Sample records for nearby offline features

  1. Online Effects of Offline Ads Diane Lambert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomkins, Andrew

    a methodology for assessing how ad campaigns in offline media such as print, audio and TV affect online in-in-difference estimation, Lift, Causal Modeling, Bootstrapping 1. INTRODUCTION Loosely speaking, an ad is effective was conducted in an offline medium such as print, radio or TV. That is, one measure of offline ad effectiveness

  2. Edition web offline -Jacquelin Charbonnel Journes Mathrice, Orlans, octobre 2012 Edition web offline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menichi, Luc

    Edition web offline - Jacquelin Charbonnel Journées Mathrice, Orléans, octobre 2012 Edition web offline Jacquelin Charbonnel Journées Mathrice Orléans, 9-11 octobre 2012 #12;Edition web offline - Jacquelin Charbonnel Journées Mathrice, Orléans, octobre 2012 Publier sur le web 1995 1995 $ vi myhomepage

  3. An Offline Foundation for Online Accountable Pseudonyms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Bryan

    An Offline Foundation for Online Accountable Pseudonyms Bryan Ford Jacob Strauss Massachusetts or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice and the full citation

  4. Offline solid phase microextraction sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harvey, Chris A. (French Camp, CA)

    2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An offline solid phase microextraction (SPME) sampling apparatus for enabling SPME samples to be taken a number of times from a previously collected fluid sample (e.g. sample atmosphere) stored in a fused silica lined bottle which keeps volatile organics in the fluid sample stable for weeks at a time. The offline SPME sampling apparatus has a hollow body surrounding a sampling chamber, with multiple ports through which a portion of a previously collected fluid sample may be (a) released into the sampling chamber, (b) SPME sampled to collect analytes for subsequent GC analysis, and (c) flushed/purged using a fluidically connected vacuum source and purging fluid source to prepare the sampling chamber for additional SPME samplings of the same original fluid sample, such as may have been collected in situ from a headspace.

  5. Human group formation in online guilds and offline gangs driven by common team dynamic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Neil F; Zhao, Zhenyuan; Ducheneaut, Nicolas; Yee, Nicholas; Tita, George; Hui, Pak Ming

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantifying human group dynamics represents a unique challenge. Unlike animals and other biological systems, humans form groups in both real (offline) and virtual (online) spaces -- from potentially dangerous street gangs populated mostly by disaffected male youths, through to the massive global guilds in online role-playing games for which membership currently exceeds tens of millions of people from all possible backgrounds, age-groups and genders. We have compiled and analyzed data for these two seemingly unrelated offline and online human activities, and have uncovered an unexpected quantitative link between them. Although their overall dynamics differ visibly, we find that a common team-based model can accurately reproduce the quantitative features of each simply by adjusting the average tolerance level and attribute range for each population. By contrast, we find no evidence to support a homophilic version of the model, nor does conventional time-aggregated network analysis help unravel the dynamics.

  6. Off-line Identification of Concurrent Discrete Event Systems Exhibiting Cyclic Behaviour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Off-line Identification of Concurrent Discrete Event Systems Exhibiting Cyclic Behaviour Ana P) from input-output sequences representing the observed behavior. The proposed off-line technique yields. The algorithms operate off-line efficiently. The off-line techniques based on integer linear programming (ILP

  7. Nuclear Activity in Nearby Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaisa Storchi-Bergmann

    1999-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss some recent observational results in the research of nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN). These results cover three main topics: (i) evidences for the current paradigm for AGN's, which include a nuclear supermassive blackhole (SMBH) fed via an accretion disk; (ii) evidence that this paradigm may also apply to LINER's, the lowest luminous AGN's and to normal galaxies; (iii) evidences of how the fueling of the SMBH occurs and its relation to recent and intermediate age (10^6 to 10^8 yrs old) episodes of star formation.

  8. Offline Social Networks: stepping away from the Internet (Position paper)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Offline Social Networks: stepping away from the Internet (Position paper) Anne-Marie Kermarrec@no-log.org Abstract Online social networks have been revolutionary in the way people interact over the Internet today. Typically in online social networks the information is ephemeral while the relationships between users

  9. Offline Dictionary Attack on Password Authentication Schemes using Smart Cards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    decades of intensive research in the security community, and the current crux lies in how to achieve truly scenario and gives rise to the strongest adversary model so far (Note that Wang's PSCAV scheme is secure poorly-chosen passwords from the notorious offline dictionary attacks and thus confirms the feasibility

  10. Enabling Offline Access to Facebook Streams on Mobile Dept. of Information and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkatasubramanian, Nalini

    Enabling Offline Access to Facebook Streams on Mobile Devices Ye Zhao Dept. of Information [Information Systems Applications]: Miscellaneous Keywords Offline, Prefetching, Rich Content, Facebook 1 such as Facebook, Twit- ter, LinkedIn, Google+, and Instagram ­ indeed, many peo- ple rely on these social networks

  11. An off-line multiprocessor real-time scheduling algorithm to reduce static energy consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    An off-line multiprocessor real-time scheduling algorithm to reduce static energy consumption, France laurent.pautet@telecom-paristech.fr Abstract--Energy consumption of highly reliable real dynamic energy consumption. This paper aims to propose a new off-line schedul- ing algorithm to put

  12. Imaging planets around nearby white dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Burleigh; F. J. Clarke; S. T. Hodgkin

    2002-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest that Jovian planets will survive the late stages of stellar evolution, and that white dwarfs will retain planetary systems in wide orbits (>5AU). Utilising evolutionary models for Jovian planets, we show that infra-red imaging with 8m class telescopes of suitable nearby white dwarfs should allow us to resolve and detect companions >3Mjup. Detection of massive planetary companions to nearby white dwarfs would prove that such objects can survive the final stages of stellar evolution, place constraints on the frequency of main sequence stars with planetary systems dynamically similar to our own and allow direct spectroscopic investigation of their composition and structure.

  13. Off-line compatible electronic cash method and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kravitz, D.W.; Gemmell, P.S.; Brickell, E.F.

    1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An off-line electronic cash system having an electronic coin, a bank B, a payee S, and a user U with an account at the bank B as well as a user password z{sub u,i}, has a method for performing an electronic cash transfer. An electronic coin is withdrawn from the bank B by the user U and an electronic record of the electronic coin is stored by the bank B. The coin is paid to the payee S by the user U. The payee S deposits the coin with the bank B. A determination is made that the coin is spent and the record of the coin is deleted by the bank B. A further deposit of the same coin after the record is deleted is determined. Additionally, a determination is made which user U originally withdrew the coin after deleting the record. To perform these operations a key pair is generated by the user, including public and secret signature keys. The public signature key along with a user password z{sub u,i} and a withdrawal amount are sent to the bank B by the user U. In response, the bank B sends a coin to the user U signed by the secret key of the bank indicating the value of the coin and the public key of the user U. The payee S transmits a challenge counter to the user U prior to receiving the coin. 16 figs.

  14. Off-line compatible electronic cash method and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kravitz, David W. (Albuquerque, NM); Gemmell, Peter S. (Albuquerque, NM); Brickell, Ernest F. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An off-line electronic cash system having an electronic coin, a bank B, a payee S, and a user U with an account at the bank B as well as a user password z.sub.u,i, has a method for performing an electronic cash transfer. An electronic coin is withdrawn from the bank B by the user U and an electronic record of the electronic coin is stored by the bank B. The coin is paid to the payee S by the user U. The payee S deposits the coin with the bank B. A determination is made that the coin is spent and the record of the coin is deleted by the bank B. A further deposit of the same coin after the record is deleted is determined. Additionally, a determination is made which user U originally withdrew the coin after deleting the record. To perform these operations a key pair is generated by the user, including public and secret signature keys. The public signature key along with a user password z.sub.u,i and a withdrawal amount are sent to the bank B by the user U. In response, the bank B sends a coin to the user U signed by the secret key of the bankindicating the value of the coin and the public key of the user U. The payee S transmits a challenge counter to the user U prior to receiving the coin.

  15. Spatially Similar Practice Immediately Following Motor Sequence Learning Eliminates Offline Gains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handa, Atul

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    after initial practice has been revealed to eliminate offline improvement. The present experiment assessed the relative impact of experiencing supplemental practice of a spatially or a motorically-similar procedural task immediately following practice...

  16. Feature Level Clustering of Large Biometric Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehrotra, Hunny; Radhika, V Bhawani; Majhi, Banshidhar; Gupta, Phalguni

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes an efficient technique for partitioning large biometric database during identification. In this technique feature vector which comprises of global and local descriptors extracted from offline signature are used by fuzzy clustering technique to partition the database. As biometric features posses no natural order of sorting, thus it is difficult to index them alphabetically or numerically. Hence, some supervised criteria is required to partition the search space. At the time of identification the fuzziness criterion is introduced to find the nearest clusters for declaring the identity of query sample. The system is tested using bin-miss rate and performs better in comparison to traditional k-means approach.

  17. The Nuclear Near-Infrared Spectral Properties of Nearby Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, R E; Martins, L; Riffel, R; Martin, O Gonzalez; Almeida, C Ramos; Dutra, D Ruschel; Ho, L C; Thanjavur, K; Flohic, H; Alonso-Herrero, A; Lira, P; McDermid, R; Riffel, R A; Schiavon, R P; Winge, C; Hoenig, M D; Perlman, E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present spectra of the nuclear regions of 50 nearby (D = 1 - 92 Mpc, median = 20 Mpc) galaxies of morphological types E to Sm. The spectra, obtained with the Gemini Near-IR Spectrograph on the Gemini North telescope, cover a wavelength range of approximately 0.85-2.5 microns at R~1300--1800. There is evidence that most of the galaxies host an active galactic nucleus (AGN), but the range of AGN luminosities (log (L2-10 keV [erg/s]) = 37.0-43.2) in the sample means that the spectra display a wide variety of features. Some nuclei, especially the Seyferts, exhibit a rich emission-line spectrum. Other objects, in particular the type 2 Low Ionisation Nuclear Emission Region galaxies, show just a few, weak emission lines, allowing a detailed view of the underlying stellar population. These spectra display numerous absorption features sensitive to the stellar initial mass function, as well as molecular bands arising in cool stars, and many other atomic absorption lines. We compare the spectra of subsets of galaxie...

  18. MID-INFRARED IRS SPECTROSCOPY OF NGC 7331: A FIRST LOOK AT THE SPITZER INFRARED NEARBY GALAXIES SURVEY (SINGS) LEGACY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draine, Bruce T.

    MID-INFRARED IRS SPECTROSCOPY OF NGC 7331: A FIRST LOOK AT THE SPITZER INFRARED NEARBY GALAXIES to 38 m using all modules of Spitzer's Infrared Spectrograph (IRS). A strong new dust emission feature with standard photodissociation region (PDR) models. Either additional PDR heating or shocks are required

  19. THE ACS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Rosema, Keith; Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Christensen, Charlotte; Gilbert, Karoline; Hodge, Paul [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Seth, Anil C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew [Raytheon, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Holtzman, Jon [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001, 1320 Frenger St., Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Skillman, Evan D.; Weisz, Daniel [Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Cole, Andrew [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania (Australia); Girardi, Leo [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova - INAF, Vicolo dell'Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Karachentsev, Igor D. [Special Astrophysical Observatory, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhnji Arkhyz, Karachai-Circessia Republic 369167 (Russian Federation); Olsen, Knut [NOAO, National Optical Astronomy Observatory 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Freeman, Ken [Mount Stromlo Observatory, Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National Univ., ACT 0200 (Australia); Gallart, Carme [Inst. de AstrofIsica de Canarias, VIa Lactea, s/n, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Harris, Jason [Steward Observatory, Univ. of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); De Jong, Roelof S. [Space Telescope Science Inst., 3700 San Martin Dr., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)], E-mail: jd@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: ben@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: krosema@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: stephanie@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: christensen@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: fabio@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: trq@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: aseth@cfa.harvard.edu (and others)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST) is a systematic survey to establish a legacy of uniform multi-color photometry of resolved stars for a volume-limited sample of nearby galaxies (D < 4 Mpc). The survey volume encompasses 69 galaxies in diverse environments, including close pairs, small and large groups, filaments, and truly isolated regions. The galaxies include a nearly complete range of morphological types spanning a factor of {approx}10{sup 4} in luminosity and star formation rate. The survey data consist of images taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), supplemented with archival data and new Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) imaging taken after the failure of ACS. Survey images include wide field tilings covering the full radial extent of each galaxy, and single deep pointings in uncrowded regions of the most massive galaxies in the volume. The new wide field imaging in ANGST reaches median 50% completenesses of m {sub F475W} = 28.0 mag, m {sub F606W} = 27.3 mag, and m {sub F814W} = 27.3 mag, several magnitudes below the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB). The deep fields reach magnitudes sufficient to fully resolve the structure in the red clump. The resulting photometric catalogs are publicly accessible and contain over 34 million photometric measurements of >14 million stars. In this paper we present the details of the sample selection, imaging, data reduction, and the resulting photometric catalogs, along with an analysis of the photometric uncertainties (systematic and random), for both ACS and WFPC2 imaging. We also present uniformly derived relative distances measured from the apparent magnitude of the TRGB.

  20. Constraints on decaying dark matter from Fermi observations of nearby galaxies and clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dugger, Leanna; Profumo, Stefano [Department of Astronomy and Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA (United States); Jeltema, Tesla E., E-mail: greentee01@gmail.com, E-mail: tesla@ucolick.org, E-mail: profumo@scipp.ucsc.edu [UCO/Lick Observatories, 1156 High St., Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the impact of Fermi gamma-ray observations (primarily non-detections) of selected nearby galaxies, including dwarf spheroidals, and of clusters of galaxies on decaying dark matter models. We show that the fact that galaxy clusters do not shine in gamma rays puts the most stringent limits available to-date on the lifetime of dark matter particles for a wide range of particle masses and decay final states. In particular, our results put strong constraints on the possibility of ascribing to decaying dark matter both the increasing positron fraction reported by PAMELA and the high-energy feature in the electron-positron spectrum measured by Fermi. Observations of nearby dwarf galaxies and of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) do not provide as strong limits as those from galaxy clusters, while still improving on previous constraints in some cases.

  1. Inclusion of a Drag Approach in the Town Energy Balance (TEB) Scheme: Offline 1D Evaluation in a Street Canyon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    Inclusion of a Drag Approach in the Town Energy Balance (TEB) Scheme: Offline 1D Evaluation 2008) ABSTRACT The Town Energy Balance module bridges the micro- and mesoscale and simulates local-scale urban surface energy balance for use in mesoscale meteorological models. Previous offline evaluations

  2. An off-line interface for HPLC and orthogonal MALDI TOF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ens, Werner

    -Hz nitrogen laser (Laser Science) with 300 µJ energy per pulse, or a high repetition-rate (up to 1 k An off-line approach to coupling HPLC with mass spectrometry has several advantages in principle over on;3 Experimental - mass spectrometry Manitoba MALDI QqTOF spectrometer Mass spectrometry was performed

  3. Secure Communication and Authentication Against Off-line Dictionary Attacks in Smart Grid Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yongge

    Secure Communication and Authentication Against Off-line Dictionary Attacks in Smart Grid Systems This paper studies the security requirements for remote authentication and communication in smart grid to smart grid systems. For example, in order to unlock the credentials stored in tamper

  4. Improving the Accuracy of Industrial Robots by offline Compensation of Joints Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Improving the Accuracy of Industrial Robots by offline Compensation of Joints Errors Adel Olabi.damak@geomnia.eu Abstract--The use of industrial robots in many fields of industry like prototyping, pre-machining and end errors. Identification methods are presented with experimental validation on a 6 axes industrial robot

  5. Off-line Karma: A Decentralized Currency for Static Peer-to-peer and Grid Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoepman, Jaap-Henk

    Off-line Karma: A Decentralized Currency for Static Peer-to-peer and Grid Networks Flavio D. Garcia Peer-to-peer (P2P) and grid systems allow their users to exchange information and share resources the decentralised and non-hierarchical nature of P2P and grid systems into account. We present a completely

  6. Exporting the Grade Center (Working Offline) Page 1 Exporting the Grade Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Shouhuai

    the data has been saved to a file. Click Download . 4. Click Save As. 5. Select a location to save the file. You may change the file name. Click Save. #12;Exporting the Grade Center (Working Offline) Page 2 to the location where you saved your file, select your file and click Import. 4. The Text Import Wizard Appears

  7. Offline Preemptive Scheduling of Jobs in Smart Anshu Ranjan, Pramod Khargonekar, Sartaj Sahni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahni, Sartaj K.

    Offline Preemptive Scheduling of Jobs in Smart Grids* Anshu Ranjan, Pramod Khargonekar, Sartaj--We consider the scheduling of flexible electric loads in a smart grid so as to minimize peak power demand and maximize the use existing electricity grid infrastructure assets, there has been a siginificant interest

  8. The Photometric Properties of Nearby Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganeshalingam, Mohan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rise-Time Distribution of Nearby Type Ia Supernovae 3.1Highlight: The Physics of Supernovae, ed. W. Hillebrandt &1.1 Supernovae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.1

  9. A Comparison of the Use of Bony Anatomy and Internal Markers for Offline Verification and an Evaluation of the Potential Benefit of Online and Offline Verification Protocols for Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNair, Helen A. [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden NHS Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Helen.McNair@rmh.nhs.uk; Hansen, Vibeke N. [Joint Department of Physics and Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden NHS Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Parker, Christopher [Academic Unit of Urology, Royal Marsden NHS Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Evans, Phil M. [Joint Department of Physics and Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden NHS Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Norman, Andrew [Department of Computing, Royal Marsden NHS Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Miles, Elizabeth [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden NHS Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Harris, Emma J. [Joint Department of Physics and Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden NHS Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Del-Acroix, Louise; Smith, Elizabeth; Keane, Richard [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden NHS Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Khoo, Vincent S.; Thompson, Alan C.; Dearnaley, David P. [Academic Unit of Urology, Royal Marsden NHS Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of intraprostatic markers in the treatment verification of prostate cancer radiotherapy. Specific aims were: to compare the effectiveness of offline correction protocols, either using gold markers or bony anatomy; to estimate the potential benefit of online correction protocol's using gold markers; to determine the presence and effect of intrafraction motion. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with three gold markers inserted had pretreatment and posttreatment images acquired and were treated using an offline correction protocol and gold markers. Retrospectively, an offline protocol was applied using bony anatomy and an online protocol using gold markers. Results: The systematic errors were reduced from 1.3, 1.9, and 2.5 mm to 1.1, 1.1, and 1.5 mm in the right-left (RL), superoinferior (SI), and anteroposterior (AP) directions, respectively, using the offline correction protocol and gold markers instead of bony anatomy. The subsequent decrease in margins was 1.7, 3.3, and 4 mm in the RL, SI, and AP directions, respectively. An offline correction protocol combined with an online correction protocol in the first four fractions reduced random errors further to 0.9, 1.1, and 1.0 mm in the RL, SI, and AP directions, respectively. A daily online protocol reduced all errors to <1 mm. Intrafraction motion had greater impact on the effectiveness of the online protocol than the offline protocols. Conclusions: An offline protocol using gold markers is effective in reducing the systematic error. The value of online protocols is reduced by intrafraction motion.

  10. Kinematic segregation of nearby disk stars from the Hipparcos database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. E. de Souza; R. Teixeira

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    To better understand our Galaxy, we investigate the pertinency of describing the sys tem of nearby disk stars in terms of a two-components Schwarzschild velocity distributio n.Using the proper motion and parallax information of Hipparcos database, we determine t he parameters characterizing the local stellar velocity field of a sample of 22000 disk stars. The sample we use is essentially the same as the one described by the criteria ad opted to study the LSR and the stream motion of the nearby stellar population

  11. Simulation and off-line programming at Sandia`s Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xavier, P.G.; Fahrenholtz, J.C.; McDonald, M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center] [and others

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One role of the Intelligent Robotics and System Center (ISRC) at Sandia National Laboratories is to address certain aspects of Sandia`s mission to design, manufacture, maintain, and dismantle nuclear weapon components. Hazardous materials, devices, and environments are often involved. Because of shrinking resources, these tasks must be accomplished with a minimum of prototyping, while maintaining high reliability. In this paper, the authors describe simulation, off-line programming/planning, and related tools which are in use, under development, and being researched to solve these problems at the ISRC.

  12. Comprehensive off-line, two-dimensional liquid chromotography. Application to the separation of peptide digest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchetti, Nicola [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Guiochon, Georges A [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The separation of the peptide digests of myoglobin and bovine serum albumin was performed with an off-line combination of two commercial, conventional HPLC columns. The first column was packed with a strong ion exchanger and eluted with a KCl gradient. The second column was packed with particles of C{sub 18}-bonded silica and eluted with an acetonitrile gradient. The conditional peak capacities of the 2D separations achieved exceed 7000 under the experimental conditions investigated. This performance is achieved at the cost of an analysis time of the order of 28 hours. Possible improvements to the separation method described here are discussed.

  13. Motions of galaxies in the nearby universe with 2MASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crook, Aidan Christopher

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I present the first model of a flow-field in the nearby Universe (cz < 12, 000 km s-') constructed from groups of galaxies identified in an all-sky flux-limited survey. The Two Micron All-Sky Redshift Survey (2MRS), upon ...

  14. Lyapunov indices with two nearby trajectories in a curved spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin Wu; Tian-Yi Huang; Hong Zhang

    2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare three methods for computing invariant Lyapunov exponents (LEs) in general relativity. They involve the geodesic deviation vector technique (M1), the two-nearby-orbits method with projection operations and with coordinate time as an independent variable (M2), and the two-nearby-orbits method without projection operations and with proper time as an independent variable (M3). An analysis indicates that M1 and M3 do not need any projection operation. In general, the values of LEs from the three methods are almost the same. As an advantage, M3 is simpler to use than M2. In addition, we propose to construct the invariant fast Lyapunov indictor (FLI) with two-nearby-trajectories and give its algorithm in order to quickly distinguish chaos from order. Taking a static axisymmetric spacetime as a physical model, we apply the invariant FLIs to explore the global dynamics of phase space of the system where regions of chaos and order are clearlyidentified.

  15. Lyapunov indices with two nearby trajectories in a curved spacetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, X. [Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China); Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Huang, T.-Y.; Zhang, H. [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare three methods for computing invariant Lyapunov exponents (LEs) in general relativity. These methods involve the geodesic deviation vector technique (M1), the two-nearby-orbits method with projection operations and with coordinate time as the independant variable (M2), and the two-nearby-orbits method without projection operations and with proper time as the independent variable (M3). An analysis indicates that M1 and M3 do not need any projection operation. In general, the values of LEs from the three methods are almost the same. However, M2 fails for some specific cases. As a result, M3 is the most preferable to calculate LEs in most cases. In addition, we propose to construct the invariant fast Lyapunov indictor (FLI) with two-nearby-trajectories and give its algorithm in order to quickly distinguish chaos from order. Taking a static axisymmetric spacetime as a physical model, we apply different algorithms of the FLI to explore the global dynamics of phase space of the system where regions of chaos and order are clearly identified.

  16. Damage to nearby divertor components of ITER-like devices during giant ELMs and disruptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Damage to nearby divertor components of ITER-like devices during giant ELMs and disruptions. Fusion 50 (2010) 115004 (7pp) doi:10.1088/0029-5515/50/11/115004 Damage to nearby divertor components. The simulation results of the integrated modelling indicate a significant potential damage of the divertor nearby

  17. Performance analysis of an off-line BMI for the control of a robotic digit Ouanezar S., (1,2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    have so far been applied to robot artifacts. Many studies on the cortical activity of the motor cortex an experimental site (robotic digit) and implemented a kinematic control of its movement (i.e. positional controlPerformance analysis of an off-line BMI for the control of a robotic digit (1,3) Ouanezar S., (1

  18. Infrared colour properties of nearby radio-luminous galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Xiao-hong; Huang, Yan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By combining the data of the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), the Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and the Akari satellite, we study the infrared colour properties of a sample of 2712 nearby radio-luminous galaxies (RLGs). These RLGs are divided into radio-loud (RL) active galactic nuclei (AGNs), mainly occurring at redshifts of $0.05$ 3.0. We also analyse the MIR colours of RL AGNs divided into low- and high-excitation radio galaxies (LERGs and HERGs, respectively). The ([3.4]-[4.6])$-$([4.6]-[12]) diagram clearly shows separate distributions of LERGs and HERGs and a region of overlap, which suggests that LERGs and HERGs have different MIR properties. LERGs are responsible for the double-core distribution of RL AGNs on the ([3.4]-[4.6])$-$([4.6]-[12]) diagram. In addition, we also suggest 90$-$140$\\mu$m band spectral index $\\alpha(90,140)<-1.4$ as a criterion of selecting nearby active galaxies with non-thermal emissions at FIR wavelengths.

  19. HI emission and absorption in nearby, gas-rich galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeves, S N; Allison, J R; Koribalski, B S; Curran, S J; Pracy, M B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a targeted search for intervening HI absorption in six nearby, gas-rich galaxies using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). The sightlines searched have impact parameters of 10-20 kpc. By targeting nearby galaxies we are also able to map their HI emission, allowing us to directly relate the absorption-line detection rate to the extended HI distribution. The continuum sightlines intersect the HI disk in four of the six galaxies, but no intervening absorption was detected. Of these four galaxies, we find that three of the non-detections are the result of the background source being too faint. In the fourth case we find that the ratio of the spin temperature to the covering factor ($T_{\\mathrm{S}}/f$) must be much higher than expected ($\\gtrsim$5700 K) in order to explain the non-detection. We discuss how the structure of the background continuum sources may have affected the detection rate of HI absorption in our sample, and the possible implications for future surveys. Future...

  20. Catalog of Nearby Galaxies and the Local Cosmic Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor D. Karachentsev; Valentina E. Karachentseva; Walter K. Huchtmeier; Dmitry I. Makarov

    2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We compiled an all-sky catalog of 451 nearby galaxies, each having an individual distance estimate $D \\la 10$ Mpc or the radial velocity $V_{LG} -17.0$, which contribute about 4% to the local luminosity density, and $\\sim(10-16)$% to the local HI mass density. We found that the mean local barion density $\\Omega_b(<8$ Mpc) = 2.3% consists of only a half of the global barion density, $\\Omega_b=(4.7\\pm0.6)$% (Spergel et al. 2003). The mean-square pairwise difference of radial velocities is about 100 km s$^{-1}$ for spatial separations within 1 Mpc, increasing to $\\sim 300$ km s$^{-1}$ on a scale of $\\sim 3$ Mpc.

  1. An offline unstructured biogeochemical model (UBM) for complex estuarine and coastal environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Tae Yun; Khangaonkar, Tarang

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to increased pollutant loads and water use from coastal development and population growth, occurrences of low-dissolved oxygen and "hypoxic zones" have increased. Reports of fish kills and water quality impairment are also becoming more frequent in many coastal waters. Water quality managers and regulatory agencies rely on numerical modeling tools to quantify the relative contributions of anthropogenic and "natural" pollutant loads (nutrients and biochemical oxygen demand) on dissolved oxygen levels and use the results for remedial activities and source control. The ability to conduct seasonlong simulations with sufficient nearshore resolution is therefore a key requirement. Mesh flexibility and the ability to increase site specific resolution without disturbing the larger domain setup and calibration are critical. The objective of this effort was to develop a robust biogeochemical model suitable for simulation of water quality dynamics including dissolved oxygen in complex coastal environments with multiple tidal channels, tidal flats, and density-driven circulation using unstructured-grid formulation. This paper presents an offline unstructured biogeochemical model that uses the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) discretization of the study domain and the corresponding hydrodynamic solution to drive biogeochemical kinetics based on a water quality model CE-QUAL-ICM. In this paper, the linkage between selected hydrodynamic and water quality models is subjected to several scalar transport and biogeochemical module tests (plume transport and dilution, BOD/DO sag, and phytoplankton/nutrients reaction), and results are compared to their analytical solutions as part of model validation. A preliminary application of the biogeochemical model with a year-long simulation of Hood Canal basin in Puget Sound, USA, is presented as an example and a test of the tool in a real estuary setting. The model reproduced the dynamics and seasonal variations in the biogeochemical state variables and was used to test short-term wind-driven dynamics that could influence dissolved oxygen concentrations in Hood Canal.

  2. INFRARED SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF NEARBY GALAXIES D. A. Dale,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Robert D.

    INFRARED SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF NEARBY GALAXIES D. A. Dale,1 G. J. Bendo,2 C. W ABSTRACT The Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) is carrying out a comprehensive) are presented using broad- band imaging data from Spitzer, 2MASS, ISO, IRAS, and SCUBA. The infrared colors

  3. MID-INFRARED SPECTRAL DIAGNOSTICS OF NUCLEAR AND EXTRANUCLEAR REGIONS IN NEARBY GALAXIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draine, Bruce T.

    MID-INFRARED SPECTRAL DIAGNOSTICS OF NUCLEAR AND EXTRANUCLEAR REGIONS IN NEARBY GALAXIES D. A. Dale,13 and F. Walter5 Received 2006 February 24; accepted 2006 March 31 ABSTRACT Mid-infrared diagnostics are presented for a large portion of the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) sample plus archival

  4. Erosion Damage of Nearby Plasma-Facing Components during a Disruption on the Divertor Plate*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Erosion Damage of Nearby Plasma-Facing Components during a Disruption on the Divertor Plate* A those of the United States Governmentor any agency thereof. #12;Erosion Damage of Nearby Plasma radiation emitted by heating of the vapor cloud. This radiation energy can cause serious erosion damage

  5. Kuiper belt structure around nearby super-Earth host stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Grant M; Marmier, Maxime; Greaves, Jane S; Wyatt, Mark C; Bryden, Geoffrey; Holland, Wayne; Lovis, Christophe; Matthews, Brenda C; Pepe, Francesco; Sibthorpe, Bruce; Udry, Stéphane

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new observations of the Kuiper belt analogues around HD 38858 and HD 20794, hosts of super-Earth mass planets within 1 au. As two of the four nearby G-type stars (with HD 69830 and 61 Vir) that form the basis of a possible correlation between low-mass planets and debris disc brightness, these systems are of particular interest. The disc around HD 38858 is well resolved with Herschel and we constrain the disc geometry and radial structure. We also present a probable JCMT sub-mm continuum detection of the disc and a CO J=2-1 upper limit. The disc around HD 20794 is much fainter and appears marginally resolved with Herschel, and is constrained to be less extended than the discs around 61 Vir and HD 38858. We also set limits on the radial location of hot dust recently detected around HD 20794 with near-IR interferometry. We present HARPS upper limits on unseen planets in these four systems, ruling out additional super-Earths within a few au, and Saturn-mass planets within 10 au. We consider the disc st...

  6. SU-E-J-245: Is Off-Line Adaptive Radiotherapy Sufficient for Head and Neck Cancer with IGRT?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z [the 6th People's Hospital of Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, Shanghai (China); Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Shang, Q; Liu, H; Greskovich, J; Koyfman, S; Xia, P [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Radiation doses delivered to patients with head and neck cancer (HN) may deviate from the planned doses because of variations in patient setup and anatomy. This study was to evaluate whether off-line Adaptive Radiotherapy (ART) is sufficient. Methods: Ten HN patients, who received IMRT under daily imaging guidance using CT-on-rail/KV-CBCT, were randomly selected for this study. For each patient, the daily treatment setup was corrected with translational only directions. Sixty weekly verification CTs were retrospectively analyzed. On these weekly verification CTs, the tumor volumes and OAR contours were manually delineated by a physician. With the treatment iso-center placed on the verification CTs, according to the recorded clinical shifts, the treatment beams from the original IMRT plans were then applied to these CTs to calculate the delivered doses. The electron density of the planning CTs and weekly CTs were overridden to 1 g/cm3. Results: Among 60 fractions, D99 of the CTVs in 4 fractions decreased more than 5% of the planned doses. The maximum dose of the spinal cord exceeded 10% of the planned values in 2 fractions. A close examination indicated that the dose discrepancy in these 6 fractions was due to patient rotations, especially shoulder rotations. After registering these 6 CTs with the planning CT allowing six degree of freedoms, the maximum rotations around 3 axes were > 1.5° for these fractions. With rotation setup errors removed, 4 out of 10 patients still required off-line ART to accommodate anatomical changes. Conclusion: A significant shoulder rotations were observed in 10% fractions, requiring patient re-setup. Off-line ART alone is not sufficient to correct for random variations of patient position, although ART is effective to adapt to patients' gradual anatomic changes. Re-setup or on-line ART may be considered for patients with large deviations detected early by daily IGRT images. The study is supported in part by Siemens Medical Solutions.

  7. Offline trapping of $^{221}$Fr in a magneto-optical trap from implantation of an $^{225}$Ac ion beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tandecki; J. Zhang; S. Aubin; J. A. Behr; R. Collister; E. Gomez; G. Gwinner; H. Heggen; J. Lassen; L. A. Orozco; M. R. Pearson; S. Raeder; A. Teigelhöfer

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a new technique to prepare an offline source of francium for trapping in a magneto-optical trap. Implanting a radioactive beam of $^{225}$Ac, $t_{1/2} = 9.920(3)$ days, in a foil, allows use of the decay products, i.e.$^{221}$Fr, $t_{1/2} = 288.0(4)$ s. $^{221}$Fr is ejected from the foil by the $\\alpha$ decay of $^{225}$Ac. This technique is compatible with the online accumulation of a laser-cooled atomic francium sample for a series of planned parity non-conservation measurements at TRIUMF. We obtain a 34% release efficiency for $^{221}$Fr from the recoil source based on particle detector measurements. We find that laser cooling operation with the source is $8^{+10}_{-5}$ times less efficient than from a mass-separated ion beam of $^{221}$Fr in the current geometry. While the flux of this source is two to three orders of magnitude lower than typical francium beams from ISOL facilities, the source provides a longer-term supply of francium for offline studies.

  8. Black holes at the centers of nearby dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, Edward C.; Shahinyan, Karlen; Sugarman, Hannah R.; Vélez, Darik O. [Astronomy Department, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT 06459 (United States); Eracleous, Michael [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, and Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a distance-limited portion of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7, we have identified 28 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in nearby (d?80 Mpc) low-mass, low-luminosity dwarf galaxies. The accreting objects at the galaxy centers are expected to be intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) with M{sub BH}?10{sup 6} M{sub ?}. The AGNs were selected using several optical emission-line diagnostics after careful modeling of the continuum present in the spectra. We have limited our survey to objects with spectral characteristics similar to those of Seyfert nuclei, excluding emission-line galaxies with ambiguous spectra that could be powered by stellar processes. Thus, as a set, the host galaxies in our sample are the least massive objects in the very local universe certain to contain central black holes. Our sample is dominated by narrow-line (type 2) AGNs, and it appears to have a much lower fraction of broad-line objects than that observed for luminous, optically selected Seyfert galaxies. Given our focus on the nearest objects included in the SDSS, our survey is more sensitive to low-luminosity emission than previous optical searches for AGNs in low-mass galaxies. The [O iii] ?5007 luminosities of the Seyfert nuclei in our sample have a median value of L{sub 5007}=2×10{sup 5} L{sub ?} and extend down to ?10{sup 4} L{sub ?}. Using published data for broad-line IMBH candidates, we have derived an [O iii] bolometric correction of log(L{sub bol}/L{sub 5007})=3.0±0.3, which is significantly lower than values obtained for high-luminosity AGNs. Applying this correction to our sample, we obtain minimum black hole mass estimates that fall mainly in the 10{sup 3} M{sub ?}–10{sup 4} M{sub ?} range, which is roughly where the predicted mass functions for different black hole seed formation scenarios overlap the most. In the stellar mass range that includes the bulk of the AGN host galaxies in our sample, we derive a lower limit on the AGN fraction of a few percent, indicating that active nuclei in dwarf galaxies are not as rare as previously thought.

  9. The Masses of Nearby Dwarfs can be Determined with Gravitational Microlensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Paczynski

    1995-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Microlensing of distant stars in the Milky Way by the nearby high proper motion stars offers a direct way to precisely measure the masses of single lower main sequence stars and brown dwarfs.

  10. DVU Featured Training & Events ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Featured Training & Events Form Please complete this form in its entirety and email to AskTheDvu@hq.doe.gov 1. Course Title: 2. Course StartEnd Date: 3. StartEnd Time (Time zone...

  11. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    We are pleased to announce a new feature on Hopper, Cray Cluster Compatibility Mode (CCM) which allows applications that previously could only run on Carver to run on Hopper....

  12. Keep Your Friends Close and Your Facebook Friends Closer: A Multiplex Network Approach to the Analysis of Offline and Online Social Ties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hristova, Desislava; Mascolo, Cecilia

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Social media allow for an unprecedented amount of interaction between people online. A fundamental aspect of human social behavior, however, is the tendency of people to associate themselves with like-minded individuals, forming homogeneous social circles both online and offline. In this work, we apply a new model that allows us to distinguish between social ties of varying strength, and to observe evidence of homophily with regards to politics, music, health, residential sector & year in college, within the online and offline social network of 74 college students. We present a multiplex network approach to social tie strength, here applied to mobile communication data - calls, text messages, and co-location, allowing us to dimensionally identify relationships by considering the number of communication channels utilized between students. We find that strong social ties are characterized by maximal use of communication channels, while weak ties by minimal use. We are able to identify 75% of close friendshi...

  13. HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS IN THE NEARBY SPIRAL GALAXY M 83

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Eric D.

    We present deep H I 21 cm and optical observations of the face-on spiral galaxy M 83 obtained as part of a project to search for high-velocity clouds (HVCs) in nearby galaxies. Anomalous-velocity neutral gas is detected ...

  14. UCAC4 nearby star survey: A search for our stellar neighbors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finch, Charlie T.; Zacharias, Norbert [U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington, DC 20392–5420 (United States); Subasavage, John P. [U.S. Naval Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ 86005–8521 (United States); Henry, Todd J. [RECONS Institute, Chambersburg, PA 17201 (United States); Riedel, Adric R., E-mail: finch@usno.navy.mil [Hunter College, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use data from the U.S. Naval Observatory fourth CCD Astrograph Catalog (UCAC4) in combination with photometry from the AAVSO Photometric All-Sky Survey and Two Micron All-Sky Survey to identify stars within 25 pc of the Sun. A sample of nearby stars with accurate trigonometric parallaxes from the Research Consortium On Nearby Stars is used to generate a set of 16 new photometric color–M{sub K{sub s}} relations that provide distance estimates with uncertainties of 15%. This work expands the available suites of well-calibrated photometric distance relations that can be used to identify nearby stellar systems. The distance relations are used with quality cuts to extract an initial sample of stars from the UCAC4 estimated to be within 25 pc. Color, proper motion, and existing literature sources are then used to obtain a clean sample of red dwarfs, while limiting the amount of contamination from background giants, resulting in a sample of 1761 candidate nearby stars within 25 pc. Of these, 339 are new discoveries with no previously known published parallax or distance estimate, primarily with proper motions less than 0.2 arcsec yr{sup ?1}. Five stars are estimated to be within 10 pc, with the nearest, TYC 3980 1081 1, with V=10.50 estimated to be at 5.9 pc. That several hundred new stars have been revealed so close to the Sun illustrates once again that there is considerable work yet to be done to map the solar neighborhood and that additional nearby stars are likely still to be discovered.

  15. CAIRNS: The Cluster And Infall Region Nearby Survey II. Environmental Dependence of Infrared Mass-to-Light Ratios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Rines; M. J. Geller; A. Diaferio; M. J. Kurtz; T. H. Jarrett

    2004-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    CAIRNS (Cluster And Infall Region Nearby Survey) is a spectroscopic survey of the infall regions surrounding nine nearby rich clusters of galaxies. In Paper I, we used redshifts within $\\sim 10\\Mpc$ of the centers of the clusters to determine the mass profiles of the clusters based on the phase space distribution of the galaxies. Here, we use 2MASS photometry and an additional \

  16. Visual Navigation Visual Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hong

    : § translation § rotation § scale, and § illumination 6 #12;2 Many detectors and descriptors § Detectors § Harris directions. § Such points can be detected by examining the structure tensor (2x2 matrix of local intensity: Scale-Invariant Feature Transform § SIFT Keypoints ­ local intensity extrema (minima or maxima) in both

  17. FEATURE ARTICLE Pipeline Corrosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botte, Gerardine G.

    F FEATURE ARTICLE Pipeline Corrosion Issues Related to Carbon Capture, Transportation, and Storage Capture, Transportation, and Storage--Aspects of Corrosion and Materials. "Until these new technologies are developed and applied, corrosion engineers are focusing on how to best design pipelines for CO2 transport

  18. Radio emission of nearby clusters of galaxies at 102. 5 MHz

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gubanov, A.G.; Dagkesamanskii, R.D.; Rudenko, V.A.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of 24 nearby Abell galaxy clusters with the Lebedev aperture-synthesis antenna array at 102.5 MHz indicate that the radio luminosity of a cluster increases with its richness class R. For clusters with R> or =1 the luminosity function conforms to a power law with exponent -0.85 in the range 3 x 10/sup 24/< or =L< or =3 x 10/sup 26/ W/Hz.

  19. Identification of four RXTE Slew Survey sources with nearby luminous active galactic nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Revnivtsev; S. Sazonov; E. Churazov; S. Trudolyubov

    2005-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on RXTE scans and observations with the SWIFT/XRT telescope and INTEGRAL observatory, we report the identification of four X-ray sources discovered during the RXTE Slew Survey of the |b|>10deg sky with nearby (z ~ 0.017-0.098) luminous (log L_2-10keV ~ 42.7-44 erg/s) active galactic nuclei. Two of the objects exhibit heavily intrinsically absorbed X-ray spectra (NHL~10^23 cm^-2).

  20. Oxygen Abundances in Nearby Stars. Clues to the formation and evolution of the Galactic disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Ramirez; C. Allende Prieto; D. L. Lambert

    2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The abundances of iron and oxygen are homogeneously determined in a sample of 523 nearby (d-0.3, we find no obvious indication of a sudden decrease (i.e., a 'knee') in the [O/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] pattern of thick-disk stars that would connect the thick and thin disk trends at a high metallicity. We conclude that Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) did not contribute significantly to the chemical enrichment of the thick disk. [Abridged

  1. NEARBY PLANETARY SYSTEMS AS LENSES DURING PREDICTED CLOSE PASSAGES TO BACKGROUND STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Stefano, Rosanne; Matthews, James [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Lepine, Sebastien [Department of Astrophysics, Division of Physical Sciences, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States)

    2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Einstein rings and proper motions of nearby stars tend to be large. Thus, every year some foreground stars within a few hundred parsecs of Earth induce gravitational lensing events in background stars. In some of these cases, the events may exhibit evidence of planets orbiting the nearby star. In fact, planets can even be discovered during relatively distant passages. Here, we study the lensing signatures associated with planets orbiting nearby high-proper-motion stars. We find the following. (1) Wide-orbit planets can be detected for all distances of closest approach between the foreground and background stars, potentially producing independent events long before and/or after the closest approach. (2) Close-orbit planets can be detected for intermediate distances of closest approach, producing quasiperiodic signatures that may occur days or weeks before and after the stellar-lens event. (3) Planets in the so-called zone for resonant lensing can significantly increase the magnification when the distance of closest approach is small, making the stellar-lens event easier to detect, while simultaneously providing evidence for planets. Because approaches close enough to allow planets to be detected can be predicted, we can plan observing strategies to take advantage of the theoretical framework built in this paper, which describes the sequence of expected effects in terms of a sequence of detection regimes.

  2. The Influence of Galactic Outflows on the Formation of Nearby Dwarf Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evan Scannapieco; Andrea Ferrara; Tom Broadhurst

    2000-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the gas in growing density perturbations is vulnerable to the influence of winds outflowing from nearby collapsed galaxies that have already formed stars. This suggests that the formation of nearby galaxies with masses less than 10^9 solar masses is likely to be suppressed, irrespective of the details of galaxy formation. An impinging wind may shock heat the gas of a nearby perturbation to above the virial temperature, thereby mechanically evaporating the gas, or the baryons may be stripped from the perturbation entirely if they are accelerated to above the escape velocity. We show that baryonic stripping is the most effective of these two processes, because shock-heated clouds that are too large to be stripped are able to radiatively cool within a sound-crossing time, limiting evaporation. The intergalactic medium temperatures and star-formation rates required for outflows to have a significant influence on the formation of low-mass galaxies are consistent with current observations, but may soon be examined directly via associated distortions in the cosmic microwave background, and with near-infrared observations from the Next Generation Space Telescope, which may detect the supernovae from early-forming stars.

  3. The Oxygen Abundance of Nearby Galaxies from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Pilyugin; T. X. Thuan

    2007-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We have derived the oxygen abundance for a sample of nearby galaxies in the Data Release 5 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) which possess at least two independent spectra of one or several HII regions with a detected [OIII]4363 auroral line. Since, for nearby galaxies, the [OII]3727 nebular line is out of the observed wavelength range, we propose a method to derive (O/H)_ff abundances using the classic Te method coupled with the ff relation. (O/H)_7325 abundances have also been determined, based on the [OII]7320,7330 line intensities, and using a small modification of the standard Te method. The (O/H)_ff and (O/H)_7325 abundances have been derived with both the one- and two-dimensional t_2 - t_3 relations. It was found that the (O/H)_ff abundances derived with the parametric two-dimensional t_2 - t_3 relation are most reliable. Oxygen abundances have been determined in 29 nearby galaxies, based on 84 individual abundance determinations in HII regions. Because of our selection methods, the metallicity of our galaxies lies in the narrow range 8.2 oxygen abundances in the disk of the spiral galaxy NGC 4490 is determined for the first time.

  4. Environment Feature Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeeches EnergyActive for Life"Environment Feature

  5. The Sandia Hand Features

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's LowerFacilityTheSandia Hand Features ï‚·

  6. Feature Stories | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget » FY 2014FacilitiesSheet2 C STECFasterFeature

  7. Feature Stories | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget » FY 2014FacilitiesSheet2 C STECFasterFeature

  8. FED reactor engineering features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sager, P.H.; Brown, T.G.; Fuller, G.M.; Smith, G.E.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fusion Engineering Device (FED) Baseline design incorporates a number of features which were selected to enhance its maintainability, as well as limit cost and achieve reliable operation. An installation of ten TF coils and ten torus sectors was selected on the basis of plasma chamber segmentation studies and TF coil cost tradeoff studies, permitting removal of a torus sector with a single radial motion. The design also features a shield sector support spool which provides a plasma chamber vacuum boundary and access to the shield sectors. The vacuum seals are made at the outboard face of the torus so that they can be readily cut and rewelded. A pumped limiter provides plasma edge definition and impurity control. Ten individual blades are inserted through the shield sector in an arrangement that permits replacement without sector removal. ICRH is used for plasma bulk heating. Two EF coils, which are located inside the TF coil bore, are segmented so that they can be removed if necessary. The removal of the superconducting lower outboard EF coil, which is trapped under the TF coil assembly, presents a problem; consideration is being given to increasing its diameter and relocating it so that it can be lifted up around the TF coils.

  9. Chapter 19. Offline Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory - Experiment 821

    SPARC DECstations and VAX/VMS. Furthermore, CERN software packages exist for nearly all our major. For example: 1 Code should be written Fortran 77 (with the usual VaX extensions) or C. 2 IMPLICIT NONE

  10. Nearby Outdoor Environmental Support of Older Adults' Yard Activities, Neighborhood Walking and Independent Living in the Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhe

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    to remain healthy and gives them the ability to access daily-life services, and thus extend their independent years at home. Nearby outdoor environments on residential sites and in the neighborhoods may influence older adults' independent living through...

  11. Feature Stories | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feature Stories Topic - Any - General Argonne Information -Awards -Honors Energy -Energy efficiency --Vehicles ---Alternative fuels ---Automotive engineering ---Biofuels ---Diesel...

  12. Hubble Residuals of Nearby SN Ia Are Correlated with Host Galaxy Masses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Patrick L.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Hicken, Malcolm; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Burke, David L.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Mandel, Kaisey S.; Kirshner, Robert P.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    From Sloan Digital Sky Survey u{prime} g{prime} r{prime} i{prime} z{prime} imaging, we estimate the stellar masses of the host galaxies of 70 low redshift SN Ia (0.015 < z < 0.08) from the hosts absolute luminosities and mass-to-light ratios. These nearby SN were discovered largely by searches targeting luminous galaxies, and we find that their host galaxies are substantially more massive than the hosts of SN discovered by the flux-limited Supernova Legacy Survey. Testing four separate light curve fitters, we detect {approx}2.5{sigma} correlations of Hubble residuals with both host galaxy size and stellar mass, such that SN Ia occurring in physically larger, more massive hosts are {approx}10% brighter after light curve correction. The Hubble residual is the deviation of the inferred distance modulus to the SN, calculated from its apparent luminosity and light curve properties, away from the expected value at the SN redshift. Marginalizing over linear trends in Hubble residuals with light curve parameters shows that the correlations cannot be attributed to a light curve-dependent calibration error. Combining 180 higher-redshift ESSENCE, SNLS, and HigherZ SN with 30 nearby SN whose host masses are less than 10{sup 10.8} M{circle_dot} n a cosmology fit yields 1 + w = 0.22{sub -0.108}{sup +0.152}, while a combination where the 30 nearby SN instead have host masses greater than 10{sup 10.8} M{circle_dot} yields 1 + w = ?0.03{sub -0.143}{sup +0.217}. Progenitor metallicity, stellar population age, and dust extinction correlate with galaxy mass and may be responsible for these systematic effects. Host galaxy measurements will yield improved distances to SN Ia.

  13. Timing the Nearby Isolated Neutron Star RX J1856.5-3754

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Kerkwijk, M H

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RX J1856.5-3754 is the X-ray brightest among the nearby isolated neutron stars. Its X-ray spectrum is thermal, and is reproduced remarkably well by a black-body, but its interpretation has remained puzzling. One reason is that the source did not exhibit pulsations, and hence a magnetic field strength--vital input to atmosphere models--could not be estimated. Recently, however, very weak pulsations were discovered. Here, we analyze these in detail, using all available data from the XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observatories. From frequency measurements, we set a 2-sigma upper limit to the frequency derivative of \\dot\

  14. Discovery of a large dust disk around the nearby star AU Microscopium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Kalas; Michael C. Liu; Brenda C. Matthews

    2004-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the discovery of a circumstellar dust disk surrounding AU Microscopium (AU Mic, GJ 803, HD 197481). This young M star at 10 parsec has the same age and origin as beta Pictoris, another nearby star surrounded by a dust disk. The AU Mic disk is detected between 50 AU and 210 AU radius, a region where dust lifetimes exceed the present stellar age. Thus, AU Mic is the nearest star where we directly observe the solid material required for planet formation. Since 85% of stars are M-type, the AU Mic disk provides new clues on how the majority of planetary systems might form and evolve.

  15. HI observations of nearby galaxies I. The first list of the Karachentsev catalog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. K. Huchtmeier; I. D. Karachentsev; V. E. Karachentseva; M. Ehle

    1999-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present HI observations of the galaxies in the first list of the Karachentsev catalog of previously unknown nearby dwarf galaxies (Karachentseva & Karachentsev 1998). This survey covers all known nearby galaxy groups within the Local Volume (i.e. within 10 Mpc) and their environment, that is about 25% of the total sky. A total of 257 galaxies have been observed with a detection rate of 60%. We searched a frequency band corresponding to heliocentric radial velocities from -470 km/s to about +4000 km/s. Non-detections are either due to limited coverage in radial velocity, confusion with Local HI (mainly in the velocity range -140 km/s to +20 km/s, or lack of sensitivity for very weak emission. 25% of the detected galaxies are located within the Local Volume. Those galaxies are dwarf galaxies judged by their optical linear diameter (1.4 +/- 0.2 kpc on the average), their mean total HI mass (4.6 E7 solar masses), and their observed linewidths (39 km/s).

  16. HERSCHEL FAR-INFRARED AND SUBMILLIMETER PHOTOMETRY FOR THE KINGFISH SAMPLE OF NEARBY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Aniano, G.; Draine, B. T. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Engelbracht, C. W.; Hinz, J. L.; Montiel, E. J. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Krause, O.; Groves, B. A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Roussel, H. [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR7095 CNRS, Universite Pierre and Marie Curie, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, 75014 Paris (France); Appleton, P. N. [NASA Herschel Science Center, IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Armus, L.; Beirao, P. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MC 314-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bolatto, A. D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Brandl, B. R. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Calzetti, D.; Crocker, A. F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Croxall, K. V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Galametz, M. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Gordon, K. D. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Hao, C.-N., E-mail: ddale@uwyo.edu [Tianjin Astrophysics Center, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300387 (China); and others

    2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    New far-infrared and submillimeter photometry from the Herschel Space Observatory is presented for 61 nearby galaxies from the Key Insights on Nearby Galaxies: A Far-Infrared Survey with Herschel (KINGFISH) sample. The spatially integrated fluxes are largely consistent with expectations based on Spitzer far-infrared photometry and extrapolations to longer wavelengths using popular dust emission models. Dwarf irregular galaxies are notable exceptions, as already noted by other authors, as their 500 {mu}m emission shows evidence for a submillimeter excess. In addition, the fraction of dust heating attributed to intense radiation fields associated with photodissociation regions is found to be (21 {+-} 4)% larger when Herschel data are included in the analysis. Dust masses obtained from the dust emission models of Draine and Li are found to be on average nearly a factor of two higher than those based on single-temperature modified blackbodies, as single blackbody curves do not capture the full range of dust temperatures inherent to any galaxy. The discrepancy is largest for galaxies exhibiting the coolest far-infrared colors.

  17. CAIRNS: The Cluster And Infall Region Nearby Survey I. Redshifts and Mass Profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Rines; M. J. Geller; M. J. Kurtz; A. Diaferio

    2003-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The CAIRNS (Cluster And Infall Region Nearby Survey) project is a spectroscopic survey of the infall regions surrounding eight nearby, rich, X-ray luminous clusters of galaxies. We collect 15665 redshifts (3471 new or remeasured) within \\sim 5-10 Mpc of the centers of the clusters, making it the largest study of the infall regions of clusters. We determine cluster membership and the mass profiles of the clusters based on the phase space distribution of the galaxies. All of the clusters display decreasing velocity dispersion profiles. The mass profiles are fit well by functional forms based on numerical simulations but exclude an isothermal sphere. Specifically, NFW and Hernquist models provide good descriptions of cluster mass profiles to their turnaround radii. Our sample shows that the predicted infall pattern is ubiquitous in rich, X-ray luminous clusters over a large mass range. The caustic mass estimates are in excellent agreement with independent X-ray estimates at small radii and with virial estimates at intermediate radii. The mean ratio of the caustic mass to the X-ray mass is 1.03\\pm0.11 and the mean ratio of the caustic mass to the virial mass (when corrected for the surface pressure term) is 0.93\\pm0.07. We further demonstrate that the caustic technique provides reasonable mass estimates even in merging clusters.

  18. The resolved star-formation relation in nearby active galactic nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casasola, Viviana; Combes, Francoise; Garcia-Burillo, Santiago

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of the relation between star formation rate (SFR) surface density (sigmasfr) and mass surface density of molecular gas (sigmahtwo), commonly referred to as the Kennicutt-Schmidt (K-S) relation, at its intrinsic spatial scale, i.e. the size of giant molecular clouds (10-150 pc), in the central, high-density regions of four nearby low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGN). We used interferometric IRAM CO(1-0) and CO(2-1), and SMA CO(3-2) emission line maps to derive sigmahtwo and HST-Halpha images to estimate sigmasfr. Each galaxy is characterized by a distinct molecular SF relation at spatial scales between 20 to 200 pc. The K-S relations can be sub-linear, but also super-linear, with slopes ranging from 0.5 to 1.3. Depletion times range from 1 and 2Gyr, compatible with results for nearby normal galaxies. These findings are valid independently of which transition, CO(1-0), CO(2-1), or CO(3-2), is used to derive sigmahtwo. Because of star-formation feedback, life-time of clouds, turbule...

  19. On The Linearity of The Black Hole - Bulge Mass Relation in Active and in Nearby Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Laor

    2001-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of PG quasar observations suggests a nonlinear relation between the black hole mass, M_BH, and the bulge mass, M_bulge, although a linear relation, as proposed for nearby galaxies, cannot be ruled out. New M_BH values for nearby galaxies from Gebhardt et al., and L_bulge measurements for Seyfert 1 galaxies from Virani et al., are used here to obtain a more accurate value for the slope of the M_BH-M_bulge relation. The combined sample of 40 active and non-active galaxies suggests a significantly nonlinear relation, M_BH\\propto M_bulge^{1.53\\pm 0.14}. Further support for a nonlinear relation is provided by the slope of the M_BH-stellar velocity dispersion relation found recently, and by the low M_BH found in late type spiral galaxies. The mean M_BH/M_bulge ratio is therefore not a universal constant, but rather drops from ~0.5% in bright (M_V ~ -22) ellipticals, to ~0.05% in low luminosity (M_V ~ -18) bulges. Hubble Space Telescope determinations of M_BH in late type spirals, and of the bulge magnitude in narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxies (both predicted to have low M_BH), can further test the validity of the nonlinear M_BH-M_bulge relation.

  20. A Comparison of Independent Star Formation Diagnostics for a UV-Selected Sample of Nearby Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, M; Chan, B; Cram, L; Ellis, R; Treyer, M A; Hopkins, A; Sullivan, Mark; Mobasher, Bahram; Chan, Ben; Cram, Lawrence; Ellis, Richard; Treyer, Marie; Hopkins, Andrew

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from a decimetric radio survey undertaken with the Very Large Array as part of a longer term goal to inter-compare star formation and dust extinction diagnostics, on a galaxy by galaxy basis, for a representative sample of nearby galaxies. For our survey field, Selected Area 57, star formation rates derived from 1.4GHz luminosities are compared with earlier nebular emission line and ultraviolet (UV) continuum diagnostics. We find broad correlations, over several decades in luminosity, between H-alpha, the UV continuum and 1.4GHz diagnostics. However, the scatter in these relations is found to be larger than observational errors, with offsets between the observed relations and those expected assuming constant star-formation histories and luminosity-independent extinction models. We investigate the physical origin of the observed relations, and conclude the discrepancies between different star-formation diagnostics can only be partly explained by simple models of dust extinction in galaxies. ...

  1. Very-High Energy Gamma-Ray Flux Limits for Nearby Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Herr; W. Hofmann; for the H. E. S. S. Collaboration

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Combining the results of targeted observations, H.E.S.S. has accumulated a large amount of extra-galactic exposure at TeV energies. Due to its large field of view a considerable part of the sky (0.6 sr) has been observed with high sensitivity outside the targeted observation positions. Since this exposure region contains little inherent bias, it is well suited for studies of extra-galactic source populations. Given the correlation between ultra-high energy cosmic rays and nearby extra-galactic objects recently claimed by the Auger collaboration, this unbiased sky sample by H.E.S.S. is of interest since it includes (besides the targeted sources) 63 AGN within 100 Mpc, for which very-high energy gamma-ray flux limits are derived.

  2. Young massive star clusters in nearby galaxies. I. Identification and general properties of cluster systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soeren S. Larsen; Tom Richtler

    1999-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Using ground-based UBVRI+Halpha CCD photometry we have been carrying out a search for young massive star clusters (YMCs) in a sample consisting of 21 nearby spiral galaxies. We find a large variety concerning the richness of the cluster systems, with some galaxies containing no YMCs at all and others hosting very large numbers of YMCs. Examples of galaxies with poor cluster systems are NGC 300 and NGC 4395, while the richest cluster systems are found in the galaxies NGC 5236, NGC 2997 and NGC 1313. The age distributions of clusters in these galaxies show no obvious peaks, indicating that massive star clusters are formed as an ongoing process rather than in bursts. This is in contrast to what is observed in starbursts and merger galaxies. The radial distributions of clusters follow the Halpha surface brightness. For the galaxies in our sample there is no correlation between the morphological type and the presence of YMCs

  3. THE ACS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY. III. CEPHEIDS IN THE OUTER DISK OF M81

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCommas, Les P.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Davis, Matthew R. [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Yoachim, Peter [Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Corporation, 870 Winter Street Waltham, MA 02451 (United States)], E-mail: lmccomma@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: jd@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: ben@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: mrdavis@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: yoachim@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: adolphin@ratheon.com

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST) has acquired deep ACS imaging of a field in the outer disk of the large spiral galaxy M81. These data were obtained over a total of 20 Hubble Space Telescope orbits, providing a baseline long enough to reliably identify Cepheid variable stars in the field. Fundamental mode and first overtone types have been distinguished through comparative fits with corresponding Cepheid light curve templates derived from principal component analysis of confirmed Cepheids in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), Small Magellanic Cloud, and Milky Way. A distance modulus of 27.78 {+-} 0.05 {sub r} {+-} 0.14 {sub s} with a corresponding distance of 3.60 {+-} 0.23 Mpc has been calculated from a sample of 11 fundamental mode and two first overtone Cepheids (assuming an LMC distance modulus of {mu}{sub LMC} = 18.41 {+-} 0.10 {sub r} {+-} 0.13 {sub s})

  4. No nearby counterparts to the moving objects in the Hubble Deep Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris Flynn; J. Sommer-Larsen; B. Fuchs; David S. Graff; Samir Salim; .

    1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Ibata et al (1999) have recently discovered faint, moving objects in the Hubble Deep Field. The quantity, magnitudes and proper motions of these objects are consistent with old white dwarfs making up the Galactic dark halo. We review a number of ground-based proper motion surveys in which nearby dark halo white dwarfs might be present, if they have the colours and absolute magnitudes proposed. No such objects have been found, whereas we argue here that several times more would be expected than in the Hubble Deep Field. We conclude it is unlikely that hydrogen atmosphere white dwarfs make up a significant fraction of the halo dark matter. No limits can be placed yet on helium atmosphere dwarfs from optical searches.

  5. Structure, dynamical impact and origin of magnetic fields in nearby galaxies in the SKA era

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Rainer; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Dettmar, Ralf-Jürgen; Ferrière, Katia; Fletcher, Andrew; Heald, George; Heesen, Volker; Horellou, Cathy; Krause, Marita; Lou, Yu-Qing; Mao, Sui Ann; Paladino, Rosita; Schinnerer, Eva; Sokoloff, Dmitry; Stil, Jeroen; Tabatabaei, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic fields are an important ingredient of the interstellar medium (ISM). Besides their importance for star formation, they govern the transport of cosmic rays, relevant to the launch and regulation of galactic outflows and winds, which in turn are pivotal in shaping the structure of halo magnetic fields. Mapping the small-scale structure of interstellar magnetic fields in many nearby galaxies is crucial to understand the interaction between gas and magnetic fields, in particular how gas flows are affected. Elucidation of the magnetic role in, e.g., triggering star formation, forming and stabilising spiral arms, driving outflows, gas heating by reconnection and magnetising the intergalactic medium has the potential to revolutionise our physical picture of the ISM and galaxy evolution in general. Radio polarisation observations in the very nearest galaxies at high frequencies (>= 3 GHz) and with high spatial resolution (<= 5") hold the key here. The galaxy survey with SKA1 that we propose will also be a...

  6. Tips for Using Reduce & Probe on the command-line This is a brief introduction to off-line use of the programs Reduce (to add and optimize hydrogens) and Probe (to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, David

    Tips for Using Reduce & Probe on the command-line This is a brief introduction to off-line use Prekin to get a kinemage of the structure, including the hydrogens with the command line: prekin -lots 1xyzH.pdb > 1xyzHdot.kin While the example here uses the command line interface with Prekin

  7. The 60-month all-sky BAT Survey of AGN and the Anisotropy of Nearby AGN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajello, M.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Alexander, D.M.; /Durham U.; Greiner, J.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE; Madejski, G.M.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Gehrels, N.; /NASA, Goddard; Burlon, D.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE

    2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Surveys above 10 keV represent one of the the best resources to provide an unbiased census of the population of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). We present the results of 60 months of observation of the hard X-ray sky with Swift/BAT. In this timeframe, BAT detected (in the 15-55 keV band) 720 sources in an all-sky survey of which 428 are associated with AGN, most of which are nearby. Our sample has negligible incompleteness and statistics a factor of {approx}2 larger over similarly complete sets of AGN. Our sample contains (at least) 15 bona-fide Compton-thick AGN and 3 likely candidates. Compton-thick AGN represent a {approx}5% of AGN samples detected above 15 keV. We use the BAT dataset to refine the determination of the LogN-LogS of AGN which is extremely important, now that NuSTAR prepares for launch, towards assessing the AGN contribution to the cosmic X-ray background. We show that the LogN-LogS of AGN selected above 10 keV is now established to a {approx}10% precision. We derive the luminosity function of Compton-thick AGN and measure a space density of 7.9{sub -2.9}{sup +4.1} x 10{sup -5} Mpc{sup -3} for objects with a de-absorbed luminosity larger than 2 x 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. As the BAT AGN are all mostly local, they allow us to investigate the spatial distribution of AGN in the nearby Universe regardless of absorption. We find concentrations of AGN that coincide spatially with the largest congregations of matter in the local ({le} 85 Mpc) Universe. There is some evidence that the fraction of Seyfert 2 objects is larger than average in the direction of these dense regions.

  8. AN INFRARED CENSUS OF DUST IN NEARBY GALAXIES WITH SPITZER (DUSTINGS). I. OVERVIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, Martha L.; Sonneborn, George [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Skillman, Evan [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, 116 Church Street SE, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Barmby, Pauline [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 3K7 (Canada); Bonanos, Alceste Z. [IAASARS, National Observatory of Athens, GR-15236 Penteli (Greece); Gordon, Karl D.; Meixner, Margaret [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Groenewegen, M. A. T. [Royal Observatory of Belgium, Ringlaan 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Lagadec, Eric [Laboratoire Lagrange, UMR7293, Univ. Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, F-06300 Nice (France); Lennon, Daniel [ESA—European Space Astronomy Centre, Apdo. de Correo 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid (Spain); Marengo, Massimo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Sloan, G. C. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Van Loon, Jacco Th. [Astrophysics Group, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Zijlstra, Albert, E-mail: martha.boyer@nasa.gov [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nearby resolved dwarf galaxies provide excellent opportunities for studying the dust-producing late stages of stellar evolution over a wide range of metallicity (–2.7 ? [Fe/H] ? –1.0). Here, we describe DUSTiNGS (DUST in Nearby Galaxies with Spitzer): a 3.6 and 4.5 ?m post-cryogen Spitzer Space Telescope imaging survey of 50 dwarf galaxies within 1.5 Mpc that is designed to identify dust-producing asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and massive stars. The survey includes 37 dwarf spheroidal, 8 dwarf irregular, and 5 transition-type galaxies. This near-complete sample allows for the building of statistics on these rare phases of stellar evolution over the full metallicity range. The photometry is >75% complete at the tip of the red giant branch for all targeted galaxies, with the exception of the crowded inner regions of IC 10, NGC 185, and NGC 147. This photometric depth ensures that the majority of the dust-producing stars, including the thermally pulsing AGB stars, are detected in each galaxy. The images map each galaxy to at least twice the half-light radius to ensure that the entire evolved star population is included and to facilitate the statistical subtraction of background and foreground contamination, which is severe at these wavelengths. In this overview, we describe the survey, the data products, and preliminary results. We show evidence for the presence of dust-producing AGB stars in eight of the targeted galaxies, with metallicities as low as [Fe/H] = –1.9, suggesting that dust production occurs even at low metallicity.

  9. THE NATURE OF STARBURSTS. I. THE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF EIGHTEEN NEARBY STARBURST DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Stark, David; Weisz, Daniel [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics and Astronomy, 116 Church Street, S.E., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Cannon, John M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Dalcanton, Julianne; Williams, Benjamin [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew [Raytheon Company, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States); Hidalgo-RodrIguez, Sebastian [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, VIa Lactea s/n. E38200, La Laguna, Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain); Holtzman, Jon, E-mail: kmcquinn@astro.umn.ed [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001-Department 4500, 1320 Frenger Street, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)

    2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We use archival Hubble Space Telescope observations of resolved stellar populations to derive the star formation histories (SFHs) of 18 nearby starburst dwarf galaxies. In this first paper, we present the observations, color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), and the SFHs of the 18 starburst galaxies, based on a homogeneous approach to the data reduction, differential extinction, and treatment of photometric completeness. We adopt a star formation rate (SFR) threshold normalized to the average SFR of the individual system as a metric for classifying starbursts in SFHs derived from resolved stellar populations. This choice facilitates finding not only the currently bursting galaxies but also 'fossil' bursts increasing the sample size of starburst galaxies in the nearby (D < 8 Mpc) universe. Thirteen of the eighteen galaxies are experiencing ongoing bursts and five galaxies show fossil bursts. From our reconstructed SFHs, it is evident that the elevated SFRs of a burst are sustained for hundreds of Myr with variations on small timescales. A long >100 Myr temporal baseline is thus fundamental to any starburst definition or identification method. The longer lived bursts rule out rapid 'self-quenching' of starbursts on global scales. The bursting galaxies' gas consumption timescales are shorter than the Hubble time for all but one galaxy confirming the short-lived nature of starbursts based on fuel limitations. Additionally, we find that the strength of the H{alpha} emission usually correlates with the CMD-based SFR during the last 4-10 Myr. However, in four cases, the H{alpha} emission is significantly less than what is expected for models of starbursts; the discrepancy is due to the SFR changing on timescales of a few Myr. The inherently short timescale of the H{alpha} emission limits identifying galaxies as starbursts based on the current characteristics which may or may not be representative of the recent SFH of a galaxy.

  10. The Evolving ISM in the Milky Way & Nearby Galaxies ISM Theory: Gas Phases, Turbulence, and Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and fills much of the volume near the Galactic midplan, and cold atomic gas, which is organized into denseThe Evolving ISM in the Milky Way & Nearby Galaxies ISM Theory: Gas Phases, Turbulence, and Star modeling efforts have begun to take into account the effects of multiscale, time- dependent processes

  11. Temperature profile for glacial ice at the South Pole: Implications for life in a nearby subglacial lake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, P. Buford

    by P. Buford Price, April 22, 2002 Airborne radar has detected 100 lakes under the Antarctic ice cap-induced melting temperature of freshwater ice. To produce the strong radar signal, the frozen lake must consistTemperature profile for glacial ice at the South Pole: Implications for life in a nearby subglacial

  12. Nature Climate Change features Los

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research February 27, 2013 New print edition of journal tags tree-stress project for cover story LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Feb. 27, 2013-The print...

  13. HOGgles: Visualizing Object Detection Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vondrick, Carl Martin

    We introduce algorithms to visualize feature spaces used by object detectors. The tools in this paper allow a human to put on 'HOG goggles' and perceive the visual world as a HOG based object detector sees it. We found ...

  14. Features

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall A This photo shows oneServicesExtremes:

  15. Vertical broad-line region structure in nearby active galactic nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kollatschny, W

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad emission lines are emitted in the surroundings of supermassive black holes in the centers of active galactic nuclei (AGN). This region is spatially not resolved. We intend to get information on the structure and geometry of this broad emitting line region (BLR) based on line profile observations. We model the rotational and turbulent velocities in the line-emitting regions based on observed full-width at half maximum line values (FWHM) and {\\sigma}_{line} of the variable broad emission lines in four nearby AGN: NGC 3783, NGC 7469, NGC 5548, and 3C 390.3. On the basis of these velocities, we estimate the height of the line-emitting regions above the midplane in context with their distances from the center. The H{\\beta} lines are emitted in a more flattened configuration above the midplane in comparison to the highly ionized lines. The H{\\beta} lines originate at heights of 0.7 to 1.6 light-days and at distances of 1.4 to 24 light-days with height/distance (H/R) ratios of only 0.07 to 0.5. The highly ioni...

  16. Update on the correlation of the highest energy cosmic rays with nearby extragalactic matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M.; /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Ahn, E.J.; /Fermilab; Allard, D.; /APC, Paris; Allekotte, I.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche; Allen, J.; /New York U.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; /Mexico U., ICN; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M.; /INFN, Naples /Naples U.; Aminaei, A.; /Nijmegen U., IMAPP; Anchordoqui, L.; /Wisconsin U., Milwaukee /Lisbon, IST

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory through 31 August 2007 showed evidence for anisotropy in the arrival directions of cosmic rays above the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin energy threshold, 6 x 10{sup 19} eV. The anisotropy was measured by the fraction of arrival directions that are less than 3.1{sup o} from the position of an active galactic nucleus within 75 Mpc (using the Veron-Cetty and Veron 12th catalog). An updated measurement of this fraction is reported here using the arrival directions of cosmic rays recorded above the same energy threshold through 31 December 2009. The number of arrival directions has increased from 27 to 69, allowing a more precise measurement. The correlating fraction is (38{sub -6}{sup +7})%, compared with 21% expected for isotropic cosmic rays. This is down from the early estimate of (69{sub -13}{sup +11})%. The enlarged set of arrival directions is examined also in relation to other populations of nearby extragalactic objects: galaxies in the 2 Microns All Sky Survey and active galactic nuclei detected in hard X-rays by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope. A celestial region around the position of the radiogalaxy Cen A has the largest excess of arrival directions relative to isotropic expectations. The 2-point autocorrelation function is shown for the enlarged set of arrival directions and compared to the isotropic expectation.

  17. An astrometric companion to the nearby metal-poor, low-mass star LHS 1589

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastien Lepine; R. Michael Rich; Michael M. Shara; Kelle L. Cruz; Andrew Skemer

    2007-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of a companion to the high proper motion star LHS 1589, a nearby high-velocity, low-mass subdwarf. The companion (LHS 1589B) is located 0.224+/-0.004" to the southwest of the primary (LHS 1589A), and is 0.5 magnitude fainter than the primary in the K_s band. The pair was resolved with the IRCAL infrared camera at Lick Observatory, operating with the Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics system. A low-resolution spectrum of the unresolved pair obtained at the MDM observatory shows the source to be consistent with a cool subdwarf of spectral subtype sdK7.5. A photometric distance estimate places the metal-poor system at a distance d=81+/-18 parsecs from the Sun. We also measure a radial velocity V_rad=67+/-8 km/s which, together with the proper motion and estimated distance, suggests that the pair is roaming the inner Galactic halo on a highly eccentric orbit. With a projected orbital separation s=18.1+/-4.8 AU, and a crude estimate of the system's total mass, we estimate the orbital period of the system to be in the range 75 yr metal-poor, low-mass stars.

  18. Effervescent heating: constraints from nearby cooling flow clusters observed with XMM-Newton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocco Piffaretti; Jelle Kaastra

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used deprojected radial density and temperature profiles of a sample of 16 nearby CF clusters observed with XMM-Newton to test whether the effervescent heating model can satisfactorily explain the dynamics of CF clusters. For each cluster we derived the required extra heating as a function of cluster-centric distance for various values of the unknown parameters $\\dot M$ (mass deposition rate) and $f_c$ (conduction efficiency). We fitted the extra heating curve using the AGN effervescent heating function and derived the AGN parameters $L$ (the time-averaged luminosity) and $r_0$ (the scale radius where the bubbles start rising in the ICM). While we do not find any solution with the effervescent heating model for only one object, we do show that AGN and conduction heating are not cooperating effectively for half of the objects in our sample. For most of the clusters we find that, when a comparison is possible, the derived AGN scale radius $r_0$ and the observed AGN jet extension have the same order of magnitude. The AGN luminosities required to balance radiative losses are substantially lowered if the fact that the AGN deposits energy within a finite volume is taken into account. For the Virgo cluster, we find that the AGN power derived from the effervescent heating model is in good agreement with the observed jet power.

  19. Starburst Anatomy: Stellar and Nebular Properties of Nearby Giant HII Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William H. Waller

    1996-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Resolution of nearby giant HII regions into their stellar and nebular constituents provides fundamental insights for interpreting more distant and powerful starburst activity. The following summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the stellar populations and nebular energetics associated with giant HII regions. Photometry and spectroscopy of ionizing clusters in the Galaxy, LMC, and SMC reveal no significant relation between metallicity and the slope of the power-law initial mass function (IMF). HST/WFPC2 photometry of 3 giant HII regions in M33 also does not show any consistent trend involving metal abundance and IMF slope -- contrary to predictions based on emission-line ratios. The upper stellar mass limit appears to be constrained more by cluster age than by anything else. The ionizing luminosities from some of the resolved stellar populations are insufficient to account for the ionization rates inferred from measurements of the composite (integrated) H-alpha emission. Absorption of stellar EUV emission by nebular dust grains would only amplify these photoionizing shortfalls. Leakage of ionizing photons from the HII regions would further exacerbate the situation. What then is providing the additional ionization? Prospects for higher stellar EUV luminosities and/or alternative sources of nebular ionization (e.g. shocks) are evaluated with this question in mind.

  20. Discretization error estimation and exact solution generation using the method of nearby problems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, Andrew J. (Auburn University Auburn, AL); Raju, Anil (Auburn University Auburn, AL); Kurzen, Matthew J. (Virginia Tech Blacksburg, VA); Roy, Christopher John (Virginia Tech Blacksburg, VA); Phillips, Tyrone S. (Virginia Tech Blacksburg, VA)

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Method of Nearby Problems (MNP), a form of defect correction, is examined as a method for generating exact solutions to partial differential equations and as a discretization error estimator. For generating exact solutions, four-dimensional spline fitting procedures were developed and implemented into a MATLAB code for generating spline fits on structured domains with arbitrary levels of continuity between spline zones. For discretization error estimation, MNP/defect correction only requires a single additional numerical solution on the same grid (as compared to Richardson extrapolation which requires additional numerical solutions on systematically-refined grids). When used for error estimation, it was found that continuity between spline zones was not required. A number of cases were examined including 1D and 2D Burgers equation, the 2D compressible Euler equations, and the 2D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The discretization error estimation results compared favorably to Richardson extrapolation and had the advantage of only requiring a single grid to be generated.

  1. Fundamental Parameters of Nearby Stars from the Comparison with Evolutionary Calculations: Masses, Radii and Effective temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos Allende Prieto; David L. Lambert

    1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hipparcos mission has made it possible to constrain the positions of nearby field stars in the colour-magnitude diagram with very high accuracy. These positions can be compared with the predictions of stellar evolutionary calculations to provide information on the basic parameters of the stars: masses, radii, effective temperatures, ages, and chemical composition. The degeneracy between mass, age, and metallicity is not so large as to prevent a reliable estimate of masses, radii and effective temperatures, at least for stars of solar metallicity. The evolutionary models of Bertelli et al. (1994) predict those parameters finely, and furthermore, the applied transformation from the theoretical (log g-Teff) to the observational (Mv-B-V) plane is precise enough to derive radii with an uncertainty of ~ 6%, masses within ~ 8%, and Teffs within ~ 2% for a certain range of the stellar parameters. This is demonstrated by means of comparison with the measurements in eclipsing binaries and the InfraRed Flux Method. The application of the interpolation procedure in the theoretical isochrones to the stars within 100 pc from the Sun observed with Hipparcos provides estimates for 17,219 stars

  2. A Chandra study of particle acceleration in the multiple hotspots of nearby radio galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Hardcastle; J. H. Croston; R. P. Kraft

    2007-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Chandra observations of a small sample of nearby classical double radio galaxies which have more than one radio hotspot in at least one of their lobes. The X-ray emission from the hotspots of these comparatively low-power objects is expected to be synchrotron in origin, and therefore to provide information about the locations of high-energy particle acceleration. In some models of the relationship between the jet and hotspot the hotspots that are not the current jet termination point should be detached from the energy supply from the active nucleus and therefore not capable of accelerating particles to high energies. We find that in fact some secondary hotspots are X-ray sources, and thus probably locations for high-energy particle acceleration after the initial jet termination shock. In detail, though, we show that the spatial structures seen in X-ray are not consistent with naive expectations from a simple shock model: the current locations of the acceleration of the highest-energy observable particles in powerful radio galaxies need not be coincident with the peaks of radio or even optical emission.

  3. A Search for "Dwarf" Seyfert Nuclei. VI. Properties of Emission-Line Nuclei in Nearby Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis C. Ho; Alexei V. Filippenko; Wallace L. W. Sargent

    2002-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the database from Paper III to quantify the global and nuclear properties of emission-line nuclei in the Palomar spectroscopic survey of nearby galaxies. We show that the host galaxies of Seyferts, LINERs, and transition objects share remarkably similar large-scale properties and local environments. The distinguishing traits emerge on nuclear scales. Compared with LINERs, Seyfert nuclei are an order of magnitude more luminous and exhibit higher electron densities and internal extinction. We suggest that Seyfert galaxies possess characteristically more gas-rich circumnuclear regions, and hence a more abundant fuel reservoir and plausibly higher accretion rates. The differences between the ionization state of the narrow emission-line regions of Seyferts and LINERs can be partly explained by the differences in their nebular properties. Transition-type objects are consistent with being composite (LINER/\\hii) systems. With very few exceptions, the stellar population within the central few hundred parsecs of the host galaxies is uniformly old, a finding that presents a serious challenge to starburst or post-starburst models for these objects. Seyferts and LINERs have virtually indistinguishable velocity fields as inferred from their line widths and line asymmetries. All three classes of objects obey a strong correlation between line width and line luminosity. We argue that the angular momentum content of circumnuclear gas may be an important factor in determining whether a nucleus becomes active. Finally, we discuss some possible complications for the unification model of Seyfert galaxies posed by our observations. (Abridged)

  4. Temperature profiles of a representative sample of nearby X-ray galaxy clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. W. Pratt; H. Boehringer; J. H. Croston; M. Arnaud; S. Borgani; A. Finoguenov; R. F. Temple

    2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the structural and scaling properties of the temperature distribution of the hot, X-ray emitting intra-cluster medium of galaxy clusters, and its dependence on dynamical state, can give insights into the physical processes governing the formation and evolution of structure. We analyse the X-ray temperature profiles from XMM-Newton observations of 15 nearby (z temperature range from 2.5 keV to 8.5 keV, and present a variety of X-ray morphologies. We derive accurate projected temperature profiles to ~ 0.5 R_200, and compare structural properties (outer slope, presence of cooling core) with a quantitative measure of the X-ray morphology as expressed by power ratios. We also compare the results to recent cosmological numerical simulations. Once the temperature profiles are scaled by an average cluster temperature (excluding the central region) and the estimated virial radius, the profiles generally decline in the region 0.1 R_200 temperature decrement appear to be slightly more regular. The present results lend further evidence to indicate that clusters are a regular population, at least outside the core region.

  5. SMT CO (2-1) Observations of Nearby Star-Forming Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Xue-Jian; Gu, Qiusheng; Wang, Junzhi; Zhang, Zhi-Yu

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present CO $J$=2-1 observations towards 32 nearby gas-rich star-forming galaxies selected from the ALFALFA and WISE catalogs, using the Sub-millimeter Telescope. Our sample is selected to be dominated by intermediate-$M_{\\rm *}$ galaxies. The scaling-relations between molecular gas, atomic gas and galactic properties (stellar mass, NUV$- r$ and WISE color W3$-$W2) are examined and discussed. Our results show that (1). In the galaxies with stellar mass $M_{\\rm *}$ $\\leqslant 10^{10}$ $M_{\\odot}$, HI fraction ($f_{\\rm HI}$ $\\equiv$ $M_{\\rm HI}$/$M_{\\rm *}$) is significantly higher than that of more massive galaxies, while H$_2$ gas fraction ($f_{\\rm H_2}$ $\\equiv$ $M_{\\rm H_2}$/$M_{\\rm *}$) remain nearly unchanged. (2). Comparing with $f_{\\rm H_2}$, $f_{\\rm HI}$ correlates better with both $M_{\\rm *}$ and NUV$- r$. (3). A new parameter, WISE color W3$-$W2 (12\\,$\\mu$m$-$4.6\\,$\\mu$m) is introduced, which is similar to NUV$- r$ in tracing star formation activity, and we find that W3$-$W2 has a tighter anti-corr...

  6. HOST GALAXY PROPERTIES AND HUBBLE RESIDUALS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE FROM THE NEARBY SUPERNOVA FACTORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childress, M.; Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Kim, A. G.; Loken, S. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Guy, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et des Hautes Energies, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Universite Paris Diderot Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Baltay, C. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06250-8121 (United States); Buton, C.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Kowalski, M. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 12, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (France); and others

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the relationship between Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) Hubble residuals and the properties of their host galaxies using a sample of 115 SNe Ia from the Nearby Supernova Factory. We use host galaxy stellar masses and specific star formation rates fitted from photometry for all hosts, as well as gas-phase metallicities for a subset of 69 star-forming (non-active galactic nucleus) hosts, to show that the SN Ia Hubble residuals correlate with each of these host properties. With these data we find new evidence for a correlation between SN Ia intrinsic color and host metallicity. When we combine our data with those of other published SN Ia surveys, we find the difference between mean SN Ia brightnesses in low- and high-mass hosts is 0.077 {+-} 0.014 mag. When viewed in narrow (0.2 dex) bins of host stellar mass, the data reveal apparent plateaus of Hubble residuals at high and low host masses with a rapid transition over a short mass range (9.8 {<=} log (M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) {<=} 10.4). Although metallicity has been a favored interpretation for the origin of the Hubble residual trend with host mass, we illustrate how dust in star-forming galaxies and mean SN Ia progenitor age both evolve along the galaxy mass sequence, thereby presenting equally viable explanations for some or all of the observed SN Ia host bias.

  7. HOST GALAXIES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE FROM THE NEARBY SUPERNOVA FACTORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childress, M.; Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Kim, A. G.; Loken, S. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Guy, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et des Hautes Energies, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Universite Paris Diderot Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Baltay, C. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06250-8121 (United States); Buton, C.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Kowalski, M. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 12, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (France); and others

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present photometric and spectroscopic observations of galaxies hosting Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed by the Nearby Supernova Factory. Combining Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) UV data with optical and near-infrared photometry, we employ stellar population synthesis techniques to measure SN Ia host galaxy stellar masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and reddening due to dust. We reinforce the key role of GALEX UV data in deriving accurate estimates of galaxy SFRs and dust extinction. Optical spectra of SN Ia host galaxies are fitted simultaneously for their stellar continua and emission lines fluxes, from which we derive high-precision redshifts, gas-phase metallicities, and H{alpha}-based SFRs. With these data we show that SN Ia host galaxies present tight agreement with the fiducial galaxy mass-metallicity relation from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) for stellar masses log(M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) > 8.5 where the relation is well defined. The star formation activity of SN Ia host galaxies is consistent with a sample of comparable SDSS field galaxies, though this comparison is limited by systematic uncertainties in SFR measurements. Our analysis indicates that SN Ia host galaxies are, on average, typical representatives of normal field galaxies.

  8. Central Mass Profiles of the Nearby Cool-core Galaxy Clusters Hydra A and A478

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okabe, N; Tamura, T; Fujita, Y; Takizawa, M; Matsushita, K; Fukazawa, Y; Futamase, T; Kawaharada, M; Miyazaki, S; Mochizuki, Y; Nakazawa, K; Ohashi, T; Ota, N; Sasaki, T; Sato, K; Tam, S I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform a weak-lensing study of the nearby cool-core galaxy clusters, Hydra A ($z=0.0538$) and A478 ($z=0.0881$), of which brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) host powerful activities of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). For each cluster, the observed tangential shear profile is well described either by a single Navarro--Frenk--White model or a two-component model including the BCG as an unresolved point mass. For A478, we determine the BCG and its host-halo masses from a joint fit to weak-lensing and stellar photometry measurements. We find that the choice of initial mass functions (IMFs) can introduce a factor of two uncertainty in the BCG mass, whereas the BCG host halo mass is well constrained by data. We perform a joint analysis of weak-lensing and stellar kinematics data available for the Hydra A cluster, which allows us to constrain the central mass profile without assuming specific IMFs.We find that the central mass profile ($r<300$ kpc) determined from the joint analysis is in excellent agreement wi...

  9. WISEP J180026.60+013453.1: A NEARBY LATE-L DWARF NEAR THE GALACTIC PLANE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gizis, John E.; Castro, Philip J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Burgasser, Adam J. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Science, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Shara, Michael M. [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10034 (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a nearby L7.5 dwarf discovered using the Preliminary Data Release of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and the Two Micron All Sky Survey. WISEP J180026.60+013453.1 has a motion of 0.42 arcsec yr{sup -1} and an estimated distance of 8.8 {+-} 1.0 pc. With this distance, it currently ranks as the sixth closest known L dwarf, although a trigonometric parallax is needed to confirm this distance. It was previously overlooked because it lies near the Galactic plane (b = 12 Degree-Sign ). As a relatively bright and nearby late L dwarf with normal near-infrared colors, W1800+0134 will serve as a benchmark for studies of cloud-related phenomena in cool substellar atmospheres.

  10. FCLib: The Feature Characterization Library.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gentile, Ann C.; Doyle, Wendy S. K.; Kegelmeyer, W. Philip [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA; Ulmer, Craig D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Feature Characterization Library (FCLib) is a software library that simplifies the process of interrogating, analyzing, and understanding complex data sets generated by finite element applications. This document provides an overview of the library, a description of both the design philosophy and implementation of the library, and examples of how the library can be utilized to extract understanding from raw datasets.

  11. NIF featured on BBC "Horizon"

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brian Cox

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility, the world's largest laser system, located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, was featured in the BBC broadcast "Horizon" hosted by physicist Brian Cox. Here is the NIF portion of the program, which was entitled "Can We Make A Star On Earth?" This video is used with the express permission of the BBC.

  12. Comparing Visual Features for Morphing Based Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jia Jane

    2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a method of object classification using the idea of deformable shape matching. Three types of visual features, geometric blur, C1 and SIFT, are used to generate feature descriptors. These feature ...

  13. FINDING {eta} CAR ANALOGS IN NEARBY GALAXIES USING SPITZER. I. CANDIDATE SELECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Rubab; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S., E-mail: khan@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: kstanek@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: ckochanek@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Ave., Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The late-stage evolution of the most massive stars such as {eta} Carinae is controlled by the effects of mass loss, which may be dominated by poorly understood eruptive mass ejections. Understanding this population is challenging because no true analogs of {eta} Car have been clearly identified in the Milky Way or other galaxies. We utilize Spitzer IRAC images of seven nearby ({approx}< 4 Mpc) galaxies to search for such analogs. We find 34 candidates with a flat or rising mid-IR spectral energy distributions toward longer mid-infrared wavelengths that emit >10{sup 5} L{sub Sun} in the IRAC bands (3.6 to 8.0 {mu}m) and are not known to be background sources. Based on our estimates for the expected number of background sources, we expect that follow-up observations will show that most of these candidates are not dust enshrouded massive stars, with an expectation of only 6 {+-} 6 surviving candidates. Since we would detect true analogs of {eta} Car for roughly 200 years post-eruption, this implies that the rate of eruptions like {eta} Car is less than the core-collapse supernova rate. It is possible, however, that every M > 40 M{sub Sun} star undergoes such eruptions given our initial results. In Paper II we will characterize the candidates through further analysis and follow-up observations, and there is no barrier to increasing the galaxy sample by an order of magnitude. The primary limitation of the present search is that Spitzer's resolution limits us to the shorter wavelength IRAC bands. With the James Webb Space Telescope, such surveys can be carried out at the far more optimal wavelengths of 10-30 {mu}m, allowing identification of {eta} Car analogs for millennia rather than centuries post-eruption.

  14. In situ measurements of rock salt permeability changes due to nearby excavation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stormont, J.C. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Howard, C.L. (RE/SPEC, Inc., Carlsbad, NM (United States)); Daemen, J.J.K. (Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Mackay School of Mines)

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Small-Scale Mine-By was an in situ experiment to measure changes in brine and gas permeability of rock salt as a result of nearby excavation. A series of small-volume pressurized brine- and gas-filled test intervals were established 8 m beneath the floor of Room L1 in the WIPP underground. The test intervals were isolated in the bottom of the 4.8-cm diameter monitoring boreholes with inflatable rubber packers, and are initially pressurized to about 2 MPa. Both brine- and gas-filled test intervals were located 1.25, 1.5, 2, 3, and 4 r from the center of a planned large-diameter hole, where r is the radius of the large-diameter hole. Prior to the drilling of the large-diameter borehole, the responses of both the brine- and gas-filled test intervals were consistent with the formation modeled as a very low permeability, low porosity porous medium with a significant pore (brine) pressure and no measurable gas permeability. The drilling of the mine-by borehole created a zone of dilated, partially saturated rock out to about 1.5 r. The formation pressure increases from near zero at 1.5 r to the pre-excavation value at 4 r. Injection tests reveal a gradient of brine permeabilities from 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}18} m{sup 2} at 1.25 r to about the pre-excavation value (10{sup {minus}21} m{sup 2}) by 3 r. Gas-injection tests reveal measurable gas permeability is limited to within 1.5 r. 17 refs., 24 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. LONG-TERM OPTICAL CONTINUUM COLOR VARIABILITY OF NEARBY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakata, Yu; Minezaki, Takeo; Yoshii, Yuzuru; Uchimoto, Yuka Katsuno; Sugawara, Shota [Institute of Astronomy, School of Science, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Kobayashi, Yukiyasu [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Koshida, Shintaro [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0013 (Japan); Aoki, Tsutomu; Tomita, Hiroyuki [Kiso Observatory, Institute of Astronomy, School of Science, University of Tokyo, 10762-30 Mitake, Kiso, Nagano 397-0101 (Japan); Enya, Keigo; Suganuma, Masahiro, E-mail: yusakata@ioa.s.u-tokyo.ac.j [Institute of Space and Astronomical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan)

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine whether the spectral energy distribution of optical continuum emission of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) changes during flux variation, based on accurate and frequent monitoring observations of 11 nearby Seyfert galaxies and QSOs carried out in the B, V, and I bands for seven years by the MAGNUM telescope. The multi-epoch flux data in any two different bands obtained on the same night show a very tight linear flux-to-flux relationship for all target AGNs. The flux of the host galaxy within the photometric aperture is carefully estimated by surface brightness fitting to available high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope images and MAGNUM images. The flux of narrow emission lines in the photometric bands is also estimated from available spectroscopic data. We find that the non-variable component of the host galaxy plus narrow emission lines for all target AGNs is located on the fainter extension of the linear regression line of multi-epoch flux data in the flux-to-flux diagram. This result strongly indicates that the spectral shape of AGN continuum emission in the optical region ({approx}4400-7900 A) does not systematically change during flux variation. The trend of spectral hardening that optical continuum emission becomes bluer as it becomes brighter, which has been reported by many studies, is therefore interpreted as the domination of the variable component of the nearly constant spectral shape of an AGN as it brightens over the non-variable component of the host galaxy plus narrow lines, which is usually redder than AGN continuum emission.

  16. BAYESIAN ANALYSIS TO IDENTIFY NEW STAR CANDIDATES IN NEARBY YOUNG STELLAR KINEMATIC GROUPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malo, Lison; Doyon, Rene; Lafreniere, David; Artigau, Etienne; Gagne, Jonathan; Baron, Frederique [Departement de physique and Observatoire du Mont-Megantic, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada)] [Departement de physique and Observatoire du Mont-Megantic, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada); Riedel, Adric, E-mail: malo@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: doyon@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: david@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: artigau@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: gagne@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: baron@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: riedel@phy-astr.gsu.edu [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States)] [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States)

    2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new method based on a Bayesian analysis to identify new members of nearby young kinematic groups. The analysis minimally takes into account the position, proper motion, magnitude, and color of a star, but other observables can be readily added (e.g., radial velocity, distance). We use this method to find new young low-mass stars in the {beta} Pictoris and AB Doradus moving groups and in the TW Hydrae, Tucana-Horologium, Columba, Carina, and Argus associations. Starting from a sample of 758 mid-K to mid-M (K5V-M5V) stars showing youth indicators such as H{alpha} and X-ray emission, our analysis yields 214 new highly probable low-mass members of the kinematic groups analyzed. One is in TW Hydrae, 37 in {beta} Pictoris, 17 in Tucana-Horologium, 20 in Columba, 6 in Carina, 50 in Argus, 32 in AB Doradus, and the remaining 51 candidates are likely young but have an ambiguous membership to more than one association. The false alarm rate for new candidates is estimated to be 5% for {beta} Pictoris and TW Hydrae, 10% for Tucana-Horologium, Columba, Carina, and Argus, and 14% for AB Doradus. Our analysis confirms the membership of 58 stars proposed in the literature. Firm membership confirmation of our new candidates will require measurement of their radial velocity (predicted by our analysis), parallax, and lithium 6708 A equivalent width. We have initiated these follow-up observations for a number of candidates, and we have identified two stars (2MASSJ01112542+1526214, 2MASSJ05241914-1601153) as very strong candidate members of the {beta} Pictoris moving group and one strong candidate member (2MASSJ05332558-5117131) of the Tucana-Horologium association; these three stars have radial velocity measurements confirming their membership and lithium detections consistent with young age.

  17. XMM-Newton Studies of the Source Population and the Hot Interstellar Medium in Nearby Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Pietsch

    2002-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    First results of X-ray source population studies in nearby galaxies show the potential of XMM-Newton observations. I will report on first XMM-Newton M31 results and on three of our XMM-Newton projects, an X-ray source population study in the Magellanic Clouds (MCs), a deep raster survey of M33, and an investigation of the hot interstellar medium (ISM) in the halo of edge-on galaxies. XMM-Newton results on several other galaxies and sources within are presented by other authors in these proceedings. Our MC study is build up of deep pointings probing MC sources down to 10^33 erg s^-1 and shallower pointings to confirm candidates from our ROSAT derived lists of X-ray binaries, super-soft sources, and supernova remnants. First XMM-Newton detections of a 455 s pulsar in the Small Magellanic Cloud and the results of the Large Magellanic Cloud deep field confirm the validity of our strategy. Our M33 raster pointing aims for luminosities as low as 10^35 erg s^-1, a factor of 10 below the sensitivity limit of the ROSAT observations. The survey will allow us to characterize the sources using extent, spectra, hardness ratios and time variability to build up an unprecedented census of the X-ray source content of M33. Of specific interest are the active source in the nuclear area and the diffuse emission in the inner disk. XMM-Newton observations of the active galaxy NGC 3079 and of the starburst galaxy NGC 253 are used to characterize the point-like sources and the hot ISM in the disk and from the halo of these galaxies.

  18. The ESO Nearby Abell Cluster Survey VIII. Morphological and spectral classification of galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Thomas; P. Katgert

    2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We have determined the morphological types of 2295 galaxies from the ESO Nearby Abell Cluster Survey (ENACS) from CCD images made with the Dutch telescope on La Silla. The reliability of our classification appears to be quite comparable to that of other classifiers. Recalibration of the ENACS spectral classification shows that early- and late- type galaxies can be distinguished from their spectra with 83% reliability. Ellipticals and S0 galaxies cannot be distinguished spectrally, while spectral classification of late spirals has a reliability of 70%. We derive average pseudo-colors and linestrengths from the ENACS spectra for the galaxies of different morphological types, considering bright (M -20) subsets of the galaxies without emission lines (non-ELG) separately. We find a strong and significant correlation between the average color and the average strength of the metal absorption lines. The average metallicity decreases and the average color gets bluer towards later Hubble type. In each morphological class the faint galaxies are bluer and less metal-rich than the bright ones. This extends the well-established color-magnitude relation of early-type galaxies to (late) spirals. Bright early spirals may, on average, have somewhat stronger H-delta absorption than the other galaxies, which could be due to recent starformation. The galaxies with emission lines (ELG) have a bluer spectral continuum than the non-ELG, and the amount of blueing hardly depends on morphological type. The fraction of ELG depends strongly on morphological type but it varies very little with projected distance from the cluster center.

  19. Starbursts and the triggering of the activity in nearby powerful radio galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Tadhunter; T. G. Robinson; R. M. Gonzalez Delgado; K. Wills; R. Morganti

    2004-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present high quality long-slit spectra for three nearby powerful radio galaxies 3C293, 3C305, PKS1345+12. These were taken with the aim of characterising the young stellar populations (YSP), and thereby investigating the evolution of the host galaxies, as well as the events that triggered the activity. Isochrone spectral synthesis modelling of the wide wavelength coverage spectra of nuclear and off-nuclear continuum-emitting regions have been used to estimate the ages, masses and luminosities of the YSP component, taking full account of reddening effects and potential contamination by activity-related components. We find that the YSP make a substantial contribution to the continuum flux in the off-nuclear regions on a radial scale of 1 - 20kpc in all three objects. Moreover, in two objects we find evidence for reddened post-starburst stellar populations in the near-nuclear regions of the host galaxies. The YSP are relatively old (0.1- 2Gyr), massive and make up a large proportion (~1 - 50%) of the total stellar mass in the regions of galaxies sampled by the observations. Overall, these results are consistent with the idea that AGN activity in some radio galaxies is triggered by major gas-rich mergers. Therefore, these radio galaxies form part of the subset of early-type galaxies that is evolving most rapidly in the local universe. Intriguingly, the results also suggest that the radio jets are triggered relatively late in the merger sequence, and that there is an evolutionary link between radio galaxies and luminous/ultra-luminous infrared galaxies.

  20. THE ACS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY. XI. THE REMARKABLY UNDISTURBED NGC 2403 DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Stilp, Adrienne; Radburn-Smith, David [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew [Raytheon, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States); Skillman, Evan D., E-mail: ben@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: jd@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: adrienne@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: dolphin@raytheon.com, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present detailed analysis of color-magnitude diagrams of NGC 2403, obtained from a deep (m {approx}< 28) Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 observation of the outer disk of NGC 2403, supplemented by several shallow (m {approx}< 26) HST Advanced Camera for Surveys fields. We derive the spatially resolved star formation history of NGC 2403 out to 11 disk scale lengths. In the inner portions of the galaxy, we compare the recent star formation rates (SFRs) we derive from the resolved stars with those measured using GALEX FUV + Spitzer 24{mu} fluxes, finding excellent agreement between the methods. Our measurements also show that the radial gradient in recent SFR mirrors the disk exponential profile to 11 scale lengths with no break, extending to SFR densities a factor of {approx}100 lower than those that can be measured with GALEX and Spitzer ({approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}). Furthermore, we find that the cumulative stellar mass of the disk was formed at similar times at all radii. We compare these characteristics of NGC 2403 to those of its ''morphological twins'', NGC 300 and M 33, showing that the structure and age distributions of the NGC 2403 disk are more similar to those of the relatively isolated system NGC 300 than to those of the Local Group analog M 33. We also discuss the environments and HI morphologies of these three nearby galaxies, comparing them to integrated light studies of larger samples of more distant galaxy disks. Taken together, the physical properties and evolutionary history of NGC 2403 suggest that the galaxy has had no close encounters with other M 81 group members and may be falling into the group for the first time.

  1. OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS ON THE MOLECULAR GAS CONTENT IN NEARBY STARBURST DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D. [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics and Astronomy, 116 Church Street, S.E., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Cannon, John M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Holtzman, Jon, E-mail: kmcquinn@astro.umn.edu [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001, Department 4500, 1320 Frenger Street, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using star formation histories derived from optically resolved stellar populations in 19 nearby starburst dwarf galaxies observed with the Hubble Space Telescope, we measure the stellar mass surface densities of stars newly formed in the bursts. By assuming a star formation efficiency (SFE), we then calculate the inferred gas surface densities present at the onset of the starbursts. Assuming an SFE of 1%, as is often assumed in normal star-forming galaxies, and assuming that the gas was purely atomic, translates to very high H I surface densities ({approx}10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2}), which are much higher than have been observed in dwarf galaxies. This implies either higher values of SFE in these dwarf starburst galaxies or the presence of significant amounts of H{sub 2} in dwarfs (or both). Raising the assumed SFEs to 10% or greater (in line with observations of more massive starbursts associated with merging galaxies), still results in H I surface densities higher than observed in 10 galaxies. Thus, these observations appear to require that a significant fraction of the gas in these dwarf starbursts galaxies was in the molecular form at the onset of the bursts. Our results imply molecular gas column densities in the range 10{sup 19}-10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} for the sample. In the galaxies where CO observations have been made, these densities correspond to values of the CO-H{sub 2} conversion factor (X{sub CO}) in the range >(3-80) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} (K km s{sup -1}){sup -1}, or up to 40 Multiplication-Sign greater than Galactic X{sub CO} values.

  2. CONSTRAINTS ON PLANET OCCURRENCE AROUND NEARBY MID-TO-LATE M DWARFS FROM THE MEARTH PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berta, Zachory K.; Irwin, Jonathan; Charbonneau, David, E-mail: zberta@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MEarth Project is a ground-based photometric survey intended to find planets transiting the closest and smallest main-sequence stars. In its first four years, MEarth discovered one transiting exoplanet, the 2.7 R{sub ?} planet GJ1214b. Here, we answer an outstanding question: in light of the bounty of small planets transiting small stars uncovered by the Kepler mission, should MEarth have found more than just one planet so far? We estimate MEarth's ensemble sensitivity to exoplanets by performing end-to-end simulations of 1.25 × 10{sup 6} observations of 988 nearby mid-to-late M dwarfs, gathered by MEarth between 2008 October and 2012 June. For 2-4 R{sub ?} planets, we compare this sensitivity to results from Kepler and find that MEarth should have found planets at a rate of 0.05-0.36 planets yr{sup –1} in its first four years. As part of this analysis, we provide new analytic fits to the Kepler early M dwarf planet occurrence distribution. When extrapolating between Kepler's early M dwarfs and MEarth's mid-to-late M dwarfs, we find that assuming the planet occurrence distribution stays fixed with respect to planetary equilibrium temperature provides a good match to our detection of a planet with GJ1214b's observed properties. For larger planets, we find that the warm (600-700 K), Neptune-sized (4 R{sub ?}) exoplanets that transit early M dwarfs like Gl436 and GJ3470 occur at a rate of <0.15 star{sup –1} (at 95% confidence) around MEarth's later M dwarf targets. We describe a strategy with which MEarth can increase its expected planet yield by 2.5 × without new telescopes by shifting its sensitivity toward the smaller and cooler exoplanets that Kepler has demonstrated to be abundant.

  3. Feature detection for spatial templates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, K.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Color Medical Image System (CMIS), a program that uses segmented mapping techniques to obtain high resolution digital images, is currently trying to develop techniques to transfer microscopic glass slides to electronic image libraries. One technique that has been attempted is to use correlation techniques to scan the image. However, when segments of high magnification are used, it is difficult and time consuming to perform correlation techniques. This project investigates feature detection in microscopic images. Various techniques are implemented to detect the section of the image containing the most feature information, thereby making the correlation process more efficient. Three tests are implemented that eliminate the background in the image and calculate the mean (1st order technique), variance (2nd order technique), and ratio test (1st order technique) of the remaining pixel values. Background elimination involves deleting all pixel values above a certain experimental value from any calculations made. The source code for each of the three tests was implemented and tested on a number of images using the green color band. Each program outputs the box containing the most features and writes that section to a file to be displayed to the screen. A visual rank was also recorded so as to compare it the output of the tests. Each of the three tests proved to be successful. After comparing the visual rank to the output of the tests, it was determined that both first and second order techniques are effective in detecting features in microscopic images. Although all of the purposes and goals were met, this investigation should be expanded to include texturized images and the use of all three color bands.

  4. Deformation of Compliant Fault Zones Induced by Nearby Earthquakes: Theoretical Investigations in Three Dimensions and Applications to The East California Shear Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Jingqian

    2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Using dynamic modeling of earthquake rupture on a strike-slip fault and seismic wave propagation in a three dimensional inhomogeneous elastoplastic medium, I investigate the inelastic response of compliant fault zones to nearby earthquakes. I...

  5. Feature Stories | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall A This photo shows oneServices »Feature

  6. Newsletter Features | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter Features Newsletter

  7. Features 2010 | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-lFederalFYRANDOMFailure ModesflowFe0 News Features

  8. Features 2011 | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-lFederalFYRANDOMFailure ModesflowFe0 News Features1

  9. Features 2012 | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-lFederalFYRANDOMFailure ModesflowFe0 News Features12

  10. Features 2013 | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-lFederalFYRANDOMFailure ModesflowFe0 News Features123

  11. Integral fast reactor safety features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cahalan, J.E.; Kramer, J.M.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Mueller, C.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Sevy, R.H.; Wade, D.C.; Wei, T.Y.C.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid-metal-cooled reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The two major goals of the IFR development effort are improved economics and enhanced safety. In addition to liquid metal cooling, the principal design features that distinguish the IFR are: (1) a pool-type primary system, (2) an advanced ternary alloy metallic fuel, and (3) an integral fuel cycle with on-site fuel reprocessing and fabrication. This paper focuses on the technical aspects of the improved safety margins available in the IFR concept. This increased level of safety is made possible by (1) the liquid metal (sodium) coolant and pool-type primary system layout, which together facilitate passive decay heat removal, and (2) a sodium-bonded metallic fuel pin design with thermal and neutronic properties that provide passive core responses which control and mitigate the consequences of reactor accidents.

  12. Multi-vehicle oceanographic feature exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ooi, Boon Teik

    Oceanographic features such as jets and vortices are often found downstream of obstacles and landforms such as islands or peninsulas. Such features have high spatial and temporal variability and are, hence, interesting but ...

  13. NEAT, An Astrometric Telescope To Probe Planetary Systems Down To The Earth Mass Around Nearby Solar-Type Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malbet, F; Goullioud, R; Shao, M; Lagage, P -O; Cara, C; Durand, G; Feautrier, P; Jakobsson, B; Hinglais, E; Mercier, M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NEAT (Nearby Earth Astrometric Telescope) mission is a proposition submitted to ESA for its 2010 call for M-size mission. The main scientific goal is to detect and characterize planetary systems in an exhaustive way down to 1 Earth mass in the habitable zone and further away, around nearby stars for F, G, and K spectral types. This survey would provide the actual planetary masses, the full characterization of the orbits including their inclination, for all the components of the planetary system down to that mass limit. Extremely- high-precision astrometry, in space, can detect the dynamical effect due to even low mass orbiting planets on their central star, reaching those scientific goals. NEAT will continue the work performed by Hipparcos (1mas precision) and Gaia (7{\\mu}as aimed) by reaching a precision that is improved by two orders of magnitude (0.05{\\mu}as, 1{\\sigma} accuracy). The two modules of the payload, the telescope and the focal plane, must be placed 40m away leading to a formation flying opt...

  14. @ work' video segment features Robotic Software Engineer

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    @ work highlights Idaho National Laboratory employees and the jobs they perform.This segment features Robotic Software Engineer Miles Walton.

  15. CHAPTER FIVE Impacts of Anthropogenic Features on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    clustering these features to maximize available habitats. Key Words: avoidance behavior, energy develop- ment Prairie-Chicken avoidance behavior of anthropogenic features be quantified for impact assessment and con of monthly home ranges (95% fixed kernels, n 539) and estimated the likelihood that anthropogenic features (i

  16. M dwarf luminosity, radius, and $\\alpha$-enrichment from $I$-band spectral features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terrien, Ryan C; Bender, Chad F; Deshpande, Rohit; Robertson, Paul

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the ubiquity of M dwarfs and their growing importance to studies of exoplanets, Galactic evolution, and stellar structure, methods for precisely measuring their fundamental stellar properties remain elusive. Existing techniques for measuring M dwarf luminosity, mass, radius, or composition are calibrated over a limited range of stellar parameters or require expensive observations. We find a strong correlation between the $K_S$-band luminosity ($M_K$), the observed strength of the $I$-band sodium doublet absorption feature, and [Fe/H] in M dwarfs without strong H$\\alpha$ emission. We show that the strength of this feature, coupled with [Fe/H] and spectral type, can be used to derive M dwarf $M_K$ and radius without requiring parallax. Additionally, we find promising evidence that the strengths of the $I$-band sodium doublet and the nearby $I$-band calcium triplet may jointly indicate $\\alpha$-element enrichment. The use of these $I$-band features requires only moderate-resolution near-infrared spectros...

  17. Cosmic rays and the magnetic field of the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heesen, V; Krause, M; Beck, R

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using radio polarimetry we study the connection between the transport of cosmic rays (CR's), the three-dimensional magnetic field structure, and features of other ISM phases in the halo of NGC 253. We present a new sensitive radio continuum map of NGC 253 obtained from combined VLA and Effelsberg observations at lambda 6.2 cm. We find a prominent radio halo with a scaleheight of the thick radio disk of 1.7 kpc. The linear dependence between the local scaleheight of the vertical continuum emission and the cosmic ray electron (CRE) lifetime requires a vertical CR bulk speed of 270 km s^-1. The magnetic field structure of NGC 253 resembles an ``X''-shaped configuration where the orientation of the large-scale magnetic field is plane-parallel only in the inner regions of the disk and at small distances from the galactic midplane. At larger galactocentric radii and further away from the midplane the vertical component becomes important. This is most clearly visible at the location of the ``radio spur'' southeast o...

  18. A Search for Extraplanar Dust in Nearby Edge-On Spirals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Christopher Howk; Blair D. Savage

    1999-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present high resolution BV images of 12 edge-on spiral galaxies observed with the WIYN 3.5-m telescope. These images were obtained to search for extraplanar (|z| > 0.4 kpc) absorbing dust structures similar to those previously found in NGC 891 (Howk & Savage 1997). Our imaged galaxies include a sample of seven massive L_*-like spiral galaxies within D 87 deg from the plane of the sky. We find that five of these seven systems show extraplanar dust, visible as highly-structured absorbing clouds against the background stellar light of the galaxies. The more prominent structures are estimated to have associated gas masses >10^5 M_sun; the implied potential energies are > 10^(52) ergs. All of the galaxies in our sample that show detectable halpha emission at large z also show extraplanar dust structures. None of those galaxies for which extraplanar halpha searches were negative show evidence for extensive high-z dust. The existence of extraplanar dust is a common property of massive spiral galaxies. We discuss several mechanisms for shaping the observed dust features, emphasizing the possibility that these dusty clouds represent the dense phase of a multiphase medium at high-z in spiral galaxies. The correlation between high-z dust and extraplanar Halpha emission may simply suggest that both trace the high-z interstellar medium in its various forms (or phases), the existence of which may ultimately be driven by vigorous star formation in the underlying disk. (Abstract abridged)

  19. Radio spectral characteristics of the supernova remnant Puppis A and nearby sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynoso, E M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a new study of the spectral index distribution of the supernova remnant (SNR) Puppis A. The nature of field compact sources is also investigated according to the measured spectral indices. This work is based on new observations of Puppis A and its surroundings performed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array in two configurations using the Compact Array Broad-band Backend centered at 1.75 GHz. We find that the global spectral index of Puppis A is -0.563 +/- 0.013. Local variations have been detected, however this global index represents well the bulk of the SNR. At the SE, we found a pattern of parallel strips with a flat spectrum compatible with small-scale filaments, although not correlated in detail. The easternmost filament agrees with the idea that the SN shock front is interacting with an external cloud. There is no evidence of the previously suggested correlation between emissivity and spectral index. A number of compact features are proposed to be evolved clumps of ejecta based...

  20. Cosmic rays and the magnetic field of the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Heesen; R. -J. Dettmar; M. Krause; R. Beck

    2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Using radio polarimetry we study the connection between the transport of cosmic rays (CR's), the three-dimensional magnetic field structure, and features of other ISM phases in the halo of NGC 253. We present a new sensitive radio continuum map of NGC 253 obtained from combined VLA and Effelsberg observations at lambda 6.2 cm. We find a prominent radio halo with a scaleheight of the thick radio disk of 1.7 kpc. The linear dependence between the local scaleheight of the vertical continuum emission and the cosmic ray electron (CRE) lifetime requires a vertical CR bulk speed of 270 km s^-1. The magnetic field structure of NGC 253 resembles an ``X''-shaped configuration where the orientation of the large-scale magnetic field is plane-parallel only in the inner regions of the disk and at small distances from the galactic midplane. At larger galactocentric radii and further away from the midplane the vertical component becomes important. This is most clearly visible at the location of the ``radio spur'' southeast of the nucleus, where the magnetic field orientation is almost vertical. We made a simple model for the dominant toroidal (r,phi) magnetic field component using a spiral magnetic field with prescribed inclination and pitch angle. The residual poloidal (r,phi,z) magnetic field component which was revealed by subtracting the model from the observations shows a distinct ``X''-shaped magnetic field orientation centered on the nucleus. The orientation angle of the poloidal magnetic field is consistent with a magnetic field transport described by the superposition of the vertical CR bulk speed and the rotation velocity. Hence, we propose a disk wind which transports cosmic rays, magnetic field, and (partially) ionized gas from the disk into the halo.

  1. CAIRNS: The Cluster And Infall Region Nearby Survey III. Environmental Dependence of H-alpha Properties of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenneth Rines; Margaret J. Geller; Michael J. Kurtz; Antonaldo Diaferio

    2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the environmental dependence of star formation in cluster virial regions and infall regions as part of CAIRNS (Cluster And Infall Region Nearby Survey), a large spectroscopic survey of the infall regions surrounding nine nearby rich clusters of galaxies. Our long-slit spectroscopy yields estimates of star formation rates in environments from cluster cores to the general large-scale structure. The fraction of galaxies with current star formation in their inner disks as traced by H-alpha emission increases with distance from the cluster and converges to the ``field'' value only at 2-3 virial radii, in agreement with other investigations. However, among galaxies with significant current star formation (EW[Ha]geq2\\AA), there is no difference in the distribution of EW[Ha] inside and outside the virial radius. This surprising result, first seen by Carter et al., suggests that (1) star formation is truncated on either very short timescales or only at moderate and high redshifts or (2) that projection effects contaminate the measurement. The number density profiles of star-forming and non-star-forming galaxies indicate that, among galaxies projected inside the virial radius, at least half of the former and 20% of the latter are ``infall interlopers,'' galaxies in the infall region but outside the virial region. The kinematics of star-forming galaxies in the infall region closely match those of absorption-dominated galaxies. This result shows that the star forming galaxies in the infall regions are not interlopers from the field and excludes one model of the backsplash scenario of galaxy transformation. Finally, we quantify systematic uncertainties in estimating the global star formation in galaxies from their inner disks.

  2. HIGH IONIZATION SPECIES IN THE NEARBY INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM FROM AN EXHAUSTIVE ANALYSIS OF THE IUE INES DATABASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freire Ferrero, R.; Halbwachs, J.-L. [Observatoire Astronomique, Universite de Strasbourg, 11 rue de l'Universite, 67.000 Strasbourg (France); Morales Duran, C.; Cabo Cubeiro, A. M., E-mail: rubens.freire@astro.unistra.fr, E-mail: jean-louis.halbwachs@astro.unistra.fr, E-mail: morales@cab.inta-csic.es, E-mail: amcabo@cab.inta-csic.es [LAEX, Centro de Astrobiologia (CAB, CSIC-INTA), LAEFF, European Space Astronomy Centre, P.O. Box 78, 28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Main-sequence (MS) and giant late-B and early-A type stars are the best targets for searching for nearby interstellar (IS) Si IV and C IV resonance lines because they are not able to produce them, either in atmospheric layers or in their circumstellar environment, and because many stars of these spectral types are nearby and located in the local interstellar medium (LISM). In addition, the use of certain stars hotter than B6 can lead to misinterpretations (e.g., alpha Arae). This work analyzes the reliable Short-Wavelength Prime high-resolution UV spectra of 558 B6-A9 type stars observed by the International Ultraviolet Explorer at distances lower than 400 pc from the Sun. For the first time, this work utilizes the entire INES database to extract stellar and IS information in a systematic way from homogeneous data. Stars were classified into seven groups: normal (MS and subgiant), giant, peculiar, emission line, Algols, pre-main sequence or Herbig Ae/Be, and shell stars. Only 10 normal stars, located beyond 90 pc, show weak Si IV and C IV absorptions and are clustered around the direction of Sco-Cen, while 85 located closer than 90 pc, as well as another 89 beyond 90 pc, do not show any absorptions at all. We conclude that these highly ionized species originate most probably in the LISM, at 90 pc from the Sun, corresponding to the warm interaction zone (IZ), where the expanding Loop I super-shell and the Local Bubble collide. We base our results on a robust statistical analysis of both spectral types and spatial distributions of the different stellar groups we defined. Our estimated column densities N of both ions are similar to those obtained by other authors for distant stars, suggesting that these absorptions concentrate fundamentally in the IZ. A logarithmic correlation between N and the distance D confirms these results.

  3. Circumnuclear Dust in Nearby Active and Inactive Galaxies. II. Bars, Nuclear Spirals, and the Fueling of Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Martini; Michael W. Regan; John S. Mulchaey; Richard W. Pogge

    2002-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    (Abridged) We present a detailed study of the relation between circumnuclear dust morphology, host galaxy properties, and nuclear activity in nearby galaxies. We use our sample of 123 nearby galaxies with visible--near-infrared colormaps from the Hubble Space Telescope to create well-matched, "paired" samples of 28 active and 28 inactive galaxies, as well as 19 barred and 19 unbarred galaxies, that have the same host galaxy properties. Comparison of the barred and unbarred galaxies shows that grand design nuclear dust spirals are only found in galaxies with a large-scale bar. Tightly wound nuclear dust spirals, in contrast, show a strong tendency to avoid galaxies with large-scale bars. Comparison of the AGN and inactive samples shows that nuclear dust spirals, which may trace shocks and angular momentum dissipation in the ISM, occur with comparable frequency in both active and inactive galaxies. The only difference between the active and inactive galaxies is that several inactive galaxies appear to completely lack dust structure in their circumnuclear region, while none of the AGN lack this structure. The comparable frequency of nuclear spirals in active and inactive galaxies, combined with previous work that finds no significant differences in the frequency of bars or interactions between well-matched active and inactive galaxies, suggests that no universal fueling mechanism for low-luminosity AGN operates at spatial scales greater than ~100 pc radius from the galactic nuclei. The similarities instead suggest that the lifetime of nuclear activity is less than the characteristic inflow time from these spatial scales. An order-of-magnitude estimate of this inflow time is the dynamical timescale. This sets an upper limit of several million years to the lifetime of an individual episode of nuclear activity.

  4. Flexible feature interface for multimedia sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coffland, Douglas R. (Livermore, CA)

    2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A flexible feature interface for multimedia sources system that includes a single interface for the addition of features and functions to multimedia sources and for accessing those features and functions from remote hosts. The interface utilizes the export statement: export "C" D11Export void FunctionName(int argc, char ** argv,char * result, SecureSession *ctrl) or the binary equivalent of the export statement.

  5. Identifying Transition State Features of Enzymatic Conformational...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Identifying Transition State Features of Enzymatic Conformational Cycles Thursday, January 5, 2012 - 11:00am SSRL Conference Room 137-322 Dr. Dimitar Pachov, HHMI Research...

  6. Digital Mapping Of Structurally Controlled Geothermal Features...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GPS Units And Pocket Computers Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Digital Mapping Of Structurally Controlled Geothermal Features...

  7. Digital Mapping Of Structurally Controlled Geothermal Features...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gps Units And Pocket Computers Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Digital Mapping Of Structurally Controlled Geothermal Features...

  8. The Role of Circulation Features on Black Carbon Transport into the Arctic in the Community Atmosphere Model Version 5 (CAM5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Po-Lun; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Kai; Easter, Richard C.; Tilmes, S.; Fast, Jerome D.; Liu, Xiaohong; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Lamarque, Jean-Francois

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Current climate models generally under-predict the surface concentration of black carbon (BC) in the Arctic due to the uncertainties associated with emissions, transport, and removal. This bias is also present in the Community Atmosphere Model Version 5.1 (CAM5). In this study, we investigate the uncertainty of Arctic BC due to transport processes simulated by CAM5 by configuring the model to run in an “offline mode” in which the large-scale circulations are prescribed. We compare the simulated BC transport when the offline model is driven by the meteorology predicted by the standard free-running CAM5 with simulations where the meteorology is constrained to agree with reanalysis products. Some circulation biases are apparent: the free-running CAM5 produces about 50% less transient eddy transport of BC than the reanalysis-driven simulations, which may be attributed to the coarse model resolution insufficient to represent eddies. Our analysis shows that the free-running CAM5 reasonably captures the essence of the Arctic Oscillation (AO), but some discernable differences in the spatial pattern of the AO between the free-running CAM5 and the reanalysis-driven simulations result in significantly different AO modulation of BC transport over Northeast Asia and Eastern Europe. Nevertheless, we find that the overall climatological circulation patterns simulated by the free-running CAM5 generally resembles those from the reanalysis products, and BC transport is very similar in both simulation sets. Therefore, the simulated circulation features regulating the long-range BC transport is unlikely the most important cause of the large under-prediction of surface BC concentration in the Arctic.

  9. Poliosis overlying a nevus with blue nevus features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Lorraine C; Dyke, Gregory S Van; Lipton, Shira; Binder, Scott W

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    overlying a nevus with blue nevus features. Acknowledgement:Poliosis overlying a nevus with blue nevus features Lorrainewith congenital as well as blue nevus features. To the best

  10. Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nature Climate Change Features Forest Research Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research The print issue features as its cover story the tree-stress research of...

  11. Theorizing the carbon economy: introduction to the special issue The term `carbon economy'often has an adjective placed nearby: the `new'carbon economy,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of carbon capture and storage and nuclear technologies. These dimensionsöand surface-level to deeperTheorizing the carbon economy: introduction to the special issue The term `carbon economy'often has an adjective placed nearby: the `new'carbon economy, the `low' carbon economy, the carbon `neutral' economy

  12. Data Foundations Data Attributes and Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Shiaofen

    1 Data Foundations Data Attributes and Features Data Pre-processing Data Storage Data Analysis Data Sources 1 Data Attributes Describing data content and characteristics Representing data Data Sortable Data Numerical Attributes 4 Discrete vs. Continuous #12;3 Statistical Features of Data 5

  13. THE ADVANCED CAMERA FOR SURVEYS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY. VI. THE ANCIENT STAR-FORMING DISK OF NGC 404

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Stilp, Adrienne [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew [Raytheon, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States); Seth, Anil C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Weisz, Daniel; Skillman, Evan, E-mail: ben@astro.washington.ed, E-mail: jd@astro.washington.ed, E-mail: stephanie@astro.washington.ed, E-mail: roskar@astro.washington.ed, E-mail: dolphin@raytheon.co, E-mail: aseth@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: dweisz@astro.umn.ed, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.ed [Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2010-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present HST/WFPC2 observations across the disk of the nearby isolated dwarf S0 galaxy NGC 404, which hosts an extended gas disk. The locations of our fields contain a roughly equal mixture of bulge and disk stars. All of our resolved stellar photometry reaches m {sub F814W} = 26 (M {sub F814W} = -1.4), which covers 2.5 mag of the red giant branch and main-sequence stars with ages <300 Myr. Our deepest field reaches m {sub F814W} = 27.2 (M {sub F814W} = -0.2), sufficient to resolve the red clump and main-sequence stars with ages <500 Myr. Although we detect trace amounts of star formation at times more recent than 10 Gyr ago for all fields, the proportion of red giant stars to asymptotic giants and main-sequence stars suggests that the disk is dominated by an ancient (>10 Gyr) population. Detailed modeling of the color-magnitude diagram suggests that {approx}70% of the stellar mass in the NGC 404 disk formed by z {approx} 2 (10 Gyr ago) and at least {approx}90% formed prior to z {approx} 1 (8 Gyr ago). These results indicate that the stellar populations of the NGC 404 disk are on average significantly older than those of other nearby disk galaxies, suggesting that early- and late-type disks may have different long-term evolutionary histories, not simply differences in their recent star formation rates. Comparisons of the spatial distribution of the young stellar mass and FUV emission in Galaxy Evolution Explorer images show that the brightest FUV regions contain the youngest stars, but that some young stars (<160 Myr) lie outside of these regions. FUV luminosity appears to be strongly affected by both age and stellar mass within individual regions. Finally, we use our measurements to infer the relationship between the star formation rate and the gas density of the disk at previous epochs. We find that most of the history of the NGC 404 disk is consistent with star formation that has decreased with the gas density according to the Schmidt law. However, {approx} 0.5-1 Gyr ago, the star formation rate was unusually low for the inferred gas density, consistent with the possibility that there was a gas accretion event that reignited star formation {approx}0.5 Gyr ago. Such an event could explain why this S0 galaxy hosts an extended gas disk.

  14. 9/18/09 2:42 PM'Big Wave' Theory Offers Alternative to Dark Energy -Tech Support Forum Page 1 of 4http://www.techsupportforum.com/relaxation-room/offline/406161-big-wave-theory-offers-alternative-dark-energy.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temple, Blake

    9/18/09 2:42 PM'Big Wave' Theory Offers Alternative to Dark Energy - Tech Support Forum Page 1 of 4http://www.techsupportforum.com/relaxation-room/offline/406161-big-wave-theory-offers-alternative-dark-energy' Theory Offers Alternative to Dark Energy User Name Remember Me? Password Log in Site Map Register Donate

  15. CHEN, LOY, GONG, XIANG: FEATURE MINING FOR LOCALISED CROWD COUNTING 1 Feature Mining for Localised Crowd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Shaogang

    CHEN, LOY, GONG, XIANG: FEATURE MINING FOR LOCALISED CROWD COUNTING 1 Feature Mining for Localised Crowd Counting Ke Chen1 cory@eecs.qmul.ac.uk Chen Change Loy2 ccloy@visionsemantics.com Shaogang Gong1 in print or electronic forms. #12;2 CHEN, LOY, GONG, XIANG: FEATURE MINING FOR LOCALISED CROWD COUNTING

  16. CMB Cold Spot from Inflationary Feature Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a "feature-scattering" mechanism to explain the cosmic microwave background cold spot seen from {\\it WMAP} and {\\it Planck} maps. If there are hidden features in the potential of multi-field inflation, the inflationary trajectory can be scattered by such features. The scattering is controlled by the amount of isocurvature fluctuations, and thus can be considered as a mechanism to convert isocurvature fluctuations into curvature fluctuations. This mechanism predicts localized cold spots (instead of hot ones) on the CMB. In addition, it may also bridge a connection between the cold spot and a dip on the CMB power spectrum at $\\ell \\sim 20$.

  17. The Heating of Mid-Infrared Dust in the Nearby Galaxy M33: A Testbed for Tracing Galaxy Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calapa, M; Draine, B T; Boquien, M; Kramer, C; Xilouris, M; Verley, S; Braine, J; Relaño-Pastor, M; van der Werf, P; Israel, F; Hermelo, I; Albrecht, M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because the 8 {\\mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission has been found to correlate with other well-known star formation tracers, it has widely been used as a star formation rate (SFR) tracer. There are, however, studies that challenge the accuracy and reliability of the 8 {\\mu}m emission as a SFR tracer. Our study, part of the Herschel M33 Extended Survey (HERM33ES) open time key program, aims at addressing this issue by analyzing the infrared emission from the nearby spiral galaxy M33 at the high spatial scale of 75 pc. Combining data from the Herschel Space Observatory and the Spitzer Space Telescope we find that the 8 {\\mu}m emission is better correlated with the 250 {\\mu}m emission, which traces cold interstellar gas, than with the 24 {\\mu}m emission. The L(8)/L(24) ratio is highly depressed in 24 {\\mu}m luminous regions, which correlate with known HII regions. We also compare our results with the dust emission models by Draine & Li (2007). We confirm that the depression of 8 {\\mu}m PAH e...

  18. BANYAN. VII. A New Population of Young Substellar Candidate Members of Nearby Moving Groups from the BASS Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gagné, Jonathan; Cruz, Kelle L; Lafrenière, David; Doyon, René; Malo, Lison; Burgasser, Adam J; Naud, Marie-Eve; Artigau, Étienne; Bouchard, Sandie; Gizis, John E; Albert, Loïc

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    [Abbreviated] We present the results of a near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic follow-up survey of 182 M4-L7 low-mass stars and brown dwarfs (BDs) from the BANYAN All-Sky Survey (BASS) for candidate members of nearby, young moving groups (YMGs). We confirm signs of low-gravity for 42 new BD discoveries with estimated masses between 8-75 $M_{Jup}$ and identify previously unrecognized signs of low gravity for 24 known BDs. This allows us to refine the fraction of low-gravity dwarfs in the high-probability BASS sample to $\\sim$82%. We use this unique sample of 66 young BDs, supplemented with 22 young BDs from the literature, to construct new empirical NIR absolute magnitude and color sequences for low-gravity BDs. We obtain a spectroscopic confirmation of low-gravity for 2MASS J14252798-3650229, which is a new $\\sim$27 $M_{Jup}$, L4 $\\gamma$ bona fide member of AB Doradus. We identify a total of 19 new low-gravity candidate members of YMGs with estimated masses below 13 $M_{Jup}$, seven of which have kinematically ...

  19. The Solar Neighborhood XXXVI: The Long-Term Photometric Variability of Nearby Red Dwarfs in the VRI Optical Bands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hosey, Altonio D; Jao, Wei-Chun; Dieterich, Sergio B; Winters, Jennifer G; Lurie, John C; Riedel, Adric R; Subasavage, John P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of long-term photometric variability for nearby red dwarfs at optical wavelengths. The sample consists of 264 M dwarfs south of DEC = +30 with V-K = 3.96-9.16 and Mv~10-20 (spectral types M2V-M8V), most of which are within 25 pc. The stars have been observed in the VRI filters for ~4-14 years at the CTIO/SMARTS 0.9m telescope. Of the 238 red dwarfs within 25 pc, we find that only ~8% are photometrically variable by at least 20 mmag (~2%) in the VRI bands. We find that high variability at optical wavelengths over the long-term can be used to identify young stars. Overall, however, the fluxes of most red dwarfs at optical wavelengths are steady to a few percent over the long term. The low overall rate of photometric variability for red dwarfs is consistent with results found in previous work on similar stars on shorter timescales, with the body of work indicating that most red dwarfs are only mildly variable. We highlight 17 stars that show long-term changes in brightness, sometimes becau...

  20. Acceleration of Solar Wind Ions by Nearby Interplanetary Shocks: Comparison of Monte Carlo Simulations with Ulysses Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew G. Baring; Keith Ogilvie; Donald Ellison; Robert Forsyth

    1996-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The most stringent test of theoretical models of the first-order Fermi mechanism at collisionless astrophysical shocks is a comparison of the theoretical predictions with observational data on particle populations. Such comparisons have yielded good agreement between observations at the quasi-parallel portion of the Earth's bow shock and three theoretical approaches, including Monte Carlo kinetic simulations. This paper extends such model testing to the realm of oblique interplanetary shocks: here observations of proton and alpha particle distributions made by the SWICS ion mass spectrometer on Ulysses at nearby interplanetary shocks are compared with test particle Monte Carlo simulation predictions of accelerated populations. The plasma parameters used in the simulation are obtained from measurements of solar wind particles and the magnetic field upstream of individual shocks. Good agreement between downstream spectral measurements and the simulation predictions are obtained for two shocks by allowing the the ratio of the mean-free scattering length to the ionic gyroradius, to vary in an optimization of the fit to the data. Generally small values of this ratio are obtained, corresponding to the case of strong scattering. The acceleration process appears to be roughly independent of the mass or charge of the species.

  1. XRF 100316D/SN 2010bh: clue to the diverse origin of nearby supernova-associated GRBs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Yi-Zhong; Xu, Dong; Liang, En-Wei; Zhang, Bing

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray Flash (XRF) 100316D, a nearby super-long under-luminous burst with a peak energy E_p \\sim 20 keV, was detected by Swift and was found to be associated with an energetic supernova SN 2010bh. Both the spectral and the temporal behavior of this burst are rather similar to that of XRF 060218, except that the latter was associated with a "less energetic" SN 2006aj and had a prominent soft thermal emission component in the spectrum. We analyze the spectral and temporal properties of this burst, and interpret the prompt gamma-ray emission and the early X-ray plateau emission as synchrotron emission from a dissipating Poynting-flux-dominated outflow, probably powered by a magnetar with a spin period of $P \\sim 10$ ms and the polar cap magnetic field $B_{\\rm p} \\sim 3\\times 10^{15}$ G. The energetic supernova SN 2010bh associated with this burst is, however, difficult to interpret within the slow magnetar model, which implies that the nascent magnetar may spin much faster with an initial rotation period $\\sim 1$...

  2. Feature Binding and the Hebb Repetition Effect 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Maeve

    2008-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies have found no evidence that long-term learning of integrated objects and individual features benefit visual short term memory tasks (Logie, Brockmole, & Vandenbroucke, in press; Olson & Jiang, 2004; Treisman, ...

  3. Feature identification framework and applications (FIFA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Audenaert, Michael Neal

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    collections that provides a general framework for applications while allowing decisions about the details of document representation and features identification to be deferred to domain specific implementations of that framework. These deferred decisions...

  4. Features . . . Cover Crop Value to Cotton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    .............................................................................................Page 6 Fuel Prices Projections - Encouraging News .......................Page 7 Agronomy Notes VolumeFeatures . . . Cotton Cover Crop Value to Cotton Cotton Price and Rotation ..............................................................Page 5 Miscellaneous Large differences in nitrogen prices.......................................Page 6

  5. Feature extraction for structural dynamics model validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemez, Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nishio, Mayuko [UNIV OF TOKYO; Worden, Keith [UNIV OF SHEFFIELD; Takeda, Nobuo [UNIV OF TOKYO

    2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This study focuses on defining and comparing response features that can be used for structural dynamics model validation studies. Features extracted from dynamic responses obtained analytically or experimentally, such as basic signal statistics, frequency spectra, and estimated time-series models, can be used to compare characteristics of structural system dynamics. By comparing those response features extracted from experimental data and numerical outputs, validation and uncertainty quantification of numerical model containing uncertain parameters can be realized. In this study, the applicability of some response features to model validation is first discussed using measured data from a simple test-bed structure and the associated numerical simulations of these experiments. issues that must be considered were sensitivity, dimensionality, type of response, and presence or absence of measurement noise in the response. Furthermore, we illustrate a comparison method of multivariate feature vectors for statistical model validation. Results show that the outlier detection technique using the Mahalanobis distance metric can be used as an effective and quantifiable technique for selecting appropriate model parameters. However, in this process, one must not only consider the sensitivity of the features being used, but also correlation of the parameters being compared.

  6. Trumpeting M Dwarfs with CONCH-SHELL: a Catalog of Nearby Cool Host-Stars for Habitable ExopLanets and Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaidos, E; Lepine, S; Buccino, A; James, D; Ansdell, M; Petrucci, R; Mauas, P; Hilton, E J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an all-sky catalog of 2970 nearby ($d \\lesssim 50$ pc), bright ($JDoppler radial velocity surveys. Stars were selected from the SUPERBLINK proper motion catalog according to absolute magnitudes, spectra, or a combination of reduced proper motions and photometric colors. From our spectra we determined gravity-sensitive indices, and identified and removed 0.2% of these as interloping hotter or evolved stars. Thirteen percent of the stars exhibit H-alpha emission, an indication of stellar magnetic activity and possible youth. The mean metallicity is [Fe/H] = -0.07 with a standard deviation of 0.22 dex, similar to nearby solar-type stars. We determined stellar effective temperatures by least-squares fitting of spectra to model predictions calibrated by fits to sta...

  7. Smart Grid Voltage Sag Detection using Instantaneous Features Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    encountered power quality disturbances. Index Terms--Smart grid, voltage sag detection, power quality (PQ as the generation system is moved nearby the distribution level and this is achieved by using a set of micro grids grids are their availability, reliability, and profitability; in order to fulfill power demand according

  8. Four nearby L dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Neill Reid; J. Davy Kirkpatrick; J. E. Gizis; C. C. Dahn; D. G. Monet; R. J. Williams; James Liebert; A. J. Burgasser

    1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present spectroscopic, photometric and astrometric observations of four bright L dwarfs identified in the course of the 2MASS near-infrared survey. Our spectroscopic data extend to wavelengths shortward of 5000\\AA in the L0 dwarf 2MASSJ0746+2000 and the L4 dwarf 2MASSJ0036+1840, allowing the identification of absorption bands due to MgH and CaOH. The atomic resonance lines Ca I 4227\\AA and Na I 5890/5896\\AA are extremely strong, with the latter having an equivalent width of 240\\AA in the L4 dwarf. By spectral type L5, the D lines extend over $\\sim1000$\\AA and absorb a substantial fraction of the flux emitted in the V band, with a corresponding effect on the (V-I) broadband colour. The KI resonance doublet at 7665/7699\\AA increases in equivalent width from spectral type M3 to M7, but decreases in strength from M7 to L0 before broadening substantially at later types. These variations are likely driven by dust formation in these cool atmospheres.

  9. The nearby supernova factory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cadence gives fewer supernovae but better constraints on thein 2003. Key words: supernovae, galaxies Preprint submitted2004 Introduction Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have proven

  10. Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Star-Forming Regions in Nearby Galaxies: Stellar Populations and Abundance Indicators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William C. Keel; Jay B. Holberg; Patrick M. Treuthardt

    2004-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present FUSE spectroscopy and supporting data for star-forming regions in nearby galaxies, to examine their massive-star content and explore the use of abundance and population indicators in this spectral range for high-redshift galaxies. New far-ultraviolet spectra are shown for four bright H II regions in M33 (NGC 588, 592, 595, and 604), the H II region NGC 5461 in M101, and the starburst nucleus of NGC 7714, supplemented by the very-low-metallicity galaxy I Zw 18. In each case, we see strong Milky Way absorption systems from H2, but intrinsic absorption within each galaxy is weak or undetectable, perhaps because of the "UV bias" in which reddened stars which lie behind molecular-rich areas are also heavily reddened. We see striking changes in the stellar-wind lines from these populations with metallicity, suggesting that C II, C III, C IV, N II, N III, and P V lines are potential tracers of stellar metallicity in star-forming galaxies. Three of these relations - involving N IV, C III, and P V - are nearly linear over the range from O/H=0.05--0.8 solar. The major difference in continuum shapes among these systems is that the giant H II complex NGC 604 has a stronger continuum shortward of 950 A than any other object in this sample. Small-number statistics would likely go in the other direction; we favor this as the result of a discrete star-forming event ~3 Myr ago, as suggested by previous studies of its stellar population. (Supported by NASA grant NAG5-8959)

  11. THE Pa{alpha} LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF H II REGIONS IN NEARBY GALAXIES FROM HST/NICMOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Guilin; Calzetti, Daniela [Astronomy Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Schinnerer, Eva [MPI for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Sofue, Yoshiaki [Department of Physics, Meisei University, 2-1-1 Hodokubo, Hino, Tokyo 191-8506 (Japan); Komugi, Shinya [Joint ALMA Office, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago 763-0355 (Chile); Egusa, Fumi [Institute of Space and Aeronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshino-dai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Scoville, Nicholas Z., E-mail: liu@pha.jhu.edu [California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The H II region luminosity function (LF) is an important tool for deriving the birthrates and mass distribution of OB associations and is an excellent tracer of the newly formed massive stars and associations. To date, extensive work (predominantly in H{alpha}) has been done from the ground, which is hindered by dust extinction and the severe blending of adjacent (spatially or in projection) H II regions. Reliably measuring the properties of H II regions requires a linear resolution <40 pc, but analyses satisfying this requirement have been done only in a handful of galaxies, so far. As the first space-based work using a galaxy sample, we have selected 12 galaxies from our HST/NICMOS Pa{alpha} survey and studied the LF and size distribution of H II regions both in individual galaxies and cumulatively, using a virtually extinction-free tracer of the ionizing photon rate. The high angular resolution and low sensitivity to diffuse emission of NICMOS also offer an advantage over ground-based imaging by enabling a higher degree of de-blending of the H II regions. We do not confirm the broken power-law LFs found in ground-based studies. Instead, we find that the LFs, both individual and co-added, follow a single power law dN(L)/dln L{proportional_to}L {sup -1}, are consistent with the mass function of star clusters in nearby galaxies, and are in agreement with the results of the existing analyses with Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data. The individual and co-added size distributions of H II regions are both roughly consistent with dN(D)/dln D{proportional_to}D {sup -3}, but the power-law scaling is probably contaminated by blended regions or complexes.

  12. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN NEARBY FGK STARS AND THE GALACTIC CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF THE LOCAL DISK AND HALO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramirez, I.; Lambert, D. L. [McDonald Observatory and Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States)] [McDonald Observatory and Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States); Allende Prieto, C. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)] [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric parameters and oxygen abundances of 825 nearby FGK stars are derived using high-quality spectra and a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis of the 777 nm O I triplet lines. We assign a kinematic probability for the stars to be thin-disk (P {sub 1}), thick-disk (P {sub 2}), and halo (P {sub 3}) members. We confirm previous findings of enhanced [O/Fe] in thick-disk (P {sub 2} > 0.5) relative to thin-disk (P {sub 1} > 0.5) stars with [Fe/H] {approx}< -0.2, as well as a 'knee' that connects the mean [O/Fe]-[Fe/H] trend of thick-disk stars with that of thin-disk members at [Fe/H] {approx}> -0.2. Nevertheless, we find that the kinematic membership criterion fails at separating perfectly the stars in the [O/Fe]-[Fe/H] plane, even when a very restrictive kinematic separation is employed. Stars with 'intermediate' kinematics (P {sub 1} < 0.7, P {sub 2} < 0.7) do not all populate the region of the [O/Fe]-[Fe/H] plane intermediate between the mean thin-disk and thick-disk trends, but their distribution is not necessarily bimodal. Halo stars (P {sub 3} > 0.5) show a large star-to-star scatter in [O/Fe]-[Fe/H], but most of it is due to stars with Galactocentric rotational velocity V < -200 km s{sup -1}; halo stars with V > -200 km s{sup -1} follow an [O/Fe]-[Fe/H] relation with almost no star-to-star scatter. Early mergers with satellite galaxies explain most of our observations, but the significant fraction of disk stars with 'ambiguous' kinematics and abundances suggests that scattering by molecular clouds and radial migration have both played an important role in determining the kinematic and chemical properties of solar neighborhood stars.

  13. THE ACS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY. IX. CONSTRAINING ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH EVOLUTION WITH OLD METAL-POOR GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girardi, Leo [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova-INAF, Vicolo dell'Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Williams, Benjamin F.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Rosenfield, Philip; Dalcanton, Julianne J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Marigo, Paola [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita di Padova, Vicolo dell'Osservatorio 2, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Boyer, Martha L. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Weisz, Daniel R.; Skillman, Evan [Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Melbourne, Jason [Caltech Optical Observatories, Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, Mail Stop 301-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Olsen, Knut A. G. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Seth, Anil C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an attempt to constrain evolutionary models of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase at the limit of low masses and low metallicities, we have examined the luminosity functions and number ratios between AGB and red giant branch (RGB) stars from a sample of resolved galaxies from the ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury. This database provides Hubble Space Telescope optical photometry together with maps of completeness, photometric errors, and star formation histories for dozens of galaxies within 4 Mpc. We select 12 galaxies characterized by predominantly metal-poor populations as indicated by a very steep and blue RGB, and which do not present any indication of recent star formation in their color-magnitude diagrams. Thousands of AGB stars brighter than the tip of the RGB (TRGB) are present in the sample (between 60 and 400 per galaxy), hence, the Poisson noise has little impact in our measurements of the AGB/RGB ratio. We model the photometric data with a few sets of thermally pulsing AGB (TP-AGB) evolutionary models with different prescriptions for the mass loss. This technique allows us to set stringent constraints on the TP-AGB models of low-mass, metal-poor stars (with M < 1.5 M{sub sun}, [Fe/H]{approx}< -1.0). Indeed, those which satisfactorily reproduce the observed AGB/RGB ratios have TP-AGB lifetimes between 1.2 and 1.8 Myr, and finish their nuclear burning lives with masses between 0.51 and 0.55 M{sub sun}. This is also in good agreement with recent observations of white dwarf masses in the M4 old globular cluster. These constraints can be added to those already derived from Magellanic Cloud star clusters as important mileposts in the arduous process of calibrating AGB evolutionary models.

  14. THE ADVANCED CAMERA FOR SURVEYS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY. V. RADIAL STAR FORMATION HISTORY OF NGC 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Roskar, Rok; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Quinn, Thomas R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Holtzman, Jon [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001, 1320 Frenger Street, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Seth, Anil C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Weisz, Daniel; Skillman, Evan [Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Cole, Andrew [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania (Australia); Debattista, Victor P. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Olsen, Knut [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); De Jong, Roelof S. [Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, 14482 Potsdam (Germany); Karachentsev, Igor D., E-mail: stephanie@astro.washington.ed [Special Astrophysical Observatory, Nizhnij Arkhyz, KChR (Russian Federation)

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of NGC 300 taken as part of the Advanced Camera for Surveys Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST). Individual stars are resolved in these images down to an absolute magnitude of M{sub F814W} = 1.0 (below the red clump). We determine the star formation history of the galaxy in six radial bins by comparing our observed color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) with synthetic CMDs based on theoretical isochrones. We find that the stellar disk out to 5.4 kpc is primarily old, in contrast with the outwardly similar galaxy M33. We determine the scale length as a function of age and find evidence for inside-out growth of the stellar disk: the scale length has increased from 1.1 +- 0.1 kpc 10 Gyr ago to 1.3 +- 0.1 kpc at present, indicating a buildup in the fraction of young stars at larger radii. As the scale length of M33 has recently been shown to have increased much more dramatically with time, our results demonstrate that two galaxies with similar sizes and morphologies can have very different histories. With an N-body simulation of a galaxy designed to be similar to NGC 300, we determine that the effects of radial migration should be minimal. We trace the metallicity gradient as a function of time and find a present-day metallicity gradient consistent with that seen in previous studies. Consistent results are obtained from archival images covering the same radial extent but differing in placement and filter combination.

  15. THE ADVANCED CAMERA FOR SURVEYS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY. IV. THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY OF NGC 2976

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Stilp, Adrienne; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Roskar, Rok; Gogarten, Stephanie M. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Seth, Anil C. [CfA Fellow, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Weisz, Daniel; Skillman, Evan [Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew [Raytheon, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States); Holtzman, Jon, E-mail: ben@astro.washington.ed, E-mail: jd@astro.washington.ed, E-mail: roskar@astro.washington.ed, E-mail: stephanie@astro.washington.ed, E-mail: aseth@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: dweisz@astro.umn.ed, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.ed, E-mail: dolphin@raytheon.co, E-mail: holtz@nmsu.ed [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001, 1320 Frenger St., Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)

    2010-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present resolved stellar photometry of NGC 2976 obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) as part of the ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST) program. The data cover the radial extent of the major axis of the disk out to 6 kpc, or approx6 scale lengths. The outer disk was imaged to a depth of M{sub F606W} approx 1, and an inner field was imaged to the crowding limit at a depth of M{sub F606W} approx -1. Through detailed analysis and modeling of the resulting color-magnitude diagrams, we have reconstructed the star formation history (SFH) of the stellar populations currently residing in these portions of the galaxy, finding similar ancient populations at all radii but significantly different young populations at increasing radii. In particular, outside of the well-measured break in the disk surface brightness profile, the age of the youngest population increases with distance from the galaxy center, suggesting that star formation is shutting down from the outside-in. We use our measured SFH, along with H I surface density measurements, to reconstruct the surface density profile of the disk during previous epochs. Comparisons between the recovered star formation rates and reconstructed gas densities at previous epochs are consistent with star formation following the Schmidt law during the past 0.5 Gyr, but with a drop in star formation efficiency at low gas densities, as seen in local galaxies at the present day. The current rate and gas density suggest that rapid star formation in NGC 2976 is currently in the process of ceasing from the outside-in due to gas depletion. This process of outer disk gas depletion and inner disk star formation was likely triggered by an interaction with the core of the M81 group approx>1 Gyr ago that stripped the gas from the galaxy halo and/or triggered gas inflow from the outer disk toward the galaxy center.

  16. VARIATIONS OF THE 10 mum SILICATE FEATURES IN THE ACTIVELY ACCRETING T TAURI STARS: DG Tau AND XZ Tau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bary, Jeffrey S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Colgate University, 13 Oak Drive, Hamilton, NY 13346 (United States); Leisenring, Jarron M.; Skrutskie, Michael F., E-mail: jbary@colgate.ed, E-mail: jml2u@virginia.ed, E-mail: mfs4n@virginia.ed [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325 Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States)

    2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the Infrared Spectrograph aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, we observed multiple epochs of 11 actively accreting T Tauri stars in the nearby Taurus-Auriga star-forming region. In total, 88 low-resolution mid-infrared spectra were collected over 1.5 years in Cycles 2 and 3. The results of this multi-epoch survey show that the 10 mum silicate complex in the spectra of two sources-DG Tau and XZ Tau-undergoes significant variations with the silicate feature growing both weaker and stronger over month- and year-long timescales. Shorter timescale variations on day- to week-long timescales were not detected within the measured flux errors. The time resolution coverage of this data set is inadequate for determining if the variations are periodic. Pure emission compositional models of the silicate complex in each epoch of the DG Tau and XZ Tau spectra provide poor fits to the observed silicate features. These results agree with those of previous groups that attempted to fit only single-epoch observations of these sources. Simple two-temperature, two-slab models with similar compositions successfully reproduce the observed variations in the silicate features. These models hint at a self-absorption origin of the diminution of the silicate complex instead of a compositional change in the population of emitting dust grains. We discuss several scenarios for producing such variability including disk shadowing, vertical mixing, variations in disk heating, and disk wind events associated with accretion outbursts.

  17. Feature recognition applications in mesh generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tautges, T.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Liu, S.S.; Lu, Y.; Kraftcheck, J.; Gadh, R. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of feature recognition as part of an overall decomposition-based hexahedral meshing approach is described in this paper. The meshing approach consists of feature recognition, using a c-loop or hybrid c-loop method, and the use of cutting surfaces to decompose the solid model. These steps are part of an iterative process, which proceeds either until no more features can be recognized or until the model has been completely decomposed into meshable sub-volumes. This method can greatly reduce the time required to generate an all-hexahedral mesh, either through the use of more efficient meshing algorithms on more of the geometry or by reducing the amount of manual decomposition required to mesh a volume.

  18. Feature Diagrams and Logics: There and Back Again Krzysztof Czarnecki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czarnecki, Krzysztof

    Feature Diagrams and Logics: There and Back Again Krzysztof Czarnecki University of Waterloo fami- lies. In their basic form, feature models contain manda- tory/optional features, feature groups in prod- uct families [15, 11, 4]. In their basic form, feature mod- els contain mandatory

  19. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015May 15, 2007 [Feature

  20. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015May 15,November8,Feature

  1. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3, 2012 [Feature Stories and

  2. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3, 2012 [Feature Stories

  3. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3, 2012 [Feature Stories7,

  4. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3, 2012 [Feature Stories7,0,

  5. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3, 2012 [Feature

  6. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3, 2012 [FeatureJuly 26, 2012

  7. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3, 2012 [FeatureJuly 26,

  8. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3, 2012 [FeatureJuly 26,1,

  9. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3, 2012 [FeatureJuly 26,1,23,

  10. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3, 2012 [FeatureJuly

  11. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3, 2012 [FeatureJuly9, 2013

  12. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3, 2012 [FeatureJuly9,

  13. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,9, 20153, 2015 [Feature

  14. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,9, 20153, 2015 [Feature15,

  15. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,9, 20153,7, 2007 [Feature

  16. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,9, 20153,7, 2007 [Feature4,

  17. Latest Feature Video | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The Energy MaterialsFeatured VideosTechnologiesLatest Feature Video

  18. Convex Principal Feature Selection Mahdokht Masaeli1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dy, Jennifer G.

    Advertising Sciences, Yahoo! Labs, Silicon Valley, CA, USA 3 Computer Aided Diagnosis and Therapy, Siemens Medical Solutions, USA {masaeli.m, yan.y, cui.yi}@neu.edu, glenn.fung@siemens.com, jdy transformation is achieved. However, true feature selection may not be achieved as non-sparse coefficients may

  19. A, Science Service Feature Released upon receipt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A, Science Service Feature Released upon receipt but intended for use July 21, 1933 ? WHY THE J every summer i n the United States and southern Canada. A citizen of South Dakota, where the mercury, i a population Of 120,000. ( A l l rights reserved by Science Service, Inc.) SCIENCE SBVICE Washington, D.C. 21st

  20. A BCience Service Feature Released oil receipt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A BCience Service Feature Released oil receipt but intended for use September 10, 1929. ? 'WXY TKE Canada, the United States (including Alaska and a West Indian service), Mexico, Costa Rica, Canal Zone there are services for Australia, New Zealand and Samoa& (All rights reserved- by---_Science--- Service, Inc

  1. Feature-oriented Runtime Adaptation Mario Pukall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cazzola, Walter

    QuickSort (dark-gray background). Figure 1: Feature Evolution in a DBMS SPL. Having recreated of a DBMS1 SPL, is replaced by fea- ture QuickSort) does not aect the running program. Usu- ally, applying (according to the modi#12;cations made in the SPL). For in- stance, the changes within the DBMS SPL require

  2. Authorization in Trust Management: Features and Foundations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skalka, Christian

    ]. In this paper we survey state-of-the-art in trust management authorization, with an emphasis on formally wellAuthorization in Trust Management: Features and Foundations Peter C. Chapin University of Vermont and Christian Skalka University of Vermont and X. Sean Wang University of Vermont Trust management systems

  3. ADVANCED DIRECT MANIPULATION OF FEATURE MODELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bidarra, Rafael

    ADVANCED DIRECT MANIPULATION OF FEATURE MODELS Rafael Bidarra, Alex Noort Faculty of Electrical validity maintenance. In particular, it offers a powerful combination of various 3D handles for real and are functionally signifi- cant for some product life-cycle phase" (Bidarra and Bronsvoort, 2000). In contrast

  4. FEATURE ARTICLE 2 Kunde Hospital: Nepal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    FEATURE ARTICLE 2 Kunde Hospital: Nepal WORK IN PROGRESS 4 Public Health in Ceylon Medical research of the Mt Everest area in Nepal who have played such an important role in Himalayan mountaineering century the region became incorporated into the Gorkha kingdom that now forms the modern nation of Nepal

  5. Historical_Habitats File Geodatabase Feature Class

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Historical_Habitats File Geodatabase Feature Class Tags Historical ecology, Ventura, Oxnard View, Meiners Oaks, Camarillo, Somis, Ventura River, Santa Clara River, Calleguas Creek, Santa Paula Springs, Ormond Beach, Mandalay Beach, Pierpont Bay, McGrath Lake, Ventura County, Los Angeles County

  6. Representing mechanical assemblies with features and mating conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qamar, Sayyad Zahid

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-level product representation has been developed and implemented, using design features for part description and mating conditions between features for the relationships among parts. The underlying ideas are that features are necessary...

  7. Chemical Feature of Eu abundance in the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, Takuji; Shigeyama, Toshikazu; Aoki, Wako

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical abundance of r-process elements in nearby dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies is a powerful tool to probe the site of r-process since their small-mass scale can sort out individual events producing r-process elements. A merger of binary neutron stars is a promising candidate of this site. In faint, or less massive dSph galaxies such as the Draco, a few binary neutron star mergers are expected to have occurred at most over the whole past. We have measured chemical abundances including Eu and Ba of three red giants in the Draco dSph by Subaru/HDS observation. The Eu detection for one star with [Fe/H]=-1.45 confirms a broadly constant [Eu/H] of ~-1.3 for stars with [Fe/H]>-2. This feature is shared by other dSphs with similar masses, i.e., the Sculptor and the Carina, and suggests that neutron star merger is the origin of r-process elements in terms of its rarity. In addition, two very metal-poor stars with [Fe/H]=-2.12 and -2.51 are found to exhibit very low Eu abundances such as [Eu/H]<-2 with an impl...

  8. automatic archaeological feature: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nancy2 University NASA Ames robots to automatically detect features. Hid- den Markov Models have been used for a long time in pattern 28 Adaptive Automatic Facial Feature...

  9. algorithm based feature: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    feature level fusion framework using two well- known biometric cryptosystems, namely, fuzzy vault 60 A stochastic algorithm for feature selection in pattern recognition...

  10. Semantic Features for Classifying Referring Search Terms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Chandler J.; Henry, Michael J.; McGrath, Liam R.; Bell, Eric B.; Marshall, Eric J.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    When an internet user clicks on a result in a search engine, a request is submitted to the destination web server that includes a referrer field containing the search terms given by the user. Using this information, website owners can analyze the search terms leading to their websites to better understand their visitors needs. This work explores some of the features that can be used for classification-based analysis of such referring search terms. We present initial results for the example task of classifying HTTP requests countries of origin. A system that can accurately predict the country of origin from query text may be a valuable complement to IP lookup methods which are susceptible to the obfuscation of dereferrers or proxies. We suggest that the addition of semantic features improves classifier performance in this example application. We begin by looking at related work and presenting our approach. After describing initial experiments and results, we discuss paths forward for this work.

  11. Soft Multiple Winners for Sparse Feature Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A simple and computationally inexpensive neural network method for generating sparse representations is presented. The network has a single layer of linear neurons and, on top of it, a mechanism, which assigns a winning strength for each neuron. Both input and output are real valued in contrast to many earlier methods, where either input or output must have been binary valued. Also, the sum of winning strengths does not have to be normalized as in some other approaches. The ability of the algorithm to find meaningful features is demonstrated in a simulation with images of handwritten numerals. 1. Introduction The objective of a feature extraction system is to refine data in such a way that further processing becomes easier. In classification, such a system has two basic goals. One is to remove redundancies from the data. This helps cutting down computational costs later on. Another, contradictory goal is to discriminate data, which helps in distinguishing between similar inputs. A fe...

  12. Minimum Redundancy Feature Selection from Microarray Gene Expression Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Hanchuan

    features or characteristics that can help identify and monitor the target diseases or function types

  13. Simultaneous Feature Extraction and Selection Using a Masking Genetic Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Simultaneous Feature Extraction and Selection Using a Masking Genetic Algorithm Michael L. Raymer: identification of functional water molecules bound to protein surfaces, and diagnosis of thyroid deficiency of feature extraction ­ defining new features in terms of the original feature set to facilitate more

  14. Visual Text Features for Image Matching Sam S. Tsai1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girod, Bernd

    Visual Text Features for Image Matching Sam S. Tsai1 , Huizhong Chen1 , David Chen1 , Vasu features that are based on text in cameraphone images. A robust text detection algorithm locates individual the visual text features in a way that resembles image features. We calculate their location, scale

  15. Quantum features of consciousness, computers and brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael B. Mensky

    2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Many people believe that mysterious phenomenon of consciousness may be connected with quantum features of our world. The present author proposed so-called Extended Everett's Concept (EEC) that allowed to explain consciousness and super-consciousness (intuitive knowledge). Brain, according to EEC, is an interface between consciousness and super-consciousness on the one part and body on the other part. Relations between all these components of the human cognitive system are analyzed in the framework of EEC. It is concluded that technical devices improving usage of super-consciousness (intuition) may exist.

  16. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM FEATURES, EVENTS AND PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaros, W.

    2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of engineered barrier system (EBS) features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to models and analyses used to support the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either Included or Excluded, is given for each FEP along with the technical basis for exclusion screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 173273]. The FEPs addressed in this report deal with those features, events, and processes relevant to the EBS focusing mainly on those components and conditions exterior to the waste package and within the rock mass surrounding emplacement drifts. The components of the EBS are the drip shield, waste package, waste form, cladding, emplacement pallet, emplacement drift excavated opening (also referred to as drift opening in this report), and invert. FEPs specific to the waste package, cladding, and drip shield are addressed in separate FEP reports: for example, ''Screening of Features, Events, and Processes in Drip Shield and Waste Package Degradation'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174995]), ''Clad Degradation--FEPs Screening Arguments (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170019]), and Waste-Form Features, Events, and Processes'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170020]). For included FEPs, this report summarizes the implementation of the FEP in the TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). This report also documents changes to the EBS FEPs list that have occurred since the previous versions of this report. These changes have resulted due to a reevaluation of the FEPs for TSPA-LA as identified in Section 1.2 of this report and described in more detail in Section 6.1.1. This revision addresses updates in Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) administrative procedures as they pertain to this report; the current procedures are addressed in Section 2. This revision also addresses updates to the technical basis in supporting analysis and model reports and corroborative documentation, as presented in Sections 4 and 6 of this report. Finally, Sections 4, 5, and 6 of this report provide additional information pertaining to the relevant FEPs-related Acceptance Criteria presented in ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (YMRP) (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274], Sections 2.2.1.2.1.3 and 2.2.1.3.3.3).

  17. Theoretical aspects of relativistic spectral features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Karas

    2006-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The inner parts of black-hole accretion discs shine in X-rays which can be monitored and the observed spectra can be used to trace strong gravitational fields in the place of emission and along paths of light rays. This paper summarizes several aspects of how the spectral features are influenced by relativistic effects. We focus our attention onto variable and broad emission lines, origin of which can be attributed to the presence of orbiting patterns -- spots and spiral waves in the disc. We point out that the observed spectrum can determine parameters of the central black hole provided the intrinsic local emissivity is constrained by theoretical models.

  18. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015May 15, 2007

  19. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015May 15, 2007February 26,

  20. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015May 15, 2007February

  1. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015May 15,

  2. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015May 15,November 2, 2006

  3. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015May 15,November 2,

  4. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015May 15,November 2,6,

  5. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015May 15,November 2,6,4,

  6. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015May 15,November 2,6,4,2,

  7. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015May 15,November

  8. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015May 15,November8, 2005

  9. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015May 15,November8, 20051,

  10. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015May 15,November8,

  11. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015May

  12. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015MaySeptember 28, 2011

  13. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015MaySeptember 28,

  14. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015MaySeptember 28,November

  15. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015MaySeptember

  16. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015MaySeptember1, 2011

  17. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015MaySeptember1,

  18. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015MaySeptember1,August 17,

  19. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015MaySeptember1,August

  20. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015MaySeptember1,August8,

  1. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,

  2. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3, 2012

  3. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3, 20123, 2013 [Facility

  4. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3, 20123, 2013 [Facility5,

  5. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3, 20123, 2013

  6. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3, 20123, 2013July 8, 2013

  7. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3, 20123, 2013July 8,

  8. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3, 20123, 2013July 8,August

  9. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  10. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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  11. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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  12. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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  13. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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  14. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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  15. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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  16. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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  17. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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  18. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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  19. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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  20. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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  1. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3, 20123,December1, 2014

  2. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3, 20123,December1, 20149,

  3. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3, 20123,December1, 20149,May

  4. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3, 20123,December1,

  5. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3, 20123,December1,November

  6. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,

  7. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,9, 2015 [Facility News,

  8. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,9, 2015 [Facility News,6,

  9. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,9, 2015 [Facility

  10. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,9, 2015 [FacilityJanuary

  11. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,9, 2015

  12. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,9, 20153, 2015

  13. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,9, 20153, 2015July 9, 2009

  14. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,9, 20153, 2015July 9,

  15. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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  16. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,9, 20153, 2015JulyJanuary

  17. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,9, 20153,

  18. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,9, 20153,7, 2007

  19. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,9, 20153,7, 2007August 27,

  20. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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  1. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,9, 20153,7, 2007AugustMarch

  2. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,9, 20153,7,

  3. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,9, 20153,7,8, 2009

  4. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,9, 20153,7,8, 200910, 2009

  5. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,9, 20153,7,8, 200910,

  6. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,9, 20153,7,8, 200910,, 2010

  7. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,9, 20153,7,8, 200910,,

  8. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,9, 20153,7,8, 200910,,9,

  9. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,9, 20153,7,8,

  10. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8,3,9, 20153,7,8,24, 2010

  11. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

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  12. DVU Featured Training & Events Form

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPMMilestone | DepartmentEA Featured Training & Events

  13. ARM - AGU Presentations Featuring ARM Data

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  14. Featured Licensing Professional - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  15. PACS photometry of the Herschel Reference Survey - Far-infrared/sub-millimeter colours as tracers of dust properties in nearby galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortese, L; Bianchi, S; Boselli, A; Ciesla, L; Bendo, G J; Boquien, M; Roussel, H; Baes, M; Buat, V; Clemens, M; Cooray, A; Cormier, D; Davies, J I; De Looze, I; Eales, S A; Fuller, C; Hunt, L K; Madden, S; Munoz-Mateos, J; Pappalardo, C; Pierini, D; Remy-Ruyer, A; Sauvage, M; Alighieri, S di Serego; Smith, M W L; Spinoglio, L; Vaccari, M; Vlahakis, C

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Herschel/PACS 100 and 160 micron integrated photometry for the 323 galaxies in the Herschel Reference Survey (HRS), a K-band-, volume-limited sample of galaxies in the local Universe. Once combined with the Herschel/SPIRE observations already available, these data make the HRS the largest representative sample of nearby galaxies with homogeneous coverage across the 100-500 micron wavelength range. In this paper, we take advantage of this unique dataset to investigate the properties and shape of the far-infrared/sub-millimeter spectral energy distribution in nearby galaxies. We show that, in the stellar mass range covered by the HRS (8

  16. New Perspectives on the X-ray Emission of HD 104237 and Other Nearby Herbig Ae/Be Stars from XMM-Newton and Chandra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Skinner; M. Guedel; M. Audard; K. Smith

    2004-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new X-ray observations of the nearby Herbig Ae star HD 104237 (= DX Cha) with XMM-Newton, whose objective is to clarify the origin of the emission. Several X-ray emission lines are clearly visible in the CCD spectra, including the high-temperature Fe K-alpha complex. The emission can be accurately modeled as a multi-temperature thermal plasma with cool (kT 3 keV) components. The presence of a hot component is compelling evidence that the X-rays originate in magnetically confined plasma, either in the Herbig star itself or in the corona of an as yet unseen late-type companion. The X-ray temperatures and luminosity (log Lx = 30.5 ergs/s) are within the range expected for a T Tauri companion, but high resolution Chandra and HST images constrain the separation of a putative companion to less than 1 arcsec. We place these new results into broader context by comparing the X-ray and bolometric luminosities of a sample of nearby Herbig stars with those of T Tauri stars and classical main-sequence Be stars. We also test the predictions of a model that attributes the X-ray emission of Herbig stars to magnetic activity that is sustained by a shear-powered dynamo.

  17. CARMA SURVEY TOWARD INFRARED-BRIGHT NEARBY GALAXIES (STING). III. THE DEPENDENCE OF ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR GAS SURFACE DENSITIES ON GALAXY PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Tony; Xue, Rui [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Bolatto, Alberto D.; Fisher, David B.; Vogel, Stuart N. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Leroy, Adam K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)] [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Blitz, Leo [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Rosolowsky, Erik [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1 (Canada); Bigiel, Frank [Institut für theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Institut für theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Ott, Jürgen [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)] [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Rahman, Nurur [Department of Physics, C1 Lab 140, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park, Johannesburg 2006 (South Africa)] [Department of Physics, C1 Lab 140, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park, Johannesburg 2006 (South Africa); Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Konigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Konigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the correlation between CO and H I emission in 18 nearby galaxies from the CARMA Survey Toward IR-Bright Nearby Galaxies (STING) at sub-kpc and kpc scales. Our sample, spanning a wide range in stellar mass and metallicity, reveals evidence for a metallicity dependence of the H I column density measured in regions exhibiting CO emission. Such a dependence is predicted by the equilibrium model of McKee and Krumholz, which balances H{sub 2} formation and dissociation. The observed H I column density is often smaller than predicted by the model, an effect we attribute to unresolved clumping, although values close to the model prediction are also seen. We do not observe H I column densities much larger than predicted, as might be expected were there a diffuse H I component that did not contribute to H{sub 2} shielding. We also find that the H{sub 2} column density inferred from CO correlates strongly with the stellar surface density, suggesting that the local supply of molecular gas is tightly regulated by the stellar disk.

  18. The interaction between radio lobes and hot gas in the nearby radio galaxies 3C285 and 3C442A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Hardcastle; R. P. Kraft; D. M. Worrall; J. H. Croston; D. A. Evans; M. Birkinshaw; S. S. Murray

    2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Chandra observations of two nearby radio galaxies in group environments, 3C285 and 3C442A. The host galaxies of both sources are involved in mergers with nearby massive galaxies, and the hot gas in the systems is extended along lines joining the interacting galaxies. Both sources show strong evidence for interactions between the radio lobes and the asymmetrical hot gas. We argue that the structure in the hot gas is independent of the existence of the radio lobes in these systems, and argue that hot gas shaped by an ongoing massive galaxy merger may play an important role in the dynamics of radio lobes in other objects. For 3C442A, our observations show that gas is being driven out of both members of the host interacting galaxy pair, and the implied constraints on galaxy velocities are consistent with mildly supersonic motions with respect to the group-scale hot gas. The previously known filamentary radio structure in the center of 3C442A may be a result of the interaction between hot gas expelled from these galaxies and pre-existing radio-emitting plasma. In 3C285, where there is no ongoing galaxy merger, the powerful radio source is probably having a significant effect on the energetics of the host group.

  19. Multiplicity features of adiabatic autothermal reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovo, M.; Balakotaiah, V. (Houston Univ., TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper singularity theory, large activation energy asymptotic, and numerical methods are used to present a comprehensive study of the steady-state multiplicity features of three classical adiabatic autothermal reactor models: tubular reactor with internal heat exchange, tubular reactor with external heat exchange, and the CSTR with external heat exchange. Specifically, the authors derive the exact uniqueness-multiplicity boundary, determine typical cross-sections of the bifurcation set, and classify the different types of bifurcation diagrams of conversion vs. residence time. Asymptotic (limiting) models are used to determine analytical expressions for the uniqueness boundary and the ignition and extinction points. The analytical results are used to present simple, explicit and accurate expressions defining the boundary of the region of autothermal operation in the physical parameter space.

  20. Component with inspection-facilitating features

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marra, John J; Zombo, Paul J

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine airfoil can be formed with features to facilitate measurement of its wall thickness. An outer wall of the airfoil can include an outer surface and an inner surface. The outer surface of the airfoil can have an outer inspection target surface, and the inner surface of the airfoil can have an inner inspection target surface. The inner and outer target surfaces can define substantially flat regions in surfaces that are otherwise highly contoured. The inner and outer inspection target surfaces can be substantially aligned with each other. The inner and outer target surfaces can be substantially parallel to each other. As a result of these arrangements, a highly accurate measurement of wall thickness can be obtained. In one embodiment, the outer inspection target surface can be defined by an innermost surface of a groove formed in the outer surface of the outer wall of the airfoil.

  1. Detection of Phonological Features in Continuous Speech using Neural Networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Simon; Taylor, Paul

    We report work on the first component of a two stage speech recognition architecture based on phonological features rather than phones. The paper reports experimentson three phonological feature systems: 1) the Sound Pattern ...

  2. Geothermal Heating and Cooling Systems Featured on NBC Nightly...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heating and Cooling Systems Featured on NBC Nightly News Geothermal Heating and Cooling Systems Featured on NBC Nightly News April 13, 2009 - 11:24am Addthis NBC Nightly News...

  3. 37th World Energy Engineering Congress / Featuring GreenStreet...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Congress Featuring GreenStreet 37th World Energy Engineering Congress Featuring GreenStreet October 1, 2014 2:00PM EDT to October 2, 2014 10:00PM EDT Washington, DC http:...

  4. On the semantics of phi features on pronouns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo, Yasutada, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis investigates three topics relating to the semantics of phi features on pronouns. Part I focuses on gender features on pronouns. Following previous studies (Cooper 1983, Heim & Kratzer 1998), I claim that they ...

  5. ARPA-E Announces 2012 Energy Innovation Summit Featuring Bill...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2012 Energy Innovation Summit Featuring Bill Gates, Fred Smith and Lee Scott ARPA-E Announces 2012 Energy Innovation Summit Featuring Bill Gates, Fred Smith and Lee Scott September...

  6. Matching Sets of Features for Efficient Retrieval and Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grauman, Kristen Lorraine

    2006-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In numerous domains it is useful to represent a single example by the collection of local features or parts that comprise it. In computer vision in particular, local image features are a powerful way to describe images of ...

  7. Matching sets of features for efficient retrieval and recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grauman, Kristen Lorraine, 1979-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In numerous domains it is useful to represent a single example by the collection of local features or parts that comprise it. In computer vision in particular, local image features are a powerful way to describe images of ...

  8. A hybrid ANN/DBN approach to articulatory feature recognition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frankel, Joe; King, Simon

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Artificial neural networks (ANN) have proven to be well suited to the task of articulatory feature (AF) recognition. Previous studies have taken a cascaded approach where separate ANNs are trained for each feature group, making the assumption...

  9. Feb. 9 Event at Jefferson Lab Features Chemistry Demonstrations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feb. 9 Event at Jefferson Lab Features Chemistry Demonstrations Set to Pop Music NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Feb. 2, 2010 - Jefferson Lab's Feb. 9 Science Series event will feature members...

  10. New Features of the Edison XC30 - Differences from Hopper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Features of the Edison XC30 New Features of the Edison XC30 While the Edison and Hopper systems have similar programming environments and software, there are some key...

  11. Feature Mining Paradigms for Scientific Data Tat-Sang Choy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkins, John

    Feature Mining Paradigms for Scientific Data Ming Jiang Tat-Sang Choy Sameep Mehta Matt Coatney techniques that can mine, track, and visualize the important features in the data. In this paper, we present to their complex evolution. Our framework includes two paradigms for feature mining, and the choice of one over

  12. Unsupervised Feature Selection for the k-means Clustering Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drineas, Petros

    Unsupervised Feature Selection for the k-means Clustering Problem Christos Boutsidis Department present a novel feature selection algorithm for the k-means clustering problem. Our algorithm any -approximate k-means algorithm ( 1) on the features selected using our method, we can find a (1

  13. Input and Output Feature Selection Alejandro Sierra and Fernando Corbacho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sierra, Alejandro

    . As a proof of concept we check its performance against the UCI spam filtering prob- lem showing are designed to choose the best features, deteriorate by 5% to 10% when a random feature is added as in market basket analysis. Here, the features are the products sold and each pattern corresponds to the set

  14. Contributed article Neuro-fuzzy feature evaluation with theoretical analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De, Rajat Kumar

    Science Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Fuzzy sets; Neural networks; Pattern recognition; Feature a fuzzy set theoretic feature evaluation index and a connectionist model for its evaluation alongContributed article Neuro-fuzzy feature evaluation with theoretical analysis R.K. De, J. Basak, S

  15. The nearby universe observed in far-infrared and in ultraviolet: an analysis of the dust attenuation and the star formation activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Buat

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the dust attenuation and the star formation rates in the nearby universe obtained from a comparison of far-infrared (IRAS) and ultraviolet (GALEX) observations. The ratio of the dust to UV flux ratio is used to derive the dust attenuation: this dust attenuation is found to increase with the luminosity of the galaxies and from z=0 to z=1. The slope of the UV continuum is found to be a very poor tracer of the dust attenuation in "normal" galaxies. Galaxies selected by their UV emission are found to be rather quiescent with a recent star formation rate equal to only 25-30% of the past averaged one. Galaxies selected in FIR appear slightly more active in star formation.

  16. Contributions to the Nearby Stars (NStars) Project: Spectroscopy of Stars Earlier than M0 within 40 parsecs: The Northern Sample I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. O. Gray; C. J. Corbally; R. F. Garrison; M. T. McFadden; P. E. Robinson

    2003-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We have embarked on a project, under the aegis of the Nearby Stars (NStars)/ Space Interferometry Mission Preparatory Science Program to obtain spectra, spectral types, and, where feasible, basic physical parameters for the 3600 dwarf and giant stars earlier than M0 within 40 parsecs of the sun. In this paper we report on the results of this project for the first 664 stars in the northern hemisphere. These results include precise, homogeneous spectral types, basic physical parameters (including the effective temperature, surface gravity and the overall metallicity, [M/H]) and measures of the chromospheric activity of our program stars. Observed and derived data presented in this paper are also available on the project's website at http://stellar.phys.appstate.edu/ .

  17. 6, 54575483, 2006 Offline and online

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    system models. 1 Introduction A key aspect of comprehensive models to study atmospheric chemistry and its and consistent representation of the spatial and temporal variability in surface exchange processes in Earth

  18. Clinical variation in epidermal features of ubiquitous plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cabral, Adolfo Celestino

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    epidermis attributes. Three dicots; Proso is ladulosa Torr. , Celtis ~1' t M'lid. , d ' ' ' M'll. , d f t B t*1 t' d 1 M' h . . ~t' d 1 El mus canadensis L. var. canadensis, Sti a leucotricha f . & R p . , d ~ h' h . . ~f (C. E. Hubb. ) Gould were... Quantitative Features. Observed Qualitative Features. . ~Sti a leucotricha. Observed Quantitative Features. 63 63 63 67 68 68 72 73 73 CHAP TER Observed Qualitative Features. . . 1 t'* t Observed Quantitative Features. . Observed Qualitative...

  19. NASA Home > News & Features > News Topics > Solar System > Features Send Print Share > Log In To MyNASA | > Sign Up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arizona, University of

    overhead to provide a birds-eye view of mountain ranges, lakes and canyons. On the ground, a rover or lakeNASA Home > News & Features > News Topics > Solar System > Features Send Print Share > Log In To MyNASA | > Sign Up News & Features News Topics Shuttle & Station Moon & Mars Solar System Sun-Earth System

  20. Features, Events, and Processes: system Level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. McGregor

    2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this analysis report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of the system-level features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either Included or Excluded, is given for each FEP along with the technical basis for screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.113 (d, e, and f) (DIRS 156605). The system-level FEPs addressed in this report typically are overarching in nature, rather than being focused on a particular process or subsystem. As a result, they are best dealt with at the system level rather than addressed within supporting process-level or subsystem-level analyses and models reports. The system-level FEPs also tend to be directly addressed by regulations, guidance documents, or assumptions listed in the regulations; or are addressed in background information used in development of the regulations. For included FEPs, this analysis summarizes the implementation of the FEP in the TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from the TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). The initial version of this report (Revision 00) was developed to support the total system performance assessment for site recommendation (TSPA-SR). This revision addresses the license application (LA) FEP List (DIRS 170760).

  1. Microstructural Features in Aged Erbium Tritide Foils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, David S.; Brewer, L. N.; Kotula, Paul G.; Cowgill, Donald F.; Busick, C. C.; Snow, C. S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aged erbium tritide foil specimens are found to contain five distinctly different microstructural features. The general structure was of large columnar grains of ErT2. But on a fine scale, precipitates believed to be erbium oxy-tritides and helium bubbles could be identified. The precipitate size was in the range of ~10 nm and the bubbles were of an unusual planar shape on {111} planes with an invariant thickness of ~1 nm and a diameter on the order of 10 nm. Also, an outer layer containing no fine precipitate structure and only a few helium bubbles was present on foils. This layer is best described as a denuded zone which probably grew during aging in air. Finally, large embedded Er2O3 particles were found at low density and non-uniformly distributed, but sometimes extending through the thickness of the foil. A failure mechanism allowing the helium to escape is suggested by observed cracking between bubbles closer to end of life.

  2. Michael Gutmann University of Helsinki ICANN2009: Learning Features by Contrasting Natural Images with Noise -p. 1/17 Learning Features by Contrasting Natural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutmann, Michael

    Contrastive feature learning Simulations Michael Gutmann ­ University of Helsinki ICANN2009: Learning Features. image vs. noise q Classifier Contrastive feature learning Simulations Michael Gutmann ­ University;Introduction q Preliminaries q Nat. image vs. noise q Classifier Contrastive feature learning Simulations

  3. Physics Features of TRU-Fueled VHTRs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lewis, Tom G.; Tsvetkov, Pavel V.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current waste management strategy for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) mandated by the US Congress is the disposal of high-level waste (HLW) in a geological repository at Yucca Mountain. Ongoing efforts on closed-fuel cycle options and difficulties in opening and safeguarding such a repository have led to investigations of alternative waste management strategies. One potential strategy for the US fuel cycle would be to make use of fuel loadings containing high concentrations of transuranic (TRU) nuclides in the next-generation reactors. The use of such fuels would not only increase fuel supply but could also potentially facilitate prolonged operation modes (viamore »fertile additives) on a single fuel loading. The idea is to approach autonomous operation on a single fuel loading that would allow marketing power units as nuclear batteries for worldwide deployment. Studies have already shown that high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) and their Generation IV (GEN IV) extensions, very-high-temperature reactors (VHTRs), have encouraging performance characteristics. This paper is focused on possible physics features of TRU-fueled VHTRs. One of the objectives of a 3-year U.S. DOE NERI project was to show that TRU-fueled VHTRs have the possibility of prolonged operation on a single fuel loading. A 3D temperature distribution was developed based on conceivable operation conditions of the 600?MWth VHTR design. Results of extensive criticality and depletion calculations with varying fuel loadings showed that VHTRs are capable for autonomous operation and HLW waste reduction when loaded with TRU fuel.« less

  4. THE ACS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY. VII. THE NGC 4214 STARBURST AND THE EFFECTS OF STAR FORMATION HISTORY ON DWARF MORPHOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Weisz, Daniel R. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Seth, Anil C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Skillman, Evan D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E., E-mail: ben@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: jd@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: kgilbert@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: dweisz@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: aseth@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.com [Raytheon, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present deep Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 optical observations obtained as part of the ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury as well as early release Wide Field Camera 3 ultraviolet and infrared observations of the nearby dwarf starbursting galaxy NGC 4214. Our data provide a detailed example of how covering such a broad range in wavelength provides a powerful tool for constraining the physical properties of stellar populations. The deepest data reach the ancient red clump at M{sub F814W} {approx} - 0.2. All of the optical data reach the main-sequence turnoff for stars younger than {approx}300 Myr and the blue He-burning sequence for stars younger than 500 Myr. The full color-magnitude diagram (CMD) fitting analysis shows that all three fields in our data set are consistent with {approx}75% of the stellar mass being older than 8 Gyr, in spite of showing a wide range in star formation rates at present. Thus, our results suggest that the scale length of NGC 4214 has remained relatively constant for many gigayears. As previously noted by others, we also find the galaxy has recently ramped up production consistent with its bright UV luminosity and its population of UV-bright massive stars. In the central field we find UV point sources with F336W magnitudes as bright as -9.9. These are as bright as stars with masses of at least 52-56 M{sub sun} and ages near 4 Myr in stellar evolution models. Assuming a standard initial mass function, our CMD is well fitted by an increase in star formation rate beginning 100 Myr ago. The stellar populations of this late-type dwarf are compared with those of NGC 404, an early-type dwarf that is also the most massive galaxy in its local environment. The late-type dwarf appears to have a similar high fraction of ancient stars, suggesting that these dominant galaxies may form at early epochs even if they have low total mass and very different present-day morphologies.

  5. Special Feature: Reducing Energy Costs with Better Batteries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reducing Energy Costs with Better Batteries Special Feature: Reducing Energy Costs with Better Batteries September 9, 2013 Contact: Linda Vu, +1 510 495 2402, lvu@lbl.gov...

  6. Fall Lectures Feature Life of Einstein; Exploring Our World With...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fall Lectures Feature Life of Einstein; Exploring Our World With Particle Accelerators NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Sept. 22, 2010 - Jefferson Lab's first 2010 Fall Science Series lecture,...

  7. Feature Detection, Characterization and Confirmation Methodology: Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karasaki, Kenzi

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and sources of salts in a granite batholith on the Canadianpetrological features of Toki Granite. STA Science Exchangefrom the rapakivi granite on the island of Hästholmen.

  8. Optimization Online - An optimization-based method for feature ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Bravi

    2015-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 27, 2015 ... Feature ranking is a very important tool for decision support systems, and ... Computational experiments both on artificial and real data sets are ...

  9. IMPROVING FISHERIES SCIENCE WITH ADVANCED SAMPLING TECHNOLOGIES FEATURE ARTICLE 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of advanced sam- pling technologies for providing accurate, precise, and timely population estimates density) in red. Echogram images are vertically exag- gerated to highlight features and patterns

  10. NERSC Helps Physicists ID New Molecules With Unique Features

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    was featured on the July 28, 2013 cover of The Journal of Chemical Physics. (Menghao Wu) That potential has since spurred worldwide interest among scientists who have been...

  11. atypical mri features: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    al. (2004) found that patients treated with typical antipsychotics exhibited 2 3-D MRI Brain Scan Feature Classification Using an Oct-tree Representation Computer Technologies and...

  12. Automatic Lung Vessel Segmentation via Stacked Multiscale Feature Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Automatic Lung Vessel Segmentation via Stacked Multiscale Feature Learning Ryan Kiros, Karteek We introduce a representation learning approach to segmenting vessels in the lungs. Our algorithm

  13. Sweetspot: Near-infrared observations of 13 type Ia supernovae from a new NOAO survey probing the nearby smooth Hubble flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weyant, Anja; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael [Pittsburgh Particle physics, Astrophysics, and Cosmology Center (PITT PACC), Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Allen, Lori; Joyce, Richard; Matheson, Thomas [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Garnavich, Peter M. [Department of Physics, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Jha, Saurabh W., E-mail: anw19@pitt.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present 13 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed in the rest-frame near-infrared (NIR) from 0.02 < z < 0.09 with the WIYN High-resolution Infrared Camera on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope. With only one to three points per light curve and a prior on the time of maximum from the spectrum used to type the object, we measure an H-band dispersion of spectroscopically normal SNe Ia of 0.164 mag. These observations continue to demonstrate the improved standard brightness of SNe Ia in an H band, even with limited data. Our sample includes two SNe Ia at z ? 0.09, which represent the most distant rest-frame NIR H-band observations published to date. This modest sample of 13 NIR SNe Ia represent the pilot sample for {sup S}weetSpot{sup —}a 3 yr NOAO Survey program that will observe 144 SNe Ia in the smooth Hubble flow. By the end of the survey we will have measured the relative distance to a redshift of z ? 0.05%-1%. Nearby Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) observations such as these will test the standard nature of SNe Ia in the rest-frame NIR, allow insight into the nature of dust, and provide a critical anchor for future cosmological SN Ia surveys at higher redshift.

  14. A planetary system around the nearby M dwarf GJ 667C with at least one super-Earth in its habitable zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anglada-Escudé, Guillem; Vogt, Steven S; Rivera, Eugenio J; Butler, R Paul; Crane, Jeffrey D; Shectman, Stephen A; Thompson, Ian B; Minniti, Dante; Haghighipour, Nader; Carter, Brad D; Tinney, C G; Wittenmyer, Robert A; Bailey, Jeremy A; O'Toole, Simon J; Jones, Hugh R A; Jenkins, James S

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We re-analyze 4 years of HARPS spectra of the nearby M1.5 dwarf GJ 667C available through the ESO public archive. The new radial velocity (RV) measurements were obtained using a new data analysis technique that derives the Doppler measurement and other instrumental effects using a least-squares approach. Combining these new 143 measurements with 41 additional RVs from the Magellan/PFS and Keck/HIRES spectrometers, reveals 3 additional signals beyond the previously reported 7.2-day candidate, with periods of 28 days, 75 days, and a secular trend consistent with the presence of a gas giant (Period sim 10 years). The 28-day signal implies a planet candidate with a minimum mass of 4.5 Mearth orbiting well within the canonical definition of the star's liquid water habitable zone, this is, the region around the star at which an Earth-like planet could sustain liquid water on its surface. Still, the ultimate water supporting capability of this candidate depends on properties that are unknown such as its albedo, atmo...

  15. A radio jet drives a molecular & atomic gas outflow in multiple regions within one square kiloparsec of the nucleus of the nearby galaxy IC5063

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dasyra, K M; Combes, F; Vlahakis, N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyzed near-infrared data of the nearby galaxy IC5063 taken with the Very Large Telescope SINFONI instrument. IC5063 is an elliptical galaxy that has a radio jet nearly aligned with the major axis of a gas disk in its center. The data reveal multiple signatures of molecular and atomic gas that has been kinematically distorted by the jet passage within an area of ~1 kpc^2. Concrete evidence that the impact of jet plasma upon gas causes the gas to accelerate comes from outflows detected near four different bending points of the jet: at the two bright radio lobes, near a diverted plasma stream close to the north lobe, and near the tip of a plasma stream in the narrow-line region. Gas moving with a velocity excess of 600 km/s to 1200 km/s with respect to ordered motions is detected in [FeII], Paa, and H2 lines. Around these regions, gas is scattered in different directions. Near the north lobe, the highly blueshifted and the highly redshifted [FeII] emission is offset by 240 pc. The (scattered or not) plasma...

  16. Feature Reinforcement Learning In Practice September 9, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutter, Marcus

    Feature Reinforcement Learning In Practice #12;Problems Robotic control in an unknown environment Feature #12;Problem formulation ht = a1o1r1o2r2a2 . . . otrt at = Agent(ht) ot+1rt+1 = Environment (Closed Finite State Machines) Markov trees are trees where given st and at, ot+1, we know st+1 Parallel

  17. Feature based volume decomposition for automatic hexahedral mesh generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LU,YONG; GADH,RAJIT; TAUTGES,TIMOTHY J.

    2000-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Much progress has been made through these years to achieve automatic hexahedral mesh generation. While general meshing algorithms that can take on general geometry are not there yet; many well-proven automatic meshing algorithms now work on certain classes of geometry. This paper presents a feature based volume decomposition approach for automatic Hexahedral Mesh generation. In this approach, feature recognition techniques are introduced to determine decomposition features from a CAD model. The features are then decomposed and mapped with appropriate automatic meshing algorithms suitable for the correspondent geometry. Thus a formerly unmeshable CAD model may become meshable. The procedure of feature decomposition is recursive: sub-models are further decomposed until either they are matched with appropriate meshing algorithms or no more decomposition features are detected. The feature recognition methods employed are convexity based and use topology and geometry information, which is generally available in BREP solid models. The operations of volume decomposition are also detailed in the paper. The final section, the capability of the feature decomposer is demonstrated over some complicated manufactured parts.

  18. CRITICAL FEATURES IN HUMAN MOTION SIMULATION FOR ERGONOMIC ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faraway, Julian

    CRITICAL FEATURES IN HUMAN MOTION SIMULATION FOR ERGONOMIC ANALYSIS Matthew P. Reed, Don B. Chaffin of choice for assessments of the physical ergonomics of products and workplaces. Software representations important for ergonomic analysis. This paper identifies and justifies a set of these critical features

  19. Topics in Biomedical Optics: introduction to the feature issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson-Prior, Linda

    Topics in Biomedical Optics: introduction to the feature issue Joseph P. Culver,1, * Wolfgang; accepted 25 March 2009; posted 25 March 2009 (Doc. ID 109253); published 30 March 2009 This Applied Optics feature issue on Topics in Biomedical Optics highlights papers presented at the 2008 Biomedical Topical

  20. Feature selection in high dimensional regression problems for genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Feature selection in high dimensional regression problems for genomics Julie Hamon1,2,3 , Clarisse, France julien.jacques@lifl.fr Abstract. In the context of genomic selection in animal breeding and "closed to real" datasets. Keywords: Feature selection, combinatorial optimization, regression, genomic. 1

  1. ON FEATURE BASED AUTOMATIC CLASSIFICATION OF SINGLE AND MULTITONE SIGNALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arabshahi, Payman

    ON FEATURE BASED AUTOMATIC CLASSIFICATION OF SINGLE AND MULTITONE SIGNALS Arindam K. Das, Payman of interest has not been previ- ously observed; it is not part of a library of known signals; and no automated demonstrating the feasibility of the above features for au- tomatic classification purposes of single

  2. Termination Semantics of Logic Programs with Cut and Related Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giesl, Juergen

    Termination Semantics of Logic Programs with Cut and Related Features Jamie Andrews Dept of termination for logic programs. I am particularly interested in the termination of logic programs which use practical features such as the Prolog ``cut''. In order to prove termination of such programs

  3. Middleware Support For Crosscutting Features in Distributed, Heterogeneous Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devanbu, Prem

    for such features are often locality-dependent and discovered late (e.g., security policies). The DADO3 approach helps program crosscutting features in standard CORBA based DH middleware software through an aspect-oriented approach. A DADO service comprises pairs of adaptlets which are explicitly modeled in IDL. Adaplets may

  4. New MOX Conservation Garden Features Federally Endangered Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    New MOX Conservation Garden Features Federally Endangered Plant Linda Lee, botanist operating officer of Shaw AREVA MOX Services, place the final stones in the new MOX Conservation Garden. A conservation garden that features a rare, endangered plant native to SRS was dedicated April 23 at MOX Fuel

  5. Using Negative Shape Features for Logo Similarity Matching Aya Soffer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samet, Hanan

    Using Negative Shape Features for Logo Similarity Matching Aya Soffer , Hanan Samet y Computer A method for representing and matching logos based on positiveandnegative shape features ispresented. Neg. The goal is to find logos in a database that are most similar to a given sample logo. A border is added

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE NEARBY L/T BINARY BROWN DWARF WISE J104915.57-531906.1 AT 2 pc FROM THE SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kniazev, A. Y.; Vaisanen, P.; Potter, S. B.; Crawford, S.; Gulbis, A. A. S. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, 7935 Observatory, Cape Town (South Africa); Muzic, K.; Mehner, A.; Boffin, H. M. J.; Melo, C.; Ivanov, V. D.; Girard, J.; Mawet, D.; Schmidtobreick, L. [European Southern Observatory, Ave. Alonso de Cordova 3107, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile); Kurtev, R.; Borissova, J. [Departamento de Fisica y Astronomia, Universidad de Valparaiso, Av. Gran Bretana 1111, Playa Ancha, 5030 Casilla (Chile); Huelamo, N. [CAB (INTA-CSIC), LAEFF, P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Minniti, D. [Departamento Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Av. Vicuna Mackenna 4860, Santiago (Chile); Ishibashi, K. [Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Beletsky, Y. [Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Colina el Pino, Casilla 601 La Serena (Chile); Buckley, D. A. H. [Southern African Large Telescope Foundation, P.O. Box 9, 7935 Observatory, Cape Town (South Africa); and others

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    WISE J104915.57-531906.1 is a L/T brown dwarf binary located 2 pc from the Sun. The pair contains the closest known brown dwarfs and is the third closest known system, stellar or sub-stellar. We report comprehensive follow-up observations of this newly uncovered system. We have determined the spectral types of both components (L8 {+-} 1, for the primary, agreeing with the discovery paper; T1.5 {+-} 2 for the secondary, which was lacking spectroscopic type determination in the discovery paper) and, for the first time, their radial velocities (V{sub rad} {approx} 23.1, 19.5 km s{sup -1}) using optical spectra obtained at the Southern African Large Telescope and other facilities located at the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO). The relative radial velocity of the two components is smaller than the range of orbital velocities for theoretically predicted masses, implying that they form a gravitationally bound system. We report resolved near-infrared JHK{sub S} photometry from the Infrared Survey Facility telescope at the SAAO which yields colors consistent with the spectroscopically derived spectral types. The available kinematic and photometric information excludes the possibility that the object belongs to any of the known nearby young moving groups or associations. Simultaneous optical polarimetry observations taken at the SAAO 1.9 m give a non-detection with an upper limit of 0.07%. For the given spectral types and absolute magnitudes, 1 Gyr theoretical models predict masses of 0.04-0.05 M{sub Sun} for the primary, and 0.03-0.05 M{sub Sun} for the secondary.

  7. A Sub-Millimeter Search of Nearby Young Stars for Cold Dust: Discovery of Debris Disks around Two Low-Mass Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael C. Liu; Brenda C. Matthews; Jonathan P. Williams; Paul G. Kalas

    2004-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    (Abridged) We present results from a JCMT/SCUBA 850 um search for cold dust around nearby young stars belonging to the beta Pic (t~12 Myr) and the Local Association (t~50 Myr) moving groups. Unlike most past sub-mm studies, our sample was chosen on the basis of stellar age. Our observations achieve about an order of magnitude greater sensitivity in dust mass compared to previous work in this age range. We detected two of the three M dwarfs in our sample at 850 um, GJ 182 and GJ 803. GJ 182 may also possess a 25 um excess, indicative of warm dust in the inner few AU of its disk. For GJ 803 (AU Mic), sub-mm mapping finds that the 850 um emission is unresolved. A non-detection of the CO 3-2 line indicates the system is gas-poor, and the SED suggests the presence of a large inner disk hole (~17 AU = 1.7 arcsec in radius). These are possible indications that planets at large separations can form around M dwarfs within \\~10 Myr. In a companion paper (Kalas, Liu & Matthews 2004), we confirm the existence of a dust disk around GJ 803 using optical coronagraphic imaging. Given its youthfulness, proximity, and detectability, the GJ 803 disk will be a valuable system for studying disk, and perhaps planet, formation in great detail. Overall, sub-mm measurements of debris disks point to a drop in dust mass by a factor of about 10^3 within the first ~10 Myr, with the subsequent decline in the masses of sub-mm detected disks consistent with t^{-0.5} to t^{-1}.

  8. THE ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH AND THE TIP OF THE RED GIANT BRANCH AS PROBES OF STAR FORMATION HISTORY: THE NEARBY DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXY KKH 98

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melbourne, J. [Caltech Optical Observatories, Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, Mail Stop 301-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Williams, B.; Dalcanton, J. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Ammons, S. M.; Max, C.; Koo, D. C. [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Girardi, Leo [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova-INAF, Padova (Italy); Dolphin, A., E-mail: jmel@caltech.ed, E-mail: ben@astro.washington.ed, E-mail: jd@astro.washington.ed, E-mail: ammons@ucolick.or, E-mail: max@ucolick.or, E-mail: koo@ucolick.or, E-mail: leo.girardi@oapd.inaf.i, E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.co [Raytheon, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States)

    2010-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the utility of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and the red giant branch (RGB) as probes of the star formation history (SFH) of the nearby (D = 2.5 Mpc) dwarf irregular galaxy, KKH 98. Near-infrared (near-IR) Keck Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics (AO) images resolve 592 IR-bright stars reaching over 1 mag below the tip of the RGB. Significantly deeper optical (F475W and F814W) Hubble Space Telescope images of the same field contain over 2500 stars, reaching to the red clump and the main-sequence turnoff for 0.5 Gyr old populations. Compared to the optical color-magnitude diagram (CMD), the near-IR CMD shows significantly tighter AGB sequences, providing a good probe of the intermediate-age (0.5-5 Gyr) populations. We match observed CMDs with stellar evolution models to recover the SFH of KKH 98. On average, the galaxy has experienced relatively constant low-level star formation (5 x 10{sup -4} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) for much of cosmic time. Except for the youngest main-sequence populations (age <0.1 Gyr), which are typically fainter than the AO data flux limit, the SFH estimated from the 592 IR-bright stars is a reasonable match to that derived from the much larger optical data set. Differences between the optical- and IR-derived SFHs for 0.1-1 Gyr populations suggest that current stellar evolution models may be overproducing the AGB by as much as a factor of 3 in this galaxy. At the depth of the AO data, the IR-luminous stars are not crowded. Therefore, these techniques can potentially be used to determine the stellar populations of galaxies at significantly further distances.

  9. GOOGLE EARTH QUICK GUIDE (1)Google Earth Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith-Konter, Bridget

    GOOGLE EARTH QUICK GUIDE (1)Google Earth Features The Google Earth of the Google Earth window. Often when opening up the Google Earth program, the view screen will be a view of the entire Earth from space. Navigation bar

  10. PPPL's Earth Week features Colloquium on NYC green plan, cleanup...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PPPL's Earth Week features Colloquium on NYC green plan, cleanup and awards By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe April 28, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Volunteers clean...

  11. MATCHING IMAGE FEATURE STRUCTURES USING SHOULDER ANALYSIS METHOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kovalerchuk, Boris

    at them. Consider the two satellite images of a lake in Kyrgyzstan in Fig. 1. Fig. 1. Two images of the lake Sonkyl in Kyrgyzstan. Feature extraction programs can be used to construct numerous polylines

  12. Efficient Match Kernels between Sets of Features for Visual Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bebendorf, Mario

    . Various methods for creating vocabularies exist [10], the most common being k-means clustering of all (or of local features, then derive their similarity using distribution-based comparison measures [12, 18, 2

  13. Learning Energy Demand Domain Knowledge via Feature Transformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Povinelli, Richard J.

    Learning Energy Demand Domain Knowledge via Feature Transformation Sanzad Siddique Department -- Domain knowledge is an essential factor for forecasting energy demand. This paper introduces a method knowledge substantially improves energy demand forecasting accuracy. However, domain knowledge may differ

  14. Enhancing inductive learning with feature selection and example selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Baranidharan

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    independently and as a combined scheme. We propose a sequential search filter approach called Subset selection using Case-based Relevance APproach (SCRAP) for identifying and eliminating irrelevant features. The SCRAP filter addresses the problem of finding a...

  15. Discrete Feature Approach for Heterogeneous Reservoir Production Enhancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dershowitz, William S.; Curran, Brendan; Einstein, Herbert; LaPointe, Paul; Shuttle, Dawn; Klise, Kate

    2002-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The report presents summaries of technology development for discrete feature modeling in support of the improved oil recovery (IOR) for heterogeneous reservoirs. In addition, the report describes the demonstration of these technologies at project study sites.

  16. Intrinsic feature-based pose measurement for imaging motion compensation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baba, Justin S.; Goddard, Jr., James Samuel

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods for generating motion corrected tomographic images are provided. A method includes obtaining first images of a region of interest (ROI) to be imaged and associated with a first time, where the first images are associated with different positions and orientations with respect to the ROI. The method also includes defining an active region in the each of the first images and selecting intrinsic features in each of the first images based on the active region. Second, identifying a portion of the intrinsic features temporally and spatially matching intrinsic features in corresponding ones of second images of the ROI associated with a second time prior to the first time and computing three-dimensional (3D) coordinates for the portion of the intrinsic features. Finally, the method includes computing a relative pose for the first images based on the 3D coordinates.

  17. Implementing autonomous crowds in a computer generated feature film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, John Andre

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The implementation of autonomous, flocking crowds of background characters in the feature film Â?RobotsÂ? is discussed. The techniques for obstacle avoidance and goal seeking are described. An overview of the implementation of the system as part...

  18. Dynamics of low capillary number interfaces moving through sharp features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , New Mexico 87185 Roger T. Bonnecazea Department of Chemical Engineering and Texas Materials Institute of the feature filling suggest an effective boundary condition for a macroscopic lubrication model of the imprint

  19. aerodynamic design features: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Aerodynamic design optimization using flow feature parameterization. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary:...

  20. The effective field theory of inflation models with sharp features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartolo, Nicola; Cannone, Dario; Matarrese, Sabino, E-mail: nicola.bartolo@pd.infn.it, E-mail: dario.cannone@pd.infn.it, E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ''G. Galilei'', Università degli Studi di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe models of single-field inflation with small and sharp step features in the potential (and sound speed) of the inflaton field, in the context of the Effective Field Theory of Inflation. This approach allows us to study the effects of features in the power-spectrum and in the bispectrum of curvature perturbations, from a model-independent point of view, by parametrizing the features directly with modified ''slow-roll'' parameters. We can obtain a self-consistent power-spectrum, together with enhanced non-Gaussianity, which grows with a quantity ? that parametrizes the sharpness of the step. With this treatment it is straightforward to generalize and include features in other coefficients of the effective action of the inflaton field fluctuations. Our conclusion in this case is that, excluding extrinsic curvature terms, the only interesting effects at the level of the bispectrum could arise from features in the first slow-roll parameter ? or in the speed of sound c{sub s}. Finally, we derive an upper bound on the parameter ? from the consistency of the perturbative expansion of the action for inflaton perturbations. This constraint can be used for an estimation of the signal-to-noise ratio, to show that the observable which is most sensitive to features is the power-spectrum. This conclusion would change if we consider the contemporary presence of a feature and a speed of sound c{sub s} < 1, as, in such a case, contributions from an oscillating folded configuration can potentially make the bispectrum the leading observable for feature models.

  1. Multi-tube fuel nozzle with mixing features

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughes, Michael John

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A system includes a multi-tube fuel nozzle having an inlet plate and a plurality of tubes adjacent the inlet plate. The inlet plate includes a plurality of apertures, and each aperture includes an inlet feature. Each tube of the plurality of tubes is coupled to an aperture of the plurality of apertures. The multi-tube fuel nozzle includes a differential configuration of inlet features among the plurality of tubes.

  2. Volume Decomposition and Feature Recognition for Hexahedral Mesh Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GADH,RAJIT; LU,YONG; TAUTGES,TIMOTHY J.

    1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable progress has been made on automatic hexahedral mesh generation in recent years. Several automatic meshing algorithms have proven to be very reliable on certain classes of geometry. While it is always worth pursuing general algorithms viable on more general geometry, a combination of the well-established algorithms is ready to take on classes of complicated geometry. By partitioning the entire geometry into meshable pieces matched with appropriate meshing algorithm the original geometry becomes meshable and may achieve better mesh quality. Each meshable portion is recognized as a meshing feature. This paper, which is a part of the feature based meshing methodology, presents the work on shape recognition and volume decomposition to automatically decompose a CAD model into meshable volumes. There are four phases in this approach: (1) Feature Determination to extinct decomposition features, (2) Cutting Surfaces Generation to form the ''tailored'' cutting surfaces, (3) Body Decomposition to get the imprinted volumes; and (4) Meshing Algorithm Assignment to match volumes decomposed with appropriate meshing algorithms. The feature determination procedure is based on the CLoop feature recognition algorithm that is extended to be more general. Results are demonstrated over several parts with complicated topology and geometry.

  3. The Unidentified InfraRed Features after ISO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Peeters; L. J. Allamandola; D. M. Hudgins; S. Hony; A. G. G. M. Tielens

    2003-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) has provided the first complete mid-IR spectra for a wide range of objects. Almost all of these spectra are dominated by the well-known infrared emission features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, and 11.2 $\\mu$m, the so-called Unidentified Infra-Red (UIR) features. Besides the major features, there is an array of minor features and broad plateaux stretching from 3 to 20 $\\mu$m which reveal subtle details of conditions in the emission zones and properties of the carriers. Generally attributed to the vibrational relaxation of UV-pumped Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon molecules (PAHs) containing some 50--100 C-atoms, these UIR spectra are a treasure trove of information. The ISO spectra have, for the first time, allowed a systematic analysis of the spectral characteristics of the UIR features in a wide variety of environments. The peak positions, profiles, and relative strengths of the major features vary from source to source and spatially within sources. These specific profiles are not unique to certain object types but can occur within each individual source. Here, we review ISO and recent ground-based observations and assess some of their implications.

  4. Genetic programming approach to extracting features from remotely sensed imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theiler, J. P. (James P.); Perkins, S. J. (Simon J.); Harvey, N. R. (Neal R.); Szymanski, J. J. (John J.); Brumby, Steven P.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-instrument data sets present an interesting challenge to feature extraction algorithm developers. Beyond the immediate problems of spatial co-registration, the remote sensing scientist must explore a complex algorithm space in which both spatial and spectral signatures may be required to identify a feature of interest. We describe a genetic programming/supervised classifier software system, called Genie, which evolves and combines spatio-spectral image processing tools for remotely sensed imagery. We describe our representation of candidate image processing pipelines, and discuss our set of primitive image operators. Our primary application has been in the field of geospatial feature extraction, including wildfire scars and general land-cover classes, using publicly available multi-spectral imagery (MSI) and hyper-spectral imagery (HSI). Here, we demonstrate our system on Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) MSI. We exhibit an evolved pipeline, and discuss its operation and performance.

  5. Microscale Confinement features in microfluidic devices can affect biofilm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Aloke [ORNL] [ORNL; Karig, David K [ORNL] [ORNL; Neethirajan, Suresh [University of Guelph] [University of Guelph; Acharya, Rajesh K [ORNL] [ORNL; Mukherjee, Partha P [ORNL] [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL] [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biofilms are aggregations of microbes that are encased by extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) and adhere to surfaces and interfaces. Biofilm development on abiotic surfaces is a dynamic process, which typically proceeds through an initial phase of adhesion of plankntonic microbes to the substrate, followed by events such as growth, maturation and EPS secretion. However, the coupling of hydrodynamics, microbial adhesion and biofilm growth remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the effect of semiconfined features on biofilm formation. Using a microfluidic device and fluorescent time-lapse microscopy, we establish that confinement features can significantly affect biofilm formation. Biofilm dynamics change not only as a function of confinement features, but also of the total fluid flow rate, and our combination of experimental results and numerical simulations reveal insights into the link between hydrodynamics and biofilm formation.

  6. SOLAR MAGNETIC TRACKING. IV. THE DEATH OF MAGNETIC FEATURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamb, D. A.; Howard, T. A.; DeForest, C. E. [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Parnell, C. E. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Welsch, B. T., E-mail: derek@boulder.swri.edu [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California-Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The removal of magnetic flux from the quiet-Sun photosphere is important for maintaining the statistical steady state of the magnetic field there, for determining the magnetic flux budget of the Sun, and for estimating the rate of energy injected into the upper solar atmosphere. Magnetic feature death is a measurable proxy for the removal of detectable flux, either by cancellation (submerging or rising loops, or reconnection in the photosphere) or by dispersal of flux. We used the SWAMIS feature tracking code to understand how nearly 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} magnetic features die in an hour-long sequence of Hinode/SOT/NFI magnetograms of a region of the quiet Sun. Of the feature deaths that remove visible magnetic flux from the photosphere, the vast majority do so by a process that merely disperses the previously detected flux so that it is too small and too weak to be detected, rather than completely eliminating it. The behavior of the ensemble average of these dispersals is not consistent with a model of simple planar diffusion, suggesting that the dispersal is constrained by the evolving photospheric velocity field. We introduce the concept of the partial lifetime of magnetic features, and show that the partial lifetime due to Cancellation of magnetic flux, 22 hr, is three times slower than previous measurements of the flux turnover time. This indicates that prior feature-based estimates of the flux replacement time may be too short, in contrast with the tendency for this quantity to decrease as resolution and instrumentation have improved. This suggests that dispersal of flux to smaller scales is more important for the replacement of magnetic fields in the quiet Sun than observed bipolar cancellation. We conclude that processes on spatial scales smaller than those visible to Hinode dominate the processes of flux emergence and cancellation, and therefore also the quantity of magnetic flux that threads the photosphere.

  7. WebFEATURE: An interactive web tool for identifying and visualizing functional sites on macromolecular structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brutlag, Doug

    1 WebFEATURE: An interactive web tool for identifying and visualizing functional sites University, Stanford CA 94305 USA Abstract WebFEATURE (http://feature.stanford.edu/webfeature/) is a web and nucleic acids. WebFEATURE is the public interface to the scanning algorithm of the FEATURE package

  8. Sample Spaces and Feature Models: There and Back Again Krzysztof Czarnecki, Steven She

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czarnecki, Krzysztof

    Sample Spaces and Feature Models: There and Back Again Krzysztof Czarnecki, Steven She University of feature configurations, each representing a particular product in the family. Basic feature models had propagation and auto- completion [13], and feature model refactoring [2]. Although basic feature models

  9. Is the silicate emission feature only influenced by grain size?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. V. Voshchinnikov; Th. Henning

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The flattening of the 10mu silicate emission feature observed in the spectra of T Tauri and Herbig Ae/Be stars is usually interpreted as an indicator of grain growth. We show in this paper that a similar behaviour of the feature shape occurs when the porosity of composite grains varies. The fluffy aggregates, having inclusions of different sizes, were modeled by multi-layered spheres consisting of amorphous carbon, amorphous silicate and vacuum. It is also found that the inclusion of crystalline silicates in composite porous particles can lead to a shift of the known resonances and production of new ones.

  10. Hydrocarbon emission features in the IR spectra of warm supergiants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buss, R.H. Jr.; Cohen, M.; Tielens, A.G.G.M.; Werner, M.W.; Bregman, J.D. (NASA, Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (USA))

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations in the 3-13 micron range are presented for two objects possessing the unidentified 21-micron feature, IRAS 22272 and IRAS 07134, which were obtained in the course of search for circumstellar aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission bands. The 3.3 and 6.2 micron bands are attributed to circumstellar PAH molecules, and the 6-9 micron plateau and the 12- and 6.9-micron lines are attributed to larger, aromatic hydrocarbon clusters. These are the coolest stars known to exhibit the IR emission bands. The 21-micron feature is conjectured to also originate in a carbonaceous carrier. 29 refs.

  11. INTRODUCTION 1. The phrase `continuous cover forestry' has featured

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 INTRODUCTION 1. The phrase `continuous cover forestry' has featured increasingly in discussions about the future management of British forests. For example, The UK forestry standard (Forestry cover forestry system and to build them into the forest design'. `Continuous cover' is defined

  12. Author's personal copy Optimal feature selection for support vector machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the classification process. This paper proposes a convex energy-based framework to jointly perform feature selection classification problems because of their flexibility, compu- tational efficiency and capacity to handle high classification accuracy, computational efficiency, and learning convergence. First, the implicit regularization

  13. Routing for Wireless Multi Hop Networks Unifying and Distinguishing Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Nick

    -to-end communication, wireless communication provides flexible deployment and use, cost reduction, mobility, network dynamic network conditions due to interference, loss of signal power with distance and freedom of mobilityRouting for Wireless Multi Hop Networks ­ Unifying and Distinguishing Features Technical Report

  14. Surface Topography Quantification by Integral and Feature-related Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smid, Michiel

    Surface Topography Quantification by Integral and Feature-related Parameters Quantifizieren von microscopy, the topography of brittle fracture surfaces and wire- eroded surfaces was quantified. The globalÈche, Topometrie 1 Introduction Surface topographies contain information about their gen- eration processes

  15. New Augmented Reality Taxonomy : Technologies and Features of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Chapter 1 New Augmented Reality Taxonomy : Technologies and Features of Augmented Environment to define augmented reality (AR) en- vironments and secondly, based on our definition, a new taxonomy space combining the real environment and a virtual environment. Below we present our functional taxonomy

  16. Green Building Features Northwest Center for Engineering, Science and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Green Building Features Northwest Center for Engineering, Science and Technology RESOURCE for commercial buildings developed by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) to provide a national consensus in what constitutes a "green" building and to provide market incentives to build green. PSU has received

  17. 38 renewable energy focus July/August 2009 Feature article

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hampshire, Damian

    38 renewable energy focus July/August 2009 Feature article Compact electrical generators.: Illustration shows magnified view of high temperature superconductor cable. #12;renewable energy focus July/August 2009 39 Renewable energy/infrastructure there has been excitement about superconductivity. The sting

  18. Feature-based design for heterogeneous objects Xiaoping Qiana,*,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Xiaoping

    and combination of these material features, are developed. A physics (diffusion) based B-spline method the implantation. A graded layer of hydroxyapatite (HAp) is coated on the porous metal. It bonds to the bone titanium plus 0010-4485/$ - see front matter q 2004 Elsevier L

  19. Advertiser retains sole responsibility for content ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    a recently opened center in Barcelona, Spain -- RMIT boasts a rich portfolio of teaching and research Solar, or photovoltaic, cells are a com- mon feature in today's cities and the electricity they generate. "Solar thermal energy is fundamen- tally more efficient than photovoltaics," explains Rosengarten. While

  20. SPATIAL POINT PROCESSES AND GRAPH BASED STATISTICAL FEATURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jyväskylä, University of

    2010 2000 Mathematics Subject Classification. 60G55, 62-07, 62M30. ISSN 1457-9235 #12;SPATIAL POINT Classification. 60G55, 62-07, 62M30. 1 #12;Spatial point processes and graph based statistical features Tuomas library has been developed for the computation of the graph-based summaries. Keywords: Spatial point

  1. COG - Special Features of Interest to Criticality Safety Practitioners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, R M; Heinrichs, D P; Krass, A W; Lent, E M

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    COG is a modern, general-purpose, high fidelity, multi-particle transport code developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory specifically for use in deep penetration (shielding) and criticality safety calculations. This paper describes some features in COG of special interest to criticality safety practitioners.

  2. SpecialFeature Ecology, 84(3), 2003, pp. 574577

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonovics, Janis

    574 SpecialFeature Ecology, 84(3), 2003, pp. 574­577 2003 by the Ecological Society of America WHAT that genetics should be incorporated into ecological explanations (Collins 1986). C. C. Adams (1915) sug- gested. Evolutionary ecology emerged in the 1960s, driven by empirical results in three areas (Collins 1986

  3. SpecialFeature Ecology, 86(5), 2005, pp. 11241134

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilleland, Eric

    1124 SpecialFeature Ecology, 86(5), 2005, pp. 1124­1134 2005 by the Ecological Society of America STATISTICS OF EXTREMES: MODELING ECOLOGICAL DISTURBANCES RICHARD W. KATZ,1,3 GRACE S. BRUSH,2 AND MARC B ecological disturbances is the central theme of this paper. The statistics of extremes have played only

  4. ORNL Lightweighting Research Featured on MotorWeek

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    PBS MotorWeek, television's longest running automotive series, featured ORNL lightweighting research for vehicle applications in an episode that aired in early April 2014. The crew captured footage of research including development of new metal alloys, additive manufacturing, carbon fiber production, advanced batteries, power electronics components, and neutron imaging applications for materials evaluation.

  5. Foveated Analysis of Image Features at Umesh Rajashekar a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajashekar, Umesh

    Foveated Analysis of Image Features at Fixations Umesh Rajashekar a , Ian van der Linde a,b , Alan@ece.utexas.edu (Ian van der Linde ), bovik@ece.utexas.edu (Alan C. Bovik), cormack@psy.utexas.edu (Lawrence K. Cormack

  6. ORNL Lightweighting Research Featured on MotorWeek

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    PBS MotorWeek, television's longest running automotive series, featured ORNL lightweighting research for vehicle applications in an episode that aired in early April 2014. The crew captured footage of research including development of new metal alloys, additive manufacturing, carbon fiber production, advanced batteries, power electronics components, and neutron imaging applications for materials evaluation.

  7. Energy efficient HVAC system features thermal storage and heat recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bard, E.M. (Bard, Rao + Athanas Consulting Engineering Inc., Boston, MA (United States))

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes a HVAC system designed to efficiently condition a medical center. The topics of the article include energy efficient design of the HVAC system, incentive rebate program by the local utility, indoor air quality, innovative design features, operations and maintenance, payback and life cycle cost analysis results, and energy consumption.

  8. Improving Moments-based Visual Servoing with Tunable Visual Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    that are subjects of active research. The first is the design of visual features most pertinent to the robotic task and y rotational motions. With the proposed method, it is possible to design moment invariants to demonstrate the validity of the proposed ideas. Results from each case are then used to design a moment

  9. 2014 Plant Sale Featuring a variety of trees, shrubs,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    of trees, shrubs, and perennials ideal for growing in Happy Valley, such as hard-to-find Pennsylvania1 2014 Plant Sale Featuring a variety of trees, shrubs, and perennials ideal for growing in Happy Valley, such as hard-to-find Pennsylvania natives, some of the best performers in the H.O. Smith Botanic

  10. 2013 Plant Sale Featuring a variety of trees, shrubs,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    for growing in Happy Valley, such as hard-to-find Pennsylvania natives, some of the best performers in the H1 2013 Plant Sale Featuring a variety of trees, shrubs, and perennials ideal for growing in Happy Valley, such as hard-to-find Pennsylvania natives, some of the best performers in the H.O. Smith Botanic

  11. Accurate Visual Features for Automatic Tag Correction in Videos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Accurate Visual Features for Automatic Tag Correction in Videos Hoang-Tung Tran, Elisa Fromont-Etienne, Fr Abstract. We present a new system for video auto tagging which aims at correcting the tags provided by users for videos uploaded on the In- ternet. Unlike most existing systems, in our proposal, we

  12. absorption features dust: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absorption features dust First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Silicon carbide absorption...

  13. Temporal, Spatial, and Morphologic Features of Hair Cell Regeneration in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubel, Edwin

    Temporal, Spatial, and Morphologic Features of Hair Cell Regeneration in the Avian Basilar Papilla 98195-7923 ABSTRACT Hair cell­selective antibodies were used in combination with the nucleotide bromode- oxyuridine (BrdU) to examine the temporal, spatial, and morphologic progression of auditory hair cell

  14. NREL: A Year in Clean Energy Innovations; A Review of NREL's 2011 Feature Stories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a compilation of articles featuring NREL research and development, deployment, commercialization, and outreach activities in 2011. The feature stories can be found online at http:www.nrel.gov/features/.

  15. Biosensor method and system based on feature vector extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenbaum, Elias; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Qi, Hairong; Wang, Xiaoling

    2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for biosensor-based detection of toxins includes providing at least one time-dependent control signal generated by a biosensor in a gas or liquid medium, and obtaining a time-dependent biosensor signal from the biosensor in the gas or liquid medium to be monitored or analyzed for the presence of one or more toxins selected from chemical, biological or radiological agents. The time-dependent biosensor signal is processed to obtain a plurality of feature vectors using at least one of amplitude statistics and a time-frequency analysis. At least one parameter relating to toxicity of the gas or liquid medium is then determined from the feature vectors based on reference to the control signal.

  16. Biosensor method and system based on feature vector extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenbaum, Elias (Knoxville, TN); Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel (Oak Ridge, TN); Qi, Hairong (Knoxville, TN); Wang, Xiaoling (San Jose, CA)

    2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of biosensor-based detection of toxins comprises the steps of providing at least one time-dependent control signal generated by a biosensor in a gas or liquid medium, and obtaining a time-dependent biosensor signal from the biosensor in the gas or liquid medium to be monitored or analyzed for the presence of one or more toxins selected from chemical, biological or radiological agents. The time-dependent biosensor signal is processed to obtain a plurality of feature vectors using at least one of amplitude statistics and a time-frequency analysis. At least one parameter relating to toxicity of the gas or liquid medium is then determined from the feature vectors based on reference to the control signal.

  17. Spatial feature tracking impedence sensor using multiple electric fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Novak, James L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear and other features on a workpiece are tracked by measuring the fields generated between electrodes arrayed in pairs. One electrode in each pair operates as a transmitter and the other as a receiver, and both electrodes in a pair are arrayed on a carrier. By combining and subtracting fields between electrodes in one pair and between a transmitting electrode in one pair and a receiving electrode in another pair, information describing the location and orientation of the sensor relative to the workpiece in up to six degrees of freedom may be obtained. Typical applications will measure capacitance, but other impedance components may be measured as well. The sensor is designed to track a linear feature axis or a protrusion or pocket in a workpiece. Seams and ridges can be tracked by this non-contact sensor. The sensor output is useful for robotic applications.

  18. Spatial feature tracking impedence sensor using multiple electric fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Novak, J.L.

    1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear and other features on a workpiece are tracked by measuring the fields generated between electrodes arrayed in pairs. One electrode in each pair operates as a transmitter and the other as a receiver, and both electrodes in a pair are arrayed on a carrier. By combining and subtracting fields between electrodes in one pair and between a transmitting electrode in one pair and a receiving electrode in another pair, information describing the location and orientation of the sensor relative to the workpiece in up to six degrees of freedom may be obtained. Typical applications will measure capacitance, but other impedance components may be measured as well. The sensor is designed to track a linear feature axis or a protrusion or pocket in a workpiece. Seams and ridges can be tracked by this non-contact sensor. The sensor output is useful for robotic applications. 10 figs.

  19. Preserving the feature record: a systematic analysis of cooking and heating features from the Richard Beene site (41BX831), Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clabaugh, Patricia Ann

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural and cultural archaeological features at the Richard Beene site (41BX831) occur in deeply buried, well-stratified, and well-dated contexts representing the Holocene period. This thesis establishes a comprehensive, systematic feature...

  20. WellcomeHistoryISSUE 40 SPRING 2009 Feature article 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    WellcomeHistoryISSUE 40 SPRING 2009 Feature article 2 Child mortality in Uruguay oxFord uNit 5 Wor and the people reSearcH reSourceS 18 Broadmoor Hospital archive booK revieWS 20 caleNdar 24 #12;2 Manchester unit: Radcliffe Square in Oxford. Line engraving after James Gibbs. See pages 5­15 on the Oxford Wellcome Unit

  1. An Ontology Design Pattern for Surface Water Features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinha, Gaurav [Ohio University, Athens; Mark, David [University at Buffalo, NY; Kolas, Dave [Raytheon BBN Technologies; Varanka, Dalia [U.S. Geological Survey, Rolla, MO; Romero, Boleslo E [University of California, Santa Barbara; Feng, Chen-Chieh [National University of Singapore; Usery, Lynn [U.S. Geological Survey, Rolla, MO; Liebermann, Joshua [Tumbling Walls, LLC; Sorokine, Alexandre [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities can be found due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology. It can then be used to systematically incor-porate concepts that are specific to a culture, language, or scientific domain. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this on-tology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is imple-mented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. A discussion about why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, es-pecially the previously developed Surface Network pattern is also provided. Fi-nally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through a few queries and annotated geospatial datasets.

  2. S e c t i o n 44Cover feature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    #12;S e c t i o n 44Cover feature: Small StepS, Big reSultS B y a m y m a s t From recycling, from lab assistants to senior personnel, look back on the path that led them to a life of science, electric bills and water usage. From small steps such as recycling to hugely ambitious ones

  3. Features and nongaussianity in the inflationary power spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James M. Cline

    2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    I summarize recent work on (1) constraining spike-like features in the cosmic microwave background and large scale structure; (2) nonstandard Friedmann equation in stabilized warped 6D brane cosmology, with applications to inflation; and (3) nonlocal inflation models, motivated by string theory, which can yield large nongaussian CMB fluctuations. Work in collaboration with N. Barnaby, T. Biswas, F. Chen, L. Hoi, G. Holder and S. Kanno.

  4. The fuzzy Hough Transform-feature extraction in medical images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philip, K.P.; Dove, E.L.; Stanford, W.; Chandran, K.B. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)); McPherson, D.D.; Gotteiner, N.L. (Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Internal Medicine)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Identification of anatomical features is a necessary step for medical image analysis. Automatic methods for feature identification using conventional pattern recognition techniques typically classify an object as a member of a predefined class of objects, but do not attempt to recover the exact or approximate shape of that object. For this reason, such techniques are usually not sufficient to identify the borders of organs when individual geometry varies in local detail, even though the general geometrical shape is similar. The authors present an algorithm that detects features in an image based on approximate geometrical models. The algorithm is based on the traditional and generalized Hough Transforms but includes notions from fuzzy set theory. The authors use the new algorithm to roughly estimate the actual locations of boundaries of an internal organ, and from this estimate, to determine a region of interest around the organ. Based on this rough estimate of the border location, and the derived region of interest, the authors find the final estimate of the true borders with other image processing techniques. The authors present results that demonstrate that the algorithm was successfully used to estimate the approximate location of the chest wall in humans, and of the left ventricular contours of a dog heart obtained from cine-computed tomographic images. The authors use this fuzzy Hough Transform algorithm as part of a larger procedures to automatically identify the myocardial contours of the heart. This algorithm may also allow for more rapid image processing and clinical decision making in other medical imaging applications.

  5. Kinetic Modeling of Halogen-Based Plasma Etching of Complex Oxide Films and its Application to Predictive Feature Profile Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchack, Nathan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C. , Chang, J.P. , “Feature Profile Evolution: From Plasmasurface kinetics and feature profile evolution in chlorineet al. (2008). "Feature profile evolution during shallow

  6. Deep PDF parsing to extract features for detecting embedded malware.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munson, Miles Arthur; Cross, Jesse S. (Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The number of PDF files with embedded malicious code has risen significantly in the past few years. This is due to the portability of the file format, the ways Adobe Reader recovers from corrupt PDF files, the addition of many multimedia and scripting extensions to the file format, and many format properties the malware author may use to disguise the presence of malware. Current research focuses on executable, MS Office, and HTML formats. In this paper, several features and properties of PDF Files are identified. Features are extracted using an instrumented open source PDF viewer. The feature descriptions of benign and malicious PDFs can be used to construct a machine learning model for detecting possible malware in future PDF files. The detection rate of PDF malware by current antivirus software is very low. A PDF file is easy to edit and manipulate because it is a text format, providing a low barrier to malware authors. Analyzing PDF files for malware is nonetheless difficult because of (a) the complexity of the formatting language, (b) the parsing idiosyncrasies in Adobe Reader, and (c) undocumented correction techniques employed in Adobe Reader. In May 2011, Esparza demonstrated that PDF malware could be hidden from 42 of 43 antivirus packages by combining multiple obfuscation techniques [4]. One reason current antivirus software fails is the ease of varying byte sequences in PDF malware, thereby rendering conventional signature-based virus detection useless. The compression and encryption functions produce sequences of bytes that are each functions of multiple input bytes. As a result, padding the malware payload with some whitespace before compression/encryption can change many of the bytes in the final payload. In this study we analyzed a corpus of 2591 benign and 87 malicious PDF files. While this corpus is admittedly small, it allowed us to test a system for collecting indicators of embedded PDF malware. We will call these indicators features throughout the rest of this report. The features are extracted using an instrumented PDF viewer, and are the inputs to a prediction model that scores the likelihood of a PDF file containing malware. The prediction model is constructed from a sample of labeled data by a machine learning algorithm (specifically, decision tree ensemble learning). Preliminary experiments show that the model is able to detect half of the PDF malware in the corpus with zero false alarms. We conclude the report with suggestions for extending this work to detect a greater variety of PDF malware.

  7. Bringing Out the Best Features of Expression Data Frederick P. Roth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, Frederick

    to distinguish acute myeloid leukemia (AML) from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). "Feature selection" (marker

  8. Towards general patterns of features in multi-field inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xian Gao; Jinn-Ouk Gong

    2015-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the consequences of general curved trajectories in multi-field inflation. After setting up a completely general formalism using the mass basis, which naturally accommodates the notion of light and heavy modes, we study in detail the simple case of two successive turns in two-field system. We find the power spectrum of the curvature perturbation receives corrections that exhibit oscillatory features sinusoidal in the logarithm of the comoving wavenumber without slow-roll suppression. We show that this is because of the resonance of the heavy modes inside and outside the mass horizon.

  9. LSU EFRC - Center for Atomic Level Catalyst Design - Featured Videos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The Energy MaterialsFeatured Videos >> space control Dr. James

  10. Geothermal Energy Featured on NBC's Today Show | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologiesNATIONAL003NotEnergyProgramElectricFeatured on

  11. Automation World Features New White Paper on Wireless Security | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments fromof Energy Automation World Features New White Paper on

  12. Pixie Dust: The Silicate Features in the Diffuse Interstellar Medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Chiar; A. G. G. M. Tielens

    2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We have analyzed the 9.7 and ``18'' micron interstellar silicate absorption features along the line of sight toward four heavily extincted galactic WC-type Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. We construct two interstellar extinction curves from 1.25 to 25 micron using near-IR extinction measurements from the literature along with the silicate profiles of WR 98a (representing the local ISM) and GCS 3 (representing the Galactic Center). We have investigated the mineralogy of the interstellar silicates by comparing extinction profiles for amorphous silicates with olivine and pyroxene stochiometry to the 9.7 and ``18'' micron absorption features in the WR 98a spectrum. In this analysis, we have considered solid and porous spheres and a continuous distribution of ellipsoids. While it is not possible to simultaneously provide a perfect match to both profiles, we find the best match requires a mixture of these two types of compounds. We also consider iron oxides, aluminosilicates and silicate carbide (SiC) as grain components. Iron oxides cannot be accommodated in the observed spectrum, while the amount of Si in SiC is limited to silicate mineralogy, grain shape and porosity.

  13. Silicate features in Galactic and extragalactic post-AGB discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gielen, C; Van Winckel, H; Evans, T Lloyd; Woods, P M; Kemper, F; Marengo, M; Meixner, M; Sloan, G C; Tielens, A G G M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims. In this paper we study the Spitzer and TIMMI2 infrared spectra of post-AGB disc sources, both in the Galaxy and the LMC. Using the observed infrared spectra we determine the mineralogy and dust parameters of the discs, and look for possible differences between the Galactic and extragalactic sources. Methods. Modelling the full spectral range observed allows us to determine the dust species present in the disc and different physical parameters such as grain sizes, dust abundance ratios, and the dust and continuum temperatures. Results. We find that all the discs are dominated by emission features of crystalline and amorphous silicate dust. Only a few sample sources show features due to CO2 gas or carbonaceous molecules such as PAHs and C60 fullerenes. Our analysis shows that dust grain processing in these discs is strong, resulting in large average grain sizes and a very high crystallinity fraction. However, we do not find any correlations between the derived dust parameters and properties of the central...

  14. Spray-Formed Tooling with Micro-Scale Features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin McHugh

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molds, dies, and related tooling are used to shape many of the plastic and metal components we use every day at home and work. Traditional mold-making practices are labor and capital equipment intensive, involving multiple machining, benching and heat treatment operations. Spray forming is an alternative method to manufacture molds and dies. The general concept is to atomize and deposit droplets of a tooling alloy onto a pattern to form a thick deposit while imaging the pattern’s shape, surface texture and details. Unlike conventional machining, this approach can be used to fabricate tooling with micro-scale surface features. This paper describes a research effort to spray form molds and dies that are used to image micro-scale surface textures into polymers. The goal of the study is to replicate textures that give rise to superhydrophobic behavior by mimicking the surface structure of highly water repellent biological materials such as the lotus leaf. Spray conditions leading to high transfer fidelity of features into the surface of molded polymers will be described. Improvements in water repellency of these materials was quantified by measuring the static contact angle of water droplets on flat and textured surfaces.

  15. Transition region features observed with Hinode/EIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. R. Young; G. Del Zanna; H. E. Mason; G. A. Doschek; J. L. Culhane; H. Hara

    2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Two types of active region feature prominent at transition region temperatures are identified in Hinode/EIS data of AR 10938 taken on 2007 January 20. The footpoints of 1 MK TRACE loops are shown to emit strongly in emission lines formed at log T=5.4-5.8, allowing the temperature increase along the footpoints to be clearly seen. A density diagnostic of Mg VII yields the density in the footpoints, with one loop showing a decrease from 3x10^9 cm^-3 at the base to 1.5x10^9 cm^-3 at a projected height of 20 Mm. The second feature is a compact active region transition region brightening which is particularly intense in O V emission (log T=5.4) but also has a signature at temperatures up to log T=6.3. The Mg VII diagnostic gives a density of 4x10^10 cm^-3, and emission lines of Mg VI and Mg VII show line profiles broadened by 50 km/s and wings extending beyond 200 km/s. Continuum emission in the short wavelength band is also found to be enhanced, and is suggested to be free-bound emission from recombination onto He^+.

  16. Automated feature detection and identification in digital point-ordered signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oppenlander, Jane E. (Burnt Hills, NY); Loomis, Kent C. (Clifton Park, NY); Brudnoy, David M. (Albany, NY); Levy, Arthur J. (Schenectady, NY)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer-based automated method to detect and identify features in digital point-ordered signals. The method is used for processing of non-destructive test signals, such as eddy current signals obtained from calibration standards. The signals are first automatically processed to remove noise and to determine a baseline. Next, features are detected in the signals using mathematical morphology filters. Finally, verification of the features is made using an expert system of pattern recognition methods and geometric criteria. The method has the advantage that standard features can be, located without prior knowledge of the number or sequence of the features. Further advantages are that standard features can be differentiated from irrelevant signal features such as noise, and detected features are automatically verified by parameters extracted from the signals. The method proceeds fully automatically without initial operator set-up and without subjective operator feature judgement.

  17. FEATURES, EVENTS, AND PROCESSES: SYSTEM-LEVEL AND CRITICALITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.L. McGregor

    2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to identify and document the screening analyses for the features, events, and processes (FEPs) that do not easily fit into the existing Process Model Report (PMR) structure. These FEPs include the 3 1 FEPs designated as System-Level Primary FEPs and the 22 FEPs designated as Criticality Primary FEPs. A list of these FEPs is provided in Section 1.1. This AMR (AN-WIS-MD-000019) documents the Screening Decision and Regulatory Basis, Screening Argument, and Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Disposition for each of the subject Primary FEPs. This AMR provides screening information and decisions for the TSPA-SR report and provides the same information for incorporation into a project-specific FEPs database. This AMR may also assist reviewers during the licensing-review process.

  18. Features, Events and Processes in UZ Flow and Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Persoff

    2005-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of the unsaturated zone (UZ) features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling that supports the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for license application (LA) for a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A screening decision, either Included or Excluded, is given for each FEP, along with the technical basis for the screening decision. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 173273]. The FEPs deal with UZ flow and radionuclide transport, including climate, surface water infiltration, percolation, drift seepage, and thermally coupled processes. This analysis summarizes the implementation of each FEP in TSPA-LA (that is, how the FEP is included) and also provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (that is, why the FEP is excluded). This report supports TSPA-LA.

  19. Features, Events, and Processes in UZ and Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Persoff

    2004-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of the unsaturated zone (UZ) features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling that supports the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for license application (LA) for a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A screening decision, either ''Included'' or ''Excluded'', is given for each FEP, along with the technical basis for the screening decision. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 156605]. The FEPs deal with UZ flow and radionuclide transport, including climate, surface water infiltration, percolation, drift seepage, and thermally coupled processes. This analysis summarizes the implementation of each FEP in TSPA-LA (that is, how the FEP is included) and also provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (that is, why the FEP is excluded). This report supports TSPA-LA.

  20. Modeling of feature profile evolution for ion etching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Kun-Dar [Department of Materials Science, National University of Tainan, Tainan 700, Taiwan (China)

    2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A kinetic model is presented to investigate the profile evolution during ion etching. The effects of ion sputtering, redeposition, and diffusion processes are all taken into consideration in the formation mechanism of surface profile. The dominant factors accounting for the surface smoothening and roughening during ion etching are well explained in this study. Under high ion flux or ion energy, the sputtering effect plays a controlling role in roughening the surface profile with a high etching rate. While decreasing ion flux or ion energy, the surface profile is smoothened by the diffusion mechanism with a long time ion irradiation. For a low temperature, the characteristic length of nanostructures decreases with a sputtered feature profile due to the low mobility. Our simulation results are consistent well with many experimental observations. This theoretical model provides an efficient numerical approach to fully understand the mechanism for the formation of surface profile allowing for designing of appropriate experiments to form specific nanostructures through ion-beam technology.

  1. Non-contact feature detection using ultrasonic Lamb waves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for non-contact ultrasonic detection of features on or within the walls of hollow pipes are described. An air-coupled, high-power ultrasonic transducer for generating guided waves in the pipe wall, and a high-sensitivity, air-coupled transducer for detecting these waves, are disposed at a distance apart and at chosen angle with respect to the surface of the pipe, either inside of or outside of the pipe. Measurements may be made in reflection or transmission modes depending on the relative position of the transducers and the pipe. Data are taken by sweeping the frequency of the incident ultrasonic waves, using a tracking narrow-band filter to reduce detected noise, and transforming the frequency domain data into the time domain using fast Fourier transformation, if required.

  2. NARROW ATOMIC FEATURES FROM RAPIDLY SPINNING NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauboeck, Michi; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Oezel, Feryal, E-mail: mbaubock@email.arizona.edu, E-mail: dpsaltis@email.arizona.edu, E-mail: fozel@email.arizona.edu [Astronomy Department, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)] [Astronomy Department, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron stars spinning at moderate rates ({approx}300-600 Hz) become oblate in shape and acquire a nonzero quadrupole moment. In this paper, we calculate the profiles of atomic features from such neutron stars using a ray-tracing algorithm in the Hartle-Thorne approximation. We show that line profiles acquire cores that are much narrower than the widths expected from pure Doppler effects for a large range of observer inclinations. As a result, the effects of both the oblateness and the quadrupole moments of neutron stars need to be taken into account when aiming to measure neutron-star radii from rotationally broadened lines. Moreover, the presence of these narrow cores substantially increases the likelihood of detecting atomic lines from rapidly spinning neutron stars.

  3. Breakaway safety feature for an intra-oral cone system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, P.J.; Wang, C.C.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With an increasing number of high energy accelerators in operation, intra-oral electron radiotherapy is likely to become a more widely-used modality in the treatment of lesions of the oral cavity. However, there is one potential problem associated with this modality which concerns patient safety. There must never be any uncontrolled movement of the couch or gantry while the cone is in the patients's mouth, otherwise serious consequences could occur. In an effort to overcome this problem, a set of cones previously constructed by the authors for use in intra-oral electron radiotherapy has been modified to include a breakaway safety feature. This modification consists of separating the plate into which each of the treatment cones screws, into two pieces, the dividing line being in the shape of a cone frustum flaring out in the upward direction.

  4. Combining missing-feature theory, speech enhancement, and speaker-dependent/-independent modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glass, James R.

    Combining missing-feature theory, speech enhancement, and speaker-dependent/-independent modeling filter for speech enhancement, hidden Markov models for speech reconstruction, and speaker reserved. Keywords: Speech enhancement; Speaker modeling; Speech recognition; Missing-feature theory

  5. NREL: A Year in Clean Energy Innovations: A Review of NREL's Feature Stories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The publication is a compilation of various feature stories published on NREL's public Web site, nrel.gov, throughout 2009.

  6. | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2014 | Hydro INTERNATIONAL22 symbols and features used on a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2014 | Hydro INTERNATIONAL22 symbols and features used on a nautical chart #12;Hydro INT

  7. Forms and Distributions of Hurricane Ike Backflow and Scour Features: Bolivar Peninsula, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potts, Michael Killgore

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    and backflow features in the beach and dune environments along Bolivar Peninsula, Texas. Using Ward?s cluster analysis, the 454 identified features were grouped according to shape and size characteristics generated by an object-oriented shape analysis... ............................................................................. 76 Analysis of Features per Kilometer of Shoreline ........................... 78 IV RESULTS ............................................................................................. 79 Size...

  8. Phone: 1-800-222-6440 Fax: 1-949-253-16801-34 Key Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Namkyoo

    safety features · Four models are available to cover laser current levels from below 50 mA up to 6 Amps. Comprehensive laser diode safety features are built into every 500 Series Laser Diode Driver. Redundant FET than 50 ppm long-term stability · Full package of operational features and time-tested laser diode

  9. Combining missing-feature theory, speech enhancement, and speaker-dependent/-independent modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glass, James R.

    Combining missing-feature theory, speech enhancement, and speaker-dependent/-independent modeling a missing-feature approach for improving crosstalk/noise robustness, a Wiener filter for speech enhancement enhancement; Speaker modeling; Speech recognition; Missing-feature theory; Posterior union model 1

  10. From Transformation-Based Dimensionality Reduction to Feature Mahdokht Masaeli masaeli.m@neu.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dy, Jennifer G.

    From Transformation-Based Dimensionality Reduction to Feature Selection Mahdokht Masaeli masaeli glenn.fung@siemens.com Computer Aided Diagnosis and Therapy, Siemens Medical Solutions, USA Jennifer G- duce dimensionality: feature selection and feature transformation. When one wishes to keep the original

  11. Estimation of eye, eyebrow and nose features in videophone sequences Markus Kampmann, Liang Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimation of eye, eyebrow and nose features in videophone sequences Markus Kampmann, Liang Zhang sequences at very low bit rates. In this contribution, algorithms for the estima­ tion of eye, eyebrow and nose features are presented. For estimation of eye features, deformable template matching

  12. Distribution and Habitat Associations of Billfish and Swordfish Larvae across Mesoscale Features in the Gulf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rooker, Jay R.

    Distribution and Habitat Associations of Billfish and Swordfish Larvae across Mesoscale Features additive models (GAMs). Mesoscale features in the NGoM affected the distribution and abundance of billfish and Swordfish Larvae across Mesoscale Features in the Gulf of Mexico. PLoS ONE 7(4): e34180. doi:10.1371/journal

  13. Iris Image Retrieval Based on Macro-features Manisha Sam Sunder and Arun Ross

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross, Arun Abraham

    Iris Image Retrieval Based on Macro-features Manisha Sam Sunder and Arun Ross West Virginia investigate the use of macro-features that are visible on the anterior surface of RGB images of the iris, melanoma, etc. and may not be present in all iris images. Given an image of a macro- feature, the goal

  14. Emerald Article: SOFTWARE FEATURES FOR INTELLIGENT INDUSTRIAL ROBOTS P. CORTI, G. GINI, M. GINI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gini, Giuseppina

    Kybernetes Emerald Article: SOFTWARE FEATURES FOR INTELLIGENT INDUSTRIAL ROBOTS P. CORTI, G. GINI FEATURES FOR INTELLIGENT INDUSTRIAL ROBOTS", Kybern Iss: 2 pp. 149 - 154 Permanent link to this document of download. #12;SOFTWARE FEATURES FOR INTELLIGENT INDUSTRIAL ROBOTS P. CORTI, G. GINI and M. GINI Istituto di

  15. Efficient Surface and Feature Estimation in Zoltan-Csaba Marton, Dejan Pangercic, Michael Beetz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cremers, Daniel

    Beetz Intelligent Autonomous Systems Group Technische Universität München RGB-D Workshop on 3DRobotics, April 2011 Efficient Surface and Feature Estimation in RGBD Marton, Pangercic, Beetz #12;Introduction Marton, Pangercic, Beetz #12;Introduction Descriptive Local Geometric Feature RGB-D Object Feature

  16. Lung Sound Recognition Using Model-Theory Based Feature Selection and Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kokar, Mieczyslaw M.

    Lung Sound Recognition Using Model-Theory Based Feature Selection and Fusion Zbigniew Korona recognition methodology to the recognition of lung sounds. Two main features of this method- ology are features using an entropy-based criterion. To evaluate the methodology we used both normal lung sounds

  17. Feature Detection, Characterization and Confirmation Methodology: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Apps, John; Doughty, Christine; Gwatney, Hope; Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Trautz, Robert; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of the NUMO-LBNL collaborative project: Feature Detection, Characterization and Confirmation Methodology under NUMO-DOE/LBNL collaboration agreement, the task description of which can be found in the Appendix. We examine site characterization projects from several sites in the world. The list includes Yucca Mountain in the USA, Tono and Horonobe in Japan, AECL in Canada, sites in Sweden, and Olkiluoto in Finland. We identify important geologic features and parameters common to most (or all) sites to provide useful information for future repository siting activity. At first glance, one could question whether there was any commonality among the sites, which are in different rock types at different locations. For example, the planned Yucca Mountain site is a dry repository in unsaturated tuff, whereas the Swedish sites are situated in saturated granite. However, the study concludes that indeed there are a number of important common features and parameters among all the sites--namely, (1) fault properties, (2) fracture-matrix interaction (3) groundwater flux, (4) boundary conditions, and (5) the permeability and porosity of the materials. We list the lessons learned from the Yucca Mountain Project and other site characterization programs. Most programs have by and large been quite successful. Nonetheless, there are definitely 'should-haves' and 'could-haves', or lessons to be learned, in all these programs. Although each site characterization program has some unique aspects, we believe that these crosscutting lessons can be very useful for future site investigations to be conducted in Japan. One of the most common lessons learned is that a repository program should allow for flexibility, in both schedule and approach. We examine field investigation technologies used to collect site characterization data in the field. An extensive list of existing field technologies is presented, with some discussion on usage and limitations. Many of the technologies on the list were in fact used during the characterization of Yucca Mountain and elsewhere by LBNL personnel. The study also includes emerging technologies and identifies the need to develop better estimation of important parameters for repository siting. Notable emerging technologies include 3-D seismic and satellite-based remote sensing and wireless micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) sensors. They enable cost-effective and ubiquitous monitoring to be applied for site characterization. We list and classify the types of uncertainties involved in site characterization. Uncertainties can exist in all aspects of site characterization: data, interpretation, conceptualization, and modeling. We use the Swedish program to exemplify such uncertainties. We also devote a chapter on geochemical issues regarding the interaction between groundwater and natural and engineered barrier materials. A recommendation has been made to take advantage of the recent advancement in geochemical modeling capabilities in natural systems. Although it is not of immediate relevance at the preliminary investigation stage, it serves as a good reminder that geochemical investigation efforts should not be overlooked at any stage in the repository program. We construct a synthetic preliminary-investigation site based on an extensive data set available from a geoscientific project in Japan, which we use as a 'real' site to evaluate uncertainties resulting from hydrogeological modeling and examine strategies for characterizing a new site. We plan various preliminary-investigation configurations and conduct preliminary numerical investigations at the synthetic site. We construct a model of the 'real' site for each PI configuration, make predictions of particle travel times, and compare against the 'real' data obtained from the 'real' model. We conclude that drilling as many as nine boreholes does not necessarily improve the understanding of the site compared to drilling as few as three boreholes, unless there is an underlying structure that is larger than the spacing of the boreholes. The

  18. Basic features of the pion valence-quark distribution function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei Chang; Cédric Mezrag; Hervé Moutarde; Craig D. Roberts; Jose Rodríguez-Quintero; Peter C. Tandy

    2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The impulse-approximation expression used hitherto to define the pion's valence-quark distribution function is flawed because it omits contributions from the gluons which bind quarks into the pion. A corrected leading-order expression produces the model-independent result that quarks dressed via the rainbow-ladder truncation, or any practical analogue, carry all the pion's light-front momentum at a characteristic hadronic scale. Corrections to the leading contribution may be divided into two classes, responsible for shifting dressed-quark momentum into glue and sea-quarks. Working with available empirical information, we use an algebraic model to express the principal impact of both classes of corrections. This enables a realistic comparison with experiment that allows us to highlight the basic features of the pion's measurable valence-quark distribution, $q^\\pi(x)$; namely, at a characteristic hadronic scale, $q^\\pi(x) \\sim (1-x)^2$ for $x\\gtrsim 0.85$; and the valence-quarks carry approximately two-thirds of the pion's light-front momentum.

  19. Stylized features of single-nucleon momentum distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maarten Vanhalst; Wim Cosyn; Jan Ryckebusch

    2014-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    [Background:] Nuclear short-range correlations (SRC) typically manifest themselves in the tail parts of the single-nucleon momentum distributions. [Purpose:] To develop an approximate flexible method for computing the single-nucleon momentum distributions throughout the whole mass table, thereby including the majority of the effects of SRC. To use this method to study the mass and isospin dependence of SRC. [Method:] The low-order cluster approximation (LCA) adopted in this work, corrects mean-field models for correlations by shifting the complexity induced by the SRC from the wave functions to the operators. Due to the local character of the SRC, it is argued that the expansion of these operators can be truncated to a low order. [Results:] After inclusion of the central and tensor correlations, the LCA can generate the SRC-related features of the single-nucleon momentum distribution like the high-momentum tails. These are dominated by correlations operating on mean-field pairs with vanishing relative radial and angular-momentum quantum numbers. In asymmetric nuclei, the correlations make the average kinetic energy for the minority nucleons larger than for the majority nucleons. [Conclusions:] The LCA method explains the dominant role of proton-neutron pairs in generating the SRC and provides predictions for the ratio of the amount of correlated proton-proton to proton-neutron pairs which are in line with the observations.

  20. Structural features of Athabasca bitumen related to upgrading performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strausz, O.P. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural studies on asphaltenes and heavy ends have, until recently, only yielded information on some of the gross compositional features of these materials. Spectroscopic methods, for sample, are limited in the sense that even if several functional groups (e.g., aromatic or aliphatic carbon, carbonyl groups, etc.) can be identified, no information on the molecular environment can be deduced. Selective chemical degradative methods, on the other hand, offer more potential and this paper describes some of their recent results on the chemical degradation of asphaltene and heavy ends. Quantitative recoveries of alkyl side chains and bridging units attached to aromatic rings have been achieved, and some insights into the aliphatic framework have been gained. The results could be particularly helpful with regard to monitoring the dealkylation processes during thermal treatment of bitumens. The aliphatic framework of the asphaltene contains units of five- and six-membered ring sulfides and thermal breakdown of these units also contributes to depolymerization and the production of alkanes. Some of the heteroatom-containing classes of compounds identified in the asphaltene and resin fractions of Athabasca bitumen will be briefly discussed.

  1. Procedural Skill Initiation, Chunks & Execution; Contributions of Offline Consolidation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatia, Sanjeev Rai

    2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been suggested that improvement in the performance of many motor sequence tasks such as playing musical instruments, operating complex machinery or tools, and/or performing a variety of athletic activities results from the learner’s ability...

  2. Approximation Algorithms for Offline Risk-averse Combinatorial Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the context of stochastic minimum spanning trees as well [3], and is sometimes referred to as mean describe a framework of risk-averse stochastic problems where the cost vector W has independent random in this stochastic setting is to look for a feasible solution whose stochastic cost has a small tail or a small

  3. Interactive Off-Line Computer Modeling for Powerhouse Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delk, S. R.; Jones, W. G.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OIL?R 1-5 FUEL 501L?R 6& 7 FUEL GAS TURI ItIE FUEL TURBI~E GENERATOR NO.1 TUUINI: CENERATOR NO.2 TUUIN! GENEIl..ATOR NO.3 GAS TURIl"E CEM. NO.4 PURCKAS!D EucntC ITY Figure 3: Computer Input Data 420 ESL-IE-82-04-84 Proceedings from the Fourth...

  4. atlas offline software: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to allow for a larger variety and more sophisticated trigger criteria. In addition, the software controlling the central trigger processor (CTP) has been extended to allow the...

  5. Achieving Real-Time Mode Estimation through Offline Compilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Eepoel, John M.

    2002-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    As exploration of our solar system and outerspace move into the future, spacecraft are being developed to venture on increasingly challenging missions with bold objectives. The spacecraft tasked with completing these ...

  6. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: OFFLINE GCSS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa-Anomalous Radiative AbsorptionARM InArctic Facilityand Newand the Status

  7. Structure of continental rifts: Role of older features and magmatism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, G.R. (Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States))

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent geological and geophysical studies in several continental rifts have begun to shed light on the details of the processes which govern the structural evolution of these important exploration targets. In Kenya and Tanzania, the classic East African rift has been the object of several investigations which reveal that its location follows the boundary (suture ) between the Tanzanian craton (Archean) and Mozambiquan belt (Proterozoic), The Baikal rift also follows a similar boundary, and the Mid-continent rift of North America appears to do the same. Rifts themselves often act as zones of weakness which are reactivated by younger tectonic regimes. The classic North American example of this effect is the Eocambrian Southern Oklahoma aulacogen which was deformed to create the Anadarko basin and Wichita uplift in the late Paleozoic. The Central basin platform has a similar history although the original rift formed at [approximately]1,100Ma. Integration of geophysical data with petrologic and geochemical data from several rift zones has also provided a new picture of the nature and extent of magmatic modification of the crust. An interesting contradiction is that Phanerozoic rifts, except the Afar region, show little evidence for major magmatic modification of the crust whereas, at least in North America, many Precambrian rifts are associated with very large mafic bodies in the crust. The Kenya rift displays evidence for modification of the lower crust in a two-phase magmatic history, but upper crustal magmatic features are limited to local intrusions associated with volcanoes. In this rift, complex basement structure plays a much more important role than previously realized, and the geophysical signatures of basement structure and magmatism are easy to confuse. If this is also the case in other rifts, additional rift basins remain to be discovered.

  8. Structure of continental rifts: Role of older features and magmatism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, G.R. [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent geological and geophysical studies in several continental rifts have begun to shed light on the details of the processes which govern the structural evolution of these important exploration targets. In Kenya and Tanzania, the classic East African rift has been the object of several investigations which reveal that its location follows the boundary (suture ?) between the Tanzanian craton (Archean) and Mozambiquan belt (Proterozoic), The Baikal rift also follows a similar boundary, and the Mid-continent rift of North America appears to do the same. Rifts themselves often act as zones of weakness which are reactivated by younger tectonic regimes. The classic North American example of this effect is the Eocambrian Southern Oklahoma aulacogen which was deformed to create the Anadarko basin and Wichita uplift in the late Paleozoic. The Central basin platform has a similar history although the original rift formed at {approximately}1,100Ma. Integration of geophysical data with petrologic and geochemical data from several rift zones has also provided a new picture of the nature and extent of magmatic modification of the crust. An interesting contradiction is that Phanerozoic rifts, except the Afar region, show little evidence for major magmatic modification of the crust whereas, at least in North America, many Precambrian rifts are associated with very large mafic bodies in the crust. The Kenya rift displays evidence for modification of the lower crust in a two-phase magmatic history, but upper crustal magmatic features are limited to local intrusions associated with volcanoes. In this rift, complex basement structure plays a much more important role than previously realized, and the geophysical signatures of basement structure and magmatism are easy to confuse. If this is also the case in other rifts, additional rift basins remain to be discovered.

  9. Quantifying Community Assembly Processes and Identifying Features that Impose Them

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stegen, James C.; Lin, Xueju; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Chen, Xingyuan; Kennedy, David W.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Konopka, Allan

    2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Across a set of ecological communities connected to each other through organismal dispersal (a ‘meta-community’), turnover in composition is governed by (ecological) Drift, Selection, and Dispersal Limitation. Quantitative estimates of these processes remain elusive, but would represent a common currency needed to unify community ecology. Using a novel analytical framework we quantitatively estimate the relative influences of Drift, Selection, and Dispersal Limitation on subsurface, sediment-associated microbial meta-communities. The communities we study are distributed across two geologic formations encompassing ~12,500m3 of uranium-contaminated sediments within the Hanford Site in eastern Washington State. We find that Drift consistently governs ~25% of spatial turnover in community composition; Selection dominates (governing ~60% of turnover) across spatially-structured habitats associated with fine-grained, low permeability sediments; and Dispersal Limitation is most influential (governing ~40% of turnover) across spatially-unstructured habitats associated with coarse-grained, highly-permeable sediments. Quantitative influences of Selection and Dispersal Limitation may therefore be predictable from knowledge of environmental structure. To develop a system-level conceptual model we extend our analytical framework to compare process estimates across formations, characterize measured and unmeasured environmental variables that impose Selection, and identify abiotic features that limit dispersal. Insights gained here suggest that community ecology can benefit from a shift in perspective; the quantitative approach developed here goes beyond the ‘niche vs. neutral’ dichotomy by moving towards a style of natural history in which estimates of Selection, Dispersal Limitation and Drift can be described, mapped and compared across ecological systems.

  10. Features, Events, and Processes in UZ Flow and Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.E. Houseworth

    2001-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and radionuclide transport is a component of the natural barriers that affects potential repository performance. The total system performance assessment (TSPA) model, and underlying process models, of this natural barrier component capture some, but not all, of the associated features, events, and processes (FEPs) as identified in the FEPs Database (Freeze, et al. 2001 [154365]). This analysis and model report (AMR) discusses all FEPs identified as associated with UZ flow and radionuclide transport. The purpose of this analysis is to give a comprehensive summary of all UZ flow and radionuclide transport FEPs and their treatment in, or exclusion from, TSPA models. The scope of this analysis is to provide a summary of the FEPs associated with the UZ flow and radionuclide transport and to provide a reference roadmap to other documentation where detailed discussions of these FEPs, treated explicitly in TSPA models, are offered. Other FEPs may be screened out from treatment in TSPA by direct regulatory exclusion or through arguments concerning low probability and/or low consequence of the FEPs on potential repository performance. Arguments for exclusion of FEPs are presented in this analysis. Exclusion of specific FEPs from the UZ flow and transport models does not necessarily imply that the FEP is excluded from the TSPA. Similarly, in the treatment of included FEPs, only the way in which the FEPs are included in the UZ flow and transport models is discussed in this document. This report has been prepared in accordance with the technical work plan for the unsaturated zone subproduct element (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153447]). The purpose of this report is to document that all FEPs are either included in UZ flow and transport models for TSPA, or can be excluded from UZ flow and transport models for TSPA on the basis of low probability or low consequence. Arguments for exclusion are presented in this analysis. Exclusion of specific FEPs from UZ flow and transport models does not necessarily imply that the FEP is excluded from the TSPA. Similarly, in the treatment of included FEPs, only the way in which FEPs are included in UZ flow and transport models is discussed in this document.

  11. Gray Level Co-Occurrence Matrices: Generalisation and Some New Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastian, Bino; Balakrishnan, Kannan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrices (GLCM) are one of the earliest techniques used for image texture analysis. In this paper we defined a new feature called trace extracted from the GLCM and its implications in texture analysis are discussed in the context of Content Based Image Retrieval (CBIR). The theoretical extension of GLCM to n-dimensional gray scale images are also discussed. The results indicate that trace features outperform Haralick features when applied to CBIR.

  12. NREL: A Year in Clean Energy Innovations, A Review of NREL's 2012 Feature Stories (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The publication is a compilation of various feature stories published on NREL's public website, nrel.gov, throughout Calendar Year 2012.

  13. NREL: A Year in Clean Energy Innovations, A Review of NREL's 2013 Feature Stories (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The publication is a compilation of various feature stories published on NREL's public website, nrel.gov, throughout Calendar Year 2013.

  14. Sandia Energy - Joint BioEnergy Institute Oxime-NIMS Work Featured...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BioEnergy Institute Oxime-NIMS Work Featured on the Cover of ACS Chemical Biology Home Renewable Energy Energy Transportation Energy Biofuels Facilities Capabilities JBEI News News...

  15. NREL: A Year in Clean Energy Innovations: A Review of NREL's Feature Stories, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The publication is a compilation of various feature stories published on NREL's public website, nrel.gov, throughout Calendar Year 2010.

  16. Autonomous adaptive environmental assessment and feature tracking via autonomous underwater vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petillo, Stephanie Marie

    In the underwater environment, spatiotemporally dynamic environmental conditions pose challenges to the detection and tracking of hydrographic features. A useful tool in combating these challenge is Autonomous Adaptive ...

  17. GRB 130427A: A Nearby Ordinary Monster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    ,13 K. Wiersema,8 Y. Yatsu,5 T. Yoshii,5 G. Tagliaferri2 Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs at 95 GeV (2). It was detected with Fermi­Gamma-ray Burst Mon- itor (GBM) (3) at T0, GBM = 47:06.42 UTon and over the full range of GRB isotropic energies. G amma-ray burst (GRB) 130427Awas the brightest burst

  18. NEARBY GALAXIES IN MORE DISTANT CONTEXTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eskew, Michael; Zaritsky, Dennis, E-mail: meskew@email.arizona.edu, E-mail: dzaritsky@as.arizona.edu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We use published reconstructions of the star formation history (SFH) of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), Small Magellanic Cloud, and NGC 300 from the analysis of resolved stellar populations to investigate where such galaxies might land on well-known extragalactic diagnostic plots over the galaxies' lifetime (assuming that nothing other than their stellar populations change). For example, we find that the evolution of these galaxies implies a complex evolution in the Tully-Fisher relation with look-back time and that the observed scatter is consistent with excursions these galaxies take as their stellar populations evolve. We find that the growth of stellar mass is weighted to early times, despite the strongly star-forming current nature of the three systems. Lastly, we find that these galaxies can take circuitous paths across the color-magnitude diagram. For example, it is possible, within the constraints provided by the current determination of its SFH, that the LMC reached the red sequence at intermediate age prior to ending back up on the blue cloud at the current time. Unfortunately, this behavior happens at sufficiently early times that our resolved SFH is crude and insufficiently constraining to convincingly demonstrate that this was the actual evolutionary path. The limited sample size precludes any general conclusions, but we present these as examples how we can bridge the study of resolved populations and the more distant universe.

  19. Lithium Depletion of Nearby Young Stellar Associations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erin Mentuch; Alexis Brandeker; Marten H. van Kerkwijk; Ray Jayawardhana; Peter H. Hauschildt

    2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We estimate cluster ages from lithium depletion in five pre-main-sequence groups found within 100 pc of the Sun: TW Hydrae Association, Eta Chamaeleontis Cluster, Beta Pictoris Moving Group, Tucanae-Horologium Association and AB Doradus Moving Group. We determine surface gravities, effective temperatures and lithium abundances for over 900 spectra through least squares fitting to model-atmosphere spectra. For each group, we compare the dependence of lithium abundance on temperature with isochrones from pre-main-sequence evolutionary tracks to obtain model dependent ages. We find that the Eta Chamaelontis Cluster and the TW Hydrae Association are the youngest, with ages of 12+/-6 Myr and 12+/-8 Myr, respectively, followed by the Beta Pictoris Moving Group at 21+/-9 Myr, the Tucanae-Horologium Association at 27+/-11 Myr, and the AB Doradus Moving Group at an age of at least 45 Myr (where we can only set a lower limit since the models -- unlike real stars -- do not show much lithium depletion beyond this age). Here, the ordering is robust, but the precise ages depend on our choice of both atmospheric and evolutionary models. As a result, while our ages are consistent with estimates based on Hertzsprung-Russell isochrone fitting and dynamical expansion, they are not yet more precise. Our observations do show that with improved models, much stronger constraints should be feasible: the intrinsic uncertainties, as measured from the scatter between measurements from different spectra of the same star, are very low: around 10 K in effective temperature, 0.05 dex in surface gravity, and 0.03 dex in lithium abundance.

  20. Dynamics of the Disks of Nearby Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Fuchs

    2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    I describe how the dynamics of galactic disks can be inferred by imaging and spectroscopy. Next I demonstrate that the decomposition of the rotation curves of spiral galaxies into the contributions by the various components of the galaxies is highly degenerate. Constraints on the decomposition can be found by considering implications for the dynamics of the galactic disks. An important diagnostic is the Toomre Q stability parameter which controls the stability of a galactic disk against local Jeans collapse. I also show how the density wave theory of galactic spiral arms can be employed to constrain the mass of a galactic disk. Applying both diagnostics to the example of NGC 2985 and discussing also the implied mass-to-light ratio I demonstrate that the inner parts of the galaxy, where the optical disk resides, are dominated by baryons. When I apply this method to the disks of low surface brightness galaxies, I find unexpectedly high mass-to light ratios. These could be explained by population synthesis models which assume a bottom heavy initial mass function similar to the recently proposed `integrated galactic initial mass function'.

  1. The Nearby Supernova Factory Ozone + Aerosol + Rayleigh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rayleigh + Aerosol Extinction monitor filter Auxiliary Camera CCD Spectrograph picko ff mirror Umbra

  2. Overview of the nearby supernova factory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from 42 High-Redshift Supernovae,” Astrophys J. 517, pp.Observational Evidence from Supernovae for an AcceleratingCalan/Tololo Type Ia Supernovae,” Astron. J. 112, p. 2391,

  3. A high resolution view of the jet termination shock in a hot spot of the nearby radio galaxy Pictor A: implications for X-ray models of radio galaxy hot spots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. J. Tingay; E. Lenc; G. Brunetti; M. Bondi

    2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Images made with the VLBA have resolved the region in a nearby radio galaxy, Pictor A, where the relativistic jet that originates at the nucleus terminates in an interaction with the intergalactic medium, a so-called radio galaxy hot spot. This image provides the highest spatial resolution view of such an object to date (16 pc), more than three times better than previous VLBI observations of similar objects. The north-west Pictor A hot spot is resolved into a complex set of compact components, seen to coincide with the bright part of the hot spot imaged at arcsecond-scale resolution with the VLA. In addition to a comparison with VLA data, we compare our VLBA results with data from the HST and Chandra telescopes, as well as new Spitzer data. The presence of pc-scale components in the hot spot, identifying regions containing strong shocks in the fluid flow, leads us to explore the suggestion that they represent sites of synchrotron X-ray production, contributing to the integrated X-ray flux of the hot spot, along with X-rays from synchrotron self-Compton scattering. This scenario provides a natural explanation for the radio morphology of the hot spot and its integrated X-ray emission, leading to very different predictions for the higher energy X-ray spectrum compared to previous studies. From the sizes of the individual pc-scale components and their angular spread, we estimate that the jet width at the hot spot is in the range 70 - 700 pc, which is comparable to similar estimates in PKS 2153-69, 3C 205, and 4C 41.17. The lower limit in this range arises from the suggestion that the jet may dither in its direction as it passes through hot spot backflow material close to the jet termination point, creating a "dentist drill" effect on the inside of a cavity 700 pc in diameter.

  4. The Connection Between the Positron Fraction Anomaly and the Spectral Features in Galactic Cosmic-Ray Hadrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomassetti, N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent data on Galactic cosmic-ray (CR) leptons and hadrons gave rise to two exciting problems: on the lepton side, the origin of the rise of the CR positron fraction e+/(e- + e+) at ~10 - 300 GeV of energy; on the hadron side, the nature of the spectral hardening observed in CR protons and nuclei at ~TeV energies. The lepton anomaly indicates the existence of a nearby e+/- source. It has been proposed that high-energy positrons can be produced inside nearby supernova remnants (SNRs) via interactions of CR hadrons with the ambient medium. A distinctive prediction of this mechanism is a high-energy rise of the boron-to-carbon ratio, which has not been observed. It also requires old SNRs at work (with ineffective magnetic field amplification and slow shock speed), that cannot account for the CR hadronic spectra observed up to the knee energies (~5 PeV). We propose a new picture where, in addition to such a nearby CR accelerator, the high-energy spectrum of CR hadrons is provided by the large-scale population of...

  5. Formation of Sets and Subsets of Informative Features of Information Carriers with Magnetic Hard Disks*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borissova, Daniela

    . Regardless of the type of the information carrier with hard magnetic disks, the main and most important137 Formation of Sets and Subsets of Informative Features of Information Carriers with Magnetic magnetic disk, new informative features are presented, which form a substantial subset of the informative

  6. Some New Features for Protein Fold Prediction Nikhil Ranjan Pal and Debrup Chakraborty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakraborty, Debrup

    Some New Features for Protein Fold Prediction Nikhil Ranjan Pal and Debrup Chakraborty Electronics}@isical.ac.in Abstract. In this paper we propose several sets of new features for protein fold prediction. The first discriminating powers in predicting protein folds. 1 Introduction One of the most important and challenging

  7. Feature Selection for Support Vector Regression in the Application of Building Energy Prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Feature Selection for Support Vector Regression in the Application of Building Energy Prediction--When using support vector regression to predict building energy consumption, since the energy influence and reduces the computational time. Keywords-support vector regression; feature selection; build- ing; energy

  8. Feature Based Rendering for 2D/3D Partial Volume Segmentation Zigang Wang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feature Based Rendering for 2D/3D Partial Volume Segmentation Datasets Zigang Wang1 and Zhengrong 11794, USA ABSTRACT In this paper, a new feature based rendering algorithm for partial volume is presented. This algorithm utilizes both surface and volume information for the rendering of the partial

  9. Non-linear Predictors for Facial Feature Tracking Across Pose and Expression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowden, Richard

    Non-linear Predictors for Facial Feature Tracking Across Pose and Expression Tim Sheerman Email: t.sheerman-chase,e.ong,r.bowden@surrey.ac.uk Abstract--This paper proposes a non-linear predictor facial feature. Linear regression is only effective when pose changes are limited. As pose variations

  10. Random Features for Large-Scale Kernel Machines Intel Research Seattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Tae-Kyun

    Random Features for Large-Scale Kernel Machines Ali Rahimi Intel Research Seattle Seattle, WA 98105 products of the transformed data are approximately equal to those in the feature space of a user specified on their ability to approximate various radial basis kernels, and show that in large-scale classification

  11. Sparse Kernel Orthonormalized PLS for feature extraction in large data sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparse Kernel Orthonormalized PLS for feature extraction in large data sets Anonymous Author a novel multivariate analysis method for large scale problems. Our scheme is based on a novel kernel strong expressive power even with rather few features, is clearly outperforming the ordinary kernel PLS

  12. Updated 2/9/2010 A quick overview of the site's features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lazar, Aurel A.

    of the site's features You can continue to refine your results by entering a new search term into the "Search and to familiarize yourself with their functions, click on Tips. B. Searching for Titles 1. In the search box, enter offers several features enabling users to search, browse, read, add bookmarks and notes, create folders

  13. Migrate Roles and Features to Windows Server 2012 R2 or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Galen

    #12;Migrate Roles and Features to Windows Server 2012 R2 or Windows Server 2012 Summary: This E-Book includes guidance to help you migrate server roles and features to Windows Server 2012 R2 or Windows Server 2012. Also included is an installation and operations guide for Windows Server Migration Tools, a set

  14. A Preliminary Report on Tool Support and Methodology for Feature Interaction Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterloo, University of

    that operate the dynamics of the vehicle. Examples of these mechanical components are brakes, throttle of these mechanical components are brakes, throttle and steering. Ideally, features should be able to be integrated simultaneous requests to apply the brakes and the throttle. The feature interaction problem becomes more

  15. Automated Diagnosis of Product-line Configuration Errors on Feature Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Douglas C.

    Automated Diagnosis of Product-line Configuration Errors on Feature Models Jules White and Doulas Feature models are widely used to model software product-line (SPL) variability. SPL variants are config Introduction Current trends and challenges. Software Product- Lines (SPLs) are a technique for creating

  16. Coarse-Graining Protein Structures With Local Multivariate Features from Molecular Zhiyong Zhang and Willy Wriggers*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wriggers, Willy

    Vised Manuscript ReceiVed: September 3, 2008 A multivariate statistical theory, local feature analysis (LFA be described by harmonic potential wells. For most systems, the dimension n of this essential space is veryCoarse-Graining Protein Structures With Local Multivariate Features from Molecular Dynamics Zhiyong

  17. Combining Missing-Feature Theory, Speech Enhancement, and Speaker-Dependent/-Independent Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Timothy J.

    Combining Missing-Feature Theory, Speech Enhancement, and Speaker-Dependent/-Independent Modeling a missing-feature approach for improving crosstalk/noise robustness, a Wiener filter for speech enhancement to speech enhancement. One approach assumes the availability of single-channel data (i.e., the speech

  18. Identifying the promoter features governing differential kinetics of co-regulated genes using fuzzy expressions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granada, Universidad de

    of the biggest challenges in genomics is the elucidation of the design principles controlling gene expression features used by a transcriptional regulator to differentially control genes that display distinctIdentifying the promoter features governing differential kinetics of co-regulated genes using fuzzy

  19. Evaluation of Circular-Shaped Features on the Surface of Solar Cells from the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluation of Circular-Shaped Features on the Surface of Solar Cells from the Hubble Space by the manufacturer of the CMX coverglass of the HST solar cells, circular shaped features of unknown origin were The Hubble Space Telescope is powered by solar cells which are arranged on two flexible wings. During

  20. DETECTING AND TRACKING OF MESOSCALE OCEANIC FEATURES IN THE MIAMI ISOPYCNIC CIRCULATION OCEAN MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tandon, Amit

    DETECTING AND TRACKING OF MESOSCALE OCEANIC FEATURES IN THE MIAMI ISOPYCNIC CIRCULATION OCEAN MODEL developed to automatically detect, locate and track mesoscale eddies spatially and temporally. Using an invaluable tool to assess mesoscale oceanic features. Key Words ­ Scientific Visualization, Eddy Detection

  1. Small-scale features of temperature and salinity surface fields in the Christophe Maes,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the onset and build-up phases of El Ni~no/ Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events in coupled numerical modelsSmall-scale features of temperature and salinity surface fields in the Coral Sea Christophe Maes,1 August 2013; accepted 11 August 2013. [1] The small-scale features in sea surface temperature

  2. Gene Feature Extraction Using T-Test Statistics and Kernel Partial Least Squares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwok, James Tin-Yau

    Gene Feature Extraction Using T-Test Statistics and Kernel Partial Least Squares Shutao Li1 , Chen Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong shutao li@yahoo.com.cn, lc337199@sina.com, jamesk@cs.ust.hk Abstract. In this paper, we propose a gene extraction method by us- ing two standard feature extraction methods, namely

  3. EXTRACTING GEOMETRIC FEATURES OF AORTIC VALVE ANNULUS MOTION FROM DYNAMIC MRI FOR GUIDING INTERVENTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Zhigang

    EXTRACTING GEOMETRIC FEATURES OF AORTIC VALVE ANNULUS MOTION FROM DYNAMIC MRI FOR GUIDING, Houston, TX 77030, USA ABSTRACT Transcatheter aortic valve implant (TAVI) has emerged as a prominent of the geometric features such as the diameter, center and orien- tation of the aortic valve annulus (AVA

  4. A Novel Damage Sensitive Feature Based on State-Space Representation1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Novel Damage Sensitive Feature Based on State-Space Representation1 ABSTRACT Damage detection and the variable and unknown excitation. There is still a lack of a robust damage detection process. Taking in a reconstructed state-space, a novel damage sensitive feature vector is proposed. Statistical modelling using

  5. Feature-based Analysis of Plasma-based Particle Acceleration Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feature-based Analysis of Plasma-based Particle Acceleration Data Oliver Rübel 1 , Cameron G;1 Feature-based Analysis of Plasma-based Particle Acceleration Data Oliver R¨ubel, Cameron G.R. Geddes, Min Chen, Estelle Cormier-Michel, and E. Wes Bethel Abstract Plasma-based particle accelerators can produce

  6. Feature Selection Using f-Information Measures in Fuzzy Approximation Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pal, Sankar Kumar

    of real-life data sets. Index Terms--Pattern recognition, data mining, feature selection, fuzzy-rough sets is an essential preprocessing step used for pattern recognition, data mining, machine learning, etc., [1], [2Feature Selection Using f-Information Measures in Fuzzy Approximation Spaces Pradipta Maji

  7. Surface runoff features on Mars: Testing the carbon dioxide formation hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nimmo, Francis

    materials and properties; KEYWORDS: Mars, gullies, seepage, runoff, carbon dioxide, water Citation: StewartSurface runoff features on Mars: Testing the carbon dioxide formation hypothesis Sarah T. Stewart1, S. T., and F. Nimmo, Surface runoff features on Mars: Testing the carbon dioxide formation

  8. Journal of Environmental Health Features Tools Developed by CDC Capacity-Building Grantees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Journal of Environmental Health Features Tools Developed by CDC Capacity-Building Grantees developed by the grantees are designed to be models and/or toolkits that can be used by other environmental­August 2007 Journal or Environmental Health featured articles written by capacity-building grantees: · Using

  9. Secure Pesticide Storage: Security and Safety-promoting Features of Pesticide Storage Facilities1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    PI32 Secure Pesticide Storage: Security and Safety-promoting Features of Pesticide Storage pesticide storage facility security and safety. Introduction In actual practice, the fundamental goal of "security" is always the same: effective safeguard. Therefore, certain features of a pesticide storage

  10. Secure Pesticide Storage: Workspace Features of a Pesticide Storage Facility 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    PI31 Secure Pesticide Storage: Workspace Features of a Pesticide Storage Facility 1 Thomas W. Dean2. Larry Arrington, Dean This document identifies and discusses three key features of a pesticide storage. Introduction Secure storage of pesticide involves more than just protecting your pesticide products from

  11. Prediction of Transcription Start Sites Based on Feature Selection Using AMOSA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Prediction of Transcription Start Sites Based on Feature Selection Using AMOSA Xi Wang1 sites (TSSs) is a primary and important step. With the aim to improve the computational prediction are extracted. Effective feature selection can minimize the noise, improve the prediction accuracy, and also

  12. Satellite observations of mesoscale ocean features and copropagating atmospheric surface fields in the tropical belt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Satellite observations of mesoscale ocean features and copropagating atmospheric surface fields speed and sea surface temperature (SST) over mesoscale ocean features in certain frontal regions. The aim of this study is to determine to what extent mesoscale ocean dynamics modifies the surface wind

  13. Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Novascone, Stephen R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Jerry P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

  14. Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Novascone, Stephen R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Jerry P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

  15. Features Extraction from Point Clouds for Automated Detection of Deformations on Automotive Body Parts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payeur, Pierre

    Features Extraction from Point Clouds for Automated Detection of Deformations on Automotive Body with the problem of detecting unwanted deformations on automotive body part in mind, where feature line detection, surface map analysis, deformation detection, pattern recognition, quality control, automotive body parts

  16. Use of volumetric features for temporal comparison of mass lesions in full field digital mammograms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bozek, Jelena, E-mail: jelena.bozek@fer.hr; Grgic, Mislav [Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, University of Zagreb, Unska 3, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)] [Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, University of Zagreb, Unska 3, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Kallenberg, Michiel; Karssemeijer, Nico [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein Zuid 18, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein Zuid 18, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Temporal comparison of lesions might improve classification between benign and malignant lesions in full-field digital mammograms (FFDM). The authors compare the use of volumetric features for lesion classification, which are computed from dense tissue thickness maps, to the use of mammographic lesion area. Use of dense tissue thickness maps for lesion characterization is advantageous, since it results in lesion features that are invariant to acquisition parameters. Methods: The dataset used in the analysis consisted of 60 temporal mammogram pairs comprising 120 mediolateral oblique or craniocaudal views with a total of 65 lesions, of which 41 were benign and 24 malignant. The authors analyzed the performance of four volumetric features, area, and four other commonly used features obtained from temporal mammogram pairs, current mammograms, and prior mammograms. The authors evaluated the individual performance of all features and of different feature sets. The authors used linear discriminant analysis with leave-one-out cross validation to classify different feature sets. Results: Volumetric features from temporal mammogram pairs achieved the best individual performance, as measured by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (A{sub z} value). Volume change (A{sub z} = 0.88) achieved higher A{sub z} value than projected lesion area change (A{sub z} = 0.78) in the temporal comparison of lesions. Best performance was achieved with a set that consisted of a set of features extracted from the current exam combined with four volumetric features representing changes with respect to the prior mammogram (A{sub z} = 0.90). This was significantly better (p = 0.005) than the performance obtained using features from the current exam only (A{sub z} = 0.77). Conclusions: Volumetric features from temporal mammogram pairs combined with features from the single exam significantly improve discrimination of benign and malignant lesions in FFDM mammograms compared to using only single exam features. In the comparison with prior mammograms, use of volumetric change may lead to better performance than use of lesion area change.

  17. DISCOVERY AND ANALYSIS OF 21 {mu}m FEATURE SOURCES IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volk, Kevin; Meixner, Margaret; Gordon, Karl D. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Hrivnak, Bruce J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Valparaiso University, Valparaiso, IN 46383 (United States); Matsuura, Mikako [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCL-Institute of Origins, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Bernard-Salas, Jeronimo [Institut d Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS/Universite Paris-Sud 11, 91405, Orsay (France); Szczerba, Ryszard [N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, Rabianska 8, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Sloan, G. C. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Kraemer, Kathleen E. [Air Force Research Laboratory, AFRL/RVBYB, 29 Randolph Road, Hanscom AFB, MA 01731 (United States); Van Loon, Jacco Th. [Astrophysics Group, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Kemper, F.; Woods, Paul M.; Zijlstra, Albert A. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Sahai, Raghvendra [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, MS 183-900, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Gruendl, Robert A. [Astronomy Department, University of Illinois, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Tielens, Alexander G. G. M. [Leiden Observatory, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Indebetouw, Remy [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Marengo, Massimo, E-mail: volk@stsci.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, A313E Zaffarano, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2011-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Spitzer Space Telescope mid-infrared spectroscopy has been obtained for 15 carbon-rich protoplanetary nebulae (PPNe) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and for two other such stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Of these 17 PPNe, the unidentified 21 {mu}m feature is strong in 7 spectra, weak in 2 spectra, and very weak or questionable in 4 spectra. Two of the four spectra without the 21 {mu}m feature have a very strong feature near 11 {mu}m, similar to a feature observed in some carbon-rich planetary nebulae (PNe) in the LMC. We attribute this feature to unusual SiC dust, although the feature-to-continuum ratio is much larger than for SiC features in Galactic or Magellanic Cloud carbon star spectra. The remaining two objects show typical carbon-rich PPNe spectra with no 21 {mu}m features. One of the LMC objects that lacks the 21 {mu}m feature and one SMC object with a questionable 21 {mu}m detection may have mixed dust chemistries based upon their spectral similarity to Galactic [WC] PNe. The 13 objects that either definitely or may show the 21 {mu}m feature have distinct dust shell properties compared to the Galactic 21 {mu}m objects-the 21 {mu}m features are weaker, the estimated dust temperatures are significantly higher, the unidentified infrared (UIR) bands are stronger, and the UIRs show more structure. Four of the 21 {mu}m objects appear to show normal SiC emission features in their spectra. Many of the PPNe show strong 30 {mu}m features, although this feature carries less of the total mid-infrared emission than is normally the case for the Galactic 21 {mu}m PPNe. The LMC objects are in the LMC halo rather than in the LMC bar. The estimated luminosities of these PPNe vary from 4700 to 12,500 L{sub sun}.

  18. Physics-Inspired Topology Changes for Thin Fluid Features Chris Wojtan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turk, Greg

    of Technology Nils Th¨urey ETH Z¨urich Markus Gross ETH Z¨urich Greg Turk Georgia Institute of Technology Figure to pinch off, thin sheets to rupture, and small features to vanish when they become smaller than

  19. Capitalization of energy efficient features into home values in the Austin, Texas real estate market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amado, Antonio R

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volatile and rising energy prices have made consumers aware of their opportunity costs for energy. Information on the cost-savings of energy efficient features in homes has not been well researched to date and is an option ...

  20. Ground penetrating radar technique to locate coal mining related features: case studies in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Save, Neelambari R

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research project is to identify the efficacy of the ground penetrating radar (GPR) technique in locating underground coal mine related subsidence features at Malakoff and Bastrop, Texas. The work at Malakoff ...