations

474

FINAL DEMAND FORECAST FORMS AND INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

......................................................................... 11 3. Demand Side Management (DSM) Program Impacts................................... 13 4. Demand Sylvia Bender Manager DEMAND ANALYSIS OFFICE Scott W. Matthews Chief Deputy Director B.B. Blevins Forecast Methods and Models ....................................................... 14 5. Demand-Side

475

Estimating electricity storage power rating and discharge duration for utility transmission and distribution deferral :a study for the DOE energy storage program.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a methodology for estimating the power and energy capacities for electricity energy storage systems that can be used to defer costly upgrades to fully overloaded, or nearly overloaded, transmission and distribution (T&D) nodes. This ''sizing'' methodology may be used to estimate the amount of storage needed so that T&D upgrades may be deferred for one year. The same methodology can also be used to estimate the characteristics of storage needed for subsequent years of deferral.

Eyer, James M. (Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA); Butler, Paul Charles; Iannucci, Joseph J., Jr. (,.Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Supply/Demand Forecasts Begin to Show Stock Rebuilding  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: During 1999, we saw stock draws during the summer months, when we normally see stock builds, and very large stock draws during the winter of 1999/2000. Normally, crude oil production exceeds product demand in the spring and summer, and stocks build. These stocks are subsequently drawn down during the fourth and first quarters (dark blue areas). When the market is in balance, the stock builds equal the draws. During 2000, stocks have gradually built, but following the large stock draws of 1999, inventories needed to have been built more to get back to normal levels. As we look ahead using EIA's base case assumptions for OPEC production, non-OPEC production, and demand, we expect a more seasonal pattern for the next 3 quarters. But since we are beginning the year with

477

Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Storage Materials Database Demonstration Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration Presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Hydrogen Storage...

478

Modeling the Benefits of Storage Technologies to Wind Power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rapid expansion of wind power in the electricity sector is raising questions about how wind resource variability might affect the capacity value of wind farms at high levels of penetration. Electricity storage, with the capability to shift wind energy from periods of low demand to peak times and to smooth fluctuations in output, may have a role in bolstering the value of wind power at levels of penetration envisioned by a new Department of Energy report ('20% Wind by 2030, Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply'). This paper quantifies the value storage can add to wind. The analysis was done employing the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, formerly known as the Wind Deployment System (WinDS) model. ReEDS was used to estimate the cost and development path associated with 20% penetration of wind in the report. ReEDS differs from the WinDS model primarily in that the model has been modified to include the capability to build and use three storage technologies: pumped-hydroelectric storage (PHS), compressed-air energy storage (CAES), and batteries. To assess the value of these storage technologies, two pairs of scenarios were run: business-as-usual, with and without storage; 20% wind energy by 2030, with and without storage. This paper presents the results from those model runs.

Sullivan, P.; Short, W.; Blair, N.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Demand Response and Electric Grid Reliability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response and Electric Grid Reliability Paul Wattles Senior Analyst, Market Design & Development, ERCOT CATEE Conference, Galveston October 10, 2012 2 North American Bulk Power Grids CATEE Conference October 10, 2012 ? The ERCOT... adequacy ? ?Achieving more DR participation would . . . displace some generation investments, but would achieve the same level of reliability... ? ?Achieving this ideal requires widespread demand response and market structures that enable loads...

Wattles, P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

DEMAND SIMULATION FOR DYNAMIC TRAFFIC ASSIGNMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the response of travelers to real-time pre- trip information. The demand simulator is an extension of dynamicDEMAND SIMULATION FOR DYNAMIC TRAFFIC ASSIGNMENT Constantinos Antoniou, Moshe Ben-Akiva, Michel Bierlaire, and Rabi Mishalani Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 Abstract

Bierlaire, Michel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "needed demand storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

A Vision of Demand Response - 2016  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Envision a journey about 10 years into a future where demand response is actually integrated into the policies, standards, and operating practices of electric utilities. Here's a bottom-up view of how demand response actually works, as seen through the eyes of typical customers, system operators, utilities, and regulators. (author)

Levy, Roger

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

482

SUMMER 2007 ELECTRICITY SUPPLY AND DEMAND OUTLOOK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION SUMMER 2007 ELECTRICITY SUPPLY AND DEMAND OUTLOOK DRAFTSTAFFREPORT May ELECTRICITY ANALYSIS OFFICE Sylvia Bender Acting Deputy Director ELECTRICITY SUPPLY ANALYSIS DIVISION B. B assessment of the capability of the physical electricity system to provide power to meet electricity demand

483

Solid-state hydrogen storage: Storage capacity, thermodynamics, and kinetics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solid-state reversible hydrogen storage systems hold great promise for onboard applications. ... key criteria for a successful solid-state reversible storage material are high storage capacity, suitable thermodyn...

William Osborn; Tippawan Markmaitree; Leon L. Shaw; Ruiming Ren; Jianzhi Hu…

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Incorporating Demand Response into Western Interconnection Transmission Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

response DSM – Demand Side Management EE – energy efficiencywith the development of demand-side management (DSM)-related

Satchwell, Andrew

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Large Scale Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work is mainly an experimental investigation on the storage of solar energy and/or the waste heat of a ... lake or a ground cavity. A model storage unit of (1×2×0.75)m3 size was designed and constructed. The...

F. Çömez; R. Oskay; A. ?. Üçer

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Uranium 2009 resources, production and demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With several countries currently building nuclear power plants and planning the construction of more to meet long-term increases in electricity demand, uranium resources, production and demand remain topics of notable interest. In response to the projected growth in demand for uranium and declining inventories, the uranium industry – the first critical link in the fuel supply chain for nuclear reactors – is boosting production and developing plans for further increases in the near future. Strong market conditions will, however, be necessary to trigger the investments required to meet projected demand. The "Red Book", jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is a recognised world reference on uranium. It is based on information compiled in 40 countries, including those that are major producers and consumers of uranium. This 23rd edition provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1 January 2009, as well as data on global ur...

Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Power-Saving Approaches and Tradeoffs for Storage Systems BEN BUZBEE, Florida State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the legacy storage stack, exploring tradeoffs made by a representative set of energy-efficient storage to a fixed power infrastructure, limited battery density, etc.), has created a need for more energy-efficientPower-Saving Approaches and Tradeoffs for Storage Systems BEN BUZBEE, Florida State University

Wang, Andy

488

Theoretical Limits of Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks: Opportunities and Trade-Offs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technologies has highlighted the need for high- density energy storage.1 In the case of fuel cell vehicles (FCVTheoretical Limits of Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks: Opportunities and Trade predict the hydrogen storage properties of these compounds. Approximately 20 000 candidate compounds were

Cafarella, Michael J.

489

Integrated Ice Storage/Sprinkler HVAC System Sharply Cuts Energy Costs and Air-Distribution First Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated ice thermal storage/sprinkler HVAC systems developed and applied by the author in several commercial applications shift a major portion of electric utility demand to cheaper off-peak hours, while also reducing significantly the first cost...

Meckler, G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Warehouse and Storage Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Warehouse and Storage Warehouse and Storage Characteristics by Activity... Warehouse and Storage Warehouse and storage buildings are those used to store goods, manufactured products, merchandise, raw materials, or personal belongings. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Warehouse and Storage Buildings... While the idea of a warehouse may bring to mind a large building, in reality most warehouses were relatively small. Forty-four percent were between 1,001 and 5,000 square feet, and seventy percent were less than 10,000 square feet. Many warehouses were newer buildings. Twenty-five percent were built in the 1990s and almost fifty percent were constructed since 1980. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

491

Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a lower heat transfer rate in the internal heat exchanger than was designed. It is believed that the fins on the heat-exchanger tubes did not make proper contact with the tubes transporting the chilled glycol, and pairs of fins were too close for interior areas of fins to serve as hydrate collection sites. A correction of the fabrication fault in the heat exchanger fin attachments could be easily made to provide faster formation rates. The storage success with the POC process provides valuable information for making the process an economically viable process for safe, aboveground natural-gas storage.

Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

492

Sandia National Laboratories: evaluate energy storage opportunity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

energy storage opportunity 2013 Electricity Storage Handbook Published On July 31, 2013, in Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety, Grid...

493

Sandia National Laboratories: implement energy storage projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

implement energy storage projects 2013 Electricity Storage Handbook Published On July 31, 2013, in Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety,...

494

Hydrogen Storage Fact Sheet | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Storage Fact Sheet Hydrogen Storage Fact Sheet Fact sheet produced by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office describing hydrogen storage. Hydrogen Storage More Documents & Publications...

495

Compressed Air Storage Strategies | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Storage Strategies Compressed Air Storage Strategies This tip sheet briefly discusses compressed air storage strategies. COMPRESSED AIR TIP SHEET 9 Compressed Air Storage...

496

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025. Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries - which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity - is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that 'the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW' by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

Goldman, Charles; Reid, Michael; Levy, Roger; Silverstein, Alison

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

497

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes strategies that can be used in commercial buildings to temporarily reduce electric load in response to electric grid emergencies in which supplies are limited or in response to high prices that would be incurred if these strategies were not employed. The demand response strategies discussed herein are based on the results of three years of automated demand response field tests in which 28 commercial facilities with an occupied area totaling over 11 million ft{sup 2} were tested. Although the demand response events in the field tests were initiated remotely and performed automatically, the strategies used could also be initiated by on-site building operators and performed manually, if desired. While energy efficiency measures can be used during normal building operations, demand response measures are transient; they are employed to produce a temporary reduction in demand. Demand response strategies achieve reductions in electric demand by temporarily reducing the level of service in facilities. Heating ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) and lighting are the systems most commonly adjusted for demand response in commercial buildings. The goal of demand response strategies is to meet the electric shed savings targets while minimizing any negative impacts on the occupants of the buildings or the processes that they perform. Occupant complaints were minimal in the field tests. In some cases, ''reductions'' in service level actually improved occupant comfort or productivity. In other cases, permanent improvements in efficiency were discovered through the planning and implementation of ''temporary'' demand response strategies. The DR strategies that are available to a given facility are based on factors such as the type of HVAC, lighting and energy management and control systems (EMCS) installed at the site.

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

498

,"Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sourcekey","N5030US2","N5010US2","N5020US2","N5070US2","N5050US2","N5060US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)","U.S. Total Natural Gas in Underground...

499

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Residential Demand Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" by appliance (or UEC-in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new

500

Underground Storage Technology Consortium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

U U U N N D D E E R R G G R R O O U U N N D D G G A A S S S S T T O O R R A A G G E E T T E E C C H H N N O O L L O O G G Y Y C C O O N N S S O O R R T T I I U U M M R R & & D D P P R R I I O O R R I I T T Y Y R R E E S S E E A A R R C C H H N N E E E E D D S S WORKSHOP PROCEEDINGS February 3, 2004 Atlanta, Georgia U U n n d d e e r r g g r r o o u u n n d d G G a a s s S S t t o o r r a a g g e e T T e e c c h h n n o o l l o o g g y y C C o o n n s s o o r r t t i i u u m m R R & & D D P P r r i i o o r r i i t t y y R R e e s s e e a a r r c c h h N N e e e e d d s s OVERVIEW As a follow up to the development of the new U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored Underground Gas Storage Technology Consortium through Penn State University (PSU), DOE's National Energy Technology Center (NETL) and PSU held a workshop on February 3, 2004 in Atlanta, GA to identify priority research needs to assist the consortium in developing Requests for Proposal (RFPs). Thirty-seven